WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrocarbon vapor sensors

  1. Development of Buoy Mounted Hydrocarbon Vapor Sensors for Use in Local Area Pollution Surveillance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    PNP transistor as hydrocarbon vapor sensor . . . . 3. Hot wire sensors for hydrocarbons 4. Suitability of an lonlzatlon sensor for... PNP transistors , (A) a radioactive ionlzatlon sensor, and (5) the Taguchl semiconductor gas sensor, TGS. Later, the Esso piezoelectric oll-on- water...sensors with coating 12 showed some promise as ammonia vapor sensors. 2. PNP transistor as hydrocarbon vapor sensor; Limited studies have been made

  2. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  3. An apparatus for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-03-23

    The installation for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv) with the formation of a mixture of H2 and C02 is a catalyst chamber (KK) filled with longitudinally disposed thin pipes (with thin walls) or with pipe units made of dolomite, MgO or potassium aluminate. These pipes have a multilayered coating (Pk) on their internal and external surfaces (Pv), which contain catalytically active components. Such pipes or pipe units form a honeycombed structure with through longitudinal channels. The catalyst chamber itself is made of a ceramic material and has a heating winding outside for heating the catalyst. To save fuel and to increase the efficiency (KPD) of the heating device, the catalyst chamber is in turn enclosed by two additional shells filled with heat conducting packings which are easily penetrated by the gases being processed. The hydrocarbon vapors or gaseous fuel from the natural gas or methane and the steam are fed through the above cited heat exchange layers with packings into the facial part of the catalytic chamber, in which the conversion of the hydrocarbons occurs with the production of H2 and C02. From the catalyzer layer the mixture of gases and steam goes through a refrigerator into a trap for the steam excess and when it is necessary, into a C02 absorber and then, pure H2 is discharged from the latter. Such a catalytic installation is convenient to use for producing pure H2 from natural gas, methane, propane or kerosene.

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The time-averaged concentration of hydrocarbon and oxygen vapors were measured in the unsaturated zone above the residually contaminated capillary fringe at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, Michigan. Total hydrocarbon and oxygen vapor concentrations were observe...

  5. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  6. Optical Sensor for Diverse Organic Vapors at ppm Concentration Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora M. Paolucci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A broadly responsive optical organic vapor sensor is described that responds to low concentrations of organic vapors without significant interference from water vapor. Responses to several classes of organic vapors are highlighted, and trends within classes are presented. The relationship between molecular properties (vapor pressure, boiling point, polarizability, and refractive index and sensor response are discussed.

  7. 33 CFR 157.132 - Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...(a)(2) or § 157.10c(b)(2) without sufficient segregated ballast tanks or dedicated clean ballast... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK...

  8. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapors in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current state of practice to estimate the risk from intrusion of vapors of petroleum hydrocarbons from spills of gasoline is to measure the concentration of the chemical of concern in ground water under the spill, use Henry’s Law to estimate a concentration of the chemical ...

  9. Qualitative Analysis of Liquid Hydrocarbon Mixtures by Absorption Spectra of Their Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesnin, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    Absorption spectra of saturated vapors of hydrocarbons and their mixtures were studied near their first overtones. Absorption spectra of hydrocarbons in the liquid and vapor states were compared. The ability to analyze qualitatively the compositions of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures using absorption spectra of their vapors was demonstrated. Indirect evidence suggested that the nonlinear absorption as a function of concentration that was seen in liquid hydrocarbon mixtures was negligible in their vapors.

  10. Surface acoustic wave vapor sensors based on resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated in the resonator configuration have been used as organic vapor sensors and compared with delay line devices more commonly used. The experimentally determined mass sensitivities of 200, 300, and 400 MHz resonators and 158 MHz delay lines coated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(vinyl tetradecanal) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The response of LB- and spray-coated sensors to various organic vapors were determined, and scaling laws for mass sensitivities, vapor sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed. The 200 MHz resonators provide the lowest noise levels and detection limits of all the devices examined.

  11. Optofluidic ring resonator sensors for rapid DNT vapor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuze; Liu, Jing; Frye-Mason, Greg; Ja, Shiou-jyh; Thompson, Aaron K; Fan, Xudong

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated rapid 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) vapor detection at room temperature based on an optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor. With the unique on-column separation and detection features of OFRR vapor sensors, DNT can be identified from other interferences coexisting in the analyte sample mixture, which is especially useful in the detection of explosives from practical complicated vapor samples usually containing more volatile analytes. The DNT detection limit is approximately 200 pg, which corresponds to a solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling time of only 1 second at room temperature from equilibrium headspace. A theoretical analysis was also performed to account for the experimental results. Our study shows that the OFRR vapor sensor is a promising platform for the development of a rapid, low-cost, and portable analytical device for explosive detection and monitoring.

  12. Vapor Phase Detection Using Chemi-Resistor Sensor Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan S. Lewis

    1999-02-17

    This paper focuses on two main areas: understanding sensor response times so as to obtain improved time response in the field when needed for vapor tracking and classification, and improved theoretical understanding of the sensor response properties that generate the pattern on the array in response to a given analyte.

  13. Plasma-assisted cataluminescence sensor array for gaseous hydrocarbons discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Han, Jiaying; Han, Feifei; Liu, Hualin; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-06-05

    Combining plasma activation and cross-reactivity of sensor array, we have developed a plasma-assisted cataluminescence (PA-CTL) sensor array for fast sensing and discrimination of gaseous hydrocarbons, which can be potentially used for fast diagnosis of lung cancer. Based on dielectric barrier discharge, a low-temperature plasma is generated to activate gaseous hydrocarbons with low cataluminescence (CTL) activities. Extremely increased CTL responses have been obtained, which resulted in a plasma assistance factor of infinity (∞) for some hydrocarbons. On a 4 × 3 PA-CTL sensor array made from alkaline-earth nanomaterials, gaseous hydrocarbons showed robust and unique CTL responses to generate characteristic patterns for fast discrimination. Because of the difference in the component of hydrocarbons in breath, exhaled breath samples from donors with and without lung cancer were tested, and good discrimination has been achieved by this technique. In addition, the feasibility of multidimentional detection based on temperature was confirmed. It had good reproducibility and gave a linear range of 65-6500 ng/mL or 77-7700 ppmv (R > 0.98) for CH(4) with a detection limit of 33 ng/mL (38 ppmv) on MgO. The PA-CTL sensor array is simple, low-cost, thermally stable, nontoxic, and has an abundance of alkaline-earth nanomaterials to act as sensing elements. This has expanded the applications of CTL-based senor arrays and will show great potential in clinical fast diagnosis.

  14. Chemometric Classification of Unknown Vapors by Conversion of Sensor Array Pattern Vectors to Vapor Descriptors: Extension from Mass-Transducing Sensors To Volume-Transducing Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2001-06-28

    A new chemometric method was recently described for classifying unknowns by transforming the vector containing the responses from a multivariate detector to a vector containing descriptors of the detected analyte (Grate et al. 1999). This approach was derived for sensor arrays where each sensor's signal is proportional to the amount of vapor sorbed by a polymer on the sensor surface. In this case, the response is proportional to the partition coefficient, K, and the concentration of the vapor in the gas phase, Cv, where K is the ratio of the concentration of vapor in the sorbent polymer phase, Cs, to Cv.

  15. SAW Sensors for Chemical Vapors and Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Jagannath; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Greve, David W

    2017-04-08

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology provides a sensitive platform for sensing chemicals in gaseous and fluidic states with the inherent advantages of passive and wireless operation. In this review, we provide a general overview on the fundamental aspects and some major advances of Rayleigh wave-based SAW sensors in sensing chemicals in a gaseous phase. In particular, we review the progress in general understanding of the SAW chemical sensing mechanism, optimization of the sensor characteristics, and the development of the sensors operational at different conditions. Based on previous publications, we suggest some appropriate sensing approaches for particular applications and identify new opportunities and needs for additional research in this area moving into the future.

  16. Investigation of bubble-point vapor pressures for mixtures of an endothermic hydrocarbon fuel with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiyun Sun; Wenjun Fang; Yongsheng Guo; Ruisen Lin [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Department of Chemistry, Molecular Thermodynamics

    2005-05-01

    Bubble-point vapor pressures and equilibrium temperatures for several mixtures with different mass fractions of a kerosene based endothermic hydrocarbon fuel (EHF) and ethanol were measured by comparative ebulliometry with inclined ebulliometers. Correlation between vapor pressures and equilibrium temperatures by the Antoine equation was given with satisfactory precision. The bubble-point lines of pressure versus composition at different temperatures and temperature versus composition at different pressures were obtained. The pseudo binary systems of EHF+ethanol appear with very large positive deviations from Raoult's law. It follows that the addition of ethanol had a critical effect on the vapor pressure of fuels. Ethanol may be an effective oxygenated hydrocarbon additive to adjust the volatility of EHF. 17 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of Empirical Data and Modeling Studies to Support Soil Vapor Intrusion Screening Criteria for Petroleum Hydrocarbon Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study is an evaluation of empirical data and select modeling studies of the behavior of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) vapors in subsurface soils and how they can affect subsurface-to-indoor air vapor intrusion (VI), henceforth referred to as petroleum vapor intrusion or “PVI” ...

  18. Pyridine Vapors Detection by an Optical Fibre Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernandez-Gutiérrez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical fibre sensor has been implemented towards pyridine vapors detection;to achieve this, a novel vapochromic material has been used, which, in solid state, suffers achange in colour from blue to pink-white in presence of pyridine vapours. This complex isadded to a solution of PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride, TBP (Tributylphosphate andtetrahydrofuran (THF, forming a plasticized matrix; by dip coating technique, the sensingmaterial is fixed onto a cleaved ended optical fibre. The fabrication process was optimizedin terms of number of dips and dipping speed, evaluating the final devices by dynamicrange. Employing a reflection set up, the absorbance spectra and changes in the reflectedoptical power of the sensors were registered to determine their response. A linear relationbetween optical power versus vapor concentration was obtained, with a detection limit of 1ppm (v/v.

  19. Risk-based evaluation of total petroleum hydrocarbons in vapor intrusion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Roger; Nagashima, Josh; Kelley, Michael; Heskett, Marvin; Rigby, Mark

    2013-06-13

    This paper presents a quantitative method for the risk-based evaluation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) in vapor intrusion investigations. Vapors from petroleum fuels are characterized by a complex mixture of aliphatic and, to a lesser extent, aromatic compounds. These compounds can be measured and described in terms of TPH carbon ranges. Toxicity factors published by USEPA and other parties allow development of risk-based, air and soil vapor screening levels for each carbon range in the same manner as done for individual compounds such as benzene. The relative, carbon range makeup of petroleum vapors can be used to develop weighted, site-specific or generic screening levels for TPH. At some critical ratio of TPH to a targeted, individual compound, the overwhelming proportion of TPH will drive vapor intrusion risk over the individual compound. This is particularly true for vapors associated with diesel and other middle distillate fuels, but can also be the case for low-benzene gasolines or even for high-benzene gasolines if an adequately conservative, target risk is not applied to individually targeted chemicals. This necessitates a re-evaluation of the reliance on benzene and other individual compounds as a stand-alone tool to evaluate vapor intrusion risk associated with petroleum.

  20. Risk-Based Evaluation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Vapor Intrusion Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Brewer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a quantitative method for the risk-based evaluation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH in vapor intrusion investigations. Vapors from petroleum fuels are characterized by a complex mixture of aliphatic and, to a lesser extent, aromatic compounds. These compounds can be measured and described in terms of TPH carbon ranges. Toxicity factors published by USEPA and other parties allow development of risk-based, air and soil vapor screening levels for each carbon range in the same manner as done for individual compounds such as benzene. The relative, carbon range makeup of petroleum vapors can be used to develop weighted, site-specific or generic screening levels for TPH. At some critical ratio of TPH to a targeted, individual compound, the overwhelming proportion of TPH will drive vapor intrusion risk over the individual compound. This is particularly true for vapors associated with diesel and other middle distillate fuels, but can also be the case for low-benzene gasolines or even for high-benzene gasolines if an adequately conservative, target risk is not applied to individually targeted chemicals. This necessitates a re-evaluation of the reliance on benzene and other individual compounds as a stand-alone tool to evaluate vapor intrusion risk associated with petroleum.

  1. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibriafor hydrocarbon binary systems by regular solution model

    OpenAIRE

    下山, 裕介; 米澤, 節子; 小渕, 茂寿; 福地, 賢治; 荒井, 康彦; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Yonezawa, Setsuko; Kobuchi, Shigetoshi; Fukuchi, Kenii; Arai, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of hydrocarbon binary systems : hexane + benzene (25 °C), toluene + octane (60°C) and cyclohexane + toluene (50°C) were predicted by using a regular solution model. In the present model, the mixing entropy term (Flory-Huggins equation) is included and an interaction parameter between unlike molecules is introduced. Solubility parameters and molar volumes at each temperature required in calculation are estimated by previously proposed methods. VLE of hexane + benz...

  2. Accelerometer Sensor Specifications to Predict Hydrocarbon Using Passive Seismic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Md Khir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ambient seismic ground noise has been investigated in several surveys worldwide in the last 10 years to verify the correlation between observed seismic energy anomalies at the surface and the presence of hydrocarbon reserves beneath. This is due to the premise that anomalies provide information about the geology and potential presence of hydrocarbon. However a technology gap manifested in nonoptimal detection of seismic signals of interest is observed. This is due to the fact that available sensors are not designed on the basis of passive seismic signal attributes and mainly in terms of amplitude and bandwidth. This is because of that fact that passive seismic acquisition requires greater instrumentation sensitivity, noise immunity, and bandwidth, with active seismic acquisition, where vibratory or impulsive sources were utilized to receive reflections through geophones. Therefore, in the case of passive seismic acquisition, it is necessary to select the best monitoring equipment for its success or failure. Hence, concerning sensors performance, this paper highlights the technological gap and motivates developing dedicated sensors for optimal solution at lower frequencies. Thus, the improved passive seismic recording helps in oil and gas industry to perform better fracture mapping and identify more appropriate stratigraphy at low frequencies.

  3. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  4. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  5. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  6. Conductometric Sensors for Detection of Elemental Mercury Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Shevade, A. V.; Lara, L. M.; Yen, S.-P. S.; Kisor, A. K.; Manatt, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    Several organic and inorganic materials have been tested for possible incorporation into a sensing array in order to add elemental mercury vapor to the suite of chemical species detected. Materials have included gold films, treated gold films, polymer-carbon composite films, gold-polymer-carbon composite films and palladium chloride sintered films. The toxicity of mercury and its adverse effect on human and animal health has made environmental monitoring of mercury in gas and liquid phases important (1,2). As consumer products which contain elemental mercury, such as fluorescent lighting, become more widespread, the need to monitor environments for the presence of vapor phase elemental mercury will increase. Sensors in use today to detect mercury in gaseous streams are generally based on amalgam formation with gold or other metals, including noble metals and aluminum. Recently, NASA has recognized a need to detect elemental mercury vapor in the breathing atmosphere of the crew cabin in spacecraft and has requested that such a capability be incorporated into the JPL Electronic Nose (3). The detection concentration target for this application is 10 parts-per-billion (ppb), or 0.08 mg/m3. In order to respond to the request to incorporate mercury sensing into the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) platform, it was necessary to consider only conductometric methods of sensing, as any other transduction method would have required redesign of the platform. Any mercury detection technique which could not be incorporated into the existing platform, such as an electrochemical technique, could not be considered.

  7. Vapor Leak Sensor Using Polarization Property and Stereoscopic Measurement for Plant Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Toshiro; Nakajima, Hajime; Matoba, Osamu

    This paper reports a sensor for the plant inspections to detect leaking vapor. Plants are usually inspected by patrolling inspectors. It requires high level skills to selectively detect abnormal phenomena occurring in various types of equipment under the complicated environments. In this research, we developed a remote detecting sensor for the vapor leaking from piping, which is one of the priority control items inside plants. The basic principle of the sensor is specifically to sense the scattered light when laser beam is illuminated on the vapor. It is also discovered in our basic experiments that there is big difference in the polarization property between the light scattered by vapor and surface structures inside plants. The sensor can discriminate the light scattered by vapor from other types of scattered light utilizing the difference of the polarization property, then detecting the light scattered by vapor only. A prototype model is fabricated for substantiating the basic property of leaking vapor detection. As a result, it is confirmed that the prototype model not only has sufficient detecting capability, but can selectively detect vapor only. In conclusion, it is confirmed that the developed sensor satisfies the requirements for the plant inspection sensors, and has sufficient capability for practical usage.

  8. Vapor pressures and sublimation enthalpies of seven heteroatomic aromatic hydrocarbons measured using the Knudsen effusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Jillian L; Suuberg, Eric M

    2010-06-01

    The vapor pressures of seven heteroatom-containing cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ranging in molecular weight from (168.19 to 208.21) grams plus sign in circlemol(-1) were measured over the temperature range of (301 to 486) Kelvin using the isothermal Knudsen effusion technique. The compounds measured include: anthraquinone, 9-fluorenone, 9-fluorenone oxime, phenoxazine, phenoxathiin and 9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole. These solid-state sublimation measurements provided values that are compared to vapor pressures of parent aromatic compounds (anthracene and fluorene) and to others with substituent groups in order to examine the effects of alcohol, ketone, pyridine, and pyrrole functionality on this property. The enthalpies and entropies of sublimation for each compound were determined from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Though there is no consistent trend in terms of the effects of substitutions on changes in the enthalpy or entropy of sublimation, we note that the prevalence of enthalpic or entropic driving forces on vapor pressure depend on molecule-specific factors and not merely molecular weight of the substituents.

  9. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  10. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  11. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser vapor sensor using swelling polymer reflection modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Dohn, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Vapor detection using a low-refractive index polymer for reflection modulation of the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated. The VCSEL sensor concept presents a simple method to detect the response of a sensor polymer in the presence of volatile organic...

  12. Multivariable passive RFID vapor sensors: roll-to-roll fabrication on a flexible substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Burns, Andrew; Surman, Cheryl; Lee, D J; McGinniss, Edward

    2012-06-21

    We demonstrate roll-to-roll (R2R) fabrication of highly selective, battery-free radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymeric substrate. Selectivity of our developed RFID sensors is provided by measurements of their resonance impedance spectra, followed by the multivariate analysis of spectral features, and correlation of these spectral features to the concentrations of vapors of interest. The multivariate analysis of spectral features also provides the ability for the rejection of ambient interferences. As a demonstration of our R2R fabrication process, we employed polyetherurethane (PEUT) as a "classic" sensing material, extruded this sensing material as 25, 75, and 125-μm thick films, and thermally laminated the films onto RFID inlays, rapidly producing approximately 5000 vapor sensors. We further tested these RFID vapor sensors for their response selectivity toward several model vapors such as toluene, acetone, and ethanol as well as water vapor as an abundant interferent. Our RFID sensing concept features 16-bit resolution provided by the sensor reader, granting a highly desired independence from costly proprietary RFID memory chips with a low-resolution analog input. Future steps are being planned for field-testing of these sensors in numerous conditions.

  13. Chemicapacitors as a versatile platform for miniature gas and vapor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Robert; Uttamchandani, Deepak

    2017-02-01

    Recent years have seen the rapid growth in the need for sensors throughout all areas of society including environmental sensing, health-care, public safety and manufacturing quality control. To meet this diverse need, sensors have to evolve from specialized and bespoke systems to miniaturized, low-power, low-cost (almost disposable) ubiquitous platforms. A technology that has been developed which gives a route to meet these challenges is the chemicapacitor sensor. To date the commercialization of these sensors has largely been restricted to humidity sensing, but in this review we examine the progress over recent years to expand this sensing technology to a wide range of gases and vapors. From sensors interrogated with laboratory instrumentation, chemicapacitor sensors have evolved into miniaturized units integrated with low power readout electronics that can selectively detect target molecules to ppm and sub-ppm levels within vapor mixtures.

  14. Potentiometric online detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous phase using carbon nanotube-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washe, Alemayehu P; Macho, Santiago; Crespo, Gastón A; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-10-01

    Surfaces made of entangled networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display a strong adsorption affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons. Adsorption of these compounds onto the walls of SWCNTs changes the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-solution interface. Using these features, we have developed a potentiometric sensor to detect neutral aromatic species. Specifically, we can detect online aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial coolant water. Our chromatographic results confirm the adsorption of toluene onto the walls of carbon nanotubes, and our impedance spectroscopy data show the change in the double layer capacitance of the carbon nanotube-solution interface upon addition of toluene, thus confirming the proposed sensing mechanism. The sensor showed a toluene concentration dependent EMF response that follows the shape of an adsorption isotherm and displayed an immediate response to the presence of toluene with a detection limit of 2.1 ppm. The sensor does not respond to other nonaromatic hydrocarbons that may coexist with aromatic hydrocarbons in water. It shows a qualitative sensitivity and selectivity of 100% and 83%, respectively, which confirms its ability to detect aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions. The sensor showed an excellent ability to immediately detect the presence of toluene in actual coolant water. Its operational characteristics, including its fast response, low cost, portability, and easy use in online industrial applications, improve those of current chromatographic or spectroscopic techniques.

  15. A Review on Prediction Methods for Molar Enthalpies of Vaporization of Hydrocarbons: The ELBA Method as the Best Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rui C.; Leal, João P.

    2012-12-01

    A review on prediction methods for molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K of hydrocarbons is presented. A new method is proposed and compared with six of the most common used ones from the literature. This new method, the extended Laidler bond additivity (ELBA), was applied to the prediction of standard molar enthalpies of vaporization of hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, polyenes, poly-ynes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, benzene compounds, biphenyl compounds, and polyphenyl compounds) at T = 298.15 K. A total of 260 experimental standard molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K were used for the parameters optimization. Comparison between the experimental values and those calculated using ELBA led to an average absolute difference of 0.35 kJ mol-1, corresponding to an average relative error of 0.92%. In addition, this new method proves to be better than the ones used for comparison with an independent set of 83 experimental standard molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K.

  16. Label-Free Vapor Selectivity in Poly(p-Phenylene Oxide) Photonic Crystal Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lova, Paola; Bastianini, Chiara; Giusto, Paolo; Patrini, Maddalena; Rizzo, Paola; Guerra, Gaetano; Iodice, Mario; Soci, Cesare; Comoretto, Davide

    2016-11-23

    The lack of sensors for low cost, extensive, and continuous detection of vapor pollutants is a serious concern for health and safety in industrialized urban areas. Colorimetric sensors, such as distributed Bragg reflectors made of polymers, could achieve this task thanks to their low cost and easy signal transduction but are typically affected by low vapor permeability and lack of selectivity without chemical labeling. Here we demonstrate all-polymer Bragg multilayers for label-free selective detection of organic volatile compounds. The system exploits the ability of amorphous poly(p-phenylene oxide), PPO, to uptake large amount of guest molecules and to form cocrystalline phases with distinct optical properties. Bragg stacks embedding PPO active layers show selective colorimetric response to vapors of carbon tetrachloride and aromatic homologues, which can be revealed by the naked eye.

  17. Study on a vapor sensor based on the optical properties of porous silicon microcavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Le-xin; ZHANG Ran; LI Zhi-quan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we set up a sensing model of PSMs(porous silicon microcavities)by applying the Bruggeman effective medium approximation theory and the transfer matrix method.In addition,we explain in detail the adsorption characteristics of porous silicon.Finally,using an experimental setup to measure the reflectivity spectrum of PSMs when the sensor is exposed to different organic vapors,the experimental results prove that it is a feasible optical sensor for the detection of organic species.Resolution of the PSMs sensor is high,response time and resume time is short and repetition is good.

  18. New Sensor Cable for the Detection and Location of Leaks in Pipelines for Transportation of Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Orduña-Reyes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At present, hydrocarbon leaks, generated mainly by corrosion of pipelines, cause large economic losses for Mexico.These leaks constitute a problem of serious consequences in Mexico and in other countries in the world. This workdescribes the results of the tests conducted on a new sensor cable for the detection and location of leaks in pipelinesfor transportation of hydrocarbons. When a liquid or gas enters in contact with the wall of the sensor cable, it causes ashort circuit in the wires; changing the measurement of the resistance may detect and locate the leak. The new sensorcable that is presented in this article has advantages over cables with similar characteristic made in other countries.The use of this sensor cable in pipelines of PEMEX will avoid economic losses, environmental damage and risks ofpossible explosions to the population. The experimental results demonstrate these advantages.

  19. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-07-05

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  20. A laser extinction based sensor for simultaneous droplet size and vapor measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqiang Sun; David J. Ewing; Lin Ma

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows involving liquid droplets in association with gas flow occur in many industrial and scientific applications.Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using optical techniques based on laser extinction to simultaneously measure vapor concentration and temperature and droplet size and loading.This work introduces the theoretical background for the optimal design of such laser extinction techniques,termed WMLE (wavelength-multiplexed laser extinction).This paper focuses on the development of WMLE and presents a systematic methodology to guide the selection of suitable wavelengths and optimize the performance of WMLE for specific applications.WMLE utilizing wavelengths from 0.5to 10 μm is illustrated for droplet size and vapor concentration measurements in an example of water spray,and is found to enable unique and sensitive Sauter mean diameter measurement in the range of ~1-15μm along with accurate vapor detection.A vapor detection strategy based on differential absorption is developed to extend accurate measurement to a significantly wider range of droplet loading and vapor concentration as compared to strategies based on direct fixed-wavelength absorption.Expected performance of the sensor is modeled for an evaporating spray.This work is expected to lay the groundwork for implementing optical sensors based on WMLE in a variety of research and industrial applications involving multi-phase flows.

  1. Highly sensitive and selective chemiresistor gas/vapor sensors based on polyaniline nanocomposite: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanand Pandey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review article directs particular attention to some current breakthrough developments in the area of gas sensors based on polyaniline (PANI nanocomposite. Conducting polymers symbolize a paramount class of organic materials that boost the resistivity towards external stimuli. Nevertheless, PANI-based sensor experiences some disadvantages of relatively low reproducibility, selectivity, and stability. In order to overcome these restrictions, PANI was functionalised or incorporated with nanoparticles (NPs (metallic or bimetallic NPs, metal oxide NPs, carbon compounds (like CNT or graphene, chalcogenides, polymers, showing improved gas sensing characteristics. It has been suggested that host–guest chemistry combined with the utilization of organic and inorganic analog in nanocomposite may allow for improvement of the sensor performance due to synergetic/complementary effects. Herein, we summarize recent advantages in PANI nanocomposite preparation, sensor construction, and sensing properties of various PANI nanocomposite-based gas/vapor sensors, such as NH3, H2, HCl, NO2, H2S, CO, CO2, SO2, LPG, vapor of volatile organic compounds (VOCs as well as chemical warfare agents (CWAs. The sensing mechanisms are discussed. Existing problems that may hinder practical applications of the sensors are also discussed.

  2. Advanced vapor recognition materials for selective and fast responsive surface acoustic wave sensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana

    2013-07-17

    The necessity of selectively detecting various organic vapors is primitive not only with respect to regular environmental and industrial hazard monitoring, but also in detecting explosives to combat terrorism and for defense applications. Today, the huge arsenal of micro-sensors has revolutionized the traditional methods of analysis by, e.g. replacing expensive laboratory equipment, and has made the remote screening of atmospheric threats possible. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors - based on piezoelectric crystal resonators - are extremely sensitive to even very small perturbations in the external atmosphere, because the energy associated with the acoustic waves is confined to the crystal surface. Combined with suitably designed molecular recognition materials SAW devices could develop into highly selective and fast responsive miniaturized sensors, which are capable of continuously monitoring a specific organic gas, preferably in the sub-ppm regime. For this purpose, different types of recognition layers ranging from nanostructured metal oxides and carbons to pristine or molecularly imprinted polymers and self-assembled monolayers have been applied in the past decade. We present a critical review of the recent developments in nano- and micro-engineered synthetic recognition materials predominantly used for SAW-based organic vapor sensors. Besides highlighting their potential to realize real-time vapor sensing, their limitations and future perspectives are also discussed.

  3. Selective detection of elemental mercury vapor using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Matthews, Glenn I; Jones, Lathe A; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-08-21

    The detection of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) within industrial processes is extremely important as it is the first major step in ensuring the efficient operation of implemented mercury removal technologies. In this study, a 131 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line sensor with gold electrodes was tested towards Hg(0) vapor (24 to 365 ppbv) with/without the presence of ammonia (NH3) and humidity (H2O), as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as acetaldehyde (MeCHO), ethylmercaptan (EM), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), which are all common interfering gas species that co-exist in many industrial applications requiring mercury monitoring. The developed sensor exhibited a detection limit of 0.7 ppbv and 4.85 ppbv at 35 and 55 °C, respectively. Furthermore, a repeatability of 97% and selectivity of 92% in the presence of contaminant gases was exhibited by the sensor at the chosen operating temperature of 55 °C. The response magnitude of the developed SAW sensor towards different concentrations of Hg(0) vapor fitted well with the Langmuir extension isotherm (otherwise known as loading ratio correlation (LRC)) which is in agreement with our basic finite element method (FEM) work where an LRC isotherm was observed for a simplified model of the SAW sensor responding to different Hg contents deposited on the Au based electrodes. Overall, the results indicate that the developed SAW sensor can be a potential solution for online selective detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor found in industrial stack effluents.

  4. Quantitative relationships for the prediction of the vapor pressure of some hydrocarbons from the van der Waals molecular surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olariu Tudor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure - property relationship (QSPR modeling of vapor pressure at 298.15 K, expressed as log (VP / Pa was performed for a series of 84 hydrocarbons (63 alkanes and 21 cycloalkanes using the van der Waals (vdW surface area, SW/Å2, calculated by the Monte Carlo method, as the molecular descriptor. The QSPR model developed from the subset of 63 alkanes (C1-C16, deemed as the training set, was successfully used for the prediction of the log (VP / Pa values of the 21 cycloalkanes, which was the external prediction (test subset. A QSPR model was also developed for a series composed of all 84 hydrocarbons. Both QSPR models were statistically tested for their ability to fit the data and for prediction. The results showed that the vdW molecular surface used as molecular descriptor (MD explains the variance of the majority of the log (VP / Pa values in this series of 84 hydrocarbons. This MD describes very well the intermolecular forces that hold neutral molecules together. The clear physical meaning of the molecular surface values, SW/Å2, could explain the success of the QSPR models obtained with a single structural molecular descriptor.

  5. Use of dissolved and vapor-phase gases to investigate methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Mayer, K.U.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Williams, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] At many sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, methanogenesis is a significant degradation pathway. Techniques to estimate CH4 production, consumption, and transport processes are needed to understand the geochemical system, provide a complete carbon mass balance, and quantify the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Dissolved and vapor-phase gas data collected at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota, demonstrate that naturally occurring nonreactive or relatively inert gases such as Ar and N2 can be effectively used to better understand and quantify physical and chemical processes related to methanogenic activity in the subsurface. In the vadose zone, regions of Ar and N2 depletion and enrichment are indicative of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones, and concentration gradients between the regions suggest that reaction-induced advection can be an important gas transport process. In the saturated zone, dissolved Ar and N2 concentrations are used to quantify degassing driven by methanogenesis and also suggest that attenuation of methane along the flow path, into the downgradient aquifer, is largely controlled by physical processes. Slight but discernable preferential depletion of N2 over Ar, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones near the free-phase oil, suggests reactivity of N2 and is consistent with other evidence indicating that nitrogen fixation by microbial activity is taking place at this site. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Inverse least-squares modeling of vapor descriptors using polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensor array responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, J W; Patrash, S J; Kaganovet, S N; Abraham, M H; Wise, B M; Gallagher, N B

    2001-11-01

    In previous work, it was shown that, in principle, vapor descriptors could be derived from the responses of an array of polymer-coated acoustic wave devices. This new chemometric classification approach was based on polymer/vapor interactions following the well-established linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) and the surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers being mass sensitive. Mathematical derivations were included and were supported by simulations. In this work, an experimental data set of polymer-coated SAW vapor sensors is investigated. The data set includes 20 diverse polymers tested against 18 diverse organic vapors. It is shown that interfacial adsorption can influence the response behavior of sensors with nonpolar polymers in response to hydrogen-bonding vapors; however, in general, most sensor responses are related to vapor interactions with the polymers. It is also shown that polymer-coated SAW sensor responses can be empirically modeled with LSERs, deriving an LSER for each individual sensor based on its responses to the 18 vapors. Inverse least-squares methods are used to develop models that correlate and predict vapor descriptors from sensor array responses. Successful correlations can be developed by multiple linear regression (MLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least-squares (PLS) regression. MLR yields the best fits to the training data, however cross-validation shows that prediction of vapor descriptors for vapors not in the training set is significantly more successful using PCR or PLS. In addition, the optimal dimension of the PCR and PLS models supports the dimensionality of the LSER formulation and SAW response models.

  7. The Shell Structure Effect on the Vapor Selectivity of Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticle Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Xuan Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Four types of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs were synthesized and characterized as active layers of vapor sensors. An interdigitated microelectrode (IDE and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM were used to measure the electrical resistance and mass loading changes of MPC films during vapor sorption. The vapor sensing selectivity was influenced by the ligand structure of the monolayer on the surface of gold nanoparticles. The responses of MPC-coated QCM were mainly determined according to the affinity between the vapors and surface ligands of MPCs. The responses to the resistance changes of the MPC films were due to the effectiveness of the swelling when vapor was absorbed. It was observed that resistive sensitivity to polar organics could be greatly enhanced when the MPC contained ligands that contain interior polar functional groups with exterior nonpolar groups. This finding reveals that reducing interparticle attraction by using non-polar exterior groups could increase effective swelling and therefore enhance the sensitivity of MPC-coated chemiresistors.

  8. An Approach that Uses the Concentrations of Hydrocarbon Compounds in Soil Gas at the Source of Contamination to Evaluate the Potential for Intrusion of Petroleum Vapors into Buildings (PVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    If motor fuels are spilled from underground storage tanks, petroleum hydrocarbons can vaporize from the spill and move as a vapor through the unsaturated zone. If a building is sited above or near the spill, the hydrocarbons may intrude into the air space of the building. This ...

  9. An Approach that Uses the Concentrations of Hydrocarbon Compounds in Soil Gas at the Source of Contamination to Evaluate the Potential for Intrusion of Petroleum Vapors into Buildings (PVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    If motor fuels are spilled from underground storage tanks, petroleum hydrocarbons can vaporize from the spill and move as a vapor through the unsaturated zone. If a building is sited above or near the spill, the hydrocarbons may intrude into the air space of the building. This ...

