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Sample records for hydrocarbon solvent suitable

  1. Miscellaneous hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat; DeWitt, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The solvents discussed in this article are common solvents not categorized as halogenated, aromatic, or botanical. The solvents discussed are categorized into two groups: hydrocarbon mixtures and single agents. The hydrocarbon mixtures discussed are Stoddard solvent, naphtha, and kerosene. The remaining solvents described are n-hexane, methyl n-butyl ketone, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and butyl mercaptans. Effects common to this group of agents and their unique effects are characterized. Treatment of exposures and toxic effects of these solvents is described, and physiochemical properties and occupational exposure levels are listed.

  2. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  3. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  4. Highly Efficient and Reproducible Nonfullerene Solar Cells from Hydrocarbon Solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    With chlorinated solvents unlikely to be permitted for use in solution-processed organic solar cells in industry, there must be a focus on developing nonchlorinated solvent systems. Here we report high-efficiency devices utilizing a low-bandgap donor polymer (PffBT4T-2DT) and a nonfullerene acceptor (EH-IDTBR) from hydrocarbon solvents and without using additives. When mesitylene was used as the solvent, rather than chlorobenzene, an improved power conversion efficiency (11.1%) was achieved without the need for pre- or post-treatments. Despite altering the processing conditions to environmentally friendly solvents and room-temperature coating, grazing incident X-ray measurements confirmed that active layers processed from hydrocarbon solvents retained the robust nanomorphology obtained with hot-processed chlorinated solvents. The main advantages of hydrocarbon solvent-processed devices, besides the improved efficiencies, were the reproducibility and storage lifetime of devices. Mesitylene devices showed better reproducibility and shelf life up to 4000 h with PCE dropping by only 8% of its initial value.

  5. Extraction of hydrocarbons from microalga Botryococcus braunii with switchable solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorì, Chiara; Torri, Cristian; Samorì, Giulia; Fabbri, Daniele; Galletti, Paola; Guerrini, Franca; Pistocchi, Rossella; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    Lipid extraction is a critical step in the development of biofuels from microalgae. Here a new procedure was proposed to extract hydrocarbons from dried and water-suspended samples of the microalga Botryococcus braunii by using switchable-polarity solvents (SPS) based on 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) and an alcohol. The high affinity of the non-ionic form of DBU/alcohol SPS towards non-polar compounds was exploited to extract hydrocarbons from algae, while the ionic character of the DBU-alkyl carbonate form, obtained by the addition of CO(2), was used to recover hydrocarbons from the SPS. DBU/octanol and DBU/ethanol SPS were tested for the extraction efficiency of lipids from freeze-dried B. braunii samples and compared with n-hexane and chloroform/methanol. The DBU/octanol system was further evaluated for the extraction of hydrocarbons directly from algal culture samples. DBU/octanol exhibited the highest yields of extracted hydrocarbons from both freeze-dried and liquid algal samples (16% and 8.2% respectively against 7.8% and 5.6% with n-hexane).

  6. Phase Behavior of Light Gases in Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L., Jr.; Trvedi, N.J., Gao, W.

    1997-09-01

    Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, our solubility apparatus was refurbished and restored to full service. To test the experimental apparatus and procedures used, measurements were obtained for the solubility Of C0{sub 2} in benzene at 160{degrees}F. Having confirmed the accuracy of the newly acquired data in comparison with our previous measurements and data reported in the literature for this test system, we have begun to measure the solubility of hydrogen in hexane. The measurements

  7. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 21 280-290...

  8. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS IIMichael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  9. Extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and sediment : solvent selection and implications for sorption mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.T.O.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Soot contains high levels of toxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Extraction of PAHs from soot for quantitative analysis is difficult because the compounds are extremely tightly bound to the sorbent matrix. This study was designed to investigate the effect of solvent type

  10. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II DECHEMA; GREEN SOLVENTS FOR CATALYSIS - ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN REACTION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green catalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in alternative solvent systems generated by PARIS IIThomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez, Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Mar...

  11. Extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and sediment: solvent evaluation and implications for sorption mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Koelmans, Albert A

    2002-10-01

    Soot contains high levels of toxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Extraction of PAHs from soot for quantitative analysis is difficult because the compounds are extremely tightly bound to the sorbent matrix. This study was designed to investigate the effect of solvent type on PAH extraction yield, to identify the most optimal solvent for PAH extraction from soot, and to gain insight into the mechanism of PAH sorption to soot in aquatic environments. To that end, different types of soot as well as coal, charcoal, and sediments containing soot-like material were extracted with seven organic solvents. Large differences in extraction recoveries were observed among solvents, with relative values as low as 16% as compared to the best extracting solvent. These differences were much larger for soot than for sediments. Dichloromethane, which to date is the most widely used solvent for soot and sediment extractions, appeared to be the overall worst extractant, whereas toluene/methanol (1:6) gave the best results. Based on extraction yields and solvent properties, extraction of PAHs from soot was explained by a two-step mechanism involving swelling of the sorbent matrix and subsequent displacement of sorbates by solvent molecules. Due to the low displacement capacity of water, desorption of PAHs from soot in the aquatic environment will be strongly limited. Moreover, a certain fraction of the total PAH mass on soot is suggested to be physically entrapped, making it unavailable for partitioning to the aqueous phase.

  12. Methanogenic biodegradation of paraffinic solvent hydrocarbons in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-04-01

    Microbial communities drive many biogeochemical processes in oil sands tailings and cause greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Paraffinic solvent (primarily C5-C6; n- and iso-alkanes) is used by some oil sands companies to aid bitumen extraction from oil sands ores. Residues of unrecovered solvent escape to tailings ponds during tailings deposition and sustain microbial metabolism. To investigate biodegradation of hydrocarbons in paraffinic solvent, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL ponds were amended with paraffinic solvent at ~0.1wt% (final concentration: ~1000mgL(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ~1600d. Albian and CNRL MFTs exhibited ~400 and ~800d lag phases, respectively after which n-alkanes (n-pentane and n-hexane) in the solvent were preferentially metabolized to methane over iso-alkanes in both MFTs. Among iso-alkanes, only 2-methylpentane was completely biodegraded whereas 2-methylbutane and 3-methylpentane were partially biodegraded probably through cometabolism. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Anaerolineaceae and Methanosaetaceae in Albian MFT and Peptococcaceae and co-domination of "Candidatus Methanoregula" and Methanosaetaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively, during active biodegradation of paraffinic solvent. The results are important for developing future strategies for tailings reclamation and management of greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. A polyphasic approach for assessing the suitability of bioremediation for the treatment of hydrocarbon-impacted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetutu, Eric M; Smith, Renee J; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Mitchell, James G; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2013-04-15

    Bioremediation strategies, though widely used for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, suffer from lack of biodegradation endpoint accountability. To address this limitation, molecular approaches of alkB gene analysis and pyrosequencing were combined with chemical approaches of bioaccessibility and nutrient assays to assess contaminant degrading capacity and develop a strategy for endpoint biodegradation predictions. In long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil containing 10.3 g C10-C36 hydrocarbons kg(-1), 454 pyrosequencing detected the overrepresentation of potential hydrocarbon degrading genera such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Mycobacterium and Gordonia whilst amplicons for PCR-DGGE were detected only with alkB primers targeting Pseudomonas. This indicated the presence of potential microbial hydrocarbon degradation capacity in the soil. Using non-exhaustive extraction methods of 1-propanol and HP-β-CD for hydrocarbon bioaccessibility assessment combined with biodegradation endpoint predictions with linear regression models, we estimated 33.7% and 46.7% hydrocarbon removal respectively. These predictions were validated in pilot scale studies using an enhanced natural attenuation strategy which resulted in a 46.4% reduction in soil hydrocarbon content after 320 days. When predicted biodegradation endpoints were compared to measured values, there was no significant difference (P=0.80) when hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed with HP-β-CD. These results indicate that a combination of molecular and chemical techniques that inform microbial diversity, functionality and chemical bioaccessibility can be valuable tools for assessing the suitability of bioremediation strategies for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  14. Solvent effects on extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosol samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flasch Mira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in the ambient particulate matter pose one of the most important issues in the focus of environmental management. The concentration of their representative, Benzo(apyrene (BaP, undergoes limitations according to European Union directive. However, a successful control over the pollution levels and their sources is limited by the high uncertainty of analytical and statistical approaches used for their characterization. Here we compare differences in PAH concentrations related to the use of different solvents in the course of ultrasonic extraction of a certified reference material (PM10-like PAH mixture and filter samples of ambient particulate matter collected in Austria for the CG-MS PAH analysis. Using solvents of increasing polarity: Cyclohexane (0,006, Toluene (0,099, Dichloromethane (0,309, Acetone (0,43 and Acetonitrile (0,460, as well as mixtures of those, filters representing high and low concentrations of particulate matter were investigated. Although some scatter of the obtained concentrations was observed no trend related to the polarity of the solvent became visible. Regarding the reproducibility, which can be expected of PAH analysis no significant difference between the different solvents was determined. This result is valid for all compounds under investigation.

  15. Development of suitable solvent system for downstream processing of biopolymer pullulan using response surface methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Roy Choudhury

    Full Text Available Downstream processing is an important aspect of all biotechnological processes and has significant implications on quality and yield of the final product. Several solvents were examined for their efficacy on pullulan precipitation from fermentation broth. Interactions among four selected solvents and their effect on pullulan yield were studied using response surface methodology. A polynomial model was developed using D-optimal design and three contour plots were generated by performing 20 different experiments and the model was validated by performing optimization experiments. The results indicated that lower concentration of ethanol in combination with the other three solvents has resulted in higher yield of polymer from fermentation broth and the optimized solvent system was able to recover 1.44 times more pullulan as compared to the conventional ethanolic precipitation method. These observations may help in enhancing efficiency of pullulan recovery from fermentation broth and also result in reduced cost of production for the final product.

  16. Influence of soil and hydrocarbon properties on the solvent extraction of high-concentration weathered petroleum from contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Hong; Hua, Zhengtao; Li, Xingang; Li, Hong; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum ether was used to extract petroleum hydrocarbons from soils collected from six oil fields with different history of exploratory and contamination. It was capable of fast removing 76-94 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbons including 25 alkanes (C11-C35) and 16 US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soils at room temperature. The partial least squares analysis indicated that the solvent extraction efficiencies were positively correlated with soil organic matter, cation exchange capacity, moisture, pH, and sand content of soils, while negative effects were observed in the properties reflecting the molecular size (e.g., molecular weight and number of carbon atoms) and hydrophobicity (e.g., water solubility, octanol-water partition coefficient, soil organic carbon partition coefficient) of hydrocarbons. The high concentration of weathered crude oil at the order of 10(5) mg kg(-1) in this study was demonstrated adverse for solvent extraction by providing an obvious nonaqueous phase liquid phase for hydrocarbon sinking and increasing the sequestration of soluble hydrocarbons in the insoluble oil fractions during weathering. A full picture of the mass distribution and transport mechanism of petroleum contaminants in soils will ultimately require a variety of studies to gain insights into the dynamic interactions between environmental indicator hydrocarbons and their host oil matrix.

  17. Solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Hamida Y. Mostafa; Ebaa A. El-Shamy; Amal S. Farag; Nadia G. Kandile

    2013-01-01

    Neat ethylacetoacetate (EAA) and its mixtures with a co-solvent and an anti-solvent have been studied for refining of heavy wax distillate fraction to produce substantially non-carcinogenic base oil. The co-solvent and anti-solvent used are dipropylene glycol (DPG) and ethylene glycol (EG) respectively. The solubility characteristics of the main solvent and its mixed solvent systems were studied. Selection of the optimum solvent mixture and extraction variables has been studied. The effect of...

  18. Model studies for evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of complex hydrocarbon solvents. I. Validation of methods with ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKee, R.H.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Hoogendijk, E.M.G.; Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Barsotti, D.A.; Owen, D.E.; Kulig, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    As a preliminary step to evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of hydrocarbon solvents and to establish a working model for extrapolating animal test data to humans, joint neurobehavioral/toxicokinetic studies were conducted which involved administering ethanol to rats and volunteers. The spe

  19. Microbial diversity in a hydrocarbon- and chlorinated-solvent- contaminated aquifer undergoing intrinsic bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojka, M.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Haack, S.K.; Pace, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons (mainly jet fuel) and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific primers and were cloned. A total of 812 clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), approximately 50% of which were unique. All RFLP types that occurred more than once in the libraries, as well as many of the unique types, were sequenced. A total of 104 (94 bacterial and 10 archaeal) sequence types were determined. Of the 94 bacterial sequence types, 10 have no phylogenetic association with known taxonomic divisions and are phylogenetically grouped in six novel division level groups (candidate divisions WS1 to WS6); 21 belong to four recently described candidate divisions with no cultivated representatives (OPS, OP8, OP10, and OP11); and 63 are phylogenetically associated with 10 well-recognized divisions. The physiology of two particularly abundant sequence types obtained from the methanogenic zone could be inferred from their phylogenetic association with groups of microorganisms with a consistent phenotype. One of these sequence types is associated with the genus Syntrophus; Syntrophus spp. produce energy from the anaerobic oxidation of organic acids, with the production of acetate and hydrogen. The organism represented by the other sequence type is closely related to Methanosaeta spp., which are known to be capable of energy generation only through aceticlastic methanogenesis. We hypothesize, therefore, that the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation in the methanogenic zone of the aquifer is aceticlastic methanogenesis and

  20. Nanostructured alkyl carboxylic acid-based restricted access solvents: Application to the combined microextraction and cleanup of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Casero, N; Çabuk, H; Martínez-Sagarra, G; Devesa, J A; Rubio, S

    2015-08-26

    Alkyl carboxylic acid-based nanostructured solvents, synthesized in mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water through self-assembly and coacervation, were proved to behave as restricted access liquids. Both physical and chemical mechanisms were found responsible for exclusion of macromolecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The potential of these solvents for extracting small molecules from complex solid samples, without interference from large biomolecules, was here evaluated. For this purpose, they were applied to the extraction of 14 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from mosses prior to their separation by liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Sample treatment involved the vortex shaking of 200 mg of moss with 200 μL of decanoic acid-based solvent for 5 min, subsequent centrifugation for 8 min and analysis of the extract by LC-FLD using external calibration. Proteins precipitated during extraction because of both the decrease of the dielectric constant of the solution caused by THF and the formation of macromolecular complexes with decanoic acid. Polysaccharides were not solubilized in the aqueous cavities of the solvent because of their size exclusion. In-house method validation was performed according to the recommendations of the European Commission Decision 202/657/EC. Method detection and quantification limits for the different PAHs were in the ranges 0.04-0.24 and 0.14-0.80 μg kg(-1), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of different moss species collected in both polluted and unpolluted sites in the South of Spain. Recoveries were within the range 71-110%. The results obtained show that solvents with restricted access properties have the potential to expand the scope of application of restricted access materials to areas other than biological fluids because of their suitability to combine analyte isolation and sample cleanup of solid samples in a single step.

  1. The doping effect of fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbon solvents on the performance of common olefin metathesis catalysts: application in the preparation of biologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samojłowicz, Cezary; Bieniek, Michał; Zarecki, Andrzej; Kadyrov, Renat; Grela, Karol

    2008-12-21

    Aromatic fluorinated hydrocarbons, used as solvents for olefin metathesis reactions, catalysed by standard commercially available Ru precatalysts, allow substantially higher yields to be obtained, especially of challenging substrates, including natural and biologically active compounds.

  2. Solvent-extractable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar: influence of pyrolysis temperature and feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Kleber, Markus; Sparrow, Margaret A; Simoneit, Bernd R T; Prahl, Fredrick G

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increasing agricultural use of biochar as a way of combining the utilization of biomass for energy production with the removal of CO(2) from the atmosphere, it is not known how variations in pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type affect concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that inevitably form and associate with biochar. To close this knowledge gap, we quantified 11 unsubstituted three- to five-ring PAHs as well as alkylated forms of phenanthrene and anthracene in grass and wood chars produced in 100 °C increments across a temperature range (100 to 700 °C). Our results show that solvent-extractable PAH concentrations in biochars produced at heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) of 400 and 500 °C greatly exceed those observed at higher and lower temperature, supporting a low HTT solid-phase formation mechanism operable at temperatures commonly used for industrial biochar production. The maximum extractable yield of 'pyrolytic' unsubstituted PAHs for grass (22 μg g(-1) at HTT = 500 °C) greatly exceeds the value for wood (5.9 μg g(-1)). Moreover, PAH signatures (e.g., total monomethylphenanthrene to phenanthrene ratios, MP/P ~2-3) at intermediate temperatures (400 °C) resemble those of fossil oils rather than that commonly attributed to pyrolytic products. Further research is needed to characterize the PAH evolution in modern pyrolysis reactors and assess the fate of biochar-bound PAHs in soils and sediments. Various commonly applied PAH ratios and indicator compounds show promise as markers for specific feedstock materials and pyrolysis conditions of biochars in environmental systems.

  3. Suitability of the hydrocarbon-hydroxylating molybdenum-enzyme ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for industrial chiral alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataruch, M; Heider, J; Bryjak, J; Nowak, P; Knack, D; Czerniak, A; Liesiene, J; Szaleniec, M

    2014-12-20

    The molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) was successfully applied to catalyze enantiospecific hydroxylation of alkylaromatic and alkylheterocyclic compounds. The optimization of the synthetic procedure involves use of the enzyme in a crude purification state that saves significant preparation effort and is more stable than purified EbDH without exhibiting unwanted side reactions. Moreover, immobilization of the enzyme on a crystalline cellulose support and changes in reaction conditions were introduced in order to increase the amounts of product formed (anaerobic atmosphere, electrochemical electron acceptor recycling or utilization of ferricyanide as alternative electron acceptor in high concentrations). We report here on an extension of effective enzyme activity from 4h to more than 10 days and final product yields of up to 0.4-0.5g/l, which represent a decent starting point for further optimization. Therefore, we expect that the hydrocarbon-hydroxylation capabilities of EbDH may be developed into a new process of industrial production of chiral alcohols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Suitability of Scirpus maritimus for petroleum hydrocarbons remediation in a refinery environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, M Nazaré P F S; Basto, M Clara P; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2012-01-01

    In the ambit of a project searching for appropriate biological approaches for recovering a refinery soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), we compared results obtained in the absence and in the presence of the salt marsh plant Scirpus maritimus or Juncus maritimus or an association of these two plants, which were tested in the refinery environment. Synergistic effects caused by addition of a non-ionic surfactant and/or a bioaugmentation product were also investigated. Major challenges of this study were: field conditions and weathered contamination. Transplants of the plants were carried out in individual containers filled with a weathered contaminated soil, which was recontaminated with turbine oil with two purposes: for increasing PHC level and allowing a comparison of the potential of plants for remediation of ancient and recent contamination. Analysis of total PHC led to the conclusion that, after 24-month exposure, neither J. maritimus nor the association caused any improvement in remediation. In contrast, S. maritimus revealed potential for PHC remediation, favoring degradation of both recent and older contamination (which was refractory to natural attenuation). About 15% of remediation improvement was found in the soil layer with higher root density (5-10 cm). A more marked improvement in that layer (28%) was observed when non-ionic surfactant amendment and bioaugmentation were used jointly. The fact that S. maritimus has demonstrated capability for PHC remediation, leads to admit that it has potential to be also used for recovering sediments that have suffered accidental oil spills.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soils: Comparison between Reflectance Spectroscopy and Solvent Extraction by 3 Certified Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH in soil, EPA method 418.1, is usually based on extraction with 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113 and FTIR spectroscopy of the extracted solvent. This method is widely used for initial site investigation, due to the relative low price per sample. It is known that the extraction efficiency varies depending on the extracting solvent and other sample properties. This study’s main goal was to evaluate reflectance spectroscopy as a tool for TPH assessment, as compared with three commercial certified laboratories using traditional methods. Large variations were found between the results of the three commercial laboratories, both internally (average deviation up to 20%, and between laboratories (average deviation up to 103%. Reflectance spectroscopy method was found be as good as the commercial laboratories in terms of accuracy and could be a viable field-screening tool that is rapid, environmental friendly, and cost effective.

  6. Investigation of ethyl lactate as a green solvent for desorption of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian Ahmadkalaei, Seyedeh Pegah; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Abdul Talib, Suhaimi

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of oil-contaminated soil is a major environmental concern worldwide. The aim of this study is to examine the applicability of a green solvent, ethyl lactate (EL), in desorption of diesel aliphatic fraction within total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in contaminated soil and to determine the associated desorption kinetics. Batch desorption experiments were carried out on artificially contaminated soil at different EL solvent percentages (%). In analysing the diesel range of TPH, TPH was divided into three fractions and the effect of solvent extraction on each fraction was examined. The experimental results demonstrated that EL has a high and fast desorbing power. Pseudo-second order rate equation described the experimental desorption kinetics data well with correlation coefficient values, R (2), between 0.9219 and 0.9999. The effects of EL percentage, initial contamination level of soil and liquid to solid ratio (L/S (v/w)) on initial desorption rate have also been evaluated. The effective desorption performance of ethyl lactate shows its potential as a removal agent for remediation of TPH-contaminated soil worldwide.

  7. DETERMINATION OF SOLID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIA DATA FOR MIXTURES OF HEAVY HYDROCARBONS IN A LIGHT SOLVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.V. Hanson; J.V. Fletcher; Karthik R.

    2003-06-01

    A methodology was developed using an FT-IR spectroscopic technique to obtain solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) data for mixtures of heavy hydrocarbons in significantly lighter hydrocarbon diluents. SLE was examined in multiple Model Oils that were assembled to simulate waxes. The various Model oils were comprised of C-30 to C-44 hydrocarbons in decane. The FT-IR technique was used to identify the wax precipitation temperature (WPT). The DSC technique was also used in the identification of the onset of the two-phase equilibrium in this work. An additional Model oil made up of C-20 to C-30 hydrocarbons in decane was studied using the DSC experiment. The weight percent solid below the WPT was calculated using the FT-IR experimental results. The WPT and the weight percent solid below the WPT were predicted using an activity coefficient based thermodynamic model. The FT-IR spectroscopy method is found to successfully provide SLE data and also has several advantages over other laboratory-based methods.

  8. Geochemical markers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvent extracts from diesel engine particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiańska, Monika; Kozielska, Barbara; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Woodburn, Joseph; Konieczyński, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exhaust particulate from compression ignition (CI) engines running on engine and chassis dynamometers was studied. Particulate dichloromethane extracts were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomarkers by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). PAH group profiles were made and the PAH group shares according to the number of rings (2 or 3; 4; 5 or more) as well as diagnostic indices were calculated. Values of geochemical ratios of selected biomarkers and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons were compared with literature values. A geochemical interpretation was carried out using these values and biomarker and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbon distributions. It has been shown that geochemical features are unequivocally connected to the emission of fossil fuels and biofuels burned in CI engines. The effect of the exothermic combustion process is limited to low-molecular-weight compounds, which shows that the applied methodology permits source identification of PAHs coexisting in the particulate emitted.

  9. The use of solvent extractions and solubility theory to discern hydrocarbon associations in coal, with application to the coal-supercritical CO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolak, Jonathan J.; Burruss, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of three high volatile bituminous coals were subjected to parallel sets of extractions involving solvents dichloromethane (DCM), carbon disulfide (CS2), and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) (40 °C, 100 bar) to study processes affecting coal–solvent interactions. Recoveries of perdeuterated surrogate compounds, n-hexadecane-d34 and four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), added as a spike prior to extraction, provided further insight into these processes. Soxhlet-DCM and Soxhlet-CS2 extractions yielded similar amounts of extractable organic matter (EOM) and distributions of individual hydrocarbons. Supercritical CO2 extractions (40 °C, 100 bar) yielded approximately an order of magnitude less EOM. Hydrocarbon distributions in supercritical CO2 extracts generally mimicked distributions from the other solvent extracts, albeit at lower concentrations. This disparity increased with increasing molecular weight of target hydrocarbons. Five- and six-ring ring PAHs generally were not detected and no asphaltenes were recovered in supercritical CO2 extractions conducted at 40 °C and 100 bar. Supercritical CO2 extraction at elevated temperature (115 °C) enhanced recovery of four-ring and five-ring PAHs, dibenzothiophene (DBT), and perdeuterated PAH surrogate compounds. These results are only partially explained through comparison with previous measurements of hydrocarbon solubility in supercritical CO2. Similarly, an evaluation of extraction results in conjunction with solubility theory (Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters) does not fully account for the hydrocarbon distributions observed among the solvent extracts. Coal composition (maceral content) did not appear to affect surrogate recovery during CS2 and DCM extractions but might affect supercritical CO2 extractions, which revealed substantive uptake (partitioning) of PAH surrogates into the coal samples. This uptake was greatest in the sample (IN-1) with the highest vitrinite content. These

  10. Influence of Solvent-Like Sidechains on the Adsorption of Light Hydrocarbons in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, Andreas; Bloch, Eric D; Henke, Sebastian; Llewellyn, Philip L; Long, Jeffrey R; Fischer, Roland A

    2015-12-14

    A variety of strategies have been developed to adsorb and separate light hydrocarbons in metal-organic frameworks. Here, we present a new approach in which the pores of a framework are lined with four different C3 sidechains that feature various degrees of branching and saturation. These pendant groups, which essentially mimic a low-density solvent with restricted degrees of freedom, offer tunable control of dispersive host-guest interactions. The performance of a series of frameworks of the type Zn2 (fu-bdc)2 (dabco) (fu-bdc(2-) =functionalized 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate; dabco=1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), which feature a pillared layer structure, were investigated for the adsorption and separation of methane, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene. The four frameworks exhibit low methane uptake, whereas C2 hydrocarbon uptake is substantially higher as a result of the enhanced interaction of these molecules with the ligand sidechains. Most significantly, the adsorption quantities and selectivity were found to depend strongly upon the type of sidechains attached to the framework scaffold.

  11. Extraction of lignite coal fly ash for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons: modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction, enhanced-fluidity solvents, and accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, D V; Olesik, S V

    1998-02-01

    A comparison among modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), enhanced-fluidity liquid extraction, and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) techniques was made for the extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aged, spiked lignite coal fly ash. All of the attempted extraction conditions allowed the extraction of the PAHs to some degree, but no single extraction technique proved to be superior for all of the PAHs used. Three groups of PAHs with similar extraction efficiencies were identified. The group with the lowest molecular weights was best recovered using a 90% CO2-10% methanol mixture at 70 degrees C and 238 atm. The group of medium-molecular-weight PAHs was recovered equally well using any of three extraction conditions: SFE (100% CO2, 90 degrees C, and 238 atm), enhanced-fluidity liquid mixture (60% CO2-40% methanol, 70 degrees C, and 238 atm), and a methanol ASE mixture. The group of high-molecular-weight PAHs seemed to be equally well recovered with all of the attempted extraction conditions, but the enhanced-fluidity conditions (60% CO2-40% methanol, 70 degrees C, and 238 atm) had extraction recoveries (> 85%) with the lowest standard deviations (approximately 5%).

  12. Extraction of bituminous coal fly ash for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons: evaluation of modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction, enhanced fluidity solvents, and accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, D V; Olesik, S V

    1998-02-01

    A comparison among supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), modified SFE, enhanced-fluidity extraction, and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) techniques was made for the extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aged, spiked bituminous coal fly ash. Non-ASE extraction techniques used in this study could not recover PAHs with molecular weights greater than that of pyrene. ASE techniques using methylene chloride (with and without a static step) and toluene were able to recover most of the PAHs studied. None of the ASE techniques could quantitatively extract the low-molecular-weight PAHs from the bituminous fly ash. The medium-molecular-weight PAHs were best recovered with toluene ASE. The high-molecular-weight PAHs were best recovered with the toluene ASE technique (> 80%), but the overall precision of these measurements was low. Methylene chloride ASE with a static step recovered the high-molecular-weight PAHs with the next highest efficiency (approximately 55%) and had standard deviations less than 10% (longer extraction times [> 30 min] with the methylene chloride would increase the recoveries of these analytes.) A comparison of the results from this study with those of a previous study using lignite coal fly ash illustrates the difficulty in developing and adapting analyte-specific extraction methods for analytes that are adsorbed on different matrices.

  13. Determination of solubility parameters and thermodynamic properties in hydrocarbon-solvent systems by gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Díaz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography used to calculate the specific retention volume of several hydrocarbons in different chromatographic liquid phases (Squalane, Carbowax-400, Carbowax-1500, Carbowax-4000, Amine-220, Dinonyl phthalate, Tributyl phosphate and Trixylenyl phosphate. Some thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy of sorption and Flory-Huggins parameters relating the interaction between liquid phases and solutes, were also calculated from the determined retention volumes. Liquid phase solubility parameters of Squalane, Carbowax-400, Carbowax-1500 and Carbowax-4000 at 80 ºC as well as the polar and apolar components were calculated too. A new model was proposed to correlate polar contribution to the solubility parameter of a liquid phase with the specific retention volume of a solute in this liquid phase.

  14. Monitoring the effect of poplar trees on petroleum-hydrocarbon and chlorinated-solvent contaminated ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    At contaminated groundwater sites, poplar trees can be used to affect groundwater levels, flow directions, and ultimately total groundwater and contaminant flux to areas downgradient of the trees. The magnitude of the hydrologic changes can be monitored using fundamental concepts of groundwater hydrology, in addition to plant physiology-based approaches, and can be viewed as being almost independent of the contaminant released. The affect of poplar trees on the fate of groundwater contaminants, however, is contaminant dependent. Some petroleum hydrocarbons or chlorinated solvents may be mineralized or transformed to innocuous compounds by rhizospheric bacteria associated with the tree roots, mineralized or transformed by plant tissues in the transpiration stream or leaves after uptake, or passively volatilized and rapidly dispersed or oxidized in the atmosphere. These processes also can be monitored using a combination of physiological- or geochemical-based field or laboratory approaches. When combined, such hydrologic and contaminant monitoring approaches can result in a more accurate assessment of the use of poplar trees to meet regulatory goals at contaminated groundwater sites, verify that these goals continue to be met in the future, and ultimately lead to a consensus on how the performance of plant-based remedial strategies (phytoremediation) is to be assessed.

  15. Accelerated solvent extraction method for the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cocoa beans by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Renata França Cassimiro; Figueiredo, Júlia Pereira; Nunes, Carolina Mariana; Pissinatti, Rafael; Souza, Scheilla Vitorino Carvalho de; Junqueira, Roberto Gonçalves

    2017-05-15

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) procedure for use with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was optimized for the determination of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cocoa beans. Plackett-Burman and rotatable central composite design (RCCD) indicated that three variables affected the recoveries of PAHs during the extraction and purification steps: agitation time in the second liquid-liquid partition, weight of silica gel in the column, and volume of hexane for PAH elution from the column. After obtaining the optimal conditions, a single laboratory method validation was performed. Linearity was demonstrated for benzo[a]pyrene in the concentration range from 0.5 to 8.0mgkg(-1) of sample, corresponding to 1.25-20.0μgkg(-1) of cocoa on a fat basis. For the other analytes, linearity was observed from 0.75 to 8.0μgkg(-1) of sample (1.88-20.0μgkg(-1) of cocoa on a fat basis). Significant matrix effects were found for chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene. The precision of the method was verified with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 2.57 to 14.13% and from 4.36 to 19.77% under repeatability and intermediate precision conditions, respectively. The average recoveries of the eight PAHs ranged from 74.99 to 109.73%. These parameters, limits and measurement uncertainties met the performance criteria established by European Union regulations, except for the theoretical limit of detection for chrysene. The method was applied to the analysis of samples of Brazilian cocoa beans, and only one sample was found to have a PAH content above the maximum limit defined by the European Union legislation. This optimized and validated method is intended to be used as part of the official Brazilian monitoring programs investigating contaminants and residues in food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Trichoderma longibrachiatum Evx1 is a fungal biocatalyst suitable for the remediation of soils contaminated with diesel fuel and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreolli, Marco; Lampis, Silvia; Brignoli, Pierlorenzo; Vallini, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Trichoderma sp. strain Evx1 was isolated from a semi-deciduous forest soil in Southern Italy. It decolorizes polynuclear organic dyes and tolerates high concentrations of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. The ability of this ascomycete fungus to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was verified in vitro and confirmed by its strong phenoloxidase activity in the presence of gallic acid. Phylogenetic characterization of Trichoderma sp. Evx1 positioned this strain within the species Trichoderma longibrachiatum. The potential use of this species for the bioremediation of contaminated environmental matrices was tested by inoculating diesel-spiked soil with a dense mycelial suspension. The biodegradation percentage of the C12-40 hydrocarbon fraction in the inoculated soil rose to 54.2 ± 1.6 %, much higher than that in non-inoculated soil or soil managed solely by a combination of watering and aeration. The survival and persistence of T. longibrachiatum Evx1 throughout the bioremediation trial was monitored by PCR-DGGE analysis. The fungal strain was still present in the soil 30 days after bioaugmentation. These findings indicate that T. longibrachiatum Evx1 may be a suitable inoculum in bioremediation protocols for the reclamation of soils contaminated by complex mixtures of hydrocarbons.

  17. Indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents by salting-out effect for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshfar, Ali; Khezeli, Tahere

    2014-12-01

    A simple and low-cost method that indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents (ISDME) by salting-out effect before high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different samples. The ISDME is a combination of salting-out extraction of water-miscible organic solvent and directly suspended droplet microextraction (DSDME). Ninety-five microliters water-miscible organic solvent (1-propanol) was added to a 500-µL sample. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. To produce a steady vortex at the top of the solution, the sample was agitated at 700 rpm using a magnetic stirrer. By the addition of ammonium sulfate (saturated solution) to the homogeneous solution, 1-propanol was separated and collected at the bottom of the steady vortex. Finally, 20 µL 1-propanol was injected into HPLC-UV. The effects of important parameters such as water-miscible organic solvent (type and volume), type of salt, and extraction time were evaluated. Under optimum conditions, the method has a good linear calibration range (0.1 µg/L-300 µg/L), coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.998), low limits of detection (between 0.02 µg/L and 0.27 µg/L), and acceptable recovery (>85.0%).

  18. Determining the better solvent and time for extracting soil by soxhlet in TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon) gravimetric method; A determinacao de qual o melhor solvente e o melhor tempo de extracao de sedimento em aparato Soxhlet na metodologia do TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon) gravimetrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Renato S.; Lima, Guilherme; Baisch, Paulo R. [Fundacao Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    There are several methods of TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminants in sediment. The TPH gravimetric has been widely used in many studies and in oil spill monitoring case. The present work examined three different solvents (DCM, DCM/N-HEX and N-HEX), in three different times, to the purpose to optimize the contaminants extraction using USEPA 9071 and 3540 reference method. Then was realized analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) for monitoring the reproducible extracts. The sediments used in this experiment was collected in the Cavalos Island, localized in the city of Rio Grande, RS-Brasil. The sediment was 'washed' and after then contaminated with petroleum. The extracts were realized in Soxhlet apparatus, in three different times (4, 8 and 12 hours), and TOC analysis were realized before and after the extraction. The result demonstrated that eight hours with DCM/N-HEX solvent is more indicated for TPH gravimetric in sediment analysis with high concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons. TOC analysis demonstrated inappropriate for monitoring extract reproducibility. (author)

  19. Extraction of S- and N-Compounds from the Mixture of Hydrocarbons by Ionic Liquids as Selective Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Gabrić; Aleksandra Sander; Marina Cvjetko Bubalo; Dejan Macut

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is an alternative method that can be used for desulfurization and denitrification of gasoline and diesel fuels. Recent approaches employ different ionic liquids as selective solvents, due to their general immiscibility with gasoline and diesel, negligible vapor pressure, and high selectivity to sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. For that reason, five imidazolium-based ionic liquids and one pyridinium-based ionic liquid were selected for extraction of thiophene...

  20. Extraction of S- and N-compounds from the mixture of hydrocarbons by ionic liquids as selective solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrić, Beata; Sander, Aleksandra; Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Macut, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is an alternative method that can be used for desulfurization and denitrification of gasoline and diesel fuels. Recent approaches employ different ionic liquids as selective solvents, due to their general immiscibility with gasoline and diesel, negligible vapor pressure, and high selectivity to sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. For that reason, five imidazolium-based ionic liquids and one pyridinium-based ionic liquid were selected for extraction of thiophene, dibenzothiophene, and pyridine from two model solutions. The influences of hydrodynamic conditions, mass ratio, and number of stages were investigated. Increasing the mass ratio of ionic liquid/model fuel and multistage extraction promotes the desulfurization and denitrification abilities of the examined ionic liquids. All selected ionic liquids can be reused and regenerated by means of vacuum evaporation.

