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Sample records for hydrogen carbon nitrogen

  1. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  2. Hydrogen adsorption of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -block transition ... absorbed wherein, the composite material TM/4ND-CNxNT can act as a medium for storing hydrogen at room temperature manifested .... Figure 1(a) shows the nitrogen-containing (10, 0) car- bon nanotubes formed by ...

  3. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-08

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. ANALYTICAL EMPLOYMENT OF STABLE ISOTOPES OF CARBON, NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND HYDROGEN FOR FOOD AUTHENTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Novelli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen were used for analytical purposes for the discrimination of the type of production (farming vs. fishing in the case of sea bass and for geographical origin in the case of milk. These results corroborate similar experimental evidences and confirm the potential of this analytical tool to support of food traceability.

  5. Experimental study of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen permeation through a microporous silica membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, V.; Favre, E.; Tondeur, D.; Nijmeijer, Arian

    2003-01-01

    The transport of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen through a microporous tubular silica membrane has been investigated between 20 and 200°C and 3–9 bar upstream pressure. Pure compounds permeabilities decrease from H2 to N2 and do not show a strong dependence upon upstream pressure. Temperature

  6. Nitrogen-Rich Polyacrylonitrile-Based Graphitic Carbons for Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Pollack

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic substrate, which is devoid of expensive noble metals and enzymes for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, reduction reactions can be obtained via nitrogen doping of graphite. Here, we report a facile fabrication method for obtaining such nitrogen doped graphitized carbon using polyacrylonitrile (PAN mats and its use in H2O2 sensing. A high degree of graphitization was obtained with a mechanical treatment of the PAN fibers embedded with carbon nanotubes (CNT prior to the pyrolysis step. The electrochemical testing showed a limit of detection (LOD 0.609 µM and sensitivity of 2.54 µA cm−2 mM−1. The promising sensing performance of the developed carbon electrodes can be attributed to the presence of high content of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogens in the pyrolytic carbons, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The reported results suggest that, despite their simple fabrication, the hydrogen peroxide sensors developed from pyrolytic carbon nanofibers are comparable with their sophisticated nitrogen-doped graphene counterparts.

  7. Hydrogen adsorption of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... (XC) functionals has been made. A thorough analysis showed that the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNT are dependent on the TMs absorbed wherein, the composite material TM/4ND-CNxNT can act as a medium for storing hydrogen at room temperature manifested through favourable adsorption energy.

  8. Adsorption of hydrogen in Scandium/Titanium decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananghaya, Michael, E-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines); DOST-ASTHRDP, PCIEERD, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 (Philippines); Belo, Lawrence Phoa; Beltran, Arnel [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines)

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doped Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) that is decorated with Scandium and Titanium as potential hydrogen storage medium using the pseudo potential density functional method was investigated. Highly localized states near the Fermi level, which are derived from the nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation and improve the material stability. A detailed Comparison of the Hydrogen adsorption capability with promising system-weight efficiency of Sc over Ti was elucidated when functionalized with 4ND-CN{sub x}NT. Finally, the (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT composite material has a thermodynamically favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy for ideal reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at room temperature such that it can hold at least 5.8 wt% hydrogen molecules at the LDA and GGA level. - Highlights: • Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) decorated with Sc and Ti. • Nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings. • H{sub 2} and (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT has a favorable adsorption. • 5.8 wt% adsorption at the LDA and GGA level.

  9. Spectroscopic properties of nitrogen doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y.; Yu, G.; Rahman, M. M.; Krishna, K. M.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    2001-06-01

    Nitrogen doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films have been deposited by rf plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4 as the source of carbon and with different nitrogen flow rates (N2/CH4 gas ratios between 0 and 3), at 300 K. The dependence modifications of the optical and the structural properties on nitrogen incorporation were investigated using different spectroscopic techniques, such as, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, electron spin resonance (ESR), photoluminescence (PL) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Raman spectroscopy and IR absorption reveal an increase in sp2-bonded carbon or a change in sp2 domain size with increasing nitrogen flow rate. It is found that the configuration of nitrogen atoms incorporated into an amorphous carbon network gradually changes from nitrogen atoms surrounded by three (σ bonded) to two (π bonded) neighboring carbons with increasing nitrogen flow rate. Tauc optical gap is reduced from 2.6 to 2.0 eV, and the ESR spin density and the peak-to-peak linewidth increase sharply with increasing nitrogen flow rate. Excellent agreement has been found between the measured SE data and modeled spectra, in which an empirical dielectric function of amorphous materials and a linear void distribution along the thickness have been assumed. The influence of nitrogen on the electronic density of states is explained based on the optical properties measured by UV-VIS and PL including nitrogen lone pair band.

  10. Facile synthesis high nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheet from pomelo peel and as catalyst support for nitrobenzene hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Pingping; Duan, Jiaqi; Fan, Huailin; Qu, Shijie; Shen, Wenzhong

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen-doping porous carbon-based nanosheets were fabricated from pemole peel and melamine through hydrothermal route and carbonization. The pomelo peel with sponge-like natural structure was employed as carbon source, and melamine was used both as nitrogen precursors and as nanosheet structure directing. The morphology and chemical composition of the obtained porous carbon nanosheet carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, transmission electron microscopy, BET surface area measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The result indicated that the nanosheet thickness, nitrogen-doped amount and surface area were determined by the ratio of pomelo peel to melamine and carbonization temperature. The catalytic nitrobenzene hydrogenation was evaluated after Pd was loaded on nitrogen-doping porous carbon-based nanosheet. The results showed Pd@PCN had almost 100% conversion and good cycling performance towards the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene due to the developed pore structure, high nitrogen-doping and well dispersed less Pd particle; it was superior to other nanomaterial supports and demonstrated great potential application.

  11. Effects of Potassium and Manganese Promoters on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Supported Iron Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praewpilin Kangvansura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs were used as a support for iron (Fe nanoparticles applied in carbon dioxide (CO2 hydrogenation at 633 K and 25 bar (1 bar = 105 Pa. The Fe/NCNT catalyst promoted with both potassium (K and manganese (Mn showed high performance in CO2 hydrogenation, reaching 34.9% conversion with a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV of 3.1 L·(g·h−1. Product selectivities were high for olefin products and low for short-chain alkanes for the K-promoted catalysts. When Fe/NCNT catalyst was promoted with both K and Mn, the catalytic activity was stable for 60 h of reaction time. The structural effect of the Mn promoter was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR with molecular hydrogen (H2, and in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES analysis. The Mn promoter stabilized wüstite (FeO as an intermediate and lowered the TPR onset temperature. Catalytic ammonia (NH3 decomposition was used as an additional probe reaction for characterizing the promoter effects. The Fe/NCNT catalyst promoted with both K and Mn had the highest catalytic activity, and the Mn-promoted Fe/NCNT catalysts had the highest thermal stability under reducing conditions.

  12. Application of gallium nitride nanostructures and nitrogen doped carbon spheres as supports for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kente, Thobeka; Dube, Sibongile M A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis and use of nanostructures of gallium nitride (GaN NSs) and nitrogen doped carbon spheres (NCSs) as support materials for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. This study provides the first investigation of GaN as a catalyst support in hydrogenation reactions. The GaN NSs were synthesized via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in a double stage furnace (750 degrees C) while NCSs were made by CVD in a single stage furnace (950 degrees C) respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the GaN NSs were rod-like with average diameters of 200 nm, while the NCSs were solid with smoother surfaces, and with diameters of 450 nm. Pd nanoparticles (1 and 3% loadings) were uniformly dispersed on acid functionalized GaN NSs and NCS. The Pd nanoparticles had average diameters that were influenced by the type of support material used. The GaN NSs and NCSs were tested for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde in isopropanol at 40 and 60 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. A comparative study of the activity of the nanostructured materials revealed that the order of catalyst activity was 3% Pd/GaN > 3% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/GaN. However, 100% selectivity to hydrocinnamaldehyde (HCALD) was obtained with 1% Pd/GaN at reasonable conversion rates.

  13. Organic Reference Materials for Hydrogen, Carbon, and Nitrogen Stable Isotope-Ratio Measurements : Caffeines, n-Alkanes, Fatty Acid Methyl Esters, Glycines, L-Valines, Polyethylenes, and Oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmelrnann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F.; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Groeing, Manfred; Helie, Jean-Francois; Herrero-Martin, Sara; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Sauer, Peter E.; Sessions, Alex L.; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope-delta values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and

  14. Characterization of narrow micropores in almond shell biochars by nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterization of biochars usually includes surface area and pore volume determination by nitrogen adsorption. In this study, we show that there is a substantial pore volume in biochars created via slow pyrolysis from low- and high-ash almond shells that cannot be characterized in this fashion due...

  15. Variation of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen stable isotope ratios in an American diet: fast food meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Lesley A; Podlesak, David W; Thompson, Alexandra H; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2008-06-11

    The stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen provide insights into a heterotrophic organism's diet and geographic origin. Although the contribution of food delta (2)H and delta (18)O to the final tissue signal will not vary for constrained diets, it will for animals eating varied diets, that is, humans. This study surveyed the isotopic range in one portion of the American diet, fast food meals. Hamburger patties, buns, and French fries from national chain restaurants across the United States and from local restaurants (Salt Lake City, UT, and Charleston, SC) were analyzed for delta (2)H, delta (13)C, delta (15)N (patties only) and delta (18)O values. Patties and buns from local Utah restaurants were more depleted for delta (2)H, delta (13)C, and delta (18)O values than samples from other restaurants. There were no significant differences in delta values among French fries. All three components of the fast food meal displayed significant linear delta (2)H versus delta (18)O relationships (delta (2)H = 7.8delta (18)O - 237 per thousand, delta (2)H = 5.9delta (18)O - 258 per thousand, and delta (2)H = 3.3delta (18)O - 231 per thousand for patties, buns, and fries, respectively). The findings show that significant predictable variation exists in the stable isotopic composition of fast food meals. It is proposed that the variation in delta (13)C values of hamburger (beef) patties is indicative of differences in cattle-rearing practices, whereas delta (2)H and delta (18)O values are evidence of geographic variation in food sources. Although the patterns support the concept of a "continental" supermarket diet, there appears to be a strong regional component within the diet.

  16. Hydrogen storage studies of palladium decorated nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayan, B P; Sethupathi, K; Ramaprabhu, S

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen storage in materials is of significant importance in the present scenario of depleting conventional energy sources. Porous solids such as activated carbon or nanostructured carbon materials have promising future as hydrogen storage media. The hydrogen storage capacity in nanostructured carbon materials can be further enhanced by atomic hydrogen spillover from a supported catalyst. In the present work, the hydrogen storage properties of nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets (N-GNP) and palladium decorated nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets (Pd/N-GNP) have been investigated. The results show that hydrogen uptake capacity of nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets and palladium decorated nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets at pressure 32 bar and temperature 25 degrees C is 0.42 wt% and 1.25 wt% respectively. The dispersion of palladium nanoparticles increases the hydrogen storage capacity of nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets by 0.83 wt%. This may be due to high dispersion of palladium nanoparticles and strong adhesion between metal and graphene nanoplatelets over the surface of N-GNP, which enhances the spillover mechanism. Thus, an increase in the hydrogen spillover effect and the binding energy between metal nanoparticles and supporting material achieved by nitrogen doping has been observed to result in a higher hydrogen storage capacity of pristine GNP.

  17. Hydrogen Regulation and Global Responses to Electron, Carbon and Nitrogen Sources of Methanococcus Maripaludis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, John A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Methanogens catalyze the critical, methane-producing step (called methanogenesis) in the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter. This project has generated the first predictive model of global gene regulation of methanogenesis in a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis. We generated a comprehensive list of genes (protein-coding and non-coding) for M. maripaludis through integrated analysis of the transcriptome structure and a newly constructed Peptide Atlas. The environment and gene-regulatory influence network (EGRIN) model of the strain was constructed from a compendium of transcriptome data that was collected over 58 different steady-state and time course experiments that were performed in chemostats or batch cultures, under a spectrum of environmental perturbations that modulated methanogenesis. Analyses of the EGRIN model have revealed novel components of methanogenesis that included at least three additional protein-coding genes of previously unknown function as well as one non-coding RNA. We discovered that at least five regulatory mechanisms act in a combinatorial scheme to inter-coordinate key steps of methanogenesis with different processes such as motility, ATP biosynthesis, and carbon assimilation. Through a combination of genetic and environmental perturbation experiments we have validated the EGRIN-predicted role of two novel transcription factors in the regulation of phosphate-dependent repression of formate dehydrogenase a key enzyme in the methanogenesis pathway. The EGRIN model demonstrates regulatory affiliations within methanogenesis as well as between methanogenesis and other cellular functions. In addition, we have published an analysis of transcriptome architecture in M. maripaludis and an analysis of the effects of H2 and formate on growth yield and regulation of methanogenesis in M. maripaludis.

  18. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  19. Electrospinning Hetero-Nanofibers of Fe3 C-Mo2 C/Nitrogen-Doped-Carbon as Efficient Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huanlei; Zhang, Wenbiao; Shi, Zhangping; Che, Minwei; Yu, Xiang; Tang, Yi; Gao, Qingsheng

    2017-06-22

    Heterostructured electrocatalysts with multiple active components are expected to synchronously address the two elementary steps in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), which require varied hydrogen-binding strength on the catalyst surface. Herein, electrospinning followed by a pyrolysis is introduced to design Fe3 C-Mo2 C/nitrogen-doped carbon (Fe3 C-Mo2 C/NC) hetero-nanofibers (HNFs) with tunable composition, leading to abundant Fe3 C-Mo2 C hetero-interfaces for synergy in electrocatalysis. Owing to the strong hydrogen binding on Mo2 C and the relatively weak one on Fe3 C, the hetero-interfaces of Fe3 C-Mo2 C remarkably promote HER kinetics and intrinsic activity. Additionally, the loose and porous N-doped carbon matrix, as a result of Fe-catalyzed carbonization, ensures the fast transport of electrolytes and electrons, thus minimizing diffusion limitation. As expected, the optimized Fe3 C-Mo2 C/NC HNFs afforded a low overpotential of 116 mV at a current density of -10 mA cm(-2) and striking kinetics metrics (onset overpotential: 42 mV, Tafel slope: 43 mV dec(-1) ) in 0.5 m H2 SO4 , outperforming most recently reported noble-metal-free electrocatalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Acrylonitrile, an advantageous precursor to synthesize nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Elguézabal, A.; Román-Aguirre, M.; De la Torre, L.; Zaragoza, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    The nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes present specific characteristics that offer better performance than pure carbon nanotubes for application like biomedicine, hydrogen adsorption and electrocataytic devices. This work present a simple method to obtain well-aligned nitrogen doped multi wall carbon nanotubes, which present open channels with diameter around 50 nm. These carbon nanotubes are obtained using acrylonitrile as carbon and nitrogen source, which offers some advantages on the use of other precursors like ammonia, pyridine, benzylamine, acetonitrile or melamine.

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon supports with terminated hydrogen and their effects on active gold species: a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junjie; Du, Qian; Han, You; He, Zhenghua; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli

    2014-12-14

    In order to disclose the reason that the N-doped carbon support can enhance the stability of Au-based catalysts for acetylene hydrochlorination, we established a big graphene cluster model of C110H28 to investigate the effect of different nitrogen-doped carbon supports on three kinds of gold species models of Au dimers, Au2Cl2 and Au2Cl6, through DFT calculations. Comparing the adsorption energy of each Au complex and the transferred charge from the support to the Au complex, it is observed that on the N-doped support GRN-I (the pyridinic N-doped graphene) the adsorption energies of the Au dimer, Au2Cl2 and Au2Cl6, are much higher than those on other three kinds of supports, and the Au complex accepts most of the transferred charges from the support of GRN-I. The effect of different supports on the adsorption of C2H2 and HCl was studied on Au2Cl6/supports, suggesting that the co-adsorption of both reactants occurs on Au2Cl6/GRN-I. The results indicate that the N-doped support of GRN-I can stabilize the gold species Au2Cl6 and enhance the interaction between Au2Cl6 and HCl, which can inhibit the reduction of Au(3+) and then increase the long-term stability of Au-based catalysts.

  2. Nitrogen-Doped Nanoporous Carbon Membranes with Co/CoP Janus-Type Nanocrystals as Hydrogen Evolution Electrode in Both Acidic and Alkaline Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-03-31

    Self-supported electrocatalysts being generated and employed directly as electrodes for energy conversion has been intensively pursued in the fields of materials chemistry and energy. Herein, we report a synthetic strategy to prepare freestanding hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped nanoporous graphitic carbon membranes functionalized with Janus-type Co/CoP nanocrystals (termed as HNDCM-Co/CoP), which were successfully applied as a highly efficient, binder-free electrode in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Benefited from multiple structural merits, such as a high degree of graphitization, three-dimensionally interconnected micro/meso/macropores, uniform nitrogen doping, well-dispersed Co/CoP nanocrystals, as well as the confinement effect of the thin carbon layer on the nanocrystals, HNDCM-Co/CoP exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity and long-term operation stability for HER under both acidic and alkaline conditions. As a proof-of-concept of practical usage, a 5.6 cm × 4 cm × 60 μm macroscopic piece of HNDCM-Co/CoP was prepared in our laboratory. Driven by a solar cell, electroreduction of water in alkaline conditions (pH 14) was performed, and H was produced at a rate of 16 mL/min, demonstrating its potential as real-life energy conversion systems.

  3. Nickel phosphide nanoparticles decorated nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped porous carbon as efficient hybrid catalyst for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-11-01

    The design of efficient and robust Ni2P-based hybrid catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is still in challenge. In this work, a hybrid catalyst composed of monodispersed Ni2P nanoparticles (NPs) and N, P co-doped porous carbon (NPPC) was synthesized through a facile thermal decomposition and used as an efficient electrocatalyst for the HER in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution. Series technologies including X-ray diffraction, Raman, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and N2 sorption are used to characterize the as-synthesized catalysts. The electrochemisty experiments suggested that the as-synthesized Ni2P/NPPC displayed efficient electrocatalytic performance with a low onset overpotential (51 mV), small Tafel slope (74 mV dec-1), high exchange current density (0.12 mA cm-2), large electrochemical double-layer capacitance (21.97 mF cm-2) and high conductivity for the HER. The needed overpotentials are 159 and 184 mV to reach to the current density of 10 and 20 mA cm-2, respectively. Simultaneously, Ni2P/NPPC also displayed good stability in acid solution. The more defects and active sites on the porous carbon which are offered by the co-doped N and P atoms as well as the synergistic effect between NPPC and Ni2P NPs are contributed to the excellent catalytic performance for HER. The current study suggests that introducing the N, P heteroatoms co-doped carbon materials to the Ni2P-based catalysts could enhance HER electrocatalytic performance efficiently.

  4. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines and products formed thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1988-04-04

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about O/degree/C up to about 300/degree/C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200-1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  5. Autotrophic nitrogen assimilation and carbon capture for microbial protein production by a novel enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Silvio; Verstraete, Willy; Pikaar, Ilje; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-15

    Domestic used water treatment systems are currently predominantly based on conventional resource inefficient treatment processes. While resource recovery is gaining momentum it lacks high value end-products which can be efficiently marketed. Microbial protein production offers a valid and promising alternative by upgrading low value recovered resources into high quality feed and also food. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria to upgrade ammonium and carbon dioxide under autotrophic growth conditions. The enrichment of a generic microbial community and the implementation of different culture conditions (sequenced batch resp. continuous reactor) revealed surprising features. At low selection pressure (i.e. under sequenced batch culture at high solid retention time), a very diverse microbiome with an important presence of predatory Bdellovibrio spp. was observed. The microbial culture which evolved under high rate selection pressure (i.e. dilution rate D = 0.1 h(-1)) under continuous reactor conditions was dominated by Sulfuricurvum spp. and a highly stable and efficient process in terms of N and C uptake, biomass yield and volumetric productivity was attained. Under continuous culture conditions the maximum yield obtained was 0.29 g cell dry weight per gram chemical oxygen demand equivalent of hydrogen, whereas the maximum volumetric loading rate peaked 0.41 g cell dry weight per litre per hour at a protein content of 71%. Finally, the microbial protein produced was of high nutritive quality in terms of essential amino acids content and can be a suitable substitute for conventional feed sources such as fishmeal or soybean meal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyvinylpyrrolidone surface modification with SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx films using Hall-type closed drift ion beam source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Grigaliunas, V.; Guobiene, A.; Puiso, J.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    In this study SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx (a-C:H:N/SiOx) films were deposited on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) templates of variable thickness using a Hall-type closed drift ion beam source with constant irradiation parameters. A detailed

  7. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  8. Is nitrogen the next carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battye, William; Aneja, Viney P.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2017-09-01

    Just as carbon fueled the Industrial Revolution, nitrogen has fueled an Agricultural Revolution. The use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and the cultivation of nitrogen-fixing crops both expanded exponentially during the last century, with most of the increase occurring after 1960. As a result, the current flux of reactive, or fixed, nitrogen compounds to the biosphere due to human activities is roughly equivalent to the total flux of fixed nitrogen from all natural sources, both on land masses and in the world's oceans. Natural fluxes of fixed nitrogen are subject to very large uncertainties, but anthropogenic production of reactive nitrogen has increased almost fivefold in the last 60 years, and this rapid increase in anthropogenic fixed nitrogen has removed any uncertainty on the relative importance of anthropogenic fluxes to the natural budget. The increased use of nitrogen has been critical for increased crop yields and protein production needed to keep pace with the growing world population. However, similar to carbon, the release of fixed nitrogen into the natural environment is linked to adverse consequences at local, regional, and global scales. Anthropogenic contributions of fixed nitrogen continue to grow relative to the natural budget, with uncertain consequences.

  9. Analyses élémentaires (carbone,hydrogène,oxygène,azote,soufre des fractions lourdes du pétrole. Elemental Analysis (Carbon,Hydrogen,Oxygen,Nitrogen,Sulfur of Heavy Oil Fractions Bibliographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbelet M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La détermination des éléments carbone, hydrogène, oxygène, azote, soufre est essentielle pour la connaissance des fractions lourdes du pétrole. Cette étude bibliographique présente les principales méthodes d'analyse élémentaire utilisées dans ce domaine. On décrit les méthodes de minéralisation, de détection, et l'évolution suivie depuis plusieurs années dans l'automatisation des dosages. Determining, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and sulfer elements is essential for understanding heavy oil fractions. This bibliographic study describes the leading elemental analysis methods used in this field. Mineralization and detection methods are described, and the development of titra-tion automation in recent years is reviewed.

  10. Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios for Amino Acids in CM and CR Chondrites and their use in Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (oD, 013C, and olSN) of organic compounds can revcal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1I2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CRZ Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CRZ Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ODC and increasing oD with increasing carbon number in the aH, (l-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Streckercyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ODC signatures for -alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ro-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in amethyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  11. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Syväranta

    Full Text Available Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton, with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes. The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter, particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources.

  12. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syväranta, Jari; Scharnweber, Kristin; Brauns, Mario; Hilt, Sabine; Mehner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H) have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex) among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton) compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton), with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes). The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios) in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter), particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  14. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil

  15. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  16. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly order mesoporous carbon has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. AC impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon exhibits a promoted electrochemical hydrogen insertion process and improved capacitance and hydrogen storage stability. The meso-structure and enlarged interlayer distance within the highly ordered mesoporous carbon are suggested as possible causes for the enhancement in hydrogen storage. Both hydrogen capacity in the carbon and mass diffusion within the matrix were improved.

  17. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    collected solids from the CO reactions appeared to be the most reacted (i.e., the most changed from the unreacted lignin) according to solid state 13C-NMR analysis, and the widest variety of products (methoxy-substituted phenolic compounds) were obtained when using CO according to GC/MS analysis. Therefore, reactions with CO were completed that varied the initial reaction pressure (300, 500 and 800 psi) in order to elucidate the effects of CO pressure. Similar conversion (≈54--58%) and DCM-soluble liquid product yields (≈53--62%) were obtained for the different pressure reactions, but the reactions with an initial pressure of 500 psi had the greatest change in aromaticity from the unreacted lignin. Additional reactions between Organosolv lignin and H2O with CO (initial pressure of 500 psi) were conducted where the reaction time was varied (15, 30 and 60 min.) to determine the effect of reaction time. Longer reaction time (60 min.) appeared to inhibit conversion to low molecular weight compounds (i.e., conversion and DCM-soluble yields were lower at ≈53% and ≈28%, respectively). Solid state 13C-NMR of collected residues also showed that there are losses in carbons representative of both guaiacyl and syringyl components as reaction time increases, which may indicate that methoxy groups are being cleaved or the products are reacting with each other (i.e., repolymerization) to form high molecular weight compounds as reaction time is increased. The role of H2O and the gases during the baseline reactions and the expanded CO reactions is not intuitive based on the results, so reactions with lignin model compounds (i.e., aromatic aldehydes represented by vanillin and syringaldehyde, aromatic ketones represented by acetovanillone and acetosyringone, and aromatic ethers represented by dibenzyl ether and 2-phenethyl phenyl ether) were completed to study this. From these results, the suggested reaction pathway of Organosolv lignin reactions in subcritical H2O with and without

  18. Biomass derived porous nitrogen doped carbon for electrochemical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litao Yan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass derived porous nanostructured nitrogen doped carbon (PNC has been extensively investigated as the electrode material for electrochemical catalytic reactions and rechargeable batteries. Biomass with and without containing nitrogen could be designed and optimized to prepare PNC via hydrothermal carbonization, pyrolysis, and other methods. The presence of nitrogen in carbon can provide more active sites for ion absorption, improve the electronic conductivity, increase the bonding between carbon and sulfur, and enhance the electrochemical catalytic reaction. The synthetic methods of natural biomass derived PNC, heteroatomic co- or tri-doping into biomass derived carbon and the application of biomass derived PNC in rechargeable Li/Na batteries, high energy density Li–S batteries, supercapacitors, metal-air batteries and electrochemical catalytic reaction (oxygen reduction and evolution reactions, hydrogen evolution reaction are summarized and discussed in this review. Biomass derived PNCs deliver high performance electrochemical storage properties for rechargeable batteries/supercapacitors and superior electrochemical catalytic performance toward hydrogen evolution, oxygen reduction and evolution, as promising electrodes for electrochemical devices including battery technologies, fuel cell and electrolyzer. Keywords: Biomass, Nitrogen doped carbon, Batteries, Fuel cell, Electrolyzer

  19. New organic reference materials for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements: caffeines, n-alkanes, fatty acid methyl esters, glycines, L-valines, polyethylenes, and oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F.; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Hélie, Jean-François; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Sauer, Peter E.; Sessions, Alex L.; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope−δ values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and IAEA-600 (caffeine). These new RMs enable users to normalize measurements of samples to isotope−δ scales. The RMs span a range of δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values from −210.8 to +397.0 mUr or ‰, for δ13CVPDB-LSVEC from −40.81 to +0.49 mUr and for δ15NAir from −5.21 to +61.53 mUr. Many of the new RMs are amenable to gas and liquid chromatography. The RMs include triads of isotopically contrasting caffeines, C16 n-alkanes, n-C20-fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), glycines, and l-valines, together with polyethylene powder and string, one n-C17-FAME, a vacuum oil (NBS 22a) to replace NBS 22 oil, and a 2H-enriched vacuum oil. A total of 11 laboratories from 7 countries used multiple analytical approaches and instrumentation for 2-point isotopic normalization against international primary measurement standards. The use of reference waters in silver tubes allowed direct normalization of δ2H values of organic materials against isotopic reference waters following the principle of identical treatment. Bayesian statistical analysis yielded the mean values reported here. New RMs are numbered from USGS61 through USGS78, in addition to NBS 22a. Because of exchangeable hydrogen, amino acid RMs currently are recommended only for carbon- and nitrogen-isotope measurements. Some amino acids contain 13C and carbon-bound organic 2H-enrichments at different molecular sites to provide RMs for potential site-specific isotopic analysis in future studies.

  20. Carbon: Hydrogen Carrier or Disappearing Skeleton?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Wechem, H.M.H. van

    1994-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrocarbons as energy carriers implies the use of carbon as a carrier for hydrogen to facilitate hydrogen transport and storage. The current trend for liquid energy carriers used in the transport sector is to maximize the load of hydrogen on the carbon carrier. The recently

  1. Hierarchical Porous Co9S8/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon@MoS2 Polyhedrons as pH Universal Electrocatalysts for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Qian, Xing; Xu, Chong; Huang, Shaowei; Zhu, Changli; Jiang, Xiancai; Shao, Li; Hou, Linxi

    2017-08-30

    The development of highly active and stable earth-abundant electrocatalysts to reduce or eliminate the reliance on noble-metal based ones for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range remains a great challenge. Herein, hierarchical porous Co9S8/N-doped carbon@MoS2 (Co9S8/NC@MoS2) polyhedrons have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach using highly conductive Co/NC polyhedrons composed of cobalt nanoparticles embedded in N-doped carbon matrices as both the structural support and cobalt source. The Co/NC polyhedrons were prepared by direct carbonization of Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) in Ar atmosphere. Benefiting from the prominent synergistic effect of N-doped carbon enhancing the conductivity of the hybrid, MoS2 and Co9S8 providing abundant catalytically active sites as well as the well-defined polyhedral structure promoting mechanical stability, the as-synthesized Co9S8/NC@MoS2 shows excellent HER activity and good stability over a broad pH range, with onset overpotentials of 4, 38, and 45 mV, Tafel slopes of 60.3, 68.8, and 126.1 mV dec-1, and overpotentials of 67, 117, and 261 mV at 10 mA cm-2 in 1.0 M KOH, 0.5 M H2SO4, and 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), respectively. This work provides a general and promising approach for the design and synthesis of inexpensive and efficient pH-universal HER electrocatalysts.

  2. Optimising carbon and nitrogen sources for Azotobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work deals with selecting and optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources for producing biomass from Azotobacter chroococcum. Four carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, manitol and sodium benzoate) and four nitrogen sources (yeast extract, meat extract, NH4Cl and (NH4)2SO4) were evaluated during the first ...

  3. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Berg, Bjørn; Currie, W.S.

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project “CarbonNitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems” (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C...

  4. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  5. Nitrogen Fixation and Hydrogen Metabolism in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Hermann; Schmitz, Oliver; Yates, M. Geoffrey; Newton, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: This review summarizes recent aspects of (di)nitrogen fixation and (di)hydrogen metabolism, with emphasis on cyanobacteria. These organisms possess several types of the enzyme complexes catalyzing N2 fixation and/or H2 formation or oxidation, namely, two Mo nitrogenases, a V nitrogenase, and two hydrogenases. The two cyanobacterial Ni hydrogenases are differentiated as either uptake or bidirectional hydrogenases. The different forms of both the nitrogenases and hydrogenases are encoded by different sets of genes, and their organization on the chromosome can vary from one cyanobacterium to another. Factors regulating the expression of these genes are emerging from recent studies. New ideas on the potential physiological and ecological roles of nitrogenases and hydrogenases are presented. There is a renewed interest in exploiting cyanobacteria in solar energy conversion programs to generate H2 as a source of combustible energy. To enhance the rates of H2 production, the emphasis perhaps needs not to be on more efficient hydrogenases and nitrogenases or on the transfer of foreign enzymes into cyanobacteria. A likely better strategy is to exploit the use of radiant solar energy by the photosynthetic electron transport system to enhance the rates of H2 formation and so improve the chances of utilizing cyanobacteria as a source for the generation of clean energy. PMID:21119016

  6. Dual Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to Hemminga & Mateo. (1996), values of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios vary considerably between seagrass species. It might also be expected that the remaining seagrass species could have some influence on the shrimp carbon signal. Isotopic evidence for mangroves being a carbon source for shrimps ...

  7. Calculated Leaf Carbon and Nitrogen, 1992 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Study plot canopy chemistry values were calculated from leaf chemistry and litterfall weight values. Average leaf concentrations of nitrogen and carbon were used to...

  8. Preparation of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-12-22

    A method for synthesizing nitrogen-doped carbon tubes involves preparing a solution of cyanamide and a suitable transition metal-containing salt in a solvent, evaporating the solvent to form a solid, and pyrolyzing the solid under an inert atmosphere under conditions suitable for the production of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes from the solid. Pyrolyzing for a shorter period of time followed by rapid cooling resulted in a tubes with a narrower average diameter.

  9. Nitrogen and hydrogen related infrared absorption in CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal)]. E-mail: elby@mec.ua.pt; Ali, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Cabral, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Madaleno, J.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Neto, V.F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Gracio, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Ramesh Babu, P [Materials Ireland, Polymer research Centre, School of Physics, Dublin (Ireland); Sikder, A.K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay (India); Okpalugo, T.I. [Northern Ireland Bio-Engineering Centre, NIBEC, University of Ulster (United Kingdom); Misra, D.S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay (India)

    2006-09-25

    In this paper, we investigate on the presence of hydrogen and nitrogen related infrared absorptions in chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films. Investigations were carried out in cross sections of diamond windows, deposited using hot filament CVD (HFCVD). The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy carried out in a cross section of self-standing diamond sheets are presented. The FTIR spectra showed several features that have not been reported before. In order to confirm the frequency of nitrogen related vibrations, ab-initio calculations were carried out using GAMESS program. The investigations showed the presence of several C-N related peaks in one-phonon (1000-1333 cm{sup -1}). The deconvolution of the spectra in the three-phonon region (2700-3150 cm{sup -1}) also showed a number of vibration modes corresponding to sp {sup m}CH {sub n} phase of carbon. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) was employed to compare the H content measured using FTIR technique. Using these measurements we point out that the oscillator strength of the different IR modes varies depending upon the structure and H content of CVD diamond sheets.

  10. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher [Allentown, PA; Farris, Thomas Stephen [Bethlehem, PA

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  11. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  12. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  13. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  14. Carbon- and Nitrogen-Based Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaushi, Ken; Antonietti, Markus

    2015-06-16

    This Account provides an overview of organic, covalent, porous frameworks and solid-state materials mainly composed of the elements carbon and nitrogen. The structures under consideration are rather diverse and cover a wide spectrum. This Account will summarize current works on the synthetic concepts leading toward those systems and cover the application side where emphasis is set on the exploration of those systems as candidates for unusual high-performance catalysis, electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy storage, and artificial photosynthesis. These issues are motivated by the new global energy cycles and the fact that sustainable technologies should not be based on rare and expensive resources. We therefore present the strategic design of functionality in cost-effective, affordable artificial materials starting from a spectrum of simple synthetic options to end up with carbon- and nitrogen-based porous frameworks. Following the synthetic strategies, we demonstrate how the electronic structure of polymeric frameworks can be tuned and how this can modify property profiles in a very unexpected fashion. Covalent triazine-based frameworks (CTFs), for instance, showed both enormously high energy and high power density in lithium and sodium battery systems. Other C,N-based organic frameworks, such as triazine-based graphitic carbon nitride, are suggested to show promising band gaps for many (photo)electrochemical reactions. Nitrogen-rich carbonaceous frameworks, which are developed from C,N-based organic framework strategies, are highlighted in order to address their promising electrocatalytic properties, such as in the hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). With careful design, those materials can be multifunctional catalysts, such as a bifunctional ORR/OER electrocatalyst. Although the majority of new C,N-based materials are still not competitive with the best (usually nonsustainable candidates) for each

  15. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The key objectives of this study are to investigate, both computationally and experimentally, which forms, compositions, and layerings of hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen containing materials will offer the greatest shielding in the most structurally robust combination against galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), secondary neutrons, and solar energetic particles (SEP). The objectives and expected significance of this research are to develop a space radiation shielding materials system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and that also has high strength for load bearing primary structures. Such a materials system does not yet exist. The boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) can theoretically be processed into structural BNNT and used for load bearing structures. Furthermore, the BNNT can be incorporated into high hydrogen polymers and the combination used as matrix reinforcement for structural composites. BNNT's molecular structure is attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation. There are two methods or techniques for introducing hydrogen into BNNT: (1) hydrogen storage in BNNT, and (2) hydrogenation of BNNT (hydrogenated BNNT). In the hydrogen storage method, nanotubes are favored to store hydrogen over particles and sheets because they have much larger surface areas and higher hydrogen binding energy. The carbon nanotube (CNT) and BNNT have been studied as potentially outstanding hydrogen storage materials since 1997. Our study of hydrogen storage in BNNT - as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrogen gas concentration - will be performed with a hydrogen storage chamber equipped with a hydrogen generator. The second method of introducing hydrogen into BNNT is hydrogenation of BNNT, where hydrogen is covalently bonded onto boron, nitrogen, or both. Hydrogenation of BN and BNNT has been studied theoretically. Hyper-hydrogenated BNNT has been theoretically predicted with hydrogen coverage up to 100% of the individual atoms. This is a higher hydrogen content

  16. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  17. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  18. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A Varotsos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of air pollution are inextricably linked to the mechanisms underlying the physicochemical functioning of the biosphere which together with the atmosphere, the cryosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere constitute the climate system. We herewith present a review of the achievements and unresolved problems concerning the modeling of the biochemical cycles of basic chemicals of the climate system, such as carbon and nitrogen. Although the achievements in this area can roughly describe the carbon and nitrogen cycles, serious problems still remain associated with the accuracy and precision of the processes and assessments employed in the relevant modeling.

  19. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  20. Elucidating the Origin of Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Activity in Mono- and Bimetallic Metal- and Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Catalysts (Me-N-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraei, Ali; Moradabadi, Ashkan; Martinaiou, Ioanna; Lauterbach, Stefan; Klemenz, Sebastian; Dolique, Stephanie; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Kaghazchi, Payam; Kramm, Ulrike I

    2017-08-02

    In this work, we present a comprehensive study on the role of metal species in MOF-based Me-N-C (mono- and bimetallic) catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The catalysts are investigated with respect to HER activity and stability in alkaline electrolyte. On the basis of the structural analysis by X-ray diffraction, X-ray-induced photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, it is concluded that MeN4 sites seem to dominate the HER activity of these catalysts. There is a strong relation between the amount of MeN4 sites that are formed and the energy of formation related to these sites integrated at the edge of a graphene layer, as obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our results show, for the first time, that the combination of two metals (Co and Mo) in a bimetallic (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst allows hydrogen production with a significantly improved overpotential in comparison to its monometallic counterparts and other Me-N-C catalysts. By the combination of experimental results with DFT calculations, we show that the origin of the enhanced performance of our (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst seems to be provided by an improved hydrogen binding energy on one MeN4 site because of the presence of a second MeN4 site in its close vicinity, as investigated in detail for our most active (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst. The outstanding stability and good activity make especially the bimetallic Me-N-C catalysts interesting candidates for solar fuel applications.

  1. Nitrogen sources impact hydrogen production by Escherichia coli using cheese whey as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Cuevas, Zazil D; Acevedo, Leandro G Ordoñez; Salas, José Tomás Ornelas; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2013-09-25

    The impact of nitrogen source on hydrogen production by Escherichia coli WDHL (ΔhycAΔlacI) strain using cheese whey as a substrate was evaluated. To improve the assimilation of complex proteins such as lactalbumin, we assessed treatment with a protease. Also, five external nitrogen sources were tested: NH4Cl, (NH4)2SO4, urea, yeast extract, and tryptone. The treatments in 120 mL serological bottles with pancreatin 1,000 mg/L produced 1.75-fold more hydrogen than the cultures without pancreatin. In the bottle cultures supplemented with yeast extract or tryptone 5 g/L, hydrogen production increased up to 3.2- and 3.5-fold, respectively, whereas inorganic salts and urea had no statistical difference with respect to the control cultures. In 1-L bioreactors, the use of tryptone improved 2.1-fold hydrogen production. Tryptone or yeast extract enable the total consumption of lactose in 40 h, whereas in the control assay the lactose was not completely consumed. Our results demonstrate that it is necessary to select an adequate nitrogen source, which allows both carbon source consumption and high hydrogen production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen Storage in Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Oku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanomaterials were synthesized from LaB6 and Pd/boron powder, and the hydrogen storage was investigated by differential thermogravimetric analysis, which showed possibility of hydrogen storage of 1–3 wt%. The hydrogen gas storage in BN and carbon (C clusters was also investigated by molecular orbital calculations, which indicated possible hydrogen storage of 6.5 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Chemisorption calculation was also carried out for B24N24 cluster with changing endohedral elements in BN cluster to compare the bonding energy at nitrogen and boron, which showed that Li is a suitable element for hydrogenation to the BN cluster. The BN cluster materials would store H2 molecule easier than carbon fullerene materials, and its stability for high temperature would be good. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that a H2 molecule remains stable in a C60 cage at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and that pressures over 5 MPa are needed to store H2 molecules in the C60 cage.