  10. A visual and organic vapor sensitive photonic crystal sensor consisting of polymer-infiltrated SiO2 inverse opal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Qiu, Jianhua; Hu, Rongrong; Li, Pei; Gao, Loujun; Heng, Liping; Tang, Ben Zhong; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-21

    A photonic crystal (PC) sensor that can selectively detect organic vapors through visual color changes has been proposed. The sensor was fabricated by infiltrating a tetraphenylethene polymer (TPEP) into the voids of SiO2 inverse opal photonic crystal. When the sensor was exposed to tetrahydrofuran or acetone vapor, a red shift of the stopband of more than 50 nm could be clearly observed; meanwhile, the film's color changed from violet to cyan. Subsequently, when exposed to air, the stopband underwent a blue shift and the color returned to violet. The reason for the observed change is that a reversible adsorption-desorption process occurs on alternate exposure of the sensor to organic vapor and air, due to the high specific surface area of the inverse opal macroporous structure and the high affinity of TPEP to tetrahydrofuran and acetone. The adsorption of vapor analyte can increase the PC's effective refractive index, which will induce the stopband red shift and the resulting color change according to Bragg's Law. The reversible adsorption-desorption of organic vapors varied the effective refractive index of the sensor repeatedly, causing the reversible stopband shift and color change, and providing a general method for the design of visual vapor sensors.

  11. Integrated water vapor above Ny Ålesund, Spitsbergen: a multi-sensor intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pałm

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor is an important constituent of the atmosphere. Because of its abundance and its radiative properties it plays an important role for the radiation budget of the atmosphere and has major influence on weather and climate.

    In this work integrated water vapor (IWV derived from the measurements of three satellite sensors, GOME, SCIAMACHY and AMSU-B, two ground based sensors, a Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTIR, a microwave radiometer for O3 (RAM and IWV inferred from GPS zenith path delay (ZPD measurements, are compared to radio-sonde measurements above Ny Ålesund, 79° N. All six remote sensors exploit different principles and work in different wavelength regions.

    All remote sensing instruments reproduce the sonde measurements very well and are highly correlated when compared with the radio-sonde measurements.

    The ground-based FTIR shows very little scatter of about 10%. The GPS performs similar to the FTIR at all times except for very low IWV, where the scatter exceeds 50% of the measured IWV. The other remote sensing instruments show scatter of about 20% (standard deviation. The ground-based RAM performs similar to the satellite instruments, despite the fact that the retrieval of IWV is just a by-product of this ozone sensor.

  12. Development of Diamond and Silicon MEMS Sensor Arrays with Integrated Readout for Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possas-Abreu, Maira; Ghassemi, Farbod; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Descours, Emilie; Lissorgues, Gaelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of an autonomous instrument based on an array of eight resonant microcantilevers for vapor detection. The fabricated sensors are label-free devices, allowing chemical and biological functionalization. In this work, sensors based on an array of silicon and synthetic diamond microcantilevers are sensitized with polymeric films for the detection of analytes. The main advantage of the proposed system is that sensors can be easily changed for another application or for cleaning since the developed gas cell presents removable electrical connections. We report the successful application of our electronic nose approach to detect 12 volatile organic compounds. Moreover, the response pattern of the cantilever arrays is interpreted via principal component analysis (PCA) techniques in order to identify samples. PMID:28538653

  13. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  14. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  15. Development of a Chemiresistor Sensor Based on Polymers-Dye Blend for Detection of Ethanol Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. L. dos Reis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The conductive blend of the poly (3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene and polystyrene sulfonated acid (PEDOT-PSS polymers were doped with Methyl Red (MR dye in the acid form and were used as the basis for a chemiresistor sensor for detection of ethanol vapor. This Au│Polymers-dye blend│Au device was manufactured by chemical vapor deposition and spin-coating, the first for deposition of the metal electrodes onto a glass substrate, and the second for preparation of the organic thin film forming ~1.0 mm2 of active area. The results obtained are the following: (i electrical resistance dependence with atmospheres containing ethanol vapor carried by nitrogen gas and humidity; (ii sensitivity at 1.15 for limit detection of 26.25 ppm analyte and an operating temperature of 25 °C; and (iii the sensing process is quickly reversible and shows very a low power consumption of 20 μW. The thin film morphology of ~200 nm thickness was analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, where it was observed to have a peculiarly granulometric surface favorable to adsorption. This work indicates that PEDOT-PSS doped with MR dye to compose blend film shows good performance like resistive sensor.

  16. Zeolite thin film-coated spherical end-face fiber sensors for detection of trace organic vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiangping; Zhao, Chun Liu; Yang, Jingyi; Chan, Chi Chiu

    2016-04-01

    A novel zeolite thin film-coated spherical end face fiber sensor for detection of trace organic vapors was experimentally demonstrated. The spherical end-face was fabricated by electrical arc discharge on the end face of a standard single-mode fiber. The proposed sensor comprise of the fiber's spherical end-face covered with a layer of zeolite thin film. The zeolite film and spherical end face constituted an arc-shaped inline Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity, which improves the interference performance. The trace chemical vapor concentration was measured by monitoring the shift of F-P interference wavelength which induced by the organic vapor molecular adsorption of the zeolite film. The proposed trace organic vapors sensor performed with the enhanced sensitivity 0.91 nm/ppm with the range from 0 to 70 ppm.

  17. Using Concentrations of Methane and Gasoline Hydrocarbons in Soil Gas to Predict Vapor Intrusion of Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk management of petroleum vapor intrusion has been a daunting and challenging task for the Underground Storage Tank Program. Because chlorinated solvents do not degrade in soil gas, techniques that focus on their properties and behavior can produce useful estimates. However, t...

  18. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  19. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods. PMID:27399696

  20. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  1. Water Vapor Sensors Based on the Swelling of Relief Gelatin Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Calixto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel device to measure relative humidity. The sensor is based on surface diffraction gratings made of gelatin. This material swells and shrinks according to the content of water vapor in air. By sending a light beam to the grating, diffracted orders appear. Due to the gelatin swelling or shrinking, first order intensity changes according to the relative humidity. Calibration curves relating intensity versus relative humidity have been found. The fabrication process of diffraction gratings and the testing of the prototype sensing devices are described.

  2. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  3. Synthesis and application of carbowax/polypyrrole nanocomposite for fabrication of electrochemical sensor to detect 2,4-DNT vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan Koudehi, Masoumeh; Mahdi Pourmortazavi, Seied

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an electrochemical sensor coated with carbowax/polypyrrole nanocomposite was fabricated so as to be sensitive to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) as a nitroaromatic explosive. The variation in electrical resistance was used as the mechanism by which the sensor responded to the concentration of explosive vapor. Polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), ATR-FTIR (attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The results showed that the fabricated PPy nanoparticles have a near spherical morphology with an average size of around 56 nm. The surface of the sensor template was then coated with a layer of nanocomposite composed of the synthesized PPy nanoparticles and carbowax polymer. Calibration and performance testing of the fabricated sensors were carried out with a special setup designed for explosive vapor generation under static conditions. The developed sensor was able to sense different concentrations of the explosive (0.5-100 ppm). The coated sensor showed a linear response in the concentration range of 0.5-50 ppm. The results showed that the designed sensor had a favorable sensitivity to the explosive. The calibration curve and sensitivity of the fabricated carbowax/PPy sensor was also determined in the explosive vapor concentration range of 0.5-50 ppm of 2,4-DNT under static conditions.

  4. Dew point fast measurement in organic vapor mixtures using quartz resonant sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Liu, Jia; Meng, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    A fast dew point sensor has been developed for organic vapor mixtures by using the quartz crystal with sensitive circuits. The sensor consists of the quartz crystal and a cooler device. Proactive approach is taken to produce condensation on the surface of the quartz crystal, and it will lead to a change in electrical features of the quartz crystal. The cessation of oscillation was measured because this phenomenon is caused by dew condensation. Such a phenomenon can be used to detect the dew point. This method exploits the high sensitivity of the quartz crystal but without frequency measurement and also retains the stability of the resonant circuit. It is strongly anti-interfered. Its performance was evaluated with acetone-methanol mixtures under different pressures. The results were compared with the dew points predicted from the universal quasi-chemical equation to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. Though the maximum deviations of the sensor are less than 1.1 °C, it still has a fast response time with a recovery time of less than 10 s, providing an excellent dehumidifying performance.

  5. Vapor transport deposition of large-area polycrystalline CdTe for radiation image sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Keedong; Cha, Bokyung; Heo, Duchang; Jeon, Sungchae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 111 Hanggaul-ro, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 426-170 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Vapor transport deposition (VTD) process delivers saturated vapor to substrate, resulting in high-throughput and scalable process. In addition, VTD can maintain lower substrate temperature than close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The motivation of this work is to adopt several advantages of VTD for radiation image sensor application. Polycrystalline CdTe films were obtained on 300 mm x 300 mm indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The polycrystalline CdTe film has columnar structure with average grain size of 3 μm ∝ 9 μm, which can be controlled by changing the substrate temperature. In order to analyze electrical and X-ray characteristics, ITO-CdTe-Al sandwich structured device was fabricated. Effective resistivity of the polycrystalline CdTe film was ∝1.4 x 10{sup 9}Ωcm. The device was operated under hole-collection mode. The responsivity and the μτ product estimated to be 6.8 μC/cm{sup 2}R and 5.5 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/V. The VTD can be a process of choice for monolithic integration of CdTe thick film for radiation image sensor and CMOS/TFT circuitry. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. CdSe quantum dots-poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanocomposite sensors for selective chloroform vapor detection at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S. P.; Bera, S.; Narender, G.; Ray, S. K.

    2012-10-01

    Olive oil capped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) of average size ˜6 nm have been grown by a green chemical route synthesis for the fabrication of nanocomposite organic vapor sensing devices. A highly selective, room temperature chloroform vapor sensor has been fabricated using capped CdSe QDs and conducting polymer [poly(3-hexylthiophene)] nanocomposites. The nanocomposite sensor has been tested with the choloroform vapor of concentration varying from 100-1200 ppm at room temperature using different bias voltages. The recovery time of the sensor has been found to be improved on illumination with a monochromatic light of 600 nm, due to the photo-induced enhancement of charge transfer in nanocomposites.

  7. Fluorescent Polystyrene Microbeads as Invisible Security Ink and Optical Vapor Sensor for 4-Nitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Swapnil L; Asha, S K

    2016-04-27

    Color-tunable solid-state emitting polystyrene (PS) microbeads were developed by dispersion polymerization, which showed excellent fluorescent security ink characteristics along with sensitive detection of vapors of nitro aromatics like 4-nitro toluene (4-NT). The fluorophores pyrene and perylenebisimide were incorporated into the PS backbone as acrylate monomer and acrylate cross-linker, respectively. Solid state quantum yields of 94 and 20% were observed for the pyrene and perylenebisimide, respectively, in the PS/Py and PS/PBI polymers. The morphology and solid state fluorescence was measured by SEM, fluorescence microscopy, and absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The ethanol dispersion of the polymer could be used directly as a fluorescent security "invisible" ink, which became visible only under ultraviolet light. The color of the ink could be tuned depending on the amounts of the pyrene and perylenebisimide incorporated with blue and orange-green for pyrene alone or perylenebisimide alone beads respectively and various shades in between including pure white for beads incorporating both the fluorophores. More than 80% quenching of pyrene emission was observed upon exposure of the polymer in the form of powder or as spin-coated films to the vapors of 4-NT while the emission of perylenebisimide was unaffected. The limit of detection was estimated at 10(-5) moles (2.7 ppm) of 4-NT vapors. The ease of synthesis of the material along with its invisible ink characteristics and nitro aromatic vapor detection opens up new opportunities for exploring the application of these PS-based materials as optical sensors and fluorescent ink for security purposes.

  8. Predicting the vapor-liquid equilibrium of hydrocarbon binary mixtures and polymer solutions using predetermined pure component parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang Kyu [Division of Chemical Engineering and Molecular Thermodynamics Laboratory, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Young Chan, E-mail: ycbae@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Chemical Engineering and Molecular Thermodynamics Laboratory, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have developed a close-packed lattice model for chain-like molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chain length dependence determined from Monte-Carlo simulation results were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To consider the volume effect, hole theory and two mixing steps were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A lattice fluid equation of state (LF-EoS) is presented for VLE of hydrocarbon mixtures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation of pure polymer solutions data with use of the LF-EoS. - Abstract: In our previous work, a new close-packed lattice model was developed for multi-component system of chain fluids with taking the chain length dependence from Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation results into account. In this work, we further extend this model to describe pressure, volume and temperature (PVT) properties, such as vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). To consider the effect of pressure on the phase behavior, the volume change effect is taken into account by introducing holes into the incompressible lattice model with two mixing steps. The corresponding new lattice fluid equation of state (LF-EoS) is applied to predict the thermodynamic properties of pure and binary mixtures of hydrocarbons as well as pure polymer solutions. The results of the proposed model are compared to other predictive approaches based on VLE calculations using predetermined pure model parameters without further adjustment. Thermodynamic properties predicted using the method developed in this work are consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Determining the Optimum Exposure and Recovery Periods for Efficient Operation of a QCM Based Elemental Mercury Vapor Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Mohibul Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, mass based transducers such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM have gained huge interest as potential sensors for online detection of elemental mercury (Hg0 vapor from anthropogenic sources due to their high portability and robust nature enabling them to withstand harsh industrial environments. In this study, we determined the optimal Hg0 exposure and recovery times of a QCM based sensor for ensuring its efficient operation while monitoring low concentrations of Hg0 vapor (<400 ppbv. The developed sensor was based on an AT-cut quartz substrate and utilized two gold (Au films on either side of the substrate which functions as the electrodes and selective layer simultaneously. Given the temporal response mechanisms associated with mass based mercury sensors, the experiments involved the variation of Hg0 vapor exposure periods while keeping the recovery time constant following each exposure and vice versa. The results indicated that an optimum exposure and recovery periods of 30 and 90 minutes, respectively, can be utilized to acquire the highest response magnitudes and recovery rate towards a certain concentration of Hg0 vapor whilst keeping the time it takes to report an accurate reading by the sensor to a minimum level as required in real-world applications.

  10. Process and apparatus for conversion of water vapor with coal or hydrocarbon into a product gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, W.; Barnert, H.; Oertel, M.; Schulten, R.

    1990-03-27

    A process and apparatus are provided for conversion of steam and hydrocarbon, or steam and coal, into a product gas which contains hydrogen. The conversion rate is augmented by effective extraction and removal of hydrogen as and when hydrogen is generated. Within a reaction vessel wherein the conversion takes place, a chamber for collection of hydrogen is formed by the provision of a hydrogen permeable membrane. The chamber is provided with a hydrogen extraction means and houses a support structure, for example, in the form of a mesh providing structural support to the membrane. The membrane may be of a pleated or corrugated construction, so as to provide an enlarged surface for the membrane to facilitate hydrogen extraction. Also, to further facilitate hydrogen extraction, a hydrogen partial pressure differential is maintained across the membrane, such as, for example, by the counter pressure of an inert gas. A preferred configuration for the apparatus of the invention is a tubular construction which houses generally tubular hydrogen extraction chambers. 5 figs.

  11. Advanced ocean color sensor observations for retrieval of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    While the next generation of ocean color sensors offers enhanced capability to retrieve ocean parameters and to advance ocean science, these sensors also offer enhanced capability for observing atmospheric parameters, as well. In particular advanced ocean color sensors are expected to broaden the spectral range to include bands from the UV to the SWIR, inclusive on a single instrument that will observe aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric targets with the same geometry, same spatial resolution, and similar calibration strategies across the entire spectrum. This broad spectrum instrument is unprecedented, and unites atmospheric parameter retrieval algorithms from MODIS and OMI heritages, but for the first time providing UV data at moderate resolution and not the 13x24 km currently available from OMI. In addition the advanced ocean instruments will likely be hyperspectral, providing opportunity to apply retrieval techniques for aerosols, clouds and water vapor that have been developed for airborne spectrometers like AVIRIS, but now can be attempted from space. These spectral techniques are powerful and may overcome longstanding issues concerning aerosol and cloud layer height, gas corrections etc. Note, that the added capability of hyperspectral and broad spectrum imagers can push atmospheric science forward, over both land and ocean, and at the same time improve atmospheric correction over ocean.

  12. Mechanism of operation and design considerations for surface acoustic wave device vapor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltjen, H.

    1984-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices offer many attractive features for application as vapor phase chemical microsensors. This paper describes the characteristics of SAW devices and techniques by which they can be employed as vapor sensors. The perturbation of SAW amplitude and velocity by polymeric coating films was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High sensitivity can be achieved when the device is used as the resonating element in a delay line oscillator circuit. A simple equation has been developed from theoretical considerations which offers reasonably accurate quantitative predictions of SAW Device frequency shifts when subjected to a given mass loading. In this mode the SAW device behaves in a fashion very similar to conventional bulk wave quartz crystal microbalance except that the sensitivity can be several orders of magnitude higher and the device size can be several orders of magnitude smaller. Detection of mass changes of less than 1 femtogram by a SAW device having a surface area of 0.0001 square cm. is theoretically possible.

  13. Examination of vapor sorption by fullerene, fullerene-coated surface acoustic wave sensors, graphite, and low-polarity polymers using linear solvation energy relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Abraham, M.H.; Du, C.M. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); McGill, R.A. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Shuely, W.J. [Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The sorption of vapors by fullerene is compared with the sorption of vapors by an assembled fullerene thin film on a surface acoustic wave vapor sensor. A linear solvation energy relationship derived for solid fullerene at 298 K was used to calculate gas/solid partition coefficients for the same vapors as those examined using the vapor sensor. This relationship correctly predicted the relative vapor sensitivities observed with the vapor sensor. A new linear solvation energy relationship for vapor adsorption by graphite at 298 K has been determined, and solid fullerene and solid graphite are found to be quite similar in their vapor sorption properties. Comparisons have also been made with linear organic and inorganic polymers, including poly(isobutylene), poly(epichorophydrin), OV25, and OV202. In all cases, sorption is driven primarily by dispersion interactions. The assembled fullerene material is generally similar in vapor selectivity to the other nonpolar sorbent materials considered but yields less sensitive vapor sensors than linear organic polymers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The Determination of the Water Vapor Content in the Pulkovo VKM-100 Multipass Vacuum Cell Using Polymer Sensors of Humidity

    CERN Document Server

    Galkin, V D; Nikanorova, I N; Sal'nikov, I B; Leiterer, U; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Dauß, D

    2010-01-01

    In spectral studies of water vapor under laboratory conditions (determination of molecular constants, measurement for spectral transmission functions), the amount of water vapor in the time of the measurements is one of the most essential parameters, which should be determined accurately. We discuss the application for this purpose of polymer sensors of humidity manufactured by Praktik-NC (Moscow) and used in the Pulkovo VKM-100 multipass vacuum cell. These sensors were examined in the laboratory of Lindenberg Meteorological observatory (Germany) by comparison between their readings and those of standard measuring devices for various values of relative humidity, pressure, and temperature. We also carried out measurements of relative humidity in boxes with saline solution, in which the relative humidity that corresponds to a given solution is guaranteed with the accuracy of several tenths of percent. The analysis of the results of the laboratory examination of the sensors and extended sets of measurements made...

  15. Selected area chemical vapor deposition of thin films for conductometric microelectronic chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoo, Sanjeev

    Recent advances in microelectronics and silicon processing have been exploited to fabricate miniaturized chemical sensors. Although the capability of chemical sensing technology has grown steadily, it has been outpaced by the increasing demands for more reliable, inexpensive, and selective sensors. The diversity of applications requires the deployment of different sensing materials that have rich interfacial chemistry. However, several promising sensor materials are often incompatible with silicon micromachining and their deposition requires complicated masking steps. The new approach described here is to first micromachine a generic, instrumented, conductometric, microelectronic sensor platform that is fully functional except for the front-end sensing element. This generic platform contains a thin dielectric membrane, an integrated boron-doped silicon heater, and conductance electrodes. The membrane has low thermal mass and excellent thermal isolation. A proprietary selected-area chemical vapor deposition (SACVD) process in a cold-wall reactor at low pressures was then used to achieve maskless, self-lithographic deposition of thin films. The temperature-programmable integrated microheater initiates localized thermal decomposition/reaction of suitable CVD precursors confined to a small heated area (500 mum in diameter), and this creates the active sensing element. Platinum and titania (TiOsb2) films were deposited from pyrolysis of organometallic precursors, tetrakistrifluorophosphine platinum Pt(PFsb3)sb4 and titanium tetraisopropoxide Ti(OCH(CHsb3)sb2rbrack sb4, respectively. Deposition of gold metal films from chlorotriethylphosphine gold (Csb2Hsb5)sb3PAuCl precursor was also attempted but without success. The conductance electrodes permit in situ monitoring of film growth. The as-deposited films were characterized in situ by conductance measurements and optical microscopy and ex situ by electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. Devices equipped with

  16. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  17. Impact of Hydrocarbon Control in Ultraviolet-Assisted Restoration Process for Extremely Porous Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition SiOCH Films with k = 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Dai; Nakano, Akinori; Kobayashi, Akiko; Matsushita, Kiyohiro; de Roest, David; Kobayashi, Nobuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effects of UV-assisted restoration on porous plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) SiOCH films with k = 2.0 and 2.3 having high porosities. By applying the UV-assisted restoration to O2-plasma-damaged films with k = 2.0 and 2.3, the recovery of the k-value was observed on the k = 2.3 film in proportion to -OH group reduction. However, the k = 2.0 film did not show recovery in spite of -OH group reduction. We found that hydrocarbon content in the k = 2.0 film was significantly increased by the UV-assisted restoration compared with the k = 2.3 film. According to these findings, we optimized the UV-assisted restoration to achieve improved controllability of the hydrocarbon uptake in the k = 2.0 film and confirmed the recovery of the k-value for O2-plasma-damaged film. Thus, adjusting the hydrocarbon uptake was crucial for restoring extremely porous SiOCH film.

  18. ZnO:Al Thin Film Gas Sensor for Detection of Ethanol Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hsiung Hon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The ZnO:Al thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering on Si substrateusing Pt as interdigitated electrodes. The structure was characterized by XRD and SEManalyses, and the ethanol vapor gas sensing as well as electrical properties have beeninvestigated and discussed. The gas sensing results show that the sensitivity for detecting400 ppm ethanol vapor was ~20 at an operating temperature of 250°C. The high sensitivity,fast recovery, and reliability suggest that ZnO:Al thin film prepared by RF magnetronsputtering can be used for ethanol vapor gas sensing.

  19. Best Frequency for Temperature Modulation of Tin Oxide Gas Sensor for Chemical Vapor Identification

    OpenAIRE

    R Chutia; Bhuyan, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of optimum temperature modulation of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) based gas sensor, operated in dynamic temperature measurement for identification of gas. The volatile organic compound (VOC) sample space consists of fourteen laboratory chemicals sampled at various concentration. We have used eleven number of gas sensors, manufactured by Figaro sensors, Japan. The heater of the sensors were modulated with sawtooth heating waveform of different frequency. ...

  20. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  1. Vapor Extraction/Bioventing Sequential Treatment of Soil Contaminated with Volatile and SemiVolatile Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malina, G.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    A cost-effective removal strategy was studied in bench-scale columns that involved vapor extraction and bioventing sequential treatment of toluene- and decane-contaminated soil. The effect of operating mode on treatment performance was examined at a continuous air flow and consecutively at two diffe

  2. Pd-Doped SnO2-Based Sensor Detecting Characteristic Fault Hydrocarbon Gases in Transformer Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4, ethane (C2H6, ethylene (C2H4, and acetylene (C2C2 are important fault characteristic hydrocarbon gases dissolved in power transformer oil. Online monitoring these gaseous components and their generation rates can present the operational state of power transformer timely and effectively. Gas sensing technology is the most sticky and tricky point in online monitoring system. In this paper, pure and Pd-doped SnO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The gas sensors were fabricated by side-heated preparation, and their gas sensing properties against CH4, C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2 were measured. Pd doping increases the electric conductance of the prepared SnO2 sensors and improves their gas sensing performances to hydrocarbon gases. In addition based on the frontier molecular orbital theory, the highest occupied molecular orbital energy and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy were calculated. Calculation results demonstrate that C2H4 has the highest occupied molecular orbital energy among CH4, C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2, which promotes charge transfer in gas sensing process, and SnO2 surfaces capture a relatively larger amount of electric charge from adsorbed C2H4.

  3. Polyaniline thin films in sensors for detection of toxic welding vapors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojković Bojana M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibilities of applying sensors based on filters with surface acoustic waves (SAW for the detection of harmful products in welding processes are analyzed. This review discusses the sensing mechanism and configurations of the sensors. The principles of SAW sensors are considered with special emphasis on the application of conducting polyaniline nanocomposites as sensitive thin layers in sensors for the detection of CO, NO2, and COCl2. The literature suggests the use of In2O3 as a dopant for CO and NO2 detection sensors, and ethylenediamine and phenylenediamine in COCl2 sensors. The paper presents original results of modeling of sensors that are designed for detection of CO and NO2 for which there are experimental data in the literature. The results obtained based on this model are in excellent agreement with results from the literature, which shows the validity of modeling. Based on the developed modeling methods, calculations were done for sensors for the detection of these gases in which the structure was the surface of quartz. From these modeling results it can be concluded that the use of the quartz substrate provides better sensitivity. In addition, the quartz sensors are thermally stable.

  4. Deep Sub-micro mol{\\cdot }mol^{-1} Water-Vapor Measurement by Dual-Ball SAW Sensors for Temperature Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N.; Oizumi, T.; Tsuji, T.; Akao, S.; Takayanagi, K.; Nakaso, N.; Yamanaka, K.

    2015-12-01

    A collimated surface acoustic wave (SAW) circles around the equator of a sphere hundreds of times. Because of the long distance travel of the collimated SAW, a small change in the SAW propagation caused by the environment of the sphere can be accumulated as a measurable range in amplitude and/or in delay time. So, a spherical SAW device enables highly sensitive water-vapor measurements. In this paper, deep sub \\upmu mol{\\cdot }mol^{-1} water-vapor detection by 1 mm diameter quartz crystal ball SAW sensors is described. To measure such a low water-vapor concentration in real time, it is necessary to compensate the temperature dependence of the ball SAW sensor, which is about 20 ppm{\\cdot }°C^{-1} in delay time change. A dual-frequency burst analog detector was developed for the temperature compensation in real time. By using a harmonic SAW sensor, which was excited by 80 MHz and 240 MHz at the same time, it was confirmed that the delay time drift for a temperature range of 21.0°C ± 1.0°C became less than 0.05 ppm in delay time change. By using dual-ball SAW sensors (which included a 150 MHz sensor with a water-vapor sensitive layer and a 240 MHz sensor as a reference), water-vapor concentrations from 0.1 \\upmu mol{\\cdot }mol^{-1} to 5 \\upmu mol{\\cdot }mol^{-1} were successfully measured. It appears that the delay time change is proportional to the square root of the water-vapor concentration. The detection limit determined by the electrical noise of the system was estimated at 0.01 \\upmu mol{\\cdot }mol^{-1}.

  5. Effect of ultraviolet illumination and ambient gases on the photoluminescence and electrical properties of nanoporous silicon layer for organic vapor sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiwongsangthong, Narin

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this research, the nanoporous silicon layer were fabricated and investigated the physical properties such as photoluminescence and the electrical properties in order to develop organic vapor sensor by using nanoporous silicon. The Changes in the photoluminescence intensity of nanoporous silicon samples are studied during ultraviolet illumination in various ambient gases such as nitrogen, oxigen and vacuum. In this paper, the nanoporous silicon layer was used as organic vapor adsorption and sensing element. The advantage of this device are simple process compatible in silicon technology and usable in room temperature. The structure of this device consists of nanoporous silicon layer which is formed by anodization of silicon wafer in hydrofluoric acid solution and aluminum electrode which deposited on the top of nanoporous silicon layer by evaporator. The nanoporous silicon sensors were placed in a gas chamber with various organic vapor such as ethanol, methanol and isopropyl alcohol. From studying on electrical characteristics of this device, it is found that the nanoporous silicon layer can detect the different organic vapor. Therefore, the nanoporous silicon is important material for organic vapor sensor and it can develop to other applications about gas sensors in the future.

  6. Highly sensitive room temperature organic vapor sensor based on polybenzoxazine-derived carbon aerogel thin film composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thubsuang, Uthen [Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Resources, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80160 (Thailand); Sukanan, Darunee [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sahasithiwat, Somboon [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Thailand Science Park (TSP), Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Wongkasemjit, Sujitra [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Chaisuwan, Thanyalak, E-mail: thanyalak.c@chula.ac.th [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and the Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Activated carbon aerogel with high surface area can be prepared from polybenzoxazine. • Activated carbon aerogel enhances the adsorption capacity of gas sensor. • Organic vapors with very low concentration can be detected by the as-prepared sensor. • The as-prepared sensor shows impressive short exposure and recovery time. • The response to different organic vapors can be tailored by changing polymer matrix. - Abstract: Gas sensing composites were fabricated using polybenzoxazine-based activated carbon aerogel as a conductive filler. The activated carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material, which has high pore volume of 0.57 cm{sup 3}/g and surface area of 917 m{sup 2}/g. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite displayed good response of 11.2 and 6.7 to toluene and n-hexane, respectively, compared to those of graphite/polybutadiene composite. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed high sensitivity of 3.09 × 10{sup 2} ppm{sup −1} to toluene. However, the sensitivity of activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite drastically decreased to 1.99 ppm{sup −1} and zero when exposed to acetone and water, respectively. Contrarily, when polyvinyl alcohol was used as a matrix, the sensitivity was about 4.19 ppm{sup −1} to water. While the composite was found to be not sensitive to toluene. The activated carbon aerogel/polybutadiene composite also showed good recovery as the electrical resistance came back to the original value within minutes when exposed to nitrogen gas.

  7. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Maier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  8. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  9. Integration of Sensor Technologies into Respirator Vapor Cartridges as End-of-Service-Life Indicators: Literature and Manufacturer’s Review and Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-06

    energy from micro- 25 solar cells , (3) high surface area, nanostructured aerogels for higher energy storage capacity, and (4) new nanostructured... interdigital microelectrode. The sensor operates by absorbing vapors into the organic monolayer, which causes a large modulation in the electrical...single-wall carbon nanotubes on an interdigitated electrode. The sensor responses were linear for concentrations of sub ppm to hundreds of ppm with

  10. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...... through modulation of the VCSEL output power as the polymer swell. We have investigated the responsivity of this technique experimentally using a plasma polymerized polystyrene coating and explain the results theoretically as a reflectance modulation of the top DBR.......We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain...

  11. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Toluene-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon System in Sub-and Supercritical State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheol-Joong; KIM; Dong-Bok; WON; 等

    2002-01-01

    The phase behaviors of toluene/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture systems were investigated with a continuous-flow type apparatus at 573.2,598.2.623.2 and 648.2K,while the pressure changed from 1 tp 5 MPa,The pseudo-binary phase behaviors were predicted with the Peng-Robinson equation of state with interaction parameters between toluene and pseudo-components considered.The phase diagrams of the system have been classified following the category of phase boundary diagram models.The extraction selectivity and efficiency of toluene as a solvent was discussed by comparing with that of hexane .The prediction model for selectivity was also suggested.

  12. A Micro-Preconcentrator Combined Olfactory Sensing System with a Micromechanical Cantilever Sensor for Detecting 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Gas Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sic Chae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Preventing unexpected explosive attacks and tracing explosion-related molecules require the development of highly sensitive gas-vapor detection systems. For that purpose, a micromechanical cantilever-based olfactory sensing system including a sample preconcentrator was developed to detect 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT, which is a well-known by-product of the explosive molecule trinitrotoluene (TNT and exists in concentrations on the order of parts per billion in the atmosphere at room temperature. A peptide receptor (His-Pro-Asn-Phe-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Leu-His-Gln-Arg that has high binding affinity for 2,4-DNT was immobilized on the surface of the cantilever sensors to detect 2,4-DNT vapor for highly selective detection. A micro-preconcentrator (µPC was developed using Tenax-TA adsorbent to produce higher concentrations of 2,4-DNT molecules. The preconcentration was achieved via adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena occurring between target molecules and the adsorbent. The µPC directly integrated with a cantilever sensor and enhanced the sensitivity of the cantilever sensor as a pretreatment tool for the target vapor. The response was rapidly saturated within 5 min and sustained for more than 10 min when the concentrated vapor was introduced. By calculating preconcentration factor values, we verified that the cantilever sensor provides up to an eightfold improvement in sensing performance.

  13. Influence of temperature and humidity on the detection of benzene vapor by piezoelectric crystal sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Chan-Hyon; Yun, Jong-Ho; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The effects of temperature and humidity on the estimation of air pollution by benzene by using the piezoelectric crystal gas sensor were studied. Polyvinylchloride films were used as substrate for the immobilization of polymethylphenylsiloxane onto the electrode surface of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer consisting of polymethylphenylsiloxane and polyvinylchloride was used for real-time monitoring of benzene, one of the atmospheric pollutants. According to the humidity from 35% to 75%, the upper limit of detection by this sensor was decreased and the response time and frequency recovery time for detecting benzene were long. On the other hand, as increasing the temperature, the response time and the frequency recovery time of the sensor were short, but its sensitivity got worse. The models for the correlation between the benzene concentration and temperature (or humidity) were presented.

  14. Micro-calorimetric sensor for vapor phase explosive detection with optimized heat profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Olsen, J.; Privorotskaya, N.

    2010-01-01

    A heater design, used in a micro-calorimetric sensor, has been optimized for temperature uniformity in order to increase the sensitivity and reliability of detection of trace amounts of explosives. In this abstract the design, fabrication and characterization is described. The performance of the ...

  15. A microcantilever-based alcohol vapor sensor-application and response model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensenius, Henriette; Thaysen, Jacob; Rasmussen, Anette Alsted

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed microcantilever probe with integrated piezoresistive readout has been applied as a gas sensor. Resistors, sensitive to stress changes, are integrated on the flexible cantilevers. This makes it possible to monitor the cantilever deflection electrically and with an integrated...... alcohols due to a difference in the evaporation rates. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  16. Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of Cationic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Zero Kinetic Energy Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Pentacene Vaporized from Laser Desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Pei, L; Kong, W; Li, Aigen

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive set of infrared (IR) emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3{\\mu}m are ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. They are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. However, not a single PAH species has yet been identified in space, as the mid-IR vibrational bands are mostly representative of functional groups and thus do not allow one to fingerprint individual PAH molecules. In contrast, the far-IR (FIR) bands are sensitive to the skeletal characteristics of a molecule, hence they are important for chemical identification of unknown species. With an aim to offer laboratory astrophysical data for the Herschel Space Observatory, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and similar future space missions, in this work we report neutral and cation FIR spectroscopy of pentacene (C_22H_14), a five-ring PAH molecule. We report three IR active modes of cationic pentacene at 53.3, 84.8, and 266{\\mu}m that may be detectable by space ...