  1. Separation and identification of hydrocarbons and other volatile compounds from cultures of Aspergillus niger by GC–MS using two different capillary columns and solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiquzzaman Siddiquee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple, fast, repeatable, and less laborious sample-preparation protocol based on gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was developed and applied for the analysis of bioactive compounds derived from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger strain SS10. The match factors for the spectra of the samples with reference to the mass-spectral library of fungal volatile compounds were determined and used to study the complex hydrocarbons and other volatile compounds that were separated using two different capillary columns and nonpolar and medium-polar stationary phases. More than 295 volatile compounds (spectral match factor of at least 90%, such as normal saturated hydrocarbons (C7–C30, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, fatty acids, alcohols, esters, sulfur- and bromo-containing compounds, simple pyrane, and benzene derivatives, were identified. Most of these compounds have not been reported earlier. The method described in this article is a suitable research tool for the determination of volatile compounds from the cultures of A. niger.

  2. Experimental neurotoxicity and urinary metabolites of the C5-C7 aliphatic hydrocarbons used as glue solvents in shoe manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, N; Amantini, M C; Spagnolo, A; Guarcini, A M; Saltari, M C; Brugnone, F; Perbellini, L

    1981-12-01

    Rats were intermittently exposed (9 to 10 h/d, 5 to 6 d/week) to controlled concentrations of single analytical grad solvents in ambient air. After periods ranging from 7 to 30 weeks the animals were perfused with glutaraldehyde and samples of nerves were processed for light microscopy of sections and of teased fibers. Animals treated with n-hexane at 5000 ppm (14 weeks) or 2500 ppm (30 weeks) developed the typical giant axonal degeneration already described in rats treated continuously with 400 to 600 ppm of the same solvent for 7 weeks or more. No such alterations were found in rats subjected to the following intermittent respiratory treatments: n-hexane 500 ppm (30 weeks) or 1500 ppm (14 weeks), cyclohexane 1500 or 2500 (30 weeks), n-pentane 3000 ppm (30 weeks), n-heptane 1500 ppm (30 weeks), 2-methylpentane 1500 ppm (14 weeks), and 3-methylpentane 1500 ppm (14 weeks). The following metabolites were found in the urine of rats according to treatment (in parenthesis): 2-methyl-2-pentanol (2-methylpentane); 3-methyl-2-pentanol and 3-methyl-3-pentanol (3-methylpentane), 2-hexanol, 3-hexanol, gamma-valerolactone, 2,5-dimethylfuran, and 2,5-hexanedione (n-hexane). 2-Hexanol was found to be the main urinary metabolite of n-hexane, while 2,5-hexanedione was present only in a lesser proportion. This feature of rat metabolism suggests that in this species 2,5-hexanedione reaches an effective level at its site of action during intermittent respiratory treatment with n-hexane with difficulty and explains the high concentrations necessary to cause polyneuropathy in rats subjected to this treatment.

  3. Semiautomatic sequential extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elemental bio-accessible fraction by accelerated solvent extraction on a single particulate matter sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Di Filippo, Patrizia; Gentili, Alessandra; Canepari, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    We describe the optimization and validation of a sequential extractive method for the determination of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V and Zn) that are chemically fractionated into bio-accessible and mineralized residual fractions on a single particulate matter filter. The extraction is performed by automatic accelerated solvent extraction (ASE); samples are sequentially treated with dichloromethane/acetone (4:1) for PAHs extraction and acetate buffer (0.01M; pH 4.5) for elements extraction (bio-accessible fraction). The remaining solid sample is then collected and subjected to acid digestion with HNO3:H2O2 (2:1) to determine the mineralized residual element fraction. We also describe a homemade ASE cell that reduces the blank values for most elements; in this cell, the steel frit was replaced by a Teflon pierced disk and a Teflon cylinder was used as the filler. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in terms of recovery from standard reference material (SRM 1648 and SRM 1649a) and repeatability. The equivalence between the new ASE method and conventional methods was verified for PAHs and for bio-accessible and mineralized residual fractions of elements on PM10 twin filters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological Treatment of Solvent-Based Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    solvent. In addition, hydrocarbon mixtures, aromatic hydrocarbon, and Medium Aliphatic Solvent Naphtha are descriptors used by the manufactures to...Enamel Aromatic Hydrocarbon 14 Mineral Spirits 10 Naphtha 10 Ethyl Benzene 0.21 Xylene 1.0 Sherwin Williams Co Enamel Mineral Spirits 49...Solvent Naphtha 31.5 Non-hazardous Ingredients 68 Parker Paints Enamel Mineral Spirits 17 Naphtha 7 Aromatic Hydrocarbons 3 1,2,4

  5. Solvent-shift strategy to identify suitable polymers to inhibit humidity-induced solid-state crystallization of lacidipine amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengchi; Wu, Chunnuan; Fu, Qiang; Di, Donghua; Kuang, Xiao; Wang, Chao; He, Zhonggui; Wang, Jian; Sun, Jin

    2016-04-30

    The solvent-shift strategy was used to identify appropriate polymers that inhibit humidity-induced solid-state crystallization of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). Lacidipine with the polymers, PVP-K30, HPMC-E5 or Soluplus, were combined to form amorphous solid dispersions prepared by solvent evaporation. The formulations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and were subjected to in vitro dissolution testing. The moisture had a significant impact on the amount dissolved for the solid dispersions. Molecular docking studies established that hydrogen bonding was critical for the stabilization of the solid dispersions. The rank order of the binding energy of the drug-polymer association was Soluplus (-6.21 kcal/mol)>HPMC-E5 (-3.21 kcal/mol)>PVP-K30 (-2.31 kcal/mol). PVP-K30 had the highest water uptake among the polymers, as did ASD system of lacidipine-PVP-K30 ASDs. In the Soluplus ASDs, with its strong drug-polymer interactions and low water uptake, moisture-induced solid-state crystallization was not observed.

  6. Contact solid-phase microextraction with uncoated glass and polydimethylsiloxane-coated fibers versus solvent sampling for the determination of hydrocarbons in adhesion secretions of Madagascar hissing cockroaches Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Blattodea) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Molecular profiles of adhesion secretions of Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Madagascar hissing cockroach, Blattodea) were investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with particular focus on a comprehensive analysis of linear and branched hydrocarbons. For this purpose, secretions from the tarsi (feet), possibly contributing to adhesion on smooth surfaces, and control samples taken from the tibiae (lower legs), which contain general cuticular hydrocarbons that are supposed to be not involved in the biological adhesion function, were analyzed and their molecular fingerprints compared. A major analytical difficulty in such a study constitutes the representative, spatially controlled, precise and reproducible sampling from a living insect as well as the minute quantities of insect secretions on both tarsi and tibiae. Thus, three different in vivo sampling methods were compared in terms of sampling reproducibility and extraction efficiency by replicate measurement of samples from tarsi and tibiae. While contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber showed higher peak intensities, a self-made uncoated glass fiber had the best repeatability in contact-SPME sampling. Chromatographic profiles of these two contact-SPME sampling methods were statistically not significantly different. Inter-individual variances were larger than potentially existing minor differences in molecular patterns of distinct sampling methods. Sampling by solvent extraction was time consuming, showed lower sensitivities and was less reproducible. In general, sampling by contact-SPME with a cheap glass fiber turned out to be a viable alternative to PDMS-SPME sampling. Hydrocarbon patterns of the tarsal adhesion secretions were qualitatively similar to those of epicuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the tibiae. However, hydrocarbons were in general less abundant in tarsal secretions than secretions from tibiae.

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Mineral Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons...

  8. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  9. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  10. Fatty acid alkyl esters as solvents: An evaluation of the kauri-butanol value. Comparison to hydrocarbons, dimethyl diesters and other oxygenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, most commonly methyl esters, of vegetable oils or animal fats or other lipid feedstocks have found increasing use as an alternative diesel fuel known as biodiesel. However, biodiesel also has good solvent properties, a feature rendered additionally attractive by its biodegradability, low tox...

  11. Avaliação de solventes de extração por ultrassom usando-se cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência para a determinação de hidrocarbonetos policíclicos aromáticos em solos contaminados Evaluation of solvent extraction by ultrasound by using high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Aparecida Oliveira Cotta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A method using ultrasonication extraction for the determination of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, selected by the USEPA and NIOSH as "consent decree" priority pollutants, in soil by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC was studied. Separation and detection were completed in 20 min with a C18 columm, acetonitrile-water gradient elution and ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence detections. The detection limits, for a 10 µL of solution injection, were less than 9,917 ng/g in UV detection and less than 1,866 ng/g in fluorescence detection. Several organic solvents were tested for extraction of the 17 PAHs from soils. Acetone was the best solvent among the three solvents tested, and the order of the extraction efficiencies was: acetone>methanol>acetonitrile. Ultrasonication using acetone as solvent extraction was used to evaluate the biodegradation of those compounds in contaminated soil during a vermicomposting process.

  12. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  13. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Selection and evaluation of alternative solvents for caprolactam extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van Mathijs L.; Kuipers, Norbert J.M.; Haan, de André B.

    2006-01-01

    Because of the strict legislation for currently applied solvents in the industrial extraction of caprolactam, being benzene, toluene and chlorinated hydrocarbons, a need exists for alternative, environmentally benign solvents. An experimental screening procedure consisting of several steps was used

  15. Progress towards a process for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric cells using a deep eutectic solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R.StJ. Foreman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction experiments relating to the recycling of the transition metals and lanthanides in nickel metal hydride cells are presented. The metal extraction is occurring from a deep eutectic solvent which is formed from chemicals suitable for use in food and related products. While it has been shown that the water content of the DES has a large effect on the extraction of transition metals by a mixture of chloride ionic liquid (Aliquat 336 and an aromatic solvent, the water content has a smaller effect on the solvent extraction of lanthanides with a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl hydrogen phosphate (DEHPA in a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbon. This study suggests that an industrial scale solvent extraction process for the recycling of metals from nickel hydride electrical cells will be feasible.

  16. Heat-Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Chlorinated Solvents in Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-activated persulfate oxidative treatment of chlorinated organic solvents containing chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in soil was investigated with different persulfate dosages (20 g/L, 40 g/L, and 60 g/L and different temperatures (30°C, 40°C, and 50°C. Chlorinated organic solvents removal was increased as persulfate concentration increase. The persulfate dosage of 20 g/L with the highest OE (oxidant efficiency value was economically suitable for chlorinated organic solvents removal. The increasing temperature contributed to the increasing depletion of chlorinated organic solvents. Chlorinated ethenes were more easily removed than chlorinated ethanes. Moreover, the persulfate depletion followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics (kps=0.0292 [PS]0+0.0008, R2=0.9771. Heat-activated persulfate appeared to be an effective oxidant for treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  17. Method for analyzing solvent extracted sponge core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellington, W.E.; Calkin, C.L.

    1988-11-22

    For use in solvent extracted sponge core measurements of the oil saturation of earth formations, a method is described for quantifying the volume of oil in the fluids resulting from such extraction. The method consists of: (a) separating the solvent/oil mixture from the water in the extracted fluids, (b) distilling at least a portion of the solvent from the solvent/oil mixture substantially without co-distillation or loss of the light hydrocarbons in the mixture, (c) determining the volume contribution of the solvent remaining in the mixture, and (d) determining the volume of oil removed from the sponge by substracting the determined remaining solvent volume.

  18. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  19. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c E.g., Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Hydrocarbons...

  20. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  1. 基于轻质萃取剂的溶剂去乳化分散液-液微萃取-气相色谱法测定水样中多环芳烃%Low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝本琼; 陈浩; 李胜清

    2012-01-01

    A novel method of low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) was developed for the determination of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ( PAHs) in water samples by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Conventional DLLME methods usually employ organic solvents heavier than water as the extraction solvents and achieve the phase separation through centrifugation. On the contrary, in this proposed extraction procedure, a mixture of low-density extraction solvent (toluene) and dispersive solvent (acetone) was injected into the aqueous sample solution to form an emulsion. A demulsification solvent (acetonitrile) was then injected into the aqueous solution to break up the emulsion, which turned clear quickly and was separated into two layers. The upper layer (toluene) was collected and analyzed by GC. No centrifugation was required in this procedure. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of dispersive solvent, extraction solvent and de-emulsifier were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 20 - 500 μg/L (r2 = 0. 994 2 - 0. 999 9). The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were in the range of 0. 52 - 5. 11 μg/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the determination of 40 μg/LPAHs were in the range of 2. 2% - 13. 6% (n = 5). The proposed method is fast, efficient and convenient. It has been successfully applied to the determination of PAHs in natural water samples with the spiked recoveries of 80. 2% - 115. 1%.%以密度小于水的轻质溶剂为萃取剂,建立了无需离心步骤的溶剂去乳化分散液-液微萃取-气相色谱( SD-DLLME-GC)测定水样中多环芳烃的新方法.传统分散液-液微萃取技术一般采用密度大于水的有机溶剂为萃取剂,并需要通过离心步骤促进分相.而本方法以密度比水小的轻质溶剂

  2. Wet SiO{sub 2} As a Suitable Media for Fast and Efficient Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with NaBH{sub 3}CN under Solvent-Free and Acid-Free Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhkan, Mehri; Zeynizadeh, Behzad [Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Reduction of carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones, α,β-unsaturated enals and enones, α-diketones and acyloins was carried out readily with NaBH{sub 3}CN in the presence of wet SiO{sub 2} as a neutral media. The reactions were performed at solvent-free conditions in oil bath (70 - 80 .deg. C) or under microwave irradiation (240 W) to give the product alcohols in high to excellent yields. Regioselective 1,2-reduction of conjugated carbonyl compounds took place in a perfect selectivity without any side product formation.

  3. Improved efficiency of extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material Diesel Particulate Matter (SRM 2975) using accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala, Silvia; Ahmed, Trifa; Bergvall, Christoffer; Westerholm, Roger

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with molecular masses of 252, 276, 278, 300, and 302 Da from standard reference material diesel particulate matter (SRM 2975) has been investigated using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with dichloromethane, toluene, methanol, and mixtures of toluene and methanol. Extraction of SRM 2975 using toluene/methanol (9:1, v/v) at maximum instrumental settings (200 °C, 20.7 MPa, and five extraction cycles) with 30-min extraction times resulted in the following elevations of the measured concentration when compared with the certified and reference concentrations reported by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST): benzo[b]fluoranthene, 46%; benzo[k]fluoranthene, 137%; benzo[e]pyrene, 103%; benzo[a]pyrene, 1,570%; perylene, 37%; indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, 41%; benzo[ghi]perylene, 163%; and coronene, 361%. The concentrations of the following PAHs were comparable to the reference values assigned by NIST: indeno[1,2,3-cd]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, and picene. The measured concentration of dibenzo[a,e]-pyrene was lower than the information value reported by the NIST. The measured concentrations of other highly carcinogenic PAHs (dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene) in SRM 2975 are also reported. Comparison of measurements using the optimized ASE method and using similar conditions to those applied by the NIST for the assignment of PAH concentrations in SRM 2975 indicated that the higher values obtained in the present study were associated with more complete extraction of PAHs from the diesel particulate material. Re-extraction of the particulate samples demonstrated that the deuterated internal standards were more readily recovered than the native PAHs, which may explain the lower values reported by the NIST. The analytical results obtained in the study demonstrated that the efficient extraction of PAHs from SRM 2975 is a critical requirement for the

  4. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  5. Distribution of multi-component solvents in solvent vapor extraction chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Marathon Oil Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Vapex process performance is sensitive to operating pressures, temperatures and the types of solvent used. The hydrocarbon solvents used in Vapex processes typically have between 5 and 10 per cent hydrocarbon impurities, and the accumulation of dense phases inside the vapor chamber reduces gravity drainage potential. This study investigated the partitioning of solvent compounds inside the vapor chamber during in situ Vapex processes.The aim of the study was to examine how the different components of the mixed solvent partitioned inside the extracted chamber during the oil and vapor phase. A 2-D homogenous reservoir model was used to simulate the Vapex process with a solvent mixture comprised of propane and methane at various percentages. The effect of injecting a hot solvent vapor was also investigated. The study showed that injected methane accumulated at both the top and the extraction interface. Accumulations near the top had a positive impact on solvent confinement in thin reservoirs. Diffusion of the solvent component was controlled by gas phase molecular diffusion, and was much faster than the diffusion of solvent molecules in the liquid phase. The use of hot solvent mixtures slowed the extraction process due to lower solvent solubility in the oil phase. It was concluded that the negative impact on viscosity reduction by dilution was not compensated by rises in temperature. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c E.g., Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons...

  7. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c e.g., Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. 3 E.g., Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic...

  9. Selection and design of solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    . With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection......Solvents are liquid solutions consisting of one or more chemicals. They have a very wide use and their use is not necessarily restricted to the process industries. This lecture will discuss the different roles and uses of solvents in chemical products and processes that manufacture them...... and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules...

  10. Occupational exposure to solvents and bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete;

    2017-01-01

    logistic regression model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Increased risks were observed for trichloroethylene (HR 1.23, 95% 95% CI 1.12-1.40), toluene (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.38), benzene (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.31), aromatic hydrocarbon solvents (HR 1...... of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, benzene and toluene and the risk of bladder cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  11. Suitability of thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection with regard to quantitative characterization of different fossil fuel products. II. Calibration methods concerning quantitative hydrocarbon-group type analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, J.; Membrado, L.; Cebolla, V.L.; Ferrando, A.C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica, Dept. de Procesos Quimicos

    1998-10-01

    Time-consuming external standard-based calibration methods are usually performed for hydrocarbon group type analysis (HGTA) of fossil fuels, regardless of the instrumental chromatographic technique. HGTA of a broad variety of coal and petroleum products was performed using a modern thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection (TLC-FID) system and a rapid method based on internal normalization. Repeatability, linear intervals, and sample load ranges for quantitative application of this method are given, namely a heavy oil and its derived hydrocracked products, raw and chemically-modified petroleum asphaltenes, a coal-tar pitch, several coal extracts, and coal hydroliquefaction products. Results from external standard calibration and a normalization method (both obtained by TLC-FID) are in agreement, and they are validated using TLC-ultraviolet scanning. The use of the latter demonstrates that TLC-FID can also be applied to products such as coal extracts and hydroliquefaction products, despite these products being more volatile than petroleum asphaltenes or heavy oils. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naptha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.) 3 1% Xylene, 1% Toluene, and 1% Ethylbenzene. Aromatic (Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light...

  14. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  15. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  16. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  17. Direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction coupled to fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry as a purification step for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcaro, Giorgia; Picardo, Massimo; Barp, Laura; Moret, Sabrina; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2013-09-13

    The aim of the present work was to optimize a preparation step for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a fatty extract. Solid-phase microextraction is an easy preparation technique, which allows to minimize solvent consumption and reduce sample manipulation. A Carbopack Z/polydimethylsiloxane fiber, particularly suitable for extraction of planar compounds, was employed to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a hexane solution obtained after a previous extraction with acetonitrile from oil, followed by a liquid-liquid partition between acetonitrile and hexane. The proposed method was a rapid and sensitive solution to reduce the interference of triglycerides saving the column life and avoiding frequent cleaning of the mass spectrometer ion source. Despite the non-quantitative extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from oil using acetonitrile, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly improved obtaining a limit of detection largely below the performance criteria required by the European Union legislation.

  18. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  19. 75 FR 68222 - Suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ...; ] OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR PART 731 RIN 3206-AL90 Suitability AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... possible, of security and suitability standards. Public Trust Positions Public trust positions are those...) for a new public trust reinvestigation. Likewise, a suitability investigation based on a change...

  20. Shorebird Habitat Suitability Indicies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset consists of predicted habitat suitability indices and species richness for eight shorebird species (Black-bellied Plover [Pluvialis squatarola],...

  1. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  2. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  3. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Mineral Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c E.g., Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic...

  4. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aromatic. b Mineral Spirits 135, Mineral Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light...

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aliphatic or aromatic. b Mineral Spirits 135, Mineral Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naphtha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend. c Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic...

  6. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  7. 76 FR 69601 - Suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... RIN 3206-AL90 Suitability AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... reinvestigation) as determined by the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, to ensure their suitability... public trust positions with a frequency as determined by the Director of the Office of...

  8. Otoneurologic disturbances caused by solvent pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odkvist, L M; Möller, C; Thuomas, K A

    1992-06-01

    Subjects exposed to industrial solvents may experience vertigo and nausea. Solvents are usually volatile hydrocarbon compounds, which are important parts of everyday life in a modern society. They may also cause neurastenia, personality changes, and reduced intellectual capacity. The syndrome that may develop was formerly named psycho-organic syndrome (POS), but in modern terminology it is called chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE). The syndrome develops slowly, and during the first years no pathological findings will be found using various test batteries. Somewhat later, when the syndrome still might be reversible, psychometric, auditory, and otoneurologic testing may well unveil disturbances within the posterior fossa structures. Animal experiments suggest one site of effect for solvents to be within the cerebellum and brainstem regions with close relationship to the gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) transmission. In the otoneurologic test battery, visual suppression and smooth pursuit are of extreme value, as are some auditory tests such as discrimination of interrupted speech and cortical response audiometry using frequency glides as stimuli. Dynamic posturography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently proved valuable in the diagnosis. Research is needed concerning the most efficient test battery for early detection of solvent-induced lesions. During further research it is important to unveil other toxic agents, like heavy metals and alcohol, and their damage to the central nervous system and to make comparisons between these substances and the lesions caused by hydrocarbon solvents.

  9. Solvent Optimization for Efficient Enzymatic Monoacylglycerol Production Based on a Glycerolysis Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, Marianne; Jensen, Tine; Sparsø, Flemming V.;

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at screening solvent systems of varying polarities to identify suitable solvents for efficient and practical enzymatic glycerolysis. Several pure solvents and solvent mixtures were screened in a batch reaction system consisting of glycerol, sunflower oil, and Novozymo (R) 435...

  10. A silica gel based method for extracting insect surface hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Ramírez, Santiago R; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-02-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for the extraction of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using silica gel, herein referred to as "silica-rubbing". This method permits the selective sampling of external hydrocarbons from insect cuticle surfaces for subsequent analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cuticular hydrocarbons are first adsorbed to silica gel particles by rubbing the cuticle of insect specimens with the materials, and then are subsequently eluted using organic solvents. We compared the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that resulted from extractions using silica-rubbing and solvent-soaking methods in four ant and one bee species: Linepithema humile, Azteca instabilis, Camponotus floridanus, Pogonomyrmex barbatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Euglossa dilemma (Hymenoptera: Apidae). We also compared the hydrocarbon profiles of Euglossa dilemma obtained via silica-rubbing and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Comparison of hydrocarbon profiles obtained by different extraction methods indicates that silica rubbing selectively extracts the hydrocarbons that are present on the surface of the cuticular wax layer, without extracting hydrocarbons from internal glands and tissues. Due to its surface specificity, efficiency, and low cost, this new method may be useful for studying the biology of insect cuticular hydrocarbons.

  11. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  12. Important factors influencing molecular weight cut-off determination of membranes in organic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenberg, Harmen Jan; Dutczak, S.M.; Boerrigter, M.E.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    In solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF), sensible selection of a membrane for a particular solvent/solute system is recognized as challenging. Prospective methods for suitability analysis of membranes include molecular weight cut off (MWCO) characterization. However, insufficient understanding of

  13. Electrolyte Suitable for Use in a Lithium Ion Cell or Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Electrolyte suitable for use in a lithium ion cell or battery. According to one embodiment, the electrolyte includes a fluorinated lithium ion salt and a solvent system that solvates lithium ions and that yields a high dielectric constant, a low viscosity and a high flashpoint. In one embodiment, the solvent system includes a mixture of an aprotic lithium ion solvating solvent and an aprotic fluorinated solvent.

  14. Method for Predicting Solubilities of Solids in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O'Connell, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvents, based on excess Henry's law constants. The basis is statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of solute/solvent infinite dilution activity coefficients. Suitable approximations...... are made for a single parameter characterizing solute/solvent interactions. Comparisons with available data show that the method is successful in describing a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behavior, including nearly ideal systems with small excess solubilities, systems with solute......-independent excess solubilities, and systems deviating from these simple rules. Successful predictions for new solvent mixtures cat? be made using limited data from other mixtures....

  15. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  16. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  17. Solvent resistant nanofiltration membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes preparation and characterization of membranes for organic solvent filtration (OSF). The main aim was developing membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) with molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1.

  18. Solvents in novolak synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobodacha, Chet J.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Durham, Dana L.; Paradis, Valerie R.

    1993-09-01

    Novolac resins may be prepared with or without a solvent present. We have found that solvent power greatly affects the properties of the finished resin and thus gives the resist chemist another variable with which to `fine-tune' resist properties. Using designed experiments, we investigated the effect of solvent power, as measured by Hansen's Solubility Parameters, of a number of solvents and solvent mixtures on the final properties of the novolac resin. We found that the relative molecular weight (RMW) and dissolution rate of a novolac resin can be varied by selection of a solvent or solvent mixture with the appropriate polarity and hydrogen- bonding characteristics. The solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics may affect the stability of the cresol/formaldehyde transition state, thus causing the observed changes in RMW and dissolution rate.

  19. Terrain correlation suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wang; McClintock, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Terrain-aided navigation (TAN), also referred to as terrain correlation, is a technique that has proven to be highly successful as a navigational aid for autonomous, unmanned guided missiles. Qualitatively speaking, the effectiveness of terrain correlation is a function of signal- to-noise (S/N) ratio. The signal is equivalent to terrain roughness, while the noise is the combination of reference map errors, radar altimeter errors, and INS altitude errors. However, it is not practical to use only a single parameter, such as S/N, to define the suitability of terrain correlation. This paper discusses the shortcomings of the conventional single-parameter approach to the terrain contour matching algorithm (TERCOM) used in cruise missile guidance systems scene selection. A more comprehensive technique is then presented that analyzes the terrain correlation suitability based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique. A figure-of-merit (FOM) for terrain correlation suitability, computed from sample statistics, is introduced and simulation results are provided to illustrate the feasibility of using a multi-parameter FOM technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed approach could provide a cost effective enhancement to the TAN-based mission planning process.

  20. Method for determining asphaltene stability of a hydrocarbon-containing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-02-05

    A method for determining asphaltene stability in a hydrocarbon-containing material having solvated asphaltenes therein is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, it involves the steps of: (a) precipitating an amount of the asphaltenes from a liquid sample of the hydrocarbon-containing material with an alkane mobile phase solvent in a column; (b) dissolving a first amount and a second amount of the precipitated asphaltenes by changing the alkane mobile phase solvent to a final mobile phase solvent having a solubility parameter that is higher than the alkane mobile phase solvent; (c) monitoring the concentration of eluted fractions from the column; (d) creating a solubility profile of the dissolved asphaltenes in the hydrocarbon-containing material; and (e) determining one or more asphaltene stability parameters of the hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  2. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electro......The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future...... is electrolysis followed by conversion into synthetic hydrocarbons, alcohols or ethers. Several types of electrolysers exist. The various types are listed together with a short description of principle and status. It is argued that electrolysis will at least become part of large sustainable energy systems...

  3. How Can We Use Carbon Dioxide as a Solvent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Azmi; Eastoe, Julian

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the work being undertaken to make more use of supercritical carbon dioxide as a green solvent. It discusses how the use of surfactants can address the limitations of supercritical CO[subscript 2] in dissolving solutes that are polar and of higher molecular weight. The design of appropriate hydrocarbon CO[subscript 2]-philic…

  4. Demonstration of Solvent Differences by Visible Polymer Swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph H.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of the "polarity" of low-polarity solvents on the amount of swelling produced in a solid polymer (demonstrated in an organic chemistry lecture) is also suitable as a laboratory experiment. Students can be assigned to a small group of solvents from the list provided. Procedures and materials needed are included. (Author/JN)

  5. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The ad

  6. Solvent abuse: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G E

    1979-01-01

    The literature on solvent abuse is reviewed. Methods of use, symptoms of use, and effects of long-term solvent abuse are discussed. Several surveys on solvent use are summarized. The highest prevalence of solvent abuse seems to occur in native peoples undergoing periods of cultural change. Environmental conditions which are postulated as leading to psychological vulnerability and solvent abuse include: low social assets, parental drug use, peer and sibling influence, and acculturative stress. Solvent abuse seems to provide a pharmacological way out of a stressful environment for people who feel helpless to improve their situation in other ways. Methods of intervention that have been proposed for dealing with solvent abuse are discussed. Methods of intervention thus far employed generally have not been evaluated in any systematic fashion. Suggestions for future research are provided.

  7. Hydrogenation of Isophthalonitrile with 1-Methylimidazole as an Effective Solvent for m-Xylenediamine Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Tae Young; Row, Sung Wook; Yoo, Kye Sang; Lee, Sang Duek [Environment and Process Technology Division, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Do Weon [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    1-methylimidazole was shown to outperform the other organic solvents in this reaction. Moreover, amount of ammonia with using 1-methylimidazole as a solvent was lower than other processes. Thus, 1-methylimidazole is an attractive solvent in IPN hydrogenation for the production of MXDA. The correct choice of a solvent is a critical factor to govern the catalytic activity with desirable hydrogenation. Conventionally, organic materials such as aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons, dimethylformamide and dioxane were employed in this reaction. Several MXDA producing processes with the organic solvent including m-xylene, pseudocumene, mesitylene, ethylbenzene, methylpyridine, benzonitrile, m-tolunitrile, MXDA and cyanopyridine were disclosed. However, the solvents and ammonia were vaporized under the operation conditions leading to amine cleavage with the resulting formation of methylbenzyl amines or the consumption of ammonia was still significant. Recently, some researchers reported that a high yield of MXDA was achieved using isopropanol under relatively low pressure condition; however, the consumption of ammonia was very significant.

  8. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  9. Porphyrin-Embedded Silicate Materials for Detection of Hydrocarbon Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    are naturally occurring in petroleum products . The individual compounds are also used in a range of manufacturing and production processes. The BTEX...478-483. 17. Ueno, Y.; Tate, A.; Niwa, O.; Zhou, H.-S.; Yamada, T.; Honma, I. High benzene selectivity of mesoporous silicate for BTX gas sensing

  10. Extraction Techniques for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a review of the analytical extraction techniques for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in soils. The extraction technologies described here include Soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic and mechanical agitation, accelerated solvent extraction, supercritical and subcritical fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid phase extraction and microextraction, thermal desorption and flash pyrolysis, as well as fluidised-bed extraction. The influencing factors in the extraction of PAHs from soil such as temperature, type of solvent, soil moisture, and other soil characteristics are also discussed. The paper concludes with a review of the models used to describe the kinetics of PAH desorption from soils during solvent extraction.

  11. Solvent as a competitive inhibitor for Candida antarctica lipase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Marianne; Irague, Romain; Rosenfeld, Eric; Lamare, Sylvain; Franson, Linda; Hult, Karl

    2007-08-01

    In enzyme-catalyzed reactions, the choice of solvent often has a marked effect on the reaction outcome. In this paper, it is shown that solvent effects could be explained by the ability of the solvent to act as a competitive inhibitor to the substrate. Experimentally, the effect of six solvents, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 2-methyl-2-pentanol, 3-methyl-3-pentanol, 2-methylpentane and 3-methylpentane, was studied in a solid/gas reactor. As a model reaction, the CALB-catalyzed transacylation between methyl propanoate and 1-propanol, was studied. It was shown that both ketones inhibited the enzyme activity whereas the tertiary alcohols and the hydrocarbons did not. Alcohol inhibition constants, K(i)(I) were changed to "K(i)", determined in presence of 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, and 3-methyl-3-pentanol, confirmed the marked inhibitory character of the ketones and an absence of inhibition of 3-methyl-3-pentanol. The molecular modeling study was performed on three solvents, 2-pentanone, 2-methyl-2-pentanol and 2-methyl pentane. It showed a clear inhibitory effect for the ketone and the tertiary alcohol, but no effect for the hydrocarbon. No change in enzyme conformation was seen during the simulations. The study led to the conclusion that the effect of added organic component on lipase catalyzed transacylation could be explained by the competitive inhibitory character of solvents towards the first binding substrate methyl propanoate.

  12. Reactive Extraction of Alcohols from Apolar Hydrocarbons with Aqueous Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmanovic, B.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; de Haan, A.B.; Kwant, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The aqueous solutions are evaluated as sustainable reactive extraction solvents for the recovery of monohydroxyl alcohols (benzyl alcohol, 1-hexanol, cyclohexanol) present in few-percent concentrations in apolar hydrocarbons (toluene, n-hexane, and cyclohexane) by considering two approaches. An aque

  13. Reactive Extraction of Alcohols from Apolar Hydrocarbons with Aqueous Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmanovic, Boris; Kuipers, Norbert J.M.; Haan, de André B.; Kwant, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The aqueous solutions are evaluated as sustainable reactive extraction solvents for the recovery of monohydroxyl alcohols (benzyl alcohol, 1-hexanol, cyclohexanol) present in few-percent concentrations in apolar hydrocarbons (toluene, n-hexane, and cyclohexane) by considering two approaches. An aque

  14. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  15. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  16. Opportunities for Bio-Based Solvents Created as Petrochemical and Fuel Products Transition towards Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Farmer, Thomas J; Hunt, Andrew J; Sherwood, James

    2015-07-28

    The global bio-based chemical market is growing in size and importance. Bio-based solvents such as glycerol and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are often discussed as important introductions to the conventional repertoire of solvents. However adoption of new innovations by industry is typically slow. Therefore it might be anticipated that neoteric solvent systems (e.g., ionic liquids) will remain niche, while renewable routes to historically established solvents will continue to grow in importance. This review discusses bio-based solvents from the perspective of their production, identifying suitable feedstocks, platform molecules, and relevant product streams for the sustainable manufacturing of conventional solvents.

  17. Opportunities for Bio-Based Solvents Created as Petrochemical and Fuel Products Transition towards Renewable Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Clark

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The global bio-based chemical market is growing in size and importance. Bio-based solvents such as glycerol and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are often discussed as important introductions to the conventional repertoire of solvents. However adoption of new innovations by industry is typically slow. Therefore it might be anticipated that neoteric solvent systems (e.g., ionic liquids will remain niche, while renewable routes to historically established solvents will continue to grow in importance. This review discusses bio-based solvents from the perspective of their production, identifying suitable feedstocks, platform molecules, and relevant product streams for the sustainable manufacturing of conventional solvents.

  18. Study of the Raveling Resistance of Porous Asphalt Pavements Used in Sustainable Drainage Systems Affected by Hydrocarbon Spills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Rodriguez-Hernandez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Permeable pavements are one of the most commonly-used sustainable drainage systems (SuDS in urban areas for managing stormwater runoff problems. Porous asphalt is widely used in surface layers of permeable pavement systems, where it can suffer from accidental oil spills from vehicles. Oil spills affect bituminous mixes through the solvent action of the hydrocarbons on the bitumen, reducing the raveling resistance of asphalt pavements. In order to assess the raveling resistance in porous asphalt pavements, the Cantabro abrasion test was performed on 200 test samples after applying controlled oil spills. Three different types of binders were used: conventional bitumen, polymer-modified bitumen and special fuel-resistant bitumen. After analyzing the results, it was concluded that the most suitable bitumen to protect against oil leakages is the polymer-modified one, which is far better than the other two types of bitumen tested.

  19. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  20. Factors that influence the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, J.; Liu, Gaisheng; Niu, Z.; Chou, C.-L.; Qi, C.; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhang, H.

    2007-01-01

    Coal samples and carbonaceous mudstone were collected from the Huaibei coalfield, China, and experiments investigating the factors influencing the extraction of the sixteen US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out. Different extraction times, solvents, and methods were used. Major interest was focused on finding optimum conditions for extracting the PAHs from coal. We conclude that (1) coal composition, including the H/C and O/C ratios, is an important factor for the distribution of PAHs in coals; (2) the total amount of EPA priority PAHs increases with increasing extraction time, 30 min being suitable for ultrasonic-assisted extraction and 24 h for Soxhlet extraction; (3) CS2 is effective in extracting low molecular weight PAHs, while CH2Cl2 is better for extracting high molecular weight PAHs (both are excellent extraction solvents vs hexane); (4) both Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction showed a similar PAH concentration profile, but the ultrasonic method is less efficient. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  1. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  2. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  3. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  4. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference, volati...

  5. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  6. Anaerobic Microbial Transformation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Mixtures of Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Halogenated Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-25

    0.005 Pantothenic acid 0.005 p-Aminobenzoic ac id 0.005 (PABA) Cyanocobalamin (B1 2 ) 0.005 Thioctic (lipoic) acid 0.005 Coenzyme M (Mercapto...vitamin B12 ( cyanocobalamin ), and others -- had been reported to reductively dechlorinate CT in the presence of reducing 42 agents (Castro and Cray

  7. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  8. Thixotropic Low-Solvent, Non-Hap Wheel Well Cleaner

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-28

    mixture of linear alcohol ethoxylates having a HLB in the range of 2 to 15 as a stabilizer, and the balance water. The cleaning composition may also...as an isoparrafinic hydrocarbon solvent, from about 10% to about 50% of a mixture of linear alcohol ethoxylates having a HLB in the range of 2 to 15...the alkylphenol ethoxylate or an ethoxylated higher aliphatic flash point of said cleaning composition above 140° F., such alcohol, and (2) a fatty

  9. Fatal fulminant hepatic failure in a 'solvent abuser'.

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, A S; Long, R G

    1992-01-01

    The case of a 17 year old abuser of butane aerosols who developed fulminant hepatic failure after taking a proprietary engine or carburetor cleaner is described. Fatalities as a result of liver failure due to volatile hydrocarbons or solvents have not previously been reported. The likely toxins included isopropyl alcohol, methyl amyl alcohol, butylated hydroxytoluene as well as petroleum products, and evidence for their toxicity is reviewed. The possibility of increased susceptibility to hepa...