  3. Stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes in non-carbonate fractions of cold-seep carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dong; Peng, Yongbo; Peckmann, Jörn; Roberts, Harry; Chen, Duofu

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) supports chemosynthesis-based communities and limits the release of methane from marine sediments. This process promotes the formation of carbonates close to the seafloor along continental margins. The geochemical characteristics of the carbonate minerals of these rocks are increasingly understood, questions remain about the geochemical characteristics of the non-carbonate fractions. Here, we report stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope patterns in non-carbonate fractions of seep carbonates. The authigenic carbonates were collected from three modern seep provinces (Black Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and South China Sea) and three ancient seep deposits (Marmorito, northern Italy, Miocene; SR4 deposit of the Lincoln Creek Formation and Whiskey Creek, western Washington, USA, Eocene to Oligocene). The δ13C values of non-carbonate fractions range from ˜-25‰ to -80‰ VPDB. These values indicate that fossil methane mixed with varying amounts of pelagic organic matter is the dominant source of carbon in these fractions. The relatively small offset between the δ34S signatures of the non-carbonate fractions and the respective sulfide minerals suggests that locally produced hydrogen sulfide is the main source of sulfur in seep environments. The δ15N values of the non-carbonate fractions are generally lower than the corresponding values of deep-sea sediments, suggesting that organic nitrogen is mostly of a local origin. This study reveals the potential of using δ13C, δ15N, δ34S values to discern seep and non-seep deposits. In cases where δ13Ccarbonate values are only moderately low due to mixing processes and lipid biomarkers have been erased in the course of burial, it is difficult to trace back AOM owing to the lack of other records. This problem is even more pronounced when authigenic carbonate is not available in ancient seep environments. Acknowledgments: The authors thank BOEM and NOAA for their years' support

  4. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by ...

  5. Hydrogen storage in carbon derived from solid endosperm of coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Viney; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Shahi, R. R.; T.P. Yadav; Srivastava, O.N.

    2014-01-01

    Carbons are being widely investigated as hydrogen storage material owing to their light weight, fast hydrogen adsorption kinetics and cost effectiveness. However, these materials suffer from low hydrogen storage capacity, particularly at room temperature. The aim of the present study is to develop carbon-based material from natural bio-precursor which shows at least moderate hydrogen storage at room temperature. For this purpose, hydrogenation characteristics of carbon derived from solid endo...

  6. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela [State College, PA; Narayanan, Deepa [Redmond, WA

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  7. Storage of hydrogen on carbons; Stockage de l'hydrogene sur les carbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS-CRMD, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    2000-07-01

    The storage of hydrogen on carbons, with densities above 10% hydrogen weight, can be used in the sector of transport. However, only the physical-sorption of this gas (which is almost perfect and boils at 20 K under atmospheric pressure) cannot explain this performance. A study of the possible sites for one hydrogen, which can take very different forms, is presented, in order to better understand the rational development of this storage mode which could reach about ten weight %. (O.M.)

  8. Hydrogen isotope adsorption on nano-carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hideki, Tanaka; Daisuke, Noguchi [Chiba Univ., Diversity and Fractal Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, (Japan); Hirofumi, Kanoh; Katsumi, Kaneko [Chiba Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on carbonaceous materials has received considerable attention in recent decades, because physisorption of hydrogen was considered to be the most promising hydrogen storage technology to achieve the US Department of Energy (DOE) target for fuel cell powered vehicles. Many simulation studies of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs) and graphitic slit pores have been performed by assuming that hydrogen can be modeled as a classical fluid above 77 K, to predict their hydrogen storage capacities; however, Wang et al. recently developed path integral grand canonical Monte Carlo (PI-GCMC) technique to explore statistical properties of quantum fluids [1] and then they applied the PI-GCMC simulation to a study of hydrogen adsorption on SWNTs including quantum effects [2]. Surprisingly, they showed that quantum effects are very important even at 298 K for adsorption in interstices of SWNT bundles: the interstitial adsorption of hydrogen from the quantum simulations is quite smaller than that from classical simulations. Recently, we also showed that quantum effects on adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on single-wall carbon nano-horn (SWNH) are significant at 77 K by comparing experiment and simulations [3]. We have thus measured adsorption isotherms of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} on nano-carbons [activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and single-wall carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs)] to evaluate quantum effects on adsorption at low temperatures, and found that, for example, adsorption of H{sub 2} on ACFs are about 10% larger than D{sub 2} at 77 K and 0.1 MPa. We have also performed grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for hydrogen isotope adsorption on graphitic slit pore, SWNT and SWNT bundle models. Quantum effects were incorporated in the simulations through the Feynman-Hibbs (FH) effective potential based on the classical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. Fig. 1 shows simulated hydrogen isotope adsorption isotherms on the (10,10) nano-tube bundle

  9. Hydrogen isotope adsorption on nano-carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hideki Tanaka; Daisuke Noguchi [Diversity and Fractal Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba 263-8522, (Japan); Hirofumi Kanoh; Katsumi Kaneko [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba 263-8522, (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on carbonaceous materials has received considerable attention in recent decades, because physi-sorption of hydrogen was considered to be the most promising hydrogen storage technology to achieve the US Department of Energy (DOE) target for fuel cell powered vehicles. Many simulation studies of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs) and graphitic slit pores have been performed by assuming that hydrogen can be modeled as a classical fluid above 77 K, to predict their hydrogen storage capacities; however, Wang et al. recently developed path integral grand canonical Monte Carlo (PI-GCMC) technique to explore statistical properties of quantum fluids and then they applied the PI-GCMC simulation to a study of hydrogen adsorption on SWNTs including quantum effects. Surprisingly, they showed that quantum effects are very important even at 298 K for adsorption in interstices of SWNT bundles: the interstitial adsorption of hydrogen from the quantum simulations is quite smaller than that from classical simulations. Recently, we also showed that quantum effects on adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on single-wall carbon nano-horn (SWNH) are significant at 77 K by comparing experiment and simulations. We have thus measured adsorption isotherms of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} on nano-carbons [activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and single-wall carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs)] to evaluate quantum effects on adsorption at low temperatures, and found that, for example, adsorption of H{sub 2} on ACFs are about 10% larger than D{sub 2} at 77 K and 0.1 MPa. We have also performed grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for hydrogen isotope adsorption on graphitic slit pore, SWNT and SWNT bundle models. Quantum effects were incorporated in the simulations through the Feynman-Hibbs (FH) effective potential based on the classical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. Fig. 1 shows simulated hydrogen isotope adsorption isotherms on the (10,10) nano-tube bundle at 77 K

  10. A high-performance mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Lu, Shiyao; Chen, Xu; Wang, Jianan; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiao, Chunhui; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-12-01

    Investigating low-cost and highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) is of crucial importance for energy conversion and storage devices. Herein, we design and prepare mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated on CMK-3. This electrocatalyst exhibits excellent performance towards ORR in alkaline media. The optimized nitrogen-doped mesoporous electrocatalyst show an onset potential (E onset) of 0.95 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential (E 1/2) of 0.83 V (versus RHE) in 0.1 M KOH. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst presents superior durability and methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C indicating its potential applications in fuel cells and metal–air batteries.

  11. Nitrogen-doped carbon aerogels for electrical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Patrick; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Merrill, Matthew; Reed, Eric W.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2017-10-03

    Disclosed here is a method for making a nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel, comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising formaldehyde, at least one nitrogen-containing resorcinol analog, at least one catalyst, and at least one solvent; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and thermally annealing the dry gel to produce the nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel. Also disclosed is a nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel obtained according to the method and a supercapacitor comprising the nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel.

  12. Nitrogen-Doped Activated Carbon as Metal-Free Catalysts Having Various Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Fujita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon materials have been gaining increasing interest as metal-free catalysts. In this article, the authors have briefly introduced their recent studies on the utilization of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (N-AC for several organic synthesis reactions, which include base catalyzed reactions of Knoevenagel condensation and transesterification, aerobic oxidation of xanthene and alcohols, and transfer hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, 3-nitrostyrene, styrene, and phenylacetylene with hydrazine. Doped-nitrogen species existed on the AC surface in different structures. For example, pyridine-type nitrogen species appear to be involved in the active sites for Knoevenagel condensation and for the oxidation of xanthene, while graphite-type nitrogen species appear to be involved for the oxidation of alcohols. Being different from these reactions, both surface nitrogen and oxygen species are involved in the active sites for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. N-AC was practically inactive for the transfer hydrogenation of vinyl and ethynyl groups, but it can catalyze those hydrogenation reactions assisted by co-existing nitrobenzene. Comparison of N-AC with conventional catalysts shows that N-AC can alternate with conventional solid base catalysts and supported metal catalysts for the Knoevenagel condensation and oxidation reactions.

  13. Cryogenic Adsorption of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuzhi; Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Hengcheng; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon have been used for a long time at low temperature for cryogenic applications. The knowledge of adsorption characteristics of activated carbon at cryogenic temperature is essential for some specific applications. However, such experimental data are very scare in the literature. In order to measure the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon under variable cryogenic temperatures, an adsorption measurement device was presented. The experiment system is based on the commercially available PCT-pro adsorption analyzer coupled to a two-stage Gifford McMahon refrigerator, which allows the sample to be cooled to 4.2K. Cryogenic environment can be maintained steadily without the cryogenic liquid through the cryocooler and temperature can be controlled precisely between 5K and 300K by the temperature controller. Adsorption measurements were performed in activated carbon for carbon dioxide and nitrogen and the adsorption isotherm were obtained.

  14. Isotopic disproportionation during hydrogen isotopic analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejesh; Geilmann, Heike; Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Gehre, Matthias; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Brand, Willi A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale High-precision hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic materials using high-temperature conversion (HTC) techniques has proven troublesome in the past. Formation of reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) has been suspected as a possible cause of incomplete H2 yield and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Methods The classical HTC reactor setup and a modified version including elemental chromium, both operated at temperatures in excess of 1400 °C, have been compared using a selection of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, including caffeine. A focus of the experiments was to avoid or suppress hydrogen cyanide (HCN) formation and to reach quantitative H2 yields. The technique also was optimized to provide acceptable sample throughput. Results The classical HTC reaction of a number of selected compounds exhibited H2 yields from 60 to 90 %. Yields close to 100 % were measured for the experiments with the chromium-enhanced reactor. The δ2H values also were substantially different between the two types of experiments. For the majority of the compounds studied, a highly significant relationship was observed between the amount of missing H2and the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecules, suggesting the pyrolytic formation of HCN as a byproduct. A similar linear relationship was found between the amount of missing H2 and the observed hydrogen isotopic result, reflecting isotopic fractionation. Conclusions The classical HTC technique to produce H2 from organic materials using high temperatures in the presence of glassy carbon is not suitable for nitrogen-bearing compounds. Adding chromium to the reaction zone improves the yield to 100 % in most cases. The initial formation of HCN is accompanied by a strong hydrogen isotope effect, with the observed hydrogen isotope results on H2 being substantially shifted to more negative δ2H values. The reaction can be understood as an initial disproportionation leading to H2 and HCN

  15. Effect of various carbon and nitrogen sources on cellulose synthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of various carbon and nitrogen sources on cellulose production by Acetobacter lovaniensis HBB5 was examined. In this study, glucose, fructose, sucrose and ethanol as carbon source and yeast extract, casein hydrolysate and ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source were used. Among the carbon sources, ...

  16. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Badding, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Crespi, Vinent [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  17. Hydrogen storage in engineered carbon nanospaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Kraus, Michael; Beckner, Matt; Cepel, Raina; Suppes, Galen; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter

    2009-05-20

    It is shown how appropriately engineered nanoporous carbons provide materials for reversible hydrogen storage, based on physisorption, with exceptional storage capacities (approximately 80 g H2/kg carbon, approximately 50 g H2/liter carbon, at 50 bar and 77 K). Nanopores generate high storage capacities (a) by having high surface area to volume ratios, and (b) by hosting deep potential wells through overlapping substrate potentials from opposite pore walls, giving rise to a binding energy nearly twice the binding energy in wide pores. Experimental case studies are presented with surface areas as high as 3100 m(2) g(-1), in which 40% of all surface sites reside in pores of width approximately 0.7 nm and binding energy approximately 9 kJ mol(-1), and 60% of sites in pores of width>1.0 nm and binding energy approximately 5 kJ mol(-1). The findings, including the prevalence of just two distinct binding energies, are in excellent agreement with results from molecular dynamics simulations. It is also shown, from statistical mechanical models, that one can experimentally distinguish between the situation in which molecules do (mobile adsorption) and do not (localized adsorption) move parallel to the surface, how such lateral dynamics affects the hydrogen storage capacity, and how the two situations are controlled by the vibrational frequencies of adsorbed hydrogen molecules parallel and perpendicular to the surface: in the samples presented, adsorption is mobile at 293 K, and localized at 77 K. These findings make a strong case for it being possible to significantly increase hydrogen storage capacities in nanoporous carbons by suitable engineering of the nanopore space.

  18. Produção de biomassa e teores de carbono, hidrogênio, nitrogênio e proteína em microalgas Production of biomass and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and protein contents in microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Ohse

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da emissão de CO2 e de outros gases efeito estufa tem gerado debates em nível mundial sobre alterações climáticas e estimulado o desenvolvimento de estratégias mitigadoras. Trabalhos nessa área incluem sequestro de CO2 por meio da produção de microalgas aquáticas. Por essa razão, desenvolveu-se um estudo visando determinar os teores de carbono, hidrogênio, nitrogênio e proteína e a produção de biomassa seca de nove espécies de microalgas marinhas (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis e Isochrysis sp. e uma de água doce (Chlorella vulgaris, em cultivo autotrófico estacionário com objetivo de identificar as mais produtivas e com maior capacidade de fixação de carbono. O experimento foi desenvolvido em sala de cultivo, na Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, com iluminação contínua e radiação em torno de 150µmol m-2 s-1, temperatura de 25±2°C, suplementação de ar constante, sendo utilizados erlenmeyers com 800mL de meio de cultura. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos casualizados no tempo com três repetições. As espécies C. vulgaris e T. suecica são menos produtivas. Quando se visa à suplementação alimentar, as espécies C. vulgaris e T. Chuii são consideradas interessantes, uma vez que apresentam altos teores de C, N, H e proteína. As espécies N. Oculata, T. pseudonana e C. vulgaris apresentam altos teores de C, demonstrando alta capacidade de fixação de carbono.The increase of CO2 emission and other gases greenhouse effect, caused global debates about climatic alterations and stimulated the development of mitigative strategies. Researches in this area includes CO2 kidnapping through the aquatic microalgae production. For this reason, a study was developed aiming to determine the production of dry biomass, carbon content, hydrogen

  19. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  20. Functionalized carbon nanostructures for hydrogen catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lung-Hao

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, is widely used as a source of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen is of interest because it is a source of clean energy. It can be converted directly into electrical energy by means of fuel cells. One of the objectives of this thesis was to develop a new catalytic process to (i) enhance the rate of hydrogen generation, and (ii) to achieve hydrogen generation equal to 100% of the theoretically expected value. The catalyst investigated in this research is constructed by starting from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). This material has a very high specific surface area and good conductivity. The SWNT were formed into a paper by a special filtration process. Polysilazane, a polymeric precursor (Ceraset(TM)-SN from KiON Corp., Wiesbaden, Germany) was diluted by acetone and then layered onto SWNT paper. The Ceraset coated SWNT was then pyrolyzed at 1100°C for three hours to form a silicon carbonitride (SiCN), polymer derived ceramic (PDC), layer on the surface of SWNT filtered paper. This functionalized SiCN carbon nanotube paper (SiCN/CNT) was used as the substrate for catalyst dispersions. The catalyst consisted of transition metals, Pt/Pd/Ru. Suspension solutions of Pt, Pd and Ru were impregnated onto the SiCN/CNT paper with the expectation of creating a monolayer of these transition metals on surface of the SiCN/CNT substrate. It is likely that an interaction could occur between the transition metals and the silicon atoms present in the SiCN layer on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is known that transition metals and silicon react to form silicides, suggesting the formation of a strong Si-transition metal bond. Therefore, it is possible that this bond could provide good wetting of metal atoms on SiCN functionalized carbon nanotube substrate. In the limit a monolayer of the transition metals may be achieved, which would correspond to a near zero dihedral angle between the substrate and the cluster of transition metals. In such a scenario a

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous hydrogenated carbon under high hydrogen fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, E. D.; von Toussaint, U.; Kleyn, A. W.; W. J. Goedheer,

    2009-01-01

    We study the flux dependence of the carbon erosion yield and the hydrogen enrichment of the surface in the high flux regime at 10(28) ions per m(2) s and higher by using molecular dynamics (MD). We simulate an amorphous hydrogenated carbon sample exposed to high flux hydrogen bombardment with a

  2. The Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    TEM analysis revealed that the nanotubes exhibit bam- boo-like structures with rough ... The XPS and CN elemental analysis revealed that nitrogen atoms were successfully doped into the carbon walls. The amount of nitrogen .... might be due to effects related to the catalyst particle shape, the bulk diffusion of carbon and ...

  3. elemental and isotopic compositions of organic carbon and nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CARBON AND NITROGEN OF RECENTLY DEPOSITED ORGANIC ... Empakai crater northern Tanzania, is used to document the contents of organic carbon and nitrogen .... erosion. The sedimentation rates in the crater as well as other lakes located in this region are poorly known. Geologically, the study area is studded by.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen losses through moulting in the Cape rock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-11-28

    Nov 28, 1987 ... Afr. J. Zoo\\. 1988,23(3). 173. Carbon and nitrogen losses through moulting in the Cape rock lobster Jasus lalandii ... However, the annual cost of moulting to J. lalandii in terms of exuvial mass, which includes carbon and nitrogen, is ... the profound effect that light has on the moulting cycle. Similarly, Nelson ...

  5. elemental and isotopic compositions of organic carbon and nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A 29 cm long core recovered from a water depth of 5 m in a small closed lake located in the. Empakai crater northern Tanzania, is used to document the contents of organic carbon and nitrogen, stable isotopes composition of organic carbon and nitrogen, and C/N ratios and to infer climatic changes from these ...

  6. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  7. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juarez-Mosqueda, Rosalba; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Kuc, Agnieszka B; Pettersson, Lars G M; Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory...

  8. Numerical investigation on pulsating heat pipes with nitrogen or hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Han, D.; Sun, X.; Gan, Z. H.; Y Luo, R.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Jiao, B.

    2017-12-01

    With flexible structure and excellent performance, pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are regarded as a great solution to distribute cooling power for cryocoolers. The experiments on PHPs with cryogenic fluids have been carried out, indicating their efficient performances in cryogenics. There are large differences in physical properties between the fluids at room and cryogenic temperature, resulting in their different heat transfer and oscillation characteristics. Up to now, the numerical investigations on cryogenic fluids have rarely been carried out. In this paper, the model of the closed-loop PHP with multiple liquid slugs and vapor plugs is performed with nitrogen and hydrogen as working fluids, respectively. The effects of heating wall temperature on the performance of close-looped PHPs are investigated and compared with that of water PHP.

  9. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  10. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  11. Carbon assisted water electrolysis for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareeswaran, S.; Balaji, R.; Ramya, K.; Rajalakshmi, N.; Dhathathereyan, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon Assisted Water Electrolysis (CAWE) is an energy efficient process in that H2 can be produced at lower applied voltage (˜1.0 V) compared to nearly 2.0 V needed for ordinary water electrolysis for the same H2 evolution rate. In this process, carbon is oxidized to oxides of carbon at the anode of an electrochemical cell and hydrogen is produced at the cathode. These gases are produced in relatively pure state and would be collected in a separate chamber. In this paper, we present the results of influence of various operating parameters on efficiency of CAWE process. The results showed that H2 can be produced at applied voltages Eo as low as 1.0V (vs. SHE) and its production rate is strongly dependent on the type of the carbon used and its concentration in the electrolyte. It has also been found that the performance of CAWE process is higher in acidic electrolyte than in alkaline electrolyte.

  12. Nitrogen and carbon storage in alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Russell K; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Forbis, Tara A; Lipson, David A; Jaeger, Charles H

    2006-02-01

    Alpine plants offer unique opportunities to study the processes and economics of nutrient storage. The short alpine growing season forces rapid completion of plant growth cycles, which in turn causes competition between vegetative and reproductive growth sinks during the early part of the growing season. Mobilization of stored nitrogen and carbon reserves facilitates competing sinks and permits successful completion of reproduction before the onset of winter stress. We discuss the theoretical framework for assessing the costs and benefits of nutrient storage in alpine plants in order to lay the foundation for interpretation of observations. A principal point that has emerged from past theoretical treatments is the distinction between reserve storage, defined as storage that occurs with a cost to growth, and resource accumulation, defined as storage that occurs when resource supply exceeds demand, and thus when there is no cost to growth. We then discuss two case studies, one already published and one not yet published, pertaining to the storage and utilization of nitrogen and carbon compounds in alpine plants from Niwot Ridge, Colorado. In the first case, we tested the hypothesis that the seasonal accumulation of amino acids in the rhizome of N-fertilized plants of Bistorta bistortoides provides an advantage to the plant by not imposing a cost to growth at the time of accumulation, but providing a benefit to growth when the accumulated N is remobilized. We show that, as predicted, there is no cost during N accumulation but, not as predicted, there is no benefit to future growth. In the presence of N accumulation, reliance on stored N for growth increases, but reliance on current-season, soil-derived N decreases; thus the utilization of available N in this species is a 'zero sum' process. Inherent meristematic constraints to growth cause negative feedback that limits the utilization of accumulated N and precludes long-term advantages to this form of storage. In the

  13. Carbon and nitrogen losses through moulting in the Cape rock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exuviae contained a higher ash content, a 28,1 % lower organic carbon content indicating reabsorption, and a similar inorganic carbon content when compared with intermoult exoskeleton. Estimates for a lobster population occupying 100 m2 at Robben Island are that 228 g organic carbon and 57,3 g nitrogen are lost ...

  14. Carbon And Nitrogen Requirements For The Cultivation Of Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon and Nitrogen requirements for the cultivation of (Pleurotus sajor-caju) oyster mushroom were studied. It was found that under these experimental conditions, the carbon compounds supported growth except ribose, starch and dextrin. Cellulose was the most utilized carbon followed by glucose and mannose.

  15. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  17. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Dan eLiu; Chao eZeng; Haolin eTan; Dong eZheng; Rong eLi; Deyu eQu; zhizhong eXie; Jiahen eLei; Liang eXiao; Deyang eQu

    2014-01-01

    A highly ordered mesoporous carbon (HOMC) has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. Active carbon impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon (HOMC) ...

  18. Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somasundar, K.; Rajendran, A.; DileepKumar, M.; SenGupta, R.

    to be a carbon source for the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea, whereas both of these adjacent seas added nitrogen to the Arabian Sea. Based on the standing crop and net outfluxes, estimated residence times were ~ 944 and 4.04× i04 years for carbon... Fig. 4. Schematic diagram of annual fluxes of nitrogen in the Arabian Sea from various sources (in trillion grams). SARBON AND NITROGEN BUDGETS OF THE ARABIAN SEA 373 ing crop in evaluating residence time. Based on the assumptions made earlier...

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen-functionalized carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kevin N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA; Christensen, Steven T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd Menlo Park CA 94023 USA; Dameron, Arrelaine A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Ngo, Chilan [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Dinh, Huyen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Gennett, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; O' Hayre, Ryan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Pylypenko, Svitlana [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA

    2016-04-07

    Carbon materials are used in a diverse set of applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to catalysis. Nitrogen modification of carbon powders has shown to be an effective method for enhancing both surface and bulk properties of as-received material for a number of applications. Unfortunately, control of the nitrogen modification process is challenging and can limit the effectiveness and reproducibility of N-doped materials. Additionally, the assignment of functional groups to specific moieties on the surface of nitrogen-modified carbon materials is not straightforward. Herein, we complete an in-depth analysis of functional groups present at the surface of ion-implanted Vulcan and Graphitic Vulcan through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Our results show that regardless of the initial starting materials used, nitrogen ion implantation conditions can be tuned to increase the amount of nitrogen incorporation and to obtain both similar and reproducible final distributions of nitrogen functional groups. The development of a well-controlled/reproducible nitrogen implantation pathway opens the door for carbon supported catalyst architectures to have improved numbers of nucleation sites, decreased particle size, and enhanced catalyst-support interactions.

  20. Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-10-13

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

  1. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  2. Hydrogen effects in nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels; Wirkung von Wasserstoff in stickstofflegierten austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, M.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Shehata, M.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen increases the yield strength of nitrogen-alloyed steels, but on the other hand adversely affects properties such as tensile strength and elongation to fracture. The effect is enhanced with increasing nitrogen and hydrogen contents. Under the effect of hydrogen addition, the discontinuous stress-strain characteristic and the distinct elongation limit of hydrogen-free, nitrogen containing steels is no longer observed in the material. This change of mechanical properties is attributed to an interatomic interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the lattice, which is shown for instance by such effects as reduction of hydrogen velocity, high solubility, and a particularly strong lattice expansion. The nature of this interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the fcc lattice remains to be identified. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wasserstoff fuehrt in stickstofflegierten Staehlen zu einer Erhoehung der Streckgrenze, aber gleichzeitig zu einer Abnahme der Zugfestigkeit und Bruchdehnung. Dieser Effekt verstaerkt sich mit zunehmenden Stickstoff- und Wasserstoffgehalten. Ein diskontinuierlicher Spannungs-Dehnungsverlauf mit einer ausgepraegten Streckgrenze in wasserstofffreien hochstickstoffhaltigen Staehlen wird nach Wasserstoffeinfluss nicht mehr beobachtet. Die Aenderung der mechanischen Eigenschaften, wird auf eine interatomare Wechselwirkung von Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im Gitter zurueckgefuehrt, die sich u.a. in geringer Wasserstoffdiffusionsgeschwindigkeit, hoher Loeslichkeit und vor allem in extremer Gitteraufweitung aeussert. Insgesamt ist die Natur der Wechselwirkung zwischen Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im kfz Gitter noch nicht aufgeklaert. (orig.)

  3. Preparation of carbon nanoparticles and carbon nitride from high nitrogen compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM; Hiskey, Michael A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-01

    The high-nitrogen compound 3,6-di(azido)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DiAT) was synthesized by a relatively simple method and used as a precursor for the preparation of carbon nanospheres and nanopolygons, and nitrogen-rich carbon nitrides.

  4. Ruthenium-cobalt nanoalloys encapsulated in nitrogen-doped graphene as active electrocatalysts for producing hydrogen in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianwei; Yang, Yang; Xia, Guoliang; Chen, Jitang; Jiang, Peng; Chen, Qianwang

    2017-04-01

    The scalable production of hydrogen could conveniently be realized by alkaline water electrolysis. Currently, the major challenge confronting hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is lacking inexpensive alternatives to platinum-based electrocatalysts. Here we report a high-efficient and stable electrocatalyst composed of ruthenium and cobalt bimetallic nanoalloy encapsulated in nitrogen-doped graphene layers. The catalysts display remarkable performance with low overpotentials of only 28 and 218 mV at 10 and 100 mA cm-2, respectively, and excellent stability of 10,000 cycles. Ruthenium is the cheapest platinum-group metal and its amount in the catalyst is only 3.58 wt.%, showing the catalyst high activity at a very competitive price. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the introduction of ruthenium atoms into cobalt core can improve the efficiency of electron transfer from alloy core to graphene shell, beneficial for enhancing carbon-hydrogen bond, thereby lowing ΔGH* of HER.

  5. Hydrogen storage in carbon materials—preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörissen, Ludwig; Klos, Holger; Lamp, Peter; Reichenauer, Gudrun; Trapp, Victor

    1998-08-01

    Recent developments aiming at the accelerated commercialization of fuel cells for automotive applications have triggered an intensive research on fuel storage concepts for fuel cell cars. The fuel cell technology currently lacks technically and economically viable hydrogen storage technologies. On-board reforming of gasoline or methanol into hydrogen can only be regarded as an intermediate solution due to the inherently poor energy efficiency of such processes. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibers may lead to an efficient solution to the above described problems.

  6. Boron-nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lars H.; Ley, Morten B.; Lee, Young-Su

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights...... a range of new boron and nitrogen based hydrides and illustrates how hydrogen release and uptake properties can be improved. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....

  7. Inter-relationships between hydrogen and carbon contents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Empirical relationships between hydrogen and carbon contents and the calorific values of rice husks, cotton see-ds, jatropha seeds, palm kernel shells and cashew shells were investigated. The experimental data indicated higher correlation coefficient between calorific values and hydrogen content than between calorific ...

  8. Platinum on Carbon Nanofibers as Catalyst for Cinnamaldehyde Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate the role and nature of nanostructured carbon materials, oxygen surface groups and promoters on platinum-based catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. The selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol

  9. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Hydrogen Evolution on Hydrophobic Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Abha; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Daraio, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    We investigate for the first time hydrophobic carbon nanotube-based electrochemical cells as an alternative solution to hydrogen sorting. We show that the electrically conducting surface of the nanotube arrays can be used as a cathode for hydrogen generation and absorption by electrolyzing water. We support our findings with Raman and gas chromatography measurements. These results suggest that carbon nanotube forests, presenting a unique combination of hydrophobicity and conductivity, are sui...

  11. High hydrogen storage capacity of porous carbons prepared by using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanlei; Gao, Qiuming; Hu, Juan

    2009-05-27

    A kind of activated carbon with further carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations for hydrogen storage was investigated. The carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations have apparently different effects on the pore structures and textures of the activated carbon which closely associated with the hydrogen storage properties. The potassium hydroxide activation can remarkably donate microporosity to the frameworks of the activated carbon. One of the resultant porous carbons exhibited a high surface area of up to 3190 m(2) g(-1) and large gravimetric hydrogen uptake capacity of 7.08 wt % at 77 K and 20 bar, which is one of the largest data reported for the porous carbon materials. This result suggests that the porous carbon with large amounts of active sites, high surface area, and high micropore volume related to optimum pore size could achieve high gravimetric hydrogen storage.

  12. Carbon accumulation in Rhodotorula glutinis induced by nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescut, Julien; Fillaudeau, Luc; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous microorganisms, such as bacterium, yeast and algal species, can represent an alternative oil source for biodiesel production. The composition of their accumulated lipid is similar to the lipid of an oleaginous plant with a predominance of unsaturated fatty acid. Moreover this alternative to conventional biodiesel production does not create competition for land use between food and oleo-chemical industry supplies. Despite this promising potential, development of microbial production processes are at an early stage. Nutritional limited conditions, such as nitrogen limitation, with an excess of carbon substrate is commonly used to induce lipid accumulation metabolism. Nitrogen limitation implies modification of the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio in culture medium, which impacts on carbon flow distribution in the metabolic network. The goal of the present study is to improve our knowledge of carbon flow distribution in oleaginous yeast metabolism by focusing carbon distribution between carbohydrate and lipid pools in order to optimize microbial lipid production. The dynamic effects of limiting nitrogen consumption flux according to carbon flow were studied to trigger lipid accumulation in the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis. With a decrease of the specific nitrogen consumption rate from 0.052 Nmol.CmolX (-1).h(-1) to 0.003 Nmol.CmolX (-1).h(-1), a short and transitory intracellular carbohydrate accumulation occurred before the lipid accumulation phase. This phenomenon was studied in fed-batch culture under optimal operating conditions, with a mineral medium and using glucose as carbon source. Two different strategies of decreasing nitrogen flow on carbohydrate accumulation were investigated: an instantaneous decrease and a progressive decrease of nitrogen flow. Lipid production performance in these fed-batch culture strategies with R. glutinis were higher than those reported in the previous literature; the catalytic specific lipid production rate was 0

  13. Functions of autophagy in plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxia eRen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon and nitrogen are essential components for plant growth. Although models of plant carbon and nitrogen metabolisms have long been established, certain gaps remain unfilled, such as how plants are able to maintain a flexible nocturnal starch turnover capacity over various light cycles, or how nitrogen remobilization is achieved during the reproductive growth stage. Recent advances in plant autophagy have shed light on such questions. Not only does autophagy contribute to starch degradation at night, but it participates in the degradation of chloroplast proteins and even chloroplasts after prolonged carbon starvation, thus help maintain the free amino acid pool and provide substrate for respiration. The induction of autophagy under these conditions may involve transcriptional regulation. Large-scale transcriptome analyses revealed that ATG8e belongs to a core carbon signaling response shared by Arabidopsis accessions, and the transcription of Arabidopsis ATG7 is tightly co-regulated with genes functioning in chlorophyll degradation and leaf senescence. In the reproductive phase, autophagy is essential for bulk degradation of leaf proteins, thus contributes to Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE both under normal and low-nitrogen conditions.

  14. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    ... and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produce...

  15. Carbon-nitrogen-water interactions: is model parsimony fruitful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puertes, Cristina; González-Sanchis, María; Lidón, Antonio; Bautista, Inmaculada; Lull, Cristina; Francés, Félix

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that carbon and nitrogen cycles are highly intertwined and both should be explained through the water balance. In fact, in water-controlled ecosystems nutrient deficit is related to this water scarcity. For this reason, the present study compares the capability of three models in reproducing the interaction between the carbon and nitrogen cycles and the water cycle. The models are BIOME-BGCMuSo, LEACHM and a simple carbon-nitrogen model coupled to the hydrological model TETIS. Biome-BGCMuSo and LEACHM are two widely used models that reproduce the carbon and nitrogen cycles adequately. However, their main limitation is that these models are quite complex and can be too detailed for watershed studies. On the contrary, the TETIS nutrient sub-model is a conceptual model with a vertical tank distribution over the active soil depth, dividing it in two layers. Only the input of the added litter and the losses due to soil respiration, denitrification, leaching and plant uptake are considered as external fluxes. Other fluxes have been neglected. The three models have been implemented in an experimental plot of a semi-arid catchment (La Hunde, East of Spain), mostly covered by holm oak (Quercus ilex). Plant transpiration, soil moisture and runoff have been monitored daily during nearly two years (26/10/2012 to 30/09/2014). For the same period, soil samples were collected every two months and taken to the lab in order to obtain the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, ammonium and nitrate. In addition, between field trips soil samples were placed in PVC tubes with resin traps and were left incubating (in situ buried cores). Thus, mineralization and nitrification accumulated fluxes for two months, were obtained. The ammonium and nitrate leaching accumulated for two months were measured using ion-exchange resin cores. Soil respiration was also measured every field trip. Finally, water samples deriving from runoff, were collected

  16. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  17. Hydrogen storage: a comparison of hydrogen uptake values in carbon nanotubes and modified charcoals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, H.-Y.; Chen, G. R.; Chen, D. Y.; Lue, J. T.; Yu, M. S.

    2010-11-01

    We compared the hydrogen uptake weight percentages (wt.%) of different carbonized materials, before and after modification, for their application in hydrogen storage at room temperature. The Sievert's method [T.P. Blach, E. Mac, A. Gray, J. Alloys Compd. 446-447, 692 (2007)] was used to measure hydrogen uptake values on: (1) Taiwan bamboo charcoal (TBC), (2) white charcoal (WC), (3) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) bought from CBT Inc. and (4) homemade multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown on TBC. Modified samples were coated with a metal catalyst by dipping in KOH solutions of different concentrations and then activated in a high temperature oven (800 °C) under the atmospheric pressure of inert gas. The results showed that unmodified SWCNTs had superior uptake but that Taiwan bamboo charcoal, after modification, showed enhanced uptake comparable to the SWCNTs. Due to TBC's low cost and high mass production rate, they will be the key candidate for future hydrogen storage applications.

  18. Sequestration of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to useful products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.; Hawkins, Aaron B.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Lipscomb, Gina Lynette Pries; Schut, Gerrit Jan

    2017-03-07

    Provided herein are genetically engineered microbes that include at least a portion of a carbon fixation pathway, and in one embodiment, use molecular hydrogen to drive carbon dioxide fixation. In one embodiment, the genetically engineered microbe is modified to convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof at levels greater than a control microbe. Other products may also be produced. Also provided herein are cell free compositions that convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof. Also provided herein are methods of using the genetically engineered microbes and the cell free compositions.

  19. Minor Stimulation of Soil Carbon Storage by Nitrogen Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Lu, M.

    2008-12-01

    How carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes are coupled at ecosystem scales is not well understood. At plant levels, a concept that N availability can limit plant productivity is well established based on (1) N fertilization that stimulates productivity and (2) increases in productivity along gradients of soil fertility. This plant-level concept of N limitation is often applied to ecosystem-scale C processes that ecosystem C sequestration is assumed limited by N availability. Under this assumption, many models predict that nitrogen fertilization or deposition would result in increases in carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. However, whether or not nitrogen addition stimulates carbon sequestration is highly controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to reveal a central tendency from diverse results obtained at individual experimental sites. We compiled data over 300 published papers to calculate response ratios (RR) of soil carbon pools (SCP) [i.e., RR(SCP)] to N addition (either as fertilization or mimic of deposition). Overall, RR(SCP) across all data points was not significantly different from zero, suggesting that N addition generally did not significantly increase soil carbon storage. However, RR(SCP) was different among different types of ecosystems. SCP significantly increased by 2.35% (Prespiratory carbon release from soil. RR of soil respiration (=RR(SR)) was positively correlated with RR(BPCP) and RR(SCP), suggesting that N-stimulated carbon input to the soil systems was largely counterbalanced by N-induced increases in carbon release. We also found that N addition tended to stimulate C loss from soil with high C/N ratio but C storage in soil with low C/N ratio. Overall, nitrogen addition, either as fertilization or mimic of deposition, did not stimulate much C storage in soil although N significantly stimulated plant growth and thus C input to soil systems. Our findings provide a new perspective on model simulations of C and N interactions in

  20. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  1. Significance of terrestrial inflows to carbon and nitrogen distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significance of terrestrial inflows to carbon and nitrogen distribution in the Lake Victoria surface water. ... Samples away from the river mouth provided C:N ratios within the Redfield ratio range (C:N:P; 106:16:1) indicating materials of phytoplanktonic origin. The POM isotopes composition indicated a maximum ä13C value of ...

  2. Distribution and sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 1. Distribution and sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and biogenic silica in the sediments of ... Author Affiliations. Sadaf Nazneen1 N Janardhana Raju1. School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India.

  3. Statistical optimization of substrate, carbon and nitrogen source by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Kafarov, 1982; Naidu and Panda, 1998; Kashyap et al.,. 2001; Tari et al., 2007). Factors like carbon and nitrogen sources and their concentrations have always been of great interest to the researchers in the industry for the low cost media design. It is also known that 30-40% of the production cost of in-.

  4. Distribution and sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009; Jennerjahn. 2012). Post-deposition bottom sediments and the constituents associated with them, such as organic matter, are likely to undergo a number of. Keywords. Organic carbon ... Smith 1983; Jennerjahn et al. 2004; Wu et al. 2007). Silicon ...... nitrogen during the decomposition of detritus derived from estuarine ...

  5. Monitoring of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil nitrogen (SN) are the principal components in soil quality assessment, and in mitigation the global greenhouse effect. In Iran, little information exists on the stocks of SOC and SN. SOC and SN stocks are a function of the SOC and SN concentrations and the bulk density of the soil that are ...

  6. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on the induction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report illustrates the effect of two carbon sources; colloidal chitin and dextrose and a nitrogen source, yeast extract on the chitinase production of seventeen B. bassiana isolates. The chitinase activity varied among the isolates and the different media studied. A high enzymatic activity was observed in the medium with ...

  7. Effects of organic nitrogen and carbon sources on mycelial growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grifola umbellate is a famous and expensive Chinese herb medicine and the main medicinal component is polysaccharide mainly produced by its mycelia. Effects of organic nitrogen and carbon resources on mycelial growth and polysaccharides production of a medicinal mushroom, G. umbellate were studied in the ...

  8. Air quality assessment of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air quality in urban areas is a cause of concern because of increased industrial activities that contribute to large quantities of emissions. The study assess levels and variations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Blantyre, Malawi using a stationary environmental monitoring station ...

  9. BENZOYL PEROXIDE DECOMPOSITION BY NITROGEN-CONTAINING CARBON NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryna Haliarnik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activities of nanoporous carbon materials, their modified forms and enzyme catalase was determined by calculation of Michaelis constants according to the kinetics of substrate decomposition. It is found that the catalytic activity of studied samples correlated with surface basicity and presence of quaternary nitrogen groups in structure.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes.

  11. Interaction of hydrogen plasma with carbon-tungsten composite layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesel, Alenka, E-mail: alenka.vesel@guest.arnes.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mozetic, Miran; Panjan, Peter [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hauptman,; Klanjsek-Gunde, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [CNRS-PROMES, Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux and Energie Solaire, UPR 8521, 7 rue du four solaire, F-66120 Font Romeu, Odeillo (France)

    2011-04-15

    Interaction of neutral hydrogen atoms with the layer of hydrogenated carbon-tungsten composite was studied. A 1 {mu}m thick layer was prepared by sputter deposition from C and WC-targets in Ar/C{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture. After deposition the samples were treated in weakly ionized highly dissociated hydrogen plasma created in a microwave discharge at a power of 1 kW. The gas flow was 13 l/h and pressure was 90 Pa. Temperature of the samples during treatment was about 850 K. After plasma treatment the samples were analyzed by AES (Auger electron spectroscopy) depth profiling, XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). It was found that during hydrogen plasma treatment selective etching of the C-W layer occurred. Carbon was preferentially removed from the C-W layer, and after about 10 min of treatment practically only tungsten with a huge porosity was detected.

  12. A Compilation of Global Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the concentrations of soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total...