  17. A multi-sensor upper tropospheric ozone product (MUTOP based on TES Ozone and GOES water vapor: derivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Felker

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES, a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Aura satellite, retrieves a vertical profile of tropospheric ozone. However, polar-orbiting instruments like TES provide limited nadir-view coverage. This work illustrates the value of these observations when taken in context with geostationary imagery describing synoptic-scale weather patterns. The goal of this study is to create map-view products of upper troposphere (UT ozone through the integration of TES ozone measurements with two synoptic dynamic tracers of stratospheric influence: specific humidity derived from the GOES Imager water vapor absorption channel, and potential vorticity (PV from an operational forecast model. As a mixing zone between tropospheric and stratospheric reservoirs, the upper troposphere (UT exhibits a complex chemical makeup. Determination of ozone mixing ratios in this layer is especially difficult without direct in situ measurement. However, it is well understood that UT ozone is correlated with dynamical tracers like low specific humidity and high potential vorticity. Blending the advantages of two remotely sensed quantities (GOES water vapor and TES ozone is at the core of the Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP.

    Our results suggest that 72 % of TES-observed UT ozone variability can be explained by its correlation with dry air and high PV. MUTOP reproduces TES retrievals across the GOES-West domain with a root mean square error (RMSE of 18 ppbv (part per billion by volume. There are several advantages to this multi-sensor derived product approach: (1 it is calculated from two operational fields (GOES specific humidity and GFS PV, so maps of layer-average ozone can be created and used in near real-time; (2 the product provides the spatial resolution and coverage of a geostationary image as it depicts the variable distribution of ozone in the UT; and (3 the 6 h temporal resolution of the derived

  18. Impedance spectroscopy and sensors under ethanol vapors application of sprayed vanadium-doped ZnO compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhamdi, A., E-mail: mhaammar@gmail.com [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Labidi, A. [Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, BP 51, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Souissi, B. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kahlaoui, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université de Carthage, Zarzouna 7021 (Tunisia); Yumak, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Marmara University, 34722 Göztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Boubaker, K.; Amlouk, A.; Amlouk, M. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Proposing an original explanation to the behavior of vanadium-doped zinc oxide structures. • Presenting an original combination of several referred and established characterization means. • Outlining average particle size changes effects along the surface of the compounds. - Abstract: Thin films of vanadium-doped zinc oxide with different vanadium-doping levels (0, 1, 2 and 3 at%) were deposited on glass substrates by employing an inexpensive, simplified spray technique using at relatively low substrate temperature (460 °C). The effect of V doping on the structural, morphological and optical properties of the films was investigated by Mhamdi et al. (2013). The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films were well crystallized in würtzite phase with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (0 0 2) direction parallel c-axis. As also that the average particle size along the surface of the films decreases with increasing of concentration of vanadium. In this work we study the AC and DC conductivity and gas sensor application on ZnO:V thin films. The dielectric properties of ZnO:V thin films were studied by means of complex impedance spectroscopy and frequency dependence of conductivity measured from the impedance data at a range of frequency intervals between 10 Hz and 13 MHz with a temperature between 355 and 445 °C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant ε′, dielectric loss ε″, loss tangent (tan δ) and AC electrical conductivity (σ{sub AC}) of the layers was subsequently investigated. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of ZnO thin films, prepared by spray, plays an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of ZnO:V sensors ethanol versus time and working temperature, relative doping and the concentration of the ethanol vapor.

  19. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  20. On-chip interrogation of a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator-based ethanol vapor sensor with an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebo, Nebiyu A.; Bogaerts, Wim; Hens, Zeger; Baets, Roel

    2012-01-01

    Silicon -on -insulator (SOI) optical microring resonators fabricated with the standard CMOS fabrication technology have recently gained considerable attention for energy efficient, compact and low cost biomedical and environmental sensing applications. High sensitivity to the surrounding refractive index variations, high compactness, direct wavelength multiplexing capabilities, simplicity, and the promise for mass fabrication are among the interesting features supported by SOI microring resonators. On the other hand, despite the strong case for microring resonators for sensing, there exist some issues which need to be addressed in order to ensure the feasibility of such sensors. One major limitation currently is the cost of optical sources and /or spectrum analyzers required to drive and interrogate these sensors. Either expensive light sources or spectrum analyzers are usually used with sensors built around microring resonators. An attractive approach to address this problem is the use of on-chip spectrometers along with cheap broadband light sources. We experimentally demonstrate on-chip interrogation of an SOI microring resonator based gas sensor with a compact Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) spectrometer. We have designed and fabricated a 200GHz AWG with strongly overlapping output channels, and used it to interrogate the wavelength shift from a ring resonator based ethanol vapor sensor on the same chip. Ethanol vapor concentrations in 100-1000ppm range are readily detected by monitoring the intensity ratio between two adjacent AWG channels to which the microring resonance overlaps. Such an integrated sensor-interrogator approach is presented as an alternative to the current costly and off-chip read-out systems used for ring resonator based sensors.

  1. A Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP based on TES ozone and GOES water vapor: derivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Felker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES, a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Aura satellite, retrieves a vertical profile of tropospheric ozone. However, polar-orbiting instruments like TES provide limited nadir-view coverage. This work illustrates the value of these observations when taken in context with information about synoptic-scale weather patterns. The goal of this study is to create map-view products of upper troposphere (UT ozone through the integration of TES ozone measurements with two synoptic dynamical tracers of stratospheric influence: specific humidity derived from the GOES Imager, and potential vorticity from an operational forecast model. As a mixing zone between tropospheric and stratospheric reservoirs, the upper troposphere (UT exhibits a complex chemical makeup. Determination of ozone mixing ratios in this layer is especially difficult without direct in-situ measurement. However, it is well understood that UT ozone is correlated with dynamical tracers like low specific humidity and high potential vorticity. Blending the advantages of two remotely sensed quantities (GOES water vapor and TES ozone is at the core of the Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP.

    Our approach results in the temporal and spatial coverage of a geostationary platform, a major improvement over individual polar overpasses, while retaining TES's ability to characterize UT ozone. Results suggest that over 70% of TES-observed UT ozone variability can be explained by correlation with the two dynamical tracers. MUTOP reproduces TES retrievals across the GOES-West domain with a root mean square error (RMSE of 19.2 ppbv. There are several advantages to this multi-sensor derived product approach: (1 it is calculated from 2 operational fields (GOES specific humidity and GFS PV, so the layer-average ozone can be created and used in near real-time; (2 the product provides the spatial resolution and coverage of a geostationary

  2. Improved Aerosol Optical Thickness, Columnar Water Vapor, and Surface Reflectance Retrieval from Combined CASI and SASI Airborne Hyperspectral Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasingly common requirement in remote sensing is the integration of hyperspectral data collected simultaneously from different sensors (and fore-optics operating across different wavelength ranges. Data from one module are often relied on to correct information in the other, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT and columnar water vapor (CWV. This paper describes problems associated with this process and recommends an improved strategy for processing remote sensing data, collected from both visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared modules, to retrieve accurate AOT, CWV, and surface reflectance values. This strategy includes a workflow for radiometric and spatial cross-calibration and a method to retrieve atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance based on a radiative transfer function. This method was tested using data collected with the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI and SWIR Airborne Spectrographic Imager (SASI from a site in Huailai County, Hebei Province, China. Various methods for retrieving AOT and CWV specific to this region were assessed. The results showed that retrieving AOT from the remote sensing data required establishing empirical relationships between 465.6 nm/659 nm and 2105 nm, augmented by ground-based reflectance validation data, and minimizing the merit function based on AOT@550 nm optimization. The paper also extends the second-order difference algorithm (SODA method using Powell’s methods to optimize CWV retrieval. The resulting CWV image has fewer residual surface features compared with the standard methods. The derived remote sensing surface reflectance correlated significantly with the ground spectra of comparable vegetation, cement road and soil targets. Therefore, the method proposed in this paper is reliable enough for integrated atmospheric correction and surface reflectance retrieval from hyperspectral remote sensing data. This study provides a good reference for surface

  3. The impact of water and hydrocarbon concentration on the sensitivity of a polymer-based quartz crystal microbalance sensor for organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcic, Bobby, E-mail: Bobby.Pejcic@csiro.au [CSIRO, Earth Science and Resource Engineering, PO Box 1130, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Crooke, Emma [CSIRO, Earth Science and Resource Engineering, PO Box 1130, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Doherty, Cara M.; Hill, Anita J. [CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Locked Bag 33, Clayton Sth MDC, Vic 3169 (Australia); Myers, Matthew [CSIRO, Earth Science and Resource Engineering, PO Box 1130, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Qi, Xiubin; Ross, Andrew [CSIRO, Earth Science and Resource Engineering, PO Box 1130, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {yields} The response of a polymer coated QCM sensor is affected by water soaking time. {yields} Polymer-water interfacial processes influence the QCM sensitivity for hydrocarbons. {yields} The QCM sensitivity of high Tg polymer films is affected by plasticization processes. - Abstract: Long-term environmental monitoring of organic compounds in natural waters requires sensors that respond reproducibly and linearly over a wide concentration range, and do not degrade with time. Although polymer coated piezoelectric based sensors have been widely used to detect hydrocarbons in aqueous solution, very little information exists regarding their stability and suitability over extended periods in water. In this investigation, the influence of water aging on the response of various polymer membranes [polybutadiene (PB), polyisobutylene (PIB), polystyrene (PS), polystyrene-co-butadiene (PSB)] was studied using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). QCM measurements revealed a modest increase in sensitivity towards toluene for PB and PIB membranes at concentrations above 90 ppm after aging in water for 4 days. In contrast, the sensitivity of PS and PSB coated QCM sensors depended significantly on the toluene concentration and increased considerably at concentrations above 90 ppm after aging in water for 4 days. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) showed that there is a change in the sorption mechanism at higher toluene levels for PS and PSB. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) studies were performed to investigate the free volume properties of all polymers and to monitor any changes in the free volume size and distribution due to water and toluene exposure. The PALS did not detect any considerable variation in the free volume properties of the polymer films as a function of solution composition and soaking time, implying that viscoelastic and/or interfacial processes (i.e. surface area changes) are probably

  4. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  5. A Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP based on TES ozone and GOES water vapor: validation with ozonesondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Moody

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate representation of ozone in the extratropical upper troposphere (UT remains a challenge. However, the implementation of hyper-spectral remote sensing using satellite instruments such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES provides an avenue for mapping ozone in this region, from 500 to 300 hPa. As a polar orbiting satellite TES observations are limited, but in this paper they are combined with geostationary satellite observations of water vapor. This paper describes a validation of the Multi-sensor UT Ozone Product (MUTOP. MUTOP is statistical retrieval method, a derived product image based on the correlation of two remotely sensed quantities, TES ozone, against geostationary (GOES specific humidity and modeled potential vorticity, a dynamical tracer in the UT. These TES-derived UT ozone mixing ratios are compared to coincident ozonesonde measurements of layer-average UT ozone mixing ratios made during the NASA INTEX/B field campaign in the spring of 2006; the region for this study is effectively the GOES west domain covering the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and the Western United States. This intercomparison evaluates MUTOP skill at representing ozone magnitude and variability in this region of complex dynamics. In total, 11 ozonesonde launch sites were available for this study, providing 127 individual sondes for comparison; the overall mean ozone of the 500–300 hPa layer for these sondes was 78.0 ppbv. MUTOP reproduces in-situ measurements reasonably well, producing an UT mean of 82.3 ppbv, with a mean absolute error of 12.2 ppbv and a root mean square error of 16.4 ppbv relative to ozonesondes across all sites. An overall UT mean bias of 4.3 ppbv relative to sondes was determined for MUTOP. Considered in the context of past TES validation studies, these results illustrate that MUTOP is able to maintain accuracy similar to TES while expanding coverage to the entire GOES-West satellite domain. In addition MUTOP provides six

  6. Application of a fiber-optic NIR-EFA sensor system for in situ monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerck, J; Roth, S; Kraemer, K; Scholz, M; Klaas, N

    2001-05-07

    Interaction of analyte molecules with the evanescent wave of light guided in optical fibers is among the most promising novel sensing schemes that can be applied for environmental monitoring and on-line process analysis. By combining this measuring principle with the solid-phase extraction of analyte molecules into the polymer cladding of a fiber, it is possible to perform direct absorption measurements in the cladding, if the fiber is adapted to a conventional spectrometer/photometer. A big advantage of this arrangement is that the measurement is scarcely disturbed by matrix effects (background absorption of water in IR measurements, stray light due to turbidity in the sample). By using near-infrared (NIR) evanescent field absorption (EFA) measurements in quartz glass fibers coated with a hydrophobic silicone membrane it is possible to design and construct sensors for monitoring apolar hydrocarbons (HCs) in aqueous matrices.The paper presents a fiber-optic sensor system for the determination of aromatic HCs in groundwater or industrial wastewater. Generally, this instrument is suitable for quantitative in situ monitoring of pollutants such as aromatic solvents, fuels, mineral oils or chlorinated HCs with relatively low water saturation solubility (typically between 0.01 and 10 g l(-1)). The sensor probe is connected via all-silica fibers to a filter photometer developed at the IFIA, thus, allowing even remote analysis in a monitoring well. This portable instrument provides a total concentration signal of the organic compounds extracted into the fiber cladding by measuring the integral absorption at the 1st C--H overtone bands in the NIR spectral range. In situ measurements with the sensor system were performed in a groundwater circulation well at the VEGAS research facility of the University of Stuttgart (Germany). The NIR-EFA sensor system was tested within the frame of an experiment that was carried through in a tank containing sandy gravel with a groundwater

  7. Fabrication of a selective mercury sensor based on the adsorption of cold vapor of mercury on carbon nanotubes: determination of mercury in industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norouz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-01-15

    A new sensor for the determination of mercury at microg ml(-1) levels is proposed based on the adsorption of mercury vapor on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The changes in the impedance of SWCNTs were monitored upon adsorption of mercury vapor. The adsorption behaviour of mercury on SWCNTs was compared with that on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Cold vapor of mercury was generated at 65 degrees C using Sn(II) solution as a reducing agent. The limit of detection was 0.64 microg ml(-1) for Hg(II) species. The calibration curve for Hg(II) was linear from 1.0 to 30.0 microg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) of eight replicate analyses of 15 microg ml(-1) of Hg(II) was 2.7%. The results showed no interfering effects from many foreign species and hydride forming elements. The system was successfully applied to the determination of the mercury content of different types of wastewater samples.

  8. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  9. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  10. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films for optical waveguide bridges for use in mechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the influence of RF power, ammonia flow, annealing temperature, and annealing time on the optical and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films, is presented. A low refractive index (1.47 to 1.48) film having tensile stress has been...

  11. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  12. A chemically stable europium metal-organic framework for bifunctional chemical sensor and recyclable on-off-on vapor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongbo; Liu, Jingjuan; Liu, Zhiliang

    2017-07-01

    A ratiometric luminescence sensing method is developed and makes the chemically stable Eu metal-organic framework to be the first bifunctional chemical sensor for Cd2+ and F- ions with naked-eye observation in the field of sensing applications utilizing luminescent Ln-MOFs. This is the first example of luminescent colorimetric sensor caused by the direct dual emissions of a single Ln-MOF. A recyclable vapoluminescent sensor for HCl and NH3 by the naked eye has also been realized.

  13. Analysis of binary mixtures of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons with low-phase-noise shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors using multielectrode transducer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Florian; Mohler, Rachel E; Ricco, Antonio J; Josse, Fabien

    2014-11-18

    The present work investigates a compact sensor system that provides rapid, real-time, in situ measurements of the identities and concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons at parts-per-billion concentrations in water through the combined use of kinetic and thermodynamic response parameters. The system uses shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensors operating directly in the liquid phase. The 103 MHz SAW sensors are coated with thin sorbent polymer films to provide the appropriate limits of detection as well as partial selectivity for the analytes of interest, the BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), which are common indicators of fuel and oil accidental releases in groundwater. Particular emphasis is placed on benzene, a known carcinogen and the most challenging BTEX analyte with regard to both regulated levels and its solubility properties. To demonstrate the identification and quantification of individual compounds in multicomponent aqueous samples, responses to binary mixtures of benzene with toluene as well as ethylbenzene were characterized at concentrations below 1 ppm (1 mg/L). The use of both thermodynamic and kinetic (i.e., steady-state and transient) responses from a single polymer-coated SH-SAW sensor enabled identification and quantification of the two BTEX compounds in binary mixtures in aqueous solution. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved, resulting in lower limits of detection and improved identification at low concentrations, by designing and implementing a type of multielectrode transducer pattern, not previously reported for chemical sensor applications. The design significantly reduces signal distortion and root-mean-square (RMS) phase noise by minimizing acoustic wave reflections from electrode edges, thus enabling limits of detection for BTEX analytes of 9-83 ppb (calculated from RMS noise); concentrations of benzene in water as low as ~100 ppb were measured directly. Reliable quantification of BTEX

  14. Vapor pressure studies of the solubilization of hydrocarbons by surfactant micelles. Final report, April 1, 1984-December 31, 1984. [Solubilization data for system benzene/sodium octylsulfate/sodium chloride/water at 15/sup 0/, 25/sup 0/, 35/sup 0/ and 45/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.D.; Tucker, E.E.

    1985-04-01

    This final report describes vapor pressure studies of the solubilization of hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives by aqueous micellar solutions. An automated vapor pressure apparatus and a manual apparatus incorporating a mercury-covered sintered-glass disk inlet valve were used to obtain highly precise data for the solubilization of hydrocarbons and aliphatic alcohols into aqueous solutions of the ionic surfactants sodium octylsulfate and n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride (cetylpyridinium chloride). A mass-action model based on a modification of the Poisson distribution equations has been developed and applied to data for the system benzene/sodium octylsulfate/sodium chloride/water at 15/sup 0/, 25/sup 0/, 35/sup 0/, and 45/sup 0/C. An excellent goodness of fit is achieved with the model. Tabulated experimental results (485 sets of activity and concentration data) are included in this report. 12 references, 2 figures.

  15. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun photometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, Samuel; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, Samuel; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, Daniel; Thompson, Anne M.

    2007-06-06

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes, and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during 8 Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during 5 Aqua and 5 Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles mean (bias) and rms AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1% and 8.8%, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 h and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and rms LWV differences are -5.4% and 8.8%, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3% and 8.4%, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 km of J31 profiles yield lower bias and rms differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8% to 5.8%, and the rms difference decreases from 21.5% to 16.4%. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2% to +6% and rms differences of ~20% below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5-km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4% compared to AATS over-ocean near surface retrievals. The MODIS Aqua subset (79 grid cells) exhibits a wet bias of 5.1%, and the MODIS-Terra subset (126 grid cells) yields a wet bias of 13.2%.

  16. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  17. Porphyrin nanoassemblies via surfactant-assisted assembly and single nanofiber nanoelectronic sensors for high-performance H₂O₂ vapor sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peipei; Zhao, Guangyao; Chen, Penglei; Lei, Bin; Jiang, Lang; Zhang, Hantang; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Minghua

    2014-04-22

    Porphyrins are recognized as important π-conjugated molecules correlating supramolecular chemistry, nanoscience, and advanced materials science. So far, as their supramolecular nanoassemblies are addressed, most efforts focus on the photo- or opto-related subjects. Beyond these traditional subjects, it is strongly desired to develop advanced porphyrin nanoassemblies in some other new topics of paramount importance. By means of a surfactant-assisted assembly, we herein show that porphyrins of different central metal ions, 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPyP), zinc 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine (ZnTPyP), and oxo-[5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrinato]titanium(IV) (TiOTPyP), could be organized to form irregular aggregates, short nanorods, and long yet straight nanofibers, respectively. Remarkably, in terms of an organic ribbon mask technique, we show that such long yet straight TiOTPyP nanofibers could be integrated into single nanofiber-based two-end nanoelectronics. Such simple nanodevices could serve as high-performance sensors of a satisfactory stability, reproducibility, and selectivity for an expeditious detection of vapor-phase H2O2. This provides a new alternative for a fast sensing of vapor-phase H2O2, which is currently an important issue in the fields of anti-terrorism, industrial healthcare, etc. In contrast to the traditional investigations focusing on the photo- or opto-related topics, our work endows porphyrin nanostructures with new opportunities as advanced nanomaterials in terms of portable yet high-performance nanoelectronic sensors, which is an issue of general concern in modern advanced nanomaterials.

  18. Role of the concentration and nature of grafted groups in the adsorption of hydrocarbon vapors on silica modified by monofunctional polyfluoroalkylsilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, T. M.; Shoniya, N. K.; Tayakina, O. Ya.; Tkachenko, O. P.; Kustov, L. M.; Bernardoni, F.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2012-03-01

    The role of the grafting density of monofunctional polyfluoroalkylsilanes of the C n F2 n - 1(CH2) m Si(CH3)2Cl general formula (where n = 3, 4, and 6; and m = 2 and 3) and their composition in intermolecular interactions of the molecules of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons with a surface of chemically modified silica is studied by means of IR spectroscopy and adsorption-static and gas chromatography. It is shown that the higher the concentration and the shorter the length of the grafted chain, the greater (by a factor of 2 to 25) the drop in the adsorption values of hydrocarbons as a result of modifications, due to an increase in the degree of oleophobization of surface upon the formation of polyorganofluorine coatings. The high specificity of the surface with respect to benzene, which is due to the active participation of the polar fragment of a grafted chain in adsorption process, is related to the features of a relatively low-density sample with a concentration of grafted perfluorobutyl groups of 1.7 nm-2. It is shown that the thermodestruction of polyfluoroalkyl silica remains virtually unobserved upon heating to 523 K in an argon flow.

  19. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenshan Lin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs. ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application.

  20. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO(2) and C(2)H(4) using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application.

  1. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  2. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  3. Characterisation of Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) radiances using radiative transfer simulations from global atmospheric reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Poli, Paul; John, Viju O.

    2017-02-01

    The near-global and all-sky coverage of satellite observations from microwave humidity sounders operating in the 183 GHz band complement radiosonde and aircraft observations and satellite infrared clear-sky observations. The Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program began operations late 1991. It has been followed by several other microwave humidity sounders, continuing today. However, expertise and accrued knowledge regarding the SSM/T-2 data record is limited because it has remained underused for climate applications and reanalyses. In this study, SSM/T-2 radiances are characterised using several global atmospheric reanalyses. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the first ECMWF reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C), and the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) are projected into SSM/T-2 radiance space using a fast radiative transfer model. The present study confirms earlier indications that the polarisation state of SSM/T-2 antenna is horizontal (not vertical) in the limit of nadir viewing. The study also formulates several recommendations to improve use of the SSM/T-2 measurement data in future fundamental climate data records or reanalyses. Recommendations are (1) to correct geolocation errors, especially for DMSP 14; (2) to blacklist poor quality data identified in the paper; (3) to correct for inter-satellite biases, estimated here on the order of 1 K, by applying an inter-satellite recalibration or, for reanalysis, an automated (e.g., variational) bias correction; and (4) to improve precipitating cloud filtering or, for reanalysis, consider an all-sky assimilation scheme where radiative transfer simulations account for the scattering effect of hydrometeors.

  4. 声表面波气体传感器聚合物敏感膜材料的选择%The choosing of polymer coatings for SAW vapor sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆宁; 邵晟宇; 潘勇; 杨柳

    2013-01-01

    聚合物敏感膜材料是声表面波(SAW)气体传感器应用最为广泛的膜材料。该文就聚合物敏感膜材料的吸附原理、物理性质以及线性溶解能关系(LESR)予以论述。给出了筛选和设计特种性能聚合物膜的方法,旨在为声表面波气体传感器选择或设计合适的聚合物敏感膜材料提供依据。%Most of sorbent layers on surface acoustic wave vapor sensors are polymers. The absorption theory, physical characters and linear solvation energy relationship of polymer coatings were discussed in this paper. The methods of choosing and designing functional polymer were introduced on which basis to choose suitable polymers coatings for SAW vapor sensors.

  5. Vapor Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  6. QCM gas phase detection with ceramic materials - VOCs and oil vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Usman; Rohrer, Andreas; Lieberzeit, Peter A.; Dickert, Franz L. [University of Vienna, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    Titanate sol-gel layers imprinted with carbonic acids were used as sensitive layers on quartz crystal microbalance. These functionalized ceramics enable us detection of volatile organic compounds such as ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, n-hexane, n-heptane, n-/iso-octane, and n-decane. Variation of the precursors (i.e., tetrabutoxy titanium, tetrapropoxy titanium, tetraethoxy titanium) allows us to tune the sensitivity of the material by a factor of 7. Sensitivity as a function of precursors leads to selective inclusion of n-butanol vapors down to 1 ppm. The selectivity of materials is optimized to differentiate between isomers, e.g., n- and iso-octane. The results can be rationalized by correlating the sensor effects of hydrocarbons with the Wiener index. A mass-sensitive sensor based on titanate layer was also developed for monitoring emanation of degraded engine oil. Heating the sensor by a meander avoids vapor condensation. Thus, a continuously working oil quality sensor was designed. (orig.)

  7. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  8. Developments toward a low-cost approach for long-term, unattended vapor intrusion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V; Tolley, William K

    2014-08-07

    There are over 450 000 sites contaminated by chemicals in the US. This large number of contaminated sites and the speed of subsurface migration of chemicals pose considerable risk to nearby residences and commercial buildings. The high costs for monitoring around these sites stem from the labor involved in placing and replacing the passive sorbent vapor samplers and the resultant laboratory analysis. This monitoring produces sparse data sets that do not track temporal changes well. To substantially reduce costs and better track exposures, less costly, unattended systems for monitoring soil gases and vapor intrusion into homes and businesses are desirable to aid in the remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes progress toward the development of an inexpensive system specifically for monitoring vapor intrusion; the system can operate repeatedly without user intervention with low detection limits (1 × 10(-9), or 1 part-per-billion). Targeted analytes include chlorinated hydrocarbons (dichloroethylene, trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene) and benzene. The system consists of a trap-and-purge preconcentrator for vapor collection in conjunction with a compact gas chromatography instrument to separate individual compounds. Chemical detection is accomplished with an array of chemicapacitors and a metal-oxide semiconductor combustibles sensor. Both the preconcentrator and the chromatography column are resistively heated. All components are compatible with ambient air, which serves as the carrier gas for the gas chromatography and detectors.

  9. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  10. Using Conventional Monitoring Wells to Collect Data Necessary to Understand Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent work has clearly established that the possibility for vapor intrusion of petroleum hydrocarbons is greatly reduced by aerobic biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in unsaturated soil. The rate and extent of aerobic biodegradation of benzene (or any other fuel hydrocarbon) in...

  11. Using Conventional Monitoring Wells to Collect Data Necessary to Understand Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent work has clearly established that the possibility for vapor intrusion of petroleum hydrocarbons is greatly reduced by aerobic biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in unsaturated soil. The rate and extent of aerobic biodegradation of benzene (or any other fuel hydrocarbon) in...

  12. Etude d'équations d'état en vue de représenter les propriétés PVT et les équilibres liquide-vapeur d'hydrocarbures Equations of State for Representing Pvt Properties and Vapor-Liquid Equilibria of Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neau E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Une étude comparative de plusieurs équations d'état issues de la théorie de van der Waals a été effectuée dans le but de sélectionner des modèles capables de calculer les propriétés PVT d'hydrocarbures dans un large domaine de pression et température. 34 hydrocarbures de différentes tailles et structures ont été sélectionnés. Les données expérimentales d'équilibres liquide-vapeur (pressions de vapeur, volumes des liquides et les propriétés PVT de fluides comprimés ont été systématiquement comparées avec des résultats obtenus au moyen de différentes équations d'état. Il est apparu que seules les équations d'état complexes (notamment l'équation COR sont en mesure de représenter correctement les propriétés volumétriques dans un large domaine de température et de pression, le voisinage du point critique inclu. A comparative study of several equations of state (EOS derived from the van der Waals theory was performed. The aim was to select the models able to represent PVT properties of hydrocarbons in large pressure and temperature ranges. 34 hydrocarbons of various sizes and structures were selected. Experimental data of vapor liquid equilibria (vapor pressures and liquid volumes and PVT properties of compressed fluids were systematically compared with results obtained using selected EOS. It was shown that only the complex EOS (especially the COR equation are able to represent volumetric properties in wide temperature and presssure ranges, the critical region included.

  13. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  14. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90

  15. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form-f...

  16. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  17. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry L.; Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2017-03-14

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  18. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  19. ZnO nano-tree active layer as heavy hydrocarbon sensor: From material synthesis to electrical and gas sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdi, Mohammad Arab Pour, E-mail: mohammad.arab-pour-yazdi@utbm.fr [Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UTBM, IRTES EA7274, F-90100 Belfort (France); Martin, Nicolas [FEMTO-ST, Département MN2S, UMR 6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, ENSMM, UTBM, 15B, Avenue des montboucons, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Monsifrot, Eric [SARL DEPHIS, 75 Avenue Oehmichen, Bat. Q, 25460 Etupes (France); Briois, Pascal [Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UTBM, IRTES EA7274, F-90100 Belfort (France); Billard, Alain [Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UTBM, IRTES EA7274, F-90100 Belfort (France); LRC CEA-IRTES-LERMPS-UTBM, site de Montbéliard, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2015-12-01

    ZnO with dense, porous, nano-wire and nano-tree morphologies was successfully synthesized via reactive magnetron sputtering at high pressure (10 Pa) and with different deposition temperatures (RT → 1273 K). The morphological properties of prepared ZnO coatings were revealed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed to determine crystalline structure of the films in relation with their deposition temperature. Hall effect measurements were used to investigate the electrical resistivity, free carrier concentration and mobility in the coatings as a function of their morphology in a temperature range from 293 K to 473 K. Finally, C{sub 12}H{sub 26} dodecane gas sensing properties of ZnO nano-trees were investigated at different temperatures (from 323 K to 566 K) and the results were discussed depending on dodecane concentration. A remarkable response of 39% was observed at 415 K for a low concentration of dodecane in air [1 ppm(v)]. High response to low concentrations of C{sub 12}H{sub 26} as well as good chemical stability of ZnO nano-trees make this kind of structure a potential candidate as sensing layer for practical sensor applications. - Highlights: • ZnO nano-trees were deposited by DC reactive sputtering. • The influence of substrate temperature on films morphologies. • Dodecane sensing property of ZnO nano-trees was measured and high relative response of 39% for detection of 1 ppm(V) dodecane in air at operating temperature of 415 K was obtained.

  20. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  1. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  2. Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of a C-141B Starlifter Aircraft: Validation of VHP and Modified VHP (mVHP) Fumigation Decontamination Process via VHP-Sensor, Biological Indicator, and HD Simulant in a Large-Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    21 18. G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953VHP Exposure Test Results ..................... 33 19. Vapor Cup ...provided forced air circulation. An anemometer , located downstream of the main blower, measured and recorded the airflow generated by the mVHP system...Station) Height (inches) 1 670 8 2 890 48 3 1230 72 3.4.2 Chemical Warfare Agent Simulant Vapor Analysis Vapor cups were prepared for residual chemical

  3. Chemical Analysis of Hydrocarbon Grease from Spin Bearing Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-30

    antioxidant but rather to some grease degradation products. (The antioxidant is expected to vaporize and leave the grease under vacuum.) The gas...to 10-3 torr level, phenyl-8- naphthylamIne Is sufficiently volatile to vaporize and leave the grease. The appearance of the solitary, hydrocarbon...Configuration of 2,4- Decadienals Isolated from Oils Containing Linoleic Acid," Nature 185, 310-311 (1960). 7. B. G. Tarladgis, and B. M. Watts

  4. Using Si Diodes To Detect H2 Liquid/Vapor Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula Jean; Fabik, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Commercially available silicon-diode temperature sensors used to detect interfaces between hydrogen liquid and hydrogen vapor at steady-state saturation conditions. Sensors mounted at short intervals along rod to form rake-like array. Array inserted in tank with rod oriented vertically, where it senses level of liquid hydrogen to resolution equal to interval between sensors. Basic idea to measure voltage across sensor while supplying small electric current that heats sensor. Because vapor cools sensor less effectively than liquid does, sensor's steady-state temperature greater when sensor surrounded by vapor than when immersed in liquid. Voltage output decreases as temperature increases for silicon diodes. Thus, temperature (voltage) reading used to determine whether liquid level above or below sensor.

  5. The Evolution of High Temperature Gas Sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Mukundan, R. (Rangachary)

    2001-01-01

    Gas sensor technology based on high temperature solid electrolytes is maturing rapidly. Recent advances in metal oxide catalysis and thin film materials science has enabled the design of new electrochemical sensors. We have demonstrated prototype amperometric oxygen sensors, nernstian potentiometric oxygen sensors that operate in high sulfur environments, and hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide sensing mixed potentials sensors. Many of these devices exhibit part per million sensitivities, response times on the order of seconds and excellent long-term stability.

  6. Pretreated Butterfly Wings for Tuning the Selective Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszter, Gábor; Kertész, Krisztián; Bálint, Zsolt; Biró, László Péter

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nanoarchitectures occurring in the scales of Blue butterflies are responsible for their vivid blue wing coloration. These nanoarchitectures are quasi-ordered nanocomposites which are constituted from a chitin matrix with embedded air holes. Therefore, they can act as chemically selective sensors due to their color changes when mixing volatile vapors in the surrounding atmosphere which condensate into the nanoarchitecture through capillary condensation. Using a home-built vapor-mixing setup, the spectral changes caused by the different air + vapor mixtures were efficiently characterized. It was found that the spectral shift is vapor-specific and proportional with the vapor concentration. We showed that the conformal modification of the scale surface by atomic layer deposition and by ethanol pretreatment can significantly alter the optical response and chemical selectivity, which points the way to the efficient production of sensor arrays based on the knowledge obtained through the investigation of modified butterfly wings. PMID:27618045

  7. Pretreated Butterfly Wings for Tuning the Selective Vapor Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Piszter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photonic nanoarchitectures occurring in the scales of Blue butterflies are responsible for their vivid blue wing coloration. These nanoarchitectures are quasi-ordered nanocomposites which are constituted from a chitin matrix with embedded air holes. Therefore, they can act as chemically selective sensors due to their color changes when mixing volatile vapors in the surrounding atmosphere which condensate into the nanoarchitecture through capillary condensation. Using a home-built vapor-mixing setup, the spectral changes caused by the different air + vapor mixtures were efficiently characterized. It was found that the spectral shift is vapor-specific and proportional with the vapor concentration. We showed that the conformal modification of the scale surface by atomic layer deposition and by ethanol pretreatment can significantly alter the optical response and chemical selectivity, which points the way to the efficient production of sensor arrays based on the knowledge obtained through the investigation of modified butterfly wings.

  8. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Jimmy; Straub, Douglas L.; Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Huckaby, David

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  9. Explosive vapor detection payload for small robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Phil J.; Pettit, Michael; Wetzel, John P.; Haas, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Detection of explosive hazards is a critical component of enabling and improving operational mobility and protection of US Forces. The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is addressing this challenge for dismounted soldiers. Under the AMDS program, ARA has developed a vapor sampling system that enhances the detection of explosive residues using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors. The Explosives Hazard Trace Detection (EHTD) payload is designed for plug-and-play installation and operation on small robotic platforms, addressing critical Army needs for more safely detecting concealed or exposed explosives in areas such as culverts, walls and vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development, robotic integration and performance of the explosive vapor sampling system, which consists of a sampling "head," a vapor transport tube and an extendable "boom." The sampling head and transport tube are integrated with the boom, allowing samples to be collected from targeted surfaces up to 7-ft away from the robotic platform. During sample collection, an IR lamp in the sampling head is used to heat a suspected object/surface and the vapors are drawn through the heated vapor transport tube to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection. The EHTD payload is capable of quickly (less than 30 seconds) detecting explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX at nanogram levels on common surfaces (brick, concrete, wood, glass, etc.).