  10. Analytical Methods for the Determination of the Distribution of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Water and Sediment of Aquatic Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Adeniji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methods of extraction and analytical determination for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHCs in aqueous and solid samples are reviewed. Infrared spectroscopy is one of the efficient methods that are being replaced today pursuant to getting rid of some halogenated solvents classified as ozone-depleting substances. The gravimetric method which uses n-hexane as an extraction solvent for the determination of oil and grease, as well as the nonpolar materials, has become a preferred choice, despite being not suitable for volatiles because of the mandatory evaporation step. Other frequently used methods include gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (FID or mass spectrometric detector (MSD which has the capacity to reveal the type of hydrocarbons present and is applicable to both volatile and semivolatile samples. Ultraviolet fluorescence is another method that is available both as a portable field device and as off-site laboratory equipment. Each of the methods has its own advantages and disadvantages; hence, the choice of method is guided by the type of data needed as discussed in detail in this review. The distribution of TPHC in water and sediments across the globe and the factors influencing the distribution were also reviewed.

  11. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  12. Halogenated solvent remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  13. Safe battery solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  14. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  15. Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2013-09-10

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  16. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL`s findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria.

  17. A comparative study on the recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fly ash and lignite coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Terzi, Eleni; Kalaitzoglou, Maria; Samara, Constantini

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from lignite coal burnt in Greek power stations and the fly ash produced is examined comparatively using Soxhlet, ultrasonic and accelerated solvent extraction procedures with various organic solvents. Soxhlet using toluene/methanol mixture and accelerated solvent extraction/toluene were found to be the most efficient methods for fly ash PAHs, yielding average recoveries of about 80%. The accelerated solvent extraction/toluene procedure was superior for lignite PAHs, yielding 96% average recovery, whereas ultrasonic and Soxhlet extraction yielded relatively lower recoveries (75% and 67%, respectively).

  18. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  19. Development of Buoy Mounted Hydrocarbon Vapor Sensors for Use in Local Area Pollution Surveillance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    PNP transistor as hydrocarbon vapor sensor . . . . 3. Hot wire sensors for hydrocarbons 4. Suitability of an lonlzatlon sensor for... PNP transistors , (A) a radioactive ionlzatlon sensor, and (5) the Taguchl semiconductor gas sensor, TGS. Later, the Esso piezoelectric oll-on- water...sensors with coating 12 showed some promise as ammonia vapor sensors. 2. PNP transistor as hydrocarbon vapor sensor; Limited studies have been made

  20. Enhanced Attenuation of Unsaturated Chlorinated Solvent Source Zones using Direct Hydrogen Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    solvents. This approach for bioremediation of unsaturated soils containing chlorinated solvents was originally proposed in a patent by Hughes et al...have been conducted on the use of hydrogen as an electron donor for the anaerobic bioremediation of saturated and unsaturated porous media (Evans and...aerobic environments. Figure 1. Comparison of H2T and bioventing. Air Injection ROI Hydrocarbons (Electron O2 (Electron acceptor) Vadose

  1. Studies of the effect of selected nondonor solvents on coal liquefaction yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R. L.; Rodgers, B. R.; Benjamin, B. M.; Poutsma, M. L.; Douglas, E. C.; McWhirter, D. A.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this research program was to evaluate the effectiveness of selected nondonor solvents (i.e., solvents that are not generally considered to have hydrogen available for hydrogenolysis reactions) for the solubilization of coals. Principal criteria for selection of candidate solvents were that the compound should be representative of a major chemical class, should be present in reasonable concentration in coal liquid products, and should have the potential to participate in hydrogen redistribution reactions. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, carbazole, phenanthridine, quinoline, 1-naphthol, and diphenyl ether were evaluated to determine their effect on coal liquefaction yields and were compared with phenol and two high-quality process solvents, Wilsonville SRC-I recycle solvent and Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent. The high conversion efficacy of 1-naphthol may be attributed to its condensation to binaphthol and the consequent availability of hydrogen. The effectiveness of both the nitrogen heterocycles and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds may be due to their polycyclic aromatic nature (i.e., possible hydrogen shuttling or transfer agents) and their physical solvent properties. The relative effectiveness for coal conversion of the Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent as compared with the Wilsonville SRC-I process solvent may be attributed to the much higher concentration of 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAH and hydroaromatic constituents in Lummus solvent. The chemistry of coal liquefaction and the development of recycle, hydrogen donor, and nondonor solvents are reviewed. The experimental methodology for tubing-bomb tests is outlined, and experimental problem areas are discussed.

  2. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  3. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  4. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    Using a reactor in which the coal is physically separated from the solid catalyst by a porous wall permeable to the hydrogen donor solvent, it was shown that direct contact between the catalyst and the coal is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. This occurs however only when there is a hydrogen atmosphere, as liquefaction with catalyst participation does not occur in a nitrogen atmosphere. Liquefaction by hydrogen transfer from the donor solvent itself does occur. This suggests that there is transfer of hydrogen from the catalyst to the coal via the solvent. The character of the solvent makes a significant difference, the better solvents being good hydrogen donors. These results indicate that the role of the catalyst may be to regenerate the spent hydrogen donor solvent during the liquefaction process. The peak temperature for volatiles evolution has been shown to be a reproducible measure of the coal rank. This was shown by an excellent correlation (R2 = 0.998) between peak volatiles temperatures (by TGA) and vitrinite reflectance. Using TG/MS, the volatiles contents of coals of a wide range of ranks was determined. The low rank coals emit largely phenols and some other oxygen compounds and olefins. The higher rank coals emit largely aromatic hydrocarbons and some olefins.

  5. Impact of Solvents Treatment on the Wettability of Froth Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of solvent addition to bitumen froth on the wettability of froth solids. The wettability of solids determines the transportation/partitioning of the solids between phases, which in turn affects the solids and water rejection in a Clark hot water extraction process (CHWE). The impact of solvents treatment on the wettability of froth solids was studied using both a model system and a real bitumen froth system. The vulnerabilities of four kinds of model minerals to hydrocarbon contamination/wettability alteration in different solvents were compared and discussed by considering solvent composition and mineral types. The wettability of solids extracted from the industrial froth using different solvents was also compared. The XRD analysis on these solids confirmed the partitioning behavior of solids observed in model solids system. The results from this study indicate that the composition of paraffinic/aromatic solvent in an industrial froth treatment process could be tailor-optimized to achieve a better solids/water rejection.

  6. Measurement and control of water content of organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goderis, H.L.; Fouwe, B.L.; Van Cauwenbergh, S.M.; Tobback, P.P.

    1986-06-01

    An isotopic dilution procedure is described for the quantitative determination of the solubility of water in organic solvents as a function of the relative humidity at which the sample is equilibrated. /sup 3/H/sub 2/O is used as a tracer, and the relative humidity conditions are realized by incubation of the organic solvent above a saturated salt solution having a known water activity. The technique is applicable independent of the concentration range of water present, the minimum amount of moisture being only limited by the concentration of the tritium label used. Solubility isotherms of water in hydrocarbon solvents such as n-hexane are sigmoidal in shape, reflecting cooperative effects in the solubilization of water molecules at the higher relative humidity portion of the curve. Solubility increases with increasing temperature.

  7. Process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons or mixtures thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wielen, L.A.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon like material or mixtures thereof by conversion of a suitable substrate using micro-organisms, in which process the said substrate is continuously, anaerobically fermented to

  8. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  9. Solvent-mediated pathways to gelation and phase separation in suspensions of grafted nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anyfantakis, Manos

    2009-01-01

    We explore the role of the solvent medium on the interplay between gelation and phase separation in suspensions of organosilicate planar hybrids grafted with hydrocarbon chains. We establish their phase diagram by means of dynamic light scattering, rheology and visual observations, and different routes to gelation, depending on the solvent used. In agreement with earlier works, the solvent quality for the grafted chains at a given temperature controls the balance between attractions and repulsions, and hence the phase diagram of the nanoparticles and their tendency to gel. Here we show how to tune the suspension state and hence its rheology. For decane, a good solvent for the hydrocarbon chains, gelation occurs at rather low volume fractions in the presence of phase separation. This is due to the interdigitation of solvent molecules with the grafted chains, resulting in their crystalline packing that promotes the attraction between particles. For toluene, a solvent of reduced quality for the hydrocarbon chains, no interdigitation takes place, and hence gelation is triggered by clustering at higher volume fractions before phase separation. Our results support the generic picture of complex kinetic arrest/phase separation interplay in soft matter, where phase separation can proceed, be interrupted or be completely inhibited. A number of interesting possibilities for tailoring the rheology of grafted colloidal systems emerge. © 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Task 8: Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Our studies focus on the stratigraphy of Late Devonian to early Pennsylvanian rocks at the NTS, because these are the best potential hydrocarbon source rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. In the last year, our stratigraphic studies have broadened to include the regional context for both the Chainman and the Eleana formations. New age data based on biostratigraphy constrain the age ranges of both Chainman and Eleana; accurate and reliable ages are essential for regional correlation and for regional paleogeographic reconstructions. Source rock analyses throughout the Chainman establish whether these rocks contained adequate organic material to generate hydrocarbons. Maturation analyses of samples from the Chainman determine whether the temperature history has been suitable for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Structural studies are aimed at defining the deformation histories and present position of the different packages of Devonian - Pennsylvanian rocks. This report summarizes new results of our structural, stratigraphic and hydrocarbon source rock potential studies at the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. Stratigraphy is considered first, with the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation discussed separately. New biostratigraphic results are included in this section. New results from our structural studies are summarized next, followed by source rock and maturation analyses of the Chainman Shale. Directions for future work are included where appropriate.

  11. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction and partial least squares regression to assay low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons leached from soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Lucas P.; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Schmidt, Marcella E. P.; Faccin, Henrique; de Machado, Leandro Carvalho; Bohrer, Denise

    2017-02-01

    A novel method was developed to determine low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous leachates from soils and sediments using a salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry and a multivariate calibration technique. Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimum conditions were: sodium carbonate as the salting-out agent at concentration of 2 mol L- 1, 3 mL of acetonitrile as extraction solvent, 6 mL of aqueous leachate, vortexing for 5 min and centrifuging at 4000 rpm for 5 min. The partial least squares calibration was optimized to the lowest values of root mean squared error and five latent variables were chosen for each of the targeted compounds. The regression coefficients for the true versus predicted concentrations were higher than 0.99. Figures of merit for the multivariate method were calculated, namely sensitivity, multivariate detection limit and multivariate quantification limit. The selectivity was also evaluated and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons did not interfere in the analysis. Likewise, high performance liquid chromatography was used as a comparative methodology, and the regression analysis between the methods showed no statistical difference (t-test). The proposed methodology was applied to soils and sediments of a Brazilian river and the recoveries ranged from 74.3% to 105.8%. Overall, the proposed methodology was suitable for the targeted compounds, showing that the extraction method can be applied to spectrofluorometric analysis and that the multivariate calibration is also suitable for these compounds in leachates from real samples.

  12. Seawater-cultured Botryococcus braunii for efficient hydrocarbon extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Furuhashi

    Full Text Available As a potential source of biofuel, the green colonial microalga Botryococcus braunii produces large amounts of hydrocarbons that are accumulated in the extracellular matrix. Generally, pretreatment such as drying or heating of wet algae is needed for sufficient recoveries of hydrocarbons from B. braunii using organic solvents. In this study, the Showa strain of B. braunii was cultured in media derived from the modified Chu13 medium by supplying artificial seawater, natural seawater, or NaCl. After a certain period of culture in the media with an osmotic pressure corresponding to 1/4-seawater, hydrocarbon recovery rates exceeding 90% were obtained by simply mixing intact wet algae with n-hexane without any pretreatments and the results using the present culture conditions indicate the potential for hydrocarbon milking.Seawater was used for efficient hydrocarbon extraction from Botryococcus braunii. The alga was cultured in media prepared with seawater or NaCl. Hydrocarbon recovery rate exceeding 90% was obtained without any pretreatment.

  13. Metabolism of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene Hydrocarbons in Soil†

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, C.-W.; Song, H. -G.; Bartha, R

    1998-01-01

    Enrichment cultures obtained from soil exposed to benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) mineralized benzene and toluene but cometabolized only xylene isomers, forming polymeric residues. This observation prompted us to investigate the metabolism of 14C-labeled BTX hydrocarbons in soil, either individually or as mixtures. BTX-supplemented soil was incubated aerobically for up to 4 weeks in a sealed system that automatically replenished any O2 consumed. The decrease in solvent vapors and the produ...

  14. Validation of an Analytical Method for Determination of 13 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mineral water using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Ramezan; Kobarfard, Farzad; Yazdanpanah, Hassan; Eslamizad, Samira; Bayat, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was used for the extraction and determination of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mineral water samples. In this procedure, the suitable combination of extraction solvent (500 µL chloroform) and disperser solvent (1000 µL acetone) were quickly injected into the water sample (10.00 mL) by Hamilton syringe. After centrifugation, 500 µL of the lower organic phase was dried under a gentle stream of nitrogen, re-dissolved in chloroform and injected into GC-MS. Chloroform and acetone were found to be the best extraction and disperser solvent, respectively. Validation of the method was performed using spiked calibration curves. The enrichment factor ranged from 93 to 129 and the recovery ranged from 71 to 90%. The linear ranges for all the PAHs were 0.10-2.80 ngmL-1. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of PAHs in water by using anthracene-d10 as internal standard, were in the range of 4-11% for most of the analytes (n = 3). Limit of detection (LOD) for different PAHs were between 0.03 and 0.1 ngmL-1. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of PAHs in mineral water samples collected from Tehran. PMID:27610156

  15. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  16. Role of solvent/non-solvent ratio on microsphere formation using the solvent removal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, J; Scott, E; Pattamunuch, P; Chen, S; Mathiowitz, E

    2004-03-01

    The importance of good solvent concentration in the non-solvent mixture and the non-solvent viscosity on the ability to form microspheres using solvent removal process was investigated. The higher the viscosity of the polymer solutions, the higher the concentration of good solvent needed in the nonsolvent mixture to produce microspheres. This finding was due to faster precipitation of the polymer phase. Also, the addition of a model drug, fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated-labelled bovine serum albumin, to the polymer solution (10% poly-L-lactic acid:poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride in methylene chloride) resulted in an overall lower polymer solution viscosity (15.5 cP with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated-labelled bovine serum albumin as compared with 18.25 cP for blank polymer at 25 degrees C). Additionally, the effect of good solvent concentration on non-solvent viscosity was evaluated, and the viscosity decreased as the concentration of good solvent increased. The effect of good solvent concentration on the non-solvent mixture on sphere formation was of great importance. Microspheres would not form when the good polymer solvent (methylene chloride) in the non-solvent phase was too low (below 175 ml for poly-L-lactic acid or 150 ml for poly(D,L-lactidco-glycolid)) or was replaced by another good solvent such as ethyl acetate, even though the same viscosity was achieved. It was shown that the concentration of the good solvent in the non-solvent mixture was more of a controlling factor than the viscosity of the non-solvent mixture in microsphere formation and the findings support the conclusion that diffusion is the main controlling parameter in solvent removal.

  17. ANALYSIS OF THE KINETICS OF SOLVOLYSIS OF P-NITROPHENYLSULFONYLMETHYL PERCHLORATE IN BINARY ALCOHOLIC MIXTURES IN TERMS OF THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF THE SOLVENT MIXTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNEN, JW; ENGBERTS, JBFN; BLANDAMER, MJ

    1993-01-01

    Rate constants are reported for the solvolysis of p-nitrophenylsulfonylmethyl perchlorate in binary ethanolic and methanolic mixtures at 298.2 K. Co-solvents include hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons and 1,4-dioxane. The kinetic data are examined in terms of the effect of decreasing mole fracti

  18. Selectivity of oxazolidine derivatives in the separation of C/sub 5/ hydrocarbons with different degrees of saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apter, Yu.M.; Gaile, A.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Semenov, L.V.

    1980-01-01

    An increase in the selectivity of cyclic compound solvents in the separation of hydrocarbons of different degrees of saturation can be attained by reducing the size of the ring and introducing an additional heteroatom into the ring. In connection with this, the selectivity of oxazolidine derivatives, differing in respect to their structure from known extractants -- pyrrolidine derivatives -- by the presence of a second heteroatom in the ring and from morpholine derivatives by the smaller ring size was studied. It was found that oxazolidine derivatives show higher selectivity in respect to hydrocarbon systems than the corresponding pyrrolidine and morpholine derivatives. The dissolving capacity of oxazolidine derivatives in respect to unsaturated hydrocarbons is higher than that of isomeric compounds of the morpholine series. The values of the activity coefficients of the C/sub 5/ hydrocarbons at infinite dilution in polar solvents correlate satisfactorily with the ionization potentials of the hydrocarbons.

  19. Diamex solvent regeneration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, C.; Cames, B.; Margot, L.; Ramain, L. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, DRRV, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    The CEA has undertaken the development of the DIAMEX process as the first step in the strategy aiming at recovering minor actinides which could then be transmuted or separately conditioned. The scientific feasibility of this process was demonstrated during counter current hot tests operated in 1993. Then experimental works were conducted, on one hand to optimise the extractant formula, on the other hand to improve the flowsheet. Reference extractant and flowsheet were then chosen, respectively in 1995 and 1996. The next step, still in progress, is the demonstration of the DIAMEX technical feasibility (in 2002); this means that the flowsheet should include solvent regeneration treatments. In this aim, degradation studies were performed to quantify main degradation products, and identify those which could be disturbing in the process. This paper deals with experimental studies performed with intend to propose a regeneration treatment, included in the flowsheet, so that the solvent could be recycled. It comprises: - Quantification of the main degradation products issued from radiolysis or hydrolysis, which are methyl octyl amine (MOA) and carboxylic acids; - Effects of these products on extracting and hydrodynamics performances of the process; - Study of methods able to remove mainly disturbing degradation products. Acidic scrubbing, which are performed in the scrubbing and stripping sections of the DIAMEX process, should allow the quantitative removal of methyl octyl amine. Then basic scrubbings, which were more especially studied, should eliminate at least 80% of carboxylic acids, and part of the cations remaining in the solvent. (authors)

  20. Solvent extraction of metals with hydroxamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, F; Khorassani, J H

    1978-07-01

    Solvent extraction with hydroxamic acids has been investigated. with comparison of aliphatic and aromatic reagents for the extraction of iron, copper, cobalt and nickel. Caprylohydroxamic acid has been evaluated for use in extraction systems for titanium, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and uranium, both in terms of acidity of aqueous phase and oxidation state of the metal. It has been established that caprylohydroxamic acid in 1-hexanol is a suitable extractant for the removal of titanium(IV), vanadium(V), chromium(VI), molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from 6M hydrochloric acid.

  1. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Mayr, Torsten; Hobisch, Mathias;

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate on-line oxygen measurements in non-aqueous media using a novel optical sensor. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological...

  2. Solvent- and Catalyst-Free Direct Aldol Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宗令; 张成潘; 张春桃; 肖吉昌

    2011-01-01

    Aldol reaction between simple benzaldehydes and ketones successfully happened in solvent- and catalyst-free condition. The desired products were obtained in moderate yield at suitable temperature. Heat was assumed as the driving force for the reaction. This approach has obvious advantages to fully meet the requirement of the principles of green chemistry.

  3. Environmental Suitability for Leasing Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Defense, regarding the procedures to determine environmental suitability for leasing property available as a result of a base closure or realignment.

  4. Hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the presence of palladium complexes fixed on a polymeric support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gvinter, L.I.; Ignatov, V.M.; Suvorova, L.N.; Sharf, V.Z.

    1987-01-01

    A new metal-complex Pd catalyst fixed on a polymer matrix has been synthesized. It exhibits high activity and stability in the hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons and does not require additional activation by NaBH/sub 4/. The activity of the catalyst depends on the nature and composition of the solvent. In a mixed benzene-methanol solvent, the rate of the reaction is higher than in pure benzene. 4 references, 3 tables.

  5. Impurity Distribution Behavior in Caprolactam Extraction with Environmentally Benign Mixed Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van M.L.; Drumm, C.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; Haan, de A.B.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study a solvent mixture of heptane containing 40 mass % heptanol was selected as an alternative in the industrial extraction of caprolactam to replace benzene, toluene, or chlorinated hydrocarbons. This work reports the equilibrium distribution ratio of caprolactam and four model impur

  6. Combining Solvent Extraction and Bioremediation for Removing Weathered Petroleum from Contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-Zhong; F.COULON; YANG Yue-Wei; LI Hong; SUI Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy,practicality and sustainability of a combined approach based on solvent extraction and biodegradation to remediate the soils contaminated with high levels of weathered petroleum hydrocarbons.The soils used in this study were obtained from the Shengli Oilfield in China,which had a long history of contamination with high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons.The contaminated soils were washed using a composite organic solvent consisting of hexane and pentane (4:1,v/v) and then bioremediated in microcosms which were bioaugmentated with Bacillus subtilis FQ06 strains and/or rhamnolipid.The optimal solvent extraction conditions were determined as extraction for 20 min at 25 ℃ with solvent-soil ratio of 6:1 (v/w).On this basis,total petroleum hydrocarbon was decreased from 140000 to 14000 mg kg-1,which was further reduced to < 4000 mg kg-1 by subsequent bioremediation for 132 d.Sustainability assessment of this integrated technology showed its good performance for both short-and long-term effectiveness.Overall the results encouraged its application for remediating contaminated sites especially with high concentration weathered hydrocarbons.

  7. The use of solvents for purifying industrial naphthalene from coal tar distilled oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azpiroz, Gonzalez; Blanco, C. Gutierrez; Banciella, Casal [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC c/Francisco Pintado Fe, 26, 33011 Oviedo (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    The organic chemistry industry is based on organic compounds derived from coal, petroleum and gas. Coal tars derived from the carbonisation process are complex mixtures, of which the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are the main component. One of the most important PAH's is naphthalene, which represents between 10 to 12% of the sample. In recent years, new applications for industrial naphthalene have been developed. However, the naphthalene required for high level industry must be extremely pure. New routes in the purification process are being studied to reduce the economic cost and environmental impact resulting from the increase in demand for pure naphthalene. Any alternative method to that of sublimation for purification in the distillation process and/or catalytic hydrogenation must improve the quality of industrial naphthalene, to make it suitable for the new applications. In the present work, an alternative method for purifying industrial naphthalene has been investigated. A new process based on extraction with solvents such as phosphoric acid and acetic acid is reported and discussed. Industrial naphthalene was purified by means of a new technique and the stability and good properties of the product were verified. (author)

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing Using Liquid Crystal Solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Yannoni, C S; Vandersypen, L M K; Miller, D C; Kubinec, M G; Chuang, I L; Yannoni, Costantino S.; Sherwood, Mark H.; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.; Miller, Dolores C.; Kubinec, Mark G.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid crystals offer several advantages as solvents for molecules used for NMR quantum computing (NMRQC). The dipolar coupling between nuclear spins manifest in the NMR spectra of molecules oriented by a liquid crystal permits a significant increase in clock frequency, while short spin-lattice relaxation times permit fast recycling of algorithms, and save time in calibration and signal-enhancement experiments. Furthermore, the use of liquid crystal solvents offers scalability in the form of an expanded library of spin-bearing molecules suitable for NMRQC. These ideas are demonstrated with the successful execution of a 2-qubit Grover search using a molecule ($^{13}$C$^{1}$HCl$_3$) oriented in a liquid crystal and a clock speed eight times greater than in an isotropic solvent. Perhaps more importantly, five times as many logic operations can be executed within the coherence time using the liquid crystal solvent.

  9. Correlation between atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and urinary hydroxyl metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in elderly population in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦晓蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify suitable hydroxyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(OH-PAHs) for co-evaluation of internal exposure level of PAHs by simultaneous determination of a variety of OH-PAHs in urine. Methods The 24-h individual particulate matter and morning urine

  10. Phase behaviour of colloids suspended in a near-critical solvent : A mean-field approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edison, John R.; Belli, Simone; Evans, Robert; Van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    Colloids suspended in a binary solvent may, under suitable thermodynamic conditions, experience a wide variety of solvent-mediated interactions that can lead to colloidal phase transitions and aggregation phenomena. We present a simple mean-field theory, based on free-volume arguments, that describe

  11. A comparison of the activities of three beta-galactosidases in aqueous-organic solvent mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, JH; Mckenzie, D

    2005-01-01

    The hydrolytic activities of beta-galactosidases from three different sources have been determined in various 50% (v/v) organic solvent-buffer mixtures with a view to finding solvent systems of reduced water content suitable for the synthesis of glycosides and oligosaccharides. K. fragilis

  12. A comparison of the activities of three beta-galactosidases in aqueous-organic solvent mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, JH; Mckenzie, D

    2005-01-01

    The hydrolytic activities of beta-galactosidases from three different sources have been determined in various 50% (v/v) organic solvent-buffer mixtures with a view to finding solvent systems of reduced water content suitable for the synthesis of glycosides and oligosaccharides. K. fragilis beta-gala

  13. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  14. The Role of Saturated Hydrocarbon in Enrichment of Cu, Pb, Znin Kupferschiefer, Southwestern Poland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to clarify the role of organic matter in the enrichment of base metal, 10 samples of the PermianKupferschiefer from southwestern Poland were analyzed by using microscopic and geochemical methods. The re-suts indicate that the solvent extracts have been depleted in the samples with high Cu, Pb, Zn contents. This de-pletion occurred preferably in saturated hydrocarbons. Saturated hydrocarbons served as hydrogen donor for ther-mochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). The GC traces of saturated hydrocarbon show that the depletion occurredmainly in long-chain n-alkanes.

  15. Thermal pre-treatment of wet microalgae harvest for efficient hydrocarbon recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, K.; Okada, S.; Sekino, H.; Imou, K.; Yokoyama, S. [Laboratory of Biological and Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Amano, T. [Technology Research Institute, Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd., 1-7-7 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Botryococcus braunii, a green colonial microalga, is an unusually rich renewable source of hydrocarbons. In this study, wet microalgae harvest was thermally pretreated to enhance hydrocarbon recovery using a solvent extraction process. Samples containing a mixture of B. braunii and water were kept below 100 C for 10 min. The observed hydrocarbon recovery was 97.8% at 90 C. The extraction results suggest that the energy-intensive concentration and drying processes of the harvest could be eliminated. The proposed thermal pretreatment would revolutionize the conventional downstream processes. (author)

  16. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  17. Thermodiffusion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in binary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Sara M.; Senthilnathan, Sid; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Thermodiffusion in liquid mixtures may explain some counter-intuitive but naturally occurring phenomena such as hydrocarbon reservoirs with heavier component(s) stratified on top of lighter ones. However, beyond benchmark systems, systematic measurements of thermodiffusion in binary organic mixtures are lacking. We use an optical beam deflection apparatus to simultaneously probe Fickian and thermal diffusion in binary solution mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in alkanes, and measure both Fickian diffusion D and the Soret coefficient ST, and then obtain the thermodiffusion coefficient DT. In a series of nine binary mixtures, we vary both the size of the aromatic compound from two to four rings, as well as the length of the alkane chain from 6 to 16 carbons. To probe the effect of increasing ring size, we include a 6-ringed aromatic compound, coronene, and toluene as a solvent, due to the insolubility of coronene in alkanes. Our results suggest that Fickian diffusion increases with the inverse of solvent viscosity and also with decreasing molecular weight of the solute. While both of these trends match our intuition, the behavior of ST and DT is more complicated. We find that ST and DT increase with the solute molecular weight when the solvent is held fixed and that the impact of solute ring size is higher in shorter chain alkane solvents.

  18. Effect of coal-derived-liquid solvent on the hydrogenation and restrictive diffusion of nickel porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E.; Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Fuels Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    Hydrogenation of nickel porphyrins was carried out at 335{degree}C and 50 atm hydrogen pressure with two Ni-Mo/alumina catalysts of different pore sizes. Solvents employed were a triple-hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid and four pure hydrocarbons (n-decane, decalin, tetralin, and mesitylene). Reaction rates in the hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid solvent were higher than those in pure solvents with higher hydrogen solubilities. The results were attributed to the greater hydrogen-donor ability of the hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid solvent. Reaction rates of different catalyst particle sizes were used to calculate effective diffusivities under processing conditions. Reactivity was significantly affected by catalyst deactivation via coke buildup at catalyst pore mouths. Accounting for this additional diffusional constraint, restrictive diffusion in the coal-liquid solvent under processing conditions was found to be in reasonable agreement with approximate hydrodynamic theory for non-reactive conditions. 33 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  20. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Hydrocarbons preserved in a ~2.7 Ga outcrop sample from the Fortescue Group, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Y; Flannery, D T; Walter, M R; George, S C

    2015-03-01

    The hydrocarbons preserved in an Archean rock were extracted, and their composition and distribution in consecutive slices from the outside to the inside of the rock were examined. The 2.7 Ga rock was collected from the Fortescue Group in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. The bitumen I (solvent-extracted rock) and bitumen II (solvent-extracted hydrochloric acid-treated rock) fractions have different hydrocarbon compositions. Bitumen I contains only trace amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and virtually no aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, bitumen II contains abundant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference seems to reflect the weathering history and preservational environment of the investigated rock. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I are considered to be mainly from later hydrocarbon inputs, after initial deposition and burial, and are therefore not indigenous. The lack of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I suggests a severe weathering environment since uplift and exposure of the rock at the Earth's surface in the Cenozoic. On the other hand, the high abundance of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen II suggests that bitumen II hydrocarbons have been physically isolated from removal by their encapsulation within carbonate minerals. The richness of aromatic hydrocarbons and the relative scarcity of aliphatic hydrocarbons may reflect the original compositions of organic materials biosynthesised in ancient organisms in the Archean era, or the high thermal maturity of the rock. Cyanobacterial biomarkers were observed in the surficial slices of the rock, which may indicate that endolithic cyanobacteria inhabited the surface outcrop. The distribution of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons implies a high thermal maturity, which is consistent with the lack of any specific biomarkers, such as hopanes and steranes, and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphic grade.

  2. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  3. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  4. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Langworthy, T. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  5. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  7. Liquid phase in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds to hydrocarbons over bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find an effective method for converting renewable biomass-derived phenolic compounds into hydrocarbons bio-fuel via in situ catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds was carried out in methanol-water solvent over bifunctional catalysts of Raney Ni and HZSM-5 or H-Beta. In the in...

  8. Solvents in Organic Synthesis: Replacement and Multi-step Reaction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Gómez, Paola Arenas; Folic, Milica

    2008-01-01

    with the principles of green chemistry, highlight the need to minimize and optimize the use of organic solvents as much as possible. One important step in optimizing organic solvent use is the identification of suitable ‘greener' solvents that can help to minimize the environmental, health and safety concerns during...... design and commercial manufacture of chemical products. A method for selecting appropriate ‘greener' solvents for the promotion of a class of organic reactions has been previously developed by Gani et al. This method employs estimates of thermodynamic properties to generate a knowledge base of reaction...

  9. CARBONIZED FIBROUS RESIN AS A NEW SORBENT FOR SAMPLING POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) IN AMBIENT AIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new sampling method of ambient air analysis using carbonized fibrous resin as asorbent for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was reported.The physical and chemical properties of the carbonized fibrous resins were measured. Thesample pretreatment with ultrasonic extraction and subsequent clean-up ehition through a silica gelcolumn was optimized. The suitable ultrasonic extraction conditions were selected as follows: resinweight was 1.5 g, ultrasonic extraction time 20 min, volume of extraction solvent 100 mi andextraction operation times 2~3. The concentrated extractable organic matter was submitted to nextstep of clean-up procedure of adsorption chromatography on silica gel column/n-hexane and amixture of dichloromethene:n-hexane solution 2:3 (v/v). The PAHs fractions in the real samplesfrom Changzhou, China were particularly analyzed using GC-MS data system and the data of massspectra, retention times and scan numbers of the real samples were compared with that of thestandards of 16 PAHs listed by the US EPA as "priority pollutants" of the environment. Theanalysis of the real samples indicates that the carbonized fibrous resin is a good sorbent. Thepretreatment of samples of ambient air with carbonized fibrous resin as a sorbent for P,AHs isproved to be reliable and might be used for the procedure of the determination of PAHs inatmospheric environment.

  10. Screening method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by high performance thin layer chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to develop a routine analytical method for the determination of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in environmental samples. The method used high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) for the separation of the PAH's. Densitometric measurements using selective fluorescence detection was employed for the quantitative aspects of the method. High performance silica gel, cellulose, acetylated cellulose and reversed-phase plates as the separation media were evaluated. Reversed-phase plates with 60% silanization and solvent system of methanol:water using continuous multiple developments produced the best separation. The method was evaluated using shale oil, air particulate, diesel exhaust particulate and an in-house dust samples. During the course of the studies a characterization of the fluorescence and single wavelength double beam reflectance modes was performed. Based on observations made during the characterization studies, a calibration method employing a single standard solution was developed. The method had an operating range of approximately 0.5 to 20 ng and is suitable as a scouting technique to determine approximate concentrations of unknown samples in HPTLC. A method for expressing the relative fluorescence intensity of the PAH's at a given excitation wavelength was also developed. The emission response ratios (ERR) were useful in approximating interferences and determining optimal wavelength combinations.

  11. Effect of spectral resolution on the measurement of monoaromatic hydrocarbons by DOAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Fumin; XIE Pinhua; ZHANG Yinghua; ZHU Yanwu; SI Fuqi; LIU Wenqing; WANG Junde

    2008-01-01

    The excellent response characteristics and detection sensitivity with much lower operational cost and the capability to discriminate between the isomer of some monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHCs) make differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) a powerful tool to trace concentration variation of MAHCs. But due to the similarity in chemical structure, those MAHCs have the similar overlapped characteristic absorption structures, which make the selection of instrumental parameter critical to the accurate detection of MAHCs. Firstly, the spectral resolution used in DOAS system determines the nonlinear absorption of O2 and the mass dependence of characteristic absorption structure; thereby it determines the effect of elimination error of O2 absorption in the atmospheric spectra for the detection of MAHCs. Secondly, spectral resolution determines the differential absorption characteristics of twelve MAHCs representing major constituents in technical solvents used in the automobile industry and the interference of spectral overlapping. Thirdly, the spectral resolution determines the sensitivity, time resolution and linear range. So the spectral resolution range with the best ratio of signal to noise is used to determine the most suitable spectral resolution range, as well as the spectral resolution range that ensure the characteristic absorption structure of MAHCs and the minimization of O2 absorption interference. Finally, 0. 15-0. 16 nm (FWHM: full width at half maximum) is assumed to be closest to the optimum spectral resolution and it is confirmed by the results of practical measurement of MAHCs by DOAS.

  12. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  13. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Mildau, Gerd; Rullmann, Anke; Marx, Gerhard; Walch, Stephan G.; Hartwig, Andrea; Kuballa, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH). MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products). Quantitative determination (qNMR) has been established using the ERETIC methodology (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations) based on the PULCON principle (pulse length based concentration determination). Various mineral hydrocarbons (e.g., white oils, paraffins or petroleum jelly) were dissolved in deuterated chloroform. The ERETIC factor was established using a quantification reference sample containing ethylbenzene and tetrachloronitrobenzene. The following spectral regions were integrated: MOSH δ 3.0 – 0.2 ppm and MOAH δ 9.2 - 6.5, excluding solvent signals. Validation showed a sufficient precision of the method with a coefficient of variation cosmetic products. For mineral hydrocarbon raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetic products, NMR delivers higher specificity without any sample preparation besides dilution. Our sample survey shows that previous methods may have overestimated the MOAH amount in mineral oil products and opens new paths to characterize this fraction. Therefore, the developed method can be applied for routine monitoring of consumer products aiming to minimize public health risks. PMID:28721203

  14. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Mildau, Gerd; Rullmann, Anke; Marx, Gerhard; Walch, Stephan G; Hartwig, Andrea; Kuballa, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH). MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products). Quantitative determination (qNMR) has been established using the ERETIC methodology (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations) based on the PULCON principle (pulse length based concentration determination). Various mineral hydrocarbons (e.g., white oils, paraffins or petroleum jelly) were dissolved in deuterated chloroform. The ERETIC factor was established using a quantification reference sample containing ethylbenzene and tetrachloronitrobenzene. The following spectral regions were integrated: MOSH δ 3.0 - 0.2 ppm and MOAH δ 9.2 - 6.5, excluding solvent signals. Validation showed a sufficient precision of the method with a coefficient of variation cosmetic products. For mineral hydrocarbon raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetic products, NMR delivers higher specificity without any sample preparation besides dilution. Our sample survey shows that previous methods may have overestimated the MOAH amount in mineral oil products and opens new paths to characterize this fraction. Therefore, the developed method can be applied for routine monitoring of consumer products aiming to minimize public health risks.