  13. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eJuarez Mosqueda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, the (10,10 CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during anaerobic quinoline degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anko; Weber, Stefanie; Reineke, Anne-Kirsten; Hollender, Juliane; Richnow, Hans-H

    2010-09-01

    Quinoline is a N-heterocyclic compound often found at tar oil contaminated field sites. To provide information whether stable isotope analysis can help to characterize the fate of quinoline within contaminated aquifers, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of quinoline were investigated during biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions. No significant carbon isotope effect was observed, however, substantial hydrogen isotope fractionation was detected. Thus, hydrogen isotope fractionation may be used as an indicator for in situ biodegradation of quinoline. The bulk hydrogen isotope enrichment factor was εH(bulk)=-33±12‰. During the biodegradation of quinoline the primary intermediate 2-hydroxyquinoline was detected indicating hydroxylation at the C2-position. According to this reaction mechanism, the reactive position specific hydrogen enrichment factor (εH(reactive position)) and apparent kinetic hydrogen isotope effect (AKIE(H)) were calculated and gave values of εH(reactive position)=-205±75‰ and AKIE(H)=1.26±0.12, respectively. The missing carbon isotope effect may be explained by strong masking or an enzymatic direct side-on insertion of oxygen from the MoOH(H) group of the molybdenum center across the CH bond at the C2-position of quinoline with concomitant hydride transfer. The later assumption is supported by recent studies showing that initial step of hydroxylation of N-heteroaromatic compounds proceeds via a similar reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Moisture effects on carbon and nitrogen emission from burning of wildland biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-W. A. Chen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C and nitrogen (N released from biomass burning have multiple effects on the Earth's biogeochemical cycle, climate change, and ecosystem. These effects depend on the relative abundances of C and N species emitted, which vary with fuel type and combustion conditions. This study systematically investigates the emission characteristics of biomass burning under different fuel moisture contents, through controlled burning experiments with biomass and soil samples collected from a typical alpine forest in North America. Fuel moisture in general lowers combustion efficiency, shortens flaming phase, and introduces prolonged smoldering before ignition. It increases emission factors of incompletely oxidized C and N species, such as carbon monoxide (CO and ammonia (NH3. Substantial particulate carbon and nitrogen (up to 4 times C in CO and 75% of N in NH3 were also generated from high-moisture fuels, maily associated with the pre-flame smoldering. This smoldering process emits particles that are larger and contain lower elemental carbon fractions than soot agglomerates commonly observed in flaming smoke. Hydrogen (H/C ratio and optical properties of particulate matter from the high-moisture fuels show their resemblance to plant cellulous and brown carbon, respectively. These findings have implications for modeling biomass burning emissions and impacts.

  16. Hydrogen storage and delivery: the carbon dioxide - formic acid couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenczy, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and the carbonates, the available natural C1 sources, can be easily hydrogenated into formic acid and formates in water; the rate of this reduction strongly depends on the pH of the solution. This reaction is catalysed by ruthenium(II) pre-catalyst complexes with a large variety of water-soluble phosphine ligands; high conversions and turnover numbers have been realised. Although ruthenium(II) is predominant in these reactions, the iron(II) - tris[(2-diphenylphosphino)-ethyl]phosphine (PP3) complex is also active, showing a new perspective to use abundant and inexpensive iron-based compounds in the CO2 reduction. In the catalytic hydrogenation cycles the in situ formed metal hydride complexes play a key role, their structures with several other intermediates have been proven by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In the other hand safe and convenient hydrogen storage and supply is the fundamental question for the further development of the hydrogen economy; and carbon dioxide has been recognised to be a viable H2 vector. Formic acid--containing 4.4 weight % of H2, that is 53 g hydrogen per litre--is suitable for H2 storage; we have shown that in aqueous solutions it can be selectively decomposed into CO-free (CO carbonate solution, opening the way to use cheap, non-noble metal based catalysts for this reaction, too.

  17. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide for methanol production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van den Berg, Henderikus; Benneker, A.; Simmelink, G.; Timmer, J.; van Weerden, S.

    2012-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol with a capacity of 10 kt/y methanol is designed in a systematic way. The challenge will be to obtain a process with a high net CO2 conversion. From initially four conceptual designs the most feasible is selected and designed in more detail. The

  18. Catalytic decomposition of carbon-based liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials for hydrogen generation under mild conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sánchez, Felipe; Motta, Davide; Dimitratos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    ... investment, and low potential risks. In this review, we survey the progress made in hydrogen generation from carbon-based liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials, focusing mainly on the catalytic decomposition of formic acid...

  19. Reduction of nitrogen- and carbon-based pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, W.E.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for educing the concentration of nitrogen oxides in an oxygen-rich effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises: injecting a solution comprising at least one additive compound selected from the group consisting of guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanide, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1,1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, and dimethyl urea, at a concentration and a temperature effective to achieve reduction in nitrogen oxide levels in the effluent.

  20. Electrochemical hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z P; Ng, S H; Wang, J Z; Huang, Z G; Liu, H K; Too, C O; Wallace, G G

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers were successfully prepared by dispersing SWNTs in Triton X-100 solution, then filtered by PVDF membrane (0.22 microm pore size). The electrochemical behavior and the reversible hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers have been investigated in alkaline electrolytic solutions (6 N KOH) by cyclic voltammetry, linear micropolarization, and constant current charge/discharge measurements. The effect of thickness and the addition of carbon black on hydrogen adsorption/desorption were also investigated. It was found that the electrochemical charge-discharge mechanism occurring in SWNT paper electrodes is somewhere between that of carbon nanotubes (physical process) and that of metal hydride electrodes (chemical process), and consists of a charge-transfer reaction (Reduction/Oxidation) and a diffusion step (Diffusion).

  1. Hydrogenation Dynamics of Biphenylene Carbon (Graphenylene) Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Splugues, Vinicius; Autreto, Pedro Alves da Silva; Galvao, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    The advent of graphene created a revolution in materials science. Because of this there is a renewed interest in other carbon-based structures. Graphene is the ultimate (just one atom thick) membrane. It has been proposed that graphene can work as impermeable membrane to standard gases, such argon and helium. Graphene-like porous membranes, but presenting larger porosity and potential selectivity would have many technological applications. Biphenylene carbon (BPC), sometimes called graphenyle...

  2. Carbon compound used in hydrogen storage; Compuesto de carbon utilizado en almacenamiento de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Lopez M, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In the present work it is studied the activated carbon of mineral origin for the sorption of hydrogen. The carbon decreased of particle size by means of the one alloyed mechanical. The time of mill was of 10 hours. The characterization one carries out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen sipped in the carbon material it was determined using the Thermal gravimetric method (TGA). The conditions of hydrogenation went at 10 atm of pressure and ambient temperature during 18 hours. They were also carried out absorption/desorption cycles of hydrogen in the same one system of thermal gravimetric analysis. The results showed percentages of sorption of 2% approximately in the cycles carried out in the system TGA and of 4.5% in weight of hydrogen at pressure of 10 atmospheres and ambient temperature during 18 hours. (Author)

  3. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  4. Hydrogen recycle and isotope exchange from dense carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1987-03-01

    Dense carbon films were prepared by deposition from hydrogen plasmas to which methane was added. The initial hydrogen recycle coefficient from the films ranges from more than two to less than one. The films contain large amounts of hydrogen (up to 50 at. %). They adjust themselves to provide recycling coefficients near unity. Isotope changeover times tend to be long. The reservoir of hydrogen instantly available to the plasma to maintain or stabilize the recycle coefficient and isotopic composition of the plasma is 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ or greater depending on film preparation, temperature, and prior plasma exposure conditions. Simulator observations tend to support and improve the understanding of the observations in TEXTOR and JET; however, they also point out the need for control of film deposition and operating parameters to provide desirable and reproducible properties. The films and the hydrogen isotopes they contain can be removed easily by plasma processes. Since the hydrogen in these films is relatively immobile except in the zone reached by energetic particles, or at temperatures above 400/sup 0/C, dense carbon films may be useful in managing the tritium recovery from near-term fusion experiments.

  5. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Becker, H.-W. [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Williams, G.V.M. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • This paper reports for the first time redistribution of hydrogen atoms in diamond like carbon thin films during ion implantation of low energy magnetic ions. • The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. • Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications. - Abstract: Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  6. Carbon nanoscrolls: a promising material for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Froudakis, George E

    2007-07-01

    A multiscale theoretical approach was used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in the recently synthesized carbon nanoscrolls. First, ab initio calculations at the density functional level of theory (DFT) were performed in order to (a) calculate the binding energy of H2 molecules at the walls of nanoscrolls and (b) fit the parameters of the interatomic potential used in Monte Carlo simulations. Second, classical Monte Carlo simulations were performed for estimating the H2 storage capacity of "experimental size" nanoscrolls containing thousands of atoms. Our results show that pure carbon nanoscrolls cannot accumulate hydrogen because the interlayer distance is too small. However, an opening of the spiral structure to approximately 7 A followed by alkali doping can make them very promising materials for hydrogen storage application, reaching 3 wt % at ambient temperature and pressure.

  7. One-carbon and hydrogen metabolism of acidophilic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    One-carbon and hydrogen metabolism of acidophilic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs Methane (CH4) is an essential molecule in the earth’s atmosphere and also very important for households and industry. Atmospheric methane contributes directly to the greenhouse effect. Global warming is a worldwide

  8. Coarsening of carbon black supported Pt nanoparticles in hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Wang, Yan; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses coarsening mechanisms of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon black in hydrogen. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Pt nanoparticle coarsening was monitored in 6 mbar 20 % H2/Ar while ramping up the temperature to almost 1000 °C. Time-resolved TEM...

  9. Sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.

    1994-01-01

    that for nitrogen. The energy distributions of the sputtered N2 and O2 molecules were measured for hydrogen ions in this energy regime as well. The yields from both solids turn out to depend on the sum of the stopping power of all atoms in the ion. The yield increases as a quadratic function of the stopping power......Electronic sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions has been studied at two low-temperature setups. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined in the energy regime 4-10 keV for H+, H-2+ and H-3+ ions. The yield for oxygen is more than a factor of two larger than...... for oxygen, but slightly slower for nitrogen. The energy distributions do not exhibit strong features, but are similar to those published earlier for electron sputtering....

  10. Vacancy Mediated Mechanism of Nitrogen Substitution in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Sadanadan, Bindu; Rao, Apparao M.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen substitution reaction in a graphene sheet and carbon nanotubes of different diameter are investigated using the generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics method. The formation of a vacancy in curved graphene sheet or a carbon nanotube is found to cause a curvature dependent local reconstruction of the surface. Our simulations and analysis show that vacancy mediated N substitution (rather than N chemisorption) is favored on the surface of nanotubes with diameter larger than 8 nm. This predicted value of the critical minimum diameter for N incorporation is confirmed by experimental results presented.

  11. The carbon bonus of organic nitrogen enhances nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Oskar; Cambui, Camila Aguetoni; Gruffman, Linda; Palmroth, Sari; Oren, Ram; Näsholm, Torgny

    2017-01-01

    The importance of organic nitrogen (N) for plant nutrition and productivity is increasingly being recognized. Here we show that it is not only the availability in the soil that matters, but also the effects on plant growth. The chemical form of N taken up, whether inorganic (such as nitrate) or organic (such as amino acids), may significantly influence plant shoot and root growth, and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). We analysed these effects by synthesizing results from multiple laboratory experiments on small seedlings (Arabidopsis, poplar, pine and spruce) based on a tractable plant growth model. A key point is that the carbon cost of assimilating organic N into proteins is lower than that of inorganic N, mainly because of its carbon content. This carbon bonus makes it more beneficial for plants to take up organic than inorganic N, even when its availability to the roots is much lower - up to 70% lower for Arabidopsis seedlings. At equal growth rate, root:shoot ratio was up to three times higher and nitrogen productivity up to 20% higher for organic than inorganic N, which both are factors that may contribute to higher NUE in crop production. © 2016 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbon materials: myth and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Terrones, Mauricio; Terrones, Humberto

    2007-04-21

    We used Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation to model the hydrogen storage in the primitive, gyroid, diamond, and quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon materials and in carbon nanotubes. We found that none of the investigated nanoporous carbon materials satisfy the US Department of Energy goal of volumetric density and mass storage for automotive application (6 wt% and 45 kg H(2) m(-3)) at considered storage condition. Our calculations indicate that quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon material can reach the 6 wt% at 3.8 MPa and 77 K, but the volumetric density does not exceed 24 kg H(2) m(-3). The bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes can store only up to 4.5 wt%, but with high volumetric density of 42 kg H(2) m(-3). All investigated nanoporous carbon materials are not effective against compression above 20 MPa at 77 K because the adsorbed density approaches the density of the bulk fluid. It follows from this work that geometry of carbon surfaces can enhance the storage capacity only to a limited extent. Only a combination of the most effective structure with appropriate additives (metals) can provide an efficient storage medium for hydrogen in the quest for a source of "clean" energy.

  13. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  14. Nitrogen doped silicon-carbon multilayer protective coatings on carbon obtained by TVA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, Victor; Vasile, Eugeniu; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Lungu, Cristian P.; Vladoiu, Rodica; Jepu, Ionut; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Caraiane, Aureliana; Nicolescu, Virginia; Cupsa, Ovidiu; Dinca, Paul; Zaharia, Agripina

    2017-08-01

    Protective nitrogen doped Si-C multilayer coatings on carbon, used to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon, were obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The initial carbon layer having a thickness of 100nm has been deposed on a silicon substrate in the absence of nitrogen, and then a 3nm Si thin film to cover carbon layer was deposed. Further, seven Si and C layers were alternatively deposed in the presence of nitrogen ions, each having a thickness of 40nm. In order to form silicon carbide at the interface between silicon and carbon layers, all carbon, silicon and nitrogen ions energy has increased up to 150eV . The characterization of microstructure and electrical properties of as-prepared N-Si-C multilayer structures were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM) techniques, Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and electrical measurements. Oxidation protection of carbon is based on the reaction between oxygen and silicon carbide, resulting in SiO2, SiO and CO2, and also by reaction involving N, O and Si, resulting in silicon oxynitride (SiNxOy) with a continuously variable composition, and on the other hand, since nitrogen acts as a trapping barrier for oxygen. To perform electrical measurements, 80% silver filled two-component epoxy-based glue ohmic contacts were attached on the N-Si-C samples. Electrical conductivity was measured in constant current mode. The experimental data show the increase of conductivity with the increase of the nitrogen content. To explain the temperature behavior of electrical conductivity we assumed a thermally activated electric transport mechanism.

  15. Hydrogen - the answer to our prayer for low carbon transport?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Albert; Kershaw, Ian; Vinke, Jan [Ricardo Strategic Consulting GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    As political, social and economic pressure mounts, the automotive industry needs low carbon solutions - but how do we get there? Despite higher fuel prices and pressure to reduce vehicle CO{sub 2} in many countries, consumers assume limited personal responsibility for reducing carbon emissions from their road transport. The automotive industry is challenged with developing low carbon vehicles without compromise on cost, performance or practicality. The options for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from road transport range from improved traffic management and driving behaviour, to improved vehicle technologies. Incremental efficiency improvements will be the most cost-effective way of improving powertrains, while economics and availability will continue to limit use of fuel cells, hydrogen and biofuels. We propose an evolutionary route of downsized combustion engines, increasing hybrid electric capability and more biofuel blends, supplemented by lower carbon plug-in electric power for short journeys. The transition to low carbon transport will require policies to encourage consumer demand. (orig.)

  16. [Effects of chlorimuron-ethyl and urea on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and soil inorganic nitrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huan-Bo; Li, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Hui-Wen; Li, Xu; Xu, Ming-Kai

    2012-08-01

    A microcosm experiment was conducted to study the effects of different concentration chlorimuron-ethyl (20, 200, and 2000 microg x kg(-1) soil) and its combination with urea (120 mg x kg(-1) soil) on the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and soil nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen. Applying chlorimuron-ethyl alone decreased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen throughout the experiment period (60 days), and the decrement increased with increasing chlorimuron-ethyl concentration. Chlorimuron-ethyl had little effects on the soil ammonium nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen in the early period of the experiment, but increased the soil ammonium nitrogen in the mid-period (15 d) and the soil nitrate nitrogen in the late period (after 30 days) significantly. Both urea addition and its combination with chlorimuron-ethyl increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen obviously in a short time, but the effect of combined addition of urea and chlorimuron-ethyl weakened then. Applying urea and its combination with chlorimuron-ethyl resulted in a lasting increase of soil nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen.

  17. Scale-up activation of carbon fibres for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunowsky, M.; Marco-Lozar, J.P.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Linares-Solano, A. [Grupo de Materiales Carbonosos y Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    In a previous study, we investigated, at a laboratory scale, the chemical activation of two different carbon fibres (CF), their porosity characterization, and their optimization for hydrogen storage. In the present work, this study is extended to: (i) a larger range of KOH activated carbon fibres, (ii) a larger range of hydrogen adsorption measurements at different temperatures and pressures (i.e. at room temperature, up to 20 MPa, and at 77 K, up to 4 MPa), and (iii) a scaling-up activation approach in which the obtained activated carbon fibres (ACF) are compared with those from laboratory-scale activation. The prepared samples cover a large range of porosities, which is found to govern their ability for hydrogen adsorption. The hydrogen uptake capacities of all the prepared samples have been analysed both in volumetric and in gravimetric bases. Thus, maximum adsorption capacities of around 5 wt% are obtained at 77 K, and 1.1 wt% at room temperature, respectively. The packing densities of the materials have been measured, turning out to play an important role in order to estimate the total storage capacity of a tank volume. Maximum values of 17.4 g l{sup -1} at 298 K, and 38.6 g l{sup -1} at 77 K were obtained. (author)

  18. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atul Jain; Xiaojuan Yang; Haroon Kheshgi; A. David McGuire; Wilfred Post; David. Kicklighter

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen...

  19. Molybdenum carbide-carbon nanocomposites synthesized from a reactive template for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide nanocrystals (Mo2C) with sizes ranging from 3 to 20 nm were synthesized within a carbon matrix starting from a mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) template with confined pores. A molybdenum carbide phase (Mo2C) with a hexagonal structure was formed using a novel synthetic method involving the reaction of a molybdenum precursor with the carbon residue originating from C3N4 under nitrogen at various temperatures. The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the synthesized samples have different surface structures and compositions, which are accordingly expected to exhibit different electrocatalytic activities toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the sample synthesized at 1323 K exhibited the highest and most stable HER current in acidic media, with an onset potential of -100 mV vs. RHE, among the samples prepared in this study. This result is attributed to the sufficiently small particle size (∼8 nm on average) and accordingly high surface area (308 m2 g-1), with less oxidized surface entrapped within the graphitized carbon matrix. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  20. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoil Array Integrated on Carbon Nanofiber Paper for Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ho; Choi, Mi Jin; Bang, Jin Ho

    2015-09-02

    Integrating a nanostructured carbon array on a conductive substrate remains a challenging task that presently relies primarily on high-vacuum deposition technology. To overcome the problems associated with current vacuum techniques, we demonstrate the formation of an N-doped carbon array by pyrolysis of a polymer array that was electrochemically grown on carbon fiber paper. The resulting carbon array was investigated for use as a supercapacitor electrode. In-depth surface characterization results revealed that the microtextural properties, surface functionalities, and degree of nitrogen incorporated into the N-doped carbon array can be delicately controlled by manipulating carbonization temperatures. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements showed that subtle changes in these physical properties resulted in significant changes in the capacitive behavior of the N-doped carbon array. Pore structures and nitrogen/oxygen functional groups, which are favorable for charge storage, were formed at low carbonization temperatures. This result showed the importance of having a comprehensive understanding of how the surface characteristics of carbon affect its capacitive performance. When utilized as a substrate in a pseudocapacitive electrode material, the N-doped carbon array maximizes capacitive performance by simultaneously achieving high gravimetric and areal capacitances due to its large surface area and high electrical conductivity.

  1. Nitrogen Doped Carbon Nanotubes from Organometallic Compounds: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nxumalo, Edward N.; Coville, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have become a topic of increased importance in the study of carbonaceous materials. This arises from the physical and chemical properties that are created when N is embedded in a CNT. These properties include modified chemical reactivity and modified conductivity and mechanical properties. A range of methodologies have been devised to synthesize N-CNTs. One of the procedures uses a floating catalyst in which an organometallic complex is decomposed in the gas phase in the presence of a nitrogen containing reactant to give N-CNTs. Most studies have been limited to ferrocene, ring substituted ferrocene and Fe(CO)5. This review covers the synthesis (and properties) of N-CNTs and other shaped carbon nanomaterials (SCNMs) produced using organometallic complexes. It summarizes the effects that physical parameters such as temperature, pressure, gas flow rates, type and concentration of N source etc. have on the N-CNT type, size and yields as well as the nitrogen content incorporated into the tubes that are produced from organometallic complexes. Proposed growth models for N-CNT synthesis are also reported.

  2. Nitrogen Doped Carbon Nanotubes from Organometallic Compounds: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J. Coville

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs have become a topic of increased importance in the study of carbonaceous materials. This arises from the physical and chemical properties that are created when N is embedded in a CNT. These properties include modified chemical reactivity and modified conductivity and mechanical properties. A range of methodologies have been devised to synthesize N-CNTs. One of the procedures uses a floating catalyst in which an organometallic complex is decomposed in the gas phase in the presence of a nitrogen containing reactant to give N-CNTs. Most studies have been limited to ferrocene, ring substituted ferrocene and Fe(CO5. This review covers the synthesis (and properties of N-CNTs and other shaped carbon nanomaterials (SCNMs produced using organometallic complexes. It summarizes the effects that physical parameters such as temperature, pressure, gas flow rates, type and concentration of N source etc. have on the N-CNT type, size and yields as well as the nitrogen content incorporated into the tubes that are produced from organometallic complexes. Proposed growth models for N-CNT synthesis are also reported.

  3. Investigation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond films grown with nitrogen/methane/hydrogen plasma at high power conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. J.; Hou, Haihong; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of some growth parameters such as high microwave power ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 kW and N2 additive on the incorporation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown through a small amount of pure N2 addition into conventional 4% CH4/H2 plasma using a 5 kW microwave plasma CVD system. Incorporation form and content of hydrogen point defects in the NCD films produced with pure N2 addition was analyzed by employing Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time. A large amount of hydrogen related defects was detected in all the produced NCD films with N2 additive ranging from 29 to 87 μm thick with grain size from 47 nm to 31 nm. Furthermore, a specific new H related sharp absorption peak appears in all the NCD films grown with pure N2/CH4/H2 plasma at high powers and becomes stronger at powers higher than 3.0 kW and is even stronger than the 2920 cm-1 peak, which is commonly found in CVD diamond films. Based on these experimental findings, the role of high power and pure nitrogen addition on the growth of NCD films including hydrogen defect formation is analyzed and discussed.

  4. Oxidative unzipping of stacked nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haifeng; Zhao, Yong; Tang, Yifan; Burkert, Seth C; Star, Alexander

    2015-05-27

    We demonstrate a facile synthesis of different nanostructures by oxidative unzipping of stacked nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups (NCNCs). Depending on the initial number of stacked-cup segments, this method can yield graphene nanosheets (GNSs) or hybrid nanostructures comprised of graphene nanoribbons partially unzipped from a central nanotube core. Due to the stacked-cup structure of as-synthesized NCNCs, preventing complete exposure of graphitic planes, the unzipping mechanism is hindered, resulting in incomplete unzipping; however, individual, separated NCNCs are completely unzipped, yielding individual nitrogen-doped GNSs. Graphene-based materials have been employed as electrocatalysts for many important chemical reactions, and it has been proposed that increasing the reactive edges results in more efficient electrocatalysis. In this paper, we apply these graphene conjugates as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to determine how the increase in reactive edges affects the electrocatalytic activity. This investigation introduces a new method for the improvement of ORR electrocatalysts by using nitrogen dopants more effectively, allowing for enhanced ORR performance with lower overall nitrogen content. Additionally, the GNSs were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (GNPs), resulting in a GNS/GNP hybrid, which shows efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering and expands the scope of its application in advanced device fabrication and biosensing.

  5. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Libault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2. In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  6. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  7. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency. PMID:24987690

  8. New nitrogen-containing materials for hydrogen storage and their characterization by high-pressure microbalance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbø, Andreas Peter

    or liquid form, technologies that are well developed and usable, but not energy efficient. Certain metals and alloys are able to contain hydrogen within practical pressure and temperature ranges very efficient volume-wise, but they are too heavy for use in cars. Recently, attention has turned to the so......-called complex hydrides, which contain hydrogen bound covalently often in very light materials involving elements such as lithium, sodium, nitrogen and aluminum. While these materials typically have high decomposition temperatures, the combination with other compounds helps to destabilize the material resulting...

  9. Nitrogen Adsorption and Hydrogenation on a MoFe6S9 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological nitrogen fixation where N-2 is reduced to NH3. Density functional calculations are presented of the bonding and hydrogenation of N-2 on a MoFe6S9 complex constructed to model aspects of the active site of nitrogenase. N-2 is found to bind end on to ...... on to one of the Fe atoms. A complete energy diagram for the addition of hydrogen to the MoFe6S9 complex with and without N-2 is given, and a mechanism for ammonia synthesis is proposed on this basis....

  10. Dark hydrogen production in nitrogen atmosphere - An approach for sustainability by marine cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, D.; Arun Kumar, D.; Uma, L.; Subramanian, G. [National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria (Sponsored by DBT, Govt. of India), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirapalli 620 024 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Biological hydrogen production is an ideal system for three main reasons i) forms a renewable energy source, ii) gives clean fuel and iii) serves as a good supplement to oil reserves. The major challenges faced in biological hydrogen production are the presence of uptake hydrogenase and lack of sustainability in the cyanobacterial hydrogen production system. Three different marine cyanobacterial species viz. Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041, Dichothrix baueriana BDU 40481 and Nostoc calcicola BDU 40302 were studied for their potential use in hydrogen production. Among these, L. valderiana BDU 20041, was found to produce hydrogen even in 100% nitrogen atmosphere which was 85% of the hydrogen produced in argon atmosphere. This is the first report of such a high rate of production of hydrogen in a nitrogen atmosphere by a cyanobacterium, which makes it possible to develop sustained hydrogen production systems. L. valderiana BDU 20041, a dark hydrogen producer uses the reductant essentially supplied by the respiratory pathway for hydrogen production. Using inhibitors, this organism was found to produce hydrogen due to the activities of both nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase, while it had no 'uptake' hydrogenase activity. The other two organisms though had low levels of bidirectional hydrogenase, possessed considerable 'uptake' hydrogenase activity and hence could not release much hydrogen either in argon or nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  11. Production of hydrogen from methane decomposition using nanosized carbon black as catalyst in a fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiuling [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Division of Chemical Engineering, the University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); He, Miao; Wang, Gaowei; Li, Yongdan [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhu, Zhonghua John [Division of Chemical Engineering, the University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2009-12-15

    Nanosized carbon black (NCB) was employed as catalyst for methane decomposition to produce hydrogen in a fluidized-bed reactor. The carbon atoms of the surface defects of NCB act as active sites in this reaction. The activity of NCB is improved after more defects in the surface of NCB are generated after the treatment in nitric acid and calcination in nitrogen gas. The loading of small amounts of Ni and Co can obviously increase the initial activity of NCB, however, their activity deceases very quickly after the reaction begins due to the encapsulation of the corresponding metal particles inside amorphous carbon produced from methane decomposition. After reaction, the formed carbon was found to grow into carbon flakes and cover the surface of NCB. The investigation with TEM and SEM indicates that they may form from a new carbon crystallite, not build upon the existing hexagon layer in the surface defects of NCB. (author)

  12. Enthalpy and entropy effects in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, Irena; Sheintuch, Moshe

    2005-07-05

    Interaction energies and entropies associated with hydrogen adsorption on the inner and outer surfaces of zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) of various diameters are analyzed by means of molecular mechanics, density functional theory, and ab initio calculations. For a single molecule the strongest interaction, which is 3.5 greater than that with the planar graphite sheet, is found inside a (8,0) nanotube. Adsorption on the outer surfaces is weaker than that on graphite. Due to the steric considerations, both processes are accompanied by an extremely strong decline in entropy. Absence of specific adsorption sites and weak attractive interaction between hydrogen molecules within carbon nanotubes results in their close packing at low temperatures. Using the calculated geometric and thermodynamic parameters in Langmuir isotherms we predict the adsorption capacity of SWCNTs at room temperature to be smaller than 1 wt % even at 100 bar.

  13. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T; Huang, Jun

    2013-09-25

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm(3) H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry.

  14. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  15. Properties of hydrogenated amorphous germanium nitrogen alloys prepared by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, I.; Kawai, H.; Komiyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium-nitrogen alloys (a-GeNx:H) were synthesized as a new group of amorphous semiconductors by rf(13.56 MHz) reactive sputtering of a Ge target in a gas mixture of Ar+N2+H2 under a variety of deposition conditions such as gas ratio, rf-discharge power, and substrate temperature. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of those a-GeNx:H alloys were systematically measured and are discussed in relation to their preparation conditions. The optical band gap E04 of a-GeNx:H alloys could be continuously controlled in the range from 1.1 eV to 3.3 eV primarily depending on the atomic N/Ge ratio in the film. The role of hydrogen and nitrogen in the optical and electrical properties of the material is also crucially demonstrated.

  16. Carbon dioxide free production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, L.; Fehling, T.; Geißler, T.; Baake, E.; Wetzel, T.

    2017-07-01

    The present report summarizes the theoretical modelling and experimental investigation results of the study on the direct thermal methane cracking. This work is a part of the LIMTECH-Project (Liquid Metal Technologies) funded of Helmholtz Alliance and was carried out from 2012 to 2017. The Project-part B5 “CO2-free production of hydrogen” focused on experimental testing and particularly on modelling the novel methane cracking method based on liquid metal technology. The new method uses a bubble column reactor, filled with liquid metal, where both the chemical reaction of methane decomposition and the separation of gas fraction from solid carbon occur. Such reactor system was designed and built in the liquid metal laboratory (KALLA) at KIT. The influences of liquid metal temperature distribution in reactor and feed gas flow rate on methane conversion ratio were investigated experimentally at the temperature range from 930°C to 1175 °C and methane flow rate at the reactor inlet from 50 to 200 mLn/min. In parallel with experimental investigations, a thermochemical model, giving insight in the influence of the above mentioned parameters has been developed at KIT and a CFD model was developed at LUH to get an overview about the bubble dynamics in the reaction system. The influence of different bubble sizes and shapes, multi-inlet coalescence effects as well as the potential of electromagnetic stirring have been investigated.

  17. Optimization of Nano-Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakobson, Boris I [Rice University

    2013-08-02

    Research undertaken has added to the understanding of several critical areas, by providing both negative answers (and therefore eliminating expensive further studies of unfeasible paths) and positive feasible options for storage. Theoretical evaluation of the early hypothesis of storage on pure carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNT) has been scrutinized with the use of comprehensive computational methods (and experimental tests by the Center partners), and demonstrated that the fundamentally weak binding energy of hydrogen is not sufficiently enhanced by the SWNT curvature or even defects, which renders carbon nanotubes not practical media. More promising direction taken was towards 3-dimensional architectures of high porosity where concurrent attraction of H2 molecule to surrounding walls of nano-scale cavities can double or even triple the binding energy and therefore make hydrogen storage feasible even at ambient or somewhat lower temperatures. An efficient computational tool has been developed for the rapid capacity assessment combining (i) carbon-foam structure generation, (ii) accurate empirical force fields, with quantum corrections for the lightweight H2, and (iii) grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. This made it possible to suggest optimal designs for carbon nanofoams, obtainable via welding techniques from SWNT or by growth on template-zeolites. As a precursor for 3D-foams, we have investigated experimentally the synthesis of VANTA (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays). This can be used for producing nano-foams. On the other hand, fluorination of VANTA did not show promising increase of hydrogen sorption in several tests and may require further investigation and improvements. Another significant result of this project was in developing a fundamental understanding of the elements of hydrogen spillover mechanisms. The benefit of developed models is the ability to foresee possible directions for further improvement of the spillover mechanism.

  18. Zeolite-templated carbon materials for high-pressure hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadie, Nicholas P; Vajo, John J; Cumberland, Robert W; Wilson, Andrew A; Ahn, Channing C; Fultz, Brent

    2012-07-03

    Zeolite-templated carbon (ZTC) materials were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated as potential hydrogen storage materials between 77 and 298 K up to 30 MPa. Successful synthesis of high template fidelity ZTCs was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen adsorption at 77 K; BET surface areas up to ~3600 m(2) g(-1) were achieved. Equilibrium hydrogen adsorption capacity in ZTCs is higher than all other materials studied, including superactivated carbon MSC-30. The ZTCs showed a maximum in Gibbs surface excess uptake of 28.6 mmol g(-1) (5.5 wt %) at 77 K, with hydrogen uptake capacity at 300 K linearly proportional to BET surface area: 2.3 mmol g(-1) (0.46 wt %) uptake per 1000 m(2) g(-1) at 30 MPa. This is the same trend as for other carbonaceous materials, implying that the nature of high-pressure adsorption in ZTCs is not unique despite their narrow microporosity and significantly lower skeletal densities. Isoexcess enthalpies of adsorption are calculated between 77 and 298 K and found to be 6.5-6.6 kJ mol(-1) in the Henry's law limit.

  19. Carbon-nitrogen feedbacks in the UVic ESCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wania

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A representation of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle is introduced into the UVic Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM. The UVic ESCM now contains five terrestrial carbon pools and seven terrestrial nitrogen pools: soil, litter, leaves, stem and roots for both elements and ammonium and nitrate in the soil for nitrogen. Nitrogen cycles through plant tissue, litter, soil and the mineral pools before being taken up again by the plant. Biological N2 fixation and nitrogen deposition represent external inputs to the plant-soil system while losses occur via leaching. Simulated carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes are in the range of other models and observations. Gross primary production (GPP for the 1990s in the CN-coupled version is 129.6 Pg C a−1 and net C uptake is 0.83 Pg C a−1, whereas the C-only version results in a GPP of 133.1 Pg C a−1 and a net C uptake of 1.57 Pg C a−1. At the end of a transient experiment for the years 1800–1999, where radiative forcing is held constant but CO2 fertilisation for vegetation is permitted to occur, the CN-coupled version shows an enhanced net C uptake of 1.05 Pg C a−1, whereas in the experiment where CO2 is held constant and temperature is transient the land turns into a C source of 0.60 Pg C a−1 by the 1990s. The arithmetic sum of the temperature and CO2 effects is 0.45 Pg C a−1, 0.38 Pg C a−1 lower than seen in the fully forced model, suggesting a strong nonlinearity in the CN-coupled version. Anthropogenic N deposition has a positive effect on Net Ecosystem Production of 0.35 Pg C a−1. Overall, the UVic CN-coupled version shows similar characteristics to other CN-coupled Earth System Models, as measured by net C balance and sensitivity to changes in climate, CO2 and temperature.

  20. Isotope tracer study of hydrogen spillover on carbon-based adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Yang, Ralph T

    2008-06-17

    A composite material comprising platinum nanoparticles supported on molecular sieve templated carbon was synthesized and found to adsorb 1.35 wt % hydrogen at 298 K and 100 atm. The isosteric heat of adsorption for the material at low coverage was approximately 14 kJ/mol, and it approached a value of 10.6 kJ/mol as coverage increased for pressures at and above 1 atm. The increase in capacity is attributed to spillover, which is observed with the use of isotopic tracer TPD. IRMOF-8 bridged to Pt/C, a material known to exhibit hydrogen spillover at room temperature, was also studied with the hydrogen-deuterium scrambling reaction for comparison. The isotherms were reversible. For desorption, sequential doses of H2 and D2 at room temperature and subsequent TPD yield product distributions that are strong indicators of the surface diffusion controlled reverse spillover process.

  1. Organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the Great Astrolabe Reef lagoon sediments : preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Charpy Roubaud, Claude; Sarazin, G.; Buscail, R.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were studied in the Great Astrolabe Reef sediment. Organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus percentages were respectively, in average for the whole lagoon top layer sediment, 0.19, 0.024 and 0.006. Organic carbon was lower than this measured in the French Polynesian atolls, organic phosphorus was higher. (Résumé d'auteur)

  2. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Dylan K; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-08

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  3. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  4. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  5. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon from Camellia oleifera shells with enhanced electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunbo; Xu, Bibo; Zhu, Yun; Qing, Renpeng; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen doped porous activated carbon was prepared by annealing treatment of Camellia oleifera shell activated carbon under NH3. We found that nitrogen content of activated carbon up to 10.43 at.% when annealed in NH3 at 800 °C. At 600 °C or above, the N-doped carbon further reacts with NH3, leads to a low surface area down to 458 m(2)/g and low graphitization degree. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that the nitrogen functional groups on the nitrogen-doped activated carbons (NACs) were mostly in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. We discovered that the oxygen groups and carbon atoms at the defect and edge sites of graphene play an important role in the reaction, leading to nitrogen atoms incorporated into the lattice of carbon. When temperatures were lower than 600 °C the nitrogen atoms displaced oxygen groups and formed nitrogen function groups, and when temperatures were higher than 600 °C and ~4 at.% carbon atoms and part of oxygen function groups reacted with NH3. When compared to pure activated carbon, the nitrogen doped activated carbon shows nearly four times the capacitance (191 vs 51 F/g). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Stacy; S. C. Hart; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; A. A. Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Lateral movement of organic matter (OM) due to erosion is now considered an important flux term in terrestrial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets, yet most published studies on the role of erosion focus on agricultural or grassland ecosystems. To date, little information is available on the rate and nature of OM eroded from forest ecosystems. We present annual...

  7. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  8. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  9. Modeling of the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X

    OpenAIRE

    Dantas,T. L. P; Luna,F. M. T; Silva Jr.,I. J.; Torres,A. E. B.; Azevedo, D. C. S.; Rodrigues,A.E.; Moreira,R.F.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X was investigated. The adsorption equilibrium and breakthrough curves were determined at different temperatures - 301 - 306 K, 323 K, 373 K and 423 K. A model based on the LDF approximation for the mass transfer, considering the energy and momentum balances, was used to describe the adsorption kinetics of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture. The model acceptably...

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays grown on graphene substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xun [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Zhu Guoxing [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Xu Zheng, E-mail: zhengxu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (N-doped CNT) arrays have been synthesized on graphene substrate by chemical vapor deposition process, in which iron nanoparticles (NPs) assembled on the graphene sheet were generated in situ from the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and were used as catalyst. The morphology and structure of the N-doped CNT arrays were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The N-doped CNTs were bamboo-shaped and the density can be controlled by modulating the density of catalyst NPs on RGO sheets. The concentration and incorporation of nitrogen were studied by elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and Raman analysis, and the results showed that the nitrogen content was around 3 wt.%. Because of the good conductivity of graphene structure, N-doped CNT arrays grown on graphene substrate may be promising candidates as noble metal-free electrodes for oxygen reduction reaction in the future.

  11. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on the mechanical characteristics of single carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh Heon; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Ryu, Kwon Sang; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    In this study, carbon fiber was exposed to a pressure of 7 MPa for 24 h in high pressure chamber. The tensile test for carbon fiber was conducted to estimate the effect on the high pressure hydrogen in the atmosphere. To determine the tensile strength and Weibull modulus, approximately thirty carbon fiber samples were measured in all cases, and carbon fiber exposed to high pressure argon was evaluated to verify only the effect of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon fiber samples were annealed at 1950 °C for 1 h for a comparison with normal carbon fiber and then tested under identical conditions. The results showed that the tensile strength scatter of normal carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was relatively wider and the Weibull modulus was decreased. Moreover, the tensile strength of the annealed carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was increased, and these samples indicated a complex Weibull modulus because the hydrogen stored in the carbon fiber influenced the mechanical characteristic.

  12. Tracking Seasonal Habitats Using Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes of Osprey Primary Flight Feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinsky, D.; Zelanko, P.; Rice, N.

    2011-12-01

    The majority of bird migration studies use the latitudinal precipitation effect of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of feathers to determine wintering and breeding grounds. Few studies have considered carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to accomplish the same goal; exploiting the variation in dietary constitutes throughout yearly migration cycles. Also, there is no standard procedure of feather sampling; some use body, while others use wing feathers. This sampling discrepancy is not an issue for most migratory species since the majority of birds molt completely in one location, i.e. wintering verse breeding ground. Large birds of prey however, have a continuous molt that may last years, growing feathers on their breeding and wintering grounds. Therefore, a stable isotopic study of Osprey could not randomly sample feathers because it is impossible to know where individual feathers were grown. Here we present an in depth study of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from Mid-Atlantic Osprey primary flight feathers. Not only did we observe three signatures indicating the breeding ground and two distinct wintering grounds, we recorded dietary seasonality shifts within 2 to 3 year olds that remain on the wintering grounds for multiple years.

  13. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM. CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high capacity for the simultaneous adsorption/oxidation of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.The introduce of basic nitrogen groups siginificantly increases the desulfurization since it can facilitate the electron transfer process between sulfur and oxygen. The structure and chemical properties are characterized using Boehm titration, N2 adsorption-desorption method, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The results showed that the major oxidation products were dimethyl disulfide and methanesulfonic acid which adsorbed in the activated carbon.