  10. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  11. Wetting and superhydrophobic properties of PECVD grown hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, D.K., E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca [Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) and Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi UQAC, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Farzaneh, M. [Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) and Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi UQAC, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Paynter, R.W. [INRS-EMT, 1650 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Wetting characteristics of micro-nanorough substrates of aluminum and smooth silicon substrates have been studied and compared by depositing hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique using a mixture of Ar, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} gases. The water contact angles on the hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings deposited on silicon substrates were found to be 72 deg. and 105 deg., respectively. However, the micro-nanorough aluminum substrates demonstrated superhydrophobic properties upon coatings with fluorinated-hydrocarbon providing a water contact angle of {approx}165 deg. and contact angle hysteresis below 2 deg. with water drops rolling off from those surfaces while the same substrates showed contact angle of 135 deg. with water drops sticking on those surfaces. The superhydrophobic properties is due to the high fluorine content in the fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings of {approx}36 at.%, as investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by lowering the surface energy of the micro-nanorough aluminum substrates.

  12. Graphene based piezoresistive pressure sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, S.E.; Ghatkesar, M.K.; Zhang, C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on the piezoresistive effect of graphene. The sensor is a 100 nm thick, 280 μm wide square silicon nitride membrane with graphene meander patterns located on the maximum strain area. The multilayer, polycrystalline graphene was obtained by chemical vapor

  13. Graphene based piezoresistive pressure sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, S.E.; Ghatkesar, M.K.; Zhang, C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on the piezoresistive effect of graphene. The sensor is a 100 nm thick, 280 μm wide square silicon nitride membrane with graphene meander patterns located on the maximum strain area. The multilayer, polycrystalline graphene was obtained by chemical vapor deposition

  14. Graphene based piezoresistive pressure sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, S.E.; Ghatkesar, M.K.; Zhang, C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on the piezoresistive effect of graphene. The sensor is a 100 nm thick, 280 μm wide square silicon nitride membrane with graphene meander patterns located on the maximum strain area. The multilayer, polycrystalline graphene was obtained by chemical vapor deposition

  15. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  16. Reduction of the thickness of the boundary film at rectification of hydrocarbonic mixes with application of dry distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakirjan Salimov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a negative impact of water vapor from the distillation of hydrocarbon mixtures. It is substantiated a promising method of primary distillation process for oil and raw materials.

  17. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods and Detectors for Naphthalene and/or Other Volatile Organic Compound Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds have been identified as serious health hazards. This is especially true for personnel working with JP8 jet fuel and other fuels containing naphthalene as well as other hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to naphthalene or other hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined. The badges employ a new native fluorescence based detection method to identify and differentiate VOCs. The particular focus of some embodiments are the detection and identification of naphthalene while other embodiments are directed to detection and identification of other VOCs like aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  18. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinnaduwage, L. A.; Gehl, A. C.; Allman, S. L.;

    2007-01-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors probably tens of sensors in a sensor package to achieve sel...... microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10 s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications. © 2007 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Vacuum-sealed silicon micromachined pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esashi, Masayoshi [Tohoku Univ., Aobaku, Sendai (Japan); Sugiyama, Susumu [Ritsumeikan Univ., Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Ikeda, Kyoichi [Yokogawa Electric Corp., Nagano (Japan); Wang, Y. [Zhejian Univ., Hangzhou (China); Miyashita, Haruzo [Anelva Corp., Yamanashi (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Considerable progress in silicon pressure sensors has been made in recent years. This paper discusses three types of vacuum-sealed silicon micromachined pressure sensors that represent the present state of the art in this important area. The devices are a capacitive vacuum sensor, a surface-micromachined microdiaphragm pressure sensor, and a resonant pressure sensor. Vacuum sealing for these devices is accomplished using anodic bonding, films deposited using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and thermal out-diffusion of hydrogen, respectively. These sensors emphasize high sensitivity; small size, and excellent stability, respectively. The silicon-diaphragm vacuum sensor uses electrostatic force balancing to achieve a wide pressure measurement range.

  20. Field effect transistors based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for the detection and classification of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayn, Alona; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Haick, Hossam

    2013-04-24

    We show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) based field effect transistor (FET) arrays can serve as excellent chemical sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under confounding humidity conditions. Using these sensors, w/o complementary pattern recognition methods, we study the ability of PAH-FET(s) to: (i) discriminate between aromatic and non-aromatic VOCs; (ii) distinguish polar and non-polar non-aromatic compounds; and to (iii) identify specific VOCs within the subgroups (i.e., aromatic compounds, polar non-aromatic compounds, non-polar non-aromatic compounds). We further study the effect of water vapor on the sensor array's discriminative ability and derive patterns that are stable when exposed to different constant values of background humidity. Patterns based on different independent electronic features from an array of PAH-FETs may bring us one step closer to creating a unique fingerprint for individual VOCs in real-world applications in atmospheres with varying levels of humidity.

  1. Using silicon diodes for detecting the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Fabik, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed using commercially available silicon diode temperature sensors to detect the location of the liquid-vapor interface in hydrogen during ground test programs. Results show that by increasing the current into the sensor, silicon diodes can be used as liquid level point sensors. After cycling the sensors from liquid to vapor several times, it was found that with a 30 mA (milliamps) input current, the sensors respond within 2 seconds by measuring a large voltage difference when transitioning from liquid to vapor across the interface. Nearly instantaneous response resulted during a transition from vapor to liquid. Detailed here are test procedures, experimental results, and guidelines for applying this information to other test facilities.

  2. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  3. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  4. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  5. Prediction of vapor pressure and heats of vaporization of edible oil/fat compounds by group contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceriani, Roberta; Gani, Rafiqul; Liu, Y.A.

    2013-01-01

    databank (2036 values) composed by fatty compounds, i.e., fatty acids, methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butyl- esters, fatty alcohols, tri-, di- and monoacylglycerols and hydrocarbons. This new methodology gives improved predictions when compared to a prior group contribution equation (Ceriani and Meirelles......, 2004) due to the inclusion of new experimental data for fatty esters and partial acylglycerols (besides hydrocarbons) and critical points, and a new temperature dependency. Heats of vaporization are properly described as a function of reduced temperature up to the critical condition....

  6. Electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in flowing vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Peng; WANG Xin-qiang; ZHANG Yun-huai

    2006-01-01

    Electric potentials were generated from carbon nanotubes immersed in flowing vapors.The nanomaterials used in this study were multiwall carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) and silver nanopowders.These nanomaterials were dispersed and densely packed on a substrate and immersed in flowing vapors generated from solution such as water,ethanol and KCl.The potentials generated from these samples were measured by a voltmeter.Experimental results showed that the electric potentials were produced at the surface of the MWCNT samlpes,and strongly dependent on the pretreatment of MWCNT and properties of the flowing vapors.The mechanism of vapor-flow induced potentials may be ascribed to ions in the flowing vapors.This property of MWCNTs can advantage their application to nanoscale sensors,detectors and power cells.

  7. Monitoring laboratory-scale bioventing using synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy: analysis of the vapor phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, J; Kanan, S M; Patterson, H H

    2001-01-01

    Bioventing is an improved method of soil remediation that is being used with increasing frequency. In this paper, we refine techniques to measure the progress of petroleum hydrocarbon decomposition by monitoring vapor phase composition with synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy (SSFS). Analysis of the vapor phase has advantages compared to standard extraction techniques that require extensive sample handling and clean up. For comparison, hydrocarbon contamination in the soil was measured by analysis of Soxhlet extractions with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of the GC-MS and SSFS data showed that changes in hydrocarbon composition measured in the vapor phase provide an accurate measure of decomposition reactions taking place in the soil.

  8. Field-effect gas sensors and their application in exhaust treatment systems; Feldeffekt-Gassensoren und ihre Anwendung in Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalwig, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Tightening environmental constraints on exhaust gas emissions of gasoline and Diesel engines led to a growing interest in new and highly sophisticated gas sensors. Such sensors will be required in future exhaust gas aftertreatment systems for the selective real time detection of pollutants such as nitric oxides, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Restrictions on cost and device dimensions imposed by the automobile industry make semiconductor gas sensors promising candidates for the realization of cheap and small-size sensor devices. This work deals with semiconductor field effect devices with catalytically active platinum (Pt) electrodes and potential applications of such devices in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment systems. To allow for continuous operation at high temperatures, silicon carbide (SiC) and group III-nitrides such as GaN and AlGaN were used as semiconductor materials. Different devices have been realized with such materials: SiC based MOS capacitors (MOSiC), GaN Schottky diodes and GaN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). The principle feasibility of SiC and GaN based field effect gas sensors for automotive applications was tested under laboratory conditions using synthetic gas mixtures. Exhaust gas components such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}), various saturated and unsaturated hydro-carbons as well as water vapor, oxygen (O{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) were used as test gases in appropriate concentrations with the sensor devices being operated in a range of temperatures extending from room temperature up to 600{sup o}C. (orig.)

  9. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot in fuel-rich oxidation of methane in a laminar flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Østberg, M.

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and soot was investigated under fuel-rich conditions in a laminar flow reactor. The effects of stoichiometry, dilution, and water vapor addition were studied at temperatures between 1073 and 1823 K. A chemical...... decrease with increasing addition of water vapor. The effect is described qualitatively by the reaction mechanism. The enhanced oxidation of acetylene is attributed to higher levels of hydroxyl radicals, formed from the reaction between the water vapor and hydrogen atoms....

  10. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Mark L.; Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Nakamura, Barbara J.; Oconnor, Dennis E.

    1995-08-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  11. Atmospheric Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapor by MoO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy Michael

    2016-01-01

    MoO3 has been tested as a catalyst in hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of both model compounds (acetone and guaiacol) and real biomass pyrolysis vapors under atmospheric pressure. The pyrolysis vapor was obtained by fast pyrolysis of wood or lignin in a continuous fast pyrolysis reactor at a fixed...... temperature of 500 °C, and it subsequently passed through a downstream, close coupled, fixed bed reactor containing the MoO3 catalyst. The influences of the catalyst temperature and the concentration of H2 on the HDO of the pyrolysis vapors were investigated. The level of HDO of the biomass pyrolysis vapors...... was not significant at temperatures below 400 °C. At 450 °C catalyst temperature and 93 vol % H2 concentration, the wood pyrolysis vapor was more active toward cracking forming gas species instead of performing the desired HDO forming hydrocarbons. The lignin pyrolysis vapor was more resistant to cracking and yielded...

  12. Detection and Measurement of Charge in Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Positive charge is found in newly formed water vapor. Two detection and two measurement experiments are presented. The detection experiments are simple; their purpose is only to show the existence of charge in water vapor. The first of these experiments places one exposed end of an insulated wire in the vapor space of a flask, which holds boiling water. The other end of this wire is connected to the input high of an electrometer. The input low, in all of the presented experiments, is grounded. The second experiment detects charge by capacitive induction. It uses a beaker with gold leaves gilded on its outside surface. When water boils inside the beaker, the vapor charge is detected by the gold layer without contacting the water or vapor. The two measurement experiments have sensors made of conducting fabric. The fabric is used to cover the opening of a flask, which holds boiling water, to collect the charge in the escaping vapor. These two experiments differ by the number of fabric layers --- four in one and six in the other. The results obtained from these two experiments are essentially the same, within the margin of error, 0.734 & 0.733 nC per gram of vapor. Since the added two layers of the six-layer sensor do not collect more charge than the four-layer sensor, the four-layer sensor must have collected all available charge. The escaping vapor exits into a chamber, which has only a small area opening connecting to the atmosphere. This chamber prevents direct contact between the sensor and the ambient air, which is necessary because air is found to affect the readings from the sensor. Readings taken in the surrounding area in all four experiments show no accumulation of negative charge. These experiments identify a source for the atmospheric electricity in a laboratory environment other than that has been discussed in the literature. However, they also raise the question about the missing negative charge that would be predicted by charge balance or the

  13. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  14. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  15. Air-dust-borne associations of phototrophic and hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms: promising consortia in volatile hydrocarbon bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Dhia; Eliyas, Mohamed; Rayan, Rihab; Radwan, Samir

    2012-11-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial associations of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms active in hydrocarbon bioremediation have been described earlier. The question arises: do similar consortia also occur in the atmosphere? Dust samples at the height of 15 m were collected from Kuwait City air, and analyzed microbiologically for phototrophic and heterotrophic hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms, which were subsequently characterized according to their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The hydrocarbon utilization potential of the heterotrophs alone, and in association with the phototrophic partners, was measured quantitatively. The chlorophyte Gloeotila sp. and the two cyanobacteria Nostoc commune and Leptolyngbya thermalis were found associated with dust, and (for comparison) the cynobacteria Leptolyngbya sp. and Acaryochloris sp. were isolated from coastal water. All phototrophic cultures harbored oil vapor-utilizing bacteria in the magnitude of 10(5) g(-1). Each phototrophic culture had its unique oil-utilizing bacteria; however, the bacterial composition in Leptolyngbya cultures from air and water was similar. The hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were affiliated with Acinetobacter sp., Aeromonas caviae, Alcanivorax jadensis, Bacillus asahii, Bacillus pumilus, Marinobacter aquaeolei, Paenibacillus sp., and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The nonaxenic cultures, when used as inocula in batch cultures, attenuated crude oil in light and dark, and in the presence of antibiotics and absence of nitrogenous compounds. Aqueous and diethyl ether extracts from the phototrophic cultures enhanced the growth of the pertinent oil-utilizing bacteria in batch cultures, with oil vapor as a sole carbon source. It was concluded that the airborne microbial associations may be effective in bioremediating atmospheric hydrocarbon pollutants in situ. Like the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, the atmosphere contains dust-borne associations of phototrophic and heterotrophic hydrocarbon

  16. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  17. Metabolism of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene Hydrocarbons in Soil†

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, C.-W.; Song, H. -G.; Bartha, R

    1998-01-01

    Enrichment cultures obtained from soil exposed to benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) mineralized benzene and toluene but cometabolized only xylene isomers, forming polymeric residues. This observation prompted us to investigate the metabolism of 14C-labeled BTX hydrocarbons in soil, either individually or as mixtures. BTX-supplemented soil was incubated aerobically for up to 4 weeks in a sealed system that automatically replenished any O2 consumed. The decrease in solvent vapors and the produ...

  18. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratoy, Boulder, CO (United States); Rye, B.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  19. Zeolites for Sensors for Reducing Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ralf Moos; Kathy Sahner; Gunter Hagen; Andreas Dubbe

    2006-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, zeolites can be used either as passive filters to greatly enhance selectivity or as very selective sensor materials. Some well known principles are briefly reviewed and the following three novel application modes are discussed. Zeolites can be applied as cover layers for specificity improvement of p-type semiconducting hydrocarbon sensors. Furthermore, a novel combination of metal oxides with zeolites leading to a very selective hydrocarbon sensor is described. In this application, it is shown that the interface chromium oxide / zeolite plays an essential role. And, in a very recent approach, Na+ ion conducting zeolites are applied as an auxiliary phase in a potentiometric gas sensor. The cell voltage shows a Nernstian response, which is selective towards propane. Here, the proposed mechanism assumes Na+ activity changes in the zeolite pores due to hydrocarbon sorption.

  20. 46 CFR 39.40-3 - Design and equipment for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vapor; and (2) Have an oxygen analyzer with a sensor or sampling connection fitted within 3 meters (9.74... on the service vessel where cargo transfer is controlled when the oxygen content in the vapor... of known concentration for calibration and testing of the oxygen analyzer. (b) If the cargo tanks...

  1. Measuring Vapor Pressure with an Isoteniscope: A Hands-on Introduction to Thermodynamic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqian; Haslam, Andrew J.; Macey, Andrew; Shah, Umang V.; Brechtelsbauer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid or azeotropic mixture, and its fluid phase diagram, can be achieved with an isoteniscope and an industrial grade digital pressure sensor using the experimental method reported in this study. We describe vapor-pressure measurements of acetone and n-hexane and their azeotrope, and how the…

  2. Three Dimensional Vapor Intrusion Modeling: Model Validation and Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbariyeh, S.; Patterson, B.; Rakoczy, A.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons, are prevalent groundwater contaminants due to their improper disposal and accidental spillage. In addition to contaminating groundwater, VOCs may partition into the overlying vadose zone and enter buildings through gaps and cracks in foundation slabs or basement walls, a process termed vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion of VOCs has been recognized as a detrimental source for human exposures to potential carcinogenic or toxic compounds. The simulation of vapor intrusion from a subsurface source has been the focus of many studies to better understand the process and guide field investigation. While multiple analytical and numerical models were developed to simulate the vapor intrusion process, detailed validation of these models against well controlled experiments is still lacking, due to the complexity and uncertainties associated with site characterization and soil gas flux and indoor air concentration measurement. In this work, we present an effort to validate a three-dimensional vapor intrusion model based on a well-controlled experimental quantification of the vapor intrusion pathways into a slab-on-ground building under varying environmental conditions. Finally, a probabilistic approach based on Monte Carlo simulations is implemented to determine the probability distribution of indoor air concentration based on the most uncertain input parameters.

  3. Synthesis of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pironon, J. (Centre de Recherche sur la Geologie de l' Uranium and GS-CNRS CREGU, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France))

    Hydrocarbon fluid inclusions have been synthesized in halogenide and sulfate crystals at low temperature (<100C) and atmospheric pressure. Water-immiscible hydrocarbon droplets were either trapped separately or with an aqueous and/or a vapor phase. Impurities on the crystal surface were verified by infrared microspectrometry, and the similarity between the initial liquid and the liquid trapped in the inclusion was documented by Raman microspectrometry for nonfluorescent compounds. This inclusion type represents a new tool for understanding inclusion-formation phenomena and for the calibration of techniques used in hydrocarbon fluid-inclusion analysis ({mu}FT-IR, {mu}Raman, {mu}UV-fluorescence, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry); these inclusions allow one to obtain microthermometric calibration curves with a high precision at low temperature.

  4. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey P., E-mail: sergey.verevkin@uni-rostock.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Emel' yanenko, Vladimir N. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Algarra, Manuel [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Manuel Lopez-Romero, J. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Malaga. Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. > We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. > Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub l}{sup g}H{sub m} of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  5. Thermochemical properties and phase behavior of halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of vapor pressure of organic pollutants is essential in predicting their fate and transport in the environment. In the present study, the vapor pressures of 12 halogenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), 9-chlorofluorene, 2,7-dichlorofluorene, 2-bromofluorene, 9-bromofluorene, 2,7-dibromofluorene, 2-bromoanthracene, 9-chlorophenanthrene, 9-bromophenanthrene, 9,10-dibromophenanthrene, 1-chloropyrene, 7-bromobenz[a]anthracene, and 6,12-dibromochrysene, were measured using the Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of 301 to 464 K. Enthalpies and entropies of sublimation of these compounds were determined via application of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The data were also compared with earlier published literature values to study the influence of halogen substitution on vapor pressure of PACs. As expected, the halogen substitution decreases vapor pressure compared with parent compounds but does not necessarily increase the enthalpy of sublimation. Furthermore, the decrease of vapor pressure also depends on the substitution position and the substituted halogen, and the di-substitution of chlorine and/or bromine decreases the vapor pressure compared with single halogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, the enthalpy of fusion and melting temperature of these 12 PACs were determined using differential scanning calorimetry and melting point analysis.

  6. Ammonia vapor sensing properties of polyaniline-titanium(IV)phosphate cation exchange nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Baig, Umair; Khalid, Mohd

    2011-02-28

    In this study, the electrically conducting polyaniline-titanium(IV)phosphate (PANI-TiP) cation exchange nanocomposite was synthesized by sol-gel method. The cation exchange nanocomposite based sensor for detection of ammonia vapors was developed at room temperature. It was revealed that the sensor showed good reversible response towards ammonia vapors ranging from 3 to 6%. It was found that the sensor with p-toluene sulphonic acid (p-TSA) doped exhibited higher sensing response than hydrochloric acid doped. This sensor has detection limit ≤1% ammonia. The response of resistivity changes of the cation exchange nanocomposite on exposure to different concentrations of ammonia vapors shows its utility as a sensing material. These studies suggest that the cation exchange nanocomposite could be a good material for ammonia sensor at room temperature.

  7. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  8. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  9. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  10. Miscellaneous hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat; DeWitt, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The solvents discussed in this article are common solvents not categorized as halogenated, aromatic, or botanical. The solvents discussed are categorized into two groups: hydrocarbon mixtures and single agents. The hydrocarbon mixtures discussed are Stoddard solvent, naphtha, and kerosene. The remaining solvents described are n-hexane, methyl n-butyl ketone, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and butyl mercaptans. Effects common to this group of agents and their unique effects are characterized. Treatment of exposures and toxic effects of these solvents is described, and physiochemical properties and occupational exposure levels are listed.

  11. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  12. Challenges in the development of sensors for monitoring automobile emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.; Pham, A.Q.

    1997-02-20

    A new generation of on-board automotive sensors are needed for diagnosis and control of engines and catalytic converters. With regard to catalytic converters, the intent of these regulations is to ensure that the vehicle operator is informed when emission control system are no longer performing adequately. In order to be commercialized, sensors for emission control must meet certain criteria, including low cost, reliability, and manufacturability. We have been developing solid state electrochemical sensors for emission control. Most recently, our work has focused on the development of hydrocarbon sensors for monitoring catalytic converter performance. Previous work was concerned with the development of an oxygen sensor having appropriate sensitivity for lean-burn engines. Operational limits for oxygen sensors have been defined and new materials have been developed for hydrocarbon sensors. Technical results are presented here as well as challenges to be met in the development of materials and designs for new chemical sensors for monitoring automotive emissions.

  13. Polymer functionalized nanostructured porous silicon for selective water vapor sensing at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Priyanka; Das, Samaresh; Dhanekar, Saakshi

    2017-04-01

    This paper highlights the surface treatment of porous silicon (PSi) for enhancing the sensitivity of water vapors at room temperature. A simple and low cost technique was used for fabrication and functionalization of PSi. Spin coated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used for functionalizing PSi surface. Morphological and structural studies were conducted to analyze samples using SEM and XRD/Raman spectroscopy respectively. Contact angle measurements were performed for assessing the wettability of the surfaces. PSi and functionalized PSi samples were tested as sensors in presence of different analytes like ethanol, acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water vapors in the range of 50-500 ppm. Electrical measurements were taken from parallel aluminium electrodes fabricated on the functionalized surface, using metal mask and thermal evaporation. Functionalized PSi sensors in comparison to non-functionalized sensors depicted selective and enhanced response to water vapor at room temperature. The results portray an efficient and selective water vapor detection at room temperature.

  14. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  15. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  16. Simulation of the high-pressure phase equilibria of hydrocarbon-water/brine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Guo, Tian-Min

    1996-01-01

    The major objectives of this work are: (1) extend the modified Patel-Teja (MPT) equation of state proposed for aqueous electrolyte systems (Zuo and Guo, 1991) to describe the liquid-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria of hydrocarbon-water/brine systems through introducing an unconventional ...

  17. Supercooled liquid vapour pressures and related thermodynamic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determined by gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method using Kovats retention indices has been applied to determine the liquid vapour pressure (P-i), enthalpy of vaporization (Delta H-i) and difference in heat capacity between gas and liquid phase (Delta C-i) for a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This group

  18. A review of catalytic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons derived from biorefinery water fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronado, I.; Stekrova, M.; Reinikainen, M.; Simell, P.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lehtonen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of oxygenated hydrocarbons is a process for the production of hydrogen and light alkanes. The reactants of APR remain in liquid phase during the reaction avoiding an energetically demanding vaporization-step compared to processes such as steam reforming (SR).

  19. Trace Detection of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Using Electrochemical Gas Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of trace amounts of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is demonstrated. The screening system is based on a sampling/concentrator front end and electrochemical potentiometric gas sensor as the detector. A single sensor is operated in the dominant hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) mode by varying the sensor operating condition. The potentiometric sensor with integrated heaters was used to capture the signature of PETN. Quantitative measurements based ...

  20. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  1. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  2. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Langworthy, T. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  3. Preparation, Delivery, and Evaluation of Picomole Vapor Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    2003. 21(1): p. 43-55. 9. Verma, A.L., et al., Hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor using metal-phthalocyanine functionalized carbon nanotubes . Thin...20.7 Ferrocene 102-54-5 0.0075 5.58x10-11 22.8 3.41 Dimethyl sulfide 75-18-3 647 3.89x10-8 * 24.0* 7.85 Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 352 2.64x10-8...and small discrete aliquots of sample to be measured with precisions of 1% RSD for many analytes. The apparatus described permits vapor samples to

  4. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  6. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  7. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  8. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  9. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  10. Numerical model investigation for potential methane explosion and benzene vapor intrusion associated with high-ethanol blend releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Luo, Hong; Devaull, George E; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could pose an explosion risk if methane accumulates in a confined space above the ground where ignitable conditions exist. Ethanol-derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel hydrocarbons by stimulating the depletion of oxygen by methanotrophs, and thus inhibiting aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors. To assess these processes, a three-dimensional numerical vapor intrusion model was used to simulate the degradation, migration, and intrusion pathway of methane and benzene under different site conditions. Simulations show that methane is unlikely to build up to pose an explosion hazard (5% v/v) if diffusion is the only mass transport mechanism through the deeper vadose zone. However, if methanogenic activity near the source zone is sufficiently high to cause advective gas transport, then the methane indoor concentration may exceed the flammable threshold under simulated conditions. During subsurface migration, methane biodegradation could consume soil oxygen that would otherwise be available to support hydrocarbon degradation, and increase the vapor intrusion potential for benzene. Vapor intrusion would also be exacerbated if methanogenic activity results in sufficiently high pressure to cause advective gas transport in the unsaturated zone. Overall, our simulations show that current approaches to manage the vapor intrusion risk for conventional fuel released might need to be modified when dealing with some high ethanol blend fuel (i.e., E20 up to E95) releases.

  11. Nanotube-Based Chemical and Biomolecular Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Koh; B.Kim; S.Hong; H.Lim; H.C.Choi

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review about recent results regarding carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemical and biomolecular sensors. For the fabrication of CNT-based sensors, devices containing CNT channels between two metal electrodes are first fabricated usually via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process or "surface programmed assembly" method. Then, the CNT surfaces are often functionalized to enhance the selectivity of the sensors. Using this process, highly-sensitive CNT-based sensors can be fabricated for the selective detection of various chemical and biological molecules such as hydrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine gas, DNA, glucose, alcohol, and proteins.

  12. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  13. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  14. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  15. Estimation of contaminant subslab concentration in petroleum vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Yang, Fangxing; Suuberg, Eric M; Provoost, Jeroen; Liu, Weiping

    2014-08-30

    In this study, the development and partial validation are presented for an analytical approximation method for prediction of subslab contaminant concentrations in PVI. The method involves combining an analytic approximation to soil vapor transport with a piecewise first-order biodegradation model (together called the Analytic Approximation Method, including Biodegradation, AAMB), the result of which calculation provides an estimate of contaminant subslab concentrations, independent of building operation conditions. Comparisons with three-dimensional (3-D) simulations and another PVI screening tool, BioVapor, show that the AAMB is suitable for application in a scenario involving a building with an impermeable foundation surrounded by open ground surface, where the atmosphere is regarded as the primary oxygen source. Predictions from the AAMB can be used to determine the required vertical source-building separation, given a subslab screening concentration, allowing identification of buildings at risk for PVI. This equation shows that the "vertical screening distance" suggested by U.S. EPA is sufficient in most cases, as long as the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) soil gas concentration at the vapor source does not exceed 50-100mg/L. When the TPH soil gas concentration of the vapor source approaches a typical limit, i.e. 400mg/L, the "vertical screening distance" required would be much greater.

  16. Estimation of contaminant subslab concentration in petroleum vapor intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Yang, Fangxing; Suuberg, Eric M.; Provoost, Jeroen; Liu, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the development and partial validation are presented for an analytical approximation method for prediction of subslab contaminant concentrations in PVI. The method involves combining an analytic approximation to soil vapor transport with a piecewise first-order biodegradation model (together called the analytic approximation method, including biodegradation, AAMB), the result of which calculation provides an estimate of contaminant subslab concentrations, independent of building operation conditions. Comparisons with three-dimensional (3-D) simulations and another PVI screening tool, BioVapor, show that the AAMB is suitable for application in a scenario involving a building with an impermeable foundation surrounded by open ground surface, where the atmosphere is regarded as the primary oxygen source. Predictions from the AAMB can be used to determine the required vertical source-building separation, given a subslab screening concentration, allowing identification of buildings at risk for PVI. This equation shows that the “vertical screening distance” suggested by U.S. EPA is sufficient in most cases, as long as the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) soil gas concentration at the vapor source does not exceed 50–100 mg/L. When the TPH soil gas concentration of the vapor source approaches a typical limit, i.e. 400 mg/L, the “vertical screening distance” required would be much greater. PMID:25124892

  17. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  18. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  19. Quantitative Recognizing Dissolved Hydrocarbons with Genetic Algorithm-Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Online monitoring of dissolved fault characteristic hydrocarbon gases, such as methane, ethane, ethylene and acetylene in power transformer oil has significant meaning for condition assessment of transformer. Recently, semiconductor tin oxide based gas sensor array has been widely applied in online monitoring apparatus, while cross sensitivity of the gas sensor array is inevitable due to same compositions and similar structures among the four hydrocarbon gases. Based on support vector regression (SVR with genetic algorithm (GA, a new pattern recognition method was proposed to reduce the cross sensitivity of the gas sensor array and further quantitatively recognize the concentration of dissolved hydrocarbon gases. The experimental data from a certain online monitoring device in China is used to illustrate the performance of the proposed GA-SVR model. Experimental results indicate that the GA-SVR method can effectively decrease the cross sensitivity and the regressed data is much more closed to the real values.

  20. Do sealless pumps belong in hydrocarbon processing services?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Shawn L. [Sundyne Corporation, Arvada, CO (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Sealless pump technology seems unimaginable in the hot, dirty and high-pressure world of hydrocarbon processing. Furthermore the high flow rates typical of the industry seem incompatible with sealless pumps. Seals and their environmental controls used in conventional technologies are not immune from these factors making sealless worth another look. In October 2000 the Sealless Centrifugal Pump Specification API 685 was published. This specification lends sealless pumps credibility and emphasizes the proper application of the technology. In many process units seal leaks can be extremely dangerous and costly. The heavy hydrocarbons can auto-ignite and light hydrocarbons will tend to find a source of ignition. The ever-increasing requirements for clean fuels are driving many of the current refinery upgrades. Best Also available control technology requirements and additional focus on Environmental Health and Safety increase the attractiveness of sealless technology to mitigate the hazards associated with seal leaks. Sealless has a place in hydrocarbon processing to eliminate seals, provide mechanical simplification, and ensure personnel/environmental protection. The proper application involves evaluating canned motor/magnetic drive technology, API 685 Guidelines, and vapor pressure versus pump circuit pressure analysis. There are four (4) specific processes where sealless pumps should be targeted: Alkylation, Sulfur Recovery/Hydrotreating, Naphtha Reforming Production, and Neutralization. (author)

  1. Influence of soil properties on vapor-phase sorption of trichloroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekele, Dawit N. [Global Center for Environmental Remediation, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); CRC for Contamination Assessment & Remediation of the Environment, Building X (Environmental Sciences Building), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: Ravi.Naidu@newcastle.edu.au [Global Center for Environmental Remediation, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); CRC for Contamination Assessment & Remediation of the Environment, Building X (Environmental Sciences Building), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Chadalavada, Sreenivasulu [Global Center for Environmental Remediation, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); CRC for Contamination Assessment & Remediation of the Environment, Building X (Environmental Sciences Building), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Vapor intrusion is a major exposure pathway for volatile hydrocarbons. • Certainty in transport processes enhances vapor intrusion model precision. • Detailed understanding of vadose zone vapor transport processes save resources. • Vapor sorption near-steady-state conditions at sites may take months or years. • Type of clay fractions equitably affects sorption of trichloroethylene vapor. - Abstract: Current practices in health risk assessment from vapor intrusion (VI) using mathematical models are based on assumptions that the subsurface sorption equilibrium is attained. The time required for sorption to reach near-steady-state conditions at sites may take months or years to achieve. This study investigated the vapor phase attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in five soils varying widely in clay and organic matter content using repacked columns. The primary indicators of TCE sorption were vapor retardation rate (R{sub t}), the time required for the TCE vapor to pass through the soil column, and specific volume of retention (V{sub R}), and total volume of TCE retained in soil. Results show TCE vapor retardation is mainly due to the rapid partitioning of the compound to SOM. However, the specific volume of retention of clayey soils with secondary mineral particles was higher. Linear regression analyses of the SOM and clay fraction with V{sub R} show that a unit increase in clay fraction results in higher sorption of TCE (V{sub R}) than the SOM. However, partitioning of TCE vapor was not consistent with the samples' surface areas but was mainly a function of the type of secondary minerals present in soils.

  2. Micro-reactor for heterogeneous catalysis. Applications: hydrogen storage in hydrocarbons and filter for gas sensor; Microreacteur pour la catalyse heterogene: applications: stockage d'hydrogene dans les hydrocarbures: filtre pour capteur gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roumanie, M

    2005-10-15

    This manuscript presents the design and the use of silicon micro-structured reactor for heterogeneous catalysis and especially for the dehydrogenation of methyl-cyclohexane reaction. This reaction enables on one hand to store hydrogen and on the other hand to realize technological developments since it is endothermic and difficult to carry out. By consequence, a new micro-reactor obtained by DRIE was designed and capped with a Pyrex wafer. It bundles micro-heaters deposited by screen-printing and a high temperature metallic connection. It comprises either a catalyst coming from micro-technology, Pt film deposited by sputtering or a classic catalyst, platinum supported on alumina. For this last catalyst, the micro-reactor previously pre-oxidized is pretreated by oxygen plasma or liquid way so that the deposit to walls. The wash coat could be done in open micro-reactor by dip coating in the suspension or in closed micro-reactor under vacuum or by liquid circulation. After catalytic tests realised in a macro-reactor, the Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was chosen to be inserted in the micro-reactor. The catalytic tests realised in a micro-reactor coupled with a mass spectrometer let to show the presence of hydrogen. In parallel, the micro-reactor was used as filter to improve gas sensor selectivity. (author)

  3. Optoelectronic sensors for subsea oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, D.; Shiach, G.; Nolan, A.; McAvoy, S.