  15. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  16. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  17. Membranous nephropathy following exposure to volatile hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenreich, T.; Yunis, S.L.; Churg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solvents has long been known to cause renal tubular disease in man. Recently, the occurrence of glomerular disease such as Goodpasture's syndrome with proliferative and extracapillary glomerulonephritis has been related to hydrocarbon exposure. This report concerns four patients with membranous nephropathy who had a history of prolonged exposure to a number of volatile hydrocarbons. Membranous nephropathy is a chronic renal disease involving glomeruli and occurring principally in adults. Its clinical onset is insidious and is manifested by proteinuria or edema. Proteinuria is the hallmark of the disease and may be present for many years without symptoms. It is often a slowly progressive disease. About one-fourth of the patients improve clinically and lose their proteinuria, while up to one-fourth develop renal failure. The glomerular capillary wall lesions are distinctive, contain deposits of immunoglobulin and complement considered to represent immune-complexes, and show a morphological progression from early Stage I to late Stage IV. While in most cases there is no known etiology, in some patients the disease has been deemed to be secondary to specific diseases or agents such as infections, neoplasms, or chemicals. The four cases described fall into this last category.

  18. Extended Hansen solubility approach: naphthalene in individual solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A; Wu, P L; Adjei, A; Beerbower, A; Prausnitz, J M

    1981-11-01

    A multiple regression method using Hansen partial solubility parameters, delta D, delta p, and delta H, was used to reproduce the solubilities of naphthalene in pure polar and nonpolar solvents and to predict its solubility in untested solvents. The method, called the extended Hansen approach, was compared with the extended Hildebrand solubility approach and the universal-functional-group-activity-coefficient (UNIFAC) method. The Hildebrand regular solution theory was also used to calculate naphthalene solubility. Naphthalene, an aromatic molecule having no side chains or functional groups, is "well-behaved', i.e., its solubility in active solvents known to interact with drug molecules is fairly regular. Because of its simplicity, naphthalene is a suitable solute with which to initiate the difficult study of solubility phenomena. The three methods tested (Hildebrand regular solution theory was introduced only for comparison of solubilities in regular solution) yielded similar results, reproducing naphthalene solubilities within approximately 30% of literature values. In some cases, however, the error was considerably greater. The UNIFAC calculation is superior in that it requires only the solute's heat of fusion, the melting point, and a knowledge of chemical structures of solute and solvent. The extended Hansen and extended Hildebrand methods need experimental solubility data on which to carry out regression analysis. The extended Hansen approach was the method of second choice because of its adaptability to solutes and solvents from various classes. Sample calculations are included to illustrate methods of predicting solubilities in untested solvents at various temperatures. The UNIFAC method was successful in this regard.

  19. Solvent-resistant sol-gel polydimethyldiphenylsiloxane coating for on-line hyphenation of capillary microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segro, Scott S; Malik, Abdul

    2008-09-26

    A sol-gel polydimethyldiphenylsiloxane (PDMDPS) coating was developed for capillary microextraction on-line hyphenated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This coating was created using methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as the sol-gel precursor and di-hydroxy-terminated PDMDPS as the sol-gel active polymer. The methyl and phenyl groups on the sol-gel active polymer and the methyl groups on the sol-gel precursor ultimately turned into pendant groups providing the ability to extract non-polar analytes. A 40-cm segment of 0.25 mm I.D. fused silica capillary containing the sol-gel PDMDPS coating was installed as an external sampling loop in an HPLC injection port. Aqueous samples containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic compounds, ketones, and aldehydes were passed through this capillary wherein the analytes were extracted by the sol-gel coating. The extracted analytes were then transferred to the HPLC column using isocratic or gradient elution with an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. This capillary demonstrated excellent extraction capability for non-polar (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds) as well as moderately polar compounds, such as aromatic amines, ketones, and aldehydes. The test results indicate that PDMDPS can be successfully immobilized into a sol-gel network and that the resulting solvent-resistant sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid coating can be effectively used for on-line hyphenation of capillary microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography. The test results also indicate that the sol-gel PDMDPS coated capillary is resistant to high-temperature solvents, making it suitable for applications in high-temperature HPLC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the creation of a silica-based sol-gel PDMDPS coating used in capillary microextraction on-line hyphenated to HPLC.

  20. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  1. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  2. Identification of process suitable diluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean R. Peterman

    2014-01-01

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  3. Suitable footwear for enhanced safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Safety shoes are the theme of a new safety campaign. Always remember that accidents can happen - even to your feet! When entering hazardous areas such as underground halls, work sites, experiment assembly sites, workshops etc., sandals, ordinary shoes or similar light footwear should not be worn. Whatever the risks to which you may be exposed, always think safety and wear suitable footwear, i.e. safety shoes, which have non-slip soles and steel reinforcements to protect your feet from being crushed, fractured or pierced. Is it serious, Doctor? "Some traumas resulting from foot-related accidents - open fractures for instance - can be quite serious," explains CERN Works Doctor Véronique Fassnacht. "But the most common injuries are sprained ankles sustained during simple falls caused by differences in floor-levels (e.g. false floors). Fractures, bruising, surface wounds or deep wounds caused by objects falling onto the top of the foot are also quite common." ...

  4. Solvent extraction: the coordination chemistry behind extractive metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A Matthew; Bailey, Phillip J; Tasker, Peter A; Turkington, Jennifer R; Grant, Richard A; Love, Jason B

    2014-01-07

    The modes of action of the commercial solvent extractants used in extractive hydrometallurgy are classified according to whether the recovery process involves the transport of metal cations, M(n+), metalate anions, MXx(n-), or metal salts, MXx into a water-immiscible solvent. Well-established principles of coordination chemistry provide an explanation for the remarkable strengths and selectivities shown by most of these extractants. Reagents which achieve high selectivity when transporting metal cations or metal salts into a water-immiscible solvent usually operate in the inner coordination sphere of the metal and provide donor atom types or dispositions which favour the formation of particularly stable neutral complexes that have high solubility in the hydrocarbons commonly used in recovery processes. In the extraction of metalates, the structures of the neutral assemblies formed in the water-immiscible phase are usually not well defined and the cationic reagents can be assumed to operate in the outer coordination spheres. The formation of secondary bonds in the outer sphere using, for example, electrostatic or H-bonding interactions are favoured by the low polarity of the water-immiscible solvents.

  5. Switchable Polarity Solvents: Are They Green?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaumann, Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Solvents play an incredibly important role in large scale chemical reactions. Switchable polarity solvents may prove to be a class of solvent that offers energy and material efficiencies greater than existing solvents. This paper examines such solvents and their potential in a variety of chemical reactions.

  6. Effects of solubility properties of solvents and biomass on biomass pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-10-01

    Hildebrand solubility parameters of biomasses and pretreatment solvents were examined by a method of intrinsic viscosity. This is to be used as basic information in selecting a suitable solvent for biomass pretreatment processes. The effects of mixing1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIM-AC) and different solvents, lignin content in a pretreatment solvent, and biomass type on the Hildebrand solubility parameter and thermodynamic properties were carried out and calculated in this work. The Hildebrand solubility parameters of the mixtures are according to those of organic solvents: δH[EMIM-AC/DMA]=25.07biomass compositions (microcrystalline cellulose, xylan and alkali lignin) and biomasses (cassava pulp residue and rice straw) vary in the ranges of 25.14-26.13. The increases of lignin content in the pretreatment solvents lead to the Hildebrand solubility parameter becoming closer to that of lignin.

  7. Electrospun polycaprolactone matrices with tensile properties suitable for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Ravi, Maddaly; Rao, Suresh; Paul, Solomon F D

    2016-05-01

    The extracellular environment is a complex network of functional and structural components that impart chemical and mechanical stimuli that affect cellular function and fate. Cell differentiation on three dimensional scaffolds is also determined by the modulus of the substrate. Electrospun PCL nanofibers, which mimic the extra cellular matrix, have been developed with a wide variety of solvents and their combinations. The various studies have revealed that the solvents used influence the physical and mechanical properties, resulting in scaffolds with Young's modulus in the range of 1.8-15.4 MPa, more suitable for engineering of hard tissue like bone. The current study describes the use of benign binary solvent-generated fibrous scaffolds with a Young's modulus of 36.05 ± 13.08 kPa, which is almost 50 times lower than that of scaffolds derived from the commonly used solvents, characterized with myoblast, which can be further explored for applications in muscle and soft tissue engineering.

  8. Isolation and characterization of ancient hydrocarbon biomarkers from crystalline minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Carrasquillo, A.; Hallmann, C.; Sherman, L. S.; Waldbauer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon biomarker analysis is conventionally conducted on bitumen (soluble fossilized organic matter) extracted from sedimentary rocks using organic solvents. Biomarkers can also be generated by pyrolysis of kerogen (insoluble organic matter) in the same rocks. These approaches have met with much success where the organic matter has not seen significant levels of thermal metamorphism but more limited success when applied to thermally mature Archean rocks. Biomarkers have also been isolated from fluid inclusions of crystalline minerals and this approach has found wide application in petroleum exploration because of the capability of minerals that form crystals in reservoir rocks to trap organics from different episodes of fluid migration. Lastly, biogenic crystalline minerals are well known to trap organics including amino acids, fatty acids or hydrocarbons from those organisms that laid down the minerals. In fact, recent observations suggest that hydrocarbon biomarkers can be abundantly preserved in crystalline minerals where they may be protected over long periods of time and also distinguished from more recent generations of organics from endolithic organisms (modern) or anthropogenic (fossil hydrocarbon) contaminants. Here we report analyses of biomarker lipids trapped in fluid inclusions or otherwise having a "tight association" with the minerals in sedimentary rocks from Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic successions in Australia and Southern Africa. In particular, cores recovered from the Agouron Griqualand Drilling Project contain over 2500m of well-preserved late Archean Transvaal Supergroup sediments, dating from ca. 2.67 to 2.46Ga. Bitumen extracts of samples from these strata were obtained using clean drilling, sampling and handling protocols and without overprinting with contaminant hydrocarbons. Dissolution of the mineral matrix of extracted sediments, followed by another solvent extraction, yielded a second bitumen that comprised hydrocarbons that

  9. Biofilm comprising phototrophic, diazotrophic, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria: a promising consortium in the bioremediation of aquatic hydrocarbon pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Dhia; Kansour, Mayada K; Rayan, Rehab; Radwan, Samir S

    2013-05-01

    Biofilms harboring simultaneously anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophic bacteria, diazotrophic bacteria, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were established on glass slides suspended in pristine and oily seawater. Via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis on PCR-amplified rRNA gene sequence fragments from the extracted DNA from biofilms, followed by band amplification, biofilm composition was determined. The biofilms contained anoxygenic phototrophs belonging to alphaproteobacteria; pico- and filamentous cyanobacteria (oxygenic phototrophs); two species of the diazotroph Azospirillum; and two hydrocarbon-utilizing gammaproteobacterial genera, Cycloclasticus and Oleibacter. The coexistence of all these microbial taxa with different physiologies in the biofilm makes the whole community nutritionally self-sufficient and adequately aerated, a condition quite suitable for the microbial biodegradation of aquatic pollutant hydrocarbons.

  10. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  11. The Solvent Selection framework: solvents for organic synthesis, separation processes and ionic-organic synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sansonetti, Sascha; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    problems are presented: 1) solvent selection and design for organic synthesis, 2) solvent screening and design of solvent mixtures for pharmaceutical applications and 3) ionic liquids selection and design as solvents. The application of the framework is highlighted successfully through case studies...... focusing on solvent replacement problem in organic synthesis and solvent mixture design for ibuprofen respectively....

  12. Contrasting solvent polarity effect on the photophysical properties of two newly synthesized aminostyryl dyes in the lower and in the higher solvent polarity regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, M; Mohanty, J; Singh, P K; Bhasikuttan, A C; Rajule, R N; Satam, V S; Bendre, S R; Kanetkar, V R; Pal, H

    2010-04-08

    Solvent polarity effect on the photophysical properties of two newly synthesized aminostyryl-thiazoloquinoxaline dyes, one with a flexible diphenylamino group, namely, N,N-diphenyl-4-[2-(thiazolo[4,5-b]quinoxalin-2-yl)vinyl]aniline (TQ1), and the other with a rigid julolidinylamino group, namely, (9-[2-(thiazolo[4,5-b]quinoxalin-2-yl)vinyl]julolidine) (TQ2), have been investigated in different aprotic solvents and solvent mixtures. From the polarity dependent changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectral properties, it is indicated that the fluorescent states of the dyes are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. For both the dyes, the photophysical properties like fluorescence quantum yields (Phi(f)), fluorescence lifetimes (tau(f)), radiative rate constants (k(f) = Phi(f)/tau(f)), and nonradiative rate constants (k(nr) = 1/tau(f) - Phi(f)/tau(f)) show clearly contrasting solvent polarity effects in the lower and in the higher solvent polarity region, causing an interesting reversal in the properties below and above an intermediate solvent polarity. It is inferred that the domination of the cis-trans isomerization in the lower solvent polarity region and that of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state formation in the higher solvent polarity region are responsible for the observed contrasting solvent polarity effects on the photophysical properties of the two dyes. As both isomerization and TICT state formation causes an enhancement in the nonradiative decay rate of the excited dyes and both the processes become less significant at the intermediate solvent polarity region, the two dyes show their largest Phi(f) and tau(f) values at intermediate solvent polarities. Suitable mechanistic schemes have been proposed and qualitative potential energy diagrams have been presented to explain the observed results with the changes in the polarity of the solvents used.

  13. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  14. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  15. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  16. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  17. Practical Approaches to Green Solvents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joseph M. DeSimone

    2002-01-01

    Solvents are widely used in commercial manufacturing and service industries. Despite abundant precaution, they inevitably contaminate our air, land, and water because they are difficult to contain and recycle...

  18. Hansen Cleaning Solvent Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental regulation will force current baseline  precision cleaning solvent (AK-225) to be phased out starting 2015. We plan to develop  a new...

  19. Bioremediation of severely weathered hydrocarbons: is it possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J. R.; Villa, R.; Sierra, C.; Sotres, A.; Pelaez, A. I.; Sanchez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Weathering processes of spilled hydrocarbons promote a reduced biodegradability of petroleum compounds mixtures, and consequently bioremediation techniques are often ruled out within the selection of suitable remediation approaches. This is truly relevant wherever old spills at abandoned industrial sites have to be remediated. However it is well known most of the remaining fractions and individual compounds of weathered oil are still biodegradable, although at slow rates than alkanes or no and two-ring aromatics. (Author)

  20. Applied biotransformations in green solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáiz, María J; Alcántara, Andrés R; García, José I; Sinisterra, José V

    2010-08-16

    The definite interest in implementing sustainable industrial technologies has impelled the use of biocatalysts (enzymes or cells), leading to high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivities under mild conditions. As usual substrates are not soluble in water, the employ of organic solvents is mandatory. We will focus on different attempts to combine the valuable properties of green solvents with the advantages of using biocatalysts for developing cleaner synthetic processes.

  1. Vapour permeation for the recovery of organic solvents from waste air streams: separation capacities and process optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemann, M.; Leemann, M.; Eigenberger, G.; Strathmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    Vapour permeation is a potentially suitable technology for the recovery of organic solvents from waste air streams. New solvent stable capillary membrane modules that are currently emerging on the market provide large membrane areas for an acceptable price and enhance the competitiveness of this

  2. Removal of Phenol from Dilute Solutions by Predispersed Solvent Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Predispersed solvent extraction (PDSE) is a new method for separating solutes from aqueous solution by solvent extraction and one which has shown promise for extraction from extremely dilute solution very efficient and very quick. The use of colloidal liquid aphrons in predispersed solvent extraction may ameliorate the problems such as emulsion formation, reduction of interfacial mass transfer and low interfacial mass transfer areas in solvent extraction process. In present paper, colloidal liquid aphrons are successfully generated using kerosene as a solvent, tributyl phosphate(TBP) as an extractant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate(SDBS) as surfactant in aqueous phase and Tween-80 in oil phase. Extraction of phenol from dilute solution was studied by using colloidal liquid aphrons and colloidal gas aphrons in a semi-batch extraction column. It has been found that the PDSE process is more suitable for extraction of dilute solutions. It has also been discovered that the PDSE process has a great advantage over traditional single-stage extraction process.

  3. Solution growth of silicon carbide using unary chromium solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Ryo; Kawanishi, Sakiko; Narumi, Taka; Sasaki, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    Solution growth of silicon carbide (SiC) using unary chromium (Cr) solvent was studied because the system enables a high solubility difference and a low degree of supersaturation, which would lead to rapid growth with a stabilized growth interface. The liquidus composition at SiC saturation in a quasi-binary Cr-SiC system was studied at 1823-2173 K. The measured carbon (C) contents are in good agreement with the thermodynamic evaluation using the sub-regular solution model. In addition, growth experiments using a unary Cr solvent were performed by the bottom-seeded travelling solvent method. The obtained growth rates at 1803-1923 K with a temperature difference of 15-70 K were proportional to the solubility difference between the seed and source temperatures, indicating that the growth was controlled by the mass transfer of C in the solution. The maximum growth rate of 720 μm/h at 1803 K was much higher than the growth rate by Si-rich solvents, suggesting that the Cr-rich solvent is suitable for the rapid growth at a low temperature.

  4. Study of ionic equilibria of indotricarbocyanines in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyadyusha, G.G.; Ishchenko, A.A.; Derevyanko, N.A.; Tolmachev, A.I.

    1982-05-01

    Study of the equilibria in nonpolar solvents is very complicated by the poor solubility of the salt-like dyes. Indotricarbocyanines I and II were found to be fairly soluble in aromatic hydrocarbons for solving these problems by means of electronic spectra. In the present work, their absorption spectra were studied in benzene, toluene, and m-xylene (the absorption spectra were measured on the SF-8 spectrophotometer). It was shown that the dyes studied in these solvents have spectral bands of unusual form of polymethine dyes. At the long wave edge of the spectra of indotricarbocyanines, a distinct band appears, whose intensity is very dependent on the nature of the anion. In the case of perchlorate I, it has a lower intensity, and in the case of iodide II, the intensity is higher.

  5. 45 CFR 12a.4 - Suitability determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suitability determination. 12a.4 Section 12a.4... PROPERTY TO ASSIST THE HOMELESS § 12a.4 Suitability determination. (a) Suitability determination. Within 30... determination to the landholding agency. Properties that are under lease, contract, license, or agreement by...

  6. 24 CFR 581.4 - Suitability determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reviewed for suitability. HUD will maintain a written public record of the following: (1) The suitability... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suitability determination. 581.4... (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  7. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  8. Evolution of a degradative bacterial consortium during the enrichment of naphtha solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, L; Confalonieri, A; Larcher, S; Andreoni, V

    2000-06-01

    A microbial mixed culture able to degrade naphtha solvent, a model of hydrocarbon aromatic mixture, was isolated from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil. Composition of the population was monitored by phenotypic and molecular methods applied on soil DNA, on whole enrichment culture DNA, and on 85 isolated strains. Strains were characterized for their 16S rDNA restriction profiles and for their random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles. Catabolic capabilities were monitored by phenotypic traits and by PCR assays for the presence of the catabolic genes methyl mono-oxygenase ( xylA, M), catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (xylE) and toluene dioxygenase (todC1) of TOL and TOD pathways. Different haplotypes belonging to Pseudomonas putida, Ps. aureofaciens and Ps. aeruginosa were found to degrade aromatic compounds and naphtha solvent. The intrinsic catabolic activity of the microbial population of the polluted site was detected by PCR amplification of the xylE gene directly from soil DNA.

  9. Optimization and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Zhou, Hui; Gan, Jay; Sun, Mingxing; Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Shen, Guoqing

    2015-03-01

    The agronomic benefit of biochar has attracted widespread attention to biochar-based fertilizers. However, the inevitable presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar is a matter of concern because of the health and ecological risks of these compounds. The strong adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to biochar complicates their analysis and extraction from biochar-based fertilizers. In this study, we optimized and validated a method for determining the 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers. Results showed that accelerated solvent extraction exhibited high extraction efficiency. Based on a Box-Behnken design with a triplicate central point, accelerated solvent extraction was used under the following optimal operational conditions: extraction temperature of 78°C, extraction time of 17 min, and two static cycles. The optimized method was validated by assessing the linearity of analysis, limit of detection, limit of quantification, recovery, and application to real samples. The results showed that the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited good linearity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The limits of detection varied between 0.001 (phenanthrene) and 0.021 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene), and the limits of quantification varied between 0.004 (phenanthrene) and 0.069 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene). The relative recoveries of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were 70.26-102.99%.

  10. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hy...

  11. Ultrasound Energy Effect on Solvent Extraction of Amaranth Seed Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Il; Chung, Ki Won; Lee, Seung Bum; Hong, In Kwon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kyung Ai [Seoul Metropolitan Government Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been widely applied to cleaning, medical appliances, extraction, etc. And ultrasonic energy can be applied to solvent extraction of plant oil from amaranth seed. Amaranth seed oil contains small amount of squalene. Squalene is polyunsaturated branched hydrocarbon, which is an essential part of the human body. In this study, the seed oil was extracted from amaranth seed by ultrasonic solvent extraction process. Ultrasonic irradiation time was 1, 3 ,5, 10, 20 and 30 min and extraction temperature was 20, 30, and 40 degree C. And ultrasonic power was 390 W and 520 W. The extracted amounts of amaranth seed oil and squalene were increased with the increase of ultrasonic power and irradiation time. Using ultrasonic energy in solvent extraction, extraction time was very shorten. The optimum extraction temperature was 30 degree C, it was caused that ultrasonic energy effects were increased in the matters of low temperature. The maximum extracted amount of amaranth seed oil was 0.746 g and squalene was 37.54 mg per 10 g amaranth seed at 30 degree C. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of regular organic solvents on cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic activities in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Han, Yonglong; Meng, Xiangle; Sun, Xipeng; Yu, Qi; Li, Yan; Wan, Lili; Huo, Yan; Guo, Cheng

    2010-11-01

    The effects of regular organic solvents on the metabolic activities of various human cytochromes P450 (P450s) have been reported. However, very little is known about their influence on metabolic activities mediated by P450s in the rat liver microsomes (RLM). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of organic solvents such as methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), acetone, and ethanol on CYP1A, CYP2C, CYP2D, CYP2E, and CYP3A-mediated metabolism using RLM. The results showed that the activities of most rat P450 enzymes appeared to be organic solvent-dependent, and the metabolism of the tested probes were remarkably reduced when the concentration of organic solvents was up to 5% v/v, whereas most organic solvents demonstrated no significant interference when the concentration was below 1%, with the exception of DMSO. In addition, organic solvents exhibited different inhibitory effects, for example, CYP2D and CYP2E showed a significant reduction of activities at lower concentrations of organic solvents. Hence, this phenomenon should be taken into consideration when designing in vitro metabolism studies of new chemical entities. Therefore, we recommend acetonitrile as the most suitable solvent for RLM incubations, and the content of organic solvent should be kept lower than 1% v/v.

  13. Handbook of green chemistry, green solvents, supercritical solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Anastas, Paul T; Jessop, Philip G

    2014-01-01

    Green Chemistry is a vitally important subject area in a world where being as green and environmentally sound as possible is no longer a luxury but a necessity. Its applications include the design of chemical products and processes that help to reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. The Handbook of Green Chemistry comprises 12 volumes, split into subject-specific sets as follows: Set I: Green Catalysis Set II: Green Solvents Volume 4: Supercritical Solvents Volume 5: Reactions in Water Volume 6: Ionic Liquids

  14. Computer Aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Conte, Elisa; Abildskov, Jens

    , millions of tons solvents have to be wasted every year [2]. Therefore, it becomes important to minimize and optimize the use of organic solvents as much as possible, to satisfy the “Green Chemistry Principles” [3]. Another challenge is that currently solvent selection relies very much on previous...... is to develop a systematic framework and implement it as software for selection and design of solvents for many applications including organic synthesis, complex reaction systems and solvent-based separations. The solvent selection framework is based on a combination of knowledge from industrial practice...... identification of solvent candidates using special software ProCAMD and ProPred, which are the implementations of computer-aided molecular techniques. The second consists of assigning the RS-indices following the reaction–solvent and then consulting the known solvent database and identifying the set of solvents...

  15. Method for predicting fouling tendency of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-07-23

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock fouling tendency for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  16. A novel zeolite process for clean end use of hydrocarbon products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskinen, K.M. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland). Technology Centre

    1996-12-31

    In recent years zeolites such as ZSM-5 have attracted considerable interest for the catalysis of a wide range of hydrocarbon transformations. A novel process developed by Neste converts light olefins to higher molecular weight hydrocarbon products. A wide range of high quality diesel, solvents and lube oils can be produced by the new NESKO process. Hydrotreated products have excellent properties; negligible sulphur or nitrogen compounds, very low aromatic content and pour point lower than -50 deg C. Proprietary technology is used in this olefin oligomerization process. (author) (7 refs.)

  17. Pressurized solvent extraction of environmental organic compounds in soils using a supercritical fluid extractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.; Landriault, M.; Fingas, M. [Emergencies Science Division, Environmement Canada, Environment Technology Centre, Ontario (Canada); Llompart, M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Nutricieon y bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica

    1998-11-01

    The applicability of pressurised solvent extraction (PSE) for the quantitative extraction of different of semi-volatiles, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons have been evaluated. For this study a conventional supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) system, the Suprex SFE/50 was adapted to function as a pressurised solvent extraction system. Solid samples were weighed into the SFE thimble and extracted using conventional extraction solvents instead of superficial carbon dioxide. Parameters such as extraction temperature and effect of modifiers were investigated. Although limited by the 150 deg. C maximum oven temperature, it was found effective extraction could still be carried out in less than 25 min for all the compounds studied. The technique was applied to different real matrices contaminated with hydrocarbons, PAHs and phenols. Validations of the technique were performed using standard reference materials. Recoveries for these matrices were good (> 75 %) and precision was generally less than a 10 % RSD. Extensive comparison of this technique with sonication and with microwave assisted extraction (MAE) were made, and recoveries were found to be comparable to MAE and superior to sonication. (authors) 15 refs.

  18. Versatile Production of Poly(Epsilon-Caprolactone) Fibers by Electrospinning Using Benign Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Liliana; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-04-15

    The electrospinning technique is widely used for the fabrication of micro- and nanofibrous structures. Recent studies have focused on the use of less toxic and harmful solvents (benign solvents) for electrospinning, even if those solvents usually require an accurate and longer process of optimization. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the use of benign solvents, like acetic acid and formic acid, for the fabrication of microfibrous and nanofibrous electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) mats. The solvent systems were also shown to be suitable for the fabrication of electrospun structures with macroporosity, as well as for the fabrication of composite electrospun mats, fabricated by the addition of bioactive glass (45S5 composition) particles in the polymeric solution.

  19. Determination of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) solubility parameters: application to solvent substitution in a microencapsulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, C; Fréville, V; Ruffin, E; Marote, P; Gauvrit, J Y; Briançon, S; Lantéri, P

    2010-01-04

    The evolution of regulation on chemical substances (i.e. REACH regulation) calls for the progressive substitution of toxic chemicals in formulations when suitable alternatives have been identified. In this context, the method of Hansen solubility parameters was applied to identify an alternative solvent less toxic than methylene chloride used in a microencapsulation process. During the process based on a multiple emulsion (W/O/W) with solvent evaporation/extraction method, the solvent has to dissolve a polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), which forms a polymeric matrix encapsulating or entrapping a therapeutic protein as the solvent is extracted. Therefore the three partial solubility parameters of PCL have been determined by a group contribution method, swelling experiments and turbidimetric titration. The results obtained allowed us to find a solvent, anisole, able to solubilize PCL and to form a multiple emulsion with aqueous solutions. A feasibility test was conducted under standard operating conditions and allowed the production of PCL microspheres.

  20. Effect of solvents on the fractionation of high oleic-high stearic sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootello, Miguel A; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2015-04-01

    Solvent fractionation of high oleic-high stearic (HOHS) sunflower oil was studied to determine the best solvent to use (hexane or acetone) in terms of the operational parameters and properties of the final stearins. Acetone fractionation on two types of HOHS sunflower oils (N17 and N20) was carried out at temperatures from 5 to 10 °C using micelles with different oil/solvent ratios. Acetone was more suitable than hexane as a solvent for HSHO sunflower oil fractionation because it allowed the oil to be fractionated at higher temperatures and at lower supercooling degrees. Likewise, a sunflower soft stearin obtained by dry fractionation of HOHS sunflower oil was also used to produce high-melting point stearins by acetone or hexane fractionation. The fractionation of these stearins could be performed at higher temperatures and gave higher yields. The combination of dry and solvent fractionation to obtain tailor-made stearins is discussed.

  1. Glycerol based solvents: synthesis, properties and applications

    OpenAIRE

    García, José I.; García-Marín, Héctor; Pires, Elísabet

    2014-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of glycerol and glycerol derivatives as solvents are reviewed. There are an increasing number of examples of the use of glycerol itself as a reaction medium, solvent-reagent or a dispersive medium for a large variety of applications. In the case of glycerol derivatives, new synthetic methods, physico-chemical properties and application examples as solvents are revised. Recent studies in the field of solvent classification, as well as solvent substitution is...

  2. An experimental investigation of Fang's Ag superlens suitable for integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of the Fang Ag superlens structure [1] suitable for further processing and integration in bio-chips by replacing PMMA with a highly chemical resistant cyclo-olefin copolymer, mr-I T85 (Micro Resist Technology, Berlin, Germany). The superlens was able to resolve...... processing is needed involving various organic polar solvents, PMMA cannot be used. We propose to use mr-I T85, which is highly chemically resistant to acids and polar solvents. Our superlens stack consists of a quartz/chrome grating mask, a 40 nm layer of mr-I T85, 35 nm Ag, and finally 70 nm...... to the excitation wavelength of the surface plasmons at the mr-I T85/Ag interface. Supporting COMSOL simulations illustrate the field intensity distribution inside the resist as well as the presence of surface plasmons at the mr-I T85/Ag boundary. AFM scans of the exposed structure revealed 80 nm gratings....

  3. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  4. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  5. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  6. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  7. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  8. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  9. Treatment of hydrocarbon contamination under flow through conditions by using magnetite catalyzed chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, M; Faure, P; Lorgeoux, C; Ruby, C; Hanna, K

    2013-01-01

    Soil pollution by hydrocarbons (aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons) is a major environmental issue. Various treatments have been used to remove them from contaminated soils. In our previous studies, the ability of magnetite has been successfully explored to catalyze chemical oxidation for hydrocarbon remediation in batch slurry system. In the present laboratory study, column experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of magnetite catalyzed Fenton-like (FL) and activated persulfate (AP) oxidation for hydrocarbon degradation. Flow-through column experiments are intended to provide a better representation of field conditions. Organic extracts isolated from three different soils (an oil-contaminated soil from petrochemical industrial site and two soils polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) originating from coking plant sites) were spiked on sand. After solvent evaporation, spiked sand was packed in column and was subjected to oxidation using magnetite as catalyst. Oxidant solution was injected at a flow rate of 0.1 mL min(-1) under water-saturated conditions. Organic analyses were performed by GC-mass spectrometry, GC-flame ionization detector, and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Significant abatement of both types of hydrocarbons (60-70 %) was achieved after chemical oxidation (FL and AP) of organic extracts. No significant by-products were formed during oxidation experiment, underscoring the complete degradation of hydrocarbons. No selective degradation was observed for FL with almost similar efficiency towards all hydrocarbons. However, AP showed less reactivity towards higher molecular weight PAHs and aromatic oxygenated compounds. Results of this study demonstrated that magnetite-catalyzed chemical oxidation can effectively degrade both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons (enhanced available contaminants) under flow-through conditions.

  10. J-aggregation, its impact on excited state dynamics and unique solvent effects on macroscopic assembly of a core-substituted naphthalenediimide

    KAUST Repository

    Kar, Haridas

    2015-03-12

    Herein we reveal a straightforward supramolecular design for the H-bonding driven J-aggregation of an amine-substituted cNDI in aliphatic hydrocarbons. Transient absorption spectroscopy reveals sub-ps intramolecular electron transfer in isolated NDI molecules in a THF solution followed by a fast recombination process, while a remarkable extension of the excited state lifetime by more than one order of magnitude occurred in methylcyclohexane likely owing to an increased charge-separation as a result of better delocalization of the charge-separated states in J-aggregates. We also describe unique solvent-effects on the macroscopic structure and morphology. While J-aggregation with similar photophysical characteristics was noticed in all the tested aliphatic hydrocarbons, the morphology strongly depends on the “structure” of the solvents. In linear hydrocarbons (n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane or n-dodecane), formation of an entangled fibrillar network leads to macroscopic gelation while in cyclic hydrocarbons (methylcyclohexane or cyclohexane) although having a similar polarity, the cNDI exhibits nanoscale spherical particles. These unprecedented solvent effects were rationalized by establishing structure-dependent specific interactions of the solvent molecules with the cNDI which may serve as a general guideline for solvent-induced morphology-control of structurally related self-assembled materials.

  11. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  12. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  13. Aggregation behavior modulation of 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide by organic solvents in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Lamei; Wang, Huiyong; Wu, Changzeng

    2011-05-05

    Material preparation in ionic liquids and environmental pollution control by ionic liquids are often closely dependent on the aggregation behavior of ionic liquids in solution. In the present work, conductivity, fluorescence probe, and dynamic light scattering techniques have been used to study the effect of organic solvents on the aggregation behavior of 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide in water. It was shown that the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), the ionization degree of the aggregates (α), and the standard Gibbs energy of aggregation (ΔG(m)°) of the ionic liquid increase, while its aggregation number (N(agg)) and aggregates' size decrease with increasing concentration of organic additives in water. These results have been discussed from the favorable interactions of alkyl chain of the ionic liquid with the mixed solvents. It is suggested that the solvophobic parameter, characterized quantitatively by Gibbs energy of transfer of hydrocarbon from gas into a given solvent, can be used to account for the effect of organic additives on the formation and growth of the ionic liquid aggregates in water. Aggregation behavior of ionic liquids in aqueous organic solutions can be modulated simply by the solvophobic parameters of hydrocarbon in the mixed solvents.

  14. Coarse grained model for calculating the ion mobility of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroboshi, Y.; Takemura, K.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrocarbons are widely used as insulating compounds. However, their fundamental characteristics in conduction phenomena are not completely understood. A great deal of effort is required to determine reasonable ionic behavior from experiments because of their complicated procedures and tight controls of the temperature and the purity of the liquids. In order to understand the conduction phenomena, we have theoretically calculated the ion mobilities of hydrocarbons and investigated their characteristics using the coarse grained model in molecular dynamics simulations. We assumed a molecule of hydrocarbons to be a bead and simulated its dependence on the viscosity, electric field, and temperature. Furthermore, we verified the suitability of the conformation, scale size, and long-range interactions for the ion mobility. The results of the simulations show that the ion mobility values agree reasonably well with the values from Walden's rule and depend on the viscosity but not on the electric field. The ion mobility and self-diffusion coefficient exponentially increase with increasing temperature, while the activation energy decreases with increasing molecular size. These values and characteristics of the ion mobility are in reasonable agreement with experimental results. In the future, we can understand not only the ion mobilies of hydrocarbons in conduction, but also we can predict general phenomena in electrochemistry with molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. A Combustion Chemistry Analysis of Carbonate Solvents in Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S J; Timmons, A; Pitz, W J

    2008-11-13

    Under abusive conditions Li-ion batteries can rupture, ejecting electrolyte and other flammable gases. In this paper we consider some of the thermochemical properties of these gases that will determine whether they ignite and how energetically they burn. We show that flames of carbonate solvents are fundamentally less energetic than those of conventional hydrocarbons. An example of this difference is given using a recently developed mechanism for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) combustion, where we show that a diffusion flame burning DMC has only half the peak energy release rate of an analogous propane flame. We find a significant variation among the carbonate solvents in the factors that are important to determining flammability, such as combustion enthalpy and vaporization enthalpy. This result suggests that thermochemical and kinetic factors might well be considered when choosing solvent mixtures.