  14. Carbon-nitrogen interactions and biomass partitioning of Carex rostrata grown at three levels of nitrogen supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Systematics

    1996-12-31

    Biomass and production of vascular plants constitutes a major source of carbon input in peatlands. As rates of decomposition vary considerably with depth, the vertical distribution of biomass may substantially affect accumulation of carbon in peatlands. Therefore, allocation patterns between shoot and roots are particularly important when considering carbon balance of peatland ecosystems. The stimulatory effect of increasing atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} or photosynthesis may increase availability of carbon to most C3 plants. Availability of nitrogen may also alter both due to increased atmospheric deposition and changer in mineralisation rates associated with climate change. Most root-shoot partitioning models predict that allocation of biomass is dependent of the availability and uptake of carbon and nitrogen. A decrease in supply of carbon would favour allocation to shoots and a decrease in supply of nitrogen would increase allocation to roots. At a cellular level, non structural carbohydrates and free amino acids are thought to represent the biochemically available fraction of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The aim of this work is study the long-term growth responses of Carex rostrata to changes in the availability of nitrogen. Special attention is paid to soluble sugars ant free amino acids, which may control partitioning of biomass. (10 refs.)

  15. Short-term carbon and nitrogen cycling in urine patches assessed by combined carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, S.O.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    sources for C include the urine itself, increased solubility of soil C, lysis of microbial cells and leakage of C from scorched roots. The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that: (i) urine deposition causes an increase in root-derived degradable C compounds in the soil, which (ii......) fuel denitrification activity and N2O production. The study took advantage of carbon-13 pulse labelling the plant tissue combined with application of nitrogen-15 labelled synthetic urine as an attempt to identify the sources of N2O. Over a 6 weeks course, the CO2 evolved in response to urine...... application was equal to the quantity of organic C added. Immediately after the application, 87% of the respired CO2 appeared to be from the urine, and respiration of plant-derived C was temporarily decreased. The cumulated amount of respired C-13 plant carbon, however, was unaltered by the urine treatment...

  16. Cloning single wall carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Kittrell, Carter [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-30

    The purpose of this research is to development the technology required for producing 3-D nano-engineered frameworks for hydrogen storage based on sp2 carbon media, which will have high gravimetric and especially high volumetric uptake of hydrogen, and in an aligned fibrous array that will take advantage of the exceptionally high thermal conductivity of sp2 carbon materials to speed up the fueling process while minimizing or eliminating the need for internal cooling systems. A limitation for nearly all storage media using physisorption of the hydrogen molecule is the large amount of surface area (SA) occupied by each H2 molecule due to its large zero-point vibrational energy. This creates a conundrum that in order to maximize SA, the physisorption media is made more tenuous and the density is decreased, usually well below 1 kg/L, so that there comes a tradeoff between volumetric and gravimetric uptake. Our major goal was to develop a new type of media with high density H2 uptake, which favors volumetric storage and which, in turn, has the capability to meet the ultimate DoE H2 goals.

  17. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Stocks of Different Hawaiian Sugarcane Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Tirado-Corbalá

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane has been widely used as a biofuel crop due to its high biological productivity, ease of conversion to ethanol, and its relatively high potential for greenhouse gas reduction and lower environmental impacts relative to other derived biofuels from traditional agronomic crops. In this investigation, we studied four sugarcane cultivars (H-65-7052, H-78-3567, H-86-3792 and H-87-4319 grown on a Hawaiian commercial sugarcane plantation to determine their ability to store and accumulate soil carbon (C and nitrogen (N across a 24-month growth cycle on contrasting soil types. The main study objective establish baseline parameters for biofuel production life cycle analyses; sub-objectives included (1 determining which of four main sugarcane cultivars sequestered the most soil C and (2 assessing how soil C sequestration varies among two common Hawaiian soil series (Pulehu-sandy clay loam and Molokai-clay. Soil samples were collected at 20 cm increments to depths of up to 120 cm using hand augers at the three main growth stages (tillering, grand growth, and maturity from two experimental plots at to observe total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrates (NO−3 using laboratory flash combustion for TC and TN and solution filtering and analysis for DOC and NO−3. Aboveground plant biomass was collected and subsampled to determine lignin and C and N content. This study determined that there was an increase of TC with the advancement of growing stages in the studied four sugarcane cultivars at both soil types (increase in TC of 15–35 kg·m2. Nitrogen accumulation was more variable, and NO−3 (<5 ppm were insignificant. The C and N accumulation varies in the whole profile based on the ability of the sugarcane cultivar’s roots to explore and grow in the different soil types. For the purpose of storing C in the soil, cultivar H-65-7052 (TC accumulation of ~30 kg·m−2 and H-86-3792 (25 kg·m−2 rather H-78

  18. LBA-ECO CD-08 Leaf Carbon, Nitrogen, LAI, and Isotope Data, Manaus, Brazil: 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides measurements for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), leaf area index (LAI), and carbon isotope ratio data (13C and 14C) of leaves sampled at the Manaus...

  19. LBA-ECO CD-08 Leaf Carbon, Nitrogen, LAI, and Isotope Data, Manaus, Brazil: 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides measurements for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), leaf area index (LAI), and carbon isotope ratio data (13C and 14C) of leaves sampled at...

  20. Studies on organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous in the sediments of Mandovi Estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nasnolkar, C.M.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Sediment organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and hydrography of the overlying waters of the estuarine region in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India have been studied. The relationship of carbon and nutrients with sediment characteristics...

  1. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  2. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  3. Hydrogen-Stimulated Gene Expression by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in a Carbon Limited Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can utilize molecular hydrogen for growth and amino acid transport during anaerobic growth in a carbon limited environment. In this study we identified hydrogen-stimulated gene expression changes contributing to Salmonella survival. Methods: Micr...

  4. Hydrogen Storage in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes at Room Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C. Liu; Y. Y. Fan; M. Liu; H. T. Cong; H. M. Cheng; M. S. Dresselhaus

    1999-01-01

    .... A hydrogen storage capacity of 4.2 weight percent, or a hydrogen to carbon atom ratio of 0.52, was achieved reproducibly at room temperature under a modestly high pressure (about 10 megapascal...

  5. A one-step carbonization route towards nitrogen-doped porous carbon hollow spheres with ultrahigh nitrogen content for CO 2 adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nitrogen doped porous carbon hollow spheres (N-PCHSs) with an ultrahigh nitrogen content of 15.9 wt% and a high surface area of 775 m2 g-1 were prepared using Melamine-formaldehyde nanospheres as hard templates and nitrogen sources. The N-PCHSs were completely characterized and were found to exhibit considerable CO2 adsorption performance (4.42 mmol g-1).

  6. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  7. Influence of nitrogen doping in sumanene framework toward hydrogen storage: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi-Vanani, Adel; Shamsali, Fatemeh

    2017-09-01

    Two conditions are important to obtain appropriate substances for hydrogen storage; high surface area and fitting binding energy (BE). Doping is a key strategy that improves BE. We investigated hydrogen adsorption onto twenty six nitrogen disubstituted isomers of sumanene (C19N2H12) by MP2/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) and M06-2X/6-31+G(d) levels of theory. Effect of nitrogen doping in different positions of sumanene was checked. To obtain better BE, basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero point energy (ZPE) corrections were used. Anticipating of adsorption sites and extra details about adsorption process was done by molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces. Various types of density of state (DOS) diagrams such as total DOS (TDOS), projected DOS (PDOS) and overlap population DOS (OPDOS) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis were used to find better insight on the adsorption properties. In addition of temperature depending of the BE, HOMO-LUMO gap (HLG), dipole moment, reactivity and stability, bowl depth and natural population analysis (NPA) of the isomers were studied. A physisorption mechanism for adsorption was proposed and a trivial change was seen. Place of nitrogen atoms in sumanene frame causes to binding energy increases or decreases compared with pristine sumanene. The best and the worst isomers and category of isomers were suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Is spillover relevant for hydrogen adsorption and storage in porous carbons doped with palladium nanoparticles?

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Rey, María; Juaristi, J. Iñaki; Alducin, Maite; López, María J.; Alonso Martín, Julio Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Producción Científica Experiments have shown that the efficiency of nanoporous carbons to store hydrogen becomes enhanced by doping the material with metallic nanoparticles. In particular, doping with palladium has been used with success. The hypothesis to justify the enhancement has been that the Pd nanoparticles dissociate the hydrogen molecules and then the hydrogen atoms spill over the carbon substrate, where the hydrogen is retained. To test this hypothesis we have performed ab initio...

  9. Can hydrogen be stored inside carbon nanotubes under pressure in gigapascal range?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.H.; Gong, X. G.; Liu, Z. F.

    2006-01-01

    By using a newly fitted multi-parameter potential to describe the van der Waals interaction between carbon and molecular hydrogen, we study the hydrogen storage inside carbon nanotubes (CNT's) under pressure in gigapascal range. Comparing with the results of graphite, we find that the shape change of the nanotubes (the curvature effect) provides a different storage mechanism for hydrogen. The negative free energy change for hydrogen storage inside CNT's makes it possible to use CNT's as the n...

  10. Soil nitrogen and carbon impacts of raising chickens on pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryals, R.; Leach, A.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Galloway, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Chicken is the most consumed meat in the US, and production continues to intensify rapidly around the world. Chicken manure from confined feeding operations is typically applied in its raw form to nearby croplands, resulting in hotspots of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Pasture-raised chicken is an alternative to industrial production and is growing in popularity with rising consumer demand for more humanely raised protein sources. In this agricultural model, manure is deposited directly onto grassland soils where it is thought to increase pools of soil carbon and nitrogen. The fate of manure nitrogen from pasture-raised chicken production remains poorly understood. We conducted a controlled, replicated experiment on a permaculture farm in Charlottesville, Virginia (Timbercreek Organics) in which small chicken coops (10 ft x 12 ft) were moved daily in a pasture. We measured manure deposition rates, soil inorganic nitrogen pools, soil moisture, and soil N2O and CO2 emissions. Measurements were made for the 28-day pasture life of three separate flocks of chickens in the spring, summer, and fall. Each flock consisted of approximately 200-300 chickens occupying three to five coops (~65 chickens/coop). Measurements were also made in paired ungrazed control plots. Manure deposition rates were similar across flocks and averaged 1.5 kgdrywt ha-1 during the spring grazing event and 4.0 kgdrywt ha-1 during the summer and fall grazing events. Manure deposition was relatively constant over the four weeks pasture-lifetime of the chickens. Compared to control plots, grazed areas exhibited higher soil N2O and CO2 fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes diminished significantly over the four-week span. Soil gas fluxes significantly increased following rainfall events. For a given rainfall event, higher fluxes were observed from transects that were grazed more recently. Soil gaseous reactive nitrogen losses were less in this pasture system compared to cultivated field amended

  11. Short and long-term impacts of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Du, E.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon to nitrogen response of forest ecosystems depends on the possible occurrence of nitrogen limitation versus possible co-limitations by other drivers, such as low temperature or availability of phosphorus. A combination of nitrogen retention estimates and stoichiometric scaling is used to

  12. Low pressure adsorption of hydrogen on carbon nanostructures; Adsorption d'hydrogene a basse pression sur des nanostructures de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melancon, E.; Benard, P. [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)

    2000-05-01

    Although hydrogen is one of the most efficient fuel per unit of mass, its low density per unit volume requires high pressure gaseous storage or cyrogenic storage in liquid form for practical applications. A promising technique to reduce the pressure requirements for gaseous storage is to use the adsorption properties of carbon materials. However, physisorption of hydrogen on activated carbon requires operating temperatures of the order of 77K and a proper densification of the carbon to exhibit appreciable gains over compression. Large absorbed densities of hydrogen have been reported on carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanofibers, at or near room temperature. Adsorption storage of hydrogen using such carbon materials may therefore be possible at much higher temperatures than activated carbon. The precise mechanisms that could explain the large adsorbed densities is still not understood. Although physiosorption does not appear to be sufficient to explain by itself the large reported values of the adsorption density of nanotubes and nanofibers, it is interesting to study its contribution to the absorbed density and to compare it to other carbon structures such as activated carbon, particularly in view of the controversy surrounding the actual values of the absorbed density in carbon nanostructures. In this work, we will study the adsorption isotherms of hydrogen on caped and uncaped carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes in the limit of Henry's Law by calculating the second virial coefficient for gas solid interaction and compare them to layered carbon structures.

  13. Formation of amorphous hydrogenated carbon from compression of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    Infrared spectra of benzene were measured at pressures up to 25.3 GPa at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell. With decompression from pressures above 18.7 GPa, a new peak of C-H vibration mode appeared at a lower frequency than that of benzene. This indicates that an irreversible chemical change occurred at a pressure that was lower than that reported in previous studies. The IR spectra of the recovered sample after compression up to 20.3 GPa are comparable with those of the amorphous hydrogenated carbon reported in the previous study that was formed by compression of benzene up to approximately 30 GPa.

  14. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst’s activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90% current efficiency for...

  15. Multiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Peter [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gillespie, Andrew [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Stalla, David [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dohnke, Elmar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-02-20

    The purpose of the project “Multiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage” is the development of materials that store hydrogen (H2) by adsorption in quantities and at conditions that outperform current compressed-gas H2 storage systems for electric power generation from hydrogen fuel cells (HFCs). Prominent areas of interest for HFCs are light-duty vehicles (“hydrogen cars”) and replacement of batteries with HFC systems in a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from forklifts to unmanned areal vehicles to portable power sources. State-of-the-art compressed H2 tanks operate at pressures between 350 and 700 bar at ambient temperature and store 3-4 percent of H2 by weight (wt%) and less than 25 grams of H2 per liter (g/L) of tank volume. Thus, the purpose of the project is to engineer adsorbents that achieve storage capacities better than compressed H2 at pressures less than 350 bar. Adsorption holds H2 molecules as a high-density film on the surface of a solid at low pressure, by virtue of attractive surface-gas interactions. At a given pressure, the density of the adsorbed film is the higher the stronger the binding of the molecules to the surface is (high binding energies). Thus, critical for high storage capacities are high surface areas, high binding energies, and low void fractions (high void fractions, such as in interstitial space between adsorbent particles, “waste” storage volume by holding hydrogen as non-adsorbed gas). Coexistence of high surface area and low void fraction makes the ideal adsorbent a nanoporous monolith, with pores wide enough to hold high-density hydrogen films, narrow enough to minimize storage as non-adsorbed gas, and thin walls between pores to minimize the volume occupied by solid instead of hydrogen. A monolith can be machined to fit into a rectangular tank (low pressure, conformable tank), cylindrical tank

  16. Graphitic Nitrogen Triggers Red Fluorescence in Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holá, Kateřina; Sudolská, Mária; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Nachtigallová, Dana; Rogach, Andrey L; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-11-20

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a stable and highly biocompatible fluorescent material offering great application potential in cell labeling, optical imaging, LED diodes, and optoelectronic technologies. Because their emission wavelengths provide the best tissue penetration, red-emitting CDs are of particular interest for applications in biomedical technologies. Current synthetic strategies enabling red-shifted emission include increasing the CD particle size (sp2 domain) by a proper synthetic strategy and tuning the surface chemistry of CDs with suitable functional groups (e.g., carboxyl). Here we present an elegant route for preparing full-color CDs with well-controllable fluorescence at blue, green, yellow, or red wavelengths. The two-step procedure involves the synthesis of a full-color-emitting mixture of CDs from citric acid and urea in formamide followed by separation of the individual fluorescent fractions by column chromatography based on differences in CD charge. Red-emitting CDs, which had the most negative charge, were separated as the last fraction. The trend in the separation, surface charge, and red-shift of photoluminescence was caused by increasing amount of graphitic nitrogen in the CD structure, as was clearly proved by XPS, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. Importantly, graphitic nitrogen generates midgap states within the HOMO-LUMO gap of the undoped systems, resulting in significantly red-shifted light absorption that in turn gives rise to fluorescence at the low-energy end of the visible spectrum. The presented findings identify graphitic nitrogen as another crucial factor that can red-shift the CD photoluminescence.

  17. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  18. Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Temperate Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginzburg Ozeri, Shimon

    edges were used to study the effects of varying N deposition load on SOC stocks and fluxes as well as on the temperature sensitivity of SOM respiration. In a third study, the effects of 20 years of continuous experimental N addition (35 kg N ha-1 year-1) on soil C budget were investigated. Our general...... incubated in litterbags had significantly lower late-stage decomposition rates compared with control litter. However, potential respiration of forest floor and mineral soil was overall unaffected by the experimental N-additions. A temperature treatment of forest floor samples taken from one edge site......Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrogen...

  19. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur metabolism in natural Thioploca samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S.; Kuenen, JG; Nielsen, LP

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Thioploca occur as dense mats on the continental shelf off the coast of Chile and Peru. Since little is known about their nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, this study was undertaken to investigate their (eco)physiology. Thioploca is able to store...... internally high concentrations of sulfur globules and nitrate. It has been previously hypothesized that these large vacuolated bacteria can oxidize sulfide by reducing their internally stored nitrate. We examined this nitrate reduction by incubation experiments of washed Thioploca sheaths,vith trichomes...... in combination with (15)N compounds and mass spectrometry and found that these Thioploca samples produce ammonium at a rate of 1 nmol min(-1) mg of protein(-1). Controls showed no significant activity. Sulfate was shown to be the end product of sulfide oxidation and was observed at a rate of 2 to 3 nmol min(-1...

  20. Current-voltage characteristics of carbon nanotubes with substitutional nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaun, C.C.; Larade, B.; Mehrez, H.

    2002-01-01

    We report ab initio analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of carbon nanotubes with nitrogen substitution doping. For zigzag semiconducting tubes, doping with a single N impurity increases current flow and, for small radii tubes, narrows the current gap. Doping a N impurity per nanotube...... unit cell generates a metallic transport behavior. Nonlinear I-V characteristics set in at high bias and a negative differential resistance region is observed for the doped tubes. These behaviors can be well understood from the alignment/mis-alignment of the current carrying bands in the nanotube leads...... due to the applied bias voltage. For a armchair metallic nanotube, a reduction of current is observed with substitutional doping due to elastic backscattering by the impurity....

  1. Carbon Accumulation and Nitrogen Pool Recovery during Transitions from Savanna to Forest in Central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, A.; Hoffmann, W. A.; Franco, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of tropical forest into savanna may potentially be a large carbon sink, but little is known about the patterns of carbon sequestration during transitional forest formation. Moreover, it is unclear how nutrient limitation, due to extended exposure to firedriven nutrient losses, may constrain carbon accumulation. Here, we sampled plots that spanned a woody biomass gradient from savanna to transitional forest in response to differential fire protection in central Brazil. These plots were used to investigate how the process of transitional forest formation affects the size and distribution of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools. This was paired with a detailed analysis of the nitrogen cycle to explore possible connections between carbon accumulation and nitrogen limitation. An analysis of carbon pools in the vegetation, upper soil, and litter shows that the transition from savanna to transitional forest can result in a fourfold increase in total carbon (from 43 to 179 Mg C/ha) with a doubling of carbon stocks in the litter and soil layers. Total nitrogen in the litter and soil layers increased with forest development in both the bulk (+68%) and plant-available (+150%) pools, with the most pronounced changes occurring in the upper layers. However, the analyses of nitrate concentrations, nitrate : ammonium ratios, plant stoichiometry of carbon and nitrogen, and soil and foliar nitrogen isotope ratios suggest that a conservative nitrogen cycle persists throughout forest development, indicating that nitrogen remains in low supply relative to demand. Furthermore, the lack of variation in underlying soil type (>20 cm depth) suggests that the biogeochemical trends across the gradient are driven by vegetation. Our results provide evidence for high carbon sequestration potential with forest encroachment on savanna, but nitrogen limitation may play a large and persistent role in governing carbon sequestration in savannas or other equally fire-disturbed tropical

  2. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configu...

  3. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  4. Theory of nitrogen doping of carbon nanoribbons: edge effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Turnbull, Joseph; Lu, Wenchang; Boguslawski, Piotr; Bernholc, J

    2012-01-07

    Nitrogen doping of a carbon nanoribbon is profoundly affected by its one-dimensional character, symmetry, and interaction with edge states. Using state-of-the-art ab initio calculations, including hybrid exact-exchange density functional theory, we find that, for N-doped zigzag ribbons, the electronic properties are strongly dependent upon sublattice effects due to the non-equivalence of the two sublattices. For armchair ribbons, N-doping effects are different depending upon the ribbon family: for families 2 and 0, the N-induced levels are in the conduction band, while for family 1 the N levels are in the gap. In zigzag nanoribbons, nitrogen close to the edge is a deep center, while in armchair nanoribbons its behavior is close to an effective-mass-like donor with the ionization energy dependent on the value of the band gap. In chiral nanoribbons, we find strong dependence of the impurity level and formation energy upon the edge position of the dopant, while such site-specificity is not manifested in the magnitude of the magnetization.

  5. Irrigating grazed pasture decreases soil carbon and nitrogen stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Paul L; Kelliher, Francis M; Knight, Trevor L; O'Connell, Denis; Fraser, Scott; Schipper, Louis A

    2017-02-01

    The sustainability of using irrigation to produce food depends not only on the availability of sufficient water, but also on the soil's 'response' to irrigation. Stocks of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are key components of soil organic matter (SOM), which is important for sustainable agricultural production. While there is some information about the effects of irrigation on soil C stocks in cropping systems, there is a paucity of such studies in pastoral food production systems. For this study, we sampled soils from 34 paired, irrigated and unirrigated pasture sites across New Zealand (NZ) and analysed these for total C and N. On average, irrigated pastures had significantly (P soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) than adjacent unirrigated pastures, with differences of 6.99 t C ha-1 and 0.58 t N ha-1 in the uppermost 0.3 m. Differences in C and N tended to occur throughout the soil profile, so the cumulative differences increased with depth, and the proportion of the soil C lost from deeper horizons was large. There were no relationships between differences in soil C and N stocks and the length of time under irrigation. This study suggests SOM will decrease when pastures under a temperate climate are irrigated. On this basis, increasing the area of temperate pasture land under irrigation would result in more CO2 in the atmosphere and may directly and indirectly increase N leaching to groundwater. Given the large and increasing area of land being irrigated both in NZ and on a global scale, there is an urgent need to determine whether the results found in this study are also applicable in other regions and under different land management systems (e.g. arable). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Modelling carbon and nitrogen turnover in variably saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Brovelli, A.; Porporato, A.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems provide services such as ameliorating the impacts of deleterious human activities on both surface and groundwater. For example, several studies have shown that a healthy riparian ecosystem can reduce the nutrient loading of agricultural wastewater, thus protecting the receiving surface water body. As a result, in order to develop better protection strategies and/or restore natural conditions, there is a growing interest in understanding ecosystem functioning, including feedbacks and nonlinearities. Biogeochemical transformations in soils are heavily influenced by microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Carbon and nutrient cycles are in turn strongly sensitive to environmental conditions, and primarily to soil moisture and temperature. These two physical variables affect the reaction rates of almost all soil biogeochemical transformations, including microbial and fungal activity, nutrient uptake and release from plants, etc. Soil water saturation and temperature are not constants, but vary both in space and time, thus further complicating the picture. In order to interpret field experiments and elucidate the different mechanisms taking place, numerical tools are beneficial. In this work we developed a 3D numerical reactive-transport model as an aid in the investigation the complex physical, chemical and biological interactions occurring in soils. The new code couples the USGS models (MODFLOW 2000-VSF, MT3DMS and PHREEQC) using an operator-splitting algorithm, and is a further development an existing reactive/density-dependent flow model PHWAT. The model was tested using simplified test cases. Following verification, a process-based biogeochemical reaction network describing the turnover of carbon and nitrogen in soils was implemented. Using this tool, we investigated the coupled effect of moisture content and temperature fluctuations on nitrogen and organic matter cycling in the riparian zone, in order to help understand the relative

  7. Comparison of Assimilatory Organic Nitrogen, Sulfur, and Carbon Sources for Growth of Methanobacterium Species

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, L.; Jain, M K; Aubert, J.-P.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments document the ability of two species of autotrophic methanogens to assimilate and utilize organic substrates as the nutrient sulfur or nitrogen source and as a carbon source during growth on H2-CO2. Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain ΔH and the mesophilic species Methanobacterium sp. strain Ivanov grew with glutamine as the nitrogen source or cysteine as the sulfur source. M. thermoautotrophicum also utilized urea as the nitrogen source and as a carbon precursor for methan...

  8. Competition of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds in complexes of hypohalous acids with nitrogenated bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Elguero, Jose

    2008-10-30

    A theoretical study of the complexes formed by hypohalous acids (HOX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) with three nitrogenated bases (NH 3, N 2, and NCH) has been carried out by means of ab initio methods, up to MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational method. In general, two minima complexes are found, one with an OH...N hydrogen bond and the other one with a X...N halogen bond. While the first one is more stable for the smallest halogen derivatives, the two complexes present similar stabilities for the iodine case and the halogen-bonded structure is the most stable one for the hypoastatous acid complexes.

  9. Thermodynamics and vibrational study of hydrogenated carbon nanotubes: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rana M. Arif; Hussain, Fayyaz; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Imran, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Thermodynamic stability of the hydrogenated carbon nanotubes has been explored in the chemisorption limit. Statistical physics and density functional theory calculations have been used to predict hydrogen release temperatures at standard pressure in zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes. It is found that hydrogen release temperatures decrease with increase in diameters of hydrogenated zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) but opposite trend is noted in armchair CNTs at standard pressure of 1 bar. The smaller diameter hydrogenated zigzag CNTs have large values of hydrogen release temperature due to the stability of Csbnd H bonds. The vibrational density of states for hydrogenated carbon nanotubes have been calculated to confirm the Csbnd H stretching mode caused by sp3 hybridization.

  10. Modeling of the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. P Dantas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X was investigated. The adsorption equilibrium and breakthrough curves were determined at different temperatures - 301 - 306 K, 323 K, 373 K and 423 K. A model based on the LDF approximation for the mass transfer, considering the energy and momentum balances, was used to describe the adsorption kinetics of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture. The model acceptably reproduced all of the breakthrough curves and can be considered as adequate for designing a PSA cycle to separate carbon dioxidenitrogen mixtures.

  11. Nitrogen feedbacks increase future terrestrial ecosystem carbon uptake in an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wårlind, D.; Smith, B.; Hickler, T.; Arneth, A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently a considerable amount of effort has been put into quantifying how interactions of the carbon and nitrogen cycle affect future terrestrial carbon sinks. Dynamic vegetation models, representing the nitrogen cycle with varying degree of complexity, have shown diverging constraints of nitrogen dynamics on future carbon sequestration. In this study, we use LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic vegetation model employing a detailed individual- and patch-based representation of vegetation dynamics, to evaluate how population dynamics and resource competition between plant functional types, combined with nitrogen dynamics, have influenced the terrestrial carbon storage in the past and to investigate how terrestrial carbon and nitrogen dynamics might change in the future (1850 to 2100; one representative "business-as-usual" climate scenario). Single-factor model experiments of CO2 fertilisation and climate change show generally similar directions of the responses of C-N interactions, compared to the C-only version of the model as documented in previous studies using other global models. Under an RCP 8.5 scenario, nitrogen limitation suppresses potential CO2 fertilisation, reducing the cumulative net ecosystem carbon uptake between 1850 and 2100 by 61%, and soil warming-induced increase in nitrogen mineralisation reduces terrestrial carbon loss by 31%. When environmental changes are considered conjointly, carbon sequestration is limited by nitrogen dynamics up to the present. However, during the 21st century, nitrogen dynamics induce a net increase in carbon sequestration, resulting in an overall larger carbon uptake of 17% over the full period. This contrasts with previous results with other global models that have shown an 8 to 37% decrease in carbon uptake relative to modern baseline conditions. Implications for the plausibility of earlier projections of future terrestrial C dynamics based on C-only models are discussed.

  12. Achieving Highly Efficient, Selective, and Stable CO2 Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjie; Yadav, Ram Manohar; Liu, Mingjie; Sharma, Pranav P; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ma, Lulu; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Yakobson, Boris I; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-05-26

    The challenge in the electrosynthesis of fuels from CO2 is to achieve durable and active performance with cost-effective catalysts. Here, we report that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), doped with nitrogen to form resident electron-rich defects, can act as highly efficient and, more importantly, stable catalysts for the conversion of CO2 to CO. The unprecedented overpotential (-0.18 V) and selectivity (80%) observed on nitrogen-doped CNTs (NCNTs) are attributed to their unique features to facilitate the reaction, including (i) high electrical conductivity, (ii) preferable catalytic sites (pyridinic N defects), and (iii) low free energy for CO2 activation and high barrier for hydrogen evolution. Indeed, DFT calculations show a low free energy barrier for the potential-limiting step to form key intermediate COOH as well as strong binding energy of adsorbed COOH and weak binding energy for the adsorbed CO. The highest selective site toward CO production is pyridinic N, and the NCNT-based electrodes exhibit no degradation over 10 h of continuous operation, suggesting the structural stability of the electrode.

  13. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  14. Method of carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production from hydrocarbon decomposition over metal salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlebacher, Jonah; Gaskey, Bernard

    2017-10-03

    A process to decompose methane into carbon (graphitic powder) and hydrogen (H.sub.2 gas) without secondary production of carbon dioxide, employing a cycle in which a secondary chemical is recycled and reused, is disclosed.

  15. Interaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen with the (1010) face of ruthenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomcsik, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction was studied at 23.5, 200, and -135/sup 0/C with low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy. (AES). Carbon monoxide adsorbs associatively at 23.5/sup 0/C, but is apparently dissociated by the LEED beam and hydrogen adsorbed from the ambient after a few minutes for less than 10 Langmuirs of carbon monoxide. For large doses of carbon monoxide at 23.5/sup 0/C, 10 Langmuirs or more, the LEED beam does not disociate carbon monoxide, but carbon monoxide and hydrogen adsorbed from the ambient do appear to be removed from the surface by the LEED beam. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen on the surface together will react and form surface complexes with distinctive LEED patterns at 23.5/sup 0/C though some of the interactions appear to be LEED beam induced. If sufficient hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface probably as methane and water. Carbon monoxide will react with itself and hydrogen at 23.5/sup 0/C with carbon being lost from the surface probably as carbon dioxide. At 200/sup 0/C, neither carbon monoxide nor hydrogen will absorb on Ru (1010) in significant amounts at the low dose pressures used. However, if the Ru(1010) crystal is allowed to cool below 70/sup 0/C, ambient carbon monoxide and hydrogen will adsorb on Ru (1010) and form LEED patterns like those formed at 23.5/sup 0/C. At -135/sup 0/C, carbon monoxide will react with itself and hydrogen readily most of the time producing surface complexes with distinctive LEED paterns. If a moderate amount of hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface, probably as methane. If a large amount of hydrogen is present, some of these complexes are lost from the surface probably as carbon dioxdie. 17 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for "green" Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Pengfei; Cong, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Yi, Qinghua; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Considering the environment protection, "green" materials are increasingly explored for photovoltaics. Here, we developed a kind of quantum dots solar cell based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots were prepared by direct pyrolysis of citric acid and ammonia. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots' excitonic absorption depends on the N-doping content in the carbon dots. The N-doping can be readily modified by the mass ratio of reactants. The constructed "green" nitrogen-doped carbon dots solar cell achieves the best power conversion efficiency of 0.79 % under AM 1.5 G one full sun illumination, which is the highest efficiency for carbon dot-based solar cells.

  17. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  18. Pomelo peels-derived porous activated carbon microsheets dual-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus for high performance electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Tan, Yongtao; Yang, Yunlong; Zhao, Xiaoning; Liu, Ying; Niu, Lengyuan; Tichnell, Brandon; Kong, Lingbin; Kang, Long; Liu, Zhen; Ran, Fen

    2018-02-01

    In this work, biomass pomelo peel is used to fabricate the porous activated carbon microsheets, and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DHP) is employed to dual-dope carbon with nitrogen and phosphorus elements. With the benefit of DHP inducement and dual-doping of nitrogen and phosphorus, the prepared carbon material has a higher carbon yield, and exhibits higher specific surface area (about 807.7 m2/g), and larger pore volume (about 0.4378 cm3/g) with hierarchically structure of interconnected thin microsheets compared to the pristine carbon. The material exhibits not only high specific capacitance (240 F/g at 0.5 A/g), but also superior cycling performance (approximately 100% of capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles at 2 A/g) in 2 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Furthermore, the assembled symmetric electrochemical capacitor in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte exhibits a high energy density of 11.7 Wh/kg at a power density of 160 W/kg.

  19. Seasonal changes in carbon and nitrogen compound concentrations in a Quercus petraea chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Angélique; Barthes, Laure; Delpierre, Nicolas; Dufrêne, Éric; Fresneau, Chantal; Bazot, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Forest productivity declines with tree age. This decline may be due to changes in metabolic functions, resource availability and/or changes in resource allocation (between growth, reproduction and storage) with tree age. Carbon and nitrogen remobilization/storage processes are key to tree growth and survival. However, studies of the effects of tree age on these processes are scarce and have not yet considered seasonal carbon and nitrogen variations in situ. This study was carried out in a chronosequence of sessile oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.) for 1 year to survey the effects of tree age on the seasonal changes of carbon and nitrogen compounds in several tree compartments, focusing on key phenological stages. Our results highlight a general pattern of carbon and nitrogen function at all tree ages, with carbon reserve remobilization at budburst for growth, followed by carbon reserve formation during the leafy season and carbon reserve use during winter for maintenance. The variation in concentrations of nitrogen compounds shows less amplitude than that of carbon compounds. Storage as proteins occurs later, and mainly depends on leaf nitrogen remobilization and root uptake in autumn. We highlight several differences between tree age groups, in particular the loss of carbon storage function of fine and medium-sized roots with tree ageing. Moreover, the pattern of carbon compound accumulation in branches supports the hypothesis of a preferential allocation of carbon towards growth until the end of wood formation in juvenile trees, at the expense of the replenishment of carbon stores, while mature trees start allocating carbon to storage right after budburst. Our results demonstrate that at key phenological stages, physiological and developmental functions differ with tree age, and together with environmental conditions, influence the carbon and nitrogen concentration variations in sessile oaks. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  20. Optimization through Response Surface Methodology of a Reactor Producing Methanol by the Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Grazia Leonzio

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide conversion and utilization is gaining significant attention worldwide, not only because carbon dioxide has an impact on global climate change, but also because it provides a source for potential fuels and chemicals. Methanol is an important fuel that can be obtained by the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In this research, the modeling of a reactor to produce methanol using carbon dioxide and hydrogen is carried out by way of an ANOVA and a central composite design. Reaction te...

  1. Carbon and nitrogen in Type 2 supernova diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Eleid, Mounib; Brown, Lawrence E.

    1993-03-01

    Abundant diamonds found in meteorites seem either to have condensed within supernova interiors during their expansions and coolings or to have been present around those explosions. Either alternative allows implantation of Xe-HL prior to interstellar mixing. A puzzling feature is the near normalcy of the carbon isotopes, considering that the only C-rich matter, the He-burning shell, is pure C-12 in that region. That last fact has caused many to associate supernova carbon with C-12 carbon, so that its SUNOCONS have been anticipated as very C-12-rich. We show that this expectation is misleading because the C-13-rich regions of Type 2's have been largely overlooked in this thinking. We here follow the idea that the diamonds nucleated in the C-12-rich He shell, the only C-rich site for nucleation, but then attached C-13-rich carbon during turbulent encounters with overlying C-13-rich matter. That is, the initial diamonds continued to grow during the same collisional encounters that cause the Xe-HL implantation. Instead of interacting with the small carbon mass having 13/12 = 0.2 in the upper He zone, however, we have calculated the remnants of the initial H-burning core, which left behind C-13-rich matter as it receded during core hydrogen burning. Howard et al. described why the velocity mixing would be essential to understanding the implantation of both the Xe-H and Xe-L components. Velocity mixing is now known to occur from the X-ray and gamma-ray light curves of supernova 1987A. Using the stellar evolution code developed at Goettingen, we calculated at Clemson the evolution of a grid of massive stars up to the beginning of core He burning. We paid attention to all H-burning reactions throughout the star, to the treatment of both convection and semiconvection, and to the recession of the outer boundary of the convective H-burning core as the star expands toward a larger redder state. This program was to generate a careful map of the CNO isotope distribution as He

  2. Nitrogen management and the future of food: lessons from the management of energy and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolow, R H

    1999-05-25

    The food system dominates anthropogenic disruption of the nitrogen cycle by generating excess fixed nitrogen. Excess fixed nitrogen, in various guises, augments the greenhouse effect, diminishes stratospheric ozone, promotes smog, contaminates drinking water, acidifies rain, eutrophies bays and estuaries, and stresses ecosystems. Yet, to date, regulatory efforts to limit these disruptions largely ignore the food system. There are many parallels between food and energy. Food is to nitrogen as energy is to carbon. Nitrogen fertilizer is analogous to fossil fuel. Organic agriculture and agricultural biotechnology play roles analogous to renewable energy and nuclear power in political discourse. Nutrition research resembles energy end-use analysis. Meat is the electricity of food. As the agriculture and food system evolves to contain its impacts on the nitrogen cycle, several lessons can be extracted from energy and carbon: (i) set the goal of ecosystem stabilization; (ii) search the entire production and consumption system (grain, livestock, food distribution, and diet) for opportunities to improve efficiency; (iii) implement cap-and-trade systems for fixed nitrogen; (iv) expand research at the intersection of agriculture and ecology, and (v) focus on the food choices of the prosperous. There are important nitrogen-carbon links. The global increase in fixed nitrogen may be fertilizing the Earth, transferring significant amounts of carbon from the atmosphere to the biosphere, and mitigating global warming. A modern biofuels industry someday may produce biofuels from crop residues or dedicated energy crops, reducing the rate of fossil fuel use, while losses of nitrogen and other nutrients are minimized.

  3. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  4. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Supported Pd Catalyst for Improved Electrocatalytic Performance toward Ethanol Electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Zhang, Xinyuan; Luo, Zhiyong; Tang, Dian; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Teng; Xie, Zailai

    2017-07-01

    In this study, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was applied for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of glucose and urea. The HTC process allowed the deposition of thin nitrogen-doped carbon layers on the surface of the CNTs. By controlling the ratio of glucose to urea, nitrogen contents of up to 1.7 wt% were achieved. The nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube-supported Pd catalysts exhibited superior electrochemical activity for ethanol oxidation relative to the pristine CNTs. Importantly, a 1.5-fold increase in the specific activity was observed for the Pd/HTC-N1.67%CNTs relative to the catalyst without nitrogen doping (Pd/HTC-CNTs). Further experiments indicated that the introduction of nitrogen species on the surface of the CNTs improved the Pd(0) loading and increased the binding energy.

  6. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Hypothetical high-surface-area carbons with exceptional hydrogen storage capacities: open carbon frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Bogdan; Firlej, Lucyna; Mohammadhosseini, Ali; Boulet, Pascal; Beckner, Matthew; Romanos, Jimmy; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-09-12

    A class of high-surface-area carbon hypothetical structures has been investigated that goes beyond the traditional model of parallel graphene sheets hosting layers of physisorbed hydrogen in slit-shaped pores of variable width. The investigation focuses on structures with locally planar units (unbounded or bounded fragments of graphene sheets), and variable ratios of in-plane to edge atoms. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on these structures was studied by performing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations with appropriately chosen adsorbent-adsorbate interaction potentials. The interaction models were tested by comparing simulated adsorption isotherms with experimental isotherms on a high-performance activated carbon with well-defined pore structure (approximately bimodal pore-size distribution), and remarkable agreement between computed and experimental isotherms was obtained, both for gravimetric excess adsorption and for gravimetric storage capacity. From this analysis and the simulations performed on the new structures, a rich spectrum of relationships between structural characteristics of carbons and ensuing hydrogen adsorption (structure-function relationships) emerges: (i) Storage capacities higher than in slit-shaped pores can be obtained by fragmentation/truncation of graphene sheets, which creates surface areas exceeding of 2600 m(2)/g, the maximum surface area for infinite graphene sheets, carried mainly by edge sites; we call the resulting structures open carbon frameworks (OCF). (ii) For OCFs with a ratio of in-plane to edge sites ≈1 and surface areas 3800-6500 m(2)/g, we found record maximum excess adsorption of 75-85 g of H(2)/kg of C at 77 K and record storage capacity of 100-260 g of H(2)/kg of C at 77 K and 100 bar. (iii) The adsorption in structures having large specific surface area built from small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons cannot be further increased because their energy of adsorption is low. (iv) Additional increase of hydrogen

  8. Intrinsic Gettering in Nitrogen-Doped and Hydrogen-Annealed Czochralski-Grown Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiroyuki; Pan, Lian-Sheng; Tanaka, Masafumi; Kashima, Kazuhiko

    2001-06-01

    The properties of nitrogen-doped and hydrogen-annealed Czochralski-grown silicon (NHA-CZ-Si) wafers were investigated in this study. The quality of the subsurface was investigated by monitoring the generation lifetime of minority carriers, as measured by the capacitance-time measurements of a metal oxide silicon capacitor (MOS C-t). The intrinsic gettering (IG) ability was investigated by determining the nickel concentration on the surface and in the subsurface as measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after the wafer was deliberately contaminated with nickel. From the results obtained, the generation lifetimes of these NHA-CZ-Si wafers were determined to be almost the same as, or a little longer than those of epitaxial wafers, and the IG ability was proportional to the total volume of oxygen precipitates [i.e., bulk micro defects (BMDs)], which was influenced by the oxygen and nitrogen concentrations in the wafers. Therefore, it is suggested that the subsurface of the NHA-CZ-Si wafers is of good quality and the IG capacity is controllable by the nitrogen and oxygen concentrations in the wafers.