    2007-07-01

    The potential for optoelectronic sensor technology to provide the monitoring and control systems required for advanced subsea hydrocarbon production management is described. The utilisation of optoelectronic sensor technology to produce a new class of subsea Christmas Tree with in-built enhanced production monitoring and control systems as well as effective environmental monitoring systems is reported.

  4. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law.

  5. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  6. Understanding the response behavior of potentiometric gas sensors for non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.)

    2002-01-01

    Many applications of gas sensors require concentration measurements of reactive gases in mixtures that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium. These applications include: hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuel gas sensors operating in ambient air for explosion hazard detection, carbon monoxide detection in ambient air for health protection, combustion efficiency sensors for stoichiometry control, and nitric oxide sensors for air pollution monitoring. Many potentiometric and amperometric electrochemical sensor technologies have been developed for these applications. A class of the potentiometric sensors developed for gas mixtures are the non-Nerstian sensors. This presentation defines a categorization and theoretical analysis of three distinct electrochemical processes that can produce a non-Nernstian sensor response.

  7. Application of the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state to complex mixtures with aromatic hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht;

    2006-01-01

    The cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state is applied to phase equilibria of mixtures containing alcohols, glycols, water, and aromatic or olefinic hydrocarbons. Previously, CPA has been successfully used for mixtures containing various associating compounds (alcohols, glycols, amines......, organic acids, and water) and aliphatic hydrocarbons. We show in this work that the model can be satisfactorily extended to complex vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria with aromatic or olefinic hydrocarbons. The solvation between aromatics/olefinics and polar compounds is accounted for. This is particularly...... of the model (the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state) can be obtained from mixtures with aliphatic hydrocarbons. For mixtures of glycols with aromatic hydrocarbons, two parameters have been fitted to experimental data, one in the physical (SRK) part and one in the association part of the model...

  8. An Approach for Developing Site-Specific Lateral and Vertical Inclusion Zones within which Structures Should be Evaluated for Petroleum Vapor Intrusion due to Releases of Motor Fuel from Underground Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buildings may be at risk from Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) when they overlie petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the unsaturated zone or dissolved in groundwater. The U.S. EPA Office of Underground Storage Tanks (OUST) is preparing Guidance for Addressing Petroleum Vapor I...

  9. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  10. Solvents and vapor intrusion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Scott D; Krieger, Gary R; Palmer, Robert B; Waksman, Javier C

    2004-08-01

    Vapor intrusion must be recognized appropriately as a separate pathway of contamination. Although many issues resemble those of other forms of contamination (particularly its entryway, which is similar to that of radon seepage), vapor intrusion stands apart as a unique risk requiring case-specific action. This article addresses these issues and the current understanding of the most appropriate and successful remedial actions.

  11. Iron bromide vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  13. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  14. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  15. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating, which could also be applied to service water heating. Refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compare the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  16. 33 CFR 154.828 - Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vapor recovery and vapor... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.828 Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units. (a) The inlet to a vapor recovery unit...

  17. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  18. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  19. A Lithium Vapor Box similarity experiment employing water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ja; Jagoe, C.; Goldston, Rj; Jaworski, Ma

    2016-10-01

    Handling high power loads and heat flux in the divertor is a major challenge for fusion power plants. A detached plasma will likely be required. However, hydrogenic and impurity puffing experiments show that detached operation leads easily to X-point MARFEs, impure plasmas, degradation in confinement, and lower helium pressure at the exhaust. The concept of the Lithium Vapor Box Divertor is to use local evaporation and strong differential pumping through condensation to localize the gas-phase material that absorbs the plasma heat flux, and so avoid those difficulties. In order to design such a box first the vapor without plasma must be simulated. The density of vapor required can be estimated using the SOL power, major radius, poloidal box length, and cooling energy per lithium atom. For an NSTX-U-sized machine, the Knudsen number Kn spans 0.01 to 1, the transitional flow regime. This regime cannot handled by fluid codes or collisionless Monte Carlo codes, but can be handled by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes. To validate a DSMC model, we plan to build a vapor box test stand employing more-convenient water vapor instead of lithium vapor as the working fluid. Transport of vapor between the chambers at -50C will be measured and compared to the model. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. An equation of state for property prediction of alcohol-hydrocarbon and water-hydrocarbon systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Adolfo P. [Laboratory of Petroleum Engineering and Exploration, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense-UENF, RJ Macae (Brazil); Mohamed, Rahoma S. [Process Engineering Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, Caixa Postal 6066, 13083-970 SP Campinas (Brazil); Ali Mansoori, G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 810 S. Clinton Street, 60607-7000 Chicago, IL (United States)

    2001-12-29

    Equations of state have been widely used in the petroleum and chemical industries for thermodynamic property calculation. In the presence of polar substances that self-associate through hydrogen bonding (such as water or alcohol), equations of state are of very limited use. One way to account for the association is to consider the equation of state to be formed of two contributions: physical and chemical. In this work, we develop an equation of state consisting of two terms as proposed by Andreko [Fluid Phase Equilib. 65 (1991) 89], a chemical and a physical term, for correlation of thermodynamic properties of mixtures containing an associating species. This equation of state is used to correlate vapor pressure data for a number of associating molecules, such as alcohol and water, as well as bubble point pressure data for binary water-hydrocarbon and alcohol-hydrocarbon systems. The results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data and requiring the use of only one adjustable parameter for each binary system.

  1. Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2012-05-01

    Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

  2. Nonmethane hydrocarbon and oxy hydrocarbon measurements during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, Paul D.; Kuster, William C.; Williams, Eric; Murphy, Paul C.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Meagher, James

    2004-11-01

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and oxy hydrocarbons (oxy HCs) were measured aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the New England Air Quality Study from 13 July to 10 August 2002 by an online dual gas chromatographic instrument with two separate analytical columns equipped, respectively, with flame ionization and mass spectrometer detectors. Measurements, taken each half hour, included C2 to C10 alkanes, C2 to C5 alkenes, alcohols and ketones, C6 to C9 aromatics, and biogenic volatile compounds including six monoterpenes, isoprene and its immediate oxidation products methacrolein and methylvinylketone. All compounds have been categorized by their contribution to the OH loss rate calculated for 298K and 1 atm. Large temporal variability was observed for all compounds. Airflow from the Providence, Rhode Island/Boston, Massachusetts, urban corridor northeast to the New Hampshire coast was usually heavily laden with NMHCs and oxy HCs of anthropogenic origin. Comparison of specific compound ratios with automotive tunnel studies suggested that these were predominantly mobile source emissions. When such flow occurred during daylight hours, these urban plumes were accompanied by increases in ozone in the 80 to 120 ppbv range. About equally as often, much less chemically mature NMHC plumes were encountered near the New Hampshire coast. Ozone was titrated out of these latter plumes, and the unusually high mixing ratios of C4 and C5 alkenes suggested that their source was partly gasoline vapor release rather than mobile source emissions. In the New England coastal region explored, in spite of the large anthropogenic NMHC input during periods of offshore flow, OH loss with hydrocarbons was frequently dominated by compounds of biogenic origin. During periods of cleaner marine air inflow the OH loss rate was dominated by reaction with methane and with oxy HCs, predominantly acetone, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde.

  3. An Electrochemical Gas Biosensor Based on Enzymes Immobilized on Chromatography Paper for Ethanol Vapor Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuretake, Tatsumi; Kawahara, Shogo; Motooka, Masanobu; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel method of fabricating an enzymatic biosensor for breath analysis using chromatography paper as enzyme supporting layer and a liquid phase layer on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We evaluated the performance with ethanol vapor being one of the breathing ingredients. The experimental results show that our sensor is able to measure the concentration of ethanol vapor within the range of 50 to 500 ppm. These results suggest the ability of detecting breath ethanol, and it can possibly be applied as a generic vapor biosensor to a wide range of diseases.

  4. Study of two-phase systems of petroleum industry interest: low volatile hydrocarbons - water-methanol and water-methanol-sodium chloride mixtures; Etude de systemes biphasiques d'interet petrolier: hydrocarbures peu volatils - melanges eau-methanol et eau-methanol-chlorure de sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getachew Sawaya, Terufat

    1998-07-01

    The characteristic of this study is the high precision requested for the measurements of vapor pressures. Therefore, a careful calibration of pressure sensors has been performed first and verified by the study of naphthalene. The vapor pressures of 3 condensed poly-aromatics, of 2 aromatic compounds and of 2 compounds coming from the degradation of biological substances at the origin of petroleum have been measured. Most of these results are new, taking into consideration the wide range of pressures considered. They have been correlated using Antoine's equation. Most of the production of North Sea oil and gas fields is transported by submarine pipelines inside which gas, petroleum and water circulate together. The most serious drawback of this kind of polyphasic transport is the risk of hydrocarbon hydrates formation which can lead to the plugging of the pipeline. Massive quantities of methanol are currently injected by operators to avoid the formation of hydrates. In order to optimize this injection, the study of water-methanol and water-methanol-sodium chloride systems is necessary. Two types of works have been carried out: 1 - the study of the liquid-vapor equilibria with the on-line analysis of the vapor phase. For this study, an original device comprising the static apparatus coupled to a chromatograph has been developed; and 2 - the study of the densities at 25 deg. C and 1 atm. These two types of data (liquid-vapor equilibria and densities) are essential for the setting of the parameters of the state equations used to model and forecast the behaviour of the gas-oil-brine system. (J.S.)

  5. A two-dimensional analytical model of petroleum vapor intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present an analytical solution of a two-dimensional petroleum vapor intrusion model, which incorporates a steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil and piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability. This new model can help practitioners to easily generate two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles for both hydrocarbons and oxygen and estimate hydrocarbon indoor air concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. The soil gas concentration profiles generated by this new model are shown in good agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations and two-dimensional measured soil gas data from a field study. This implies that for cases involving diffusion dominated soil gas transport, steady state conditions and homogenous source and soil, this analytical model can be used as a fast and easy-to-use risk screening tool by replicating the results of 3-D numerical simulations but with much less computational effort.

  6. Calculation of Interfacial Tensions of Hydrocarbon-water Systems under Reservoir Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    Assuming that the number densities of each component in a mixture are linearly distributed across the interface between the coexisting vapor-liquid or liquid-liquid phases, we developed in this research work a linear-gradient-theory (LGT) model for computing the interfacial tension of hydrocarbon......-brine systems. The new model was tested on a number of hydrocarbon-water/brine mixtures and two crude oil-water systems under reservoir conditions. The results show good agreement between the predicted and the experimental interfacial tension data....

  7. Astrobiological Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Murray, G. M.; van Houten, K. A.; Hofstra, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    Development of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) sensors for astrobiology is intended to provide a new class of microlaboratory sensors compatible with other life or biomarker detection. Molecular imprinting is a process for making selective binding sites in synthetic polymers. The process may be approached by designing the recognition site or by simply choosing monomers that may have favorable interactions with the imprinting molecule. We are working to apply this methodology to astrobiology for development of a reliable, low cost, low mass, low power consumption sensor technology for quantitative in-situ analysis of biochemistry, biomarkers, and other indicators of astrobiological importance. Specific goals of the project are: 1) To develop a general methodology and specific methods for MIP-based sensor construction. The overall methodology will guide procedures for design and testing of any desired sensor. Specific methods will be applied to key families and specific species of astrobiological interest, i.e., alkanes (and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - PAHs), amino acids, steroids, and hopanes; 2) To construct and characterize the general family and specific species sensors. We will test for accuracy, precision, interferences, and limitations of the sensor against blanks, standards, and known terrestrial biological environment samples. Additional testing will determine sturdiness and longevity of sensors after exposure to transit conditions (launch and space environment), and at potential target environments (pressure, temperature, pH, etc.); and 3) To construct and demonstrate the combination of multiple sensors into a viable prototype instrument, and roadmap the expansion of potential instrument capabilities and exploration of the ultimate environmental limitations of the technology, and the necessary changes and additions to create a mission-ready instrument. Initial work has resulted successful detection of aqueous alanine (D and L) with simple MIP

  8. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-05-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide data for the development and validation of models for the fuel regression rates in liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. The experiments will be performed on fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool will be investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface will be measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel will be assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets will provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  9. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  10. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  11. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  12. Joule-Thomson Inversion in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Solution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichita, Dan Vladimir; Pauly, Jerome; Daridon, Jean-Luc

    2009-07-01

    Solid phase precipitation can greatly affect thermal effects in isenthalpic expansions; wax precipitation may occur in natural hydrocarbon systems in the range of operating conditions, the wax appearance temperature being significantly higher (as high as 350 K) for hyperbaric fluids. Recently, methods for calculating the Joule-Thomson inversion curve (JTIC) for two-phase mixtures, and for three-phase vapor-liquid-multisolid systems have been proposed. In this study, an approach for calculating the JTIC for the vapor-liquid-solid solution systems is presented. The JTIC is located by tracking extrema and angular points of enthalpy departure variations versus pressure at isothermal conditions. The proposed method is applied to several complex synthetic and naturally occurring hydrocarbon systems. The JTIC can exhibit several distinct branches (which may lie within two- or three-phase regions or follow phase boundaries), multiple inversion temperatures at fixed pressure, as well as multiple inversion pressures at given temperature.

  13. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  14. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  15. Archimedes Mass Filter Vaporizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putvinski, S.; Agnew, A. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Ohkawa, T.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.; Dresvin, S. V.; Kuteev, B. V.; Feygenson, O. N.; Ivanov, D. V.; Zverev, S. G.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Egorov, S. M.; Kiesewetter, D. V.; Maliugin, V. I.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group, Inc., is developing a plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter that separates waste oxide mixtures ion by ion into two mass groups: light and heavy. Since high-level waste at Hanford has 99.9its radioactivity associated with heavy elements, the Archimedes Filter can effectively decontaminate over three-quarters of that waste. The Filter process involves some preprocessing followed by volatilization and separation by the magnetic and electric fields of the main plasma. This presentation describes the approach to volatilization of the waste oxy-hydroxide mixture by means of a very high heat flux (q > 10 MW/m2). Such a high heat flux is required to ensure congruent evaporation of the complex oxy-hydroxide mixture and is achieved by injection of small droplets of molten waste into an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch. This presentation further addresses different issues related to evaporation of the waste including modeling of droplet evaporation, estimates of parameters of plasma torch, and 2D modeling of the plasma. The experimental test bed for oxide vaporization and results of the initial experiments on oxide evaporation in 60 kW ICP torch will also be described.

  16. Vapor Intrusion Facilities - South Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — POINT locations for the South Bay Vapor Instrusion Sites were derived from the NPL data for Region 9. One site, Philips Semiconductor, was extracted from the...

  17. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  18. Modeling vapor dominated geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconcini, R.; McEdwards, D.; Neri, G.; Ruffilli, C.; Schroeder, R.; Weres, O.; Witherspoon, P.

    1977-09-12

    The unresolved questions with regard to vapor-dominated reservoir production and longevity are reviewed. The simulation of reservoir behavior and the LBL computer program are discussed. The geology of Serrazzano geothermal field and its reservoir simulation are described. (MHR)

  19. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  20. Vapor recovery system in the gasolines commercialization; Sistema de recuperacion de vapores en la comercializacion de las gasolinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas Barba, R.; Molina Gallegos, J.R. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    In the last years the studies performed with respect to the environmental pollution show that the ozone is one of the most problematic contaminants in the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City (MZMC) and that the hydrocarbons are the main forerunners of it. The main source of hydrocarbon vapor emissions originates from the handling and distribution operations. In this paper a description is made of the involved stages in the commercialization of gasolines in the MZMC and a description is also made of the systems employed to control the emissions in the three stages of the fuels storage and distribution cycle and explains the degree the hydrocarbon emissions to the atmosphere will be reduced, once the recovery systems are installed in all of the involved stages. [Espanol] En los ultimos anos los estudios realizados con respecto a contaminacion ambiental reflejan que el ozono es uno de los contaminantes mas problematicos de la zona metropolitana de la ciudad de Mexico (ZMCM), y los hidrocarburos son los principales precursores de este. La principal fuente de emision de vapores de hidrocarburos proviene de las operaciones de manejo y distribucion de combustibles. En este articulo se hace una descripcion de las etapas involucradas en la comercializacion de las gasolinas en la ZMCM, se describen tambien los sistemas utilizados para controlar las emisiones en las tres etapas del ciclo de almacenamiento y distribucion de combustibles y se explica en que grado se reduciran las emisiones de hidrocarburos a la atmosfera, una vez que se instalen los sistemas de recuperacion en todas las etapas involucradas.

  1. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  2. Dispensing fuel with aspiration of condensed vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkovich, M.S.; Strock, D.J.

    1993-08-10

    A vapor recovery process is described, comprising the steps of: fueling a motor vehicle with gasoline by discharging gasoline into a fill opening or filler pipe of a tank of said vehicle through a fuel outlet conduit of a nozzle; emitting gasoline vapors from said tank during said fueling; substantially collecting said vapors during said fueling with a vapor return conduit of said nozzle and passing said vapors through said vapor return conduit in counter current flow relationship to said discharging gasoline in said fuel conduit; conveying said vapors from said vapor return conduit to a vapor return hose; at least some of said vapors condensing to form condensate in said vapor return hose; substantially removing said condensate from said vapor return hose during said fueling with a condensate pickup tube from said nozzle by passing said condensate through said condensate pickup tube in counter current flow relationship to said conveying vapors in said vapor return hose; sensing the presence of gasoline with a liquid sensing tube in said vapor return conduit of said nozzle between inner and outer spouts of said nozzle to detect when said tank of said vehicle is filled with said fuel conduit being within the inner spout of said nozzle; and automatically shutting off said fueling and condensate removing when said liquid sensing tube detects when said tank of said vehicle is filled and fuel enters said vapor return conduit.

  3. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  4. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  5. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  6. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  7. Combustion performance and heat transfer characterization of LOX/hydrocarbon type propellants. Task 3: Data dump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary characterization of Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) and Reaction Control System (RCS) engine point designs over a range of thrust and chamber pressure for several hydrocarbon fuels is reported. OMS and RCS engine point designs were established in two phases comprising baseline and parametric designs. Interface pressures, performance and operating parameters, combustion chamber cooling and turboprop requirements, component weights and envelopes, and propellant conditioning requirements for liquid to vapor phase engine operation are defined.

  8. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  9. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  10. Comparison of the sensitive property between soman and its simulant DMMP by hydrogen-bond acidic polymer coated SAW sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Long, Yin; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) polymers are widely used for the detection of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP, a simulant of real nerve agents) based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. This paper presented an HBA polymer PLF, and subsequently the polymer was dissolved into chloroform and spray-coated on a SAW device to fabricate a gas sensor. Then the sensor was equipped into a SAW test platform to investigate its sensitive property to soman vapor and its simulant DMMP at the concentrations below 20 mg/m3. Results revealed that the sensor showed high sensitivity to the analyte vapors, furthermore, the response of the sensor to soman vapor was relatively smaller and slower than that to DMMP. Tests to some common interference vapors were studied at the concentration of 10 mg/m3, and the results indicated that the sensor showed a good selective property.

  11. Optofluidic reactors for reverse combustion photocatalytic production of hydrocarbons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Erickson, David

    2017-03-01

    In combustion, hydrocarbon fuels are burned with oxygen to release energy, carbon dioxide and water vapor. Here, we introduce a photocatalytic reactor for reversing this process, when carbon dioxide and water are combined and using optical and thermal energy from the sun hydrocarbons are produced and oxygen is released. This allows for the sustainable production of hydrocarbon products from non-fossil sources, allowing for the development of "green" hydrocarbon products. Our reactors take the form of modular cells of 10 x 10 x 10 cm scale where light is delivered to nanostructured catalysts through the evanescent field around dielectric slab waveguides. The light distribution is optimized through the use of engineered scattering sites to enhance field uniformity. This is combined with integrated fluidic architecture to deliver a stream rich in water and carbon dioxide (such as exhaust from a natural gas burning plant) to the nanostructured catalyst particles in a narrow channel. Exhaust streams rich in oxygen and hydrocarbon products are collected at the outlet of the reactor cell. The cell is heated using solar thermal energy and temperatures of up to 200°C are achieved, enhancing reaction efficiency. Hydrocarbon products produced include methanol as well as other potentially useful molecules for fuel production or precursors to the manufacture of plastics. These reactors can be coupled to solar collectors to take advantage of the sun as a free source of heat and light, and the modular nature of the cells enables scaling to larger deployments.

  12. Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung S.; Kim, Young J.; Kang, Chang H.

    Daily particulate- and vapor-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) samples were collected at an urban site in Seoul, Korea, during five intensive sampling campaigns between October 1998 and December 1999. PAH samples collected on quartz fiber filters and PUF plugs were first extracted using dichloromethane with ultrasonication and supercritical fluid extraction methods, respectively, and then analyzed by GC/MSD/SIM. Seasonal trends in atmospheric PAH concentrations in the study area were highly influenced by fossil fuel usage for domestic heating, boundary layer height, and air temperature. The relative benzo[a]pyrene amount and particulate organic to elemental carbon ratio calculated from the measurement results suggested that photo-oxidation is not an important factor in the variation of PAH concentrations during the summer sampling periods. Correlation studies between specific PAH of the individual factors identified by principal component factor analysis and meteorological parameters revealed that both temperature and relative humidity gave greater effects on the semi-volatile PAH, PHEN and FLT, rather than on the heavier PAH, B(b+k)F and BghiP.

  13. A device for reforming a hydrocarbon fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendzi, T.; Ikuo, M.

    1984-03-15

    In order to utilize the heat from the reaction of reforming of a hydrocarbon fuel and the heat scattered from a heater, a design is proposed for a fuel reforming reactor in which the gases entering the reactor first pass inside the reactor along the external wall and are heated by the heat dispersed inside the reactor. Then they go in the opposite direction along a clearance between the interior shell of the reactor and the internal body of the reactor itself with a catalyst (Kt) and a heated electrical cylindrical heater. Then the gases, already heated, go directly into the cavity of the reactor filled with the catalyst where the reforming reaction occurs and then the gases and the vapors of the reformed fuel are discharged, passing through a system of heat exchangers. The layout of such a reactor, which contains a cylindrical shell inside, a cylindrical sleeve coaxial with it and the body of the reactor itself with the heater, is given. A system for attaching the internal sleeve and the body of the reactor to the catalyst is cited. The course of the gases inside the reactor is also given.

  14. Solubility properties of siloxane polymers for chemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Abraham, M.H. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    This paper discusses the factors governing the sorption of vapors by organic polymers. The principles have been applied in the past for designing and selecting polymers for acoustic wave sensors; however they apply equally well to sorption of vapors by polymers used on optical chemical sensors. A set of solvation parameters (a table is presented for various organic vapors) have been developed that describe the particular solubility properties of individual solute molecules; they are used in linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) that model the sorption process. LSER coefficients are tabulated for five polysiloxanes; so are individual interaction terms for each of the 5 polymers. Dispersion interactions play a major role in determining overall partition coefficients; the log L{sup 16} (gas-liquid partition coefficient of solute on hexadecane) value of vapors are important in determining overall sorption. For the detection of basic vapors such as organophosphates, a hydrogen-bond acidic polymers will be most effective at sorbing them. Currently, fiber optic sensors are being developed where the cladding serves as a sorbent layer to collect and concentrate analyte vapors, which will be detected and identified spectroscopically. These solubility models will be used to design the polymers for the cladding for particular vapors.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices as Chemical Vapor Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    found that an exposure time of 3.3 seconds with a development in LDD -26W of 70 seconds produced a number of good devices. Examples of these devices are...IDTs, but the cor- responding input IDTs were completely unusable. This could have been a result of uneven photoresist dispersal across the wafer

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - 4100 VAPOR DETECTOR - ELECTRONIC SENSOR TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In July 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted a demonstration of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) FIELD ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES. The demonstration design was subjected to extensive review and comment by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Environmen...

  17. Differentiation of Chemical Components in a Binary Solvent Vapor Mixture Using Carbon/Polymer Composite-Based Chemiresistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Hughes, Robert C.; Yelton, W. Graham; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1999-07-19

    We demonstrate a ''universal solvent sensor'' constructed from a small array of carbon/polymer composite chemiresistors that respond to solvents spanning a wide range of Hildebrand volubility parameters. Conductive carbon particles provide electrical continuity in these composite films. When the polymer matrix absorbs solvent vapors, the composite film swells, the average separation between carbon particles increases, and an increase in film resistance results, as some of the conduction pathways are broken. The adverse effects of contact resistance at high solvent concentrations are reported. Solvent vapors including isooctane, ethanol, dlisopropyhnethylphosphonate (DIMP), and water are correctly identified (''classified'') using three chemiresistors, their composite coatings chosen to span the full range of volubility parameters. With the same three sensors, binary mixtures of solvent vapor and water vapor are correctly classified, following classification, two sensors suffice to determine the concentrations of both vapor components. Polyethylene vinylacetate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) are two such polymers that are used to classify binary mixtures of DIMP with water vapor; the PVA/carbon-particle-composite films are sensitive to less than 0.25{degree}A relative humidity. The Sandia-developed VERI (Visual-Empirical Region of Influence) technique is used as a method of pattern recognition to classify the solvents and mixtures and to distinguish them from water vapor. In many cases, the response of a given composite sensing film to a binary mixture deviates significantly from the sum of the responses to the isolated vapor components at the same concentrations. While these nonlinearities pose significant difficulty for (primarily) linear methods such as principal components analysis, VERI handles both linear and nonlinear data with equal ease. In the present study the maximum speciation accuracy is achieved by an array

  18. A Review of Vapor Intrusion Models

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts-one describing vapor transport in the soil and the other its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulatio...

  19. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-02-22

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed.

  20. Determination of vapor pressures for nonpolar and semipolar organic compounds from gas chromatographic retention data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Foreman, W.T.; Tuschall, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Vapor pressures for nonpolar and moderately polar organochlorine, pyrethroid, and organophosphate insecticides, phthalate esters, and organophosphate flame retardants were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC). Organochlorines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with known liquid-phase vapor pressures (P??L) (standard compounds) were chromatographed along with two reference compounds n-C20 (elcosane) and p,p???-DDT on a 1.0-m-long poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonded-phase (BP-1) column to determine their vapor pressures by GC (P??GC). A plot of log P??L vs log P??GC for standard compounds was made to establish a correlation between measured and literature values, and this correlation was then used to compute P??L of test compounds from their measured P??GC. P??L of seven major components of technical chlordane, endosulfan and its metabolites, ??-hexachlorocyclohexane, mirex, and two components of technical toxaphene were determined by GC. This method provides vapor pressures within a factor of 2 of average literature values for nonpolar compounds, similar to reported interlaboratory precisions of vapor pressure determinations. GC tends to overestimate vapor pressures of moderately polar compounds. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  1. Fixed-bed Adsorption Characteristics of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Vapors onto Hydrophobic Hypercrosslinked Polymeric Resin%疏水性超高交联吸附树脂对氯代烃蒸气的固定床吸附特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于伟华; 刘鹏; 龙超; 陶为华

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic adsorption of trichloroethylene(TCE),1,2-dichloroethane(DCE) and trichloromethane(TCM) vapors onto hydrophobic hypercrosslinked polymeric resin(LC-1) were investigated using the fixed-bed adsorption method.The results indicated that the breakthrough time decreased and the height of mass transfer zone increased with the elevated initial concentration,gas flow rate and adsorption temperature.The gas flow rate had the wost significant influence on breakthrough time and height of mass transfer zone among the three factors.In addition,a simple semi-empirical mathematic model developed by Yoon and Nelson was applied to investigate the breakthrough behavior,and all correlation coefficients R2 were greater than 0.994.%采用固定床吸附法研究了三氯乙烯(TCE)、1,2-二氯乙烷(DCE)和三氯甲烷(TCM)共3种氯代烃类蒸气在疏水性超高交联吸附树脂LC-1上的动态吸附行为.结果表明,TCE、DCE和TCM蒸气的初始浓度、气体流速和吸附温度均会影响动态吸附过程,随着初始浓度、气体流速和吸附温度的增大,穿透时间变短,传质区长度增大,其中气体流速的影响最大;采用半经验数学模型Yoon-Nelson模型对吸附穿透实验数据进行拟合,拟合相关性系数R2≥0.994.

  2. Trace vapor detection of hydrogen peroxide: An effective approach to identification of improvised explosive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Miao

    Vapor detection has been proven as one of the practical, noninvasive methods suitable for explosives detection among current explosive detection technologies. Optical methods (especially colorimetric and fluorescence spectral methods) are low in cost, provide simple instrumentation alignment, while still maintaining high sensitivity and selectivity, these factors combined facilitate broad field applications. Trace vapor detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) represents an effective approach to noninvasive detection of peroxide-based explosives, though development of such a sensor system with high reliability and sufficient sensitivity (reactivity) still remains challenging. Three vapor sensor systems for H2O2 were proposed and developed in this study, which exploited specific chemical reaction towards H2O2 to ensure the selectivity, and materials surface engineering to afford efficient air sampling. The combination of these features enables expedient, cost effective, reliable detection of peroxide explosives. First, an expedient colorimetric sensor for H2O2 vapor was developed, which utilized the specific interaction between Ti(oxo) and H2O2 to offer a yellow color development. The Ti(oxo) salt can be blended into a cellulose microfibril network to produce tunable interface that can react with H2O2. The vapor detection limit can reach 400 ppb. To further improve the detection sensitivity, a naphthalimide based fluorescence turn-on sensor was designed and developed. The sensor mechanism was based on H2O2-mediated oxidation of a boronate fluorophore, which is nonfluorescent in ICT band, but becomes strongly fluorescent upon conversion into the phenol state. The detection limit of this sensory material was improved to be below 10 ppb. However, some technical factors such as sensor concentration, local environment, and excitation intensity were found difficult to control to make the sensor system sufficiently reproducible. To solve the problem, we developed a

  3. Thermal performance of direct contact heat exchangers for mixed hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, L. Jr.; Coswami, D.Y.; Demuth, O.J.; Mines, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a physical and a mathematical model for evaluating the tray efficiencies for a direct contact heat exchanger (DCHX). The model is then used to determine the efficiencies for tests conducted on a 60kW sieve tray DCHX as heat is transferred from a geofluid (brine) to a working fluid (mixed hydrocarbons). It is assumed that there are three distinct regions in the column based on the state of the working fluid, as follows: Region I - Preheating with no vaporization; Region II - Preheating with moderate vaporization; and Region III - Major vaporization. The boundaries of these regions can be determined from the experimental data. In the model, mass balance and energy balance is written for a tray ''N'' in each of these regions. Finally, the ''tray efficiency'' or ''heat transfer'' effectiveness of the tray is calculated based on the definition that it is the ratio of the actual heat transfer to the maximum possible, thermodynamically.

  4. Exposure assessment modeling for volatiles--towards an Australian indoor vapor intrusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turczynowicz, Leonid; Robinson, Neville I

    2007-10-01

    Human health risk assessment of sites contaminated by volatile hydrocarbons involves site-specific evaluations of soil or groundwater contaminants and development of Australian soil health-based investigation levels (HILs). Exposure assessment of vapors arising from subsurface sources includes the use of overseas-derived commercial models to predict indoor air concentrations. These indoor vapor intrusion models commonly consider steady-state assumptions, infinite sources, limited soil biodegradation, negligible free phase, and equilibrium partitioning into air and water phases to represent advective and diffusive processes. Regional model construct influences and input parameters affect model predictions while steady-state assumptions introduce conservatism and jointly highlight the need for Australian-specific indoor vapor intrusion assessment. An Australian non-steady-state indoor vapor intrusion model has been developed to determine cumulative indoor human doses (CIHDs) and to address these concerns by incorporating Australian experimental field data to consider mixing, dilution, ventilation, sink effects and first-order soil and air degradation. It was used to develop provisional HILs for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), naphthalene, and volatile aliphatic and aromatic total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) < or = EC16 fractions for crawl space dwellings. This article summarizes current state of knowledge and discusses proposed research for differing exposure scenarios based on Australian dwelling and subsurface influences, concurrent with sensitivity analyses of input parameters and in-field model validation.

  5. Distribution of multi-component solvents in solvent vapor extraction chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Marathon Oil Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Vapex process performance is sensitive to operating pressures, temperatures and the types of solvent used. The hydrocarbon solvents used in Vapex processes typically have between 5 and 10 per cent hydrocarbon impurities, and the accumulation of dense phases inside the vapor chamber reduces gravity drainage potential. This study investigated the partitioning of solvent compounds inside the vapor chamber during in situ Vapex processes.The aim of the study was to examine how the different components of the mixed solvent partitioned inside the extracted chamber during the oil and vapor phase. A 2-D homogenous reservoir model was used to simulate the Vapex process with a solvent mixture comprised of propane and methane at various percentages. The effect of injecting a hot solvent vapor was also investigated. The study showed that injected methane accumulated at both the top and the extraction interface. Accumulations near the top had a positive impact on solvent confinement in thin reservoirs. Diffusion of the solvent component was controlled by gas phase molecular diffusion, and was much faster than the diffusion of solvent molecules in the liquid phase. The use of hot solvent mixtures slowed the extraction process due to lower solvent solubility in the oil phase. It was concluded that the negative impact on viscosity reduction by dilution was not compensated by rises in temperature. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Sensor Compendium

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Caberera, B; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cooper, W; Da Via, C; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Frisch, H; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Golwala, S; Haber, C; Hall, J; Hoppe, E; Irwin, K D; Kagan, H; Kenney, C; Lee, A T; Lynn, D; Orrell, J; Pyle, M; Rusack, R; Sadrozinski, H; Sanchez, M C; Seiden, A; Trischuk, W; Vavra, J; Wetstein, M; Zhu, R-Y

    2013-01-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future ...

  7. Fabrication of PECVD-grown fluorinated hydrocarbon nanoparticles and circular nanoring arrays using nanosphere lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, D.K. [Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) at Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca; Farzaneh, M. [Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) at Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-04-30

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) masks were created by spin-coating of polystyrene particles onto silicon surfaces. Fluorinated hydrocarbon films were coated on the nanosphere lithography masks using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to obtain ordered arrays of fluorinated hydrocarbon. Atomic force microscope images show hexagonally ordered nanodots of dimension 225 {+-} 11 nm with a height of 23 {+-} 4 nm. Every hexagon encloses a circular ring of diameter 540 {+-} 24 nm having a height and width of 13.5 {+-} 0.6 nm and 203 {+-} 16 nm, respectively. FTIR analysis shows two distinct zones of atomic bonding of CH{sub x} and CF{sub x} in the plasma coated ordered fluorinated hydrocarbon films.