  16. Personality and long term exposure to organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, K.; Martelin, T.

    1980-01-01

    Personality, especially emotional reactions of two solvent exposed groups and a nonexposed reference group were described by means of 20 formal, content and check-list type of Rorschach variables. Another objective of the study was to explore the suitability and psychological meaning of other types of Rorschach variables than those applied earlier in the field of behavioral toxicology. The factor analyses grouped the applied variables into factors of Productivity, Ego Strength, Control of Emotionality, Defensive Introversion and Aggressiveness. One solvent group, a patient groups (N.53), was characterized by a high number of Organic signs and a low Genetic Level, indicating possible psychoorganic deterioration. The other solvent group, styrene exposed but subjectively healthy (N.98), was characterized by few emotional reactions, low Anxiety and a low number of Neurotic Signs. the long duration of exposure of the solvent patient group (mean 10.2 +/- 8.7 years) was related to variables of the Productivity factor, a finding that indicates a possible better adjustment of those exposed for a longer time. The duration of exposure of the styrene exposed group (mean 4.9 +/- 3.2 years) revealed a very slight relation to personality variables, but the mean urinary mandelic acid concentration, indicating the level of styrene exposure, correlated with increased emotional reactions. For the most part definite causal conclusions could not be drawn because of the cross-sectional design of the study.

  17. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using 1H NMR spectroscopy [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk W. Lachenmeier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH. MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products. Quantitative determination (qNMR has been established using the ERETIC methodology (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations based on the PULCON principle (pulse length based concentration determination. Various mineral hydrocarbons (e.g., white oils, paraffins or petroleum jelly were dissolved in deuterated chloroform. The ERETIC factor was established using a quantification reference sample containing ethylbenzene and tetrachloronitrobenzene. The following spectral regions were integrated: MOSH δ 3.0 – 0.2 ppm and MOAH δ 9.2 - 6.5, excluding solvent signals. Validation showed a sufficient precision of the method with a coefficient of variation <6% and a limit of detection <0.1 g/100 g. The applicability of the method was proven by analysing 27 authentic samples with MOSH and MOAH contents in the range of 90-109 g/100 g and 0.02-1.10 g/100 g, respectively. It is important to distinguish this new NMR-approach from the hyphenated liquid chromatography-gas chromatography methodology previously used to characterize MOSH/MOAH amounts in cosmetic products. For mineral hydrocarbon raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetic products, NMR delivers higher specificity without any sample preparation besides dilution. Our sample survey shows that previous methods may have overestimated the MOAH amount in mineral oil products and opens new paths to characterize this fraction. Therefore, the developed method can be applied for routine monitoring of consumer

  18. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using 1H NMR spectroscopy [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk W. Lachenmeier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH. MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products. Quantitative determination (qNMR has been established using the ERETIC methodology (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations based on the PULCON principle (pulse length based concentration determination. Various mineral hydrocarbons (e.g., white oils, paraffins or petroleum jelly were dissolved in deuterated chloroform. The ERETIC factor was established using a quantification reference sample containing ethylbenzene and tetrachloronitrobenzene. The following spectral regions were integrated: MOSH δ 3.0 – 0.2 ppm and MOAH δ 9.2 - 6.5, excluding solvent signals. Validation showed a sufficient precision of the method with a coefficient of variation <6% and a limit of detection <0.1 g/100 g. The applicability of the method was proven by analysing 27 authentic samples with MOSH and MOAH contents in the range of 90-109 g/100 g and 0.02-1.10 g/100 g, respectively. It is important to distinguish this new NMR-approach from the hyphenated liquid chromatography-gas chromatography methodology previously used to characterize MOSH/MOAH amounts in cosmetic products. For mineral hydrocarbon raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetic products, NMR delivers higher specificity without any sample preparation besides dilution. Our sample survey shows that previous methods may have overestimated the MOAH amount in mineral oil products and opens new paths to characterize this fraction. Therefore, the developed method can be applied for routine monitoring of consumer

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  20. How to Evaluate the Rice Cultivation Suitability?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxi; LI; Yueping; ZHANG; Changsong; WANG; Wei; MAO; Tianwen; HANG; Ming; CHEN; Bingning; ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    To rationally allocate farmland resources,and scientifically make farming industrial planning,we take Yizheng City in Jiangsu Province as the research object,and select 13 indicators.Based on Farmland Resources Management Information System in Yizheng City,we establish AHP model,and membership function model,for the evaluation of farmland suitability of rice.The results show that the farmland area in the highly suitable areas accounts for 10.2%of the total farmland area;the farmland area in the suitable areas accounts for 56.08%of the total farmland area;the farmland area in the marginally suitable areas accounts for 25.50%of the total farmland area;the farmland area in the unsuitable areas accounts for 8.22%of the total farmland area.There is significant positive correlation between the actual yield of rice surveyed and suitability index obtained through evaluation(R2=0.1964,319 samples);the actual yield of rice in the highly suitable areas is higher than in the marginally suitable areas and suitable areas,and the rice yield is the lowest in the unsuitable areas.

  1. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts.

  2. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Cold Plasma Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons via cold plasma reaction with catalysts has been studied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Methane can be converted into C2 hydrocarbons in different selectivity depending on the form of the reactor, power of plasma, flow rate of methane, ratio of N2/CH4 and nature of the catalysts. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can reach as high as 98.64%, and the conversion of methane as high as 60% and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons as high as 50% are obtained. Coking can be minimized under the conditions of: proper selection of the catalysts,appropriate high flow rate of inlet methane and suitable ratio of N2 to CH4. The catalyst surface provides active sites for radical recombination.

  3. A method for removing aromatic hydrocarbons from liquid n-paraffins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle, A.A.; Pavlyuk, N.F.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Semenov, L.V.; Zakhrov, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    In the known method for removing aromatic hydrocarbons from liquid n-paraffins through liquid extraction by a selective solvent, in order to increase the output of the paraffins methoxyacetonitrile (I) is used as the selective solvent. The advantages of the extraction process using I are high output and quality of the purified paraffins and the possibility of using series produced extractors of medium effectiveness. The high selectivity of I relative to aromatic hydrocarbons, unlike low selective acetone in the known method and its high density (1.032) as compared with acetone (0.790) provide for effective mass exchange in industrial performance of the process. The regeneration of I from the extraction phase may be accomplished through rectification. In an example of single stage isolation of mixtures of n-tetradecane with 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene and 1-methylnaphthaline (a temperature of 30 degrees, a ratio of solvent to raw material of 3, an aromatic hydrocarbon content in the mixture of 1.0 percent) showed the following.

  4. Saturated hydrocarbon content in olive fruits and crude olive pomace oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Coca, Raquel B; Pérez-Camino, María Del Carmen; Moreda, Wenceslao

    2016-01-01

    Olive fruits contain an n-alkane series of saturated hydrocarbons mainly in the pulp. Lower amounts of a complex mixture of paraffins, unresolved by gas chromatography (UCM--unresolved complex mixture), have been found in cuticle, stone (woody shell and seed), olive leaves, and talc used as an aid to olive oil extraction. The amounts of both kinds of hydrocarbons are related to the olive cultivar and are transferred to oils in a proportion depending on the oil-obtaining process (centrifugation or solvent extraction). In olive oil obtained by centrifugation, only n-alkanes were detected. However, in olive oil extracted by second centrifugation, small amounts of UCM paraffins were detected together with the n-alkanes. Olive pomace oils showed a very variable content of both types of hydrocarbons according to the different obtaining process, such as double centrifugation, solvent extraction or centrifugation followed by solvent extraction. 'White mineral oil' used in oil extraction machinery is the source of the high concentrations of UCM paraffins found in some olive and olive pomace oils. In the case of second centrifugation olive oil, a maximum limit of 50 mg kg(-1) of UCM is suggested, whereas in the case of crude olive pomace oil, it amounts to 250 mg kg(-1) plus an additional minimum of 1.0 for the n-alkanes/UCM ratio.

  5. Methods for analysis of trace levels (. mu. g/kg) of hydrocarbons in the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesler, S.N.; Gump, B.H.; Hertz, H.S.; May, W.E.; Wise, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of dynamic headspace sampling and coupled-column LC either alone or in combination offers a number of advantages over most of the current sample preparation techniques for ..mu..g/kg hydrocarbon analysis of marine sediment and water samples. These techniques require minimal sample handling, thereby reducing the risks of loss of sample components and of possible contamination. Volatile components of the sample are efficiently separated from the matrix in a closed system and collected in a concentrated form that is free from large amounts of solvents and ready for GC/GC-MS analysis. A significant advantage derives from the fact that water is the only solvent needed for the preparation of water and sediment samples. The use of hydrocarbon-free water reduces opportunities for contamination of the sample by fossil hydrocarbons. Tissue samples must be stripped of biogenic nonhydrocarbon constituents prior to GC/GC-MS analysis. However, low blanks (< 20 ..mu..g/kg) can be obtained if special care is used in distillation of solvents and preparation of columns used in the LC clean-up.

  6. Modified Hyperbranched Polyglycerol as Dispersant for Size Control and Stabilization of Gold Nanoparticles in Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanyu; He, Guijin; Guo, Yongsheng; Xie, Hujun; Fang, Wenjun

    2017-09-01

    Hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) is modified with dodecanethiol (DS) via the "thiol-ene" click reaction to obtain an amphiphilic product DSHPG. The molecular structures of DSHPG samples are characterized by NMR, FTIR, and GPC, and the thermal behaviors are characterized by DSC and TGA. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are prepared with DSHPG as the stabilizer and surface-modification reagent. The size of Au NPs can be tuned by changing the molecular weight of HPG. It is observed that the HPG molecular weights of 1123, 3826, and 55,075 lead to the NP diameters of 4.1 nm for Au@DSHPG-1, 9.7 nm for Au@DSHPG-2, and 15.1 nm for Au@DSHPG-3, respectively. The morphology and size of Au NPs are characterized by TEM and DLS. Especially, the dispersion abilities of Au NPs in different pure solvents and co-solvent mixtures are investigated. The long alkyl chains on DSHPG give the ability of Au NPs to be well dispersed in nonpolar solvents. Hydrocarbon-based nanofluids can be obtained from the hydrophobic Au NPs dispersed into a series of hydrocarbons. The dispersion stability for Au NPs in hydrocarbons is monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, and the relative concentration of Au NPs is observed to still maintain over 80% after 3600 h.

  7. Metabolism of benzene, toluene, and xylene hydrocarbons in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao; Song; Bartha

    1998-12-01

    Enrichment cultures obtained from soil exposed to benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) mineralized benzene and toluene but cometabolized only xylene isomers, forming polymeric residues. This observation prompted us to investigate the metabolism of 14C-labeled BTX hydrocarbons in soil, either individually or as mixtures. BTX-supplemented soil was incubated aerobically for up to 4 weeks in a sealed system that automatically replenished any O2 consumed. The decrease in solvent vapors and the production of 14CO2 were monitored. At the conclusion of each experiment, 14C distribution in solvent-extractable polymers, biomass, and humic material was determined, obtaining 14C mass balances of 85 to 98%. BTX compounds were extensively mineralized in soil, regardless of whether they were presented singly or in combinations. No evidence was obtained for the formation of solvent-extractable polymers from xylenes in soil, but 14C distribution in biomass (5 to 10%) and humus (12 to 32%) was unusual for all BTX compounds and especially for toluene and the xylenes. The results suggest that catechol intermediates of BTX degradation are preferentially polymerized into the soil humus and that the methyl substituents of the catechols derived from toluene and especially from xylenes enhance this incorporation. In contrast to inhibitory residues formed from xylene cometabolism in culture, the humus-incorporated xylene residues showed no significant toxicity in the Microtox assay.

  8. Metabolism of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene Hydrocarbons in Soil†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C.-W.; Song, H.-G.; Bartha, R.

    1998-01-01

    Enrichment cultures obtained from soil exposed to benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) mineralized benzene and toluene but cometabolized only xylene isomers, forming polymeric residues. This observation prompted us to investigate the metabolism of 14C-labeled BTX hydrocarbons in soil, either individually or as mixtures. BTX-supplemented soil was incubated aerobically for up to 4 weeks in a sealed system that automatically replenished any O2 consumed. The decrease in solvent vapors and the production of 14CO2 were monitored. At the conclusion of each experiment, 14C distribution in solvent-extractable polymers, biomass, and humic material was determined, obtaining 14C mass balances of 85 to 98%. BTX compounds were extensively mineralized in soil, regardless of whether they were presented singly or in combinations. No evidence was obtained for the formation of solvent-extractable polymers from xylenes in soil, but 14C distribution in biomass (5 to 10%) and humus (12 to 32%) was unusual for all BTX compounds and especially for toluene and the xylenes. The results suggest that catechol intermediates of BTX degradation are preferentially polymerized into the soil humus and that the methyl substituents of the catechols derived from toluene and especially from xylenes enhance this incorporation. In contrast to inhibitory residues formed from xylene cometabolism in culture, the humus-incorporated xylene residues showed no significant toxicity in the Microtox assay. PMID:9835584

  9. Reactive Extraction of Alcohols from Apolar Hydrocarbons with Aqueous Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The aqueous solutions are evaluated as sustainable reactive extraction solvents for the recovery of monohydroxyl alcohols (benzyl alcohol, 1-hexanol, cyclohexanol) present in few-percent concentrations in apolar hydrocarbons (toluene, n-hexane, and cyclohexane) by considering two approaches. An aqueous solution containing a reactive extractant, like borate salts, borate complexes, a monosalt of dicarboxylic acid,hydroxypropyl-cyclodextrins, and silver nitrate, shows limited potential to be used. Another approach, in which the alcohol is chemically modified prior to the extraction into an easy-extractable form, in this case a monoesterlcarboxylic acid, shows much more potential. An environmentally benign aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate can provide a distribution ratio of benzyl alcohol up to 200, leaving the solubility of the organic solvent in the aqueous solution unchanged relative to pure water and therefore increasing the selectivity with two orders of magnitude. The modification of aromatic, cyclo-aliphatic, and linear aliphatic alcohols can be performed efficiently in the apolar organic solvent without need for a catalyst. The recovery of the modified alcohol can be performed by back-extraction in combination with a spontaneous hydrolysis.

  10. Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Zhu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2012-08-01

    Developing feedstock-independent biomass pretreatment would be vital to second generation biorefineries that would fully utilize diverse non-food lignocellulosic biomass resources, decrease transportation costs of low energy density feedstock, and conserve natural biodiversity. Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation (COSLIF) was applied to a variety of feedstocks, including Miscanthus, poplar, their mixture, bagasse, wheat straw, and rice straw. Although non-pretreated biomass samples exhibited a large variation in enzymatic digestibility, the COSLIF-pretreated biomass samples exhibited similar high enzymatic glucan digestibilities and fast hydrolysis rates. Glucan digestibilities of most pretreated feedstocks were ∼93% at five filter paper units per gram of glucan. The overall glucose and xylose yields for the Miscanthus:poplar mixture at a weight ratio of 1:2 were 93% and 85%, respectively. These results suggested that COSLIF could be regarded as a feedstock-independent pretreatment suitable for processing diverse feedstocks by adjusting pretreatment residence time only.

  11. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  12. Reactions and Separations in Green Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spronsen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical processes involve solvents in the reaction and the separation step. These solvents give rise to a heavy environmental and economical burden. Moreover, these solvents are based on non-sustainable resources like petroleum. The aim of this thesis has been to develop a number of alternativ

  13. Reactions and Separations in Green Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spronsen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical processes involve solvents in the reaction and the separation step. These solvents give rise to a heavy environmental and economical burden. Moreover, these solvents are based on non-sustainable resources like petroleum. The aim of this thesis has been to develop a number of

  14. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichenberger, Christian X. [European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano (EURAC), Viale Druso 1, Bozen/Bolzano, I-39100 Südtirol/Alto Adige (Italy); Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kantardjieff, Katherine [California State University, San Marcos, CA 92078 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: br@hofkristallamt.org [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 991 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  15. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  16. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-05-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide data for the development and validation of models for the fuel regression rates in liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. The experiments will be performed on fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool will be investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface will be measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel will be assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets will provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  17. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    temperature for volatile evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a wide variety of coals of a wide range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatile evolution was quite a precise indicator of rank and correlated closely wit the rank values obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile materials evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amount of alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolitic products and not volatilization products of coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with TG-PI-MS indicates that the low oiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight and therefor less extractable.

  18. Land Suitability Assessmemtin Continental Grits of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use types (LUTs). using a qualitative physical land evaluation methodology. The results indicated that the ..... Suggested land characteristics and scores for suitability evaluation for cereals ..... the FAO framework: an example from Zambia.

  19. Suitable long tendon technologies and practices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Altounyan, P

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available effective long tendon support systems suitable in South African coalmines. Appropriate test procedures for the evaluation of the performance of long tendon systems were also determined and are detailed in this report....

  20. High Pressure Preignition Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and hydrocarbon blends in our various combustion systems, with emphasis on the effects of elevated pressure using our pressurized flow reactor ( PFR ...facility. Detailed experimental data were generated from the PFR for use in associated kinetic modeling work. We continued to develop and extend both

  1. Heterobimetallic Zeolite, InV-ZSM-5, Enables Efficient Conversion of Biomass Derived Ethanol to Renewable Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Li, Zhenglong; Casbeer, Erik M.; Geiger, Robert A.; Moses-Debusk, Melanie; Keller, Martin; Buchanan, Michelle V.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-01

    Direct catalytic conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon blend-stock can increase biofuels use in current vehicles beyond the ethanol blend-wall of 10-15%. Literature reports describe quantitative conversion of ethanol over zeolite catalysts but high C2 hydrocarbon formation renders this approach unsuitable for commercialization. Furthermore, the prior mechanistic studies suggested that ethanol conversion involves endothermic dehydration step. Here, we report the complete conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons over InV-ZSM-5 without added hydrogen and which produces lower C2 (products come from the hydrocarbon pool type mechanism and dehydration step is not necessary. Thus, our method of direct conversion of ethanol offers a pathway to produce suitable hydrocarbon blend-stock that may be blended at a refinery to produce fuels such as gasoline, diesel, JP-8, and jet fuel, or produce commodity chemicals such as BTX.

  2. Enhancement of in situ Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.

    2006-07-01

    Approximately 750 000 sites of contaminated land exist across Europe. The harmful chemicals found in Finnish soils include heavy metals, oil products, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorophenols, and pesticides. Petroleum and petroleum products enter soil from ruptured oil pipelines, land disposal of refinery products, leaking storage tanks and through accidents. PAH contamination is caused by the spills of coal tar and creosote from coal gasification and wood treatment sites in addition to oil spills. Cleanup of soil by bioremediation is cheaper than by chemical and physical processes. However, the cleaning capacity of natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation is limited. The purpose of this thesis was to find feasible options to enhance in situ remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The aims were to increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and microbial activity at the subsurface in order to achieve higher contaminant removal efficiency than by intrinsic biodegradation alone. Enhancement of microbial activity and decrease of soil toxicity during remediation were estimated by using several biological assays. The performance of these assays was compared in order to find suitable indicators to follow the progress of remediation. Phytoremediation and chemical oxidation are promising in situ techniques to increase the degradation of hydrocarbons in soil. Phytoremediation is plant-enhanced decontamination of soil and water. Degradation of hydrocarbons is enhanced in the root zone by increased microbial activity and through the detoxifying enzymes of plants themselves. Chemical oxidation of contaminants by Fenton's reaction can produce degradation products which are more biodegradable than the parent compounds. Fenton's reaction and its modifications apply solutions of hydrogen peroxide and iron for the oxidation of organic chemicals. The cost of oxidation can be reduced by aiming at partial instead of full

  3. Nitromethane as solvent in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Xavier; Porras, Simo P; Rosés, Martí; Kenndler, Ernst

    2005-06-24

    Nitromethane has several properties that make it an interesting solvent for capillary electrophoresis especially for lipophilic analytes that are not sufficiently soluble in water: freezing and boiling points are suitable for laboratory conditions, low viscosity leads to favourable electrophoretic mobilities, or an intermediate dielectric constant enables dissolution of electrolytes. In the present work we investigate the change of electrophoretically relevant analyte properties - mobilities and pKa values - in nitromethane in dependence on the most important experimental conditions determined by the background electrolyte: the ionic strength, I, and the pH. It was found that the mobility decreases with increasing ionic strength (by, e.g. up to 30% from I = 0 to 50 mmol/L) according to theory. An appropriate pH scale is established by the aid of applying different concentration ratios of a buffer acid with known pKa and its conjugate base. The mobility of the anionic analytes (from weak neutral acids) depends on the pH with the typical sigmoidal curve in accordance with theory. The pKa of neutral acids derived from these curves is shifted by as much as 14 pK units in nitromethane compared to water. Both findings confirm the agreement of the electrophoretic behaviour of the analytes with theories of electrolyte solutions. Separation of several neutral analytes was demonstrated upon formation of charged complexes due to heteroconjugation with chloride as ionic constituent of the background electrolyte.

  4. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  5. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  6. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  7. Equilibrium data on ethanol-water-solvent ternaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbaslar, I.; Cehreli, S.; Ustun, D.; Keskinocak, E. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). School of Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering. E-mail: krbaslar@istanbul.edu.tr

    2000-06-01

    Experimental liquid equilibria of water-ethanol and water-ethanol-1-decanol systems were investigated at 303.16{+-} o.20 K. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was ascertained by using Othmer-Tobias and Hand plots. distribution coefficients (D{sub i}) and separation factors (S) were evaluated for the immiscibility region. It is concluded that the solvents with high boiling point, 1-nonanol and 1-decanol, are suitable separation agents for dilute aqueous ethyl alcohols solutions. (author)

  8. Equilibrium data on ethanol-water-solvent ternaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kirbaslar

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental liquid-liquid equilibria of water-ethanol-1-nonanol and water-ethanol-1-decanol systems were investigated at 303.16± 0.20 K. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was ascertained by using Othmer-Tobias and Hand plots. Distribution coefficients (Di and separation factors (S were evaluated for the immiscibility region. It is concluded that the solvents with high boiling point, 1-nonanol and 1-decanol, are suitable separating agents for dilute aqueous ethyl alcohol solutions.

  9. Human monitoring of exposure to organic solvents. I Benzene, phenol, toluene, cresols and xylenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen EHJM; de Fluiter P; TOX

    1994-01-01

    In this report the conclusions of a literature study has been summarized concerning the monitoring of the general population to exposure to benzene-like solvents. Since the Dutch population is exposed to concentrations far below the ppm level, the conclusions on the suitability of biomarkers are

  10. Human monitoring of exposure to organic solvents. I Benzene, phenol, toluene, cresols and xylenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen EHJM; de Fluiter P; TOX

    1994-01-01

    In this report the conclusions of a literature study has been summarized concerning the monitoring of the general population to exposure to benzene-like solvents. Since the Dutch population is exposed to concentrations far below the ppm level, the conclusions on the suitability of biomarkers are ba

  11. Solvent refined coal studies: effects and characterization of treated solvent refined coal effluent. Progress report, FY 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Woodfield, W.G.; Strand, J.A.

    1978-07-01

    The Freshwater Sciences Section of PNL has initiated biologically oriented studies at the P and M solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant on the Fort Lewis Reservation in western Washington. Essentially, the study objectives are to identify residual components in the treated SRC process and assess potential for adverse impact on water quality and aquatic biota. Since inception of research in mid-1976, six static toxicity tests with treated SRC process effluent have been conducted. Toxic components, not yet specifically identified, sometimes occur in the effluent. It is believed these components involve organic hydrocarbons of the phenol and cresol groups. Analyses have been obtained on inorganic and organic constituents in partially-treated and treated process effluent. Concentrations of inorganics identified in the effluent did not differ greatly from their concentrations in Lake Sequalitchew or SRC plant tap water, but the low concentrations may be due primarily to dilution with freshwater before discharge. Organics identified in the effluent are similar to those found in samples contaminated with petroleum, and involve many complex hydrocarbons.

  12. Pyrolysates of raw vitrinites and their residues after CS2-NMP solvent extraction and its significance for petroleum geology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dayong; PENG Ping'an

    2006-01-01

    Binary solvent (CS2-NMP) has extreme high extraction ability to coals, and it can extract most bitumens out of coals and vitrinites. And large amount of messages on side chains and their distribution character in vitrinites should be acquired through flash pyrolysis before and after binary solvent (CS2-NMP) extraction. A few low maturated coals have been selected and vitrinites are handpicked from coals. Then vitrinites have been extracted using different solvents in the order of polarity. Flash pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrum has been applied to samples. The result shows that CS2-NMP is efficient for the extraction of vitirnites, giving much higher extraction yield than common solvents. Production ratio of liquid hydrocarbons in pyrolysates of vitrinites extracted with CS2-NMP is lower than that of raw vitrinites. And relative ratio of each component in pyrolysates has changed apparently. Production ratio of aliphatic hydrocarbons, especially those long chain aliphatics have decreased much after mixed solvent extraction. It shows that bitumens extracted with CS2-NMP have largely contributed to pyrolysates, especially those aliphatics in pyrolysates.

  13. Ionic liquids as superior solvents for headspace gas chromatography of residual solvents with very low vapor pressure, relevant for pharmaceutical final dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Gerhard; Andre, Max; Bentivoglio, Gino; Schottenberger, Herwig

    2009-08-07

    1-n-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate (BMIM DMP) was identified as the most suitable ionic liquid as solvent for the headspace gas chromatographic analysis of solvents with very low vapor pressure such as dimethylsulfoxide, N-methylpyrrolidone, sulfolane, tetralin, and ethylene glycol in a realistic matrix of commonly used excipients (carboxymethylcellulose, magnesium stearate, guar flour, and corn starch) in pharmaceutical products. Limits of quantification and limits of detection were in the low microgram per gram range. The detection of traces of sulfolane in a real sample of tablets containing the drug cefpodoxim proxetil demonstrated the applicability of the method.

  14. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  15. Compositions and methods for hydrocarbon functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent; Fortman, George; Boaz, Nicholas C.; Groves, John T.

    2017-03-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of hydrocarbon functionalization, methods and systems for converting a hydrocarbon into a compound including at least one group ((e.g., hydroxyl group) (e.g., methane to methanol)), functionalized hydrocarbons, and the like.

  16. Solvent effects and improvements in the deoxyribose degradation assay for hydroxyl radical-scavenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xican

    2013-12-01

    The deoxyribose degradation assay is widely used to evaluate the hydroxyl (OH) radical-scavenging ability of food or medicines. We compared the hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity of 25 antioxidant samples prepared in ethanol solution with samples prepared after removing the ethanol (residue). The data suggested that there was an approximately 9-fold difference between assay results for the ethanol solution and residue samples. This indicated a strong alcoholic interference. To further study the mechanism, the scavenging activities of 18 organic solvents (including ethanol) were measured by the deoxyribose assay. Most pure organic solvents (especially alcohols) could effectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. As hydroxyl radicals have extremely high reactivities, they will quickly react with surrounding solvent molecules. This shows that any organic solvent should be completely evaporated before measurement. The proposed method is regarded as a reliable hydroxyl radical-scavenging assay, suitable for all types of antioxidants.

  17. Effect of solvents on the characteristics of rosin walled microcapsules prepared by a solvent evaporation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheorey, D S; Dorle, A K

    1991-01-01

    Rosin microcapsules were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique using solvents with different rates of evaporation. Sulphadiazine was used as a model drug. The microcapsules were studied for their size, drug content, wall thickness, surface characteristics and in vitro release. The mean diameter increased and the drug content decreased as the rate of evaporation of the solvent increased. Fast evaporating solvents produced thick walled microcapsules with innumerable surface pores/cracks compared with slow evaporating solvents.

  18. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 mL@min?1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is 76%, and the total selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons and C3 hydrocarbons is nearly 100%. The conversion of methane increases with the increase of voltage and decreases with the flow of methane increase; the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons decreases with the increase of voltage and increases with the flow of methane increase. The selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is improved with catalyst for conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons in plasma field. Methane molecule collision with radicals is mainly responsible for product formation.

  19. Solvent substitution: an analysis of comprehensive hazard screening indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debia, M; Bégin, D; Gérin, M

    2011-06-01

    The air index (ψ(i)(air)) of the PARIS II software (Environmental Protection Agency), the Indiana Relative Chemical Hazard Score (IRCHS), and the Final Hazard Score (FHS) used in the P2OASys system (Toxics Use Reduction Institute) are comprehensive hazard screening indices that can be used in solvent substitution. The objective of this study was to evaluate these indices using a list of 67 commonly used or recommended solvents. The indices ψ(i)(air), IRCHS and FHS were calculated considering 9, 13, and 33 parameters, respectively, that summarized health and safety hazards, and environmental impacts. Correlation and sensitivity analyses were performed. The vapor hazard ratio (VHR) was used as a reference point. Two good correlations were found: (1) between VHR and ψ(i)(air) (ρ = 0.84), (2) and between IRCHS and FHS (ρ = 0.81). Values of sensitivity ratios above 0.2 were found with ψ(i)(air) (4 of 9 parameters) and IRCHS (3 of 13 parameters), but not with FHS. Overall, the three indices exhibited important differences in the way they integrate key substitution factors, such as volatility, occupational exposure limit, skin exposure, flammability, carcinogenicity, photochemical oxidation potential, atmospheric global effects, and environmental terrestrial and aquatic effects. These differences can result in different choices of alternatives between indices, including the VHR. IRCHS and FHS are the most comprehensive indices but are very tedious and complex to use and lack sensitivity to several solvent-specific parameters. The index ψ(i)(air) is simpler to calculate but does not cover some parameters important to solvents. There is presently no suitably comprehensive tool available for the substitution of solvents. A two-tier approach for the selection of solvents is recommended to avoid errors that could be made using only a global index or the consideration of the simple VHR. As a first tier, one would eliminate solvent candidates having crucial impacts. As a

  20. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  1. Fire-safe hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, G.E.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Wright, B.R.

    1979-11-06

    A stabilized, fire-safe, aqueous hydrocarbon fuel emulsion prepared by mixing: a diesel fuel; an emulsifier (consisting of oleyl diethanolamide, diethanolamine, and diethanolamine soap of oleic acid) which has been treated with about 0 to 7 1/2 of oleic acid. A modified version of this fuel also contains 0 to 0.5% of an antimisting agent, and water.

  2. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  3. Photodegradation of mutagens in solvent-refined coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.; Stewart, D.L.; Pelroy, R.A.; Weimer, W.C.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate any changes in the chemical composition and microbial mutagenicities of two representative solvent-refined coal (SRC) liquids as a function of exposure time to sunlight and air. This information was desired to assess potential health hazards arising from ground spills of these liquids during production, transport and use. Results of microbial mutagenicity assays using Salmonella typhimurium TA98, conducted after exposure, showed that the mutagenicities of both an SRC-II fuel oil blend and an SRC-I process solvent decreased continuously with exposure time to air and that the decrease was accelerated by simultaneous exposure to simulated sunlight. The liquids were exposed as thin layers supported on surfaces of glass, paper, clay or aluminum; but the type of support had little effect on the results. The contrast between these results and the reported increases of mutagenesis in organisms exposed simultaneously to coal liquids and near-ultraviolet light suggested that short-lived mutagenic intermediates, e.g., organic free radicals, were formed in the liquids during exposure to light. The highest activities of microbial mutagenicity in the SRC liquids were found in fractions rich in amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino PAH). After a 36-hour exposure of the fuel oil blend to air in the dark, the mutagenicity of its amine-rich fraction was reduced by 65%; whereas a 36-hour exposure in the light reduced the mutagenicity of this fraction by 92%. Similar rates of reduction in mutagenicity were achieved in exposures of the process solvent. The mutagenicities of other chemical fractions remained low during exposure.

  4. Anion-π aromatic neutral tweezers complexes: are they stable in polar solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lozano, Marta; Otero, Nicolás; Hermida-Ramón, Jose M; Estévez, Carlos M; Mandado, Marcos

    2011-03-17

    The impact of the solvent environment on the stabilization of the complexes formed by fluorine (T-F) and cyanide (T-CN) substituted tweezers with halide anions has been investigated theoretically. The study was carried out using computational methodologies based on density functional theory (DFT) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). Interaction energies were obtained at the M05-2X/6-31+G* level. The obtained results show a large stability of the complexes in solvents with large dielectric constant and prove the suitability of these molecular tweezers as potential hosts for anion recognition in solution. A detailed analysis of the effects of the solvent on the electron withdrawing ability of the substituents and its influence on the complex stability has been performed. In particular, the interaction energy in solution was split up into intermonomer and solvent-complex terms. In turn, the intermonomer interaction energy was partitioned into electrostatic, exchange, and polarization terms. Polar resonance structures in T-CN complexes are favored by polar solvents, giving rise to a stabilization of the intermonomer interaction, the opposite is found for T-F complexes. The solvent-complex energy increases with the polarity of the solvent in T-CN complexes, nonetheless the energy reaches a maximum and then decreases slowly in T-F complexes. An electron density analysis was also performed before and after complexation, providing an explanation to the trends followed by the interaction energies and their different components in solution.

  5. The effect of solvents on the stabilities (color and Fe) of anthocyanin isolated from the red-color-melinjo peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmizi, Ermiziar; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum; Saragih, Raskita

    2015-12-01

    Anthocyanin from the red-color-melinjo peels could be isolated using a polar solvent (ethanol) [ermiziar, 2010]. The amount of hydrocarbons in the structure of anthocyanin might cause that anthocyanin could be isolated using a non polar solvent. The purpose of research is to isolate anthocyanin using non polar solvents (hexane and petroleum ether) with maceration steps for 24 hours and separate solvents using rotary evaporator equipment. The stability of anthocyanin could be observed every week (1,2,3 and 4 weeks) in various environmental conditions (with or without light in refrigerator and open or closed storage). The characterization of anthocyanin was analyzed with visual (physic photo) and or using equipments such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for determining functional groups, Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV/Vis) with 500-550 nm wavelengths for deciding absorption of anthocyanin and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for analyzing Fe element. The result showed that anthocyanin isolation with hexane solvent has yield higher than petroleum eter solvent. From the results of physic observation for 4 weeks looked that there are changing colors of samples significant after 3 and 4 weeks in cooler with or without light. The stability of anthocyanin color was the best on the storage time until 2 weeks using hexane solvent in refrigerator and closed condition that it has absorption of 0.6740 with 500 nm wavelengths and Fe concentration 6.29 ppm.

  6. The effect of solvents on the stabilities (color and Fe) of anthocyanin isolated from the red-color-melinjo peels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarmizi, Ermiziar, E-mail: uph-ermi@yahoo.com, E-mail: ermitarmizi@gmail.com; Saragih, Raskita, E-mail: raskitasaragih@yahoo.com [Indonesia Institute of Technology (ITI), Raya PuspiptekSerpong, Tangerang Banten 15320 (Indonesia); Lalasari, Latifa Hanum, E-mail: ifa-sari@yahoo.com, E-mail: lati003@lipi.go.id [Research Centre for Metallurgy and Material, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), KawasanPuspiptekSerpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Anthocyanin from the red-color-melinjo peels could be isolated using a polar solvent (ethanol) [ermiziar, 2010]. The amount of hydrocarbons in the structure of anthocyanin might cause that anthocyanin could be isolated using a non polar solvent. The purpose of research is to isolate anthocyanin using non polar solvents (hexane and petroleum ether) with maceration steps for 24 hours and separate solvents using rotary evaporator equipment. The stability of anthocyanin could be observed every week (1,2,3 and 4 weeks) in various environmental conditions (with or without light in refrigerator and open or closed storage). The characterization of anthocyanin was analyzed with visual (physic photo) and or using equipments such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for determining functional groups, Ultraviolet–Visible Spectroscopy (UV/Vis) with 500-550 nm wavelengths for deciding absorption of anthocyanin and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for analyzing Fe element. The result showed that anthocyanin isolation with hexane solvent has yield higher than petroleum eter solvent. From the results of physic observation for 4 weeks looked that there are changing colors of samples significant after 3 and 4 weeks in cooler with or without light. The stability of anthocyanin color was the best on the storage time until 2 weeks using hexane solvent in refrigerator and closed condition that it has absorption of 0.6740 with 500 nm wavelengths and Fe concentration 6.29 ppm.

  7. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  8. Influence of brine-hydrocarbon interactions on FT-IR microspectroscopic analyses of intracrystalline liquid inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pironon, J. (CNRS-CREGU, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)); Barres, O. (Univ. de Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France))

    1992-01-01

    Hydrocarbon droplets surrounded by an aqueous phase and trapped in a host crystal (i.e., fluid inclusion) are windows to the migrating hydrocarbon-water emulsions in petroleum reservoirs. Using synthetic hydrocarbon inclusions, Fourier transform infrared microspectrometric analysis shows that the interactions at the two liquid (hydrocarbon-aqueous solution) phase interface can be determined on a 20 {mu}m scale. Spectral deformation, observed for the CH stretching bands, disappears when the alkali salt concentration decreases, when the organic solvent (CCl{sub 4} or C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) concentration increases, and when the {mu}FT-IR analysis point moves off the interface. This deformation is due to the cation effect on the interaction of the OH/CH dipoles. The Na{sup +}, K{sup +} cations break the water structure and induce modifications to the OH dipole at the interface, which then modifies the CH dipole moment and the CH stretching band intensity. Knowledge of the salinity of the aqueous phase is essential for complete understanding of infrared microanalysis of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions.