  9. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z [Melbourne, FL

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  10. Evolution of the nitrogen depth distribution in an implanted titanium alloy with a surface carbon nanolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcak, Petr; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Valenta, Richard; Kovac, Janez

    2017-07-01

    The impact of the thickness of the carbon nanolayer on the depth distribution of the implanted nitrogen was examined. Ti6Al4V samples with a carbon nanolayer (20 and 40 nm) were implanted with nitrogen with fluence of 1.2 · 1017 cm-2 and an accelerating voltage of 90 kV. GD-OES measurements showed an almost Gaussian-like nitrogen depth profile. The nitrogen peak moves deeper into the sample with increasing thickness of the nanolayer. The experimental depth profiles are in good agreement with the calculated results from the analytical model and from the SRIM2013 code.

  11. sup 1 H NMR studies of hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorption on the EUROPt-1 catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyssy, P X

    2001-01-01

    possible carbon monoxide-induced reorganisation of the surface sites available for hydrogen, following a carbon monoxide precoverage above a critical level. It also shows that carbon monoxide blocks hydrogen adsorption but not in the manner expected. No desorption of carbon monoxide was observed with gas phase infrared experiments even at hydrogen coverages approaching saturation. Secondly, to further the understanding of the dynamics of adsorbed hydrogen exchanging between the strongly bound and the weakly bound sites, proton relaxation NMR experiments were undertaken. T sub 1 and T sub 1 subrho measurements were carried out as a function of hydrogen coverage at room temperature and as a function of temperature at fixed hydrogen coverage. These experiments proved to be experimentally challenging and the data obtained do not show a clear enough trend to reach a significant conclusion as was firstly expected. A specially designed sup 1 H NMR probe, capable of holding a large quantity of catalyst sample for in ...

  12. A facile approach towards increasing the nitrogen-content in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via halogenated catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ombaka, L.M. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Ndungu, P.G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Department of Applied Chemistry, Doornfontein Campus, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 17011, Johannesburg 2028 (South Africa); Omondi, B. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); McGettrick, J.D.; Davies, M.L. [SPECIFIC, Swansea University, Baglan Bay Innovation Centre, Baglan, Port Talbot SA12 7AX (United Kingdom); Nyamori, V.O., E-mail: nyamori@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2016-03-15

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been synthesized at 850 °C via a CVD deposition technique by use of three ferrocenyl derivative catalysts, i.e. para-CN, -CF{sub 3} and -Cl substituted-phenyl rings. The synthesized catalysts have been characterized by NMR, IR, HR-MS and XRD. The XRD analysis of the para-CF{sub 3} catalyst indicates that steric factors influence the X-ray structure of 1,1′-ferrocenylphenyldiacrylonitriles. Acetonitrile or pyridine was used as carbon and nitrogen sources to yield mixtures of N-CNTs and carbon spheres (CS). The N-CNTs obtained from the para-CF{sub 3} catalysts, in pyridine, have the highest nitrogen-doping level, show a helical morphology and are less thermally stable compared with those synthesized by use of the para-CN and -Cl as catalyst. This suggests that fluorine heteroatoms enhance nitrogen-doping in N-CNTs and formation of helical-N-CNTs (H-N-CNTs). The para-CF{sub 3} and para-Cl catalysts in acetonitrile yielded iron-filled N-CNTs, indicating that halogens promote encapsulation of iron into the cavity of N-CNT. The use of acetonitrile, as carbon and nitrogen source, with the para-CN and -Cl as catalysts also yielded a mixture of N-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), with less abundance of CNFs in the products obtained using para-Cl catalysts. However, para-CF{sub 3} catalyst in acetonitrile gave N-CNTs as the only shaped carbon nanomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Graphical abstract showing the synthesis of N-CNTs using halogenated-ferrocenyl derivatives as catalyst with pyridine or acetonitrile as nitrogen and carbon sources via the chemical vapour deposition technique. - Highlights: • N-CNTs were synthesized from halogenated ferrocenyl catalysts. • Halogenated catalysts promote nitrogen-doping and pyridinic nitrogen in N-CNTs. • Halogenated catalysts facilitate iron filling of N-CNTs.

  13. In situ ellipsometry study of atomic hydrogen etching of extreme ultraviolet induced carbon layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J. Q.; E. Louis,; Harmsen, R.; T. Tsarfati,; Wormeester, H.; van Kampen, M.; van Schaik, W.; van de Kruijs, R.; F. Bijkerk,

    2011-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen based etching is generally considered an efficient method for the removal of carbon films resulting from photo-induced hydrocarbon dissociation, as occurs in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photolithography environments. The etch rate of atomic hydrogen for three different kinds of carbon

  14. Characterization of Fe-Co-Mn catalysts after carbon monoxide hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, S.L.; Serbia, M.A.; Baechler, R.; Orozco, J. [Laboratorio de Cinetica y Catalisis, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101A (Venezuela); e-mail: goncor@ula.ve

    2003-07-01

    An Fe-Co-Mn catalysts series after hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been characterized. The XRD analysis shows the magnetite as main crystalline phase after reaction, in addition of carbon and carbide phases. All these phases lead to hydrogen consumption and oxidation rate changes on Fe-Co-Mn catalysts. A phase transformation superficial diagram is analysed. (Author)

  15. Development of Affordable, Low-Carbon Hydrogen Supplies at an Industrial Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Dermot J.

    2008-01-01

    An existing industrial hydrogen generation and distribution infrastructure is described, and a number of large-scale investment projects are outlined. All of these projects have the potential to generate significant volumes of low-cost, low-carbon hydrogen. The technologies concerned range from gasification of coal with carbon capture and storage…

  16. Hydrogenated carbon clusters produced by highly charged ion impact on solid C-84

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Newman, MW; Niedermayr, TR; Machicoane, GA; McDonald, JW; Schenkel, T; Hoekstra, R; Hamza, AV

    2000-01-01

    The emission of small (hydrogenated) carbon cluster ions: CnHm+ (n = 2-22) upon highly charged Xeq+ (q = 20- 14) impact on C-84 surfaces is studied by means of time-of-flight secundary ion mass spectrometry. The respective stage of hydrogenation/protonation of a certain carbon cluster ion C-n(+) is

  17. Effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide on soil nitrogen cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, Kirsten S.

    elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil nitrogen cycling at the ecosystem scale, despite an increase in N demand of 0.86 g m-2 y -1 under elevated CO2. My results suggest that elevated CO2 does not alter soil nitrogen cycling at the decadal time scale. Retranslocation within trees and slowly cycling soil organic pools are likely supporting the increased N demand under elevated CO2. Longer-term studies may reveal differences in soil organic matter and carbon sequestration dynamics under ambient and elevated CO2.

  18. The biogeochemistry of bioenergy landscapes: carbon, nitrogen, and water considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G Philip; Hamilton, Stephen K; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Parton, William J

    2011-06-01

    The biogeochemical liabilities of grain-based crop production for bioenergy are no different from those of grain-based food production: excessive nitrate leakage, soil carbon and phosphorus loss, nitrous oxide production, and attenuated methane uptake. Contingent problems are well known, increasingly well documented, and recalcitrant: freshwater and coastal marine eutrophication, groundwater pollution, soil organic matter loss, and a warming atmosphere. The conversion of marginal lands not now farmed to annual grain production, including the repatriation of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and other conservation set-aside lands, will further exacerbate the biogeochemical imbalance of these landscapes, as could pressure to further simplify crop rotations. The expected emergence of biorefinery and combustion facilities that accept cellulosic materials offers an alternative outcome: agricultural landscapes that accumulate soil carbon, that conserve nitrogen and phosphorus, and that emit relatively small amounts of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Fields in these landscapes are planted to perennial crops that require less fertilizer, that retain sediments and nutrients that could otherwise be transported to groundwater and streams, and that accumulate carbon in both soil organic matter and roots. If mixed-species assemblages, they additionally provide biodiversity services. Biogeochemical responses of these systems fall chiefly into two areas: carbon neutrality and water and nutrient conservation. Fluxes must be measured and understood in proposed cropping systems sufficient to inform models that will predict biogeochemical behavior at field, landscape, and regional scales. Because tradeoffs are inherent to these systems, a systems approach is imperative, and because potential biofuel cropping systems and their environmental contexts are complex and cannot be exhaustively tested, modeling will be instructive. Modeling alternative biofuel cropping systems converted

  19. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  1. Fire frequency drives decadal changes in soil carbon and nitrogen and ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Adam F. A.; Ahlström, Anders; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Nieradzik, Lars P.; Staver, A. Carla; Scharenbroch, Bryant C.; Jumpponen, Ari; Anderegg, William R. L.; Randerson, James T.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2018-01-01

    Fire frequency is changing globally and is projected to affect the global carbon cycle and climate. However, uncertainty about how ecosystems respond to decadal changes in fire frequency makes it difficult to predict the effects of altered fire regimes on the carbon cycle; for instance, we do not fully understand the long-term effects of fire on soil carbon and nutrient storage, or whether fire-driven nutrient losses limit plant productivity. Here we analyse data from 48 sites in savanna grasslands, broadleaf forests and needleleaf forests spanning up to 65 years, during which time the frequency of fires was altered at each site. We find that frequently burned plots experienced a decline in surface soil carbon and nitrogen that was non-saturating through time, having 36 per cent (±13 per cent) less carbon and 38 per cent (±16 per cent) less nitrogen after 64 years than plots that were protected from fire. Fire-driven carbon and nitrogen losses were substantial in savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, but not in temperate and boreal needleleaf forests. We also observe comparable soil carbon and nitrogen losses in an independent field dataset and in dynamic model simulations of global vegetation. The model study predicts that the long-term losses of soil nitrogen that result from more frequent burning may in turn decrease the carbon that is sequestered by net primary productivity by about 20 per cent of the total carbon that is emitted from burning biomass over the same period. Furthermore, we estimate that the effects of changes in fire frequency on ecosystem carbon storage may be 30 per cent too low if they do not include multidecadal changes in soil carbon, especially in drier savanna grasslands. Future changes in fire frequency may shift ecosystem carbon storage by changing soil carbon pools and nitrogen limitations on plant growth, altering the carbon sink capacity of frequently burning savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests.

  2. Fire frequency drives decadal changes in soil carbon and nitrogen and ecosystem productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Adam F A; Ahlström, Anders; Hobbie, Sarah E; Reich, Peter B; Nieradzik, Lars P; Staver, A Carla; Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Jumpponen, Ari; Anderegg, William R L; Randerson, James T; Jackson, Robert B

    2018-01-11

    Fire frequency is changing globally and is projected to affect the global carbon cycle and climate. However, uncertainty about how ecosystems respond to decadal changes in fire frequency makes it difficult to predict the effects of altered fire regimes on the carbon cycle; for instance, we do not fully understand the long-term effects of fire on soil carbon and nutrient storage, or whether fire-driven nutrient losses limit plant productivity. Here we analyse data from 48 sites in savanna grasslands, broadleaf forests and needleleaf forests spanning up to 65 years, during which time the frequency of fires was altered at each site. We find that frequently burned plots experienced a decline in surface soil carbon and nitrogen that was non-saturating through time, having 36 per cent (±13 per cent) less carbon and 38 per cent (±16 per cent) less nitrogen after 64 years than plots that were protected from fire. Fire-driven carbon and nitrogen losses were substantial in savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, but not in temperate and boreal needleleaf forests. We also observe comparable soil carbon and nitrogen losses in an independent field dataset and in dynamic model simulations of global vegetation. The model study predicts that the long-term losses of soil nitrogen that result from more frequent burning may in turn decrease the carbon that is sequestered by net primary productivity by about 20 per cent of the total carbon that is emitted from burning biomass over the same period. Furthermore, we estimate that the effects of changes in fire frequency on ecosystem carbon storage may be 30 per cent too low if they do not include multidecadal changes in soil carbon, especially in drier savanna grasslands. Future changes in fire frequency may shift ecosystem carbon storage by changing soil carbon pools and nitrogen limitations on plant growth, altering the carbon sink capacity of frequently burning savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests.

  3. Aptamer strategy for ATP detection on nanocrystalline diamond functionalized by a nitrogen and hydrogen radical beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaebah, E.; Seshimo, Y.; Shibata, M.; Kono, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawarada, H.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a novel method for micropatterning oligonucleotides on the diamond surface via forming amine groups on the diamond surface by nitrogen/hydrogen radical treatment. The covalent bonding of the supporting oligonucleotide and characterization of an immobilized hybridized oligonucleotide with Cy5 modification were investigated by fluorescence microscopy. To investigate the effectiveness of nitrogen/hydrogen radical treatment for amine termination, two types of radical treatment were used: hydrogen/nitrogen radical treatment and pure nitrogen radical treatment. From the results, hydrogen/nitrogen radical treatment produces amine (NH2) termination on the diamond surface. The effect of amine termination was investigated by immobilization of single-stranded DNA via amide bonding between surface NH2 groups and COOH groups terminating the DNA. The immobilized single-stranded DNA (supporting DNA), which has a complementary relationship with the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer (DNA), hybridizes with the aptamer with attached fluorescence dye. When ATP molecules approach the double-stranded DNA, the aptamer forms a close relationship with the supporting DNA and combines with ATP. ATP detection was effectively carried out by reduction of fluorescence.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in intertidal sediments near Doel, Scheldt Estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Vlug, T.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen cycling in intertidal mud flat sediments in the Scheldt Estuary was studied using measurements of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emission rates and pore-water profiles of ΣCO2, ammonium and nitrate. A comparison between chamber measured carbon dioxide fluxes and those

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Intertidal Sediments near Doel, Scheldt Estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Vlug, T.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen cycling in intertidal mud flat sediments in the Scheldt Estuary was studied using measurements of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emission rates and pore- water profiles of Sigma CO2, ammonium and nitrate. A comparison between chamber measured carbon dioxide fluxes and

  6. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  7. Hydrogen storage capacity characterization of carbon nanotubes by a microgravimetrical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Aidong; Mukasyan, Alexander

    2005-08-25

    An accurate gravimetric apparatus based on a contactless magnetic suspension microbalance was developed. This unit was used to measure the hydrogen storage capacity for a variety of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at room temperature and hydrogen pressures up to 11.5 MPa. The results show that regardless of their synthesis methods, purities, and nanostructures all investigated CNT products possess relatively low hydrogen storage capacities (hydrogen uptake measurements are also discussed.

  8. Hydrogen in carbon foils made by DC glow discharge in ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, P.; Armour, D. G.; England, J. B. A.; Tait, N. R. S.; Tolfree, D. W. L.

    1983-08-01

    Thermal desorption has been studied from thin films of carbon prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene. The only gases released in significant quantities are hydrogen and methane. Both releases can be characterised by a continuum of activation energies but the methane release peaks at a lower temperature than that from hydrogen. The estimated total hydrogen release is compared with the hydrogen content determined by nuclear scattering experiments. Infra red studies suggest that the majority of CH 2 and CH 3 bonds can be ruptured by annealing at 300°C, a temperature well below the hydrogen and methane release rate maxima. Possible hydrogen bonding modes and desorption mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Long-term nitrogen addition decreases carbon leaching in a nitrogen-rich forest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC plays a critical role in the carbon (C cycle of forest soils, and has been recently connected with global increases in nitrogen (N deposition. Most studies on effects of elevated N deposition on DOC have been carried out in N-limited temperate regions, with far fewer data available from N-rich ecosystems, especially in the context of chronically elevated N deposition. Furthermore, mechanisms for excess N-induced changes of DOC dynamics have been suggested to be different between the two kinds of ecosystems, because of the different ecosystem N status. The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine how long-term N addition affects DOC dynamics below the primary rooting zones (the upper 20 cm soils in typically N-rich lowland tropical forests. We have a primary assumption that long-term continuous N addition minimally affects DOC concentrations and effluxes in N-rich tropical forests. Experimental N addition was administered at the following levels: 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Results showed that seven years of N addition significantly decreased DOC concentrations in soil solution, and chemo-physical controls (solution acidity change and soil sorption rather than biological controls may mainly account for the decreases, in contrast to other forests. We further found that N addition greatly decreased annual DOC effluxes from the primary rooting zone and increased water-extractable DOC in soils. Our results suggest that long-term N deposition could increase soil C sequestration in the upper soils by decreasing DOC efflux from that layer in N-rich ecosystems, a novel mechanism for continued accumulation of soil C in old-growth forests.

  10. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  11. A comparative theoretical study of metal functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets as potential hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalabi, A S; Soliman, K A; Taha, H O

    2014-09-28

    The hydrogen storage of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets is investigated by using the state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. The Ti atom prefers to bind at the hollow site of the hexagonal ring. The average adsorption energies corrected for dispersion forces are -0.54 and -0.39 eV per hydrogen molecule. With no metal clustering, the system gravimetric capacities are expected to be as large as 9.31 and 11.01 wt%. The hydrogen storage reactions are characterized in terms of simulated infrared spectra, projected densities of states, kinetics, and statistical thermodynamics. The free energies and enthalpies of the Ti functionalized carbon nanocone meet the ultimate targets of the Department of Energy for all temperatures and pressures. The closest reactions to zero free energy occur at 378.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocones and 233.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocone sheets. The translational component is found to exert a dominant effect on the total entropy change with temperature. More promising thermodynamics are assigned to the hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets at 233.15 K. As the temperature is increased, the lifetimes of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at the surface drop and the rate constants increase. At fixed pressure, the rate constants of hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones are smaller than those of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets, while the lifetimes are greater.

  12. The use of nickel to probe the role of hydrogen metabolism in cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, D M; Daday, A; Smith, G D

    1986-01-01

    The hydrogenase activities of the heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica and Mastigocladus laminosus are nickel dependent, based on their inability to consume hydrogen with various electron acceptors or produce hydrogen with dithionite-reduced methyl viologen, after growth in nickel-depleted medium. Upon addition of nickel ions to nickel-deficient cultures of A. cylindrica, the hydrogenase activity recovered in a manner which was protein synthesis-dependent, the recovery being inhibited by chloramphenicol. We have used the nickel dependence of the hydrogenase as a probe of the possible roles of H2 consumption in enhancing nitrogen fixation, and particularly for protecting nitrogenase against oxygen inhibition. Although at the usual growth temperatures (25 degrees for A. cylindrica and 40 degrees for M. laminosus), the cells consume H2 vigorously in an oxyhydrogen reaction after growth in the presence of nickel ions, we have not found that the reaction confers any significant additional protection of nitrogenase, either at aerobic pO2 (for both organisms) or at elevated pO2 (for A. cylindrica). However, at elevated temperatures (e.g., 40 degrees for A. cylindrica and 48 degrees for M. laminosus) a definite protective effect was observed. At these temperatures both organisms rapidly lost acetylene reduction activity under aerobic conditions. When hydrogen gas (10%) was present, the cells retained approximately 50% of the nitrogenase activity observed under anaerobic conditions (argon gas phase). No such protection by hydrogen gas was observed with nickel-deficient cells. Studies with cell-free extracts of A. cylindrica showed that the predominant effect of temperature was not due to thermal inactivation of nitrogenase.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide sensing based on carbon quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Cheng-Shane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, carbon quantum dots (CQDs have been synthesized by one step hydrothermal method to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The optical H2O2 sensors were based on the fluorescent quenching of the carbon quantum dots. The optical H2O2 sensors demonstrate capable of detecting H2O2 over the range of 0-88.2 mM and 0-60 mM. The H2O2 sensitivities of wavelength shift to changes in the H2O2 concentration were found to be 0.18 nm/mM and 0.26 nm/mM. These results of the optical sensors showed that the method can be used in practice detection of H2O2 and could offer a new approach for developing a new optical biosensor. The CQDs exhibit good emission property and high stability, as well as excitation-independent emission behavior. Moreover, it is attractive that CQDs can be used as an effective fluorescent probe for the detection of H2O2 with linear Stern-Volmer plot and wavelength shift in an aqueous solution.

  14. Effect of Li Termination on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Linear Carbon Chains: A TAO-DFT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2017-07-10

    Accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of linear carbon chains (C n ) and Li-terminated linear carbon chains (Li2C n ), with n carbon atoms (n = 5-10), has been very challenging for traditional electronic structure methods, due to the presence of strong static correlation effects. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our newly developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT), a very efficient electronic structure method for the study of large systems with strong static correlation effects. Owing to the alteration of the reactivity of C n and Li2C n with n, odd-even oscillations in their electronic properties are found. In contrast to C n , the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li2C n are in (or close to) the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). In addition, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li2C n are in the range of 10.7 to 17.9 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li2C n can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials that can uptake and release hydrogen at temperatures well above the easily achieved temperature of liquid nitrogen.

  15. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  16. SAFARI 2000 Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data (Zinke et al.)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains a subset of the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen (Zinke et al. 1986) data set for southern Africa. The data were obtained from soil...

  17. LBA-ECO ND-08 Soil Respiration, Soil Fractions, Carbon and Nitrogen, Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides (1) carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentration measurements of two soil aggregate fractions (250-2000 micon, small macro-aggregates (SMAG)),...

  18. LBA Regional Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data (Zinke et al.)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The data set contains a subset of a global organic soil carbon and nitrogen data set (Zinke et al. 1986). The subset was created for the study area of the...

  19. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen Stable Isotopes in Organic Material, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the measurement of stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios in organic material (plant, litter and soil samples) in forest canopy...

  20. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen Stable Isotopes in Organic Material, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the measurement of stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios in organic material (plant, litter and soil samples) in forest...

  1. SAFARI 2000 Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data (Zinke et al.)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains a subset of the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen (Zinke et al. 1986) data set for southern Africa. The data were obtained...

  2. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of differing...

  3. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can be used to...

  4. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can...

  5. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of...

  6. Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data table contains mean decomposition rates and mean carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types buried in 7 marshes during 2015. Note that C:N data are...

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nanopowder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Lin Chu; Chia-Feng Chang; Jiann-Ruey Chen; Yiin-Kuen Fuh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nanopowder (Fe/CNP) composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt% was obtained with 14 wt% of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of h...

  8. Impact of nitrogen seeding on carbon erosion in the JET divertor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Jachmich, S.; Rapp, J.; Meigs, A. G.; Nicholas, C.; O' Mullane, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen has been introduced in H-mode plasmas in JET in order to study its radiation cooling capability and impact on the erosion of divertor plasma-facing components made of carbon-fiber composites (CFC). Experiments in the ionizing plasma regime with low nitrogen injection show a reduction of the

  9. Assessment of the dynamics in nitrogen and carbon sequestration of European forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Salm, van der C.; Reinds, G.J.; Dise, N.B.; Gundersen, P.; Erisman, J.W.; Posch, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the major result of a research project that focused on the assessment of the dynamics in nitrogen and carbon sequestration of European forest soils by estimation of the: (i) retention or release of nitrogen species for selected Intensive Monitoring plots by comparing the input,

  10. Vegetation-mediated feedback in water, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassen, M.J.; Boer, H.J. de; Fleischer, K.; Rebel, K.T.; Dekker, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Since the industrial revolution, industry, traffic and the manufacture and application of nitrogenous fertilizers have increased carbon dioxide emissions and accelerated the nitrogen (N) cycle. The combined effects of a warming climate,CO2 fertilization, land-use change and increased N

  11. Oxidative coupling of sp 2 and sp 3 carbon-hydrogen bonds to construct dihydrobenzofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiang-Ling; Wang, Ding; Zhang, Xi-Sha; Li, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Yu-Qin; Li, Yu-Xue; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2017-08-10

    Metal-catalyzed cross-couplings provide powerful, concise, and accurate methods to construct carbon-carbon bonds from organohalides and organometallic reagents. Recent developments extended cross-couplings to reactions where one of the two partners connects with an aryl or alkyl carbon-hydrogen bond. From an economic and environmental point of view, oxidative couplings between two carbon-hydrogen bonds would be ideal. Oxidative coupling between phenyl and "inert" alkyl carbon-hydrogen bonds still awaits realization. It is very difficult to develop successful strategies for oxidative coupling of two carbon-hydrogen bonds owning different chemical properties. This article provides a solution to this challenge in a convenient preparation of dihydrobenzofurans from substituted phenyl alkyl ethers. For the phenyl carbon-hydrogen bond activation, our choice falls on the carboxylic acid fragment to form the palladacycle as a key intermediate. Through careful manipulation of an additional ligand, the second "inert" alkyl carbon-hydrogen bond activation takes place to facilitate the formation of structurally diversified dihydrobenzofurans.Cross-dehydrogenative coupling is finding increasing application in synthesis, but coupling two chemically distinct sites remains a challenge. Here, the authors report an oxidative coupling between sp 2 and sp 3 carbons by sequentially activating the more active aryl site followed by the alkyl position.

  12. Effects of wetland recovery on soil labile carbon and nitrogen in the Sanjiang Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyu; Song, Changchun; Nkrumah, Philip Nti

    2013-07-01

    Soil management significantly affects the soil labile organic factors. Understanding carbon and nitrogen dynamics is extremely helpful in conducting research on active carbon and nitrogen components for different kinds of soil management. In this paper, we examined the changes in microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to assess the effect and mechanisms of land types, organic input, soil respiration, microbial species, and vegetation recovery under Deyeuxia angustifolia freshwater marshes (DAMs) and recovered freshwater marsh (RFM) in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. Identifying the relationship among the dynamics of labile carbon, nitrogen, and soil qualification mechanism using different land management practices is therefore important. Cultivation and land use affect intensely the DOC, DON, MBC, and MBN in the soil. After DAM soil tillage, the DOC, DON, MBC, and MBN at the surface of the agricultural soil layer declined significantly. In contrast, their recovery was significant in the RFM surface soil. A long time was needed for the concentration of cultivated soil total organic carbon and total nitrogen to be restored to the wetland level. The labile carbon and nitrogen fractions can reach a level similar to that of the wetland within a short time. Typical wetland ecosystem signs, such as vegetation, microbes, and animals, can be recovered by soil labile carbon and nitrogen fraction restoration. In this paper, the D. angustifolia biomass attained natural wetland level after 8 years, indicating that wetland soil labile fractions can support wetland eco-function in a short period of time (4 to 8 years) for reconstructed wetland under suitable environmental conditions.

  13. Nitrogen-doped fullerene as a potential catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Zhao, Guang-Lin; Yang, Shizhong; Spivey, James J

    2013-03-06

    We examine the possibility of nitrogen-doped C60 fullerene (N-C60) as a cathode catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells. We use first-principles spin-polarized density functional theory calculations to simulate the electrocatalytic reactions on N-C60. The first-principles results show that an O2 molecule can be adsorbed and partially reduced on the N-C complex sites (Pauling sites) of N-C60 without any activation barrier. Through a direct pathway, the partially reduced O2 can further react with H(+) and additional electrons and complete the water formation reaction (WFR) with no activation energy barrier. In the indirect pathway, reduced O2 reacts with H(+) and additional electrons to form H2O molecules through a transition state (TS) with a small activation barrier (0.22-0.37 eV). From an intermediate state to a TS, H(+) can obtain a kinetic energy of ∼0.95-3.68 eV, due to the Coulomb electric interaction, and easily overcome the activation energy barrier during the WFR. The full catalytic reaction cycles can be completed energetically, and N-C60 fullerene recovers to its original structure for the next catalytic reaction cycle. N-C60 fullerene is a potential cathode catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells.

  14. Interaction of the Helium, Hydrogen, Air, Argon, and Nitrogen Bubbles with Graphite Surface in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartali, Ruben; Otyepka, Michal; Pykal, Martin; Lazar, Petr; Micheli, Victor; Gottardi, Gloria; Laidani, Nadhira

    2017-05-24

    The interaction of the confined gas with solid surface immersed in water is a common theme of many important fields such as self-cleaning surface, gas storage, and sensing. For that reason, we investigated the gas-graphite interaction in the water medium. The graphite surface was prepared by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The surface chemistry and morphology were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The surface energy of HOPG was estimated by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt method. The interaction of gases (Ar, He, H2, N2, and air) with graphite was studied by a captive bubble method, in which the gas bubble was in contact with the exfoliated graphite surface in water media. The experimental data were corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. The surface energy of HOPG equaled to 52.8 mJ/m2 and more of 95% of the surface energy was attributed to dispersion interactions. The results on gas-surface interaction indicated that HOPG surface had gasphilic behavior for helium and hydrogen, while gasphobic behavior for argon and nitrogen. The results showed that the variation of the gas contact angle was related to the balance between the gas-surface and gas-gas interaction potentials. For helium and hydrogen the gas-surface interaction was particularly high compared to gas-gas interaction and this promoted the favorable interaction with graphite surface.

  15. Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-02-09

    Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

  16. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  17. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7–overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  18. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lyuliang University, Lyuliang 033001 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yaling [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) from ammonia solution and citric acid were synthesized at different temperatures. • Quantum yield (QY) of NCDs depends largely on the amount of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), more FPC gives higher QY. • The law of QY of NCDs first increase and then decrease with the reaction temperature increased is found and explained. • Nitrogen doping plays significant role in getting increased UV–vis absorption and QY. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV–vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  19. [Nitrogen removal under the condition of carbon source supplement in integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Li-Hua; He, Feng; Xu, Dong; Lin, Ji-Dong; Wu, Zhen-Bin

    2009-11-01

    Carbon source is the main factor influencing biological denitrification efficiency. In most cities of China, carbon content in sewage was observed to be low, herein carbon source supplement should be considered to provide electron donors needed in biological denitrification process. The influence of adding different carbon sources through aeration pipe of integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland (IVCW) on nitrogen removal had been studied. Carbon source supplement to the bottom of IVCW could improve microbe conditions and intensify nitrogen removalfunction of IVCW. The results showed that glucose as external carbon source was better than carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on denitrification. Nitrogen removal had significant difference between adding glucose and no carbon source in IVCW system (p < 0.05). By the experiments of adding different quantity of glucose, the dose of 1.5 g glucose under 60 L x d(-1) hydraulic load was the optimization for denitrification. C6H12O6:NO3(-) -N was 4.3 and far lower than that by adding in inflow. So carbon source supplement to the bottom of IVCW through aeration pipe could save carbon source supplement cost. Additionally, adding glucose for four hours before influent feeding could improve nitrogen removal.

  20. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Junhua; Aulich, Ted R; Ignatchenko, Alexey V

    2015-04-14

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia are disclosed. Embodiments include (1) ammonium nitrate produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source: (3) ammonia produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source or a hydrogen equivalent such as carbon monoxide or a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source.

  1. Effects of Climate Change and Vegetation Type on Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation during Incipient Soil Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingley, R.; Juarez, S.; Dontsova, K.; Hunt, E.; Le Galliard, J. F.; Chollet, S.; Cros, A.; Llavata, M.; Massol, F.; Barré, P.; Gelabert, A.; Daval, D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Ferrière, R.

    2016-12-01

    Plants play an important role in carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the environment. Plants remove carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and deposit a fraction of this carbon into the soil as a result of root exudation and senescence, contributing to soil formation. Additionally, plants can facilitate sequestration of CO2 from the atmosphere in inorganic form during the process of mineral weathering. With increasing temperatures and levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, it is unknown what effect these changes will have on plant growth and weathering of silicate rocks, and by extension on carbon accumulation in the soils. To identify climate change effects on C and N fluxes, a controlled study was conducted at Ecotron Ile-de-France utilizing mesocosms maintained at elevated and ambient CO2 concentration and temperature with four different vegetation treatments: control, alfalfa, velvet mesquite, and green sprangletop. Each experiment lasted for 4 months with monthly rainfall events using deionized water. After each rain, soil solution and drainage were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements, as well as anions, nitrogen, and organic and inorganic carbon. CO2 concentrations in the soil air were monitored as well. At the end of this study, soil samples were collected from each mesocosm at four different depths and then analyzed for organic carbon, inorganic carbon, and total nitrogen. Accumulation of organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen with clear differences with depth was observed in all mesocosms. Elevated CO2 in the atmosphere influenced C accumulation in the soils, while the type of vegetation significantly affected concentrations of nitrogen and organic carbon in soil and solution. This indicates that climate change would affect carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the soils causing feedbacks to the atmospheric CO2.

  2. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon, E-mail: jhahn@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Well-ordered nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials were prepared by in-situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile in SBA-15 template. The composite of sulfur and nitrogen-doped carbon was successfully used as a cathode material for lithium sulfur battery. - Highlights: • N-doped mesoporous carbons were prepared with PAN as carbon source. • Highly ordered pore system facilitates sulfur loading. • Ladder-type carbon matrix provides good structural stability for confining sulfur. • N-doping ensures an improved absorbability of soluble polysulfides. - Abstract: Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g{sup −1} and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes–A Successful Hydrogen Storage Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaya Ilango; Avika Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen fuel is a zero-emission fuel which uses electrochemical cells or combustion in internal engines, to power vehicles and electric devices. Methods of hydrogen storage for subsequent use span many approaches, including high pressures, cryogenics and chemical compounds that reversibly release H2 upon heating. Most research into hydrogen storage is focused on storing hydrogen as a lightweight, compact energy carrier for mobile applications. With the accelerating demand for cleaner and m...

  4. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  5. Synthesis of zeolite-templated carbons for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage has been a key bottle-neck in the actualization of hydrogen as an energy carrier. The new field of hydrogen storage in templated carbonaceous materials has excited many researchers and considerable effort is being directed...

  6. Hydrogen Storage using Physisorption : Modified Carbon Nanofibers and Related Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Marije Gessien

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes our research on adsorbent systems for hydrogen storage for small scale, mobile application. Hydrogen storage is a key element in the change-over from the less efficient and polluting internal combustion engine to the pollution-free operating hydrogen fuel cell. In general,

  7. Modeling of carbon and nitrogen gaseous emissions from cattle manure compost windrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrow composting of cattle manure is a significant source of gaseous emissions, which include ammonia (NH3) and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). A manure compost model was developed to simulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes includ...

  8. Carbon and nitrogen stocks in the soils of the Amazon Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.; Dijkshoorn, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Soil nitrogen and organic carbon stocks, to a depth of 0.3 m and 1 m respectively, were determined for the Amazon Region using the soil and terrain (SOTER-LAC) database for Latin America and the Caribbean. Mean carbon densities, to a depth of 1 m, range from 4.0 kg m−2 for coarse textured Arenosols

  9. The role of mycorrhizal fungi in integrated carbon and nitrogen cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, Karin; Phillips, Rich; Fransson, Petra; Brzostek, Eddie; Wassen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere remains one of the fundamental challenges to predicting future changes in the Earth's climate. Will forests continue to sequester carbon (C) under rising atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition,

  10. Carbon availability for the fungus triggers nitrogen uptake and transport in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is characterized by a transfer of nutrients in exchange for carbon. We tested the effect of the carbon availability for the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on nitrogen (N) uptake and transport in the symbiosis. We followed the uptake and transport of 15N and ...

  11. Direct Evidence for Solid-like Hydrogen in a Nanoporous Carbon Hydrogen Storage Material at Supercritical Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Valeska P; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Bimbo, Nuno; Sharpe, Jessica E; Noguera-Diaz, Antonio; Presser, Volker; Rudic, Svemir; Mays, Timothy J

    2015-08-25

    Here we report direct physical evidence that confinement of molecular hydrogen (H2) in an optimized nanoporous carbon results in accumulation of hydrogen with characteristics commensurate with solid H2 at temperatures up to 67 K above the liquid-vapor critical temperature of bulk H2. This extreme densification is attributed to confinement of H2 molecules in the optimally sized micropores, and occurs at pressures as low as 0.02 MPa. The quantities of contained, solid-like H2 increased with pressure and were directly evaluated using in situ inelastic neutron scattering and confirmed by analysis of gas sorption isotherms. The demonstration of the existence of solid-like H2 challenges the existing assumption that supercritical hydrogen confined in nanopores has an upper limit of liquid H2 density. Thus, this insight offers opportunities for the development of more accurate models for the evaluation and design of nanoporous materials for high capacity adsorptive hydrogen storage.

  12. LBA-ECO ND-07 Carbon and Nitrogen in Cerrado Plants and Soils, Brasilia: 1999-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides (1) delta 15N ratios and nitrogen concentrations for foliar samples and (2) delta 13C and delta 15N ratios as well as carbon and nitrogen...

  13. Enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting performance of TiO2 nanotube arrays coated with an ultrathin nitrogen-doped carbon film by molecular layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xili; Yang, Peng; Wang, Yunwei; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiangyun

    2014-06-21

    Vertically oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) were conformally coated with an ultrathin nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon film via the carbonization of a polyimide film deposited by molecular layer deposition and simultaneously hydrogenated, thereby creating a core/shell nanostructure with a precisely controllable shell thickness. The core/shell nanostructure provides a larger heterojunction interface to substantially reduce the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and hydrogenation enhances solar absorption of TNTAs. In addition, the N-doped carbon film coating acts as a high catalytic active surface for oxygen evolution reaction, as well as a protective film to prevent hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube oxidation by electrolyte or air. As a result, the N-doped carbon film coated TNTAs displayed remarkably improved photocurrent and photostability. The TNTAs with a N-doped carbon film of ∼ 1 nm produces a current density of 3.6 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl under the illumination of AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)), which represents one of the highest values achieved with modified TNTAs. Therefore, we propose that ultrathin N-doped carbon film coating on materials is a viable approach to enhance their PEC water splitting performance.

  14. Nitrogen and carbon interactions in controlling terrestrial greenhouse gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    The increased input of N to terrestrial systems may have profound impacts on net greenhouse gas (GHGs) fluxes and, consequently, our future climate; however, fully capturing and quantifying these interactions under field conditions urgently requires new, more efficient, measurement approaches. We have recently developed and deployed a novel system for the automation of terrestrial GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scales, using the approach of 'flying' a single measurement chamber to multiple points in an experimental field arena. As an example of the value of this approach, we shall describe the results from a field experiment investigating the interactions between increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) additions on net ecosystem exchanges of N2O, CH4 and CO2, enabling the simultaneous application of 25 treatments, replicated five times in a fully replicated block field design. We will describe how the ability to deliver automated GHG flux measurements, highly replicated in space and time, has revealed hitherto unreported findings on N and C interactions in field soil. In our experiments we found insignificant N2O fluxes from bare field soil, even at very high inorganic N addition rates, but the interactive addition of even small amounts of available C resulted in very large and rapid N2O fluxes. The SkyGas experimental system enabled investigation of the underlying interacting response surfaces on the fluxes of the major soil-derived GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) to increasing N and C inputs, and revealed unexpected interactions. In addition to these results we will also discuss some of the technical problems which have been overcome in developing these 'flying' systems and the potential of the systems for automatically screening the impacts of large numbers of treatments on GHG fluxes, and other ecosystem responses, under field conditions. We describe here technological advances that can facilitate the development of more robust GHG mitigation

  15. The Role of Nitrogen Dynamics in the Responses of Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics to Changes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Climate, and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, A. D.; Melillo, J.; Kicklighter, D.; Joyce, L.

    2007-12-01

    While it has long been appreciated that alterations of the nitrogen cycle can substantially affect the carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems, most large-scale models of terrestrial carbon dynamics have ignored carbon-nitrogen interactions in making projections of how carbon dynamics will respond to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, climate, and land use. Numerous experimental studies have documented that the uptake of carbon by terrestrial ecosystems is enhanced by nitrogen fertilization under baseline and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Ecosystem warming studies often identify that the uptake of carbon is enhanced when mineralization of soil organic nitrogen increases in response to warming, but the response often depends on how warming affects soil moisture. Nitrogen amendments are a standard practice in heavily managed agro-forestry ecosystems because of the enhanced response of plant growth to nitrogen fertilization. We have used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) as a tool to explore the regional and global implications of how carbon-nitrogen interactions may influence the responses of terrestrial carbon dynamics to environmental change and land use. Comparisons of the model with and without nitrogen dynamics indicate that the response of carbon uptake to increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are clearly constrained by nitrogen dynamics. In contrast, carbon uptake is enhanced in situations in which warming enhances the mineralization of soil organic nitrogen, and this response can lead to increases in vegetation carbon storage that are greater than losses of carbon from increases in decomposition of soil organic matter. Land use can result in substantial depletion of nitrogen from terrestrial ecosystems in the harvest of agricultural products. As substantial sink activity is associated with forest re-growth after agricultural land abandonment, we conducted simulations with TEM in the eastern United State to evaluate to role of

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nanopowder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lin Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nanopowder (Fe/CNP composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt% was obtained with 14 wt% of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt%, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  17. Coherent Carbon Cryogel-Ammonia Borane Nanocomposites for Improved Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feaver, Aaron M.; Sepehri, Saghar; Shamberger, Patrick J.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Autrey, Thomas; Cao, Guozhong

    2007-07-15

    Ammonia borane has been adsorbed into mesoporous carbon cryogels in an effort to manipulate the hydrogen release properties. TEM studies showed that ammonia borane was incorporated into the cyrogel structure. Thermochemical analysis of the dehydrogenation indicated that the hydrogen release properties of ammonia borane were enhanced when incorporated into cryogels. Dehydrogenation occured at lower temperatures and the non-hydrogen volatile products were controlled, liimiting borazine formation.