  8. Development of air fuel ratio sensor; A/F sensor no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakawa, T.; Hori, M. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan); Nakamura, Y. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The Air Fuel Ratio Sensor (A/F sensor), which is applied to a 1997 model year Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) was developed. This sensor enables the detection of the exhaust gas air fuel ratio, both lean and rich of stoichiometric. It has an effective air fuel ratio range from 12 to 18 as required for LEV regulation. It has the fast light off, - within 20 seconds - to minimize exhaust hydrocarbon content. Further, it has fast response time, less than 200 msec, to improve the air fuel ratio controllability. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Wind Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiaoyang; Ni, Jiqin

    2014-01-01

    Wind measurement is needed in many practical and scientific research situations. Some specific applications require to precisely measuring both wind direction and wind speed at the same time. Current commercial sensors for wind direction and wind speed measurement usually use ultrasonic technology and the sensors are very expensive (> $1500). In addition, the sensors are large in dimension and cannot measure airflow patterns in high spatial resolution. Therefore new and low cost wind speed an...

  10. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  11. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  12. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  13. Restructuring in block copolymer thin films: In situ GISAXS investigations during solvent vapor annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posselt, Dorthe; Zhang, Jianqi; Smilgies, Detlef-M.;

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BCP) thin films have been proposed for a number of nanotechnology applications, such as nanolithography and as nanotemplates, nanoporous membranes and sensors. Solvent vapor annealing (SVA) has emerged as a powerful technique for manipulating and controlling the structure of BCP ...

  14. Radio-frequency-modulated Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Stephanie A; Raithel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We measure strong radio-frequency (RF) electric fields using rubidium Rydberg atoms prepared in a room-temperature vapor cell as field sensors. Electromagnetically induced transparency is employed as an optical readout. We RF-modulate the 60$S_{1/2}$ and 58$D_{5/2}$ Rydberg states with 50~MHz and 100~MHz fields, respectively. For weak to moderate RF fields, the Rydberg levels become Stark-shifted, and sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. In high fields, the adjacent hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect the shifted levels, providing rich spectroscopic structure suitable for precision field measurements. A quantitative description of strong-field level modulation and mixing of $S$ and $D$ states with hydrogenic states is provided by Floquet theory. Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC electric fields in the interior of the glass vapor cell.

  15. Stage 2 vapor recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, W.H.; Strock, D.J.; Butkovich, M.S.; Hartman, H.B.

    1993-05-25

    A vapor recovery system is described, comprising: a set of elongated underground storage tanks, each storage tank containing a different grade of gasoline; vent pipes; a series of dispensing units; fuel flow lines; vapor return lines; an array of fuel pumps for pumping gasoline from said storage tanks to said dispenser units; an elongated condensate liquid pickup tube; an elongated inner spout providing a fuel conduit and having an outer tip defining a fuel outlet for discharging gasoline into a filler pipe of a motor vehicle tank during fueling; an outer spout assembly; extending into and engaging said spout-receiving socket, said outer spout assembly comprising an outer spout providing a vapor return conduit and defining apertures providing a vapor inlet spaced from said fuel outlet for withdrawing, removing, and returning a substantial amount of gasoline vapors emitted during said fueling; an elongated liquid sensing tube; a manually operable level; a flow control valve assembly; an automatic shutoff valve assembly; and a venturi sleeve assembly positioned in said venturi sleeve receiving chamber.

  16. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Benzodiazepine-like discriminative stimulus effects of toluene vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Keith L; Nicholson, Katherine L

    2013-11-15

    In vitro studies show that the abused inhalant toluene affects a number of ligand-gated ion channels.The two most consistently implicated of these are γ-aminobutyric acid type A(GABAA) receptors which are positively modulated by toluene and N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA) receptors which are negatively modulated by toluene. Behavioral studies also suggest an interaction of toluene with GABAA and/or NMDA receptors but it is unclear if these receptors underlie the abuse-related intoxicating effects of toluene. Seventeen B6SJLF1/J mice were trained using a two-choice operant drug discrimination procedure to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 2000 ppm toluene vapor from 10 min of exposure to air. The discrimination was acquired in a mean of 65 training sessions. The stimulus effects of 2000 ppm toluene vapor were exposure concentration-dependent but rapidly diminished following the cessation of vapor exposure. The stimulus effects of toluene generalized to the chlorinated hydrocarbon vapor perchloroethylene but not 1,1,2-trichloroethane nor the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. The competitive NMDA antagonist CGS-19755, the uncompetitive antagonist dizocilpine and the glycine-site antagonist L701,324 all failed to substitute for toluene. The classical nonselective benzodiazepines midazolam and chlordiazepoxide produced toluene-like stimulus effects but the alpha 1 subunit preferring positive GABAA modulator zaleplon failed to substitute for toluene. The barbiturates pentobarbital and methohexital and the GABAA positive modulator neurosteroid allopregnanolone did not substitute for toluene. These data suggest that the stimulus effects of toluene may be at least partially mediated by benzodiazepine-like positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors containing alpha 2, 3 or 5 subunits.

  18. Optimization of metal vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanov, V. V.; Molodykh, E. I.; Tykotskii, V. V.

    1983-03-01

    The method proposed here for performing numerical calculations on a computer in order to predict and optimize the characteristics of metal vapor lasers is based on the use of a universal program for numerical experiments designed expressly for metal vapor lasers and on a simultaneous application of an algorithm for multifactor optimization of the output parameters. The latter, in turn, is based on the complex Boks method (Himmelblau, 1970) and on the Gel'fand-Tsetlin ravine method (Himmelblau, 1970). Calculations carried out for a metal with a copper vapor in neon reveal that for optimization with respect to the geometry of the active zone and the parameters of the electrical circuits (including the voltage pulses and excitation frequency) it is sufficient to use the Boks method. The objective function optimum regarding the concentration of the metal particles and the buffer gas found using this algorithm calls for further refinement; this can be performed efficiently with the Gel'fand-Tsetlin ravine method.

  19. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  20. In situ calibration of a light source in a sensor device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin k.; Merchant, Bion J.

    2015-12-29

    A sensor device is described herein, wherein the sensor device includes an optical measurement system, such as an interferometer. The sensor device further includes a low-power light source that is configured to emit an optical signal having a constant wavelength, wherein accuracy of a measurement output by the sensor device is dependent upon the optical signal having the constant wavelength. At least a portion of the optical signal is directed to a vapor cell, the vapor cell including an atomic species that absorbs light having the constant wavelength. A photodetector captures light that exits the vapor cell, and generates an electrical signal that is indicative of intensity of the light that exits the vapor cell. A control circuit controls operation of the light source based upon the electrical signal, such that the light source emits the optical signal with the constant wavelength.

  1. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  2. Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduced inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, non-uniformity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the front end of FPA microbolometers processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation thresholding.

  3. Zirconia-based solid state chemical gas sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuiykov, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of chemical gas sensors, based on solid state technology, that are sensitive to environmental gases, such as O sub 2 , SO sub x , NO sub x , CO sub 2 and hydrocarbons. The paper is focussed on performance of electrochemical gas sensors that are based on zirconia as a solid electrolyte. The paper considers sensor structures and selection of electrode materials. Impact of interfaces on sensor performance is discussed. This paper also provides a brief overview of electrochemical properties of zirconia and their effect on sensor performance. Impact of auxiliary materials on sensors performance characteristics, such as sensitivity, selectivity, response time and recovery time, is also discussed. Dual gas sensors that can be applied for simultaneous monitoring of the concentration of both oxygen and other gas phase components, are briefly considered

  4. Columnar water vapor retrievals from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Turner, David D.; Cairns, Brian; Oinas, Valdar; Lacis, Andrew A.; Gutman, S.; Westwater, Ed R.; Smirnov, A.; Eilers, J.

    2009-01-26

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measures direct and diffuse irradiances in the visible and near IR spectral range. In addition to characteristics of atmospheric aerosols, MFRSR data also allow retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV) column amounts, which are determined from the direct normal irradiances in the 940 nm spectral channel. The HITRAN 2004 spectral database was used in our retrievals to model the water vapor absorption. We present a detailed error analysis describing the influence of uncertainties in instrument calibration and spectral response, as well as those in available spectral databases, on the retrieval results. The results of our PWV retrievals from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operated by the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were compared with correlative standard measurements by Microwave Radiometers (MWRs) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) water vapor sensor, as well as with retrievals from other solar radiometers (AERONET’s CIMEL, AATS-6). Some of these data are routinely available at the SGP’s Central Facility, however, we also used measurements from a wider array of instrumentation deployed at this site during the Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (WVIOP2000) in September – October 2000. The WVIOP data show better agreement between different solar radiometers or between different microwave radiometers (both groups showing relative biases within 4%) than between these two groups of instruments, with MWRs values being consistently higher (up to 14%) than those from solar instruments. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using MFRSR network data for creation of 2D datasets comparable with the MODIS satellite water vapor product.

  5. Characterization of Upper-Troposphere Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX Using LASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrare, Richard; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Brasseur, L. H.; Brackett, V. G.; Clayton, M. B.; Goldsmith, John E M.; Lesht, B. M.; Podolske, J. R.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Turner, David D.; Whiteman, D. N.; Demoz, B. B.; Tobin, D. C.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Miloshevich, Larry M.; di Girolamo, P.

    2004-12-01

    Water vapor profiles from NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system acquired during the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) are used to characterize upper troposphere water vapor (UTWV) measured by ground-based Raman lidars, radiosondes, and in situ aircraft sensors over the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma. LASE was deployed from the NASA DC-8 aircraft and measured water vapor over the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) site during seven flights between November 27 and December 10, 2000. Initially, the DOE ARM SGP Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman lidar (CARL) UTWV profiles were about 5-7% wetter than LASE in the upper troposphere, and the Vaisala RS80-H radiosonde profiles were about 10% drier than LASE between 8-12 km. Scaling the Vaisala water vapor profiles to match the precipitable water vapor (PWV) measured by the ARM SGP microwave radiometer (MWR) did not change these results significantly. By accounting for an overlap correction of the CARL water vapor profiles and by employing schemes designed to correct the Vaisala RS80-H calibration method and account for the time response of the Vaisala RS80H water vapor sensor, the average differences between the CARL and Vaisala radiosonde upper troposphere water vapor profiles are reduced to about 5%, which is within the ARM goal of mean differences of less than 10%. The LASE and DC-8 in situ Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH) UTWV measurements generally agreed to within about 3 to 4%. The DC-8 in situ frost point cryogenic hygrometer and Snow White chilled mirror measurements were drier than the LASE, Raman lidars, and corrected Vaisala RS80H measurements by about 10-25% and 10-15%, respectively. Sippican (formerly VIZ manufacturing) carbon hygristor radiosondes exhibited large variabilities and poor agreement with the other measurements. PWV derived from the LASE profiles agreed to within about 3% on average with

  6. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  7. High Pressure Preignition Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and hydrocarbon blends in our various combustion systems, with emphasis on the effects of elevated pressure using our pressurized flow reactor ( PFR ...facility. Detailed experimental data were generated from the PFR for use in associated kinetic modeling work. We continued to develop and extend both

  8. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  9. Final OSWER Vapor Intrusion Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is preparing to finalize its guidance on assessing and addressing vapor intrusion, which is defined as migration of volatile constituents from contaminated media in the subsurface (soil or groundwater) into the indoor environment. In November 2002, EPA issued draft guidance o...

  10. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  11. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  12. Magnesium ferrite nanoparticles: a rapid gas sensor for alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Rhushikesh; Rao, Pratibha; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2017-02-01

    Highly porous spinel MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with a high specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by a sintering free auto-combustion technique and characterized for their structural and surface morphological properties using XRD, BET, TEM and SEM techniques. Their sensing properties to alcohol vapors viz. ethanol and methanol were investigated. The site occupation of metal ions was investigated by VSM. The as-synthesized sample shows the formation of sponge-like porous material which is necessary for gas adsorption. The gas sensing characteristics were obtained by measuring the gas response as a function of operating temperature, concentration of the gas, and the response-recovery time. The response of magnesium ferrite to ethanol and methanol vapors was compared and it was revealed that magnesium ferrite is more sensitive and selective to ethanol vapor. The sensor operates at a substantially low vapor concentration of about 1 ppm of alcohol vapors, exhibits fantastic response reproducibility, long term reliability and a very fast response and recovery property. Thus the present study explored the possibility of making rapidly responding alcohol vapor sensor based on magnesium ferrite. The sensing mechanism has been discussed in co-relation with magnetic and morphological properties. The role of occupancy of Mg2+ ions in magnesium ferrite on its gas sensing properties has also been studied and is found to influence the response of magnesium ferrite ethanol sensor.

  13. Fully Deuterated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons Obtained From Iron Carbide Treated with DCl and D2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, C.; Lazcano, A.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1966-01-01

    According to Oparin, Mendeleev thought that the origin of petroleum was the result of the hydrolysis of iron carbides by superheated steam under pressure from the deep interior of the Earth through geological formations where the metal carbides exist. As early as 1877, Mendeleev described the reaction leading to the synthesis of hydrocarbons according to the general equation 3Fe(sub m)C(sub n) + mH2O yields mFe3O4 + C(sub 3n)H(sub 8m). Other experimental studies on the production of hydrocarbons from cast iron have been reported. Because of the possibility that hydrocarbons may have been trapped within the carbon matrix of the cast iron, which usually has a high content of carbon, we have studied the reaction of pure iron carbide with deuterium chloride and deuterated water. This was done in order to distinguish any newly formed deuterated hydrocarbons from any possible impurities of trapped hydrocarbons. The experiments were carried out by simply allowing iron carbide to react with concentrated deuterium chloride in D2O. The volatile hydrocarbon fraction examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), using a Finnigan 1020/OWA instrument. contained low molecular weight hydrocarbons in a range C3 to C7. Lower molecular weight hydrocarbons were not detected by GC/MS because the MS scanning mode was preset above mass 40 to exclude components of air. The identified hydrocarbons are similar to those obtained under prebiotic conditions using high frequency discharge. The hydrocarbons found in common were propane, butane, pentane, 3-methylpentane, hexane, and heptane. The percent yields decline with increasing carbon number (propane 11%, n-heptane 1%). Similar results have been obtained by the direct treatment of metal carbides by pulse laser vaporization mass spectrometry. These results show that the hydrolysis of iron carbides may have been a significant source of hydrocarbons on the primitive Earth. There appears to be a predominance of straight chain

  14. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  15. Automotive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jiri; Illing, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Sensors are an essential component of most electronic systems in the car. They deliver input parameters for comfort features, engine and emission control as well as for the active and passive safety systems. New technologies such as silicon micromachining play an important role for the introduction of these sensors in all vehicle classes. The importance and use of these sensor technologies in today"s automotive applications will be shown in this article. Finally an outlook on important current developments and new functions in the car will be given.

  16. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  17. Compositions and methods for hydrocarbon functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent; Fortman, George; Boaz, Nicholas C.; Groves, John T.

    2017-03-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of hydrocarbon functionalization, methods and systems for converting a hydrocarbon into a compound including at least one group ((e.g., hydroxyl group) (e.g., methane to methanol)), functionalized hydrocarbons, and the like.

  18. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    VAPOR PRESSURE DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS ECBC-TR-1422 Ann Brozena RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE...DATE XX-12-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Nov 2015 – Apr 2016 4. TITLE Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics 5a...1 VAPOR PRESSURE DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS 1. INTRODUCTION Knowledge of the vapor pressure of materials as a function of temperature is

  19. Estimation of the minimum and maximum substrate temperatures for diamond growth from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, Fangqing; Chen, Guanghua

    1994-12-01

    It is proposed in this paper that the minimum substrate temperature for diamond growth from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures be determined by the packing arrangements of hydrocarbon fragments at the surface, and the maximum substrate temperature be limited by the diamond growth surface reconstruction, which can be prevented by saturating the surface dangling bonds with atomic hydrogen. Theoretical calculations have been done by a formula proposed by Dryburgh [J. Crystal Growth 130 (1993) 305], and the results show that diamond can be deposited at the substrate temperatures ranging from ≈ 400 to ≈ 1200°C by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. This is consistent with experimental observations.

  20. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  1. Fire-safe hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, G.E.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Wright, B.R.

    1979-11-06

    A stabilized, fire-safe, aqueous hydrocarbon fuel emulsion prepared by mixing: a diesel fuel; an emulsifier (consisting of oleyl diethanolamide, diethanolamine, and diethanolamine soap of oleic acid) which has been treated with about 0 to 7 1/2 of oleic acid. A modified version of this fuel also contains 0 to 0.5% of an antimisting agent, and water.

  2. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  3. Cooperative use of standoff and UAV sensors for CBRNE detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, William J.; Schmit, Thomas; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mulhall, Phil; Croteau, Philly; Manegold, David; Beshay, Manal; Lav, Marvin

    2015-05-01

    The defense of the US armed forces against chemical and biological (CB) attack is transitioning from a focus on standoff detection of these threats to the concept of Early Warning (EW). In this approach an array of dual-use and low-burden dedicated use sensor capabilities are used to replace longer-range single use sensors to detect a CB attack. In this paper we discuss the use of passive broadband thermal imaging to detect chemical vapor clouds as well as a developing suite of compact UAV-borne chemical and radiological sensors for the investigation of threats detected by these indirect approaches. The sensors include a colorimetric ammonia sensor, a chemical sensor based on ion mobility spectrometry, and a radiation detector based on gamma ray scintillation. The implementation and initial field tests of each of these sensor modalities is discussed and future plans for the further development of the capability is presented.

  4. Investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons through landfarming using apparent electrical conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Seuntjens, Piet

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons through landfarming has been widely applied commercially at large scale. Biodegradation is one of the dominant pollutant removal mechanisms involved in landfarming, but strongly depends on the environmental conditions (e.g. presence of oxygen, moisture content). Conventionally the biodegradation process is monitored by the installation of field monitoring equipment and repeated sample collection and analysis. Because the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons and their degradation products can affect the electrical properties of the soil, proximal soil sensors such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors may provide an alternative to investigate the biodegradation process of these contaminants. We investigated the relation between the EMI-based apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of a landfarm soil and the presence and degradation status of petroleum hydrocarbons. The 3 ha study area was located in an oil refinery complex contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, mainly composed of diesel. At the site, a landfarm was constructed in 1999. The most recent survey of the petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations was conducted between 2011 and 2013. The sampling locations were defined by a grid with a 10 m by 10 m cell size and on each location a sample was taken from four successive soil layers with a thickness of 0.5 m each. Because the survey was carried out in phases using different georeferencing methods, the final dataset suffered from uncertainty in the coordinates of the sampling locations. In September 2013 the landfarm was surveyed for ECa with a multi-receiver electromagnetic induction sensor (DUALEM-21S) using motorized conveyance. The horizontal measurement resolution was 1 m by 0.25 m. On each measurement location the sensor recorded four ECa values representative of measurement depths of 0.5 m, 1.0 m, 1.6 m and 3.2 m. After the basic processing, the ECa measurements were filtered to remove

  5. Comparison of two association models (Elliott-Suresh-Donohue and simplified PC-SAFT) for complex phase equilibria of hydrocarbon-water and amine-containing mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grenner, Andreas; Schmelzer, Jürgen; von Solms, Nicolas;

    2006-01-01

    Two Wertheim-based association models, the simplified PC-SAFT and the Elliott-Suresh-Donohue (ESD) equation of state, are compared in this work for the description of vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) in binary systems of aniline, cyclohexylamine (CHA), hydrocarbons...

  6. In vivo real-time ethanol vapor detection in the interstitial fluid of a Wistar rat using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, C. Parks; Wig, A.; Farahi, R. H.; Gehl, A.; Hedden, D. L.; Ferrell, T. L.; Ji, D.; Bell, R.; McBride, W. J.; O'Connor, S.

    2007-01-01

    Real-time, in vivo measurements were taken in the interstitial fluid of a Wistar rat after administering 2.5g/kg ethanol by intraperitoneal injection. A low-power piezoresistive microcantilever sensor array was used with polymer coatings suitable for measuring ethanol concentrations at 100% humidity over several hours. A hydrophobic, vapor permeable nanopore membrane was used to screen liquid and ions while allowing vapor to pass to the sensor that was implanted into the saline environment presented by the interstitial fluid. The real-time measurements followed the time scale of previous blood ethanol concentration data.

  7. Vibrissa Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Docket No. 300119 1 of 11 VIBRISSA SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention provides a... measured as strain. [0009] Thus, there is a need for a sensor utilizing a vibrissa that can detect dynamic and high frequency movement of the

  8. Weather and climate analyses using improved global water vapor observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vonder Haar, Thomas H; Bytheway, Janice L; Forsythe, John M

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP) dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple sources of atmospheric water vapor to form a global data base of total and layered precipitable water vapor...

  9. RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERRARE,R.A.

    2000-01-09

    We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  10. Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrare, R.A.

    2000-01-09

    The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  11. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertész, K., E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Piszter, G. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P O Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zs. [Hungarian Natural History Museum, H-1088, Budapest, Baross utca 13 (Hungary); Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary)

    2014-06-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales.

  12. Vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  13. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  14. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  16. Ricor's Nanostar water vapor compact cryopump: applications and model overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rodney S.; Nachman, Ilan; Tauber, Tomer; Kootzenko, Michael; Barak, Boris; Aminov, Eli; Gover, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Ricor Systems has developed a compact, single stage cryopump that fills the gap where GM and other type cryopumps can't fit in. Stirling cycle technology is highly efficient and is the primary cryogenic technology for use in IR, SWIR, HOT FPA, and other IR detector technology in military, security, and aerospace applications. Current GM based dual stage cryopumps have been the legacy type water vapor pumping system for more than 50 years. However, the typically large cryopanel head, compressor footprint, and power requirements make them not cost and use effective for small, tabletop evaporation / sputtering systems, portable analysis systems, and other systems requiring small volume vacuum creation from medium, high, and UHV levels. This single stage cryopump works well in-line with diffusion and molecular turbopumps. Studies have shown effective cooperation with non-evaporable getter technology as well for UHV levels. Further testing in this area are ongoing. Temperatures created by Stirling cycle cryogenic coolers develop a useful temperature range of 40 to 150K. Temperatures of approximately 100 K are sufficient to condense water and all hydrocarbons oil vapors.

  17. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals using catalysts with different concentrations of acid sites. It shows that greater separation of acid sites makes catalysts more efficient at producing hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. The conversion of biomass into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant attention because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Biomass is a renewable resource, which is abundant worldwide and can potentially be exploited to produce transportation fuels that are less damaging to the environment. This renewable resource consists of cellulose (40–50%), hemicellulose (25–35%), and lignin (16–33%) biopolymers in addition to smaller quantities of inorganic materials such as silica and alkali and alkaline earth metals (calcium and potassium). Fast pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical technology for converting biomass into precursors for hydrocarbon fuels because it produces up to 75 wt% bio-oil,1 which can be upgraded to feedstocks and/or blendstocks for further refining to finished fuels. Bio-oil that has not been upgraded has limited applications because of the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups, derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which gives rise to high acidity, high viscosity, low heating value, immiscibility with hydrocarbons and aging during storage. Ex situ catalytic vapor phase upgrading is a promising approach for improving the properties of bio-oil. The goal of this process is to reject oxygen and produce a bio-oil with improved properties for subsequent downstream conversion to hydrocarbons.

  18. System for dosing formaldehyde vapor at the ppb level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Frank; Barsan, Nicolae; Weimar, Udo

    2010-11-01

    Formaldehyde is one of the most relevant compounds for indoor air pollution. It is toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic and acts already at the ppb level. State-of-the-art detection methods are based on the wet chemical analysis of formaldehyde derivates. This is a complex and time-consuming approach and hinders the collection of real-time data. However, the use of wet chemistry allows for the simple calibration based on formalin solutions. By using gas sensors, online monitoring of indoor air quality is, in principle, possible. To find out whether their performance is good enough, calibration is the first issue to be resolved. Formaldehyde vapor at low concentrations has to be used, and temperature, humidity and flow rate have to be kept constant. This paper discusses the different possibilities of dosing formaldehyde and how to better meet the gas sensor calibration demands. The authors favor the use of an aqueous formaldehyde solution obtained by the depolymerization of paraformaldehyde in combination with a permeation tube used as external reference. Moreover, in the paper it is demonstrated that metal oxide sensors are appropriate detectors to calibrate the system for concentrations even down to 20 ppb. Consequently, the presented system is able to characterize gas sensors and can be used for the development of new devices which monitor indoor air quality.

  19. A copper vapor laser by using a copper-vapor-complex reaction at a low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser performance by using ametal-vapor-complex reaction (Cu+AlBr3) is reported. The laser operation is obtained at a low temperature without externalheating because of the AlBr3 vapors evaporating at a room temperature. The copper vapor laser using this metal-vapor-complex reaction has an advantage of deposition-free of a metallic copper to the laser tube wall, which is different from the copper halide and the organometallic copper lasers.

  20. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  1. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  2. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M

    2016-04-27

    The need to sense gases and vapors arises in numerous scenarios in industrial, environmental, security and medical applications. Traditionally, this activity has utilized bulky instruments to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the constituents of the gas mixture. It is ideal to use sensors for this purpose since they are smaller in size and less expensive; however, their performance in the field must match that of established analytical instruments in order to gain acceptance. In this regard, nanomaterials as sensing media offer advantages in sensitivity, preparation of chip-based sensors and construction of electronic nose for selective detection of analytes of interest. This article provides a review of the use of carbon nanotubes in gas and vapor sensing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  4. Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Mcbrearty, Charles F.; Curran, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS) was developed to detect vapors of hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in air at parts-per-billion (ppb) concentration levels. The sampler consists of a commercial personal pump that draws ambient air through paper tape treated with vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde). The paper tape is sandwiched in a thin cardboard housing inserted in one of the two specially designed holders to facilitate sampling. Contaminated air reacts with vanillin to develop a yellow color. The density of the color is proportional to the concentration of HZ or MMH. The AHVS can detect 10 ppb in less than 5 minutes. The sampler is easy to use, low cost, and intrinsically safe and contains no toxic material. It is most beneficial for use in locations with no laboratory capabilities for instrumentation calibration. This paper reviews the development, laboratory test, and field test of the device.

  5. Vapor stabilizing surfaces for superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Neelesh

    2010-11-01

    The success of rough substrates designed for superhydrophobicity relies crucially on the presence of air pockets in the roughness grooves. This air is supplied by the surrounding environment. However, if the rough substrates are used in enclosed configurations, such as in fluidic networks, the air pockets may not be sustained in the roughness grooves. In this work a design approach based on sustaining a vapor phase of the liquid in the roughness grooves, instead of relying on the presence of air, is explored. The resulting surfaces, referred to as vapor stabilizing substrates, are deemed to be robust against wetting transition even if no air is present. Applications of this approach include low drag surfaces, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation heat transfer, among others.

  6. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  7. Vapor pressure of ionic liquids at low temperatures from AC-chip-calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrenberg, Mathias; Beck, Martin; Neise, Christin; Keßler, Olaf; Kragl, Udo; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph

    2016-08-03

    The very low vapor pressure of ionic liquids is challenging to measure. At elevated temperatures the liquids might start to decompose, and at relatively low temperatures the vapor pressure becomes too low to be measured by conventional methods. In this work we developed a highly sensitive method for mass loss determination at temperatures starting from 350 K. This technique is based on an alternating current calorimeter equipped with a chip sensor that consists of a free-standing SiNx-membrane (thickness measuring area with lateral dimensions of the order of 1 mm. A small droplet (diameter ca. 600 μm) of an ionic liquid is vaporized isothermally from the chip sensor in a vacuum-chamber. The surface-to-volume-ratio of such a droplet is large and the relative mass loss due to evaporation is therefore easy to monitor by the changing heat capacity (J K(-1)) of the remaining liquid. The vapor pressure is determined from the measured mass loss rates using the Langmuir equation. The method was successfully tested for the determination of the vapor pressure and the vaporization enthalpy of an archetypical ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][NTf2]). The data set created in this way in an extremely broad temperature range from 358 K to 780 K has allowed the estimation of the boiling temperature of [EMIm][NTf2]. The value (1120 ± 50) K should be considered as the first reliable boiling point of the archetypical ionic liquid obtained from experimental vapor pressures measured in the most possible close proximity to the normal boiling temperature.

  8. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  9. MEMS sensor technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhuangde

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992 the author has led research group in Xi'an Jiaotong University to investigate and develop microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors, including pressure sensor, acceleration sensor, gas sensor, viscosity & density sensor, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip and integrated sensor etc. This paper introduces the technologies and research results related to MEMS sensors we achieved in the last 20 years.

  10. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  11. Critical points of metal vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomkin, A. L., E-mail: alhomkin@mail.ru; Shumikhin, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid (insulator–metal) phase transition in vapors of metals with multielectron valence shells. The method is based on a model developed earlier for the vapors of alkali metals, atomic hydrogen, and exciton gas, proceeding from the assumption that the cohesion determining the basic characteristics of metals under normal conditions is also responsible for their properties in the vicinity of the critical point. It is proposed to calculate the cohesion of multielectron atoms using well-known scaling relations for the binding energy, which are constructed for most metals in the periodic table by processing the results of many numerical calculations. The adopted model allows the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid phase transition in metal vapors to be calculated using published data on the properties of metals under normal conditions. The parameters of critical points have been calculated for a large number of metals and show satisfactory agreement with experimental data for alkali metals and with available estimates for all other metals. Binodals of metals have been calculated for the first time.

  12. Adsorption of volatile hydrocarbons in iron polysulfide chalcogels

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2014-11-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and possible applications of three new metal-chalcogenide aerogels KFe3Co3S 21, KFe3Y3S22 and KFe 3Eu3S22. Metal acetates react with the alkali metal polychalcogenides in formamide/water mixture to form extended polymeric frameworks that exhibit gelation phenomena. Amorphous aerogels obtained after supercritical CO2 drying have BET surface area from 461 to 573 m 2/g. Electron microscopy images and nitrogen adsorption measurements showed that pore sizes are found in micro (below 2 nm), meso (2-50 nm), and macro (above 50 nm) porous regions. These chalcogels possess optical bandgaps in the range of 1.55-2.70 eV. These aerogels have been studied for the adsorption of volatile hydrocarbons and gases. A much higher adsorption of toluene in comparison with cyclohexane and cyclopentane vapors have been observed. The adsorption capacities of the three volatile hydrocarbons are found in the following order: toluene > cyclohexane > cyclopentane. It has been observed that high selectivity in adsorption is feasible with high-surface-area metal chalcogenides. Similarly, almost an eight to ten times increase in adsorption selectivity towards CO2 over H2/CH4 was observed in the aerogels. Moreover, reversible ion-exchange properties for K+/Cs+ ions have also been demonstrated. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring the Framework Hydrophobicity and Flexibility of ZIF-8: From Biofuel Recovery to Hydrocarbon Separations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ke

    2013-11-07

    The framework hydrophobicity and flexibility of ZIF-8 are investigated by a detailed adsorption and diffusion study of a series of probe molecules including ethanol, 1-butanol, water, hexane isomers, xylene isomers, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. The prospects for using ZIF-8 in biofuel recovery and hydrocarbon separations are discussed in terms of adsorption or kinetic selectivities. ZIF-8 shows extremely low water vapor uptakes and is especially suitable for vapor phase butanol-based biofuel recovery. The extraordinary framework flexibility of ZIF-8 is demonstrated by the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules that are much larger than its nominal pore size, such as m-xylene, o-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. The calculation of corrected diffusion coefficients reveals an interesting spectrum of promising kinetic hydrocarbon separations by ZIF-8. These findings confirm that a molecular sieving effect tends to occur in the sorbate molecular size range of 4-6 Å rather than around the nominal ZIF-8 pore size of 3.4 Å, due to its surprising framework flexibility. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  15. Ionic solvents used in ionic polymer transducers, sensors and actuators

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Ionic liquids are incorporated into transducers, actuators or sensors which employ the ionic polymer membranes. The ionic liquids have superior electrochemical stability, low viscosity and low vapor pressure. The transducers, actuators and sensors which utilize ionic polymer membranes solvated with ionic liquids have long term air stability. Superior results are achieved when a conductive powder and ionomer mixture is applied to the ionic polymer membrane to form the electrodes during or afte...

  16. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  17. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  18. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  19. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  20. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  1. Direct Measuring Methods of Water Vapor Content and Air Velocity at High Temperature using ZrO2-MgO Gas Chemisorption Type Ceramic Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Shiba, Tooru; Hyodo, Tsutomu

    The control of humidity or air velocity as well as temperature is imperative for industrial process equipment such as air conditioners, dryers. At present, much about humidity sensors has been reported, and recently, ceramic sensors have been used with improved results. However, the effective operating temperature of these sensors for a direct measurement of the humidity is about 423 K at the highest. From the various ceramic sensors so far investigated, the authors selected composite ceramics ZrO2-MgO with porous structure and n-type semiconductor for humidity sensing at high temperature. This is because, when the working temperature of the ceramic sensor is between 673 and 973K, the sensor detects the presence of water vapor and gas velocity by the variations in the electronic condition caused by the reversible of the water vapor. From the test, the sensor that use a single sensing ceramic element can detect directly both the water vapor content in a mixed gas of air and superheated vapor in the temperature range 373-773 K and the air velocity(O.5-4m/s) in the range 373-573K.

  2. Feature extraction using distribution representation for colorimetric sensor arrays used as explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Raich, Raviv; Kostesha, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    We present a colorimetric sensor array which is able to detect explosives such as DNT, TNT, HMX, RDX and TATP and identifying volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air. To analyze colorimetric sensors with statistical methods, a suitable representation of sensory readings...

  3. Performances of electrically heated microgroove vaporizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An electrically heated microgroove vaporizer was proposed. The vaporizer mainly comprised an outer tube, an inner tube and an electrical heater cartridge. Microgrooves were fabricated on the external surface of the inner tube by micro-cutting method,which formed the flow passage for fluid between the external surface of the inner tube and the internal surface of the outer tube.Experiments related to the temperature rise response of water and the thermal conversion efficiency of vaporizer were done to estimate the influences of microgroove's direction, feed flow rate and input voltage on the performances of the vaporizer. The results indicate that the microgroove's direction dominates the vaporizer performance at a lower input voltage. The longitudina lmicrogroove vaporizer exhibits the best performances for the temperature rise response of water and thermal conversion efficiency of vaporizer. For a moderate input voltage, the microgroove's direction and the feed flow rate of water together govern the vaporizer performances. The input voltage becomes the key influencing factor when the vaporizer works at a high input voltage, resulting in the similar performances of longitudinal, oblique and latitudinal microgroove vaporizers.

  4. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  5. Virtual Sensors for Designing Irrigation Controllers in Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Arahal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the greenhouse transpiration for control purposes is currently a difficult task. The absence of affordable sensors that provide continuous transpiration measurements motivates the use of estimators. In the case of tomato crops, the availability of estimators allows the design of automatic fertirrigation (irrigation + fertilization schemes in greenhouses, minimizing the dispensed water while fulfilling crop needs. This paper shows how system identification techniques can be applied to obtain nonlinear virtual sensors for estimating transpiration. The greenhouse used for this study is equipped with a microlysimeter, which allows one to continuously sample the transpiration values. While the microlysimeter is an advantageous piece of equipment for research, it is also expensive and requires maintenance. This paper presents the design and development of a virtual sensor to model the crop transpiration, hence avoiding the use of this kind of expensive sensor. The resulting virtual sensor is obtained by dynamical system identification techniques based on regressors taken from variables typically found in a greenhouse, such as global radiation and vapor pressure deficit. The virtual sensor is thus based on empirical data. In this paper, some effort has been made to eliminate some problems associated with grey-box models: advance phenomenon and overestimation. The results are tested with real data and compared with other approaches. Better results are obtained with the use of nonlinear Black-box virtual sensors. This sensor is based on global radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD measurements. Predictive results for the three models are developed for comparative purposes.