  9. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  10. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  11. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  12. [Ecology suitability study of Ephedra intermedia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Hui; Lu, You-Yuan; Huang, De-Dong; Zhu, Tian-Tian; Lv, Pei-Lin; Jin, Ling

    2017-06-01

    The study aims at predicting ecological suitability of Ephedra intermedia in China by using maximum entropy Maxent model combined with GIS, and finding the main ecological factors affecting the distribution of E. intermedia suitability in appropriate growth area. Thirty-eight collected samples of E. intermedia and E. intermedia and 116 distribution information from CVH information using ArcGIS technology were analyzed. MaxEnt model was applied to forecast the E. intermedia in our country's ecology. E. intermedia MaxEnt ROC curve model training data and testing data sets the AUC value was 0.986 and 0.958, respectively, which were greater than 0.9, tending to be 1.The calculated E. intermedia habitat suitability by the model showed a high accuracy and credibility, which indicated that MaxEnt model could well predict the potential distribution area of E. intermedia in China. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Dynamics around solutes and solute-solvent complexes in mixed solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Sungnam; Fayer, M D

    2007-09-04

    Ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo experiments, IR pump-probe experiments, and FT-IR spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of phenol-OD in three solvents, CCl4, mesitylene (1, 3, 5 trimethylbenzene), and the mixed solvent of mesitylene and CCl4 (0.83 mole fraction CCl4), are used to study solute-solvent dynamics via observation of spectral diffusion. Phenol forms a complex with Mesitylene. In the mesitylene solution, there is only complexed phenol; in the CCl4 solution, there is only uncomplexed phenol; and in the mixed solvent, both phenol species are present. Dynamics of the free phenol in CCl4 or the mixed solvent are very similar, and dynamics of the complex in mesitylene and in the mixed solvent are very similar. However, there are differences in the slowest time scale dynamics between the pure solvents and the mixed solvents. The mixed solvent produces slower dynamics that are attributed to first solvent shell solvent composition variations. The composition variations require a longer time to randomize than is required in the pure solvents, where only density variations occur. The experimental results and recent MD simulations indicate that the solvent structure around the solute may be different from the mixed solvent's mole fraction.

  15. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  16. Hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing honey bees increase forager recruitment by stimulating dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilley, David C

    2014-01-01

    Hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing honey bees are known to reactivate experienced foragers to visit known food sources. This study investigates whether these hydrocarbons also increase waggle-dance recruitment by observing recruitment and dancing behavior when the dance compounds are introduced into the hive. If the hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing bees affect the recruitment of foragers to a food source, then the number of recruits arriving at a food source should be greater after introduction of dance compounds versus a pure-solvent control. This prediction was supported by the results of experiments in which recruits were captured at a feeder following introduction of dance-compounds into a hive. This study also tested two nonexclusive behavioral mechanism(s) by which the compounds might stimulate recruitment; 1) increased recruitment could occur by means of increasing the recruitment effectiveness of each dance and/or 2) increased recruitment could occur by increasing the intensity of waggle-dancing. These hypotheses were tested by examining video records of the dancing and recruitment behavior of individually marked bees following dance-compound introduction. Comparisons of numbers of dance followers and numbers of recruits per dance and waggle run showed no significant differences between dance-compound and solvent-control introduction, thus providing no support for the first hypothesis. Comparison of the number of waggle-dance bouts and the number of waggle runs revealed significantly more dancing during morning dance-compound introduction than morning solvent-control introduction, supporting the second hypothesis. These results suggest that the waggle-dance hydrocarbons play an important role in honey bee foraging recruitment by stimulating foragers to perform waggle dances following periods of inactivity.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF SOME CARCINOGENIC POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN BANGLADESHI VEHICLES EXHAUST TAR BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amzad Hossain

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A more sensitive GC-MS method has been established for the determination of some carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in vehicles exhaust tar samples. The tar samples were extracted using dichloromethane (DMC: n-hexane solvent mixture. A multi-layer clean-up (silica gel/sodium sulphate column was used, followed by glass fiber filter (GFF paper. The method was successfully applied to determine a number of PAHs present in exhaust tar sample of different vehicles of the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, Bangladesh.   Keywords: Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, vehicles tar samples, identification, GC-MS/MS

  18. Extracellular terpenoid hydrocarbon extraction and quantitation from the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii var. Showa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Ela; Melis, Anastasios

    2010-04-01

    Mechanical fractionation and aqueous or aqueous/organic two-phase partition approaches were applied for extraction and separation of extracellular terpenoid hydrocarbons from Botryococcus braunii var. Showa. A direct spectrophotometric method was devised for the quantitation of botryococcene and associated carotenoid hydrocarbons extracted by this method. Separation of extracellular botryococcene hydrocarbons from the Botryococcus was achieved upon vortexing of the micro-colonies with glass beads, either in water followed by buoyant density equilibrium to separate hydrocarbons from biomass, or in the presence of heptane as a solvent, followed by aqueous/organic two-phase separation of the heptane-solubilized hydrocarbons (upper phase) from the biomass (lower aqueous phase). Spectral analysis of the upper heptane phase revealed the presence of two distinct compounds, one absorbing in the UV-C, attributed to botryococcene(s), the other in the blue region of the spectrum, attributed to a carotenoid. Specific extinction coefficients were developed for the absorbance of triterpenes at 190nm (epsilon = 90 +/- 5 mM(-1) cm(-1)) and carotenoids at 450 nm (epsilon=165+/-5mM(-1) cm(-1)) in heptane. This enabled application of a direct spectrophotometric method for the quantitation of water- or heptane-extractable botryococcenes and carotenoids. B. braunii var. Showa constitutively accumulates approximately 30% of the dry biomass as extractable (extracellular) botryococcenes, and approximately 0.2% of the dry biomass in the form of a carotenoid. It was further demonstrated that heat-treatment of the Botryococcus biomass substantially accelerates the rate and yield of the extraction process. Advances in this work serve as foundation for a cyclic Botryococcus growth, non-toxic extraction of extracellular hydrocarbons, and return of the hydrocarbon-depleted biomass to growth conditions for further product generation.

  19. A novel 9 × 9 map-based solvent selection strategy for targeted counter-current chromatography isolation of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junling; Meng, Jie; Wu, Dingfang; Guo, Mengzhe; Wu, Shihua

    2015-06-26

    Counter-current chromatography (CCC) is an efficient liquid-liquid chromatography technique for separation and purification of complex mixtures like natural products extracts and synthetic chemicals. However, CCC is still a challenging process requiring some special technical knowledge especially in the selection of appropriated solvent systems. In this work, we introduced a new 9 × 9 map-based solvent selection strategy for CCC isolation of targets, which permit more than 60 hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (HEMWat) solvent systems as the start candidates for the selection of solvent systems. Among these solvent systems, there are clear linear correlations between partition coefficient (K) and the system numbers. Thus, an appropriate CCC solvent system (i.e., sweet spot for K = 1) may be hit by measurement of k values of the target only in two random solvent systems. Besides this, surprisingly, we found that through two sweet spots, we could get a line ("Sweet line") where there are infinite sweet solvent systems being suitable for CCC separation. In these sweet solvent systems, the target has the same partition coefficient (K) but different solubilities. Thus, the better sweet solvent system with higher sample solubility can be obtained for high capacity CCC preparation. Furthermore, we found that there is a zone ("Sweet zone") where all solvent systems have their own sweet partition coefficients values for the target in range of 0.4 natural products as standards and further confirmed by isolation of several targets including honokiol and magnolol from the extracts of Magnolia officinalis Rehd. Et Wils and tanshinone IIA from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In practice, it is much easier to get a suitable solvent system only by making a simple screening two to four HEMWat two-phase solvent systems to obtain the sweet line or sweet zone without special knowledge or comprehensive standards as references. This is an important advancement for solvent system selection

  20. Treatment of phosphogypsum waste using suitable organic extractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Didamony, H; Ali, M M; Awwad, N S; Fawzy, M M; Attallah, M F

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a residue of the phosphate fertilizer industry that has relatively high concentrations of harmful radioactive materials. The reduction in concentration of the radionuclides from PG was investigated. The removal process is based on leaching of radionuclides using suitable organic extractants. The studied radionuclides were (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (238)U and (40)K. The factors affect the leaching process such as type of leaching materials, contact time, concentration of the desired solvent, liquid to solid ratio, and temperature were studied. Based on the experimental results, about 71.1, 76.4, 62.4, and 75.7% of (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (238)U and (40)K respectively were successfully removed from the PG. The reduction in the concentration of radionuclides was accompanied by reduction in the concentration of rare earth elements (∑REE) equals to 69.8%. Using the desired organic extractant under optimum conditions for treatment of the PG waste leads to obtain a decontaminated product that can be safely used in many industrial applications.

  1. Spring Season Habitat Suitability Index raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster represents a continuous surface of sage-grouse habitat suitability index (HSI, created using ArcGIS 10.2.2) values for Nevada during spring, which is a...

  2. Web page classification on child suitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eickhoff, C.; Serdyukov, P.; Vries, A.P. de

    2010-01-01

    Children spend significant amounts of time on the Internet. Recent studies showed, that during these periods they are often not under adult supervision. This work presents an automatic approach to identifying suitable web pages for children based on topical and non-topical web page aspects. We discu

  3. Suitability of Ostrich eggshell for radiocarbon dating

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel, JC

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ostrich eggshell from archaeological sites remains largely free of more recent carbon contamination and as such is suitable material for radiocarbon dating. The carbonate fraction of the shell does, however, display an initial deficit in C14, which...

  4. Measurements of volatile hydrocarbons in ambient air coking plant `Walbrzych`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, R.; Weglarz, A.; Skrok, R. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Zabrze (Poland). Inst. of Environmental Engineering

    1998-12-31

    The air is a matrix very difficult to handle. In addition, the pollutants are usually present at very low concentrations. Many techniques can be used to collect air samples. The simplest way is to use special containers, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. The adsorption of pollutants on adsorbents shows a growing interest, despite the difficulty to choose the appropriate support in order to obtain quantitative yields. To overcome this problem, two or three types of adsorbents may be used in series for collecting a wide range of analytes. In addition, the miniaturization of these techniques (i.e. microtraps and solid-phase microextraction) is also very promising: easy to handle, low cost, no solvent required, detection limits at ppt level when sensitive detectors are used. If we have no money for this modern equipment we must use traditional methods for compounds determination. This paper describes measurements of volatile hydrocarbons (such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and phenol) in ambient air of coking plant `Walbrzych` Measuring points were at streets: Beethoven 4, Dworcowa 2, Kosteckiego 5 and Zamkowa 1. BTEX were collected on graphitized carbon and phenol on Chromosorb 102. After that samples were extracted by solvents (dichloromethane for BTEX or benzene for phenol). Next step was the analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector without preconcentration. The lower limit of detection was circa 0.01 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for each of the determined compounds. These measurements of hydrocarbons in town of Walbrzych were performed for two years from 1996 to 1998. 2 tabs.

  5. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ting Ma; Hiroyuki Imai; Manami Yamawaki; Kazusa Terasaka; Xiaohong Li

    2014-01-01

      The conversion of syngas (CO + H2) to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent...

  6. Suitable scale of Weigan River plain oasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU ShunJun; SONG YuDong; TIAN ChangYan; LI YueTan; LI XiuCang; CHEN XiaoBing

    2007-01-01

    Desert coexists with oasis in long time, and the existence and development of oasis system demand better oasis vegetation ecological system. Oasis scale of arid zone plain encircling water should be determined in case of desertification caused by land over-reclamation under the circumstance of water resources shortage. Steady oasis with virtuous circle must have appropriate land use structure for agriculture, forestry and graziery. The study on the suitable scale and developmental space of oasis will provide theoretical and applicable foundation for effective construction of oases. By analyzing the hydrothermal, water and soil balance, an optimal mathematical model has been established. Based on hydrometeorology data collected for years in Weigan River plain, and by the principle of water balance,a calculation has been made of the water resources for evapotranspiration and the optimal acreage of oasis and cultivated land, which shows that the water resources for evapotranspiration in the Weigan River plain oasis is 22.32×108 m3 and the optimal oasis acreage under the condition of conventional irrigation mode is 3716.06 km2, in which the suitable cultivated land acreage is 1564.79 km2. Under the condition of water-saving irrigation, the suitable oasis acreage is 5515.49 km2, in which the suitable cultivated land acreage is 2322.31 km2. The oasis area had reached 4123 km2, and the cultivated land acreage had reached 1507 km2 after the Agriculture Irrigation Drainage Water Project of World Bank Loan in Weigan River basin was finished in 1997. The oasis and cultivated land acreage will be more suitable, and the oasis scale can be enlarged moderately by means of water saving irrigation.

  7. Suitability Evaluation of Groundwater for Irrigation, Drinking and Industrial Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Hakim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Groundwater is an important source of freshwater for agricultural, drinking and domestic uses in many regions of the world including Bangladesh. Demand of groundwater has been increasing day by day for irrigation by bringing more area under cultivation. As a drinking water the bottled water market currently has an average annual growth rate of 7.4% between 2002 and 2007, which is parallel to the growth of this industry all over the world. Obviously, the feed water should be free of particles and colloidal material and as low as possible in soluble organic matter. Series of water quality problems have been identified and addressed since the 1950s. These include point and non-point source pollutants such as nutrients, hydrocarbons, pesticides and heavy metals. In this regard, some studies to assessment the quality of water had been conducted in world wide. Where as, a Chiribandar a selected southern part of Bangladesh has great importance in agriculture and industrial perspective, no study has been done yet to asses the ground water quality for agricultural, drinking and industrial uses. Approach: A research was conducted to assess the degree of ionic toxicity of groundwater sources as irrigation, drinking and industrial purposes. Twenty eight groundwater samples were analyzed for different elements of dominant cations and anions such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, HCO3 and other minor ions P, B, As, N03-N, S04-S and Cl. In addition, to classify water quality as excellent, good suitable, Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR, Soluble Sodium Percentage (SSP and Residual Sodium Carbonate (RSC were calculated following standard equations. The quality of water is generally judged by its total salts concentrations, relative proportion of cations or Sodium Absorption Ratio (SAR and the contents of HCO3. Results: According to the concentration of cation and anion constitutes of groundwater, water quality of study area were suitable for irrigation

  8. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  9. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  10. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    using fimbriae and pili. Formation of biofilm with biosurfactant characteristics has been observed in Marinobacter cultures and environmental strains in relation to hydrocarbon degradation. Genomic potential exists for the synthesis of biofilm-related carbon and energy storage compounds, e.g. alginate and isoprenoid wax esters, and quorum sensing encoded by the regulatory luxR gene and N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals. Halotolerance is predicted to be achieved through biosynthesis and/or import of compatible solutes, including glycine betaine, choline, ectoine, sucrose, periplasmic glucans as well as membrane channel activity regulating intracellular sodium, potassium and chloride concentration balance. Gene abundances concur with those observed in sequenced halophilic Halomonas genomes. Defense mechanisms are plentiful and include arsenate, organic solvent, copper, and mercuric resistance, compounds, which frequently occur in oil refinery wastewater. The Marinobacter genomes reflect dynamic environments and diverse interactions with viruses and other bacteria with similar metabolic strategies, as reflected by the large number of integrases and transposases. This study has provided comprehensive genomic insights into the metabolic versatility and predicted environmental impact potential of one of the most ubiquitous bacterial genera.

  11. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  12. The bacterial community structure of hydrocarbon-polluted marine environments as the basis for the definition of an ecological index of hydrocarbon exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada, Mariana; Marcos, Magalí S; Commendatore, Marta G; Gil, Mónica N; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to design a molecular biological tool, using information provided by amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, that could be suitable for environmental assessment and bioremediation in marine ecosystems. We selected 63 bacterial genera that were previously linked to hydrocarbon biodegradation, representing a minimum sample of the bacterial guild associated with this process. We defined an ecological indicator (ecological index of hydrocarbon exposure, EIHE) using the relative abundance values of these genera obtained by pyrotag analysis. This index reflects the proportion of the bacterial community that is potentially capable of biodegrading hydrocarbons. When the bacterial community structures of intertidal sediments from two sites with different pollution histories were analyzed, 16 of the selected genera (25%) were significantly overrepresented with respect to the pristine site, in at least one of the samples from the polluted site. Although the relative abundances of individual genera associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation were generally low in samples from the polluted site, EIHE values were 4 times higher than those in the pristine sample, with at least 5% of the bacterial community in the sediments being represented by the selected genera. EIHE values were also calculated in other oil-exposed marine sediments as well as in seawater using public datasets from experimental systems and field studies. In all cases, the EIHE was significantly higher in oiled than in unpolluted samples, suggesting that this tool could be used as an estimator of the hydrocarbon-degrading potential of microbial communities.

  13. Improved Production of Paclitaxel from Suspension Culture of Taxus chinensis var.mairei by in situ Extraction with Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    未作君; 元英进; 吴兆亮; 吴金川

    2003-01-01

    The production of paclitaxel from suspension culture of Taxus chinensis var,mairei was improved by in situ extraction with organic solvents to avoid feedback repression and product degradation.Oleic acid and dibutyl phthalate were proved to be suitable solvents .The optimal volumetric percentage of organic solvents in the culture medium was found to be around 8%,and the favorable time for their introduction was at the exponential phase of cell growth,Paclitaxel production with the in situ extraction was ca 3-fold of that without extraction.

  14. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  15. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  16. Effects of Assistant Solvents and Mixing Intensity on the Bromination Process of Butyl Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 邹海魁; 初广文; 向阳; 彭晗; 陈建峰

    2014-01-01

    A slow bromination process of butyl rubber (IIR) suffers from low efficiency and low selectivity (S) of target-product. To obtain suitable approach to intensify the process, effects of assistant solvents and mixing inten-sity on the bromination process were systemically studied in this paper. The reaction process was found constantly accelerated with the increasing dosage and polarity of assistant solvent. Hexane with 30%(by volume) dichloro-methane was found as the suitable solvent component, where the stable conversion of 1,4-isoprene transferring to target product (xA1s) of 80.2%and the corresponding S of 91.2%were obtained in 5 min. The accelerated reaction process was demonstrated being remarkably affected by mixing intensity until the optimal stirring rate of 1100 r·min-1 in a stirred tank reactor. With better mixing condition, a further intensification of the process was achieved in a ro-tating packed bed (RPB) reactor, where xA1s of 82.6% and S of 91.9% were obtained in 2 min. The usage of the suitable solvent component and RPB has potential application in the industrial bromination process intensification.

  17. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  18. A solvent tolerant isolate of Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anshu; Singh, Rajni; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2006-01-01

    A solvent tolerant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Presence of cyclohexane (20%) in culture media prolonged the lag phase and caused reduction in biomass. Transmission electron micrographs showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvent in case of the cells grown in cyclohexane. The Enterobacter isolate was able to grow in the range of organic solvents having log P above 3.2 and also in presence of mercury, thus showing potential for treatment of solvent rich wastes.

  19. Organic solvent use in enterprises in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yasuhiro; Ukai, Hirohiko; Okamoto, Satoru; Samoto, Hajime; Itoh, Kenji; Moriguchi, Jiro; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Ohashi, Fumiko; Takada, Shiro; Kawakami, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to elucidate possible changes in types of organic solvents (to be called solvents in short) used in enterprises in Japan through comparison of current solvent types with historical data since 1983. To investigate current situation in solvent use in enterprises, surveys were conducted during one year of 2009 to 2010. In total, workroom air samples in 1,497 unit workplaces with solvent use were analyzed in accordance with regulatory requirements. Typical use pattern of solvents was as mixtures, accounting for >70% of cases. Adhesives spreading (followed by adhesion) was relatively common in small-scale enterprises, whereas printing and painting work was more common in middle-scale ones, and solvent use for testing and research purpose was basically in large-scaled enterprises. Through-out printing, painting, surface coating and adhesive application, toluene was most common (being detected in 49 to 82% of workplaces depending on work types), whereas isopropyl alcohol was most common (49%) in degreasing, cleaning and wiping workplaces. Other commonly used solvents were methyl alcohol, ethyl acetate and acetone (33 to 37%). Comparison with historical data in Japan and literature-retrieved data outside of Japan all agreed with the observation that toluene is the most commonly used solvent. Application of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, once common in 1980s, has ceased to exist in recent years.

  20. Extractive Distillation with Salt in Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Extractive distillation with salt in solvent is a new process for producing anhydrous ethanol by combining the principle of "salt effect" and some traditional extractive distillation methods. Compared with the common extractive distillation the performance of solvent is improved, the recycling amount of solvent is reduced to 1/4-1/5, and the number of theoretical plates is reduced to 1/3. Energy consumption and cost of equipment are also reduced and continuous production is realized. High efficiency and low solvent wastage make this technique feasible.

  1. OCCUPATIONAL SOLVENT EXPOSURE ASSOCIATED WITH DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvent is a broad term that applies to many classes of chemicals. The solvent (benzene, toluene etc. aspects of occupational exposure are reviewed via the examination of the use, occurrence, and disposition as well as population’s potential of risk. The general public can be exposed to solvent in ambient air as a result of its occurrence in paint process. Solvents are primarily irritants to the skin and mucous membranes and have narcotic properties at high concentrations. Published epidemiological data identified various types of birth defects in certain occupations.

  2. Emulsification of Hydrocarbons by Biosurfactant: Exclusive Use of Agrowaste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Solomon Amodu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Novel biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated environments that exclusively utilize agro-waste as their primary carbon source for the expression of biosurfactants. These were quantified using various standardized methods. Among the agro-waste screened, Beta vulgaris (Beetroot proved to be the most suitable substrate, for which the biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates–B. licheniformis STK01, B. subtilis STK02, and P. aeruginosa STK03–lowered the surface tension of the culture media to 30.0, 32.98, and 30.37 mN/m, respectively. The biosurfactants achieved considerable emulsification activity, particularly for heavy hydrocarbons, with the highest emulsification indices being 65.5% and 95% for anthracene and lubricant oil, respectively. The emulsion formed with lubricant oil was thermally stable even up to 50 °C for 21 days. The results showed the proficiency of the novel bacterial isolates used, as well as the suitability of solid agro-waste for biosurfactant production, thus suggesting that exclusive utilization of solid agro-waste is a promising option for use in biosurfactant production for environmental remediation. The outstanding emulsification activity and thermal stability demonstrated by the biosurfactants produced showed their potential applications in enhancing bioavailability and bioremediation of recalcitrant and hydrophobic environmental contaminants.

  3. octanol/water partition coefficient using solvation free energy and solvent-accessible surface area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The regression model for octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow ), is founded with only two molecular descriptors available through quantum chemical calculations: solvation free energy (△ Gs ), and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA). For the properties of 47 organic compounds from 17 types, the model gives a oonection coefficient (adjusted for degrees of freedom) of 0.959 and a standard error of 0.277 log unit. It is a suitable way to predict the partition properties that are related to solute-solvent interactions in the water phase.

  4. Measurement of residual solvents in a drug substance by a purge-and-trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Miklós

    2008-08-05

    The purge-and-trap (P&T) gas extraction method combined with gas chromatography was studied for its suitability for quantitative residual solvents determination in a water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Some analytical method performance characteristics were investigated, namely, the repeatability, the accuracy and the detection limit of determination. The results show that the P&T technique is--as expected--more sensitive than the static headspace, thus it can be used for the determination of residual solvents pertaining to the ICH Class 1 group. It was found that it could be an alternative sample preparation method besides the static headspace (HS) method.

  5. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  6. Mapping global environmental suitability for Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Jane P; Kraemer, Moritz Ug; Brady, Oliver J; Pigott, David M; Shearer, Freya M; Weiss, Daniel J; Golding, Nick; Ruktanonchai, Corrine W; Gething, Peter W; Cohn, Emily; Brownstein, John S; Khan, Kamran; Tatem, Andrew J; Jaenisch, Thomas; Murray, Christopher Jl; Marinho, Fatima; Scott, Thomas W; Hay, Simon I

    2016-04-19

    Zika virus was discovered in Uganda in 1947 and is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, which also act as vectors for dengue and chikungunya viruses throughout much of the tropical world. In 2007, an outbreak in the Federated States of Micronesia sparked public health concern. In 2013, the virus began to spread across other parts of Oceania and in 2015, a large outbreak in Latin America began in Brazil. Possible associations with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome observed in this outbreak have raised concerns about continued global spread of Zika virus, prompting its declaration as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization. We conducted species distribution modelling to map environmental suitability for Zika. We show a large portion of tropical and sub-tropical regions globally have suitable environmental conditions with over 2.17 billion people inhabiting these areas.

  7. A semiotic approach to suitability for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, J D

    1978-11-01

    At the beginning of my career as a psychotherapist I interviewed a number of patients in an effort to find one who seemed to be a good prospect for long-term psychotherapy. While interviewing with this purpose in mind, I was struck by the fact that a number of the people I spoke with gave me a sense of being extremely suitable for this sort of therapy, but that others seemed quite unsuitable. An informal survey among my peers as well as among more senior therapists revealed that they were not unfamiliar with the phenomenon. The present empirical study of the semiotic aspects of suitability for psychotherapy grew out of this early experience.

  8. [Identification of organic solvents in the water of a freshly coated drinking-water reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrenbrock, F; Haberer, K

    1982-01-01

    Chloro-caoutschouc coatings on reservoirs made of concrete can release organic solvents to the drinking water for several month after applying. These solvents can be identified directly in the water by highly sensitive analytical methods (GC/MS). The concentrations verified distinctly exceed the maximum permissible concentration of 10 micrograms/l as suggested by the EEG for the parameter: "dissolved or emulsified hydrocarbons (after extraction by petroleum ether); mineral oils" (2). Protective chloro-caoutchouc coatings should therefore be tested for the release of organic substances to water according to the KTW-Recommendations of the German Federal Health Bureau (1). In future drinking water reservoirs should not be coated unless compelling reasons exist, such as to protect concrete against aggressive water.

  9. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Eastern wild turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo sylvestris). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  10. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Swamp rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  11. Research on Items Suitable for Online Auction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhanghua; LIU Lu; WU Lihua

    2004-01-01

    Based on the classification to the attribute information of auctioned commodity, the valuation signal of auctioned commodity is categorized into two groups: codable valuation signal and un-codable valuation signal. A valuation signal model is developed and used to reason under the environment of common valuation auction. The results show that the value of commodity auctioned online tends to be lower and the commodity with bigger factor that can be described online is more suitable for online auction.

  12. Global habitat suitability models of terrestrial mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinini, Carlo; Di Marco, Moreno; Chiozza, Federica; Santulli, Giulia; Baisero, Daniele; Visconti, Piero; Hoffmann, Michael; Schipper, Jan; Stuart, Simon N.; Tognelli, Marcelo F.; Amori, Giovanni; Falcucci, Alessandra; Maiorano, Luigi; Boitani, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Detailed large-scale information on mammal distribution has often been lacking, hindering conservation efforts. We used the information from the 2009 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as a baseline for developing habitat suitability models for 5027 out of 5330 known terrestrial mammal species, based on their habitat relationships. We focused on the following environmental variables: land cover, elevation and hydrological features. Models were developed at 300 m resolution and limited to within species' known geographical ranges. A subset of the models was validated using points of known species occurrence. We conducted a global, fine-scale analysis of patterns of species richness. The richness of mammal species estimated by the overlap of their suitable habitat is on average one-third less than that estimated by the overlap of their geographical ranges. The highest absolute difference is found in tropical and subtropical regions in South America, Africa and Southeast Asia that are not covered by dense forest. The proportion of suitable habitat within mammal geographical ranges correlates with the IUCN Red List category to which they have been assigned, decreasing monotonically from Least Concern to Endangered. These results demonstrate the importance of fine-resolution distribution data for the development of global conservation strategies for mammals. PMID:21844042

  13. Mild extractability and bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between bioavailability of unaged and aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and the amounts detected by mild solvent extraction. More aged than unaged anthracene remained in Lima loam following introduction of earthworms (Eisenia foetida), a mixed culture containing anthracene-degrading microorganisms, or earthworms or wheat after bacterial biodegradation of the compound. Aging decreased the percentage of anthracene recovered by mild extraction with n-butanol from soil following introduction of earthworms, growth of wheat, biodegradation by bacteria, or when maintained sterile. Biodegradation resulted in a marked decrease in the percentage of aged and unaged anthracene recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol or ethyl acetate. Aging of fluoranthene and pyrene decreased the amount removed by mild extraction with n-butanol, ethyl acetate, and propanol. The uptake of aged and unaged anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by earthworms was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol, propanol, and ethyl acetate. The retention of aged and unaged anthracene by wheat and barley was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by the same procedure. The authors suggest that mild extraction with organic solvents can be used to predict the bioavailability of PAHs in soil.

  14. Additive diffusion from LDPE slabs into contacting solvents as a function of solvent absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmroth, I.E.; Dekker, M.; Hankemeier, Th.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the simultaneous diffusion of a migrant and a solvent in low density polyethylene (LDPE). The migrant (Irganox 1076) moves out of the slab, while the solvent (isooctane, n-heptane or cyclohexane) moves inwards. Solvent absorption was measured separately by following the increa

  15. Additive Diffusion from LDPE Slabs into Contacting Solvents as a Function of Solvent Absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmroth, I.E.; Dekker, M.; Hankemeier, T.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the simultaneous diffusion of a migrant and a solvent in low density polyethylene (LDPE). The migrant (Irganox 1076) moves out of the slab, while the solvent (isooctane, n-heptane or cyclohexane) moves inwards. Solvent absorption was measured separately by following the increa

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of organohalide perovskite precursors: solvent effects in the formation of perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Sevillano, Juan José; Ahmad, Shahzada; Calero, Sofía; Anta, Juan A

    2015-09-21

    The stability and desirable crystal formation of organohalide perovskite semiconductors is of utmost relevance to ensure the success of perovskites in photovoltaic technology. Herein we have simulated the dynamics of ionic precursors toward the formation of embryonic organohalide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 units in the presence of solvent molecules using Molecular Dynamics. The calculations involved, a variable amount of Pb(2+), I(-), and CH3NH3(+) ionic precursors in water, pentane and a mixture of these two solvents. Suitable force fields for solvents and precursors have been tested and used to carry out the simulations. Radial distribution functions and mean square displacements confirm the formation of basic perovskite crystalline units in pure pentane - taken as a simple and archetypal organic solvent. In contrast, simulations in water confirm the stability of the solvated ionic precursors, which prevents their aggregation to form the perovskite compound. We have found that in the case of a water/pentane binary solvent, a relatively small amount of water did not hinder the perovskite formation. Thus, our findings suggest that the cause of the poor stability of perovskite films in the presence of moisture is a chemical reaction, rather than the polar nature of the solvents. Based on the results, a set of force-field parameters to study from first principles perovskite formation and stability, also in the solid phase, is proposed.

  17. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The importance of solvent hydrogen-bond interactions with the substrate and the abstracting radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Giammarioli, Ilaria; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-06-03

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from propanal (PA) and 2,2-dimethylpropanal (DMPA) by the cumyloxyl radical (CumO•) has been carried out in different solvents (benzene, PhCl, MeCN, t-BuOH, MeOH, and TFE). The corresponding reactions of the benzyloxyl radical (BnO•) have been studied in MeCN. The reaction of CumO• with 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD) also has been investigated in TFE solution. With CHD a 3-fold increase in rate constant (k(H)) has been observed on going from benzene, PhCl, and MeCN to TFE. This represents the first observation of a sizable kinetic solvent effect for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from hydrocarbons by alkoxyl radicals and indicates that strong HBD solvents influence the hydrogen abstraction reactivity of CumO•. With PA and DMPA a significant decrease in k(H) has been observed on going from benzene and PhCl to MeOH and TFE, indicative of hydrogen-bond interactions between the carbonyl lone pair and the solvent in the transition state. The similar k(H) values observed for the reactions of the aldehydes in MeOH and TFE point toward differential hydrogen bond interactions of the latter solvent with the substrate and the radical in the transition state. The small reactivity ratios observed for the reactions of CumO• and BnO• with PA and DMPA (k(H)(BnO•)/k(H)(CumO•) = 1.2 and 1.6, respectively) indicate that with these substrates alkoxyl radical sterics play a minor role.

  18. Niche suitability affects development: skull asymmetry increases in less suitable areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Maestri

    Full Text Available For conservation purposes, it is important to take into account the suitability of a species to particular habitats; this information may predict the long-term survival of a species. In this sense, morphological measures of developmental stress, such as fluctuating asymmetry, can be proxies for an individual's performance in different regions. In this study, we conducted tests to determine whether areas with different levels of suitability for a species (generated by ecological niche models were congruent with morphological markers that reflect environmental stress and morphological variance. We generated a Maxent niche model and compared the suitability assessments of several areas with the skull morphology data (fluctuating asymmetry and morphological disparity of populations of the Atlantic forest endemic to Brazil rodent Akodon cursor. Our analyses showed a significant negative relationship between suitability levels and fluctuating asymmetry levels, which indicates that in less suitable areas, the individuals experience numerous disturbances during skull ontogeny. We have not found an association between morphological variance and environmental suitability. As expected, these results suggest that in environments with a lower suitability, developmental stress is increased. Such information is helpful in the understanding of the species evolution and in the selection of priority areas for the conservation of species.

  19. Correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and water-hydrocarbon ratio in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Zhou; Qingling Chen; Yuewu Tao; Huixin Weng

    2011-01-01

    In order to shorten the evaluation cycle of cobalt catalyst before the optimized catalyst is fixed on,a mathematical method is proposed to calculate weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons.Based on the carbide polymerization mechanism and the main hydrocarbons being linear alkanes and α-olefins,the correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and the molecular mass ratio of water to hydrocarbons is discussed.The result shows the ratio was within the range of 1.125-1.286 and the lower the ratio,the more gaseous hydrocarbons were obtained.Moreover,a linear equation between the weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons and the weight ratio of C5+ hydrocarbons to the total water is established.These results are validated by corresponding experiments.The weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons could be immediately calculated by this linear equation without detailed gas chromatography (GC) analysis of them.

  20. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment.

  1. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  2. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  3. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  4. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  5. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  6. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.

  7. Solvation of rhodamine575 in some solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit

    2016-05-01

    FTIR spectra of Rhodamine575 dye in powder form and in different solvents are reported. Positions of some of the observed FTIR bands show noticeable change in solvents. The bands, which shift, have contributions from the vibrational motion of nitrogen atoms of the ethylamine groups, oxygen atom of the carboxylic group attached to the phenyl ring and oxygen atom of the Xanthene ring.

  8. Composite capillary membrane for solvent resistant nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, S.M.; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Zwijnenberg, Harmen Jan; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A.M.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) is a membrane separation process allowing for an efficient separation of small molecules of 200–1000 g mol−1 from organic solvents. The application of SRNF in industry applications is currently hindered by a limited choice of SRNF membranes and configurations.

  9. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  10. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  11. Solvent-vapor-assisted imprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voicu, Nicoleta E.; Ludwigs, Sabine; Crossland, Edward J. W.; Andrew, Piers; Steiner, Ullrich

    2007-01-01

    Sub-micrometer features are replicated into high-molecular-weight polymer resists by using solvent-assisted nanoimprint lithography (see figure). By swelling the polymer in a controlled solvent-vapor atmosphere, millibar pressures and ambient temperatures are sufficient to achieve high-fidelity

  12. Relationship between Fermi Resonance and Solvent Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiu-Lan; LI Dong-Fei; SUN Cheng-Lin; LI Zhan-Long; YANG Guang; ZHOU Mi; LI Zuo-Wei; GAO Shu-Qin

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study the relationship between Fermi resonance and solvent effects and investigate the Fermi resonance of p-benzoquinone and cyclopentanone in different solvents and the Fermi resonance of CS2 in C6H6 at different concentrations. Also, we investigate the Fermi resonance of C6H6 and CCl4 in their solution at different pressures. It is found that solvent effects can be utilized to search Fermi resonance parameters such as coupling coefficient and spectral intensity ratio, etc., on the other hand, the mechanism of solvent effects can be revealed according to Fermi resonance at high pressure.%@@ We theoretically and experimentally study the relationship between Fermi resonance and solvent effects and investigate the Fermi resonance of p-benzoquinone and cyclopentanone in different solvents and the Fermi resonance of CS2 in C6H6 at different concentrations.Also,we investigate the Fermi resonance of C6H6 and CCl4 in their solution at different pressures.It is found that solvent effects can be utilized to search Fermi resonance parameters such as coupling coefficient and spectral intensity ratio,etc.,on the other hand,the mechanism of solvent effects can be revealed according to Fermi resonance at high pressure.

  13. Formation of positive ions in hydrocarbon containing dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Ilarion; Pohoata, Valentin; Jijie, Roxana; Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Rusu, Ioana Alexandra; Topala, Ionut

    2016-12-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices are suitable experimental solutions to generate transitory molecular environments with various applications. In this study we present experimental results regarding the plasma chemistry of dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) in helium - hydrogen (0.1%) - hydrocarbons (1.2%) mixtures. Four types of hydrocarbon gases were studied: methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). Discharge diagnosis and monitoring was assured by electrical measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. Molecular beam mass spectrometry is engaged to sample positive ions populations from two different plasma sources. Dissociation and generation of higher-chain and cyclic (aromatic) hydrocarbons were discussed as a function of feed gas and discharge geometry. We found a strong influence of these parameters on both molecular mass distribution and recombination processes in the plasma volume.