  18. Combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations for elucidating benzene biodegradation pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.; Herklotz, I.; Herrmann, S.; Thullner, M.; Weelink, S.A.B.; Stams, A.J.M.; Richnow, H.H.; Vogt, C.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations have emerged as a powerful tool for the characterization of reaction mechanisms relevant for the removal of organic pollutants. Here, we applied this approach in order to differentiate benzene biodegradation pathways under

  19. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    OpenAIRE

    Yongjun Men; Martina Ambrogi; Baohang Han; Jiayin Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection.

  20. Modification of rubber surface with hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Bui, X. L.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Laudon, M; Romanowicz, B

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, by sputtering graphite targets in C(2)H(2)/Ar plasma. The wax removal and pre-deposition

  1. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be

  2. Comparison of MOF-5- and Cr-MOF-derived carbons for hydrogen storage application

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Segakweng, T

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available nanostructure from MOF-5 possessed higher surface area, higher pore volume and enhanced hydrogen storage capacity as compared to pristine MOF. Meanwhile, the derived carbons from Cr-MOF displayed lower surface areas, pore volumes and hydrogen uptake than...

  3. Heterogeneous selective hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate to methanol and ethylene glycol over a copper chromite nanocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Chao; Ren, Fumin; Liu, Yuxi; Zhao, Guofeng; Ji, Yongjun; Rong, Hongpan; Jia, Wei; Ma, Lei; Lu, Haiyuan; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-25

    Heterogeneous selective hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate (EC), a key step in indirect conversion of CO2, was realized over a copper chromite nanocatalyst prepared via a hydrothermal method followed by calcination. The selectivities towards methanol (60%) and ethylene glycol (93%) were higher than those achieved over other usual hydrogenation catalysts.

  4. Microbial carbon and nitrogen fixation on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J.; Anesio, A. M.; Stibal, M.; Hawkings, J.; Bellas, C. M.; Tranter, M.; Wadham, J. L.; Cook, J.; Hodson, A. J.; Yallop, M.; Barker, G.; Butler, C. E.; Fountain, A. G.; Nylen, T.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Sole, A. J.; Nienow, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    Studying the microbial sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (via net autochthonous production) and nitrogen (via nitrogen fixation) into organic matter on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets is important for three main reasons. First, they can provide essential nutrients for supporting microbial ecosystems in these cold, typically nutrient-poor environments. Second, nutrients formed in the supraglacial environment may be important for sustaining hydrologically connected subglacial and downstream (e.g. fjords, near-shore marine) ecosystems. Third, organic matter produced or transformed by microbial activity can alter the albedo of ice, either directly by the production of dark pigments, or indirectly through the trapping and agglutination of dark mineral via the production of exopolysaccharides. Here, we present recent results of microbial carbon and nitrogen fixation in surface sediment (cryoconite) on Arctic and Antarctic glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet ablation zone. Results suggest that the fixation and recycling of autochthonous carbon in cryoconite on glaciers and ice sheets can support a significant fraction of the total microbial activity in the supraglacial environment during the ablation season. Nitrogen fixation can be important as a nitrogen source for microbial communities on both Arctic and Antarctic glaciers during the main ablation season. Nitrogen fixation could feasibly exceed precipitation as a source of nitrogen to microbial communities in debris rich zones on the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, aiding the colonization and subsequent 'greening' of subglacial and moraine derived debris.

  5. [Release and supplement of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from jellyfish (Nemopilema nomurai) decomposition in seawater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning; Li, Xue-gang; Yuan, Hua-mao; Duan, Li-qin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Jellyfish bloom has been increasing in Chinese seas and decomposition after jellyfish bloom has great influences on marine ecological environment. We conducted the incubation of Nemopilema nomurai decomposing to evaluate its effect on carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus recycling of water column by simulated experiments. The results showed that the processes of jellyfish decomposing represented a fast release of biogenic elements, and the release of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus reached the maximum at the beginning of jellyfish decomposing. The release of biogenic elements from jellyfish decomposition was dominated by dissolved matter, which had a much higher level than particulate matter. The highest net release rates of dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon reached (103.77 ± 12.60) and (1.52 ± 0.37) mg · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹, respectively. The dissolved nitrogen was dominated by NH₄⁺-N during the whole incubation time, accounting for 69.6%-91.6% of total dissolved nitrogen, whereas the dissolved phosphorus was dominated by dissolved organic phosphorus during the initial stage of decomposition, being 63.9%-86.7% of total dissolved phosphorus and dominated by PO₄³⁻-P during the late stage of decomposition, being 50.4%-60.2%. On the contrary, the particulate nitrogen was mainly in particulate organic nitrogen, accounting for (88.6 ± 6.9) % of total particulate nitrogen, whereas the particulate phosphorus was mainly in particulate. inorganic phosphorus, accounting for (73.9 ±10.5) % of total particulate phosphorus. In addition, jellyfish decomposition decreased the C/N and increased the N/P of water column. These indicated that jellyfish decomposition could result in relative high carbon and nitrogen loads.

  6. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01), while NH4(+) -N contents in soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01).

  7. What measurements are needed to capture coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles in arctic tundra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K.; Rocha, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Greening has been observed across the arctic, but the ecological processes that enable widespread increases in plant productivity have been difficult to understand with field measurements alone. Using the functional convergence of foliar nitrogen and leaf area index in arctic plants, we developed a simple coupled carbon and nitrogen cycling model (CCaN) to increase our understanding of warming induced vegetation changes and carbon and nitrogen coupling in the arctic. We used primary literature and data from long term ecological research sites at Toolik Field Station, Alaska to calculate prior ranges for CCaN parameters, and then we assimilated five years of eddy covariance data from a nearby field site using a batch data assimilation method based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques. Variance decomposition analyses show that the majority of model variance in carbon and nitrogen stocks can be attributed to uncertainty in four parameters: proportion of nitrogen in foliage, proportion of nitrogen in roots, nitrogen uptake rate, and litter rate. These parameters associated with nitrogen cycling are widely used in biogeochemical cycling models and are difficult to constrain because they vary greatly across plant functional groups. The parameters responsible for variance in net ecosystem exchange vary seasonally; winter variance is controlled by parameters associated with the temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration, and summer variance is controlled by the proportion of nitrogen in foliage. The widespread greening observed across the arctic over the last decade has been attributed to the direct effects of increased temperature, despite the inconsistency of the response of arctic plants to experimental warming indicating there must be other mechanisms at play. These mechanisms can be teased apart using models, but we must first improve model predictions by constraining widely-used processes and parameters, particularly those linked to nitrogen cycling.

  8. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  9. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  10. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  11. [Effects of nitrogen and carbon addition and arbuscular mycorrhiza on alien invasive plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Sang, Wei-guo; Zhu, Li; Song, Ying-ying; Wang, Jin-ping

    2010-12-01

    A greenhouse control experiment was conducted to explore the effects of nitrogen and carbon addition and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) on the growth of alien invasive plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed). Nitrogen addition had no significant effects on the morphological indices, biomass and its allocation, and absolute growth rate of A. artemisiifolia, but increased the nitrogen content in the aboveground and underground parts of the plant significantly. Carbon addition increased the content of soil available nitrogen. In this case, the biomass allocation in root system for nutrient (nitrogen) absorption promoted, resulting in a remarkable decrease of branch number, total leaf area, specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf mass ratio. As a result, the total biomass decreased significantly. The symbiosis of A. artemisiifolia and AM fungi had great influence on the common ragweed's soil nitrogen acclimation, which enhanced its resource-capture by the increase of SLA, and this effect was more significant when the soil nitrogen content was low. AM fungi played an important role in the growth of A. artemisiifolia in low-nitrogen environment.

  12. The effects of hydrogen proportion on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with gaseous detonation (deflagration) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiejun; Li, Xiaojie; Lee, John H. S.; Yan, Honghao

    2018-02-01

    Using ferrocene, H2 and O2, Carbon nanomaterials were prepared with gaseous detonation (deflagration) method. The effects of H2 on the phase and morphology of carbon nanomaterials were studied by various proportions of H2 in the reaction. The prepared samples were characterized by x-ray diffractometer, transmission electron microscope and Raman spectrometer. The results show that hydrogen proportion has a great influence on the phase and morphology of carbon nanomaterials. The high hydrogen proportion leads to much unreacted hydrogen, which could protect the iron atom from oxidation of carbon and dilute the reactants contributing to uniform particle size. In addition, the graphitization degree of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, observed in samples with high H2 proportion, is high enough to see the lattice fringes, but the degree of graphitization of whole sample is lower than which fabricated with low H2 proportion, and it may result from the low energy generation.

  13. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Hydrogen Adsorption in Single-Wall Carbon Nano-Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ahadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nano-cones are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo simulations. A great deal of our computational results show that the hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nano-cones is slightly smaller than the capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at any time at the same conditions. This indicates that the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nano-cones is related to angles of carbon nano-cones. It seems that these type of nanotubes could not exceed the 2010 goal of 6 wt%, which is presented by the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, these results are discussed in theory.

  14. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N(2 fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2 at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2 as sole N-source bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase, has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase. An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Representative of aerobic N(2-fixing and H(2-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2 respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2, specifically that produced by N(2 fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2 has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As

  15. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxu Ji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of O2. The specific amino-carboxyl reaction provides strong and stable immobilization of GOx on electrodes. The developed biosensor responds efficiently to the presence of glucose in serum samples over the concentration range from 1 to 12 mM with a detection limit of 0.25 mM. This novel biosensor has good reproducibility and stability, and is highly selective for glucose determination under physiological conditions. These results indicate that N-doped quantum dots represent a novel candidate material for the construction of electrochemical biosensors.

  16. NITROGEN, WATER AND BENZENE ADSORPTION IN MESOPOROUS CARBON (CMK-1 AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVATED CARBON (NORIT SX22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taba

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption at various interfaces has attracted the attention of many scientists. This article discusses gas-solid and vapour-solid adsorption in CMK-1 and Norit SX22 using nitrogen, water and benzene as adsorbates. For comparison, MCM-48 used as template in synthesizing CMK-1 was also utilized as adsorbent. Results showed that the shape of nitrogen isotherm for CMK-1 is categorized as Type IV shape, whereas activated carbon (Norit SX2 has Type I shape with a hysteresis loop at P/P0 > 0.5, which is a H4 type of hysteresis. The shape of nitrogen isotherm for MCM-48 is categorized as Type IV shape with small hysteresis loop observed at P/P0 above 0.45, indicating that the larger pores are filled at high P/P0, which is typical of an H3 hysteresis loop The amount of nitrogen adsorbed in activated carbon at the high relative pressure is considerably smaller than that in CMK-1. The hydrophobicity feature of CMK-1 is the same as activated carbon (Norit SX2, but slightly different to the template MCM-48. The affinity of CMK-1 to benzene is considerably higher than activated carbon, suggesting the promising future of CMK-1 to be used as a selective adsorbent for the removal of organic compounds from water environment.   Keywords: Adsorption, water, benzene, CMK-1, activated carbon

  17. Enhanced photosynthetic capacity increases nitrogen metabolism through the coordinated regulation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otori, Kumi; Tanabe, Noriaki; Maruyama, Toshiki; Sato, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-09-01

    Plant growth and productivity depend on interactions between the metabolism of carbon and nitrogen. The sensing ability of internal carbon and nitrogen metabolites (the C/N balance) enables plants to regulate metabolism and development. In order to investigate the effects of an enhanced photosynthetic capacity on the metabolism of carbon and nitrogen in photosynthetically active tissus (source leaves), we herein generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants (ApFS) that expressed cyanobacterial fructose-1,6-/sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase in their chloroplasts. The phenotype of ApFS plants was indistinguishable from that of wild-type plants at the immature stage. However, as plants matured, the growth of ApFS plants was superior to that of wild-type plants. Starch levels were higher in ApFS plants than in wild-type plants at 2 and 5 weeks. Sucrose levels were also higher in ApFS plants than in wild-type plants, but only at 5 weeks. On the other hand, the contents of various free amino acids were lower in ApFS plants than in wild-type plants at 2 weeks, but were similar at 5 weeks. The total C/N ratio was the same in ApFS plants and wild-type plants, whereas nitrite levels increased in parallel with elevations in nitrate reductase activity at 5 weeks in ApFS plants. These results suggest that increases in the contents of photosynthetic intermediates at the early growth stage caused a temporary imbalance in the free-C/free-N ratio and, thus, the feedback inhibition of the expression of genes involved in the Calvin cycle and induction of the expression of those involved in nitrogen metabolism due to supply deficient free amino acids for maintenance of the C/N balance in source leaves of ApFS plants.

  18. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  19. [Effects of eutrophic nitrogen nutrition on carbon balance capacity of Liquidambar formosana seedlings under low light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-Hua; Li, Jun-Qing; Yang, Ying

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on the seedlings regeneration of Liquidambar formosana, a greenhouse experiment was conducted, in which, the low light- and nitrogen supplies were controlled similar to those in typical L. formosana secondary forests, with the effects of different light- and nitrogen supply on the L. formosana seedlings survival, leaf functional traits, biomass allocation, and gas exchange studied. The whole plant light compensation point (LCP(whoIe-plant)) of the seedlings was estimated with a whole plant carbon balance model, and then compared with the understory photosynthetic active radiance (PAR) of the typical secondary forests. Under 3.0% and 6.0% of full sunlight, eutrophic nitrogen supply led to a decrease of seedlings survival (shade tolerance) and specific leaf area (SLA), but had no obvious effects on the seedlings biomass allocation. At eutrophic nitrogen supply, light intensity had significant effects on the leaf area based maximum assimilation rate, whereas increasing nitrogen supply under low light induced the increase of leaf mass based dark respiration rate. Both light intensity and nitrogen supply had significant effects on the mass based leaf respiration rate, and the interaction of light and nitrogen had significant effects on the mass based stem respiration rate. Increasing nitrogen supply increased the LCP(wholeplant), under 3.0%, 6.0%, and 12.0% of full sunlight, but decreased the LCP(whoIe-plant) under 25.0% of full sunlight. The decrease of the seedlings shade tolerance induced by the increasing nitrogen supply under low light was correlated with the variations of the seedlings carbon balance capacity. Under the background of elevated atmospheric nitrogen deposition, the maintenance of L. formosana populations in China would more depend on disturbances and gap regeneration, and the population dynamics would be deeply affected.

  20. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers from melamine over nickel alloy in a closed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzhin, Roman M.; Bauman, Yuri I.; Volodin, Alexander M.; Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach to the synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers in a closed system at elevated pressure with the use of bulk Ni-Cr alloy as a catalyst precursor was proposed. Melamine was chosen as a substrate containing both carbon and nitrogen. Method of ferromagnetic resonance was applied for diagnostics of dispersed Ni particles appearance. The process of corrosion of a bulk alloy followed by formation of dispersed Ni particles catalyzing the growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers was found to take place at temperatures above 560 °C. The final content of nitrogen in obtained carbon nanofibers was about 10 at.%.

  1. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  2. Formate stability and carbonate hydrogenation on strained Cu overlayers on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Nerlov, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Formate (HCOO) synthesis, decomposition and the hydrogenation of carbonate (CO3) on Cu overlayers deposited on a Pt(111) single crystal are investigated to examine the reactivity of a Cu surface under tensile strain with defects present. Formate is synthesized from a 0.5 bar mixture of 70% CO2 an...... of formate on the surface, or any other hydrogenation product, could not be established during or after H2 exposure by PM-IRRAS, EELS or TPD. Even so, the results suggest that carbonate and its hydrogenation may constitute a relevant pathway to methanol production....

  3. Effects of carbon nanotubes and metal catalysts on hydrogen storage in magnesium nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X; Wu, C Z; Wang, H; Cheng, H M; Lu, G Q

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a study on nanostructured magnesium composites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and catalytic transition metals with high H2 adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics at reduced hydrogenation temperatures. Nanostructures in such a composite are shown to be responsible for improvements in both adsorption capacity and kinetics. It is found that the carbon nanotubes significantly increase the hydrogen storage capacity, and the catalytic transition metals (Fe and Ti) greatly improve the kinetics. This could be understood from the enhancement of diffusion by CNTs and decrease in energy barrier of hydrogen dissociation at the magnesium surface.

  4. A novel mechanism for red emission carbon dots: hydrogen bond dominated molecular states emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhai, Yue; Wang, He; Bai, Xue; Dong, Biao; Wang, Haiyu; Song, Hongwei

    2017-09-14

    Carbon dots (CDs) have emerged as novel fluorescent probes due to their remarkable optical properties; however, red emission is still rare, has a relatively low efficiency, and its mechanism remains ambiguous. Herein, relatively efficient red-emission CDs based on p-phenylenediamine were prepared through various solvothermal means, where the highest quantum yield approached 41.1% in n-amyl alcohol, which was the most efficient quantum yield reported to date. Various structural characterizations were performed and confirmed that the red emission originated from the molecular states consisting of a nitrogen-containing organic fluorophore. The CDs were dispersed in different organic solvents and showed tunable emission, evolving from green to orange-red in aprotic solvents and a red emission in protic solvents. Further solvent correlation studies indicated that the hydrogen bond effect between the CDs and solvents was the main mechanism leading to the spectral shift. Accordingly, solid-state luminescent CDs-polymers were fabricated, which also demonstrated continuously tunable emission properties. This work opens a new window for recognizing the generation of tunable and red-emission CDs.

  5. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  6. Carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Naik, H.; DeSouza, W.; Narvekar, P.V.; Paropkari, A.L.; Bange, H.W.

    in the surface layer. This amounts to approximately three-fourths of all sources of new nitrogen. However, even though the atmospheric and riverine inputs of nitrogen are relatively modest, they are continuously being enhanced by human activities, and have... peculiar geography, the Indian Ocean north of the equator, having an area of around 10.3 x 10 6 km 2 and an approximately 20,000 km long coastline between longitudes 50 o and 100 o E (Sen Gupta and Naqvi, 1984), is distinguished by a much lower area...

  7. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes: a multi-scale theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Froudakis, George

    2006-01-01

    A Combination of quantum and classical calculations has been performed to investigate the hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The ab-initio calculations at the Density Functional level of Theory (DFT) show the nature of hydrogen interaction in selected sites of a (5,5) tube walls. On top of this, Molecular Dynamics simulations model large scale nanotube systems and reproduce the storage capacity under variant temperature conditions. Our results indicate that the interaction of hydrogen with SWNTs is very weak and slightly increase of temperature, causes hydrogen diffusion from the tube walls.

  8. Ability of carbon nano-tubes for the hydrogen storage; Capacite des nanotubes de carbone pour le stockage de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechete, I.; Batonneau, Y.; Descorme, C.; Epron, F.; Duprez, D. [Poitiers Univ., Lab. de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR 6503 CNRS, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the efficiency of the carbon nano-tubes for the hydrogen storage. The characterization technique chosen here is based on the bulk method which consists to introduce on the sample different hydrogen quantities calculated from the pressure established in a reference volume. The adsorbed hydrogen quantity is determined by the equilibrium pressure measurement in the sample volume using the ideal-gas law or Van der Waals law. The characterizations are carried out in a wide pressure range (0 - 100 bars) and at ambient temperature. After having described the synthesis and purification methods of the carbon nano-tubes, and the different structural and textural properties of these materials, it is taken stock on their storage ability. (O.M.)

  9. Inhalation toxicology. IX., Times-to-incapacitation for rats exposed to carbon monoxide alone, to hydrogen cyanide alone, and to mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rats were exposed to experimental atmospheres that contained a) carbon monoxide in air, b) hydrogen cyanide in air, and c) mixtures of CO and HCN in air. The toxic potency of each of the three types of environments was evaluated toxico-kin...

  10. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  11. Nanosized Magnesium Electrochemically Deposited on a Carbon Nanotubes Suspension: Synthesis and Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqi Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report on a novel method for deposition of magnesium (Mg nanoparticles at the surface of carbon materials. Through the suspension of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in an electrolyte containing di-n-butylmagnesium as a precursor, Mg nanoparticles were effectively deposited at the surface of the CNTs as soon as these touched the working electrode. Through this process, CNTs supported Mg particles as small as 1 nm were synthesized and the distribution of the nanoparticles was found to be influenced by the concentration of the CNTs in the electrolyte. Hydrogenation of these nanoparticles at 100°C was found to lead to low temperature hydrogen release starting at 150°C, owing to shorter diffusion paths and higher hydrogen mobility in small Mg particles. However, these hydrogen properties drastically degraded as soon as the hydrogenation temperature exceeded 200°C and this may be related to the low melting temperature of ultrasmall Mg particles.

  12. Carbon nano-fiber based membrane reactor for selective nitrite hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunet Espinosa, Roger; Rafieian, D.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of nitrite in drinking water demands control over the selectivity towards nitrogen, minimizing the formation of ammonia. This selectivity is strongly influenced by the H/N ratio of reaction intermediates at the catalyst surface. Therefore, we fabricated a membrane reactor

  13. Enhancing nitrogen removal from low carbon to nitrogen ratio wastewater by using a novel sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Li, Jun; Ni, Yongjiong; Wei, Su

    2016-12-01

    Removing nitrogen from wastewater with low chemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (COD/TN) ratio is a difficult task due to the insufficient carbon source available for denitrification. Therefore, in the present work, a novel sequencing batch biofilm reactor (NSBBR) was developed to enhance the nitrogen removal from wastewater with low COD/TN ratio. The NSBBR was divided into two units separated by a vertical clapboard. Alternate feeding and aeration was performed in the two units, which created an anoxic unit with rich substrate content and an aeration unit deficient in substrate simultaneously. Therefore, the utilization of the influent carbon source for denitrification was increased, leading to higher TN removal compared to conventional SBBR (CSBBR) operation. The results show that the CSBBR removed up to 76.8%, 44.5% and 10.4% of TN, respectively, at three tested COD/TN ratios (9.0, 4.8 and 2.5). In contrast, the TN removal of the NSBBR could reach 81.9%, 60.5% and 26.6%, respectively, at the corresponding COD/TN ratios. Therefore, better TN removal performance could be achieved in the NSBBR, especially at low COD/TN ratios (4.8 and 2.5). Furthermore, it is easy to upgrade a CSBBR into an NSBBR in practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Hydrogen and nitrogen codoping of anatase TiO2for efficiency enhancement in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulou, Maria; Kelaidis, Nikolaos; Polydorou, Ermioni; Soultati, Anastasia; Davazoglou, Dimitris; Argitis, Panagiotis; Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos; Tsikritzis, Dimitris; Kennou, Stella; Auras, Florian; Georgiadou, Dimitra G; Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard G; Chroneos, Alexander

    2017-12-19

    TiO 2 has high chemical stability, strong catalytic activity and is an electron transport material in organic solar cells. However, the presence of trap states near the band edges of TiO 2 arising from defects at grain boundaries significantly affects the efficiency of organic solar cells. To become an efficient electron transport material for organic photovoltaics and related devices, such as perovskite solar cells and photocatalytic devices, it is important to tailor its band edges via doping. Nitrogen p-type doping has attracted considerable attention in enhancing the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO 2 under visible light irradiation while hydrogen n-type doping increases its electron conductivity. DFT calculations in TiO 2 provide evidence that nitrogen and hydrogen can be incorporated in interstitial sites and possibly form N i H i , N i H O and N Ti H i defects. The experimental results indicate that N i H i defects are most likely formed and these defects do not introduce deep level states. Furthermore, we show that the efficiency of P3HT:IC 60 BA-based organic photovoltaic devices is enhanced when using hydrogen-doping and nitrogen/hydrogen codoping of TiO 2 , both boosting the material n-type conductivity, with maximum power conversion efficiency reaching values of 6.51% and 6.58%, respectively, which are much higher than those of the cells with the as-deposited (4.87%) and nitrogen-doped TiO 2 (4.46%).

  15. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Materials for Oxygen Reduction Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Wei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon materials, including nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs and nitrogen-doped graphene (NG, have attracted increasing attention for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in metal-air batteries and fuel cell applications, due to their optimal properties including excellent electronic conductivity, 4e− transfer and superb mechanical properties. Here, the recent progress of NCNTs- and NG-based catalysts for ORR is reviewed. Firstly, the general preparation routes of these two N-doped carbon-allotropes are introduced briefly, and then a special emphasis is placed on the developments of both NCNTs and NG as promising metal-free catalysts and/or catalyst support materials for ORR. All these efficient ORR electrocatalysts feature a low cost, high durability and excellent performance, and are thus the key factors in accelerating the widespread commercialization of metal-air battery and fuel cell technologies.

  16. Effects of drying method, storage period and carbon: nitrogen ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method 1 x period 1, for each soil, resulted in NH4+-N and NO3--N contents significantly different from other treatments indicating that extraction for mineral N should be done on field moist soil not later than two days after sampling. Key words: Drying method, mineral nitrogen, storage period, soil preparation, Vertisols.

  17. The Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TEM analysis revealed that the nanotubes exhibit bamboo-like structures with rough surfaces and a relatively uniform diameter. The bamboo compartment distance decreased with increase in synthesis temperature due to the increased nitrogen content inN-MWCNTs. The SEM examination showed that at high synthesis ...

  18. Hydrogen-induced Ostwald ripening of cobalt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Vece, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/248753355; Zoican-Loebick, Codruta; Pfefferle, Lisa D.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes can be used as a high surface area catalyst or as a means to produce well-defined particles. In this study, cobalt nanoparticles were formed on xxsingle-walled carbon nanotubes during hydrogen exposure at an elevated temperature. The average particle size increased

  19. Benthic biogeochemical cycling, nutrient stoichiometry, and carbon and nitrogen mass balances in a eutrophic freshwater bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.V.; Fitzgerald, S.A.; Waplesa, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Green Bay, while representing only ,7% of the surface area and ??1.4% of the volume of Lake Michigan, contains one-third of the watershed of the lake, and receives approximately one-third of the total nutrient loading to the Lake Michigan basin, largely from the Fox River at the southern end of the bay. With a history of eutrophic conditions dating back nearly a century, the southern portion of the bay behaves as an efficient nutrient and sediment trap, sequestering much of the annual carbon and nitrogen input within sediments accumulating at up to 1 cm per year. Depositional fluxes of organic matter varied from ??0.1 mol C m-2 yr-1 to >10 mol C m-2 yr-1 and were both fairly uniform in stoichiometric composition and relatively labile. Estimates of benthic recycling derived from pore-water concentration gradients, whole-sediment incubation experiments, and deposition-burial models of early diagenesis yielded an estimated 40% of the carbon and 50% of the nitrogen recycled back into the overlying water. Remineralization was relatively rapid with ??50% of the carbon remineralized within <15 yr of deposition, and a mean residence time for metabolizable carbon and nitrogen in the sediments of 20 yr. On average, organic carbon regeneration occurred as 75% CO2, 15% CH4, and 10% dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the southern bay were based upon direct measurements of inputs and burial and upon estimates of export and production derived stoichiometrically from a coupled phosphorus budget. Loadings of organic carbon from rivers were ??3.7 mol m-2 yr-1, 80% in the form of DOC and 20% as particulate organic carbon. These inputs were lost through export to northern Green Bay and Lake Michigan (39%), through sediment burial (26%), and net CO2 release to the atmosphere (35%). Total carbon input, including new production, was 4.54 mol m-2 C yr-1, equivalent to ??10% of the gross annual primary production. Nitrogen budget terms were less well quantified

  20. Surface Modification of Biodegradable Poly(D,L-lactic acid) by Nitrogen and Nitrogen/Hydrogen Plasma for Improving Surface Hydrophilicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guowei; Gao, Junping; Gao, Qiang; Chen, Yashao

    2011-04-01

    Enhancement of the surface hydrophilicity of biodegradable poly (D,L-lactic acid) (PLA) films is studied. The PLA films were treated by nitrogen plasma (PLA-N2) and nitrogen/hydrogen plasma (PLA-N2/H2), respectively. The surface properties and microstructure of PLA-N2 and PLA-N2/H2 were studied by static contact angle measurement, surface free energy calculation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is confirmed that the surface hydrophilicity of PLA-N2 and PLA-N2/H2 was higher than that of pristine PLA, and the surface hydrophilicity of PLA-N2 films was better than that of PLA-N2/H2.

  1. Carbon sequestration and Jerusalem artichoke biomass under nitrogen applications in coastal saline zone in the northern region of Jiangsu, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Li; Manxia, Chen; Xiumei, Gao [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Xiaohua, Long, E-mail: longxiaohua@njau.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Hongbo, Shao, E-mail: shaohongbochu@126.com [Institute of Agro-biotechnology, Jiangsu Academy of Agriculture Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Zhaopu, Liu [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zed, Rengel [Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Agriculture is an important source of greenhouse gases, but can also be a significant sink. Nitrogen fertilization is effective in increasing agricultural production and carbon storage. We explored the effects of different rates of nitrogen fertilization on biomass, carbon density, and carbon sequestration in fields under the cultivation of Jerusalem artichoke as well as in soil in a coastal saline zone for two years. Five nitrogen fertilization rates were tested (in g urea m{sup −} {sup 2}): 4 (N1), 8 (N2), 12 (N3), 16 (N4), and 0 (control, CK). The biomass of different organs of Jerusalem artichoke during the growth cycle was significantly higher in N2 than the other treatments. Under different nitrogen treatments, carbon density in organs of Jerusalem artichoke ranged from 336 to 419 g C kg{sup −} {sup 1}. Carbon sequestration in Jerusalem artichoke was higher in treatments with nitrogen fertilization compared to the CK treatment. The highest carbon sequestration was found in the N2 treatment. Soil carbon content was higher in the 0–10 cm than 10–20 cm layer, with nitrogen fertilization increasing carbon content in both soil layers. The highest soil carbon sequestration was measured in the N2 treatment. Carbon sequestration in both soil and Jerusalem artichoke residue was increased by nitrogen fertilization depending on the rates in the coastal saline zone studied. - Highlights: • Dry matter accumulation increased under nitrogen fertilization application. • Carbon density in Jerusalem artichoke ranged from 336 to 419 g C kg{sup −} {sup 1}. • Soil carbon storage increased under nitrogen fertilizer application. • Nitrogen application is effective in increasing carbon sequestration.

  2. Hydrogen storage by carbon materials synthesized from oil seeds and fibrous plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, Maheshwar; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Jaybhaye, Sandesh [Nanotechnology Research Center, Birla College, Kalyan 421304 (India); Soga, T.; Afre, Rakesh [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Dasgupta, K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, BARC, Trombay 400 085 (India); Sharon, Madhuri [Monad Nanotech Pvt. Ltd., A702 Bhawani Tower, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon materials of various morphologies have been synthesized by pyrolysis of various oil-seeds and plant's fibrous materials. These materials are characterized by SEM and Raman. Surface areas of these materials are determined by methylene blue method. These carbon porous materials are used for hydrogen storage. Carbon fibers with channel type structure are obtained from baggas and coconut fibers. It is reported that amongst the different plant based precursors studied, carbon from soyabean (1.09 wt%) and baggas (2.05 wt%) gave the better capacity to store hydrogen at 11kg/m{sup 2} pressure of hydrogen at room temperature. Efforts are made to correlate the hydrogen adsorption capacity with intensities and peak positions of G- and D-band obtained with carbon materials synthesized from plant based precursors. It is suggested that carbon materials whose G-band is around 1575cm{sup -1} and the intensity of D-band is less compared to G-band, may be useful material for hydrogen adsorption study. (author)

  3. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  4. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g. We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  5. Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-01-07

    On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

  6. Hydrogen in carbon foils made by DC glow discharge in ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, P.; Armour, D.G. (Salford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); England, J.B.A. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Tait, N.R.S.; Tolfree, D.W.L. (Science and Engineering Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.)

    1983-08-01

    Thermal desorption has been studied from thin films of carbon prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene. The only gases released in significant quantities are hydrogen and methane. Both releases can be characterised by a continuum of activation energies but the methane release peaks at a lower temperature than that from hydrogen. The estimated total hydrogen release is compared with the hydrogen content determined by nuclear scattering experiments. Infrared studies suggest that the majority of CH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/ bonds can be ruptured by annealing at 300/sup 0/C, a temperature well below the hydrogen and methane release rate maxima. Possible hydrogen bonding modes and desorption mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Carbon Excretion and Losses in Growing Pigs Fed Danish or Asian Diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prapaspongsa, Trakarn; Vu, T K V; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine inputs and outputs of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) and to estimate the nutrient losses during housing and storage in order to address these important parts of the whole manure management systems in pigs fed different diets.......The objectives of this study were to determine inputs and outputs of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) and to estimate the nutrient losses during housing and storage in order to address these important parts of the whole manure management systems in pigs fed different diets....

  8. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  9. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced.

  10. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, H; Des Marais, D J; Ueda, A; Moore, J G

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges, -6.2 +/- 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 +/- 0.6% relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (delta 13 C = around -24%) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). the delta 34S values average +0.3 +/- 0.5% with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 +/- 1.6%. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt.

  11. Influence of carbon dioxide content in the biogas to nitrogen oxides emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Marija A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are an alternative solution for the fossil fuel shortage. Usually this kind of fuels is called low calorific value fuels, due to the large proportion of inert components in their composition. The most common is carbon dioxide, and its proportion in biogas can be different, from 10 up to 40%, or even more. The presence of inert component in the composition of biogas causes the problems that are related with flame blow off limits. One of the possibilities for efficient combustion of biogas is the combustion in swirling flow including a pilot burner, aimed to expand the borders of stable combustion. This paper presents an analysis of the influence of the carbon dioxide content to the nitrogen oxides emissions. Laboratory biogas was used with different content of CO2 (10, 20, 30 and 40%. Investigation was carried out for different nominal powers, coefficients of excess air and carbon dioxide content. With increasing content of carbon dioxide, emission of nitrogen oxides was reduced, and this trend was the same throughout the whole range of excess air, carried out through measurements. Still, the influence of carbon dioxide content is significantly less than the influence of excess air. The coefficient of excess air greatly affects the production of radicals which are essential for the formation of nitrogen oxides, O, OH and CH. Also, the results show that the nominal power has no impact on the emission of nitrogen oxides.

  12. Radiation Shielding and Hydrogen Storage with Multifunctional Carbon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  13. Hydrogen Generator by Methane Pyrolysis with Carbon Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop, fabricate, and test a system to provide 99.999% hydrogen by efficiently performing methane pyrolysis. The system has three unique...

  14. Study on the excimer laser annealed amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbon films deposited by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosone, G. [CNR-INFM CRS-Coherentia, Complesso Universitario MSA, Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario MSA, Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Utkal University, Bhubaneswar (India); Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario MSA, Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, Napoli (Italy); Tresso, E.; Celasco, E. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Chiodoni, A. [Materials and Microsystems Laboratory, chi-LAB, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Pinto, N.; Murri, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Camerino (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon films of different carbon content were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperature (200 C) and were subjected to excimer laser annealing. X-ray diffraction spectra and field emission scanning electron microscopy images demonstrate that carbon content plays an important role in facilitating the crystallization process induced by the excimer laser treatment (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Carbon and nitrogen balances for six shrublands across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Claus; Emmett, Bridget A.; Tietema, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Shrublands constitute significant and important parts of European landscapes providing a large number of important ecosystem services. Biogeochemical cycles in these ecosystems have gained little attention relative to forests and grassland systems, but data on such cycles are required...... for developing and testing ecosystem models. As climate change progresses, the potential feedback from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere through changes in carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and general knowledge on biogeochemical cycles becomes increasingly important. Here we present carbon...... that in the future a climate-driven land cover change between grasslands and shrublands in Europe will likely lead to increased ecosystem C where shrublands are promoted and less where grasses are promoted. However, it also emphasizes that if feedbacks on the global carbon cycle are to be predicted it is critically...

  16. Physiology and gene expression profiles of Dekkera bruxellensis in response to carbon and nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Pita, Will; Silva, Denise Castro; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; Passoth, Volkmar; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a nitrogenous compound, was previously described as an important factor favoring Dekkera bruxellensis in the competition with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the industrial sugarcane substrate. In this substrate, nitrogen sources are limited and diverse, and a recent report showed that amino acids enable D. bruxellensis to grow anaerobically. Thus, understanding the regulation of nitrogen metabolism is one fundamental aspect to comprehend the competiveness of D. bruxellensis in the fermentation environment. In the present study, we evaluated the physiological and transcriptional profiles of D. bruxellensis in response to different carbon and nitrogen supplies to determine their influence on growth, sugar consumption, and ethanol production. Besides, the expression of genes coding for nitrogen permeases and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glutamate and energetic metabolism were investigated under these conditions. Our data revealed that genes related to nitrogen uptake in D. bruxellensis are under the control of nitrogen catabolite repression. Moreover, we provide indications that glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase may switch roles as the major pathway for glutamate biosynthesis in D. bruxellensis. Finally, our data showed that in nonoptimal growth conditions, D. bruxellensis leans toward the respiratory metabolism. The results presented herein show that D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae share similar regulation of GDH–GOGAT pathway, while D. bruxellensis converts less glucose to ethanol than S. cerevisiae do when nitrogen is limited. The consequence of this particularity to the industrial process is discussed.

  17. Scandium and Titanium Containing Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage: a Thermodynamic and First Principle Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananghaya, Michael; Yu, Dennis; Santos, Gil Nonato; Rodulfo, Emmanuel

    2016-06-15

    The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the highly localized states derived from the defects of nitrogen doped carbon nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CNxNT) contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation. Comparison of the H2 adsorption capability of Sc over Ti-decorated 4ND-CNxNT shows that Ti cannot be used for reversible H2 storage due to its inherent high adsorption energy. The Sc/4ND-CNxNT possesses favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy at the local-density approximation (LDA) and GGA level. Molecular dynamics (MD) study confirmed that the interaction between molecular hydrogen and 4ND-CNxNT decorated with scandium is indeed favorable. Simulations indicate that the total amount of adsorption is directly related to the operating temperature and pressure. The number of absorbed hydrogen molecules almost logarithmically increases as the pressure increases at a given temperature. The total excess adsorption of hydrogen on the (Sc/4ND)10-CNxNT arrays at 300 K is within the range set by the department of energy (DOE) with a value of at least 5.85 wt%.

  18. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  19. Carbon and carbon dioxide accumulation by marandu grass under nitrogen fertilization and irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Dupas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen (N is the most limiting nutrient for growth of forage grasses, especially in conditions of low water availability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effect of N fertilization and irrigation on the accumulation of carbon (C and carbon dioxide (CO2 by marandu grass in the Cerrado Paulista, in the rainy and dry seasons. Experiments were conducted to evaluate N fertilization in each season, with and without irrigation. Five N rates were used (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1 per cutting, using urea as N source, totaling 0, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 kg ha-1 in the rainy season and 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kg ha-1 in the dry season. The experiments were arranged in a split-plot randomized block design. There was no significant interaction (p > 0.05 between N and time of fertilization in the irrigated experiment. However, N promoted a quadratic effect in organic matter production (OMP, accumulation of C and CO2 by marandu grass, while there was no influence of the seasons. In the non-irrigated experiment, the interaction between N rates and seasons was significant (p < 0.05 only for the rainy season. Organic matter production and C and CO2 accumulation was greater in the rainy season than in the dry season. Irrigation provided increases of approximately 20% in C and CO2 accumulation. The use of N and irrigation increases the accumulation of C and CO2 by marandu grass, and this increase is higher during the rainy season.

  20. Consequences of different management of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. residue on microbial biomass carbon, organic carbon and total nitrogen indices in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hoseini Hoseini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available .Soil microorganisms are important agents in nutrient cycling and energy flow. They are extremely sensitive to environmental changes. Soil microbial biomass has been proposed as an index of soil stress and disturbance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. residue amounts, burning, nitrogen fertilizer levels and tillage management on organic carbon, total nitrogen and microbial biomass carbon, after 90 days. The experiment was carried out based on a completely randomized design with a factorial arrangement with two replications. The treatments included two levels of barley residues (3 and 6 t.ha-1, burning (without and with stubble burning, urea fertilizer (0 and 125 Kg.ha-1 and tillage systems (no-till, conventional tillage. Results showed that 6 t.ha-1 barely residue treatment increased organic carbon, total nitrogen and microbial biomass carbon in comparison with 3 t.ha-1, while stubble burning significantly decreased all these parameters. Tillage treatment also significantly decreased organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon whereas had no effect on total nitrogen. The nitrogen fertilizer had no effect on microbial biomass carbon, whereas organic carbon and total nitrogen positively affected by urea application. The results of this experiment showed that no-tillage system along with crop residue retention of 6 t.ha-1 and without stubble burning systems would be the most effective management to protect and promote soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and microbial biomass carbon.

  1. Optimal Design of a Fossil Fuel-Based Hydrogen Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Case Study in Ohio

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ni, Jason; Johnson, Joshua; Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    Presented at the National Hydrogen Association Annual Hydrogen Conference (NHA 2005), Washington, DC, March 29 - April 1, 2005 The use of hydrogen as a light-duty transportation fuel requires the development of a widespread regional hydrogen infrastructure, including production facilities, a distribution network, and refueling stations. In the case of fossil-based hydrogen production with carbon capture and sequestration, additional infrastructure is needed for CO2 disposal. If const...