  6. Virtual sensors for designing irrigation controllers in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge Antonio; Rodríguez, Francisco; Guzmán, José Luis; Arahal, Manuel R

    2012-11-08

    Monitoring the greenhouse transpiration for control purposes is currently a difficult task. The absence of affordable sensors that provide continuous transpiration measurements motivates the use of estimators. In the case of tomato crops, the availability of estimators allows the design of automatic fertirrigation (irrigation + fertilization) schemes in greenhouses, minimizing the dispensed water while fulfilling crop needs. This paper shows how system identification techniques can be applied to obtain nonlinear virtual sensors for estimating transpiration. The greenhouse used for this study is equipped with a microlysimeter, which allows one to continuously sample the transpiration values. While the microlysimeter is an advantageous piece of equipment for research, it is also expensive and requires maintenance. This paper presents the design and development of a virtual sensor to model the crop transpiration, hence avoiding the use of this kind of expensive sensor. The resulting virtual sensor is obtained by dynamical system identification techniques based on regressors taken from variables typically found in a greenhouse, such as global radiation and vapor pressure deficit. The virtual sensor is thus based on empirical data. In this paper, some effort has been made to eliminate some problems associated with grey-box models: advance phenomenon and overestimation. The results are tested with real data and compared with other approaches. Better results are obtained with the use of nonlinear Black-box virtual sensors. This sensor is based on global radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) measurements. Predictive results for the three models are developed for comparative purposes.

  7. Load sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder for

  8. Gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  9. In situ sensing of subsurface contamination--part I: near-infrared spectral characterization of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavarioti, Maria; Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Pourjabbar, Anahita; Ghandehari, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    There is an imperative need for a chemical sensor capable of remote, in situ, long-term monitoring of chemical species at sites containing toxic chemical spills, specifically at chemical waste dumps, landfills, and locations with underground storage tanks. In the current research, a series of experiments were conducted measuring the near-infrared optical absorption of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. A spectral library was then developed to characterize the optical spectra of liquid hydrocarbons. Near-infrared analysis was chosen due to compatibility with optical fibers. The goal was to differentiate between classes of hydrocarbons and to also discriminate between compounds within a class of similar molecular structures. It was observed that unique absorption spectra can be obtained for each hydrocarbon, and this uniqueness can be used to discriminate between hydrocarbons from different families. Statistical analyses, namely, principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation coefficient (Spearman and Pearson methods), were attempted to match absorption spectra from an unknown hydrocarbon with the database with limited success. An algorithm was subsequently written to identify the characteristic peaks of each hydrocarbon that could be used to match data from an unknown chemical species with the database.

  10. Morphology tailoring of nano/micro-structured conductive polymers, composites and their applications in chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingfa; Gao, Mingjun; He, Xiaochun; Li, Guang

    2010-11-01

    Conductive polymer is one of the important multi-functional materials. It has many applications in light-emitting diodes, chemical sensors, biosensors, et al. This paper provides a relatively comprehensive review on the progress of conductive polymer and composite as sensitive film for sensors to chemical vapors including patents, papers and our preliminary research results. Especially, the feature of conjugated polymers, the processing technology, doping characteristics and some factors affecting gas responses are discussed. Otherwise, the developments of nanostructured conductive polymer and organic-inorganic hybrid film sensor with high sensitivity and rapid response to vapors are also described, and some suggestions are proposed.

  11. Modeling vapor-liquid interfaces with the gradient theory in combination with the CPA equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, Antonio; Miqueu, C; Marrucho, IM

    2005-01-01

    With the final purpose of describing the important aqueous + hydrocarbon liquid-liquid interfaces, the gradient theory was combined with the Cubic-Plus-Association equation of state (CPA EOS), taking advantage of the correct representation of interfacial tensions provided by the gradient theory...... and discussed. The good description of equilibrium properties such as vapor pressure and liquid and vapor phase densities is shown in the full range of the vapor-liquid saturation line. For non-associating components, results are compared with those from the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations...... of state. A correlation for the influence parameter is presented from which surface tensions can be obtained in a broad temperature range with average errors smaller than 1%. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy of phthalocyanine vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, J.

    1979-01-01

    The He(I) photoelectron spectra of several metal phthalocyanines and metal-free phthalocyanine vapor shows that: a sharp peak at 4.99 eV is an artifact due to ionization of atomic He by He(II) radiation; the first phthalocyanine peak (metal-containing or metal-free) occurs at 6.4 eV; and the metal-like d orbitals lie at least 1 to 2 eV deeper, except in the case of Fe. (DLC)

  13. Photovoltaic driven vapor compression cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, D. K.

    Since the vast majority of heat pumps, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment employs the vapor compression cycle (VCC), the use of renewable energy represents a significant opportunity. As discussed in this report, it is clear that the use of photovoltaics (PV) to drive the VCC has more potential than any other active solar cooling approach. This potential exists due to improvements in not only the PV cells but VCC machinery and control algorithms. It is estimated that the combined improvements will result in reducing the PV cell requirements by as much as one half.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  15. Correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and water-hydrocarbon ratio in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Zhou; Qingling Chen; Yuewu Tao; Huixin Weng

    2011-01-01

    In order to shorten the evaluation cycle of cobalt catalyst before the optimized catalyst is fixed on,a mathematical method is proposed to calculate weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons.Based on the carbide polymerization mechanism and the main hydrocarbons being linear alkanes and α-olefins,the correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and the molecular mass ratio of water to hydrocarbons is discussed.The result shows the ratio was within the range of 1.125-1.286 and the lower the ratio,the more gaseous hydrocarbons were obtained.Moreover,a linear equation between the weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons and the weight ratio of C5+ hydrocarbons to the total water is established.These results are validated by corresponding experiments.The weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons could be immediately calculated by this linear equation without detailed gas chromatography (GC) analysis of them.

  16. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  17. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  18. An Integrated DNA Modified Dual-microelectrode Sensor Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Qin LIN; Li Ping LU; Xiao Hua JIANG

    2005-01-01

    A unique method for preparing a coaxial dual-microelectrode sensor by vaporizing the nano-thickness Au layer on the DNA modified carbon fiber micro-column electrode was illustrated.The dual-electrode showed particular merit for determination in biological systems.

  19. Operations and Maintenance Manual, Atmospheric Contaminant Sensor, Revision B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The sensor is a mass spectrometer system which continuously monitors the atmospheric constituents of hydrogen, water vapor, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, and monitors the Freons on a demand sampling basis. The manual provides a system description, operational procedures, and maintenance and troubleshooting instructions. Circuit diagrams…

  20. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  1. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  2. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  3. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  4. Physico-chemical mechanism for the vapors sensitivity of photoluminescent InP quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosposito, P.; De Angelis, R.; De Matteis, F.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Zhang, H.; Casalboni, M.

    2016-03-01

    InP/InGaP surface quantum dots are interesting materials for optical chemical sensors since they present an intense emission at room temperature, whose intensity changes rapidly and reversibly depending on the composition of the environmental atmosphere. We present here their emission properties by time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy investigation and we discuss the physico-chemical mechanism behind their sensitivity to the surrounding atmosphere. Photoluminescence transients in inert atmosphere (N2) and in solvent vapours of methanol, clorophorm, acetone and water were measured. The presence of vapors of clorophorm, acetone and water showed a very weak effect on the transient times, while an increase of up to 15% of the decay time was observed for methanol vapour exposure. On the basis of the vapor molecule nature (polarity, proticity, steric hindrance, etc.) and of the interaction of the vapor molecules with the quantum dots surface a sensing mechanism involving quantum dots non-radiative surface states is proposed.

  5. Effects of growth pressure on morphology of ZnO nanostructures by chemical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Eadi Sunil; Kim, Sungjin; Song, Jung-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Ku

    2016-08-01

    The effect of growth pressure on the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures in chemical vapor transport by using Zn powder and oxygen as source materials has been investigated. Highly uniform aligned ZnO nanorods or multifaceted tripod structures were grown depending on the growth pressure. The mechanism governing the morphology change was explained by the relative concentration of Zn vapor and supersaturation based on experimental observations. It was concluded that heterogeneous nucleation on the substrate is enhanced at low growth pressure, while homogeneous nucleation from vapor phase is enhanced at high growth pressure. The difference resulted in different morphology of ZnO nanostructures. ZnO nanorods grown at optimized condition were used for the fabrication of gas sensor for the detection of H2 gas.

  6. A novel porphyrin-containing polyimide nanofibrous membrane for colorimetric and fluorometric detection of pyridine vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yani; Du, Yanglong; Xu, Jiayao; Wang, Junbo

    2013-11-19

    A novel zinc porphyrin-containing polyimide (ZPCPI) nanofibrous membrane for rapid and reversible detection of trace amounts of pyridine vapor is described. The membrane displays a distinct color change, as well as dramatic variations in absorption and fluorescent emission spectra, upon exposure to pyridine vapor. This condition allows the detection of the analyte at concentrations as low as 0.041 ppm. The vapochromic and spectrophotometric responses of the membrane are attributed to the formation of the ZPCPI-pyridine complex upon axial coordination. From surface plasmon resonance analysis, the affinity constant of ZPCPI-pyridine complex was calculated to be (3.98 ± 0.25) × 104 L · mol(-1). The ZPCPI nanofibrous membrane also showed excellent selectivity for pyridine vapor over other common amines, confirming its applicability in the manufacture of pyridine-sensitive gas sensors.

  7. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  8. A Flash Vaporization System for Detonation of Hydrocarbon Fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, Inc. Canada, 1975. 78. Material Safety Data Sheet,” Knovel Solvents - A Properties Database, ChemTec...Publishing, 2000. 79. Knovel Chemical Properties Handbook, McGraw-Hill, 1999. 80. Lin, K.C., Cox-Stouffer, S., Kennedy, P. J., and Jackson, T

  9. Experimental results for hydrocarbon refrigerant vaporization inside brazed plate heat exchangers at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desideri, Adriano; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Wronski, Jorrit;

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the interest in small capacity organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power systems for harvesting low qualitywaste thermal energy from industrial processes has been steadily growing. Micro ORC systems are normally equippedwith brazed plate heat exchangers which allows for efficient heat tra...

  10. Design and evaluation of high performance rocket engine injectors for use with hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the feasibility of using a heavy hydrocarbon fuel as a rocket propellant is reported herein. A method of predicting performance of a heavy hydrocarbon in terms of vaporization effectiveness is described and compared to other fuels and to experimental test results. The work was done at a chamber pressure of 4137 KN/sq M (600 psia) with RP-1, JP-10, and liquefied natural gas as fuels, and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Combustion length effects were explored over a range of 21.6 cm (8 1/2 in.) to 55.9 cm (22 in.). Four injector types were tested, each over a range of mixture ratios. Further configuration modifications were obtained by 'reaming' each injector several times to provide test data over a range of injector pressure drop.

  11. Design and evaluation of high performance rocket engine injectors for use with hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using a heavy hydrocarbon fuel as a rocket propellant is examined. A method of predicting performance of a heavy hydrocarbon in terms of vaporization effectiveness is described and compared to other fuels and to experimental test results. Experiments were done at a chamber pressure of 4137 KN/sq M (600 psia) with RP-1, JP-10, and liquefied natural gas as fuels, and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Combustion length effects were explored over a range of 21.6 cm (8 1/2 in) to 55.9 cm (22 in). Four injector types were tested, each over a range of mixture ratios. Further configuration modifications were obtained by reaming each injector several times to provide test data over a range of injector pressure drop.

  12. Optimization of the OPLS-AA Force Field for Long Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Shirley W I; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2012-04-10

    The all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field is a popular force field for simulating biomolecules. However, the current OPLS parameters for hydrocarbons developed using short alkanes cannot reproduce the liquid properties of long alkanes in molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore, the extension of OPLS-AA to (phospho)lipid molecules required for the study of biological membranes was hampered in the past. Here, we optimized the OPLS-AA force field for both short and long hydrocarbons. Following the framework of the OPLS-AA parametrization, we refined the torsional parameters for hydrocarbons by fitting to the gas-phase ab initio energy profiles calculated at the accurate MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ theory level. Additionally, the depth of the Lennard-Jones potential for methylene hydrogen atoms was adjusted to reproduce the densities and the heats of vaporization of alkanes and alkenes of different lengths. Optimization of partial charges finally allowed to reproduce the gel-to-liquid-phase transition temperature for pentadecane and solvation free energies. It is shown that the optimized parameter set (L-OPLS) yields improved hydrocarbon diffusion coefficients, viscosities, and gauche-trans ratios. Moreover, its applicability for lipid bilayer simulations is shown for a GMO bilayer in its liquid-crystalline phase.

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for Abreu & Johnson numerical vapor intrusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Yan, Guangxu; Li, Haiyan; Guo, Shaohui

    2016-03-05

    This study conducted one-at-a-time (OAT) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a numerical vapor intrusion model for nine input parameters, including soil porosity, soil moisture, soil air permeability, aerobic biodegradation rate, building depressurization, crack width, floor thickness, building volume, and indoor air exchange rate. Simulations were performed for three soil types (clay, silt, and sand), two source depths (3 and 8m), and two source concentrations (1 and 400 g/m(3)). Model sensitivity and uncertainty for shallow and high-concentration vapor sources (3m and 400 g/m(3)) are much smaller than for deep and low-concentration sources (8m and 1g/m(3)). For high-concentration sources, soil air permeability, indoor air exchange rate, and building depressurization (for high permeable soil like sand) are key contributors to model output uncertainty. For low-concentration sources, soil porosity, soil moisture, aerobic biodegradation rate and soil gas permeability are key contributors to model output uncertainty. Another important finding is that impacts of aerobic biodegradation on vapor intrusion potential of petroleum hydrocarbons are negligible when vapor source concentration is high, because of insufficient oxygen supply that limits aerobic biodegradation activities.

  14. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The “open field” soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture di...

  15. Applied bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchee, R.E.; Kittel, J.A. [eds.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Reisinger, H.J. [ed.] [Integrated Science and Technology, Inc., Marietta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. The papers in this volume focus on petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation, with an emphasis on pilot-scale and field-scale applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  16. Experimental study of vapor local characteristics in upward low pressure boiling tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qi; ZHAO Hua; XI Zhao; YANG Rui-Chang

    2003-01-01

    Radial distribution of vapor local parameters, including local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubblesize, bubble frequency and interfacial area concentration, are investigated through the measurement in an upwardboiling tube using dual-sensor optical probe. In addition, a new local parameter -"local bubble number concentra-tion" is developed on the basis of bubble frequency. The analysis shows that this parameter can reflect bubble numberdensity in space, and has clear physical meaning.

  17. Satellite derived integrated water vapor and rain intensity patterns - Indicators of rapid cyclogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurdie, Lynn; Katsaros, Kristina

    1992-01-01

    We examine integrated water vapor fields and rain intensity patterns derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) for several rapidly deepening and non-rapidly deepening midlatitude cyclones in the North Atlantic. Our goal is to identify features in the satellite data unique to the rapidly deepening cases, and to explore how these data can potentially be used in the analysis and forecasting of these events.

  18. Satellite derived integrated water vapor and rain intensity patterns: Indicators of rapid cyclogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurdie, Lynn; Katsaros, Kristina

    1992-01-01

    We examine integrated water vapor fields and rain intensity patterns derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) for several rapidly deepening and non-rapidly deepening midlatitude cyclones in the North Atlantic. Our goal is to identify features in the satellite data unique to the rapidly deepening cases, and to explore how these data can potentially be used in the analysis and forecasting of these events.

  19. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  20. Pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  1. Semiconductor sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Frank, E-mail: frank.hartmann@cern.c [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  2. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  3. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  4. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmair, Felix

    2016-09-01

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  5. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  6. Phoenix Water Vapor Measurements using the SSI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie; Lemmon, Mark T.

    2016-10-01

    The Phoenix and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft participated together in an observation campaign that was a coordinated effort to study the Martian atmosphere. These coordinated observations were designed to provide near-simultaneous observations of the same column of atmosphere over the Phoenix lander. Seasonal coverage was obtained at Ls=5-10° resolution and diurnal coverage was obtained as often as possible and with as many times of day as possible. One key aspect of this observation set was the means to compare the amount of water measured in the whole column (via the MRO Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM; Murchie et al., 2007) and the Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) with that measured at the surface (via the Phoenix Thermal and Electrical Conductivity probe (TECP; Zent et al., 2008) which contained a humidity sensor). This comparison, along with the Phoenix LIDAR observations of the depth to which aerosols are mixed (Whiteway et al., 2008, 2009), provides clues to the water vapor mixing ratio profile. Tamppari et al. (2009) showed that examination of a subset of these coordinated observations indicate that the water vapor is not well mixed in the atmosphere up to a cloud condensation height at the Phoenix location during northern summer, and results indicated that a large amount of water must be confined to the lowest 0.5-1 km. This is contrary to the typical assumption that water vapor is "well-mixed."Following a similar approach to Titov et al. (2000), we use the Phoenix SSI camera [Lemmon et al., 2008] filters to detect water vapor: LA = 930.7 nm (broad), R4 = 935.5 nm (narrow), and R5 = 935.7 nm (narrow). We developed a hybrid DISORT-spherical model (DISORT model, Stamnes et al. 1988) to model the expected absorption due to a prescribed water vapor content and profile, to search for matches to the observations. Improvements to the model have been made and recent analysis using this model and comparisons to

  7. Quantification of aerobic biodegradation and volatilization rates of gasoline hydrocarbons near the water table under natural attenuation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.; Baker, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation and volatilization near the water table constitute a coupled pathway that contributes significantly to the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons at gasoline spill sites. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation and volatilization were quantified by analyzing vapor transport in the unsaturated zone at a gasoline spill site in Beaufort, South Carolina. Aerobic biodegradation rates decreased with distance above the water table, ranging from 0.20 to 1.5g m-3 d-1 for toluene, from 0.24 to 0.38 g m-3 d-1 for xylene, from 0.09 to 0.24 g m-3 d-1 for cyclohexene, from 0.05 to 0.22 g m-3 d-1 for ethylbenzene, and from 0.02 to 0.08 g m-3 d-1 for benzene. Rates were highest in the capillary zone, where 68% of the total hydrocarbon mass that volatilized from the water table was estimated to have been biodegraded. Hydrocarbons were nearly completely degraded within 1 m above the water table. This large loss underscores the importance of aerobic biodegradation in limiting the transport of hydrocarbon vapors in the unsaturated zone and implies that vapor-plume migration to basements and other points of contact may only be significant if a source of free product is present. Furthermore, because transport of the hydrocarbon in the unsaturated zone can be limited relative to that of oxygen and carbon dioxide, soil, gas surveys conducted at hydrocarbon-spill sites would benefit by the inclusion of oxygen- and carbon-dioxide-gas concentration measurements. Aerobic degradation kinetics in the unsaturated zone were approximately first-order. First-order rate constants near the water table were highest for cyctohexene (0.21-0.65 d-1) and nearly equivalent for ethylbenzene (0.11-20.31 d-1), xylenes (0.10-0.31 d-1), toluene (0.09-0.30 d-1), and benzene (0.07,0.31 d-1). Hydrocarbon mass loss rates at the water table resulting from the coupled aerobic biodegradation and volatilization process were determined by extrapolating gas transport rates through the capillary zone. Mass

  8. Development of a fieldable rugged TATP surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Sylvia, James M.

    2011-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has repeatedly been shown to be capable of single molecule detection in laboratory controlled environments. However, superior detection of desired compounds in complex situations requires optimization of factors in addition to sensitivity. For example, SERS sensors are metals with surface roughness in the nm scale. This metallic roughness scale may not adsorb the analyte of interest but instead cause a catalytic reaction unless stabilization is designed into the sensor interface. In addition, the SERS sensor needs to be engineered sensitive only to the desired analyte(s) or a small subset of analytes; detection of every analyte would saturate the sensor and make data interpretation untenable. Finally, the SERS sensor has to be a preferable adsorption site in passive sampling applications, whether vapor or liquid. In this paper, EIC Laboratories will discuss modifications to SERS sensors that increase the likelihood of detection of the analyte of interest. We will then demonstrate data collected for TATP, a compound that rapidly decomposes and is undetected on standard silver SERS sensors. With the modified SERS sensor, ROC curves for room temperature TATP vapor detection, detection of TATP in a non equilibrium vapor environment in 30 s, detection of TATP on a sensor exposed to a ventilation duct, and detection of TATP in the presence of fuel components were all created and will be presented herein.

  9. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  10. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  11. Cool Sooting Flames of Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.A. MANSUROV

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paramagnetism of soot particles sampled from cool sooting flames of methane and propane in a separately-heated two-sectional reactor under atmospheric pressure at the reactor temperatures of 670-1170 K. The temperature profiles of the flames were studied. The sampling was carried out with a quartz sampler and the samples were frozen with liquid nitrogen. A number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, fluoranthene, coronene, anthanthrene, 1,12-benzperylene,were identified by spectroscopic methods in the extract of soot. The processes of soot formation at methaneoxygen mixture combustion in the electric field with applied potential changed from 0 to 2,2 kV at different polarity of electrodes have been investigated. It has been stated that at the electrical field application, an increase in soot particle sizes and soot yield occurs; besides, at the application of the field, speeding up the positively charged particles, the interplanar distance decreases. On the basis of investigation of soot particles paramagnetism, it was shown that initially soot particles have high carcinogetic activity and pollute the environment owing to a rapid decrease of the number of these radical centers. The reduction of the radical concentration is connected with radical recombination on soot.

  12. A micro-system based on glass-nanoporous silicon for optical sensing of organic solvent vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-You; Kim, Han-Jung; Kim, Ho-Jong; Choi, Dae-Geun; Cheng, Horchhong

    2012-06-01

    We present a recent experimental study on the application of nanoporous silicon (np-Si) to an optical vapor sensor. We fabricated the micro-system based on a glass-nanoporous silicon layer on a p(+)-type silicon wafer. To check the selectivity and sensitivity of the np-Si layer to organic vapors, we prepared three types of np-Si layer samples--a single layer, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) layer, and microcavity layer--and investigated its reflectance spectra upon exposure to different concentrations of various organic vapors. When the np-Si layer samples were exposed to the organic vapors, a red-shift occurred in the reflectance spectrum, and we determined that this red-shift can be attributed to the changes in the refractive index induced by the capillary condensation of the organic vapor within the pores of the np-Si layer. The np-Si layer samples showed excellent sensing ability to different types and concentrations of organic vapors. After removing the organic vapors, the reflectance spectrum immediately returned to its original state.

  13. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  14. Versatility of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms using solar energy, H2O, and CO2 as the primary inputs. Compared to plants and eukaryotic microalgae, cyanobacteria are easier to be genetically engineered and possess higher growth rate. Extensive genomic information and well-established genetic platform make cyanobacteria good candidates to build efficient biosynthetic pathways for biofuels and chemicals by genetic engineering. Hydrocarbons are a family of compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. Structural diversity of the hydrocarbon family is enabled by variation in chain length, degree of saturation, and rearrangements of the carbon skeleton. The diversified hydrocarbons can be used as valuable chemicals in the field of food, fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and cosmetics. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis is ubiquitous in bacteria, yeasts, fungi, plants, and insects. A wide variety of pathways for the hydrocarbon biosynthesis have been identified in recent years. Cyanobacteria may be superior chassis for hydrocabon production in a photosynthetic manner. A diversity of hydrocarbons including ethylene, alkanes, alkenes, and terpenes can be produced by cyanobacteria. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology strategies can be employed to improve hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria. This review mainly summarizes versatility and perspectives of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

  15. Primary biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.H.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Paumen, M.L.; Parkerton, T.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes primary biodegradation experiments performed to determine the persistence of higher molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater. Results from the biodegradation experiments show that the majority of tested petroleum hydrocarbons have half-lives in seawater less than 60 days.

  16. Vapor Pressures of Several Commercially Used Alkanolamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepacova, Katarina; Huttenhuis, Patrick J. G.; Derks, Peter W. J.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Klepáčová, Katarína

    2011-01-01

    For the design of acid gas treating processes, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data must be available of the solvents to be applied. In this study the vapor pressures of seven frequently industrially used alkanolamines (diethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, N,N-diethylethano

  17. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  18. Water Vapor Forecasting for Chilean Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Julio C.; Cuevas, O.; Pozo, D.; Curé, M.

    2017-09-01

    "A number of observatories in Chile operate in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, it is very important to them to accurately know the water vapor content of the atmosphere for a better observational planning. This talk provides an overview of the methods used to forecast water vapor over astronomical sites in Chile using observations and atmospheric numerical modeling."

  19. Can a drawover vaporizer be a pushover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J C; Restall, J

    1994-10-01

    Bench testing was carried out to establish whether the vapour output from an OMV50 vaporizer, as used in the Triservice apparatus, differs according to whether the carrier gas is either drawn or pushed through the vaporizer. Results show that the differences in output concentration between the two modes were clinically insignificant.

  20. Thermal flow micro sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Elwenspoek, M.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow sensors and time of flight flow sensors. Anemometers may comprise several heaters and temperature sensors and from a geometric point of view are similar sometimes for calorimetric flow sensors. We fi...

  1. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  2. Soil vapor extraction with dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, N.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    The physical treatment technology of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is reliable, safe, robust, and able to remove significant amounts of mass at a relatively low cost. SVE combined with a pump-and-treat system to create a dewatered zone has the opportunity to remove more mass with the added cost of treating the extracted groundwater. Various limiting processes result in a significant reduction in the overall mass removal rates from a SVE system in porous media. Only pilot scale, limited duration SVE tests conducted in low permeability media have been reported in the literature. It is expected that the presence of a fracture network in low permeability media will add another complexity to the limiting conditions surrounding the SVE technology. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Porous wall hollow glass microsphere as an optical microresonator for chemical vapor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Pienkowski, Edward; Xiao, Hai

    2012-02-01

    Optical microresonators have been proven effective for developing sensitive chemical and biological sensors by monitoring the changes in refractive index or mass near the resonator surface. The rotationally symmetric structures support high quality (Q) whispering gallery modes (WGMs) that interact with the local environment through the evanescent field. The long photon lifetime of the high-Q resonator (thus the long light-material interaction path) is the key reason that a microresonator can achieve very high sensitivity in detection. In this paper, we present our recent research on using porous wall hollow glass microsphere (PW-HGM) as an optical microresonator for chemical vapor detection. The diameter of the PW-HGM ranges from 10μm to 100μm. The wall thickness is about 2μm and the pore size is about 20nm. The Q-factors and free spectrum ranges (FSR) of PW-HGMs were measured by coupling light into the PW-HGM using a single mode fiber taper. Various types of chemical vapors were used to characterize the PW-HGM resonator. The resonant wavelength shift was measured as a function of vapor concentration. Comparisons between a PW-HGM and a solid glass microsphere indicated that a PW-HGM can effectively adsorb vapor molecules into its nanosized pores, providing a direct and long light-material interaction path for significant sensitivity enhancement for chemical vapor detection.

  4. Engineering vapor-deposited polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Yu

    The vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) of PMDA-ODA polyimide was studied parametrically to produce microcapsules and thin films with desirable properties and quality for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The mechanical properties and gas permeability were determined at temperatures from 10 to 573 K. The VDP polyimide possessed distinct properties including lower gas permeability and stronger tensile properties from those of solution-cast Kapton, which were attributed to the presence of cross-linking. Processing parameters determining the properties of the VDP polyimide were identified: (1) utilizing air instead of nitrogen as the atmosphere of imidization increased the permeability by 140%, lowered the activation energy for permeation, and reduced the tensile strength by 30% without affecting the Young's modulus; (2) imidizing at faster heating rates increased the permeability by up to 50% and reduced the activation energy for permeation with 50% lowered tensile strength and impervious Young's modulus; (3) bi-axial stretching increased the permeability by up to three orders of magnitude. Analyses via IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density measurement revealed that the effects of the processing parameters were results of the modifications in the crystallinity and molecular weight. The VDP polyimide underwent minor degradation in the tensile strength and elongation at break with unaffected Young's modulus and permeability upon absorbing 120 MGy of beta-radiation. Substituting a fluorinated dianhydride monomer, 6FDA, for PMDA in the optimized VDP process yielded 6FDA-ODA polyimide microcapsules and films with 50-fold increased permeability and comparable mechanical properties. The results of this study enable the production of polyimide microcapsules that will greatly facilitate the ICF experiments, and will broaden the applications of vapor-deposited polyimides in other technology fields.

  5. Significance of Microbiology in Porous Hydrocarbon Related Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Augsburger, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    This thesis explores bio-mediated processes in geotechnical and petroleum engineering. Worldwide energy consumption is rapidly increasing as the world population and per-capita consumption rises. The US Energy Information Agency (EIA) predicts that hydrocarbons will remain the primary energy source to satisfy the surging energy demands in the near future. The three topics described in detail in this document aim to link microbiology with geotechnical engineering and the petroleum industry. Microorganisms have the potential to exploit residual hydrocarbons in depleted reservoirs in a technique known as microbial enhanced oil recovery, MEOR. The potential of biosurfactants was analyzed in detail with a literature review. Biosurfactant production is the most accepted MEOR technique, and has been successfully implemented in over 700 field cases. Temperature is the main limiting factor for these techniques. The dissolution of carbonates by microorganisms was investigated experimentally. We designed a simple, economical, and robust procedure to monitor diffusion through porous media. This technique determined the diffusion coefficient of H+ in 1.5% agar, 1.122 x 10-5 cm2 sec-1, by using bromothymol blue as a pH indicator and image processing. This robust technique allows for manipulation of the composition of the agar to identify the effect of specific compounds on diffusion. The Red Sea consists of multiple seeps; the nearby sediments are telltales of deeper hydrocarbon systems. Microbial communities associated with the sediments function as in-situ sensors that provide information about the presence of carbon sources, metabolites, and the remediation potential. Sediments seeps in the Red Sea revealed different levels of bioactivity. The more active seeps, from the southern site in the Red Sea, indicated larger pore sizes, higher levels of carbon, and bioactivity with both bacteria and archaeal species present.

  6. FTIR Study of Vapor Offgassing from Orbiter Tile Re-Waterproofing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, C. B.

    1999-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed to identify and quantify the offgassing behavior of alternative re-waterproofmg materials under investigation for application to Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile and blanket materials. The purpose was to determine whether the new materials would cause a problem with the operational analysis of residual vapors using the current portable vapor analyzer, a Miran 203. The materials investigated were limited to dimethylethoxysilane (DMES) and proposed solvent selected as suitable for use in re-waterproofing Orbiter TPS. The solvent was selected in another phase of the overall project. Obiter TPS tiles were injected with the re-waterproofing materials under constant conditions of temperature, relative humidity and air flow. The vapor concentrations of offgassing materials were monitored using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) multi-component analysis, and with the Miran 203 instruments. The procedure was to record the time dependent concentrations of offgassing materials as analyzed by the FTIR, and the time response of the Miran 203 to the materials under consideration. The FTIR was calibrated for vapor phase DMES, tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDS), ethanol and the hydrocarbon solvents to be used to dilute the DMES for application to the TPS tile. The Miran 203 was calibrated for the operational measurement of DMES airborne vapors. The FTIR data, shows for the first time that the principal product which offgases from the tile after the first hour is not DMES, but TMDS and ethanol. The Miran 203 response to TMDS is the primary reading after the re-waterproofing operation is completed. The operational use of the Miran 203 to measure DMES vapors after re-waterproofmg operations has been responding to TMDS. The results of this study suggest that the historical complaints that have contributed to the low threshold limit value (TLV) for DMES concentrations, as read with the Miran 203, are actually based on

  7. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  8. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  9. A New Technique for the Retrieval of Near Surface Water Vapor Using DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Kooi, Susan; Ferrare, Richard; Winker, David; Hair, Johnathan; Nehrir, Amin; Notari, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric trace gas species and influences radiation, climate, cloud formation, surface evaporation, precipitation, storm development, transport, dynamics, and chemistry. For improvements in NWP (numerical weather prediction) and climate studies, global water vapor measurements with higher accuracy and vertical resolution are needed than are currently available. Current satellite sensors are challenged to characterize the content and distribution of water vapor in the Boundary Layer (BL) and particularly near the first few hundred meters above the surface within the BL. These measurements are critically needed to infer surface evaporation rates in cloud formation and climate studies. The NASA Langley Research Center Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system, which uses the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, has demonstrated the capability to provide high quality water vapor measurements in the BL and across the troposphere. A new retrieval technique is investigated to extend these DIAL water vapor measurements to the surface. This method uses signals from both atmospheric backscattering and the strong surface returns (even over low reflectivity oceanic surfaces) using multiple gain channels to cover the large signal dynamic range. Measurements can be made between broken clouds and in presence of optically thin cirrus. Examples of LASE measurements from a variety of conditions encountered during NASA hurricane field experiments over the Atlantic Ocean are presented. Comparisons of retrieved water vapor profiles from LASE near the surface with dropsonde measurements show very good agreement. This presentation also includes a discussion of the feasibility of developing space-based DIAL capability for high resolution water vapor measurements in the BL and above and an assessment of the technology needed for developing this capability.

  10. Ethanol vapor detection in saline solution using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, C. Parks; Wig, A.; Hedden, D. L.; Gehl, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Farahi, R. H.; Hunter, S. R.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2006-09-01

    We report detection of ethanol in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution using a low-power piezoresistive microcantilever-based system that has the potential to be used in the human body. PBS was used to simulate interstitial fluid and a permeable hydrophobic membrane was employed to transport ethanol vapor to the sensor while blocking the liquid and ions of the PBS. Commercial gold-coated cantilevers were functionalized with polymers for optimal ethanol response. Advantages of this device are its low-power consumption, its high sensitivity, and its capabilities for miniaturization into an implantable capsule. The limit of detection for ethanol in PBS was found to be less than 100ppm or 8mg/dl.

  11. Nanostructured zinc oxide thin film by simple vapor transport deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athma, P. V.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Johns, N.; Safeera, T. A.; Reshmi, R.; Anila, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures find applications in optoelectronic devices, photo voltaic displays and sensors. In this work zinc oxide nanostructures in different forms like nanorods, tripods and tetrapods have been synthesized by thermal evaporation of zinc metal and subsequent deposition on a glass substrate by vapor transport in the presence of oxygen. It is a comparatively simpler and environment friendly technique for the preparation of thin films. The structure, morphology and optical properties of the synthesized nanostructured thin film were characterized in detail by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and photoluminescence (PL). The film exhibited bluish white emission with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates x = 0.22, y = 0.31.