  14. Selection of Environmentally Friendly Solvents for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Secondary Oxygen Pack Cold Trap Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John; Chullen, Cinda; Morenz, Jesse; Stephenson, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Freon-113(TradeMark) has been used as a chemistry lab sampling solvent at NASA/JSC for EMU (extravehicular Mobility Unit) SOP (Secondary Oxygen Pack) oxygen testing Cold Traps utilized at the USA (United Space Alliance) Houston facility. Similar testing has occurred at the HSWL (Hamilton Sundstrand Windsor Locks) facility. A NASA Executive Order bans the procurement of all ODS (ozone depleting substances), including Freon-113 by the end of 2009. In order to comply with NASA direction, HSWL began evaluating viable solvents to replace Freon-113 . The study and testing effort to find Freon-113 replacements used for Cold Trap sampling is the subject of this paper. Test results have shown HFE-7100 (a 3M fluorinated ether) to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to remove and measure the non-volatile residue collected in a Cold Trap during oxygen testing. Furthermore, S-316 (a Horiba Instruments Inc. high molecular weight, non-ODS chlorofluorocarbon) was found to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to reconstitute non-volatile residue removed from a Cold Trap during oxygen testing for subsequent HC (hydrocarbon) analysis via FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy).

  15. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of <8 eV (measured by electron impact). The reaction products contain hydroxyl and keto groups. In one case, carbon-carbon bond cleavage, yielding anthraquinone from 9-methylanthracene, was detected. Kinetic constants and stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  16. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  17. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia Malaguarnera; Emanuela Cataudella; Maria Giordano; Giuseppe Nunnari; Giuseppe Chisari; Mariano Malaguarnera

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals,and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents.Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and,moreover,organic solvents are used in various industrial processes.Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity.Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are:species differences,nutritional condition,genetic factors,interaction with medications in use,alcohol abuse and interaction,and age.This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity.The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are:inflammation,dysfunction of cytochrome P450,mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work.

  18. Assessment of solvents for cellulose dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Tsianou, Marina; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-03-01

    A necessary step in the processing of biomass is the pretreatment and dissolution of cellulose. A good solvent for cellulose involves high diffusivity, aggressiveness in decrystallization, and capability of disassociating the cellulose chains. However, it is not clear which of these factors and under what conditions should be improved in order to obtain a more effective solvent. To this end, a newly-developed phenomenological model has been applied to assess the controlling mechanism of cellulose dissolution. Among the findings, the cellulose fibers remain crystalline almost to the end of the dissolution process for decrystallization-controlled kinetics. In such solvents, decreasing the fiber crystallinity, e.g., via pretreatment, would result in a considerable increase in the dissolution rate. Such insights improve the understanding of cellulose dissolution and facilitate the selection of more efficient solvents and processing conditions for biomass. Specific examples of solvents are provided where dissolution is limited due to decrystallization or disentanglement.

  19. Preparation of coal slurry with organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    In this study, various organic solvents were used to prepare coal slurries and the rheological and thermal properties of coal-organic solvent slurries were examined. Solvents with molecules containing unpaired electrons (high basicity) show high extraction power and cause swelling of coal. Therefore, coal-organic solvent slurries usually showed higher viscosities compared to coal-water slurry. In addition, coal slurries prepared by alcohols and cyclohexanone demonstrated lower settling rates but a high specific sedimentation volume presumably because these solvents swelled coal particles well and led to the formation of weak gel structures in the bulk. In addition, ethanol and cyclohexanone are capable of breaking a considerable amount of hydrogen bonds in coal and subsequently opening up the structures. Thus, more surface area is available for combustion and the combustion rate of coal slurries was increased.

  20. Efficient cellulose solvent: quaternary ammonium chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; El Seoud, Omar A; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Pure quaternary tetraalkylammonium chlorides with one long alkyl chain dissolved in various organic solvents constitute a new class of cellulose solvents. The electrolytes are prepared in high yields and purity by Menshutkin quaternization, an inexpensive and easy synthesis route. The pure molten tetraalkylammonium chlorides dissolve up to 15 wt% of cellulose. Cosolvents, including N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), may be added in large excess, leading to a system of decreased viscosity. Contrary to the well-established solvent DMA/LiCl, cellulose dissolves in DMA/quaternary ammonium chlorides without any pretreatment. Thus, the use of the new solvent avoids some disadvantages of DMA/LiCl and ionic liquids, the most extensively employed solvents for homogeneous cellulose chemistry.

  1. Green-solvent-processable organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processable organic photovoltaics (OPV has emerged as a promising clean energy-generating technology due to its potential for low-cost manufacturing with a high power/weight ratio. The state-of-the-art OPV devices are processed by hazardous halogenated solvents. Fabricating high-efficiency OPV devices using greener solvents is a necessary step toward their eventual commercialization. In this review, recent research efforts and advances in green-solvent-processable OPVs are summarized, and two basic strategies including material design and solvent selection of light-harvesting layers are discussed. In particular, the most recent green-solvent-processable OPVs with high efficiencies in excess of 9% are highlighted.

  2. Solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime drastically improves carrier transport in small-molecule thin-film transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah

    2013-04-10

    We demonstrate a new way to investigate and control the solvent vapor annealing of solution-cast organic semiconductor thin films. Solvent vapor annealing of spin-cast films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-Pn) is investigated in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) capability, allowing us to monitor both solvent mass uptake and changes in the mechanical rigidity of the film. Using time-resolved grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and complementary static atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate that solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime can cause significant performance improvements in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), whereas allowing the solvent to percolate and form a liquid phase results in catastrophic reorganization and dewetting of the film, making the process counterproductive. Using these lessons we devise processing conditions which prevent percolation of the adsorbed solvent vapor molecules for extended periods, thus extending the benefits of solvent vapor annealing and improving carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Ultimately, it is demonstrated that QCM-D is a very powerful sensor of the state of the adsorbed solvent as well as the thin film, thus making it suitable for process development as well as in-line process monitoring both in laboratory and in future manufacturing settings. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. [Neurotoxicity of organic solvents--recent findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Masato

    2007-06-01

    In this review, the recent findings of central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS) dysfunction induced by occupational exposure to organic solvents are described. While acute, high-level exposure to almost all organic solvents causes the general, nonspecific depression of CNS, it is still not clear whether chronic, low-level occupational exposure causes the chronic neurological dysfunction which has been called "organic solvent syndrome", "painters syndrome", "psycho-organic syndrome" or "chronic solvent encephalopathy". At least at lower than occupational exposure limits, chronic and low-level organic solvent exposure does not appear to cause the "sy mptomatic" neurological dysfunction. The chronic, moderate- to high-level exposure to a few organic solvents (such as carbon disulfide, n-hexane and methyl n-butyl ketone) affects CNS or PNS specifically. The substitutes for chlorofluorocarbons, 2-bromopropane and 1-bromopropane were shown to have the peripheral nerve toxicity in the experimental animals. Shortly after these observations, human cases of 1-bromopropane intoxication with the dysfunction of CNS and PNS were reported in the United States. Neurological abnormalities in workers of a 1-bromopropane factory in China were also reported. Thus, the possible neurotoxicity of newly introduced substitutes for ozone-depleting solvents into the workplace must be considered. Enough evidences indicate that some common solvents (such as toluene and styrene) induce sensorineural hearing loss and acquired color vision disturbances in workers. In some studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral atrophy, patchy periventricular hyperintensities and hypointensities in the basal ganglia were found in solvent-exposed workers as have been shown in toluene abusers (toluene leukoencephalopathy). Further studies using the neurobehavioral test batteries, neurophysiological measurements and advanced neuroimaging techniques are required to detect the

  4. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  5. Cuticular Hydrocarbon Cues Are Used for Host Acceptance by Pseudacteon spp. Phorid Flies that Attack Azteca sericeasur Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Kaitlyn A; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2016-04-01

    Parasitoids often use complex cues to identify suitable hosts in their environment. Phorid fly parasitoids that develop on one or a few host species often use multiple cues, ranging from general to highly specific, to home in on an appropriate host. Here, we describe the hierarchy of cues that Pseudacteon phorid flies use to identify Azteca ant hosts. We show, through behavioral observations in the field, that phorid flies are attracted to two cryptic Azteca species, but only attack Azteca sericeasur (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Dolichoderinae). To test whether the phorid flies use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to distinguish between the two Azteca taxa, we first documented and compared cuticular hydrocarbons of the two Azteca taxa using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Then, using cuticular hydrocarbon-transfer experiments with live ants, we characterized the cuticular hydrocarbons of A. sericeasur as a short-range, host location cue used by P. lasciniosus (Diptera: Phoridae) to locate the ants.

  6. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  7. Applied bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchee, R.E.; Kittel, J.A. [eds.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Reisinger, H.J. [ed.] [Integrated Science and Technology, Inc., Marietta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. The papers in this volume focus on petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation, with an emphasis on pilot-scale and field-scale applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  8. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  9. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Red king crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Stephen C.; Onuf, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for evaluating habitat of different life stages of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica). A model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat) in Alaskan coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Alaska and the southeastern Bering Sea. HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  10. Spatial Experiment Technologies Suitable for Unreturnable Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Weibo; Tong, Guanghui

    2016-07-01

    The system composition and main function of the bioreactor piggybacked on TZ cargo transport spacecraft are introduced briefly in the paper.The spatial experiment technologies which are suitable for unreturnable bioreactor are described in detail,including multi-channel liquid transportion and management,multi-type animal cells circuit testing,dynamic targets microscopic observation in situ etc..The feasibility and effectiveness of these technologies which will be used in space experiment in bioreactor are verified in tests and experiments on the ground.

  11. Resonance enhancement by suitably chosen frequency detuning

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter we report new effects of resonance detuning on various dynamical parameters of a generic 3-wave system. Namely, for suitably chosen values of detuning the variation range of amplitudes can be significantly wider than for exact resonance. Moreover, the range of energy variation is not symmetric with respect to the sign of the detuning. Finally, the period of the energy oscillation exhibits non-monotonic dependency on the magnitude of detuning. These results have important theoretical implications where nonlinear resonance analysis is involved, such as geophysics, plasma physics, fluid dynamics. Numerous practical applications are envisageable e.g. in energy harvesting systems.

  12. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Lange

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1 in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Measurement of activity coefficients at infinite dilution for hydrocarbons in imidazolium-based ionic liquids and QSPR model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiqin; YU Yanmei; CHEN Jian; FEI Weiyang

    2007-01-01

    The separations of olefin/paraffin,aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbons or olefin isomers using ionic liquids instead of volatile solvents have interested many researchers.Activity coefficients γ∞ at infinite dilution of a solute in ionic liquid are generally used in the selection of solvents for extraction or extractive distillation.In fact,the measurement of γ∞ by gas-liquid chromatography is a speedy and costsaving method.Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of hydrocarbon solutes,such as alkanes,hexenes,alkylbenzenes,styrene,in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([AMIM][BF4]) and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]), 1-isobutenyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([MPMIM][BF4]) and [MPMIM][BF4]-AgBF4 have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography using ionic liquids as stationary phase.The measurements were carried out at different temperatures from 298 to 318 K.The separating effects of these ionic liquids for alkanes/hexane,aliphatic hydrocarbons/benzene and hexene isomers have been discussed.The hydrophobic parameter,dipole element,frontier molecular orbital energy gap and hydration energy of these hydrocarbons were calculated with the PM3 semi-empirical quantum chemistry method.The quantitative relations among the computed structure parameters and activity coefficients at infinite dilution were also developed.The experimental activity coefficient data are consistent with the correlated and predicted results using QSPR models.

  14. Sequential biodegradation of complex naphtha hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-02-01

    Methane emissions in oil sands tailings ponds are sustained by anaerobic biodegradation of unrecovered hydrocarbons. Naphtha (primarily C6-C10; n- iso- and cycloalkanes) is commonly used as a solvent during bitumen extraction process and its residue escapes to tailings ponds during tailings deposition. To investigate biodegradability of hydrocarbons in naphtha, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL tailings ponds were amended with CNRL naphtha at ∼0.2 wt% (∼2000 mg L(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ∼1600 d. Microbial communities in both MFTs started metabolizing naphtha after a lag phase of ∼100 d. Complete biodegradation/biotransformation of all n-alkanes (except partial biodegradation of n-octane in CNRL MFT) followed by major iso-alkanes (2-methylpentane, 3-methylhexane, 2- and 4-methylheptane, iso-nonanes and 2-methylnonane) and a few cycloalkanes (derivatives of cyclopentane and cyclohexane) was observed during the incubation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Peptococcaceae and Anaerolineaceae in Albian MFT and Anaerolineaceae and Syntrophaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial communities with co-domination of Methanosaetaceae and "Candidatus Methanoregula" in archaeal populations during active biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The findings extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments and help refine existing kinetic model to predict greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Compositions and residual properties of petroleum hydrocarbon in contaminated soil of the oilfields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Di; Li, Chuan; Dong, Qian-Qian; Li, Li-Ming; Li, Guang-He

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the compositions and residual properties of petroleum hydrocarbon in soil, as well as to identify the source and weathering degree of the pollution. A total of 5 producing wells in Gudao and Hekou oil producing region of Shengli oilfields were analyzed. More than 50 individual target compounds including straight-and branched-chain alkanes( n-alkanes, pristine and phytane) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil samples and crude oil were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The percentages of chain alkanes and PAHs in total solvent extractable matters(TSEM) of soil samples were both much lower than those in the crude oil samples. The compositions of petroleum hydrocarbon in soil samples differed from those in crude oil, which indicated the n-alkanes with carbon numbers oil contaminated soils, the relationship between the index and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The results showed that the n-alkanes with carbon numbers > 33 and the PAHs with rings between 3 and 5 were much harder to degrade. PCA of 4 indexes for source identification revealed more than 50% of the soil samples were polluted by crude oil, which needs more attention during remediation.

  16. The specific carbon isotopic compositions of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons from Fushun oil shale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi; WU Baoxiang; ZHENG Guodong; ZHANG Hui; ZHENG Chaoyang

    2004-01-01

    Various branched and cyclic hydrocarbons are isolated from the Fushun oil shale and their carbon isotopes are determined. The analytical results show that the branched and cyclic hydrocarbons are fully separated from n-alkanes by 5 A Molecular-sieve adduction using long time and cold solvent. The branched and cyclic hydrocarbon fraction obtained by this method is able to satisfy the analytic requests of GC-IRMS. The carbon isotopic compositions of these branched and cyclic hydrocarbons obtained from the sample indicate that they are derived from photoautotrophic algae, chemoautotrophic bacteria (-3.4‰ --39.0‰) and methanotrophic bacteria (-38.4‰--46.3‰). However the long-chain 2-methyl-branched alkanes indicate that their carbon isotopic compositions reflect biological origin from higher plants. The carbon isotopic composition of C30 4-methyl sterane (-22.1‰) is the heaviest in all studied ste- ranes, showing that the carbon source or growth condition for its precursor, dinoflagellate, may be different from that of regular steranes. The variation trend of δ13C values between isomers of hopanes shows that 13C-enriched precursors take precedence in process of their epimerization. Methanotrophic hopanes presented reveal the processes of strong transformation of organic matter and cycling of organic carbon in the water column and early diagenesis of oil shale.

  17. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  18. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Eric

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown clinically to cure 82% of patients with only a 10-minute treatment time, repeated once after 7 days. All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival. When the protective wax is disrupted, water loss becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, leading to dehydration and death. A specific pattern of hydrocarbons has been found in all of the head louse cuticular wax studied. Iso-octane effectively removes these hydrocarbons from human head lice’s cuticular wax. Methods A method of head louse cuticle wax extraction and analysis by gas chromatography was developed. Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis were collected from infested patients and subjected to any of three extraction solvents comprising either the test product or one of two solvents introduced as controls. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID was used to determine the presence of hydrocarbons in the three head lice extracts. Results In the study reported herein, the test product isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 (IPM/D5 was shown to perform comparably with iso-octane, effectively extracting the target hydrocarbons from the cuticular wax that coats the human head louse exoskeleton. Conclusions Disruption of the integrity of the insect cuticle by removal of specific hydrocarbons found in the cuticular wax

  19. Method for estimating processability of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock for hydroprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2014-01-14

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitates asphaltenes. Determined parameters and processabilities for a plurality of feedstocks can be used to generate a mathematical relationship between parameter and processability; this relationship can be used to estimate the processability for hydroprocessing for a feedstock of unknown processability.

  20. Fractional Multistage Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass and Catalytic Conversion into Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy; Rozmiarek, Robert; Dally, Brice; Holland, Chris

    2017-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an improved multistage process for the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to serve as a new front-end, deconstruction process ideally suited to feed Virent’s well-proven catalytic technology, which is already being scaled up. This process produced water soluble, partially de-oxygenated intermediates that are ideally suited for catalytic finishing to fungible distillate hydrocarbons. Through this project, Virent, with its partners, demonstrated the conversion of pine wood chips to drop-in hydrocarbon distillate fuels using a multi-stage fractional conversion system that is integrated with Virent’s BioForming® process. The majority of work was in the liquefaction task and included temperature scoping, solvent optimization, and separations.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons connected with Schiff base linkers: Experimental and theoretical photophysical characterization and electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sęk, Danuta; Siwy, Mariola; Małecki, Jan Grzegorz; Kotowicz, Sonia; Golba, Sylwia; Nowak, Elżbieta M.; Sanetra, Jerzy; Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    A series of polyaromatic hydrocarbons with anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrene units connected with Schiff base junctions were synthesized via condensation of p-phenylenediamine and hydrazine with selected aldehydes. The effect of both hydrocarbon structures and presence of N-N- or phenyl- linked diimines on properties of the prepared azines and azomethines was analyzed. The obtained compounds were soluble in common organic solvents and melted in the range of 226-317 °C. Their photophysical and electrochemical properties were investigated by UV-vis, photoluminescence spectroscopies and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. Moreover, a density functional theory (DFT) was applied for calculation of their electronic and geometric structures as well as absorption and emission spectra. Additionally, their electron acceptor activity was preliminary tested in photovoltaic experiment.

  2. Chromatographic separation of three monoclonal antibody variants using multicolumn countercurrent solvent gradient purification (MCSGP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Späth, Thomas; Aumann, Lars; Melter, Lena; Ströhlein, Guido; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2008-08-15

    Multicolumn countercurrent solvent gradient purification (MCSGP) is a continuous chromatographic process developed in recent years (Aumann and Morbidelli, 2007a; Aumann et al., 2007) that is particularly suited for applications in the field of bioseparations. Like batch chromatography, MCSGP is suitable for three-fraction chromatographic separations and able to perform solvent gradients but it is superior in terms of solvent consumption, yield, purity, and productivity due to the countercurrent movement of the liquid and the solid phases. In this work, the MCSGP process is applied to the separation of three monoclonal antibody variants on a conventional preparative cation exchange resin. The experimental process performance was compared to simulations based on a lumped kinetic model. Yield and purity values of the target variant of 93%, respectively were obtained experimentally. The batch reference process was clearly outperformed by the MCSGP process.

  3. Effects of organic solvent and solution temperature on electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Kim, Han-Ki; Kimura, Naotaka; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Satou, Hidekazu; Lee, Ki-Hoon; Park, Young-Hwan; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoethylene) (PVDF) electrospun fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning. Processing parameters, such as solvents and solution temperature were varied to study their influence on fiber dimensions. Electrospun PVDF fibers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result indicated that the solvent component and temperature have great influence on fiber dimensions. 19% PVDF dissolved in DMF/MEK mixed solvents with the ratio of 8:2 was considered to be most suitable in this study. Furthermore, the increasing of solution temperature can probably induce the formation of beta-phases in electrospun PVDF Fibers.

  4. Recovery of zinc from low-grade zinc oxide ores by solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃文庆; 蓝卓越; 黎维中

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of zinc from low-grade zinc oxide ores with solvent extraction-electrowinning technique was investigated by using D2EHPA as extractant and 260# kerosene as diluent. The results show that it is possible to selectively leach zinc from the ores by heap leaching. The zinc concentration of leach solution in the first leaching cycle is 32.57 g/L, and in the sixteenth cycle the zinc concentration is 8.27g/L after solvent extraction. The leaching solution is subjected to solvent extraction, scrubbing and selective stripping for enrichment of zinc and removal of impurities. The pregnant zinc sulfate solution produced from the stripping cycle is suitable for zinc electrowinning.Extra-pure zinc metal was obtained in the electrowinning test under conventional conditions.

  5. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  6. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  7. Cool Sooting Flames of Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.A. MANSUROV

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paramagnetism of soot particles sampled from cool sooting flames of methane and propane in a separately-heated two-sectional reactor under atmospheric pressure at the reactor temperatures of 670-1170 K. The temperature profiles of the flames were studied. The sampling was carried out with a quartz sampler and the samples were frozen with liquid nitrogen. A number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, fluoranthene, coronene, anthanthrene, 1,12-benzperylene,were identified by spectroscopic methods in the extract of soot. The processes of soot formation at methaneoxygen mixture combustion in the electric field with applied potential changed from 0 to 2,2 kV at different polarity of electrodes have been investigated. It has been stated that at the electrical field application, an increase in soot particle sizes and soot yield occurs; besides, at the application of the field, speeding up the positively charged particles, the interplanar distance decreases. On the basis of investigation of soot particles paramagnetism, it was shown that initially soot particles have high carcinogetic activity and pollute the environment owing to a rapid decrease of the number of these radical centers. The reduction of the radical concentration is connected with radical recombination on soot.

  8. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s not only improve(s the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented.

  9. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  10. Auditory dysfunction associated with solvent exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuente Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have demonstrated that solvents may induce auditory dysfunction. However, there is still little knowledge regarding the main signs and symptoms of solvent-induced hearing loss (SIHL. The aim of this research was to investigate the association between solvent exposure and adverse effects on peripheral and central auditory functioning with a comprehensive audiological test battery. Methods Seventy-two solvent-exposed workers and 72 non-exposed workers were selected to participate in the study. The test battery comprised pure-tone audiometry (PTA, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE, Random Gap Detection (RGD and Hearing-in-Noise test (HINT. Results Solvent-exposed subjects presented with poorer mean test results than non-exposed subjects. A bivariate and multivariate linear regression model analysis was performed. One model for each auditory outcome (PTA, TEOAE, RGD and HINT was independently constructed. For all of the models solvent exposure was significantly associated with the auditory outcome. Age also appeared significantly associated with some auditory outcomes. Conclusions This study provides further evidence of the possible adverse effect of solvents on the peripheral and central auditory functioning. A discussion of these effects and the utility of selected hearing tests to assess SIHL is addressed.

  11. Solvent Effect on the Photolysis of Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmed, Sofia; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Bano, Raheela; Hafeez, Ambreen

    2015-10-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in water (pH 7.0) and in organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrometric method for the assay of RF and its major photoproducts, formylmethylflavin and lumichrome. The apparent first-order rate constants (k obs) for the reaction range from 3.19 (ethyl acetate) to 4.61 × 10(-3) min(-1) (water). The values of k obs have been found to be a linear function of solvent dielectric constant implying the participation of a dipolar intermediate along the reaction pathway. The degradation of this intermediate is promoted by the polarity of the medium. This indicates a greater stabilization of the excited-triplet states of RF with an increase in solvent polarity to facilitate its reduction. The rate constants for the reaction show a linear relation with the solvent acceptor number indicating the degree of solute-solvent interaction in different solvents. It would depend on the electron-donating capacity of RF molecule in organic solvents. The values of k obs are inversely proportional to the viscosity of the medium as a result of diffusion-controlled processes.

  12. Separation of C/sub 3+/ hydrocarbons by absorption and rectification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapper, R.

    1989-02-21

    A process for separation of C/sub 3+/ hydrocarbons from natural gas and the like comprises subjecting the gas under pressure to partial condensation under cooling, separating the uncondensed gaseous phase and engine expanding same while the condensed liquid fraction is subjected to rectification. Additional C/sub 3+/ hydrocarbons are separated from the engine expanded gaseous fraction by a scrubbing step. The loaded scrubbing agent is preferably fed to the rectification column, while the unabsorbed gaseous fraction coming from the scrubbing step is preferably heated and delivered as a product stream containing C/sub 2-/ hydrocarbons. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, scrubbing is conducted at a higher pressure than rectification, for example, about 10 to 20 bar higher than the rectification pressure. This proves to be especially advantageous if the C/sub 2-/ fraction is to be delivered under energy-intensive recompression is required. The scrubbing step is preferably performed with a liquid hydrocarbon mixture derived from the process itself, although other scrubbing agents, particularly other liquid hydrocarbon mixtures, are suitable. In a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention, the scrubbing is conducted with a scrubbing agent obtained by partial condensation of the residual gas from the rectification column. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the partial condensation of the residual gas is conducted by heat exchange with the evaporating bottoms product from the scrubbing step. 1 fig.

  13. Biological quality of soils containing hydrocarbons and efficacy of ecological risk reduction by bioremediation alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, A.J.; Napolitano, G.E.; Sample, B.E.

    1996-06-01

    This project provides technical support to the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF; a consortium of petroleum companies) on environmentally acceptable endpoints that may be used to help assess the ecological risk of petroleum hydrocarbon residuals in soils. The project, was designed in consultation with PERF representatives and focuses on the relationship between {open_quotes}chemically available{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biologically available{close_quotes} measurements of petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in soils, a discrepancy of considerable interest to the petroleum industry. Presently, clean-up standards for soils contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) constituents are based on concentrations of TPH, as measured in solvent extracts of soil samples. Interestingly, TPH includes a complex mixture of compounds which differ from one another in molecular weight and toxicity. Based on various studies with insecticides, herbicides and metals, some compounds apparently can slowly permeate into soil particles. If this situation occurs, the particle-embedded compounds may be extractable by use of organic solvents, and yet be unavailable biologically. This hypothesis serves as the central focus for our study. If this hypothesis is correct, then soil clean-up standards based on solvent-extractable TPH data may be more stringent than necessary to achieve a desired level of environmental risk. The economic significance of this possibility is considerable, because clean-up costs to achieve a low-risk status would, in most cases, be lower than those needed to achieve a standard based on present limits, which are based on measurements of {open_quotes}extractable{close_quotes} TPH.

  14. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  15. Versatility of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms using solar energy, H2O, and CO2 as the primary inputs. Compared to plants and eukaryotic microalgae, cyanobacteria are easier to be genetically engineered and possess higher growth rate. Extensive genomic information and well-established genetic platform make cyanobacteria good candidates to build efficient biosynthetic pathways for biofuels and chemicals by genetic engineering. Hydrocarbons are a family of compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. Structural diversity of the hydrocarbon family is enabled by variation in chain length, degree of saturation, and rearrangements of the carbon skeleton. The diversified hydrocarbons can be used as valuable chemicals in the field of food, fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and cosmetics. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis is ubiquitous in bacteria, yeasts, fungi, plants, and insects. A wide variety of pathways for the hydrocarbon biosynthesis have been identified in recent years. Cyanobacteria may be superior chassis for hydrocabon production in a photosynthetic manner. A diversity of hydrocarbons including ethylene, alkanes, alkenes, and terpenes can be produced by cyanobacteria. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology strategies can be employed to improve hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria. This review mainly summarizes versatility and perspectives of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

  16. Primary biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.H.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Paumen, M.L.; Parkerton, T.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes primary biodegradation experiments performed to determine the persistence of higher molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater. Results from the biodegradation experiments show that the majority of tested petroleum hydrocarbons have half-lives in seawater less than 60 days.

  17. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  18. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric...... constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt...

  19. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric...... constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt...

  20. Supercritical CO2 as a substitute of volatile hydrocarbons; Superkritisch CO2 vervangt vluchtige koolwaterstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, G. (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    In many cases supercritical carbon dioxide can replace volatile hydrocarbons in extraction processes. Currently gaseous or liquid CO2 is already used for industrial purification processes, extraction of caffeine from coffee and as a solvent for paint. Although supercritical extraction s a batch process the technique can be applied as a continuous process. [Dutch] In processen waar vluchtige koolwaterstoffen worden ingezet om stoffen te extraheren, biedt superkritisch CO2 een milieuvriendelijk alternatief. Het koolzuur dat zowel in de vloeistof- als gasfase zit, wordt dan ook steeds meer ingezet in extractieprocessen.

  1. Features of the micellar solubility of metal-containing surfactants in hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.B.; Zdobnova, O.L.; Zaichenko, L.P.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1988-03-10

    Metal-containing surfactants (SF) are now widely used as different additives to oils and fuels. The micellar solubility of a series of individual metal-containing SF and widely used additives was investigated as a function of the structure and polarity of the additive, type of hydrocarbon solvent, and presence of water in this study. Individual decyl benzenesulfonates (DBS) of different metals and samples of surfactant additives for oils of the alkylphenolate (VNII NP-370), sulfonate (PMSA, PMSya, S-150, S-300, Lubrizol 58, SB-3, PMSya (bariated), alkylsalicylate (ASK, MASK), and dialkyldithiophosphate (DF-11, VNII NP-354) types were investigated.

  2. Mid-Atlantic elasmobranchs: Suitable metal scouts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Paulo; Tristão da Cunha, Regina; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2017-04-15

    Heavy metals are a hazard to marine fauna and human health. In this study we assess stable isotopes and metal content in Prionace glauca and Isurus oxyrinchus and analyse these results within and among other species and across regions and geographical areas. Also, we evaluate their suitability, together with Raja clavata and Galeorhinus galeus, as Mid-Atlantic bioindicators. Prionace glauca and I. oxyrinchus shared the same trophic level in a pelagic food web and did not present significant differences between genders or metals, except for As. Arsenic and Hg accumulated while Cd and Pb were not detected. One I. oxyrinchus presented Hg values above regulatory limits. A high Hg exposure was associated with I. oxyrinchus since its maximum weekly intake was exceeded. Elasmobranchs can be used as metal sentinels, each presenting different key features which defines a good marine bioindicator, allowing long-term monitoring at different temporal and spatial scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  4. The suitability of internal versus external successors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    of family business succession in order to understand when family successors are preferred because of their family-specific experiential knowledge. A case study analysis from the German-Danish border region explores how a family firm has used internal successors for the last 12 successions. We argue...... that in industries where tacit knowledge forms the basis for competitive advantage, the use of internal successors can help family firms excel after a transition of power has occurred. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed to enhance the long-term perspective for family businesses.......Understanding knowledge transfer in family firm succession is important for the survival of family firms. Previous research has begun to explore the suitability of internal versus external successor in family firms with regard to relevant knowledge types. This paper builds on the contingency model...

  5. Solution Properties of Soy Protein in DMSO/Urea Solvent System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Ru; YIN Duan; JIN Xin; SUN Gang

    2008-01-01

    Solution properties of 7S globulins (7S), 11S globulins (11S) and soy protein isolates (SPI) in dimethylsulfoxide ( DMSO )/urea solvent system were studied by intrinsic viscosity and particle size distributions.The results showed that the existence of urea was the main reason for the denaturation and solubility of soy protein in the system, and the effects were more obvious with increasing of urea concentration in solutions.Suitably dissolution temperature and time contributed to the solubility of soy proteins.

  6. Measurement of Infinite Diluted Activity Coefficient of Solvents in Polymer by Inverse Gas Chromatography Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@1 INTRODUCTION Due to its short experimental time, little sample needed, suitable for broad temperature range, inverse gas chromatography (IGC) has been widely used to measure variety of properties of polymer systems, such as the intinite diluted activity coefficients of solvent in polymer, the glass transition temperature of polymer and the surface properties of polymer[1-5], etc. Those data have been used to develop the group contribution method for the prediction of thermodynamic proper-ties of polymer solution[6].

  7. SEQUESTRATION AND TREATMENT OF VADOSE ZONE SOLVENTS USING EDIBLE OILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riha, B; Brian02 Looney, B; Richard Hall (NOEMAIL), R

    2008-03-28

    Edible oils have emerged as an effective treatment amendment for a variety of contaminants. When applied to chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) in the saturated zone, edible oils have been shown to enhance anaerobic bioremediation and sequester the contaminants. However, edible oils have not been applied to the vadose zone for contaminant treatment. Soybean oil was injected into the vadose zone in M-Area at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a research study to evaluate the effectiveness of edible oils for solvent sequestration and the ability to change a vadose system from aerobic to anaerobic to initiate reductive dechlorination. The proposed use of this technique would be an enhanced attenuation/transition step after active remediation. The goals of the research were to evaluate oil emplacement methods and monitoring techniques to measure oil placement, partitioning and degradation. Gas sampling was the cornerstone for this evaluation. Analyses for cVOCs and biotransformation products were performed. Overall, the cVOC concentration/flux reduction was 75-85% in this vadose zone setting. Destruction of the cVOCs by biotic or abiotic process has not yet been verified at this site. No reductive dechlorination products have been measured. The deployment has resulted in a substantial generation of light hydrocarbon gases and geochemical conditions that would support cometabolism.

  8. Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ee Von; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of PAHs in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove PAHs from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

  9. Inclusion of poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in a functionalized layered double hydroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Mohanambe; S Vasudevan

    2006-01-01

    The internal surface of an Mg-Al layered double hydroxide has been functionalized by anchoring carboxy-methyl derivatized -cyclodextrin cavities to the gallery walls. Neutral polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been included within the functionalized solid by driving the hydrophobic aromatic molecules from a polar solvent into the less polar interior of the anchored cyclodextrin cavities by a partitioning process. The optical (absorption and emission) properties of the PAH molecules included within the functionalized Mg-Al layered double hydroxide solid are similar to that of dilute solutions of the PAH in non-polar solvents. The unique feature of these hybrid materials is that they are thermally stable over a wide temperature range with their emission properties practically unaltered.

  10. Development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X; Xu, X; Cui, W; Xi, Z

    2001-08-01

    The development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material (CRM) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is described; this is the first natural matrix CRM for organic environmental analysis in China. The homogeneity and stability of this material have been tested by HPLC. The concentrations of several PAH were determined by use of two independent, different methods--solvent extraction-HPLC analysis with UV detection coupled with fluorescence detection (FLD) and solvent extraction, isolation with a silica column, and GC analysis with flame ionization detection (FID). Five certified values were determined: phenanthrene 7.1 +/- 2.6 microg g(-1), anthracene 2.0 +/- 0.8 microg g(-1), fluoranthene 7.4 +/- 1.9 microg g(-1), pyrene 7 +/- 2 microg g(-1), and benzo[a]pyrene 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg g(-1). Reference values for several other PAH are also suggested.

  11. Solvent exposure and malignant lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeg Evelin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To analyze the relationship between exposure to chlorinated and aromatic organic solvents and malignant lymphoma in a multi-centre, population-based case-control study. Methods Male and female patients with malignant lymphoma (n = 710 between 18 and 80 years of age were prospectively recruited in six study regions in Germany (Ludwigshafen/Upper Palatinate, Heidelberg/Rhine-Neckar-County, Würzburg/Lower Frankonia, Hamburg, Bielefeld/Gütersloh, and Munich. For each newly recruited lymphoma case, a gender, region and age-matched (± 1 year of birth population control was drawn from the population registers. In a structured personal interview, we elicited a complete occupational history, including every occupational period that lasted at least one year. On the basis of job task-specific supplementary questionnaires, a trained occupational physician assessed the exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride and aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking (in pack years and alcohol consumption. To increase the statistical power, patients with specific lymphoma subentities were additionally compared with the entire control group using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results We observed a statistically significant association between high exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons and malignant lymphoma (Odds ratio = 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.1–4.3. In the analysis of lymphoma subentities, a pronounced risk elevation was found for follicular lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma. When specific substances were considered, the association between trichloroethylene and malignant lymphoma was of borderline statistical significance. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not significantly associated with the lymphoma diagnosis

  12. Large-Scale Solvent-Free Chlorination of Hydroxy-Pyrimidines, -Pyridines, -Pyrazines and -Amides Using Equimolar POCl3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Sun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination with equimolar POCl3 can be efficiently achieved not only for hydroxypyrimidines, but also for many other substrates such as 2-hydroxy-pyridines, -quinoxalines, or even -amides. The procedure is solvent-free and involves heating in a sealed reactor at high temperatures using one equivalent of pyridine as base. It is suitable for large scale (multigram batch preparations.