  2. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flege, S., E-mail: flege@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Ensinger, W. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen containing diamond-like carbon films were prepared by a plasma ignited by a high voltage. • Variation of preparation method (N{sub 2} implantation, N{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} co-deposition). • Maximum nitrogen content similar for co-deposition and implantation. • Electrical resistivity decreases for small nitrogen contents, increases again for higher contents. - Abstract: The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and N{sub 2}, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  3. Evaluation of Lighting Systems, Carbon Sources, and Bacteria Cultures on Photofermentative Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Choy, Sing-Ying; Giannis, Apostolos

    2017-11-10

    Fluorescent and incandescent lighting systems were applied for batch photofermentative hydrogen production by four purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria (PNSB). The hydrogen production efficiency of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodospirillum rubrum was evaluated using different carbon sources (acetate, butyrate, lactate, and malate). Incandescent light was found to be more effective for bacteria cell growth and hydrogen production. It was observed that PNSB followed substrate selection criteria for hydrogen production. Only R. palustris was able to produce hydrogen using most carbon sources. Cell density was almost constant, but cell growth rate and hydrogen production were significantly varied under the different lighting systems. The kinetics study suggested that initial substrate concentration had a positive correlation with lag phase duration. Among the PNSB, R. palustris grew faster and had higher hydrogen yields of 1.58, 4.92, and 2.57 mol H2/mol using acetate, butyrate, and lactate, respectively. In the integrative approach with dark fermentation effluents rich in organic acids, R. palustris should be enriched in the phototrophic microbial consortium of the continuous hydrogen production system.

  4. Influence of activated carbon amended ASBR on anaerobic fermentative hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Li; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of activated carbon amended ASBR on fermentative bio-hydgrogen production from glucose was evaluated at hydraulic retention time (HRTs) ranging from 48 h to 12 h with initial pH of 6.0 at the system temperature of 60°C. Experimental results showed that the performance of activated carbon...... amended anazrobic seguencs batch reactor (ASBRs) was more stable than that of ASBRs without activated carbon addition regarding on hydrogen production and pH. Higher hydrogen yield(HY) and hydrogen producing rate(HPR) were observed in the activated carbon amended ASBRs, with 65%, 63%, 54%, 56% enhancement...... of hydrogen yield in smaller size activated carbon amended reactor under the tested HRT ranges, and the maximum HPR of (7.09±0.31)L·(L·d)-1 and HY of (1.42±0.03) mol·mol-1 was obtained at HRT of 12h. The major soluble products form hydrogen fermentation were n-butyric acid and acetic acid, accounting for 46...

  5. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

    2013-03-19

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

  6. Carbon and nitrogen content of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in relation to their Alcian Blue adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Anja; Passow, Uta

    2001-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen content of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) was determined and related to the concentration of TEP as quantified by a colorimetrical method. TEP were produced in the laboratory from dissolved precursors by laminar or turbulent shear. Dissolved precursors were obtained by 0.2 µm filtration from diatom cultures, with or without nutrient reduction, and from natural diatom populations. The relationship between carbon and TEP was significant, linear and species-specif...

  7. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  8. Catalytic effects of TiF3 on hydrogen spillover on Pt/carbon for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Ralph T

    2010-10-05

    Recent studies have shown that using the hydrogen spillover phenomena is a promising approach for developing new materials for hydrogen storage at ambient temperature. However, the rates need to be improved. Significant catalytic effects on both spillover (i.e., adsorption) and reverse spillover (i.e., desorption) on Pt-doped carbon by TiF(3) were found. By doping 2 wt % TiF(3) on the Pt-doped Maxsorb (a superactivated carbon), both adsorption and desorption rates were significantly increased while the storage capacity decreased only slightly due to decreased surface areas. The effect of the heat treatment temperature (473 K vs 673 K) of the doped TiF(3) on its catalytic effects was also studied. XPS analyses showed that C-F bonds were formed upon heat treatment and that the amount of C-F bonds increased with the heat treatment temperature. The catalytic effects also increased with the heat treatment temperature, indicating that the catalytic mechanism possibly involved the formation of C-F bonds on the carbon edge sites. In addition, the issue of proper sample preparation of Pt/carbon was briefly addressed; missteps in metal doping and consequently poor metal dispersion will result in significantly diminished spillover enhancements (Stadie et al.).

  9. Theoretical Investigation on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Nitrogen, Pyridine-Like Nitrogen Defects, and Transition Metal Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the inherent difficulty in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with uniform chirality and well-defined electronic properties through the introduction of dopants, topological defects, and intercalation of metals. Depending on the desired application, one can modify the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNTs through an appropriate introduction of imperfections. This scheme broadens the application areas of SWCNTs. Under this motivation, we present our ongoing investigations of the following models: (i (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT doped with nitrogen (CNxNT, (ii (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT with pyridine-like defects (3NV-CNxNT, (iii (10, 0 SWCNT with porphyrine-like defects (4ND-CNxNT. Models (ii and (iii were chemically functionalized with 14 transition metals (TMs: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Ag, Pt and Au. Using the spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT, stable configurations, deformations, formation and binding energies, the effects of the doping concentration of nitrogen, pyridine-like and porphyrine-like defects on the electronic properties were all examined. Results reveal that the electronic properties of SWCNTs show strong dependence on the concentration and configuration of nitrogen impurities, its defects, and the TMs adsorbed.

  10. Effects of nitrogen plasma treatment on the surface characteristics of olive stone-based activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudani, Nouha; Najar-Souissi, Souad; Abderkader-Fernandez, Victor K; Ouederni, Abdelmottalab

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen plasma treatment (NPT) of activated carbon (AC) at different conditions was carried out to introduce nitrogen-containing groups onto olive stone-activated carbon (OSAC) surfaces. Textural characteristics of raw and irradiated samples were analyzed by N 2 and CO 2 adsorption. Surface chemical functional groups were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that after NPT, the surface textural properties of irradiated OSAC were slightly damaged, and a gradual decrease in surface area and pore volume was observed during the irradiation. XPS revealed that NPT could change the distribution of oxygen functional groups on the OSAC surface and there were more nitrogen atoms incorporated into the aromatic ring. A tentative explanation for the modification process is proposed. Phenol adsorption was enhanced from 110 mg/g for untreated AC to 635 mg/g for 30-min plasma-treated OSAC.

  11. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured carbons by spillover: bridge-building enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Qi, Gongshin; Yang, Ralph T

    2005-11-22

    The hydrogen storage capacity in nanostructured carbon materials can be increased by atomic hydrogen spillover from a supported catalyst. A simple and effective technique was developed to build carbon bridges that serve to improve contact between a spillover source and a secondary receptor. In this work, a supported catalyst (Pd-C) served as the source of hydrogen atoms via dissociation and primary spillover and AX-21 or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were secondary spillover receptors. By carbonizing a bridge-forming precursor in the presence of the components, the hydrogen adsorption amount was increased by a factor of 2.9 for the AX-21 receptor and 1.6 for the SWNT receptor at 298 K and 100 kPa. Similar results were obtained at 10 MPa, indicating that the enhancement factor is a weak function of pressure. The AX-21 receptor with carbon bridges had the highest absolute capacity of 1.8 wt % at 298 K and 10 MPa. Reversibility was demonstrated through desorption and readsorption at 298 K. The bridge-building process appears to be receptor specific, and optimization may yield even greater enhancement. Using this technique, enhancements in storage of up to 17-fold on other carbon-based materials have been observed and will be reported elsewhere shortly.

  12. Effects of harvest on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest forest catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Abdelnour; Robert B. McKane; Marc Stieglitz; Feifei Pan; Yiwei. Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We used a new ecohydrological model, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessments (VELMA), to analyze the effects of forest harvest on catchment carbon and nitrogen dynamics. We applied the model to a 10 ha headwater catchment in the western Oregon Cascade Range where two major disturbance events have occurred during the past 500 years: a stand-replacing fire...

  13. Environmental Systems Simulations for Carbon, Energy, Nitrogen, Water, and Watersheds: Design Principles and Pilot Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Christopher; Pérez-Lapeña, Blanca; Xiong, Weidong; Kraft, Steven; Kowalchuk, Rhonda; Blair, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the Next Generation Science Standards and elements of problem-based learning, four human-environment systems simulations are described in brief--carbon, energy, water, and watershed--and a fifth simulation on nitrogen is described in more depth. These science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education simulations illustrate…

  14. The ternary Fe-C-N system: Homogeneous distributions of nitrogen and carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    of the nitriding and carburizing potentials, tailored nitrogen and carbon contents can be achieved, which allows assessment of a phase stability diagram for the Fe-N-C system, for which available experimental data is limited. Thermal decomposition sequences were established for the various iron carbides and (carbo...

  15. Carbon and Nitrogen Pools and Fluxes in Adjacent Mature Norway Spruce and European Beech Forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, Filip; Růžek, M.; Tahovská, K.; Bárta, J.; Myška, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 282. ISSN 1999-4907 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Fagus sylvatica * Picea abies * carbon * nitrogen * budget * respiration * productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.951, year: 2016

  16. Linking floral biodiversity with nitrogen and carbon translocations in semi-natural grasslands in Lithuani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcinkonis Saulius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate the long-term effects of long-term piggery effluent application on semi-natural grassland ecotop-phytotop changes (above- and below-ground phytomass production, and carbon and nitrogen allocation in grassland communities in relation to changes (or variability in topsoil properties. Analysis of phytomass distribution in piggery effluent irrigated grassland communities showed that dry biomass yield varied from 1.7−5.3 t ha-1. Variability in soil and plant cover created a unique and highly unpredictable site specific system, where long-term anthropogenic influences established successor communities with specific characteristics of above- and below-ground biomass distribution. These characteristics depend more on grassland communities than on soil chemical properties. Families of grasses (Poaceae dominated the surveyed communities and accumulated most carbon and least nitrogen, while legumes accumulated most nitrogen and lignin and least carbon. Carbon concentrations in above-ground biomass had minor variations, while accumulation of nitrogen was strongly influenced by species diversity (r = 0.94, n = 10, p <0.001 and production of above-ground biomass

  17. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in shallow photic systems: Interactions between macroalgae, microalgae, and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardison, A.; Anderson, I.C.; Canuel, E.A.; Tobias, C.R.; Veuger, B.

    2011-01-01

    We tracked carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) uptake into sediments in the presence and absence of benthic macroalgae using dual stable isotope tracers in combination with compound-specific isotope analyses of hydrolyzable amino acids and phospholipid-linked fatty acids to quantify the uptake and retention

  18. Dust storm erosion and its impact on soil carbon and nitrogen losses in Northern China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang Xiaobin,; Oenema, O.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Perdok, U.D.; Cai, D.

    2006-01-01

    There is increased awareness of the environmental impacts of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) losses through wind erosion, especially in areas heavily affected by dust storm erosion. This paper reviews the recent literature concerning dust storm-related soil erosion and its impact on soil C and N

  19. Carbon respiration and nitrogen dynamics in Corsican pine litter amended with aluminium and tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Kaal, J.; Tietema, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the carbon (C) mineralisation and nitrogen (N) dynamics in litter from a Corsican pine forest in response to individual and combined additions of aluminium (M), condensed tannin (extracted from fresh Corsican pine needles) and hydrolysable tannin (commercial tannic acid). Production

  20. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniela F. Cusack; Whendee L. Silver; Margaret S. Torn; William H. McDowell

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and...

  1. Will more nitrogen enhance carbon storage in young forest stands in central Appalachia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah K. Fowler; Mary Beth Adams; William T. Peterjohn

    2015-01-01

    Many temperate deciduous forests in the Eastern US are secondary, regrowing forests and have experienced decades of elevated inputs of acidic compounds and biologically available nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere. These young forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle as C sinks, and it is possible that acidic deposition will influence the strength...

  2. Stable Isotope Values of Nitrogen and Carbon in Particulate Matter: Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data set from “Patterns in stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in particulate matter from the Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf, from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras” by Oczkowski et al. These are the data upon which all results and conclusion are made...

  3. Effects of nitrogen deposition on carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Dejun; Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in China has increased greatly, but the general impact of elevated N deposition on carbon (C) dynamics in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems is not well documented. In this study we used a meta-analysis method to compile 88 studies on the effects of N deposition C cycling...

  4. Quantifying fire severity, carbon, and nitrogen emissions in Alaska's boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie A. Boby; Edward A.G. Schuur; Michelle C. Mack; David Verbyla; Jill F. Johnstone

    2010-01-01

    The boreal region stores a large proportion of the world's terrestrial carbon (C) and is subject to high-intensity, stand-replacing wildfires that release C and nitrogen (N) stored in biomass and soils through combustion. While severity and extent of fires drives overall emissions, methods for accurately estimating fire severity are poorly tested in this unique...

  5. Burrowing herbivores alter soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a semi-arid ecosystem, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Jose L. Hierro; Diego. Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Activities of burrowing herbivores, including movement of soil and litter and deposition of waste material, can alter the distribution of labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil, affecting spatial patterning of nutrient dynamics in ecosystems where they are abundant. Their role in ecosystem processes in surface soil has been studied extensively, but effects of...

  6. Modeling forest stand dynamics from optimal balances of carbon and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry T. Valentine; Annikki. Makela

    2012-01-01

    We formulate a dynamic evolutionary optimization problem to predict the optimal pattern by which carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are co-allocated to fine-root, leaf, and wood production, with the objective of maximizing height growth rate, year by year, in an even-aged stand. Height growth is maximized with respect to two adaptive traits, leaf N concentration and the ratio...

  7. Carbon and nitrogen in forest floor and mineral soil under six common European tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lars; Schmidt, Inger K.; Callesen, Ingeborg

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of tree species effects on soil C and N pools is scarce, particularly for European deciduous tree species. We studied forest floor and mineral soil carbon and nitrogen under six common European tree species in a common garden design replicated at six sites in Denmark. Three decades...

  8. Carbon allocation and nitrogen acquisition in a developing Populus deltoides plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Coleman; Alexander L. Friend; Christel C. Kern

    2004-01-01

    We established Populus deltoides Bartr. stands differing in nitrogen (N) availability and tested if: (1) N-induced carbon (C) allocation could be explained by developmental allocation controls; and (2) N uptake per unit root mass, i.e., specific N-uptake rate, increased with N availability. Closely spaced (1 x 1 m) stands were treated with 50, 100...

  9. Coupling of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen cycles in sediments from a Mediterranean lagoon: a seasonal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dedieu, K.; Rabouille, C.; Gilbert, F.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Metzger, E.; Simonucci, C.; Jézéquel, D.; Prévot, F.; Anschutz, P.; Hulth, S.; Ogier, S.; Mesnage, V.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental data and simulations were used to investigate the seasonal coupling between carbon, nitrogen and oxygen cycles in marine sediments from a eutrophic shallow lagoon in the Mediterranean Sea area. A negative seasonal correlation was observed between oxygen consumption and coupled

  10. Optimal co-allocation of carbon and nitrogen in a forest stand at steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annikki Makela; Harry T. Valentine; Helja-Sisko Helmisaari

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for plant production, but N uptake imposes carbon (C) costs through maintenance respiration and fine-root construction, suggesting that an optimal C:N balance can be found. Previous studies have elaborated this optimum under exponential growth; work on closed canopies has focused on foliage only. Here, the optimal co-allocation of C and N to...

  11. Woody overstorey effects on soil carbon and nitrogen pools in South African savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. T. Hudak; C. A. Wessman; T. R. Seastedt

    2003-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment in savannas may alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools over the longterm, which could have regional or global biogeochemical implications given the widespread encroachment observed in the vast savanna biome. Soil and litter %C and %N were surveyed across four soil types in two encroached, semiarid savanna landscapes in northern South Africa....

  12. Synthesis and drug detection performance of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Jingjing [Functional and Environment Materials Research Institute, College of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nano Structure and Low Dimensional Physics Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gao, Hui, E-mail: hope@lzu.edu.cn [Functional and Environment Materials Research Institute, College of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Recently, nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) have attracted considerable interest since nitrogen (N) doping could effectively tailor the electronic properties and the chemical reactivity of carbon dots (CDs) for advanced potential applications. Herein, a one-step pyrolysis method was presented for synthesizing the NCDs with excellent water solubility, good stability and a high quantum yield of ca. 28%. The detection performance of NCDs for the antibacterial drugs was further explored, and it was proved to effectively enhance the fluorescence due to the strong interaction between the NCDs and antibacterial drugs. - Highlights: • A facile yet economic bottom-up pyrolysis method for synthesizing nitrogen (N)-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glutamic acid as the precursor. • Glutamic acid was the only starting material and used as a source of carbon and nitrogen; the formation and functionalization of NCDs were accomplished simultaneously. • The NCDs possess bright blue emission (with a high quantum yield of ca. 28%) and excellent excitation dependent on PL properties. • NCDs were used for the determination of antibacterial drugs based on the fluorescence enhancement.

  13. Forest disturbances trigger erosion controlled fluxes of nitrogen, phosphorus and dissolved carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek Matyjasik; Gretchen Moisen; Todd A. Schroeder; Tracy Frescino; Michael Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of the research that addressed correlation between annual forest disturbance maps produced from LANDSAT images and water quality and flow data indicate that forest disturbances in conjunction with intense atmospheric precipitation commonly trigger fluxes of several chemical constituents, such as nitrogen, phosphorus carbon. These fluxes appear to be...

  14. A database and synthesis of northern peatland soil properties and Holocene carbon and nitrogen accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.W.; Camill, P.; Alm, J.; Amesbury, M.J.; Anderson, D.; Andersson, S.; Bochicchio, C.; Barber, K.; Belyea, L.R.; Bunbury, J.; Chambers, F.M.; Charman, D.J.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, B.; Finkelstein, S.A.; Gałka, M.; Garneau, M.; Hammarlund, D; Hinchcliffe, W.; Holmquist, J.; Hughes, P.; Jones, M.C.; Klein, E.S.; Kokfelt, U.; Korhola, A.; Kuhry, P.; Lamarre, A.; Lamentowicz, M.; Large, D.; Lavoie, M.; Macdonald, G.; Magnan, G.; Mäkilä, M.; Mallon, G.; Mathijssen, P.; Mauquoy, D.; McCarroll, J.; Moore, T.R.; Nichols, J.; O'Reilly, B.; Oksanen, P.; Packalen, M.; Peteet, D.; Richard, P.J.H.; Robinson, S.; Ronkainen, T.; Rundgren, M.; Sannel, A.B.K.; Tarnocai, C.; Thom, T.; Tuittila, E.S.; Turetsky, M.; Väliranta, M.; van der Linden, M.; van Geel, B.; van Bellen, S.; Vitt, D.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, W.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present results from the most comprehensive compilation of Holocene peat soil properties with associated carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates for northern peatlands. Our database consists of 268 peat cores from 215 sites located north of 45°N. It encompasses regions within which peat

  15. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus stoichiometry and eutrophication in River Thames Tributaries, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary productivity in aquatic systems relies on the availability of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), with a preferred stoichiometric ratio of 106 C/16 N/1 P, known as the Redfield ratio. The intent of this paper is to present a methodology to visualize C/N/P stoichiometry and examine ...

  16. Novel porous carbon materials with ultrahigh nitrogen contents for selective CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials were prepared by a nanocasting route using tri-continuous mesoporous silica IBN-9 as a hard template. Rationally choosing carbon precursors and carefully controlling activation conditions result in an optimized material denoted as IBN9-NC1-A, which possesses a very high nitrogen doping concentration (∼13 wt%) and a large surface area of 890 m 2 g -1 arising from micropores (<1 nm). It exhibits an excellent performance for CO 2 adsorption over a wide range of CO 2 pressures. Specifically, its equilibrium CO 2 adsorption capacity at 25 °C reaches up to 4.50 mmol g -1 at 1 bar and 10.53 mmol g -1 at 8 bar. In particular, it shows a much higher CO 2 uptake at low pressure (e.g. 1.75 mmol g -1 at 25 °C and 0.2 bar) than any reported carbon-based materials, owing to its unprecedented nitrogen doping level. The high nitrogen contents also give rise to significantly enhanced CO 2/N 2 selectivities (up to 42), which combined with the high adsorption capacities, make these new carbon materials promising sorbents for selective CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas and other relevant applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. The effect of soil carbon on symbiotic nitrogen fixation and symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the main attribute of high-quality soil. The amount of nitrogen fixed by Rhizobium symbiotically with Trifolium repens (white clover) is ultimately determined by the quality of the soil environment. The effect of SOC on the total number of symbiotic and saprophytic rhizobia was determined.

  18. Plant species richness promotes soil carbon and nitrogen stocks in grasslands without legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, W.; Ruijven, van J.; Mommer, L.; Deyn, de G.B.; Berendse, F.; Hoffland, E.

    2014-01-01

    1.The storage of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil is important ecosystem functions. Grassland biodiversity experiments have shown a positive effect of plant diversity on soil C and N storage. However, these experiments all included legumes, which constitute an important N input through

  19. Environmental Systems Simulations for Carbon, Energy, Nitrogen, Water, and Watersheds: Design Principles and Pilot Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lant, C.; Pérez Lapena, B.; Xiong, W.; Kraft, S.; Kowalchuk, R.; Blair, M.

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the Next Generation Science Standards and elements of problem-based learning, four human-environment systems simulations are described in brief—carbon, energy, water, and watershed—and a fifth simulation on nitrogen is described in more depth. These science, technology, engineering, and

  20. Modeling water, carbon, and nitrogen dynamics for two drained pine plantations under intensive management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiying Tian; Mohamed A. Youssef; R. Wayne Skaggs; Devendra Amatya; George M. Chescheir

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports results of a study to test the reliability of the DRAINMOD-FOREST model for predicting water, soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in intensively managed forests. The study site, two adjacent loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations (referred as D2 and D3), are located in the coastal plain of North Carolina, USA. Controlled drainage (with weir...

  1. Developing Ecological Models on Carbon and Nitrogen in Secondary Facultative Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aponte-Reyes Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecological models formulated for TOC, CO2, NH4+, NO3- and NTK, based in literature reviewed and field work were obtained monitoring three facultative secondary stabilization ponds, FSSP, pilots: conventional pond, CP, baffled pond, BP, and baffled-meshed pond, BMP. Models were sensitive to flow inlet, solar radiation, pH and oxygen content; the sensitive parameters in Carbon Model were KCOT Ba, umax Ba, umax Al, K1OX, VAl, R1DCH4, YBh. The sensitive parameters in the Nitrogen model were KCOT Ba, umax Ba, umax Al, VAl, KOPH, KOPA, r4An. The test t–paired showed a good simulating of Carbon model refers to TOC in FSSP; on the other side, the Nitrogen model showed a good simulating of NH4+. Different topological models modify ecosystem ecology forcing different transformation pathways of Nitrogen; equal transformations of the Carbon BMP topology could be achieved using lower volumes, however, a calibration for a new model would be required. Carbon and Nitrogen models developed could be coupled to hydrodynamics models for better modeling of FSSP.

  2. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen balances of direct land use changes from energy crops in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Jørgensen, Uffe; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    2012-01-01

    and perennials), two soil types (sandy loam and sand), two climate types (wet and dry), three initial soil carbon level (high, average, low), two time horizons for soil carbon changes (20 and 100 years), two residues management practices (removal and incorporation into soil) as well as three soil carbon turnover......- and micronutrients are presented. The inventory results highlight Miscanthus as a promising energy crop, indicating it presents the lowest emissions of nitrogen compounds, the highest amount of carbon dioxide sequestrated from the atmosphere, a relatively high carbon turnover efficiency and allows to increase soil...... organic carbon. Results also show that the magnitude of these benefits depends on the harvest season, soil types and climatic conditions. Inventory results further highlight winter wheat as the only annual crop where straw removal for bioenergy may be sustainable, being the only annual crop not involving...

  3. Microbial responses to carbon and nitrogen supplementation in an Antarctic dry valley soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dennis, P. G.; Sparrow, A. D.; Gregorich, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys are exposed to extremely dry and cold conditions. Nevertheless, they contain active biological communities that contribute to the biogeochemical processes. We have used ester-linked fatty acid (ELFA) analysis to investigate the effects of additions of carbon...... and nitrogen in glucose and ammonium chloride, respectively, on the soil microbial community in a field experiment lasting three years in the Garwood Valley. In the control treatment, the total ELFA concentration was small by comparison with temperate soils, but very large when expressed relative to the soil...... organic carbon concentration, indicating efficient conversion of soil organic carbon into microbial biomass and rapid turnover of soil organic carbon. The ELFA concentrations increased significantly in response to carbon additions, indicating that carbon supply was the main constraint to microbial...

  4. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  5. Effect of nitrogen doping on the electromagnetic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Plyushch, A. O.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Lapko, K. N.; Sokol, A. A.; Ivashkevich, O. A.; Lambin, Ph.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped and pure carbon nanotube (CNT) based composites were fabricated for investigating their dielectric properties in static regime as well as electromagnetic response properties in microwave frequency range (Ka-band). Two classes of host matrix—polystyrene and phosphate unfired ceramics—have been used for composites fabrication. The study reveals miscellaneous effect of nitrogen doping on the dielectric permittivity, dc conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency of CNT-based composites, produced with both polymer and ceramic matrices. The high-frequency polarizability, estimated for different-length CNTs, and static polarizability, calculated for nitrogen-containing CNT models using a quantum-chemical approach, show that this effect results from a decrease of the nanotube defect-free-length and deterioration of the polarizability with incorporation of nitrogen in pyridinic form.

  6. Single walled carbon nanotube-metal oxide nanocomposites for reversible and reproducible storage of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silambarasan, D; Surya, V J; Vasu, V; Iyakutti, K

    2013-11-13

    Composite material consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and metal oxide nanoparticles has been prepared and their hydrogen storage performance is evaluated. Metal oxides such as tin oxide (SnO2), tungsten trioxide (WO3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are chosen as the composite constituents. The composites have been prepared by means of ultrasonication. Then, the composite samples are deposited on alumina substrates and at 100 °C in a Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. Characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), CHN elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric (TG) measurements are used to analyze the samples at various stages of experiments. Hydrogen storage capacity of the composites namely, SWCNT-SnO2, SWCNT-WO3, and SWCNT-TiO2 are found to be 1.1, 0.9, and 1.3 wt %, respectively. Hydrogenated composite samples are stable at room temperature and desorption of hydrogen is found to be 100% reversible. Desorption temperature ranges and binding energy ranges of hydrogen have been measured from the desorption studies. The hydrogenation, dehydrogenation temperature, and binding energy of hydrogen fall in the recommended range of a suitable hydrogen storage medium applicable for fuel cell applications. Reproducibility and deterioration level of the composite samples have also been examined.

  7. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in δ13C and δ15N isotope values of flight feathers (range = 3.1‰ and 2.7‰, respectively) indicated that the source of carbon (i.e. ...

  8. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks along a seasonal wetland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecosystems of central and southern Africa are occupied by some of the largest seasonal wetlands commonly called dambos. Dambos are likely to store huge stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) because of their saturated conditions. However, most available literature report average SOC concentrations while ignoring ...

  9. Titanium-capped carbon chains as promising new hydrogen storage media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Zeng, Zhi

    2011-02-14

    The capacity of Ti-capped sp carbon atomic chains for use as hydrogen storage media is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The Ti atom is strongly attached at one end of the carbon chains via d-p hybridization, forming stable TiC(n) complexes. We demonstrate that the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules on Ti through Kubas interactions depends upon the chain types. For polyyne (n even) or cumulene (n odd) structures, each Ti atom can hold up to five or six H(2) molecules, respectively. Furthermore, the TiC(5) chain effectively terminated on a C(20) fullerene can store hydrogen with an optimal binding energy of 0.52 eV per H(2) molecule. Our results reveal a possible way to explore high-capacity hydrogen storage materials in truly one-dimensional carbon structures.

  10. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  11. A Low-Stress, Elastic, and Improved Hardness Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with fullerene-like microstructure was investigated with a different proportion of hydrogen supply in deposition. The results showed at hydrogen flow rate of 50 sccm, the deposited films showed a lower compressive stress (lower 48.6%, higher elastic recovery (higher 19.6%, near elastic recovery rate 90%, and higher hardness (higher 7.4% compared with the films deposited without hydrogen introduction. Structural analysis showed that the films with relatively high sp2 content and low bonded hydrogen content possessed high hardness, elastic recovery rate, and low compressive stress. It was attributed to the curved graphite microstructure, which can form three-dimensional covalently bonded network.

  12. CARBON TO NITROGEN RATIO AND NITROGENOUS WASTE ACCUMULATION IN THE INTENSIVE CATFISH (Clarias gariepinus CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Gunadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out to determine the optimum C/N ratio for heterotrophic bacteria (biofloc growth in order to control nitrogenous waste accumulation in the catfish (Clarias gariepinus culture. Twenty fish with an initial individual size of about 50 g were stocked in fiberglass tanks which were filled with 200 L of water. Fish were fed with commercial floating fish feed with a protein level of 31%-33% (manufacturer label. The daily feeding rate was 2.5% of the fish biomass. The inoculation of commercial Bacillus sp. isolates was applied in the first day of the experiment after fish stocking in order to obtain a bacterial density in water of 106 cfu/L. Molases was suplemented daily to the tanks to adjust C/N ratio in water. Four C/N ratios, i.e. 0, 7, 14, and 21, were applied as treatments in this experiment. The results showed that molasses suplementation up to C/N ratio 14 to 21 were able to support the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and to inhibit the accumulation of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN and nitrite in water therefore increase water quality for better growth of cultured catfish.

  13. Adsorption Sites of Hydrogen Atom on Pure and Mg-Doped Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Al-Ghamdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen adsorption sites on pure multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT and Mg-doped MWCNTs material system have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations as well as quantum chemical calculations. Through combining MWCNTs with Mg, the hydrogen adsorption sites energy on this Mg-MWCNTs system is found to be larger than that of the pure MWCNTs. Additionally, it was found that, through Mg-doping, new adsorption sites for hydrogen molecules are created in comparison with undoped nanotubes. It is also found that H atom is preferably adsorbed at every place near magnesium atom.

  14. Modeling of roughness effect on hydrogen permeation in a low carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Carreño, J. A.; Uribe, I.; Carrillo, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented to evaluate the effect of the roughness and the profile of concentration of hydrogen in a low carbon steel. The model takes advantage of the Fick's Second Law, to predict the transport of hydrogen in the steel. The problem is treated as a variational one and its space solution is made numerically by means of the Finite Elements Method, while the temporal equation is solved via the Finite Differences Method, in order to determine the concentration profiles of Hydrogen in t...

  15. Carbon hybridized halloysite nanotubes for high-performance hydrogen storage capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming; Ouyang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanotubes of carbon and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with different carbon:HNTs ratio were hydrothermally synthesized from natural halloysite and sucrose. The samples display uniformly cylindrical hollow tubular structure with different morphologies. These hybrid nanotubes were concluded to be promising medium for physisorption-based hydrogen storage. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of pristine HNTs was 0.35% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while that of carbon coated HNTs with the pre-set carbon:HNTs ratio of 3:1 (3C-HNTs) was 0.48% under the same condition. This carbon coated method could offer a new pattern for increasing the hydrogen adsorption capacity. It was also possible to enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacity through the spillover mechanism by incorporating palladium (Pd) in the samples of HNTs (Pd-HNTs) and 3C-HNTs (Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs are the samples with different location of Pd nanoparticles). The hydrogen adsorption capacity of the Pd-HNTs was 0.50% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while those of Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs were 0.58% and 0.63%, respectively. In particular, for this spillover mechanism of Pd-carbon-HNTs ternary system, the bidirectional transmission of atomic and molecular hydrogen (3C-Pd-HNTs) was concluded to be more effective than the unidirectional transmission (Pd-3C-HNTs) in this work for the first time. PMID:26201827

  16. Carbon hybridized halloysite nanotubes for high-performance hydrogen storage capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming; Ouyang, Jing

    2015-07-23

    Hybrid nanotubes of carbon and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with different carbon:HNTs ratio were hydrothermally synthesized from natural halloysite and sucrose. The samples display uniformly cylindrical hollow tubular structure with different morphologies. These hybrid nanotubes were concluded to be promising medium for physisorption-based hydrogen storage. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of pristine HNTs was 0.35% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while that of carbon coated HNTs with the pre-set carbon:HNTs ratio of 3:1 (3C-HNTs) was 0.48% under the same condition. This carbon coated method could offer a new pattern for increasing the hydrogen adsorption capacity. It was also possible to enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacity through the spillover mechanism by incorporating palladium (Pd) in the samples of HNTs (Pd-HNTs) and 3C-HNTs (Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs are the samples with different location of Pd nanoparticles). The hydrogen adsorption capacity of the Pd-HNTs was 0.50% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while those of Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs were 0.58% and 0.63%, respectively. In particular, for this spillover mechanism of Pd-carbon-HNTs ternary system, the bidirectional transmission of atomic and molecular hydrogen (3C-Pd-HNTs) was concluded to be more effective than the unidirectional transmission (Pd-3C-HNTs) in this work for the first time.

  17. Novel Carbon (C)-Boron (B)-Nitrogen (N)-Containing H2 Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shih-Yuan [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Giustra, Zachary X. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Autrey, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Osenar, Paul [Protonex Technology Corporation, Southborough, MA (United States)

    2017-09-20

    The following summarizes the research conducted for DOE project DE-EE0005658 “Novel Carbon(C)-Boron(B)-Nitrogen(N)-Containing H2 Storage Materials”. This work focused in part on the continued study of two materials identified from the preceding project DE-FG360GO18143 (“Hydrogen Storage by Novel CBN Heterocycle Materials”) as lead candidates to meet the DOE technical targets for either vehicular or non-automotive hydrogen storage applications. Specifically, a room-temperature liquid, 3-methyl-1,2-cyclopentane (B), and a high H2 capacity solid, 1,2-BN-cyclohexane (J), were selected for further characterization and performance optimization. In addition to these compounds, the current project also aimed to prepare several new materials predicted to be disposed towards direct reversibility of H2 release and uptake, a feature deemed critical to achieving efficient recycling of spent fuel end products. To assist in the rational design of these and other next-generation materials, this project undertook to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen release from established compounds (mainly B and J) using a combined experimental/computational approach. Among this project’s signature accomplishments, the preliminary synthetic route to B was optimized for production on decagram scale. With such quantities of material available, its performance in powering an actual 30 W proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack was tested and found to be identical to that of facility H2. Despite this positive proof-of-concept achievement, however, further consideration of neat B as a potential hydrogen storage material was abandoned due to evidence of thermal instability. Specifically, mass spectrometry-coupled thermogravimetric analysis (TGA-MS) revealed significant H2 release from B to initiate at 50 °C, well below the 60 °C minimum threshold set by the DOE. This result prompted a more extensive investigation in the decomposition mechanism of B vis-à-vis that of J, which

  18. Carbon and nitrogen burial in a plateau lake during eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changchun; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Yunmei; Lin, Chen; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Mingli; Zhu, A-Xing; Yang, Hao; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-11-06

    Organic carbon (OC) buried in lake sediment is an important component of the global carbon cycle. The impact of eutrophication on OC burial in lakes should be addressed due to worldwide lake eutrophication. Fourteen (210)Pb- and (137)Cs-dated sediment cores taken in Dianchi Lake (China) in August 2006 (seven cores) and July 2014 (seven cores) were analyzed to evaluate the response of the organic carbon accumulation rate (OCAR) to eutrophication and algal blooms over the past hundred years. The mean value of OCAR before eutrophication occurred in 1979, 16.62±7.53 (mean value±standard deviation), increased to 54.33±27.29gm(-2)yr(-1) after eutrophication. It further increased to 61.98±28.94gm(-2)yr(-1) after algal blooms occurred (1989). The accumulation rate of organic nitrogen (ONAR) is coupled with OCAR. The high loss rate of OC and organic nitrogen (ON) leads to a long-term burial efficiency of only 10% and 5% of OC and ON. However, this efficiency can still lead to an increase in OCAR by a factor of 4.55 during algal blooms in Dianchi Lake. Dianchi Lake stored 1.26±0.32 Tg carbon and 0.071±0.018 Tg nitrogen, including 0.94±0.23 Tg OC and 0.32±0.14 Tg inorganic carbon, 0.066±0.018 Tg ON, 0.002±0.001 Tg nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) and 0.003±0.001 Tg ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) between 1900 and 2012. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on the understorey carbon balance over the growing season in a boreal Pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D. B.; Eisele, B.; Hasselquist, N. J.

    2013-08-01

    Boreal forests play a key role in the global carbon cycle and are facing rapid shifts in nitrogen availability with poorly understood consequences for ecosystem function and global climate. We quantified the effects of nitrogen availability on carbon fluxes from a relatively understudied component of these forests - understorey vegetation - at three intervals over the summer growing period in a northern Swedish Scots Pine stand. Nitrogen addition altered both photosynthetic carbon uptake and respiratory release, but the magnitude and direction of this effect depended on the time during the growing season and the amount of nitrogen added. Specifically, nitrogen addition stimulated net ecosystem carbon uptake only in the late growing season. We find evidence for species-specific control of understorey carbon sink strength, as photosynthesis per unit ground area was positively correlated only with the abundance of the vascular plant Vaccinium myrtillus and no others. Comparison of photosynthetic carbon uptake with data on plant carbon dioxide release from the study site, indicate that understorey vegetation photosynthate was mainly supplying respiratory demands for much of the year. Only in the late season with nitrogen addition did understorey vegetation appear to experience a large surplus of carbon in excess of respiratory requirements. Further work, simultaneously comparing all major biomass and respiratory carbon fluxes in understorey and tree vegetation, is required to resolve the likely impacts of environmental changes on whole-ecosystem carbon sequestration in boreal forests.

  20. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  1. Mechanisms of Hydrogen Transport in Flexible-Wall Narrow Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Hao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interaction between hydrogen and carbon nanotubes is crucial to enhancing the performance of hydrogen storage and nanofluidic carbon-adsorbent systems. Accordingly, this study performs a series of molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the transport properties of hydrogen molecules confined within a flexible narrow carbon nanotube. The tube’s diameter is 10.8 Å at temperatures in the range of 100~800 K. The particle loadings inside carbon nanotubes are ranging from 0.01∼1 No/Å. The results show that the hydrogen molecules exhibit three distinct diffusion regimes, namely, single-file, Fickian, and ballistic, depending on the value of the Knudsen number. In addition, it is shown that with the Knudsen number of less than 1, the tube-wall long wavelength acoustic phonons induced Rayleigh traveling wave prompts a longitudinal wave slip and compression-expansion of the hydrogen molecule crowds within the CNT, which leads to a significant increase in the mean square displacement of the molecules.

  2. The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon foils prepared bydc glow discharge in ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, N. R. S.; Tolfree, D. W. L.; John, P.; Odeh, I. M.; Thomas, M. J. K.; Tricker, M. J.; Wilson, J. I. B.; England, J. B. A.; Newton, D.

    1980-10-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon films produced bydc glow discharge have been determined using a precise method involving the elastic scattering of 25 MeV α-particles. The number of carbon-hydrogen bonds has been determined for similar samples using infra-red spectroscopy. The results are compared with those for samples made by the carbon arc process. Assuming that the glow discharge carbon contains graphitic regions surrounded by amorphous tetrahedrally bonded material to which hydrogen can attach, a simple estimate is made of the relative numbers of carbon atoms in the two forms.

  3. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  4. Renewable Hydrogen for Carbon-Free Data Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, Steven W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wipke, Keith B [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cader, T. [Hewlett Packard Enterprise

    2017-11-28

    NREL, in collaboration with Hewlett Packard Enterprise, has developed a system model for simulating both grid-tied and island microgrid power for hydrogen production and data center operation (assumed at 50 MW, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

  5. Carbon and nitrogen co-doping self-assembled MoS2 multilayer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Jiao; Chai, Liqiang; He, Tengfei; Yu, Fucheng; Wang, Peng

    2017-06-01

    Mo-S-C-N composite films were prepared using reactive magnetron sputtering of graphite and MoS2 targets in argon and nitrogen atmospheres. The effects of carbon/nitrogen co-doping and carbon concentration on the composition, microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of deposited films have been investigated by various characterization techniques. The results show that the deposited films comprise MoS2 nanocrystalline and amorphous carbon, and the incorporating nitrogen forms Mo-N and C-N chemical bonds. Increasing carbon concentration leads to the increase of sp2 carbon fraction in the films. Furthermore, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that a self-assembled multilayer structure with periodicity in the nanometer scale is formed in the Mo-S-C-N film. Benefiting from the composite and self-assembled multilayer structures, the hardness of Mo-S-C-N film deposited at optimized parameter reaches up to 9.76 GPa, and corresponding friction experiment indicates that this composite films display low friction coefficient and high wear resistance both in vacuum and ambient air conditions.

  6. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for Red Phosphorous Based Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serving as conductive matrix and stress buffer, the carbon matrix plays a pivotal role in enabling red phosphorus to be a promising anode material for high capacity lithium ion batteries and sodium ion batteries. In this paper, nitrogen-doping is proved to effective enhance the interface interaction between carbon and red phosphorus. In detail, the adsorption energy between phosphorus atoms and oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon is significantly reduced by nitrogen doping, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption mechanisms are further revealed on the basis of DFT (the first density functional theory calculations. The RPNC (red phosphorus/nitrogen-doped carbon composite material shows higher cycling stability and higher capacity than that of RPC (red phosphorus/carbon composite anode. After 100 cycles, the RPNC still keeps discharge capacity of 1453 mAh g−1 at the current density of 300 mA g−1 (the discharge capacity of RPC after 100 cycles is 1348 mAh g−1. Even at 1200 mA g−1, the RPNC composite still delivers a capacity of 1178 mAh g−1. This work provides insight information about the interface interactions between composite materials, as well as new technology develops high performance phosphorus based anode materials.