  12. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  13. Microbial growth with vapor-phase substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, Joanna; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y., E-mail: lukas.wick@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Limited information exists on influences of the diffusive transport of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) on bacterial activity in the unsaturated zone of the terrestrial subsurface. Diffusion of VOC in the vapor-phase is much more efficient than in water and results in effective VOC transport and high bioavailability despite restricted mobility of bacteria in the vadose zone. Since many bacteria tend to accumulate at solid-water, solid-air and air-water interfaces, such phase boundaries are of a special interest for VOC-biodegradation. In an attempt to evaluate microbial activity toward air-borne substrates, this study investigated the spatio-temporal interplay between growth of Pseudomonas putida (NAH7) on vapor-phase naphthalene (NAPH) and its repercussion on vapor-phase NAPH concentrations. Our data demonstrate that growth rates of strain PpG7 were inversely correlated to the distance from the source of vapor-phase NAPH. Despite the high gas phase diffusivity of NAPH, microbial growth was absent at distances above 5 cm from the source when sufficient biomass was located in between. This indicates a high efficiency of suspended bacteria to acquire vapor-phase compounds and influence headspace concentration gradients at the centimeter-scale. It further suggests a crucial role of microorganisms as biofilters for gas-phase VOC emanating from contaminated groundwater or soil. - Research highlights: > Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene. > Bacteria influence NAPH vapor-phase concentration gradients at centimeter-scale. > Microbial growth on vapor-phase naphthalene is inversely correlated to its source. > Bacteria are good biofilters for gas-phase NAPH emanating from contaminated sites. - Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene and effectively influence vapor-phase naphthalene concentration gradients at the centimeter scale.

  14. Absolute and relative emissions analysis in practical combustion systems—effect of water vapor condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J. P.; Mollendorf, J. C.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the absolute combustion gas composition is necessary in the automotive, aircraft, processing, heating and air conditioning industries where emissions reduction is a major concern. Those industries use a variety of sensor technologies. Many of these sensors are used to analyze the gas by pumping a sample through a system of tubes to reach a remote sensor location. An inherent characteristic with this type of sampling strategy is that the mixture state changes as the sample is drawn towards the sensor. Specifically, temperature and humidity changes can be significant, resulting in a very different gas mixture at the sensor interface compared with the in situ location (water vapor dilution effect). Consequently, the gas concentrations obtained from remotely sampled gas analyzers can be significantly different than in situ values. In this study, inherent errors associated with sampled combustion gas concentration measurements are explored, and a correction methodology is presented to determine the absolute gas composition from remotely measured gas species concentrations. For in situ (wet) measurements a heated zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) oxygen sensor (Bosch LSU 4.9) is used to measure the absolute oxygen concentration. This is used to correct the remotely sampled (dry) measurements taken with an electrochemical sensor within the remote analyzer (Testo 330-2LL). In this study, such a correction is experimentally validated for a specified concentration of carbon monoxide (5020 ppmv).

  15. Evolution of hydrocarbon migration style in a fractured reservoir deduced from fluid inclusion data, Clair Field, west of Shetland, UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Martin; Parnell, John; Mark, Darren [Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, Meston Building, University of Aberdeen, King' s College, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Carr, Andrew [Advanced Geochemical Systems Ltd., Towles Fields, Burton on the Wolds, Leicestershire LE12 5TD (United Kingdom); British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Przyjalgowski, Milosz [Department of Physics, National University of Ireland-Galway, Galway (Ireland); Feely, Martin [Department of Geology, National University of Ireland-Galway, Galway (Ireland)

    2008-02-15

    A petrographic and fluid inclusion microthermometric study was performed on sandstones from the Devonian-Carboniferous reservoir rocks of the Clair Field, west of Shetland. Fluid inclusion petrographic and microthermometric observations were collected from quartz, K-feldspar and calcite cements and veins. Vein and cement minerals host both aqueous and hydrocarbon two-phase (liquid and vapor-filled) fluid inclusions indicating that cementation occurred during oil charging. The location of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions in the paragenetic sequence of the reservoir rocks indicates that hydrocarbon migration during early-stage diagenesis occurred via intergranular pores as well as fractures, whereas towards the later stages of diagenesis, as porosities were occluded, hydrocarbon migration was predominantly fracture controlled. The microthermometric characteristics of primary and secondary aqueous fluid inclusions in association with hydrocarbon fluid inclusions indicates that cementation and veining during oil charging occurred at temperatures up to 180 C. Salinity values are variable (0-10.9 wt% NaCl eq.) indicating that fluid mixing occurred during veining and cementation. Basin modeling and vitrinite reflectance data indicate that temperatures of up to 180 C could not have been attained through burial alone. The high temperatures attained during late-stage diagenesis are interpreted to be caused by high temperature, short-lived fluids circulating within the Devonian-Carboniferous reservoir rocks in association with late Cretaceous and Paleocene magmatism. These high temperature fluid flow events were not recorded in the vitrinite reflectance data because of their short duration. (author)

  16. Organophosphate vapor detection on gold electrodes using peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Peter A; Goltz, Mark N; Schrand, Amanda M; Yoon, Do Young; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2014-11-15

    Peptide nanotubes (PNTs) encapsulating horseradish peroxidase and surface coated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were attached to gold screen printed electrodes to construct a novel gas phase organophosphate (OP) biosensor. When the sensor with the AChE enzyme is put in contact with acetylthiocholine (ATCh), the ATCh is hydrolyzed to produce thiocholine, which is then oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Direct electron transfer between HRP and electrode is achieved through PNTs. The signal produced by the electron transfer is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV). The presence of an OP compound inhibits this signal by binding with the AChE enzyme. In this study, gas phase malathion was used as a model OP due to the fact that it displays the identical binding mechanism with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as its more potent counterparts such as sarin and VX, but has low toxicity, making it more practical and safer to handle. The CV signal was proportionally inhibited by malathion vapor concentrations as low as 12 ppbv. Depending on the method used in their preparation, the electrodes maintained their activity for up to 45 days. This research demonstrates the potential of applying nano-modified biosensors for the detection of low levels of OP vapor, an important development in countering weaponized organophosphate nerve agents and detecting commercially-used OP pesticides.

  17. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  18. Role of the source to building lateral separation distance in petroleum vapor intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Capobianco, Oriana; Baciocchi, Renato

    2016-06-01

    The adoption of source to building separation distances to screen sites that need further field investigation is becoming a common practice for the evaluation of the vapor intrusion pathway at sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Namely, for the source to building vertical distance, the screening criteria for petroleum vapor intrusion have been deeply investigated in the recent literature and fully addressed in the recent guidelines issued by ITRC and U.S.EPA. Conversely, due to the lack of field and modeling studies, the source to building lateral distance received relatively low attention. To address this issue, in this work we present a steady-state vapor intrusion analytical model incorporating a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability that accounts for lateral source to building separation. The developed model can be used to evaluate the role and relevance of lateral vapor attenuation as well as to provide a site-specific assessment of the lateral screening distances needed to attenuate vapor concentrations to risk-based values. The simulation outcomes showed to be consistent with field data and 3-D numerical modeling results reported in previous studies and, for shallow sources, with the screening criteria recommended by U.S.EPA for the vertical separation distance. Indeed, although petroleum vapors can cover maximum lateral distances up to 25-30 m, as highlighted by the comparison of model outputs with field evidences of vapor migration in the subsurface, simulation results by this new model indicated that, regardless of the source concentration and depth, 6 m and 7 m lateral distances are sufficient to attenuate petroleum vapors below risk-based values for groundwater and soil sources, respectively. However, for deep sources (> 5 m) and for low to moderate source concentrations (benzene concentrations lower than 5 mg/L in groundwater and 0.5 mg/kg in soil) the above criteria were found extremely conservative as

  19. Development of Advanced Membranes Technology Platform for Hydrocarbon Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalthod, Dr Dilip [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-03-01

    selected for membrane development. A novel dope composition and spinning process were developed, which provide a new approach to controlling membrane porosity and wall and skin morphology. A hollow-fiber membrane with an external dense “skin” was produced that has a high water vapor permeation coefficient and selectivity, durability when in operation at 1000 psig and 70°C, and the ability to withstand aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon vapors for an extended period. The fiber meets the technical requirements for a commercial product offering in gas dehydration. It can be readily manufactured with some changes in process equipment and process conditions, and is an excellent candidate for scale-up to full-size membrane modules.

  20. Temporal biogeophysical signatures at hydrocarbon contaminated sites associated with long-term remediation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekwana, E.; Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E.; Werkema, D. D.

    2009-05-01

    Biogeophysical signatures of hydrocarbon contaminated sites provide ideal laboratories for investigating microbial-geophysical relationships as the excess organic carbon present at these sites stimulates microbial activity. As such geophysical investigations have documented characteristic changes associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation in both field and laboratory experiments. The conceptual model that results from almost a decade of studies from these environments is one in which over time, the geophysical signatures due to bio-physicochemical changes imparted on the aquifer by the microbial activity reach some maximum or minimum related to the availability of terminal electron acceptors, the organic carbon source concentration, and microbial activity. However, with continuous removal of the contaminant mass either by natural attenuation (e.g., intrinsic bioremediation) or engineered (bio) remediation, a decrease in the microbial activity is predicted to cause associated changes in the geophysical properties (i.e., geophysical signatures revert to original conditions). This paper will present the results of repeated geophysical investigations at a hydrocarbon contaminated site acquired over an eleven-year period documenting changes in geophysical signatures associated with removal of hydrocarbon mass in the contaminated zone. Initial investigations at the site showed that relative to background, the contaminated area was characterized by higher bulk electrical conductivity, positive SP anomaly, and attenuated GPR reflections. Over time, the contaminated zone bulk electrical conductivity had reverted to near background conditions, the positive SP anomaly became more negative, and the zone of attenuated GPR reflections showed increased signal strength. The removal of hydrocarbon mass in the vadose zone over the plume by a soil vapor extraction system decreased the level of biological activity and therefore the magnitude of the geophysical signatures. We conclude

  1. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  2. Microcantilever sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  3. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  4. Hydrocarbon degradation abilities of psychrotolerant Bacillus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Kolsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation requires identification of hydrocarbon degrading microbes and the investigation of psychrotolerant hydrocarbon degrading microbes is essential for successful biodegradation in cold seawater. In the present study, a total of 597 Bacillus isolates were screened to select psychrotolerant strains and 134 isolates were established as psychrotolerant on the basis of their ability to grow at 7 °C. Hydrocarbon degradation capacities of these 134 psychrotolerant isolate were initially investigated on agar medium containing different hydrocarbons (naphthalene, n-hexadecane, mineral oil and 47 positive isolates were grown in broth medium containing hydrocarbons at 20 °C under static culture. Bacterial growth was estimated in terms of viable cell count (cfu ml–1. Isolates showing the best growth in static culture were further grown in presence of crude oil under shaking culture and viable cell count was observed between 8.3 × 105–7.4 × 108 cfu ml–1. In the final step, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH (chrysene and naphthalene degradation yield of two most potent isolates was determined by GC-MS along with the measurement of pH, biomass and emulsification activities. Results showed that isolates Ege B.6.2i and Ege B.1.4Ka have shown 60% and 36% chrysene degradation yield, respectively, while 33% and 55% naphthalene degradation yield, respectively, with emulsification activities ranges between 33–50%. These isolates can be used to remove hydrocarbon contamination from different environments, particularly in cold regions.

  5. Dynamics of chemical vapor sensing with MoS2 using 1T/2H phase contacts/channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; Perkins, F. Keith; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Culbertson, James C.; Campbell, Paul M.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) films show remarkable potential for use in chemical vapor sensing devices. Electronic devices fabricated from TMD films are inexpensive, inherently flexible, low-power, amenable to industrial-scale processing because of emergent growth techniques, and have shown high sensitivity and selectivity to electron donor analyte molecules important for explosives and nerve gas detection. However, for devices reported to date, the conductance response to chemical vapors is dominated by Schottky contacts, to the detriment of the sensitivity, selectivity, recovery, and obscuring their intrinsic behavior. Here, we use contact engineering to transition the contacts in a MoS2 FET-based chemical vapor sensor to the 1T conducting phase, while leaving the channel in the 2H semiconducting state, and thus providing Ohmic contacts to the film. We demonstrate that the resultant sensors have much improved electrical characteristics, are more selective, and recover fully after chemical vapor exposure--all major enhancements to previously MoS2 sensor devices. We identify labile nitrogen-containing electron donors as the primary species that generate a response in MoS2, and we study the dynamics of the sensing reactions, identifying two possible qualitative models for the chemical sensing reaction.

  6. Sensors for Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-07-15

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  7. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  8. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  9. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  10. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been

  11. Mechanical properties and microstructure of TiC/amorphous hydrocarbon nanocomposite coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, W. J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Materials Science Division; Louisana State Univ.

    2000-12-01

    Using the techniques of reactive magnetron sputter deposition and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted hybrid physical vapor deposition (PVD)/chemical vapor deposition (CVD), we have synthesized a wide variety of metal-free amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H) and Ti-containing hydrocarbon (Ti-C:H) coatings. Coating elastic modulus and hardness have been measured by the technique of instrumented nanoindentation and related to Ti and hydrogen compositions. We show that both metal and hydrogen compositions significantly influence the mechanical properties of Ti-C:H coatings. The microstructure of Ti-C:H coatings is further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. XANES spectroscopy and high-resolution TEM examination of Ti-C:H specimens shows that the dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C:H matrix is between 0.9 and 2.5 at.%. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, precipitation of nanocrystalline B1-TiC cluster occurs and Ti-C:H coatings are in fact TiC/a-C:H thin film nanocomposites. Measurements of the average Ti bonding environment in TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites by EXAFS spectroscopy are consistent with a microstructure in which bulk-like B1-TiC clusters are embedded in an a-C:H matrix.

  12. SeaMon-HC Buoy. A specific real-time-lightweight-moored platform as a tool for fast hydrocarbon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C.; Rueda, M. J.; Moran, R.; Llerandi, C.; Llinas, O.

    2009-04-01

    The present paper-work describes the design, last development stages and the derived results from a specific buoy platform for fast hydrocarbon detection in seawater. Under the name of SeaMon-HC, (Patent No. P200302219/8) the buoy represents a very chief tool for coastal monitoring, mainly surrounding areas with a high oil-spill risk level, like harbours, off-shore fish farming, beaches and so on. Nowadays, the Macaronesian area has nine units working in real-time, under the frame of the Red ACOMAR Network. The main innovative aspect from this buoy is the detection system. It's based in polymer technology, working as a resistance, who increase its value when the pollutant on water surface is detected. The response time from the sensor is a direct function of the hydrocarbon volatility level. For hydrocarbons with high volatility levels (like petrol), the sensor needs less time (around 3 minutes) than others with less volatility such as oils. SeaMon-HC is an autonomous, modular, reusable and a very low-cost development integrated by four subsystems (SS): SS-Flotation (different materials and shapes available); SS-Sensors (hydrocarbon detector and additional sensors -up to 15-, to solve specific sensor configuration requirements); SS-Power Supply (equipped in its basic configuration with a couple of solar modules and two 12V batteries) and the SS-Communication (based on a RF or GSM/GPRS modem technology, with a selectable communication frequency). All SeaMon-HC units, as well the rest of the ODAS buoys who joint together the Red ACOMAR Network, works in real-time, sending the collected information to the control centre that manages the communications, providing data, in a useful form (as a web site), to diverse socio-economic important sectors which make an exhaustive use of the littoral in the Macaronesian region. The access to the information by the users is done through a specific GIS software application.

  13. Free Energy-Based Coarse-Grained Force Field for Binary Mixtures of Hydrocarbons, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fenglei; Deetz, Joshua D; Sun, Huai

    2017-01-23

    The free energy based Lennard-Jones 12-6 (FE-12-6) coarse-grained (CG) force field developed for alkanes1 has been extended to model small molecules of light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, butane, and isobutane), nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. The adjustable parameters of the FE-12-6 potential are determined by fitting against experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) curves and heat of vaporization (HOV) data for pure substance liquids. Simulations using the optimized FE-12-6 parameters correctly reproduced experimental measures of the VLE, HOV, density, vapor pressure, compressibility, critical point, and surface tension for pure substances over a wide range of thermodynamic states. The force field parameters optimized for pure substances were tested on methane/butane, nitrogen/decane, and carbon dioxide/decane binary mixtures to predict their vapor-liquid equilibrium phase diagrams. It is found that for nonpolar molecules represented by different sized beads, a common scaling factor (0.08) that reduces the strength of the interaction potential between unlike beads, generated using Lorentz-Berthelot (LB) combination rules, is required to predict vapor-liquid phase equilibria accurately.

  14. Formation of conductive spontaneous via holes in AlN buffer layer on n+Si substrate by filling the vias with n-AlGaN by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and application to vertical deep ultraviolet photo-sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have grown conductive aluminum nitride (AlN layers using the spontaneous via holes formation technique on an n+-Si substrate for vertical-type device fabrication. The size and density of the via holes are controlled through the crystal growth conditions used for the layer, and this enables the conductance of the layer to be controlled. Using this technique, we demonstrate the fabrication of a vertical-type deep ultraviolet (DUV photo-sensor. This technique opens up the possibility of fabrication of monolithically integrated on-chip DUV sensors and DUV light-emitting devices (LEDs, including amplifiers, controllers and other necessary functional circuits, on a Si substrate.

  15. Sensors for online determination of CNG gas quality; Sensorer foer onlinebestaemnning av fordonsgaskvalitet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenlaaaas, Ola; Roedjegaard, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Swedish automotive gas has until now been a very uniform, high quality automotive fuel. Elsewhere in Europe the quality of automotive gas varies significantly. Gas from different sources with different flammability require engine settings adjusted to the chosen gas' unique composition. The prospects for a vehicle-mounted sensor based on infrared technology for gas quality measurement has been studied and solutions are presented with questions that must be answered in a possible future work. The proposed vehicle mounted sensor is based on two channels, one of which measures the partial pressure of methane and the other measures the partial pressure of heavier hydrocarbons in 'equivalents of butane'. Ethane produces a signal of about 0.6 equivalents of butane and propane about 0.8 equivalents. The sensor can be accommodated in a cube with 5 cm side and should be equipped with nipple connections to the existing system. The sensor is expected to work throughout their entire lifetime without manual calibration, through continuous automatic calibration, so-called ABC (Automatic Baseline Compensation). The sensor will have to meet tough quality and environmental standards in which primarily contact ring, vibration and prevention of leakage are identified as extra difficult. Working temperatures and the electrical conditions of power supply and communication interface is considered less challenging. In one million volumes, the cost per sensor could be 200 to 300 SEK.

  16. Laboratory retention of vapor-phase PAHs using XAD adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J.; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Yu, Yaochien Y.; Chen, Minsung S.

    This investigation focuses on the retention of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on XAD (-2, -4, and -16) resins, which is crucial for estimating PAH gas/particle partition coefficients. The XAD resins were found to exhibit higher specific retention volumes ( Vg, net gas-phase retention volume per unit weight (gram) of sorbent) than PUF for some 3-ring PAHs at 20 oC. The 3-ring compounds broke through the XAD adsorbents more easily than the 4-ring compounds at constant temperature. For the equation, Log Vg= m log PL+ b ( PL: subcooled liquid vapor pressure) the average m values were approximately -0.2 and -0.3 at 20 and 40 oC, respectively. Moreover, the Vg values were lower at 40 oC than at 20 oC for each PAH compound. The XAD-4 appeared to have a greater Vg value (adsorbent weight based) for each compound among the adsorbents at 40 oC. It was possible that PAH micropore adsorption dominated on XAD-4, different from the predominance of the PAH surface adsorption on the other two adsorbents.

  17. Harvesting liquid from unsaturated vapor - nanoflows induced by capillary condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marguet, Bastien; Stroock, Abraham

    2016-11-01

    A vapor, even subsaturated, can spontaneously form liquid in nanoscale spaces. This process, known as capillary condensation, plays a fundamental role in various contexts, such as the formation of clouds or the dynamics of hydrocarbons in the geological subsurface. However, large uncertainties remain on the thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of the phenomenon, due to experimental challenges as well as outstanding questions about the validity of macroscale physics at the nanometer scale. We studied experimentally the spatio-temporal dynamics of water condensation in a model nanoporous medium (pore radius 2 nm), taking advantage of the color change of the material upon hydration. We found that at low relative humidities (diffusive fashion, while it occurred through a well-defined capillary-viscous imbibition front at > 60 % RH, driven by a balance between the pore capillary pressure and the condensation stress given by Kelvin equation. Further analyzing the imbibition dynamics as a function of saturation allowed us to extract detailed information about the physics of nano-confined fluids. Our results suggest excellent extension of macroscale fluid dynamics and thermodynamics even in pores 10 molecules in diameter.

  18. Advances in wireless sensors and sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Leung, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Written by experts, this book illustrates and collects recent advances in wireless sensors and sensor networks. It provides clever support for scientists, students and researchers in order to stimulate exchange and discussions for further developments.

  19. El vapor de ruedas "Cid": de pionero de la navegación comercial a vapor a primer vapor hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. González García

    Full Text Available La aparición de la máquina de vapor había hecho realidad el sueño de navegar sin depender de las fuerzas de la naturaleza. La carrera por lograr un vapor comercial eficiente había comenzado. Con retraso por la Guerra de la Independencia, España se incorporó a la carrera. Entre los primeros vapores comerciales estaba el vapor "Cid". En 1859, en la Guerra de África, ante la necesidad de una evacuación regular de bajas se designa al "Cid" como buque hospital, fue la primera vez en el mundo que se usó un vapor hospital. El Dr. Nicasio Landa fue el responsable de realizar la misión con una organización moderna, eficaz y ejemplar. Pronto los vapores de ruedas perdieron su batalla con los de hélice y el "Cid" quedó obsoleto. Sin embargo, a pesar de su corta vida operativa, poco más de quince años, escribió una importante página en la historia de la navegación en España.

  20. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  1. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3530 - Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic... hydrocarbons, synthetic. Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic, may be safely used in the production... isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, produced by synthesis from petroleum gases consist of a mixture of...

  4. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons. 172... hydrocarbons. Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the... liquid hydrocarbons meeting the following specifications: Boiling point 93-260 °C as determined by...

  5. Ampoule failure sensor development for semiconductor crystal growth experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watring, Dale A.; Johnson, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Currently there are no devices to detect an ampoule failure in semiconductor crystal growth experiments. If an ampoule fails, it will go undetected until the containing cartridge is breached due to chemical degradation. The experiment will then be terminated resulting in a failed experiment and a loss of data. The objective of this research was to develop a reliable failure sensor that would detect a specific liquid or vapor material before the metallic cartridge is degraded and the processing furnace contaminated. The sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. Upon ampoule failure, the sensor is exposed to the vapor or liquid semiconductor and the chemical reaction causes a resistance change in the sensor material. The sensor shows a step change in resistance on the order of megohms when exposed to mercury zinc telluride (HgZnTe), mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe), or gallium arsenide (GaAs). This ampoule failure sensor is being tested for possible use on the second United States Microgravity Mission (USML-2) and is the subject of a NASA patent application.

  6. Wireless sensor platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Pooran C.; Killough, Stephen M.; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2017-08-08

    A wireless sensor platform and methods of manufacture are provided. The platform involves providing a plurality of wireless sensors, where each of the sensors is fabricated on flexible substrates using printing techniques and low temperature curing. Each of the sensors can include planar sensor elements and planar antennas defined using the printing and curing. Further, each of the sensors can include a communications system configured to encode the data from the sensors into a spread spectrum code sequence that is transmitted to a central computer(s) for use in monitoring an area associated with the sensors.

  7. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  8. Analytical modeling of the subsurface volatile organic vapor concentration in vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds that intrude from a subsurface contaminant source into indoor air has become the subject of health and safety concerns over the last twenty years. Building subslab and soil gas contaminant vapor concentration sampling have become integral parts of vapor intrusion field investigations. While numerical models can be of use in analyzing field data and in helping understand the subslab and soil gas vapor concentrations, they are not widely used due to the perceived effort in setting them up. In this manuscript, we present a new closed-form analytical expression describing subsurface contaminant vapor concentrations, including subslab vapor concentrations. The expression was derived using Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Results from this analytical model match well the numerical modeling results. This manuscript also explores the relationship between subslab and exterior soil gas vapor concentrations, and offers insights on what parameters need to receive greater focus in field studies.

  9. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes Using Injection-Vertical Chemical Vapor Deposition: Effects of Synthesis Parameters on the Nitrogen Content

    OpenAIRE

    Abdouelilah Hachimi; Belabbes Merzougui; Abbas Hakeem; Tahar Laoui; Swain, Greg M.; Qiaowan Chang; Minhua Shao; Muataz Ali Atieh

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped CNTs (N-CNTs) were synthesized using an injection-vertical chemical vapor deposition (IV-CVD) reactor. This type of reactor is quite useful for the continuous mass production of CNTs. In this work, the optimum deposition conditions for maximizing the incorporation of nitrogen were identified. Ferrocene served as the source of the Fe catalyst and was dissolved in acetonitrile, which served as both the hydrocarbon and nitrogen sources. Different concentrations of ferrocene in ace...

  10. A Flexible Approach for Human Activity Recognition Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity recognition based on sensors is a growing area of interest given the great advances in wearable sensors. Applications in various domains are taking advantage of the ease of obtaining data to monitor personal activities and behavior in order to deliver proactive and personalized services. Although many activity recognition systems have been developed for more than two decades, there are still open issues to be tackled with new techniques. We address in this paper one of the main challenges of human activity recognition: Flexibility. Our goal in this work is to present artificial hydrocarbon networks as a novel flexible approach in a human activity recognition system. In order to evaluate the performance of artificial hydrocarbon networks based classifier, experimentation was designed for user-independent, and also for user-dependent case scenarios. Our results demonstrate that artificial hydrocarbon networks classifier is flexible enough to be used when building a human activity recognition system with either user-dependent or user-independent approaches.

  11. A Flexible Approach for Human Activity Recognition Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Hiram; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes

    2016-10-25

    Physical activity recognition based on sensors is a growing area of interest given the great advances in wearable sensors. Applications in various domains are taking advantage of the ease of obtaining data to monitor personal activities and behavior in order to deliver proactive and personalized services. Although many activity recognition systems have been developed for more than two decades, there are still open issues to be tackled with new techniques. We address in this paper one of the main challenges of human activity recognition: Flexibility. Our goal in this work is to present artificial hydrocarbon networks as a novel flexible approach in a human activity recognition system. In order to evaluate the performance of artificial hydrocarbon networks based classifier, experimentation was designed for user-independent, and also for user-dependent case scenarios. Our results demonstrate that artificial hydrocarbon networks classifier is flexible enough to be used when building a human activity recognition system with either user-dependent or user-independent approaches.

  12. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  13. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  14. Leidenfrost Vapor Layer Stabilization on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Patankar, Neelesh; Marston, Jeremy; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We have performed experiments to investigate the influence of the wettability of a superheated metallic sphere on the stability of a thin vapor layer during the cooling of a sphere immersed in water. For high enough sphere temperatures, a continuous vapor layer (Leidenfrost regime) is observed on the surface of non-superhydrophobic spheres, but below a critical sphere temperature the layer becomes unstable and explosively switches to nuclear boiling regime. In contrast, when the sphere surface is textured and superhydrophobic, the vapor layer is stable and gradually relaxes to the sphere surface until the complete cooling of the sphere, thus avoiding the nuclear boiling transition altogether. This finding could help in the development of heat exchange devices and of vapor layer based drag reducing technologies.

  15. Colorometric detection of ethylene glycol vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, C.; Mosier, B.; Verostko, C. E.

    1970-01-01

    Very low concentrations of ethylene glycol in air or other gases are detected by passing a sample through a glass tube with three partitioned compartments containing reagents which successively convert the ethylene glycol vapor into a colored compound.

  16. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  17. ZnO–PDMS Nanohybrids: A Novel Optical Sensing Platform for Ethanol Vapor Detection at Room Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Klini, Argyro

    2015-01-08

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. A new optical gas sensor platform based on highly luminescent ZnO-polymer nanohybrids is demonstrated. The nanohybrids consist of ZnO nanoparticles, typically 125 (±25) nm in size, dispersed in an inert cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. Upon exposure to ethanol-enriched air at room temperature, the nanocomposites exhibit a clear increase in their photoluminescence (PL) emission, which shows a nearly Langmuir dependence on the alcohol vapor pressure. The response time is on the order of 50 s, particularly at low ethanol concentrations. The limit of ethanol vapor detection (LOD) is as low as 0.4 Torr, while the sensor remains unaffected by the presence of water vapor, demonstrating the potential of the ZnO-PDMS system as an optical gas sensing device. The interaction of the ZnO nanoparticles with molecular oxygen plays an essential role on the overall performance of the sensor, as shown in comparative experiments performed in the presence and absence of atmospheric air. Notably, O2 was found to be quite effective in accelerating the sensor recovery process compared to N2 or vacuum.

  18. Analytical modeling of the subsurface volatile organic vapor concentration in vapor intrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds that intrude from a subsurface contaminant source into indoor air has become the subject of health and safety concerns over the last twenty years. Building subslab and soil gas contaminant vapor concentration sampling have become integral parts of vapor intrusion field investigations. While numerical models can be of use in analyzing field data and in helping understand the subslab and soil gas vapor concentrations, they are not w...

  19. Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen H

    1992-01-01

    This "Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste" forms part of a series of "Informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the instructions of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behal

  20. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  1. Compost bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was reduced by 17% in the .... Identification of bacterial isolates was done by biochemical tests. Atagana 1517 ..... control the prolonged thermophilic period in two-phase olive oil mill.

  2. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  3. Molecular characterization of autochthonous hydrocarbon utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria in water, soil and sediment samples collected from ... of the genomic DNA extracted from each bacterial isolate was amplified with ... that16S rRNA-gene-based techniques be used when studying the bacterial ...

  4. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The

  5. Determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cinthia

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... In this study, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with airborne particulate ... compounds from the heavily industrialized Vaal Triangle region. ... benzene ring as cluster, linear or angular (Maliszewska-.

  6. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  7. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  8. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  9. VLE MEASUREMENTS FOR ASYMMETRIC MIXTURES OF FISCHER-TROPSCH HYDROCARBONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark C. Thies

    2004-01-12

    The ability to model the thermodynamic phase behavior of long-chain and short-chain alkane mixtures is of considerable industrial and theoretical interest. However, attempts to accurately describe the phase behavior of what we call asymmetric mixtures of hydrocarbons (AMoHs) have met with only limited success. Vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data are surprisingly scarce, and the limited data that are available suggest that cubic equations of state may not be capable of fitting (much less predicting) the phase behavior of AMoHs. The following tasks, which address the problems described above, were accomplished during the one-year period of this Phase I UCR grant: (1) A continuous-flow apparatus was modified for the measurement of AMoHs and used to measure VLE for propane + hexadecane mixtures at temperatures from 473 to 626 K and pressures up to the mixture critical pressures of about 100 bar. (2) The extent to which cubic vs. modern, statistical mechanics-based equations of state (EoS) are applicable to AMoHs was evaluated. Peng-Robinson (PR) was found to be a surprisingly accurate equation for fitting AMoHs, but only if its pure component parameters were regressed to liquid densities and vapor pressures. However, even this form of PR was still not a predictive equation, as there was a significant variation of kij with temperature. In spite of its deficiencies in terms of vapor-phase predictions and modeling of the critical region, PC-SAFT was found to be the most appropriate EoS for truly predicting the phase behavior of highly asymmetric mixtures of alkanes. (3) Finally, a dense-gas extraction (DGE) apparatus was designed and constructed for the fractionation of F-T waxes into cuts of pure oligomers. Such oligomers are needed in g-sized quantities to perform VLE measurements with long-chain alkanes with carbon numbers greater than 40. The dense gas and the solute mixture to be extracted are contacted in a packed column that has a separation power significantly

  10. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2016-03-11

    Bio-oil produced from conventional flash pyrolysis has poor quality and requires expensive upgrading before it can be used as a transportation fuel. In this work, a high quality bio-oil has been produced using a novel approach where flash pyrolysis, catalysis and fractionation of pyrolysis vapors using two stage condensation are combined in a single process unit. A bench scale unit of 1 kg/h feedstock capacity is used for catalytic pyrolysis in an entrained down-flow reactor system equipped with two-staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5), different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low catalyst/biomass ratios did not show any significant improvements in the bio-oil quality, while high catalyst/biomass ratios showed an effective deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The application of zeolites decreased the organic liquid yield due to the increased production of non-condensables, primarily hydrocarbons. The catalytically produced bio-oil was less viscous and zeolites were effective at cracking heavy molecular weight compounds in the bio-oil. Acidic zeolites, H-Y and H-ZSM5, increased the desirable chemical compounds in the bio-oil such as phenols, furans and hydrocarbon, and reduced the undesired compounds such as acids. On the other hand reducing the acidity of zeolites reduced some of the undesired compounds in the bio-oil such as ketones and aldehydes. The performance of H-Y was superior to that of the rest of zeolites studied: bio-oil of high chemical and calorific value was produced with a high organic liquid yield and low oxygen content. H-ZSM5 was a close competitor to H-Y in performance but with a lower yield of bio-oil. Online fractionation of catalytic pyrolysis vapors was employed by controlling the condenser temperature and proved to be a successful process parameter to tailor the

  11. Binary Schemes of Vapor Bubble Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zudin, Yu. B.

    2015-05-01

    A problem on spherically symmetric growth of a vapor bubble in an infi nite volume of a uniformly superheated liquid is considered. A description of the limiting schemes of bubble growth is presented. A binary inertial-thermal bubble growth scheme characterized by such specifi c features as the "three quarters" growth law and the effect of "pressure blocking" in a vapor phase is considered.

  12. Vapor Pressure of 2-Chlorovinyl Dichloroarsine (Lewisite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Streams of Compounds for Determining Vapor Pressure 11 3. Vapor Pressure of Lewisite I from Multiple Sources: Conant, Sumner, Lewis, Keyes, Price ...number of publications in the open literature by Green and Price ,4 Lewis and Perkins,5 Mann and Pope, Mohler and Polya7 and Gibson and Johnson.8...point. (2) Banks et al.,14 reported that during the fractional distillation of the reaction products of phenyl dichloroarsine and acetylene , 2

  13. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  14. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Venkatram Prasad; Martin, Ivan; Langer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control ov...

  15. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  16. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  17. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  18. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  19. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  20. Electrokinetic Remediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Spiked Soils

    OpenAIRE

    , M. Bilgin; , G. Akıncı

    2011-01-01

    In the presented study, remediation studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of electrokinetic method on the treatment of natural soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, in laboratory scale reactors. Electokinetic remediation of agricultural soil with an initial TPHs (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) concentration of 10000 ppm was investigated under 20 V or 40 V direct current by using NaOH and acetic acid as electrolyte solution, treatment efficiencies were observed accordin...