  13. Local anodic bonding of Kovar to Pyrex aimed at high-pressure, solvent-resistant microfluidic connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M.T.; Chmela, E.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Tijssen, R.; van den Berg, Albert

    Local anodic bonding of a common Kovar alloy to Pyrex is presented. This technique is ideally suitable for temperature-, solvent- and pressure-resistant microfluidic connections. In this paper we mainly concentrate on the stress problems occurring during and after bonding. Because of the different

  14. Occurrence of aliphatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Mytillus galloprovincialis from the traditional market in Marseille, France, by Gas Chromatography triplequadropole tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-QQQ/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azis, M. Y.; Yelmiza; Asia, L.; Piram, A.; Bucharil, B.; Doumenq, P.; Syakti, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Mediterranean mussel, Mytillusgalloprovincialis collected from the traditional market in Marseille, France,have been analysed using GC-QQQ/MS for their hydrocarbons (n-alkanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) extentwith two different solvent extraction, such as heptane:dichloromethane (HEP:DCM;1:1) and heptane:acetone (HEP:ACE; 1:1). The results showed hydrocarbons yielded from heptane:acetone extractionwere 28335 μg.kg- 1mussels dw (Ʃ n-alkanes C15-34) and 202 μg.kg-1mussels dw(ƩPAHs) while the yield from heptane:DCM extract was lower ca. 27026 μg.kg-1musselsdw and 133 μg.kg-1 mussels dw respectively from the Ʃn-alkanesC15-34and ƩPAHs. High hydrocarbon levels can be affected by the presence of lipids or other metabolites in mussels that have the same polarity with hydrocarbon compounds which has interferred the measurement. Several ratio parameter of n- alcanes and PAHs source in the mussels were evaluated to asses the origins of their hydrocarbons in mussels from which we suggested origins of hydrocarbons were pyrolytic and biogenic rather than petrogenic.

  15. Receptor modeling of C2─C7 hydrocarbon sources at an urban background site in Zurich, Switzerland: changes between 1993─1994 and 2005─2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reimann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hourly measurements of 13 volatile hydrocarbons (C2–C7 were performed at an urban background site in Zurich (Switzerland in the years 1993–1994 and again in 2005–2006. For the separation of the volatile organic compounds by gas-chromatography (GC, an identical chromatographic column was used in both campaigns. Changes in hydrocarbon profiles and source strengths were recovered by positive matrix factorization (PMF. Eight and six factors could be related to hydrocarbon sources in 1993–1994 and in 2005–2006, respectively. The modeled source profiles were verified by hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The source strengths were validated by independent measurements, such as inorganic trace gases (NOx, CO, SO2, methane (CH4, oxidized hydrocarbons (OVOCs and meteorological data (temperature, wind speed etc.. Our analysis suggests that the contribution of most hydrocarbon sources (i.e. road traffic, solvents use and wood burning decreased by a factor of about two to three between the early 1990s and 2005–2006. On the other hand, hydrocarbon losses from natural gas leakage remained at relatively constant levels (−20%. The estimated emission trends are in line with the results from different receptor-based approaches reported for other European cities. Their differences to national emission inventories are discussed.

  16. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of syngas (CO + H2 to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent. Methanol was synthesized from syngas over Cu-ZnO; subsequently, was converted to hydrocarbons through the formation of dimethyl ether (DME over the metal-loaded ZSM-5. When 0.5 wt% Pd/ZSM-5 and 5 wt% Cu/ZSM-5 among the metal-loaded ZSM-5 catalysts with Pd, Co, Fe or Cu were employed as a portion of the hybrid catalyst, the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons were selectively produced (the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons in all hydrocarbons: 59% for the hybrid catalyst with Pd/ZSM-5 and 64% for that with Cu/ZSM-5 with a similar CO conversion during the reaction. An increase in the Cu loading on ZSM-5 resulted in increasing the yield of the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons, and in decreasing the yield of DME. Furthermore, the hybrid catalyst with Cu/ZSM-5 exhibited no deactivation for 30 h of the reaction. It was revealed that a hybrid catalyst containing Cu/ZSM-5 was efficient in the selective synthesis of gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons from syngas via methanol in the near-critical n-hexane fluid.

  17. Quantification of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cigarette smoke condensate using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography with atmospheric-pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotao; Hou, Hongwei; Chen, Huan; Liu, Yong; Wang, An; Hu, Qingyuan

    2015-09-17

    A stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cigarette smoke condensate was developed and validated. Compared with previously reported methods, this method has lower limits of detection (0.04-1.35 ng/cig). Additionally, the proposed method saves time, reduces the number of separation steps, and reduces the quantity of solvent needed. The new method was applied to evaluate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content in 213 commercially available cigarettes in China, under the International Standardization Organization smoking regime and the Health Canadian intense smoking regime. The results showed that the total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content was more than two times higher in samples from the Health Canadian intense smoking regime than in samples from the International Standardization Organization smoking regime (1189.23 vs. 2859.50 ng/cig, ppolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) increased with labeled tar content in both of the tested smoking regimes. There was a positive correlation between total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under the International Standardization Organization smoking regime with that under the Health Canadian intense smoking regime. The proposed liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method is satisfactory for the rapid, sensitive, and accurately quantitative evaluation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content in cigarette smoke condensate, and it can be applied to assess potential health risks from smoking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Solvent-Free Synthesis of New Coumarins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redah I. Al-Bayati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A solvent-free synthesis of five series of coumarin derivatives using microwave assistant is presented herein. The synthesized compounds are fully characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, and NMR spectroscopy.

  19. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  20. Solvent Extraction Developments in Southern Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The largest solvent-extraction plant in the world at the time, the Nchanga Copper Operation, was in Zambia. The first commercial process using solvent extraction for the refining of the platinum-group metals was in South Africa. More recently, the Southern African region has seen the implementation of solvent extraction for other base metals, precious metals, and specialty metals. These include the world firsts of primary production of zinc at Skorpion Zinc in Namibia and the large-scale refining of gold by Harmony Gold in South Africa. Several other flowsheets that use solvent-extraction technology are currently under commissioning, development, or feasibility study for implementation in this part of the world, including those for the recovery of copper, cobalt, nickel, tantalum, and niobium.

  1. Water as a Solvent for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  2. Biofiltration of solvent vapors from air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Young-sook.

    1993-01-01

    For various industrial solvent vapors, biofiltration promises to offer a cost-effective emission control technology. Exploiting the full potential of this technology will help attain the goals of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Concentrating on large volumes of volatile industrial solvents, stable multicomponent microbial enrichments capable of growing a mineral medium with solvent vapors as their only source of carbon and energy were obtained from soil and sewage sludge. These consortia were immobilized on an optimized porous solid support (ground peat moss and perlite). The biofilter material was packed in glass columns connected to an array of pumps and flow meters that allowed the independent variation of superficial velocity and solvent vapor concentrations. In various experiments, single solvents, such as methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, hexane and nitrobenzene, and solvent mixtures, such as benzene-toluene-xylene (BTX) and chlorobenzene-o-dichlorobenzene (CB/DCB) were biofiltered with rates ranging from 15 to334 g solvent removed per m[sup 3] filter volume /h. Pressure drops were low to moderate (0-10 mmHg/m) and with periodic replacement of moisture, the biofiltration activity could be maintained for a period of several months. The experimental data on methanol biofiltration were subjected to mathematical analysis and modeling by the group of Dr. Baltzis at NJIT for a better understanding and a possible scale up of solvent vapor biofilters. In the case of chlorobenzenes and nitrobenzene, the biofilter columns had to be operated with water recirculation in a trickling filter mode. To prevent inactivation of the trickling filter by acidity during CB/DCB removal, pH control was necessary, and the removal rate of CB/DCB was strongly influenced by the flow rate of the recyling water. Nitrobenzene removal in a trickling filter did not require pH control, since the nitro group was reduced and volatilized as ammonia.

  3. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate.

  4. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  5. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  6. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus.

  7. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  8. Computer-aided tool for solvent selection in pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; K. Tula, Anjan; Gernaey, Krist V.

    In the pharmaceutical processes, solvents have a multipurpose role since different solvents can be used in different stages (such as chemical reactions, separations and purification) in the multistage active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) production process. The solvent swap and selection task......-aided framework with the objective to assist the pharmaceutical industry in gaining better process understanding. A software interface to improve the usability of the tool has been created also....

  9. Influence of solvent polarity on preferential solvation of molecular recognition probes in solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Valeria; Cook, Joanne L; Hunter, Christopher A; Low, Caroline M R; Vinter, Jeremy G

    2012-12-13

    The association constants for formation of 1:1 complexes between a H-bond acceptor, tri-n-butylphosphine oxide, and a H-bond donor, 4-phenylazophenol, have been measured in a range of different solvent mixtures. Binary mixtures of n-octane and a more polar solvent (ether, ester, ketone, nitrile, sulfoxide, tertiary amide, and halogenated and aromatic solvents) have been investigated. Similar behavior was observed in all cases. When the concentration of the more polar solvent is low, the association constant is identical to that observed in pure n-octane. Once a threshold concentration of the more polar solvent in reached, the logarithm of the association constant decreases in direct proportion to the logarithm of the concentration of the more polar solvent. This indicates that one of the two solutes is preferentially solvated by the more polar solvent, and it is competition with this solvation equilibrium that determines the observed association constant. The concentration of the more polar solvent at which the onset of preferential solvation takes place depends on solvent polarity: 700 mM for toluene, 60 mM for 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 20 mM for the ether, ester, ketone, and nitrile, 0.2 mM for the tertiary amide, and 0.1 mM for the sulfoxide solvents. The results can be explained by a simple model that considers only pairwise interactions between specific sites on the surfaces of the solutes and solvents, which implies that the bulk properties of the solvent have little impact on solvation thermodynamics.

  10. Innovative eco-friendly bio- solvent for combating sea surface and sedimented oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Paraskevas

    2017-04-01

    The combating of oil spill at sea surface by chemical dispersants accelerates the evaporation and disperse the oil into the water column, where it is broken down by natural processes and/or is sedimented at the sea bottom, especially at near coastal shallow areas, ports and marinas. The usual methodology for cleaning the sedimented oil from the sea bottom is mainly carried out via excavation and dumping of the polluted sediment into deeper sea areas, where the contamination is transferred from one area to another. The eco-friendly bio-solvent MSL Aqua 250 is an innovative new solution based mainly on natural constituents. The action mechanism and the effectiveness of this eco-friendly solvent is based on the high surface tension process. Organic compounds, including hydrocarbons upon coming in contact with MSL Aqua 250 solvent generate a significant surface tension reaction, which is able to alter the organic compounds to liquid form and then to drastically evaporate it. The use of MSL Aqua 250 solvent, both at sea surface and at the bottom, has the following advantages compared to the dispersants: • Efficient solution without transferring the pollution from sea surface to the water column and to the bottom or disturbing the Aquatic Eco System. • Non-Toxic. • Environmentally friendly with a restoration of marine life in the Eco System. • Cost effective. The MSL Aqua 250 solvent has been tested in cooperation with the Cyprus Department of Fisheries and Marine Research and the Technological University of Cyprus and used during the years 2015 and 2016 in marinas and fishing shelters in Cyprus faced oil pollution, with high concentration in the sea water and at the sea bottom of chemical parameters (BOD5, COD, FOG, TKN, TP, TPH), with excellent results.

  11. Hydrolysis of fluorotelomer compounds leading to fluorotelomer alcohol production during solvent extractions of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasu, Kavitha; Royer, Laurel A; Liu, Jinxia; Lee, Linda S

    2010-11-01

    The experimental approaches used in assessing the biodegradability of fluorotelomer-based surfactants and polymers have been under increasing scrutiny. These substances consist of an aliphatic or aromatic backbone linked to perfluoroethyl moieties by ester, ether or urethane linkages. These linkages when broken yield fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), which are known to biotransform to a suite of polyfluorinated metabolites including perfluorinated carboxylic acids. Quantifying FTOH levels with minimal experimental artifacts is imperative in properly assessing the biotransformation potential and half-lives of fluorotelomer-based materials. We examined the potential for solvent-enhanced ester hydrolysis of fluorotelomer compounds with different hydrocarbon backbones including a monoester stearate (FTS), a citrate tri-ester (TBC), an acrylate (FTA), and a 2,4-toluenediamine urethane (FTU) in acetonitrile, methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl acetate with live, autoclaved, 60Co-γ-irradiated, and heat-treated (400°C) soils. Substantial hydrolysis only occurred with FTS in live and γ-irradiated soils for which microbial enzymes are expected to be active, but not in autoclaved soils where enzymes are deactivated. Acetonitrile and methanol (solvents with higher dielectric constants) enhanced hydrolysis by an order of magnitude compared to less polar solvents such as MTBE and ethyl acetate. For example, in a 24-h extraction with acetonitrile of FTS-amended soil, >5wt.% FTOH was produced compared to ethyl acetate or MTBE. FTA hydrolysis was <0.7 wt.% after a 15-h extraction period and was not solvent dependent. No statistically significant solvent-enhanced hydrolysis was observed for TBC, FTA or FTU.

  12. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  13. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  14. The use of environmentally sustainable bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications-A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li; Kathryn H. Smith; Geoffrey W. Stevens

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by greener or more environmental y sustainable solvents is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing health and environmental concerns as wel as economic pressures associated with VOCs. Solvents that are derived from biomass, namely bio-derived solvents, are a type of green solvent that have attracted intensive investigations in recent years because of their advantages over con-ventional VOCs, such as low toxicity, biodegradability and renewability. This review aims to summarize the use of bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications, with special emphasis given to utilization of biodiesels and terpenes. Compared with the conventional VOCs, the overall performance of these bio-derived solvents is comparable in terms of extraction yields and selectivity for natural product extraction and no difference was found for metal extraction. To date most researchers have focused on laboratory scale thermodynamics studies. Future work is required to develop and test new bio-derived solvents and understand the kinetic performance as well as solvent extraction pilot plant studies.

  15. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  16. Influence of Energy on Solvent Diffusion in Polymer/Solvent Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUHuijun; JIANGWenhua; 等

    2002-01-01

    The Vrentas-Duda free-volume theory has been extensively used to correlate or predict the solvent diffusion coefficient of a polymer/solvent system.The energy term in the free volume diffusion equation is difficult to estimate,so the energy term was usually neglected in previous predictive versions of the free volume diffusion coefficient equation.Recent studies show that the energy effect is very important even above the glass transition temperature of the system. In this paper, a new evaluation method of the energy term is proposed,that is the diffusion energy at different solvent concentrations is assumed to be a linear function of the solvent diffusion energy in pure solvents and that in polymers under the condition that the solvent in infinite dilution.By taking consideration of the influence of energy on the solvent diffustion,the prediction of solvent diffusion coefficient was preformed for three polymer/solvent systems over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures.The results show an improvement on the predictive capability of the free volume diffusion theory.

  17. Hydrocarbon degradation abilities of psychrotolerant Bacillus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Kolsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation requires identification of hydrocarbon degrading microbes and the investigation of psychrotolerant hydrocarbon degrading microbes is essential for successful biodegradation in cold seawater. In the present study, a total of 597 Bacillus isolates were screened to select psychrotolerant strains and 134 isolates were established as psychrotolerant on the basis of their ability to grow at 7 °C. Hydrocarbon degradation capacities of these 134 psychrotolerant isolate were initially investigated on agar medium containing different hydrocarbons (naphthalene, n-hexadecane, mineral oil and 47 positive isolates were grown in broth medium containing hydrocarbons at 20 °C under static culture. Bacterial growth was estimated in terms of viable cell count (cfu ml–1. Isolates showing the best growth in static culture were further grown in presence of crude oil under shaking culture and viable cell count was observed between 8.3 × 105–7.4 × 108 cfu ml–1. In the final step, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH (chrysene and naphthalene degradation yield of two most potent isolates was determined by GC-MS along with the measurement of pH, biomass and emulsification activities. Results showed that isolates Ege B.6.2i and Ege B.1.4Ka have shown 60% and 36% chrysene degradation yield, respectively, while 33% and 55% naphthalene degradation yield, respectively, with emulsification activities ranges between 33–50%. These isolates can be used to remove hydrocarbon contamination from different environments, particularly in cold regions.

  18. Review of soot measurement in hydrocarbon-air flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Soot,which is produced in fuel-rich parts of flames as a result of incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons,is the No.2 contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide.Developing soot measurement techniques is important to understand soot formation mechanism and control soot emission.The various soot measurement techniques,such as thermophoretic sampling par-ticles diagnostics followed by electron microscopy analysis,thermocouple particle densitometry,light extinction,laser-induced incandescence,two-color method,and emission computed tomography,are reviewed in this paper.The measurement principle and application cases of these measurement methods are described in detail.The development trend of soot measurement is to realize the on-line measurement of multi-dimensional distributions of temperature,soot volume fraction,soot particle size and other parameters in hydrocarbon-air flames.Soot measurement techniques suitable for both small flames in laboratories and large-scale flames in industrial combustion devices should be developed.Besides,in some special situations,such as high-pressure,zero gravity and micro-gravity flames,soot measurement also should be provided.

  19. Bioavailability and bioaccessibility of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated site soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, G.; Angell, R.; Strive, E.; Ma, W. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Although the bioavailability and/or bioaccessibility of contaminants in soil can be measured by various ecological receptors, the methods that are suitable for metals do not necessarily work well for petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). In this study, several biological and chemical methods were used at various PHC contaminated sites to find the most fitting method for different soil types in terms of predicting the biological responses of organisms as measured by standard single species toxicity tests. Organisms such as plants, earthworms, and collembolan were exposed to soils with different PHC concentrations. Multiple endpoints were then measured to evaluate the biological responses. The exposure concentrations for the 4 CCME hydrocarbon fractions were measured using hexane:acetone extraction as well as extractions with cyclodextrin, and a mixture of enzymes to simulate the gastro-intestinal fluid of an earthworm. The estimated exposure concentrations depended on the extraction method. The study showed that existing methodologies must be modified in order to better estimate the biological effect of PHCs in soil. Comparative data was presented and discussed along with proposed methodological modifications.

  20. Inclusions of Hydrocarbon Fluids in Diamonds From Wafangdian, Liaoning, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2015-12-01

    We studied a large number of industrial-grade diamonds from Pipe 50 of Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not suitable for polishing into gems or making cutting tools. They are usually crushed to form abrasives, without much scientific scrutiny. We report here fluid inclusions in dozens of diamonds. The first type of fluids occur in the outer rim of diamonds, just below the surface, while their interior is free of visible fluids. Under UV radiation, when a non-fluorescent diamond appeared dim, bubbles of included fluids became visible as yellow and blue spherules. Such diamonds are sometimes encrusted with euhedral micro-diamonds resembling those on thin films grown by CVD. The second type of fluid-rich diamonds display iridescence of pink, blue, green and yellow colors. They show lamellar, filamentous, or tubular structures, some of the tubes are filled with granules, probably grown from fluids in the tubes. An FT-IR investigation of both types yielded similar results. Apart from absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations, we found an outstanding group of bands just below wavenumber 3000. This indicates the presence of a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons of long chain length. Our results seem to implicate that hydrocarbons might be an important component in Earth's mantle, which might even have provided carbon from which diamonds crystllized.

  1. Uncertainty in Various Habitat Suitability Models and Its Impact on Habitat Suitability Estimates for Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Pin Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs are extensively used to project habitat suitability of species in stream ecological studies. Owing to complex sources of uncertainty, such models may yield projections with varying degrees of uncertainty. To better understand projected spatial distributions and the variability between habitat suitability projections, this study uses five SDMs that are based on the outputs of a two-dimensional hydraulic model to project the suitability of habitats and to evaluate the degree of variability originating from both differing model types and the split-sample procedure. The habitat suitability index (HSI of each species is based on two stream flow variables, including current velocity (V, water depth (D, as well as the heterogeneity of these flow conditions as quantified by the information entropy of V and D. The six SDM approaches used to project fish abundance, as represented by HSI, included two stochastic models: the generalized linear model (GLM and the generalized additive model (GAM; as well as three machine learning models: the support vector machine (SVM, random forest (RF and the artificial neural network (ANN, and an ensemble model (where the latter is the average of the preceding five models. The target species Sicyopterus japonicas was found to prefer habitats with high current velocities. The relationship between mesohabitat diversity and fish abundance was indicated by the trends in information entropy and weighted usable area (WUA over the study area. This study proposes a method for quantifying habitat suitability, and for assessing the uncertainties in HSI and WUA that are introduced by the various SDMs and samples. This study also demonstrated both the merits of the ensemble modeling approach and the necessity of addressing model uncertainty.

  2. A novel viscoelastic surfactant suitable for use in high temperature carbonate reservoirs for diverted acidizing stimulation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Stuart; Zhou, Jian; Gadberry, Fred [AkzoNobel Surface Chemistry, Forth Worth, TX (United States); Nasr-El-Din, Hisham; Wang, Guanqun [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2012-07-01

    Due to the low permeability of many carbonate hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs, it is difficult to achieve economic hydrocarbon recovery from a well without secondary stimulation. Bullheading of strong acids, such as HCl is practiced in low temperature reservoirs, but as the bottom hole temperature (BHT) rises, the acid becomes increasingly corrosive, causing facial dissolution and sub-optimal wormhole network development. In the last decade, viscoelastic surfactants (VES) have been added to HCl acid systems to improve the stimulation of HT carbonate reservoirs. The VES form 'living polymers' or worm-like micelles as electrolyte concentration rises in the acid due to reaction with the reservoir. This leads to viscosification of the stimulation fluid. The viscosification slows further acid reaction in the region already contacted by the acid, and forces the acid to take an alternate path into the rock, leading to diversion of the acids further down the well to the harder to access toe or lower permeability zones. Until recently, the maximum BHT that such VES-based diverting systems could be used was up to about 250 deg F/120 deg C. Above that temperature, all viscous properties of the fluid are lost, destroying the mechanism of acid diversion. A recently developed novel viscoelastic surfactant provides nearly 100 deg F/55 deg C extension in the BHT range in which diverted acid treatments can be used. These fluids are able to maintain both viscosity up to about 375 deg F/190 deg C, with the elastic modulus predominating up to 350 deg F/175 deg C. It is the elasticity which is particularly important in acid diversion. These fluids can have their viscosity readily broken by in-situ hydrocarbons, dilution with water or by using a mutual solvent. The broken fluids are readily removed from the near-well bore, leaving the newly created wormhole network to produce the target hydrocarbons. The new VES is significantly more environmentally benign compared with current

  3. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  4. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  5. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  6. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been

  7. Novel, benign, solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasamy, Paul; Raja, Robert; Srinivas, Darbha

    2005-04-15

    The catalytic properties of two classes of solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid phase are discussed: (i) microporous solids, encapsulating transition metal complexes in their cavities and (ii) titanosilicate molecular sieves. Copper acetate dimers encapsulated in molecular sieves Y, MCM-22 and VPI-5 use dioxygen to regioselectively ortho-hydroxylate L-tyrosine to L-dopa, phenol to catechol and cresols to the corresponding o-dihydroxy and o-quinone compounds. Monomeric copper phthalocyanine and salen complexes entrapped in zeolite-Y oxidize methane to methanol, toluene to cresols, naphthalene to naphthols, xylene to xylenols and phenol to diphenols. Trimeric mu3-oxo-bridged Co/Mn cluster complexes, encapsulated inside Y-zeolite, oxidize para-xylene, almost quantitatively, to terephthalic acid. In almost all cases, the intrinsic catalytic activity (turnover frequency) of the metal complex is enhanced very significantly, upon encapsulation in the porous solids. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies suggest that the geometric distortions of the complex on encapsulation change the electron density at the metal ion site and its redox behaviour, thereby influencing its catalytic activity and selectivity in oxidation reactions. Titanosilicate molecular sieves can oxidize hydrocarbons using dioxygen when loaded with transition metals like Pd, Au or Ag. The structure of surface Ti ions and the type of oxo-Ti species generated on contact with oxidants depend on several factors including the method of zeolite synthesis, zeolite structure, solvent, temperature and oxidant. Although, similar oxo-Ti species are present on all the titanosilicates, their relative concentrations vary among different structures and determine the product selectivity.

  8. C 2-C 10 nonmethane hydrocarbons measured in Dallas, USA—Seasonal trends and diurnal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Walk, T.; Gary, R.; Yao, X.; Elles, S.

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are important precursors of ozone and other photo oxidants. We presented continuous hourly average concentrations of 45 C 2-C 10 NMHCs measured in urban area of Dallas, USA from 1996 to 2004. Most of the selected compounds are good variables with less noise. The top 10 species with high ozone-generating potential were identified according to their concentrations and reactivities. The ambient concentrations of abundant anthropogenic emission hydrocarbons measured in Dallas were about 2-4 times of the background values measured in the remote areas with adjacent latitude. The time series for anthropogenic emission hydrocarbons showed an obvious seasonal cycle with relatively high concentration in winter and low concentration in summer. The sinusoidal function with a linearly decreasing factor could well fit the time series of NMHCs. The phase of seasonal cycle for the aromatic hydrocarbons of toluene, m/ p xylene and o-xylene that might come from both vehicle emission and solvent utilities evaporation was about 1 month earlier than that for alkanes and alkenes that mainly came from vehicle emission. Ambient NMHCs in Dallas decreased with a stable rate during 1996-2004. For most of compounds with high ozone-generating potential, the rate of ambient concentration decrease was higher or much higher than the rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) source emission reduction estimated by EPA's National Emission Inventory. On weekdays, the morning hydrocarbon concentration peak was coincident with morning traffic rush time in Dallas. Another concentration peak was delayed to afternoon traffic rush time. The characteristics of VOCs sources, photochemical removal processes and atmospheric dilution could be interpreted by the diurnal variations of benzene/ethylbenzene (B/E), toluene/ethylbenzene (T/E) and xylene/ethylbenzene (X/E). The ratio of VOC/NO x measured in Dallas was substantially smaller than that calculated for USA cities. Ozone

  9. Lipase catalyzed esterification of glycidol in nonaqueous solvents: solvent effects on enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J F; de Sampaio, T C; de Carvalho, I B; Barreiros, S

    1994-06-05

    We studied the effect of organic solvents on the kinetics of porcine pancreatic lipase (pp) for the resolution of racemic glycidol through esterification with butyric acid. We quantified ppl hydration by measuring water sorption isotherms for the enzyme in the solvents/mixtures tested. The determination of initial rates as a function of enzyme hydration revealed that the enzyme exhibits maximum apparent activity in the solvents/mixtures at the same water content (9% to 11% w/w) within the associated experimental error. The maximum initial rates are different in all the media and correlate well with the logarithm of the molar solubility of water in the media, higher initial rates being observed in the solvents/mixtures with lower water solubilities. The data for the mixtures indicate that ppl apparent activity responds to bulk property of the solvent. Measurements of enzyme particle sizes in five of the solvents, as function of enzyme hydration, revealed that mean particle sizes increased with enzyme hydration in all the solvents, differences between solvents being more pronounced at enzyme hydration levels close to 10%. At this hydration level, solvents having a higher water content lead to lower reaction rates; these are the solvents where the mean enzyme particle sizes are greater. Calculation of the observable modulus indicates there are no internal diffusion limitations. The observed correlation between changes in initial rates and changes in external surface area of the enzyme particles suggests that interfacial activation of ppl is only effective at the external surface of the particles. Data obtained for the mixtures indicate that ppl enantioselectivity depends on specific solvent-enzyme interactions. We make reference to ppl hydration and activity in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  10. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  11. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  13. 21 CFR 178.3530 - Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic... hydrocarbons, synthetic. Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic, may be safely used in the production... isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, produced by synthesis from petroleum gases consist of a mixture of...

  14. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons. 172... hydrocarbons. Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the... liquid hydrocarbons meeting the following specifications: Boiling point 93-260 °C as determined by...

  15. Predatory aquatic beetles, suitable trace elements bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghelea, Carmen I; Zaharescu, Dragos G; Hooda, Peter S; Palanca-Soler, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Predatory aquatic beetles are common colonizers of natural and managed aquatic environments. While as important components of the aquatic food webs they are prone to accumulate trace elements, they have been largely neglected from metal uptake studies. We aim to test the suitability of three dytiscid species, i.e.Hydroglyphus pusillus, Laccophilus minutus and Rhantus suturalis, as trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) bioindicators. The work was carried out in a case area representing rice paddies and control sites (reservoirs) from an arid region known for its land degradation (Monegros, NE Spain). Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was tested as a nonlinear approach to identify significant relationships between metals, species and habitat conditions so as to examine the ability of these species to reflect differences in metal uptake. Except Se and As, the average concentrations of all other elements in the beetles were higher in the rice fields than in the control habitats. The CATPCA determined that H. pusillus had high capacity to accumulate Fe, Ni and Mn regardless of the habitat type, and hence may not be capable of distinguishing habitat conditions with regards to these metals. On the other hand, L. minutus was found less sensitive for Se in non-managed habitats (i.e. reservoirs), while R. suturalis was good in accumulating Al, Mo and Pb in rice fields. The latter seems to be a promising bioindicator of metal enrichment in rice fields. We conclude that predatory aquatic beetles are good candidates for trace elements bioindication in impacted and non-impacted environments and can be used in environmental monitoring studies. CATPCA proved to be a reliable approach to unveil trends in metal accumulation in aquatic invertebrates according to their habitat status.

  16. Comprehensive Suitability Evaluation of Tea Crops Using GIS and a Modified Land Ecological Suitability Evaluation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; ZHANG Feng; ZHANG Li-Wen; HUANG Jing-Feng; JIN Zhi-Feng; D. K. GUPTA

    2012-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most valuable cash crops in southern China; however,the planting distribution of tea crops is not optimal and the production and cultivation regions of tea crops are restricted by law and custom.In order to evaluate the suitability of tea crops in Zhejiang Province,the annual mean temperature,the annual accumulated temperature above 10 ℃,the frequency of extremely low temperature below -13 ℃,the mean humidity from April to October,slope,aspect,altitude,soil type,and soil texture were selected from climate,topography,and soil factors as factors for land ecological evaluation by the Delphi method based on the ecological characteristics of tea crops.These nine factors were quantitatively analyzed using a geographic information system (GIS).The grey relational analysis (GRA) was combined with the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to address the uncertainties during the process of evaluating the traditional land ecological suitability,and a modified land ecological suitability evaluation (LESE) model was built.Based on the land-use map of Zhejiang Province,the regions that were completely unsuitable for tea cultivation in the province were eliminated and then the spatial distribution of the ecological suitability of tea crops was generated using the modified LESE model and GIS.The results demonstrated that the highly,moderately,and non-suitable regions for the cultivation of tea crops in Zhejiang Province were 27552.66,42724.64,and 26507.97 km2,and accounted for 28.47%,44.14%,and 27.39% of the total evaluation area,respectively.Validation of the method showed a high degree of coincidence with the current planting distribution of tea crops in Zhejiang Province.The modified LESE model combined with GIS could be useful in quickly and accurately evaluating the land ecological suitability of tea crops,providing a scientific basis for the rational distribution of tea crops and acting as a reference to land policy makers and land

  17. Phase equilibria study of the binary systems (N-hexylisoquinolinium thiocyanate ionic liquid + organic solvent or water).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królikowska, Marta; Karpińska, Monika; Zawadzki, Maciej

    2012-04-12

    Liquid-liquid phase equilibria (LLE) of binary mixtures containing a room-temperature ionic liquid N-hexylisoquinolinium thiocyanate, [HiQuin][SCN] with an aliphatic hydrocarbon (n-hexane, n-heptane), aromatic hydrocarbon (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene), cyclohexane, thiophene, water, and 1-alcohol (1-ethanol, 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, 1-decanol) have been determined using a dynamic method from room temperature to the boiling-point of the solvent at ambient pressure. N-hexylisoquinolinium thiocyanate, [HiQuin][SCN] has been synthesized from N-hexyl-isoquinolinium bromide as a substrate. Specific basic characterization of the new compound including NMR spectra, elementary analysis, and water content have been done. The density and viscosity of pure ionic liquid were determined over a wide temperature range from 298.15 to 348.15 K. The mutual immiscibility with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) for the binary systems {IL + aliphatic hydrocarbon, cyclohexane, or water} was detected. In the systems of {IL + aromatic hydrocarbon or thiophene} an immiscibility gap with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) was observed. Complete miscibility in the liquid phase, over a whole range of ionic liquid mole fraction, was observed for the binary mixtures containing IL and an 1-alcohol. For the tested binary systems with immiscibility gap {IL + aliphatic hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, cyclohexane, thiophene, or water}, the parameters of the LLE correlation have been derived using the NRTL equation. The basic thermal properties of the pure IL, that is, the glass-transition temperature as well as the heat capacity at the glass-transition temperature, have been measured using a differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Decomposition of the IL was detected by simultaneous thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) experiments.

  18. New Polymeric Membranes for Organic Solvent Nanofiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2017-05-01

    The focus of this dissertation was the development, synthesis and modification of polymers for the preparation of membranes for organic solvent nanofiltration. High chemical stability in a wide range of solvents was a key requirement. Membranes prepared from synthesized polymers as well as from commercial polymers were designed and chemically modified to reach OSN requirements. A solvent stable thin-film composite (TFC) membrane is reported, which is fabricated on crosslinked polythiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as substrate. The membranes exhibited high fluxes towards solvents like THF, DMF and DMSO ranging around 20 L/m2 h at 5 bar with a MWCO of around 1000 g/mol. Ultrafiltration PTSC membranes were prepared by non-solvent induced phase separation and crosslinked with GPTMS. The crosslinking reaction was responsible for the formation of an inorganic-type-network that tuned the membrane pore size. The crosslinked membranes acquired high solvent stability in DMSO, DMF and THF with a MWCO above 1300 g/mol. Reaction Induced Phase Separation (RIPS) was introduced as a new method for the preparation of skinned asymmetric membranes. These membranes have two distinctive layers with different morphologies both from the same polymer. The top dense layer is composed of chemically crosslinked polymer chains while the bottom layer is a porous structure formed by non-crosslinked polymer chains. Such membranes were tested for vitamin B12 in solvents after either crosslinking the support or dissolving the support and fixing the freestanding membrane on alumina. Pebax® 1657 was utilized for the preparation of composite membranes by simple coating. Porous PAN membranes were coated with Pebax® 1657 which was then crosslinked using TDI. Crosslinked Pebax® membranes show high stability towards ethanol, propanol and acetone. The membranes were also stable in DMF once crosslinked PAN supports were used. Sodium alginate polymer was investigated for the preparation of thin film composite

  19. Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen H

    1992-01-01

    This "Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste" forms part of a series of "Informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the instructions of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behal

  20. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  1. Compost bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was reduced by 17% in the .... Identification of bacterial isolates was done by biochemical tests. Atagana 1517 ..... control the prolonged thermophilic period in two-phase olive oil mill.

  2. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  3. Molecular characterization of autochthonous hydrocarbon utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria in water, soil and sediment samples collected from ... of the genomic DNA extracted from each bacterial isolate was amplified with ... that16S rRNA-gene-based techniques be used when studying the bacterial ...

  4. Determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cinthia

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... In this study, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with airborne particulate ... compounds from the heavily industrialized Vaal Triangle region. ... benzene ring as cluster, linear or angular (Maliszewska-.

  5. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  6. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  7. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  8. The orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the pure solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedermeijer-Denessen, H.J.M.; Ligny, C.L. de

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the assessment of the preferential orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the solvent from the surface potential χ and its temperature coefficient, dχ/dT. The method is based on the model of Levine et al. of the Stern inner region at the mercury-water interface in

  9. The orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the pure solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedermeijer-Denessen, H.J.M.; Ligny, C.L. de

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the assessment of the preferential orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the solvent from the surface potential χ and its temperature coefficient, dχ/dT. The method is based on the model of Levine et al. of the Stern inner region at the mercury-water interface in

  10. PSE For Solvent Applications: A Generic Computer-aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    Solvents are widely used across a number of industries in many applications such as separation agents, reaction mediums, cleaning agents and product carriers. Selection of optimal solvents in these applications is mostly based on previous experiences and experimental trial and error. A process sy...

  11. Solvent System Selection Strategies in Countercurrent Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J. Brent; McAlpine, James B.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of applications in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography, collectively known as countercurrent separation, are dedicated to medicinal plant and natural product research. In countercurrent separation, the selection of the appropriate solvent system is of utmost importance as it is the equivalent to the simultaneous choice of column and eluent in liquid chromatography. However, solvent system selection is often laborious, involving extensive partition and/or analytical trials. Therefore, simplified solvent system selection strategies that predict the partition coefficients and, thus, analyte behavior are in high demand and may advance both the science of countercurrent separation and its applications. The last decade of solvent system selection theory and applications are critically reviewed, and strategies are classified according to their data input requirements. This offers the practitioner an up-to-date overview of rationales and methods for choosing an efficient solvent system, provides a perspective regarding their accuracy, reliability, and practicality, and discusses the possibility of combining multiple methods for enhanced prediction power. PMID:26393937

  12. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  13. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Venkatram Prasad; Martin, Ivan; Langer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control ov...

  15. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  16. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  17. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  18. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  19. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  20. Electrokinetic Remediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Spiked Soils

    OpenAIRE

    , M. Bilgin; , G. Akıncı

    2011-01-01

    In the presented study, remediation studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of electrokinetic method on the treatment of natural soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, in laboratory scale reactors. Electokinetic remediation of agricultural soil with an initial TPHs (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) concentration of 10000 ppm was investigated under 20 V or 40 V direct current by using NaOH and acetic acid as electrolyte solution, treatment efficiencies were observed accordin...