  7. Electronic structure of nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes irradiated with argon ions: XPS and XANES studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesov, S. N.; Korusenko, P. M.; Bolotov, V. V.; Povoroznyuk, S. N.; Smirnov, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    Using the methods of X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies with synchrotron radiation, data on changes in the electronic structure and chemical composition of nitrogen-containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) upon their exposure to the radiation of argon ions with an energy of 5 keV are obtained. It is found that the exposure leads to an increase in the degree of defectiveness of the N-MWCNTs structure and to the carbon oxidation with formation of various oxygen-containing groups (C-OH, C=O/COOH, C-O-C/O-C-O, and CO3). The presence of carbon-oxygen bonds on the surface of carbon nanotubes is associated with the formation of radiation defects. It is shown that an increase in the fraction of nitrogen atoms present in the substituting configuration in the N-MWCNTs wall structure due to the irradiation does not give rise to an increase in the density of the occupied states near the Fermi level against the background of an increase in the degree of structure defectiveness, carbon oxidation, and a decrease in the total nitrogen concentration. The obtained results show that the irradiation of N-MWCNTs with argon ions allows one to successfully functionalize their surface.

  8. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show an impro......This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show...

  9. Marine meiofauna, carbon and nitrogen mineralization in sandy and soft sediments of Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, S.; Christensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Martin Vinther

    2000-01-01

    layers of the sediment. Algal photosynthetic activity and nitrogen uptake reduced nitrogen effluxes and denitrification rates. Sulfate reduction was the most important pathway for carbon mineralization in the sediments of the shallow-water station. In contrast, high bottom-water NO3- concentrations...... and was, together with organotrophic O-2 respiration, the most important pathway for carbon mineralization within these sediments. The obtained process rates were comparable to mineralization rates from much warmer localities, suggesting that benthic mineralization in arctic marine environments......Organic carbon mineralization was studied in a shallow-water (4 m), sandy sediment and 2 comparatively deep-water (150 and 300 m), soft sediments in Disko Bay, West Greenland. Benthic microalgae inhabiting the shallow-water locality significantly affected diurnal O-2 conditions within the surface...

  10. Thermodynamic diagrams for high temperature plasmas of air, air-carbon, carbon-hydrogen mixtures, and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kroepelin, H; Hoffmann, K-U

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic Diagrams for High Temperature Plasmas of Air, Air-Carbon, Carbon-Hydrogen Mixtures, and Argon provides information relating to the properties of equilibrium gas plasmas formed from hydrocarbons, from air without argon, from pure argon, and from mixtures of air and carbon at various compositions, temperatures and pressures. The data are presented in graphical rather than tabular form to provide a clearer picture of the plasma processes investigated. This book is composed of four chapters, and begins with the introduction to the characteristics of plasmas, with emphasis on their th

  11. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Peter [University of Missouri; Wexler, Carlos [University of Missouri; Hawthorne, M. Frederick [University of Missouri; Lee, Mark W. [University of Missouri; Jalistegi, Satish S. [University of Missouri

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  12. Percolative metal-organic framework/carbon composites for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuqian; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Sun, Xiang; Shi, Shangzhao; Zhang, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yuchun

    2014-05-01

    Percolative Metal-organic framework/Carbon (MOFAC) composites are synthesized by IRMOF8 (isoreticular metal-organic frameworks) directly depositing on activated carbon via heterogeneous nucleation. Carbon content is calculated by TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis) tests. XRD (X-ray diffraction) and FESEM (Field emission-scanning electron microscope) are carried out to characterize the structures of the samples. BET surface areas and the pore size distribution are measured. The dielectric constant is measured with impedance analyzer and a specially designed sample holder. The dielectric constants of the MOFAC composites rise with increasing the carbon content, and the composites possess the insulator-conductor transition as the carbon content increases from 17.77 wt% to 22.2 wt%. The composites are further tested for hydrogen storage capability under assist of the PMN-PT (single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) generated electric field. With help from the PMN-PT, the hydrogen uptake capability is increased about 31.5% over the MOFAC3 (MOF-Carbon composite with 22.2 wt% of carbon) without PMN-PT, which is elucidated by the charge distribution mechanisms. The improved storage is due to a stronger electrostatic interaction between IRMOF8 and hydrogen molecule caused by field polarization. Meanwhile, rapid adsorption/desorption kinetics and total reversibility on the samples are observed in the present or absence of external electric field.

  13. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  14. Potential Biological Chemistry of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) with the Nitrogen Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    King, S. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an important gaseous signaling agent generated in numerous biological tissues, influences many physiological processes. This biological profile appears reminiscent of nitric oxide, another important endogenously synthesized gaseous signaling molecule. Hydrogen sulfide reacts with nitric oxide or oxidized forms of nitric oxide and nitric oxide donors in vitro to form species that display distinct biology compared to both hydrogen sulfide and NO. The products of these interest...

  15. Constructing hierarchical sulfur-doped nitrogenous carbon nanosheets for sodium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejun; Hou, Hongshuai; Huang, Caijin; Ji, Xiaobo; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2017-11-01

    Hierarchical sulfur-doped nitrogenous carbon (S/NC) and nitrogenous carbon (NC) nanosheets are successfully fabricated by carbonization of their corresponding precursor polymers which are synthesized through the polymerization reaction of dianhydride and multi-amine compounds. Hierarchical S/NC nanosheets deliver greatly enhanced reversible capacity, compared with hierarchical NC nanosheets, of 280 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 after 300 cycles. It is found that the introduction of sulfur species in carbon skeleton results in increasing the turbostratic structures, rather than enlarging the interlayer distances, for boosting the specific capacity of sodium-ion storage. The turbostratic structures and sulfur dopant existed in the carbon can offer more active sites for the sodium-ion storage. Carbon-based materials doped with sulfur are capable of improving the sodium-ion storage property, which can broaden the horizon of designing a string of outstanding carbon materials for the future energy storage technologies.

  16. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  17. PAF-derived nitrogen-doped 3D Carbon Materials for Efficient Energy Conversion and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Wang, Dan; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming; Chen, Jian-Feng; Cao, Dapeng

    2015-06-05

    Owing to the shortage of the traditional fossil fuels caused by fast consumption, it is an urgent task to develop the renewable and clean energy sources. Thus, advanced technologies for both energy conversion (e.g., solar cells and fuel cells) and storage (e.g., supercapacitors and batteries) are being studied extensively. In this work, we use porous aromatic framework (PAF) as precursor to produce nitrogen-doped 3D carbon materials, i.e., N-PAF-Carbon, by exposing NH3 media. The "graphitic" and "pyridinic" N species, large surface area, and similar pore size as electrolyte ions endow the nitrogen-doped PAF-Carbon with outstanding electronic performance. Our results suggest the N-doping enhance not only the ORR electronic catalysis but also the supercapacitive performance. Actually, the N-PAF-Carbon obtains ~70 mV half-wave potential enhancement and 80% increase as to the limiting current after N doping. Moreover, the N-PAF-Carbon displays free from the CO and methanol crossover effect and better long-term durability compared with the commercial Pt/C benchmark. Moreover, N-PAF-Carbon also possesses large capacitance (385 F g(-1)) and excellent performance stability without any loss in capacitance after 9000 charge-discharge cycles. These results clearly suggest that PAF-derived N-doped carbon material is promising metal-free ORR catalyst for fuel cells and capacitor electrode materials.

  18. The effect of mesoporous carbon modification by nitrogen on its enrichment efficiency of chromate ion: Comparison between N-doped mesoporous carbon and amino grafted mesoporous carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, N-doped mesoporous carbon (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media. The structural order and textural properties of nanostructured materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen Adsorption-desorption experiment. Adsorption of Chromate over various porous adsorbents such as mesoporous carbon (MC, N-doped mesoporous carbon (MCN, and amino modified mesoporous carbon (AMC was studied from solutions with different concentration, temperature and pH in polar (water solvent. The adsorption isotherms of Chromate were in agreement with Langmuir model, moreover, the uptake capacity of Chromate over MCN was much higher than amino modified mesoporous carbon (AMC and pristine mesoporous carbon adsorbent.

  19. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquids into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Men

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquids have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection.

  20. Ethanol steam reforming with Co0 (111 for hydrogen and carbon nanofilament generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cobalt metal catalysts are highly active at low temperature ESR. In this study, ESR was studied over barren Co metal (Co0 from oxalate precursor without any pre-reduction to find out its role in hydrogen and carbon nano-filament generation. The ethanol conversion was found to be 100% with 96.5% hydrogen selectivity at 723K. The time on stream (TOS study has shown stability up to 19h for Co catalyst. The diameter of Co-carbon nanofilament was calculated and found to be typically in the range of 70–80 nm by the TEM image analysis of spent catalyst. The SEM with EDS analysis revealed that Co0 state was found in between the carbon nanofilament as well as at the tip of carbon nanofilament. The obtained Co-C nanofilament displayed an adsorption capacity of 552 mg/g at optimum parameter of pH = 2, contact time = 60 minute, concentration = 30 ppm, dose = 0.05g for Orange G dye removal without any chemical or physical treatment. This approach has shown significant results in terms of hydrogen generation and method of Co carbon nanofilament for further utilization in different prospects. Keywords: Catalyst deactivation, Characterization, ESR, Hydrogen production

  1. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  2. Migration Mechanism for Atomic Hydrogen in Porous Carbon Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, B.; Zhao, Y. F.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2012-05-14

    To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies on H hopping from a carbon nanotube (CNT) to another. Using density functional theory, we have found that the barrier for H hopping becomes smaller than that for diffusion along a tube for certain CNT separations, decreasting to less than 0.5 eV for separations of -3.1 {angstrom}. Such significant reduction occurs irrespective of radius, chirality, registry, and orientation of the two CNTs: the diffusion is thus facilitated by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon-based nanomaterials.

  3. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1 daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2 competition among three plants functional types (PFTs, production and litter production of plants; (3 decomposition of peat; and (4 production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  4. HYDROGENATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING NI SUPPORT ON H-BETA ZEOLITE IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary rationale for use of supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent in hydrogenation is the elimination of mass transfer limitations, through enhancement of the solubility of hydrogen at the reaction locus. Hydrogenation of anthracene was performed using NiHB-zeolite catal...

  5. Electrochemical wastewater treatment: influence of the type of carbon and of nitrogen on the organic load removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annabel; Coelho, João; Ciríaco, Lurdes; Pacheco, Maria José; Lopes, Ana

    2016-12-01

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) and Ti/Pt/PbO2 anodes were utilized to perform the electrodegradation of synthetic samples containing humic acid in the presence of different organic and inorganic carbon-containing and nitrogen-containing compounds. The influence of the chloride ion in the degradation process of the different synthetic samples was also assessed. The results showed that the anodic oxidation process can efficiently degrade recalcitrant compounds such as humic acid. The presence of carbonate in solution enhances the nitrogen removal, whereas it hinders the oxidation of the organic compounds. When organic nitrogen is present, it is converted to NH4(+), which in turn is oxidized to nitrate and to volatile nitrogen compounds. Hydroxyl radicals are more prone to oxidize the organic nitrogen than the ammonium nitrogen. The presence of chloride enhances the organic matter and nitrogen removal rates, BDD being the anode material that yields the highest removals.

  6. The key role of metal dopants in nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sisi; Deng, Chengwei; Yao, Lan; Zhong, Hexiang; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Highly active non-precious metal catalysts based on nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel (NCX) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is prepared with resorcinol(R)-formaldehyde (F) resin as carbon precursor and NH3 as nitrogen source. NCX samples doped with various transition metal species are investigated to elucidate the effect of transition metals on the structure and ORR activity of the products. As-prepared NCX catalysts with different metals are characterized using nitrogen-adsorption analysis, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The structural properties and ORR activities of the catalysts are altered by addition of different metals, and NCX doped with iron exhibits the best ORR activity. Metal doping evidently promotes the formation of more micropores and mesopores. Raman and XPS studies reveal that iron, cobalt, and nickel can increase pyridinic-N contents and that iron can catalyse the formation of graphene structures and enhance quaternary-N contents. Whereas the total N-content does not determine ORR activity, Metal-N4/C-like species generated from the interaction of the metals with nitrogen and carbon atoms play important roles in achieving high ORR activity.

  7. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Ju Won [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Sharma, Ronish [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meduri, Praveen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Arey, Bruce W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schaef, Herbert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lutkenhaus, Jodie [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Lemmon, John P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, Praveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nune, Satish K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Electrochemical performance of the existing state-of-the art capacitors is not very high, key scientific barrier is that its charge storage mechanism wholly depends on adsorption of electrolyte on electrode. We present a novel method for the synthesis of nitrogen -doped porous carbons and address the drawback by precisely controlling composition and surface area. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon was synthesized using a self-sacrificial template technique without any additional nitrogen and carbon sources. They exhibited exceptionally high capacitance (239 Fg-1) due to additional pseudocapacitance originating from doped nitrogen. Cycling tests showed no obvious capacitance decay even after 10,000 cycles, which meets the requirement of commercial supercapacitors. Our method is simple and highly efficient for the production of large quantities of nitrogen-doped porous carbons.

  8. Nitrogen Doped Macroporous Carbon as Electrode Materials for High Capacity of Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen doped carbon materials as electrodes of supercapacitors have attracted abundant attention. Herein, we demonstrated a method to synthesize N-doped macroporous carbon materials (NMC with continuous channels and large size pores carbonized from polyaniline using multiporous silica beads as sacrificial templates to act as electrode materials in supercapacitors. By the nice carbonized process, i.e., pre-carbonization at 400 °C and then pyrolysis at 700/800/900/1000 °C, NMC replicas with high BET specific surface areas exhibit excellent stability and recyclability as well as superb capacitance behavior (~413 F ⋅ g−1 in alkaline electrolyte. This research may provide a method to synthesize macroporous materials with continuous channels and hierarchical pores to enhance the infiltration and mass transfer not only used as electrode, but also as catalyst somewhere micro- or mesopores do not work well.

  9. Effect of carbon and nitrogen addition on nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide fluxes from thawing forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haohao, Wu; Xingkai, Xu; Cuntao, Duan; TuanSheng, Li; Weiguo, Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Packed soil-core incubation experiments were done to study the effects of carbon (glucose, 6.4 g C m-2) and nitrogen (NH4Cl and KNO3, 4.5 g N m-2) addition on nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes during thawing of frozen soils under two forest stands (broadleaf and Korean pine mixed forest and white birch forest) with two moisture levels (55 and 80% water-filled pore space). With increasing soil moisture, the magnitude and longevity of the flush N2O flux from forest soils was enhanced during the early period of thawing, which was accompanied by great NO3--N consumption. Without N addition, the glucose-induced cumulative CO2 fluxes ranged from 9.61 to 13.49 g CO2-C m-2, which was larger than the dose of carbon added as glucose. The single addition of glucose increased microbial biomass carbon but slightly affected soil dissolved organic carbon pool. Thus, the extra carbon released upon addition of glucose can result from the decomposition of soil native organic carbon. The glucose-induced N2O and CO2 fluxes were both significantly correlated to the glucose-induced total N and dissolved organic carbon pools and influenced singly and interactively by soil moisture and KNO3 addition. The interactive effects of glucose and nitrogen inputs on N2O and CO2 fluxes from forest soils after frost depended on N sources, soil moisture, and vegetation types.

  10. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  11. Application of Moessbauer Spectroscopy to the Carbon Oxides Hydrogenation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubeiro, M. L. [UCV, Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: mcubeiro@strix.ciens.ucv.ve; Gonzalez-Jimenez, F.; Goldwasser, M. R.; Perez-Zurita, M. J.; Pietri, E.; Garcia, L. [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, UCV (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2001-05-15

    Iron-based catalysts have favorable activity and selectivity properties for the CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reactions. Several Fe phases (oxides and carbides) can be present in these catalysts. The interaction of Fe with the other components of the catalyst (support, promoters) can affect the ease of reduction and also its transformation during the reactions. In this work, the relationship between catalytic behavior in the CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reactions and the Fe phase composition of fresh and reacted catalysts was studied. Two types of catalysts were tested: a laterite and the other one made of iron supported on alumina, both unpromoted and promoted with K and Mn. Only those Fe species which can be reduced-carburized, by means of a pretreatment or by an in situ transformation under the reaction, seem to be able to perform the CO or CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The reoxidation of the Fe carbide to magnetite was not associated to deactivation. The selectivity seems to be more affected by Fe species difficult to reduce than by magnetite produced by reoxidation.

  12. Carbon and nitrogen contents in Desert Plants and Soil in the Yanqi basin of Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are two main elements in plant-soil systems. Here, we present a study of carbon and nitrogen contents in several typical desert plants and underlying soil, which was conducted in Yanqi basin, Xinjiang province of China. Our results show that carbon (C) content is around 30% in both aboveground tissues and belowground roots. Nitrogen (N) content in desert plants has a range of 0.5%-3.5%, and the aboveground tissue has higher nitrogen content (~2%) than the belowground root (~1%). As a result, the belowground root has higher C/N ratio (~35) than the aboveground tissue (~25). Especially, the C/N values in belowground roots are twice as much as their aboveground tissues in Acroption repens, Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb. and Halostachys caspica. In desert soils, the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) with depth 0-50cm are range of 12.5-4.6 and 3.2-1.4 g/kg, respectively, different . As expected, the SOC and TN contents are declined with the depth increase. Meanwhile, our result indicated the soil TN is followed the SOC dynamic, as both elements are bond into the organic compounds. However, unlike the C/N ratios in aboveground tissue and roots, there is no significant difference of C/N ratios (2.95-3.46) in the soils within the 0-50 cm depth. The results inferred that in the desert plant C mainly storage in roots, but the C, N allocation between desert plant and soil has no significantly related.

  13. Light-Promoted Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide¿An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Puga Vaca, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide is considered as a viable strategy to generate fuels while closing the carbon cycle (heavily disrupted by the abuse in the exploitation of fossil resources) and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The process can be performed by heat-powered catalytic processes, albeit conversion and selectivity tend to be reduced at increasing temperatures owing to thermodynamic constraints. Recent investigations, as summarised in this overview, have proven that light acti...

  14. Structure and properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by nitrogen-ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. P.; Yano, T.; Shinozaki, T.; Ooie, T.

    2002-09-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited by pulsed KrF excimer laser ablation of graphite with assistance of low energy nitrogen-ion-beam bombardment. The nitrogen to carbon ratio, bonding state, microstructure, and surface morphology of the deposited carbon nitride films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The irradiation effect of the nitrogen ion beam with various ion currents on the synthesis of carbon nitride films was investigated. XPS and FTIR analyses indicate that the bonding state between carbon and nitrogen in the deposited films is influenced by nitrogen irradiation with different ion currents during deposition. The carbon-nitrogen bonding of C-N and CDouble_BondN is observed in the films. High nitrogen ion current is proposed to promote the desired N-sp3C bonds, i.e., the C3N4 phase. In addition, tribological properties of the carbon nitride films deposited on TiN coated stainless steel substrates were also studied in both dry and oil environments, which exhibits a low friction coefficient compared with hard TiN film. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  15. Simulating coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics following mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edburg, Steven L. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hicke, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Lawrence, David M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Thornton, Peter E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Insect outbreaks are major ecosystem disturbances, affecting a similar area as forest fires annually across North America. Tree mortality caused by epidemics of bark beetles alters carbon cycling in the first several years following the disturbance by reducing stand-level primary production and increasing decomposition rates. The few studies of biogeochemical cycling following outbreaks have shown a range of impacts from small responses of net carbon fluxes in the first several years after a severe outbreak to large forest areas that are sources of carbon to the atmosphere for decades. To gain more understanding about causes of this range of responses, we used an ecosystem model to assess impacts of different bark beetle outbreak conditions on coupled carbon and nitrogen cycling. We modified the Community Land Model with prognostic carbon and nitrogen to include prescribed bark beetle outbreaks. We then compared control simulations (without a bark beetle outbreak) to simulations with various mortality severity, durations of outbreak, and snagfall dynamics to quantify the range of carbon flux responses and recovery rates of net ecosystem exchange to a range of realistic outbreak conditions. Prescribed mortality by beetles reduced leaf area and thus productivity. Gross primary productivity decreased by as much as 80% for a severe outbreak (95% mortality) and by 10% for less severe outbreaks (25% mortality). Soil mineral nitrogen dynamics (immobilization and plant uptake) were important in governing post-outbreak productivity, and were strongly modulated by carbon inputs to the soil from killed trees. Initial increases in heterotrophic respiration caused by a pulse of labile carbon from roots were followed by a slight reduction (from pre-snagfall reduced inputs), then a secondary increase (from inputs due to snagfall). Secondary increases in heterotrophic respiration were largest for simulated windthrow of snags after a prescribed snagfall delay period. Net ecosystem

  16. Adsorption behaviors of methyl orange dye on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; An, Nihong; Liu, Gang; Li, Jialu; Liu, Na; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yuan, Xiaoling

    2016-03-15

    A series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials (NMC) with different nitrogen contents (from 9.1 to 11.3 wt.%) were prepared using urea and ammonia as economical nitrogen resources by sol-gel method. The NMC materials possessed high surface areas (from 659 m(2)/g to 912 m(2)/g) as well as large number of oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups. The adsorption behaviors of NMC materials for anionic dye methyl orange (MO) were investigated, which are fit excellent for the Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation. All the materials exhibited high adsorption capacity for MO at room temperature. Their adsorption capacity can be adjusted by changing the nitrogen contents in NMC materials. Moreover, treating the NMC material at higher temperature can significantly improve the adsorption capacity for MO. According to the results of characterization, the main features of NMC materials, like large pore size and abundant basic nitrogen-containing groups on the surface, should be related to the excellent adsorption property for MO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrailov Simeon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  18. Increased forest carbon storage with increased atmospheric CO2 despite nitrogen limitation: a game-theoretic allocation model for trees in competition for nitrogen and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybzinski, Ray; Farrior, Caroline E; Pacala, Stephen W

    2015-03-01

    Changes in resource availability often cause competitively driven changes in tree allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots, either via plastic changes within individuals or through turnover of individuals with differing strategies. Here, we investigate how optimally competitive tree allocation should change in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 along a gradient of nitrogen and light availability, together with how those changes should affect carbon storage in living biomass. We present a physiologically-based forest model that includes the primary functions of wood and nitrogen. From a tree's perspective, wood is an offensive and defensive weapon used against neighbors in competition for light. From a biogeochemical perspective, wood is the primary living reservoir of stored carbon. Nitrogen constitutes a tree's photosynthetic machinery and the support systems for that machinery, and its limited availability thus reduces a tree's ability to fix carbon. This model has been previously successful in predicting allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots along natural productivity gradients. Using game theory, we solve the model for competitively optimal foliage, wood, and fine root allocation strategies for trees in competition for nitrogen and light as a function of CO2 and nitrogen mineralization rate. Instead of down-regulating under nitrogen limitation, carbon storage under elevated CO2 relative to carbon storage at ambient CO2 is approximately independent of the nitrogen mineralization rate. This surprising prediction is a consequence of both increased competition for nitrogen driving increased fine root biomass and increased competition for light driving increased allocation to wood under elevated CO2 . © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Carbon cryogel as support of platinum nano-sized electrocatalyst for the hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babic, B.M. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciencies, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Vracar, Lj.M. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Radmilovic, V. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBLN University of California, Berkeley (United States); Krstajic, N.V. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: nedeljko@tmf.bg.ac.yu

    2006-05-05

    The kinetics of hydrogen oxidation reaction was studied in perchloric acid solution on carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles using the rotating disk electrode technique. Carbon cryogel and commercial carbon black. Vulcan XC-72 were used as catalyst supports. Pt/C catalysts were prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG) solution. Considerable effect has been observed for the specific surface area of carbon support on the fundamental properties of Pt/C catalyst, such as catalyst particle size distribution and dispersion as well as catalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrogen. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the particle size of the catalyst decreases with the increase of specific surface area of carbon support. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used for determination of the actual exposed surface area of catalyst particles. It was found that Pt catalyst prepared by using the novel carbon material displayed better hydrogen electrochemical oxidation activity than the catalyst prepared by using Vulcan XC-72.

  20. Enhancement of oxygen reduction activity of nanoshell carbons by introducing nitrogen atoms from metal phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jozaki@cee.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanifuji, Shin-ichi; Furuichi, Atsuya; Yabutsuka, Katsutoshi [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Nanoshell carbon is a type of catalytically grown nanocarbon with a hollow, round, shell-like structure, with a diameter in the range of approximately 20-50 nm. It has been shown to possess the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and is also expected to be a non-Pt catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This paper reports the synergetic enhancement of the ORR activity of nanoshell carbons caused by the coexistence of nitrogen atoms. The nanoshell carbons were prepared by the carbonization of furan resin in the presence of acetylacetonates (AAs) and of phthalocyanines (Pcs), which contained Fe, Co, and Ni. The Pc-derived nanoshells (MP-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) showed higher ORR activities than the AA-derived nanoshells (MA-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) when the same metal elements were employed. An XPS study revealed that nitrogen species were introduced to the surface of the nanoshells when Pcs were used as the nanoshell-forming catalysts, and that no metal species remained on the nanoshells. Principally, the ORR activity of the carbons was governed by the presence of the nanoshells and further enhancement could be achieved by the introduction of nitrogen atoms. 0.78 V of OCV and 0.21 W cm{sup -2} of the maximum power density were observed for a fuel cell whose MEA consisted of 3CoP1000 cathode and a commercial Pt/C anode, when it was operated at 80 deg. C under a pressurized condition of 0.35 MPa.

  1. Hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped partial graphitized carbon monoliths for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yifeng; Du, Juan; Liu, Lei; Wang, Guoxu; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Aibing, E-mail: chen-ab@163.com [Hebei University of Science and Technology, College of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2017-03-15

    Porous carbon monoliths have attracted great interest in many fields due to their easy availability, large specific surface area, desirable electronic conductivity, and tunable pore structure. In this work, hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped partial graphitized carbon monoliths (N–MC–Fe) with ordered mesoporous have been successfully synthesized by using resorcinol-formaldehyde as precursors, iron salts as catalyst, and mixed triblock copolymers as templates via a one-step hydrothermal method. In the reactant system, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) is used as nitrogen source and one of the carbon precursors under hydrothermal conditions instead of using toxic formaldehyde. The N–MC–Fe show hierarchically porous structures, with interconnected macroporous and ordered hexagonally arranged mesoporous. Nitrogen element is in situ doped into carbon through decomposition of HMT. Iron catalyst is helpful to improve the graphitization degree and pore volume of N–MC–Fe. The synthesis strategy is user-friendly, cost-effective, and can be easily scaled up for production. As supercapacitors, the N–MC–Fe show good capacity with high specific capacitance and good electrochemical stability.

  2. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  3. Predicting hydrogen and methane adsorption in carbon nanopores for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Yungok; Morris, James; Cooper, Valentino; Morris Lab, U. tennessee Collaboration; Advanced material Group, ORNL Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    There are increasing demands for alternate fuels for transportation, which requires safe, high energy density, lightweight storage materials. Experimental measurements and theoretical predictions show relatively low hydrogen storage capacities in various porous materials, limiting hydrogen as a viable alternative for automobiles. In this work, we use a continuum model based on van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations to elucidate the role that long-range interactions play in the hydrogen adsorption properties of model slit nanopores in carbon. The proper treatment of long-range interactions gives an optimal pore size for hydrogen storage of 8-9 Å (larger than previously predicted). Remarkably, we find a peak hydrogen density close to that of liquid H2 at ambient temperatures, in agreement with recent experimental results on pore-size dependent adsorption in nanoporous carbon. We then show that such nanopores would be better suited to storing methane, possibly providing an alternative to fill the gap between the capacity required by DOE goals and that attainable with current hydrogen storage technology. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Hydride/Carbon Aerogel Composites for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4, a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs, a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. The objectives of the present work have been to investigate the synthesis, characterization, and hydrogenation behavior of Pd-, Ti- or Fe-doped CAs, NaAlH4, and MgH2 nanocomposites. The diameters of Pd nanoparticles onto CA’s surface and BET surface area of CAs were 3–10 nm and 700–900 m2g−1, respectively. The H2 storage capacity of metal hydrides has been studied using high-pressure TGA microbalance and they were 4.0, 2.7, 2.1, and 1.2 wt% for MgH2-FeTi-CAs, MgH2-FeTi, CAs-Pd, and 8 mol% Ti-doped NaAlH4, respectively, at room temperature. Carbon aerogels with higher surface area and mesoporous structures facilitated hydrogen diffusion and adsorption, which accounted for its extraordinary hydrogen storage phenomenon. The hydrogen adsorption abilities of CAs notably increased after inclusion of metal hydrides by the “hydrogen spillover” mechanisms.

  5. Facile electrospinning preparation of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers as bifunctional electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuang; Zuo, Pengjian; Fan, Liquan; Han, Jianan; Xiong, Yueping; Yin, Geping

    2016-04-01

    A novel electrochemical catalyst of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers (Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs) is prepared by a facile and cost-effective electrospinning technique. Excellent features of the porous carbon nanofibers with large amounts of Co atoms, N/P-doping effect, abundant pyridinic-N and Cosbnd Nx clusters as catalytic active sites, and the advantages of the structure and composition result in a high catalytic efficiency. In alkaline or acidic media, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities and kinetics for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), superior methanol tolerance and stability, and a similar four-electron pathway. In addition, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs also shows excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), offering a low onset potential of -0.216 V and a stable current density of 10 mA cm-2 at potential of -0.248 V. The mechanism of ORR and HER catalytic active site arises from the doping of N/P atoms in the Co-based CNFs, which is responsible for the excellent electrocatalytic performance. Due to the excellent catalytic efficiencies, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs act as a promising catalyst material for fuel cells and water splitting technologies.

  6. Influence of surface chemistry of carbon materials on their interactions with inorganic nitrogen contaminants in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaraj; Padhye, Lokesh P

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic nitrogen contaminants (INC) (NH 4 + , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , NH 3 , NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O) pose a growing risk to the environment, and their remediation methods are highly sought after. Application of carbon materials (CM), such as biochar and activated carbon, to remediate INC from agricultural fields and wastewater treatment plants has gained a significant interest since past few years. Understanding the role of surface chemistry of CM in adsorption of various INC is highly critical to increase adsorption efficiency as well as to assess the long term impact of using these highly recalcitrant CM for remediation of INC. Critical reviews of adsorption studies related to INC have revealed that carbon surface chemistry (surface functional groups, pH, Eh, elemental composition, and mineral content) has significant influence on adsorption of INC. Compared to basic functional groups, oxygen containing surface functional groups have been found to be more influential for adsorption of INC. However, basic sites on carbon materials still play an important role in chemisorption of anionic INC. Apart from surface functional groups, pH, Eh and pH zpc of CM and elemental and mineral composition of its surface are important properties capable of altering INC interactions with CM. This review summarizes our current understanding of INC interactions with CM's surface through the known chemisorption mechanisms: electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, electron donor-acceptor mechanism, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interaction, chemisorption aided by minerals, and interactions influenced by pH and elemental composition. Change in surface chemistry of CM in soil during aging is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on the forest floor carbon balance over the growing season in a boreal pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D. B.; Eisele, B.; Hasselquist, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal forests play a key role in the global carbon cycle and are facing rapid shifts in nitrogen availability with poorly understood consequences for ecosystem function and global climate change. We quantified the effects of increasing nitrogen availability on carbon fluxes from a relatively understudied component of these forests - the forest floor - at three intervals over the summer growing period in a northern Swedish Scots pine stand. Nitrogen addition altered both the uptake and release of carbon dioxide from the forest floor, but the magnitude and direction of this effect depended on the time during the growing season and the amount of nitrogen added. Specifically, nitrogen addition stimulated net forest floor carbon uptake only in the late growing season. We find evidence for species-specific control of forest floor carbon sink strength, as photosynthesis per unit ground area was positively correlated only with the abundance of the vascular plant Vaccinium myrtillus and no others. Comparison of understorey vegetation photosynthesis and respiration from the study site indicates that understorey vegetation photosynthate was mainly supplying respiratory demands for much of the year. Only in the late season with nitrogen addition did understorey vegetation appear to experience a large surplus of carbon in excess of respiratory requirements. Further work, simultaneously comparing all major biomass and respiratory carbon fluxes in forest floor and tree vegetation, is required to resolve the likely impacts of environmental changes on whole-ecosystem carbon sequestration in boreal forests.

  8. Hard graphitelike hydrogenated amorphous carbon grown at high rates by a remote plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Zaharia, T.; Creatore, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) deposited from an Ar-C 2H2 expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition (ETP-CVD) is reported. The downstream plasma region of an ETP is characterized by a low electron temperature (∼0.3 eV), which leads to an ion driven chemistry and negligible physical...

  9. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  10. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  11. Reorganization of graphite surfaces into carbon micro- and nanoparticles under high flux hydrogen plasma bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; van der Vegt, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-grain graphite samples were exposed to high density low temperature (n(e) similar to 10(20)m(-3), T-e similar to 1 eV) hydrogen plasmas in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. Redeposition of eroded carbon is so strong that no external precursor gas injection is necessary for deposits to form

  12. Synthesis of Cr-MOF derived porous carbon for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, applications of porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in hydrogen storage have received increasing attention in the scientific community. Conversion of organic moiety in MOFs to porous carbon, as well as the use of MOFs as a...

  13. Effect of hydrogen and carbon dioxide on carboxylic acids patterns in mixed culture fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, D.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Diels, L.; Wever, De H.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the carboxylate spectrum from mixed culture fermentation of three organic waste streams after supplying 2 bar hydrogen and carbon dioxide or a mixture of these two gases to the headspace. Under any modified headspace, propionate production was ceased and butyrate, caproate

  14. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed. Fe3Al-based iron aluminides. M SEN and R BALASUBRAMANIAM*. Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India. MS received 2 February 2002; revised 11 March 2002. Abstract. The effect of ...

  15. Carbon-nitrogen coupling and algal-bacterial interactions during an experimental bloom: Modeling a 13C tracer experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Meersche, K.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Van Rijswijk, P.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2004-01-01

    We tracked flows of carbon and nitrogen during an experimental phytoplankton bloom in a natural estuarine assemblage in Randers Fjord, Denmark. We used 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon to trace the transfer of carbon from phytoplankton to bacteria. Ecosystem development was followed over a

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Nitrogen Content and Its Role on the Carbon Dioxide Adsorption Capacity of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhi, Kripal S; Park, Dae-Hwan; Joseph, Stalin; Talapaneni, Siddulu N; Ravon, Ugo; Al-Bahily, Khalid; Vinu, Ajayan

    2017-03-02

    Mesoporous carbon nitrides (MCNs) with rod-shaped morphology and tunable nitrogen contents have been synthesized through a calcination-free method by using ethanol-washed mesoporous SBA-15 as templates at different carbonization temperatures. Carbon tetrachloride and ethylenediamine were used as the sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The resulting MCN materials were characterized with low- and high-angle powder XRD, nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution (HR) SEM, HR-TEM, elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure techniques. The carbonization temperature plays a critical role in controlling not only the crystallinity, but also the nitrogen content and textural parameters of the samples, including specific surface area and specific pore volume. The nitrogen content of MCN decreases with a concomitant increase in specific surface area and specific pore volume, as well as the crystallinity of the samples, as the carbonization temperature is increased. The results also reveal that the structural order of the materials is retained, even after heat treatment at temperatures up to 900 °C with a significant reduction of the nitrogen content, but the structure is partially damaged at 1000 °C. The carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of these materials is not only dependent on the textural parameters, but also on the nitrogen content. The MCN prepared at 900 °C, which has an optimum BET surface area and nitrogen content, registers a carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of 20.1 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 30 bar, which is much higher than that of mesoporous silica, MCN-1, activated carbon, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen Infused Compressed Air Foam for Depopulation of Caged Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; White, Dima; Archer, Gregory; Styles, Darrel; Zhao, Dan; Farnell, Yuhua; Byrd, James; Farnell, Morgan

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary Compressed air, detergent, and water make up compressed air foam. Our laboratory has previously reported that compressed air foam may be an effective method for mass depopulation of caged layer hens. Gases, such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen, have also been used for poultry euthanasia and depopulation. The objective of this study was to produce compressed air foam infused with carbon dioxide or nitrogen to compare its efficacy against foam with air and gas inhalation methods (carbon dioxide or nitrogen) for depopulation of caged laying hens. The study showed that a carbon dioxide-air mixture or 100% nitrogen can replace air to make compressed air foam. However, the foam with carbon dioxide had poor foam quality compared to the foam with air or nitrogen. The physiological stress response of hens subjected to foam treatments with and without gas infusion did not differ significantly. Hens exposed to foam with nitrogen died earlier as compared to methods such as foam with air and carbon dioxide. The authors conclude that infusion of nitrogen into compressed air foam results in better foam quality and shortened time to death as compared to the addition of carbon dioxide. Abstract Depopulation of infected poultry flocks is a key strategy to control and contain reportable diseases. Water-based foam, carbon dioxide inhalation, and ventilation shutdown are depopulation methods available to the poultry industry. Unfortunately, these methods have limited usage in caged layer hen operations. Personnel safety and welfare of birds are equally important factors to consider during emergency depopulation procedures. We have previously reported that compressed air foam (CAF) is an alternative method for depopulation of caged layer hens. We hypothesized that infusion of gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen (N2), into the CAF would reduce physiological stress and shorten time to cessation of movement. The study had six treatments, namely a negative control

  18. Pelagic nitrogen dynamics in the Vietnamese upwelling area according to stable nitrogen and carbon isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loick, Natalie; Dippner, Joachim; Doan, Hai Nhu; Liskow, Iris; Voss, Maren

    2007-04-01

    Upwelling and nitrogen (N) fixation provide new N for primary production off southern central Vietnam. Here we evaluate the roles of both N sources for zooplankton nutrition by comparing δ15N and δ13C values in nitrate, particulate organic matter (POM), and six net-plankton size fractions from monsoon and intermonsoon seasons. The δ13C values in POM and the net-plankton size fractions differed by 2-4‰ at any time. We assume that plankton from the POM filters was dominated by nano-and picoplankton as opposed to micro- and mesoplankton in the net-samples. The implications of this are discussed in terms of size differential pathways of C and N in the planktonic food web. We used δ15N to estimate the differences in N nutrition between the actual upwelling region and the oligotrophic area further offshore. The δ15N values of the net-plankton size fractions were depleted in δ15N by ca. 2‰ outside compared to inside the upwelling area during the monsoon season. We attribute these patterns to the additional utilization of N derived from N fixation. The concomitant findings of high N fixation rates reported earlier and low subthermocline nitrate (nitrate sub) values of 2.9-3.6‰ support this conclusion. Net-plankton δ15N values increased with size, pointing to the dominance of higher trophic levels in the larger size fractions. According to a two source mixing model N fixation may have provided up to 13% of the N demand in higher trophic levels.

  19. Carbon Sequestration: Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay Praveenkumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration CO2 gas has become a great worldwide challenge because CO2 is considered as an important counterpart of greenhouse gases. The tremendous increase in the concentration of CO2 gas, elevated the worldwide temperature as well as it altered the climatic changes. Various physiochemical approached have been reported to trap the CO2 gas and the chemical conversion of CO2 to useful chemicals is one of them. This review covers the conversion of CO2 gas to formic acid. In this CO2 hydrogenation reaction, both the homogeneous as well as heterogeneous catalytic systems were discussed along with the effect of solvent systems on reaction kinetics.

  20. Boreal mire carbon exchange: sensitivity to climate change and anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Boreal peatlands are important long-term sinks of atmospheric carbon and in the same time the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. A changing climate as well as deposition of anthropogenically derived pollutants, such as nitrogen and sulfur, has the potential to affect the processes that control the carbon exchange in peatlands. Many of the biogeochemical responses to changed environmental conditions, such as changed plant community composition, are slow and therefore long-term studies are required. In this thesis I have investigated the long-term effects of nitrogen addition, sulfur addition and greenhouse enclosures on carbon exchange by using a field manipulation experiment in a boreal minerogenic, oligotrophic mire after 10-12 years of treatment. Treatment effects on CH{sub 4} emissions, gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were estimated from 1-2 seasons of chamber flux measurements. Treatment effects on potential CH{sub 4} production and oxidation were estimated in incubations of peat from different depth intervals. The effect of nitrogen deposition on carbon accumulation was evaluated in peat cores at different depth intervals. The long-term nitrogen additions have: shifted plant community composition from being dominated by Sphagnum to being dominated by sedges and dwarf shrubs; changed mire surface microtopography so that mean water table is closer to the surface in plots with high nitrogen; increased CH{sub 4} production and emission; increased Reco slightly but have not affected GPP or NEE; reduced the peat height increment, but increased both peat bulk density and carbon content, leading to an unchanged carbon accumulation. The long-term sulfur additions have not reduced CH{sub 4} emissions, only slightly reduced CH{sub 4} production and did not have any effect on the CO{sub 2} carbon exchange. The greenhouse treatment, manifested in increased air and soil temperatures, reduced