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Sample records for hydrocarbon oxidation reaction

  1. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  2. Comparison of automatically generated reaction mechanism for oxidation of simple hydrocarbons in IC engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mansha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a detailed kinetic reaction mechanism, consisting of 208 reactions and 79 species, has been developed todescribe the oxidation of simple hydrocarbon fuel (natural gas in IC engine. The performance of the proposed mechanismis tested using simulation, tool CHEMKIN 4.1.1, and experimental measurements. The simulation results of the proposedreaction scheme were compared with those of reference mechanisms (GRI v3.0 and Konnov 0.5 version as well as experimentaldata. Based upon simulation results, it can be concluded that the proposed mechanism shows good concordanceswith GR I3.0 mechanism especially in the prediction of temperature, pressure, and major product species (H2O, CO2 profilesat stoichiometric conditions (= 1.0. Although, there are some discrepancies among each predicted profile, the proposeddetailed mechanism is good to describe the oxidation of natural gas in IC engine. The experimental data also showed favorableresults for prediction of major product species (CO2, H2O & CO at various engine operating speeds in idle mode.

  3. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elçin Külah; Laurent Marot; Roland Steiner; Andriy Romanyuk; Thomas A Jung; Aneliia Wäckerlin; Ernst Meyer

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide...

  4. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  5. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  6. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  7. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II DECHEMA; GREEN SOLVENTS FOR CATALYSIS - ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN REACTION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green catalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in alternative solvent systems generated by PARIS IIThomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez, Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Mar...

  8. Chemical – thermodynamics description of oxidization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Л. Матвєєва

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  In theory it is grounded, that in the process of exploitation because of intensification of oxidizing processes worsening takes place of power properties of fuels, in particular warmth of combustion, due to reduction of thermal effects of reactions of combustion of the oxidized hydrocarbons.

  9. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  10. Atmospheric oxidation of selected hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Olariu, R.I.

    2002-02-01

    This work presents investigations on the gas-phase chemistry of phenol and the cresol isomers performed in a 1080 l quartz glass reactor in Wuppertal and in a large-volume outdoor photoreactor EUPHORE in Valencia, Spain. The studies aimed at clarifying the oxidation mechanisms of the reactions of these compounds with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals. Product investigations on the oxidation of phenol and the cresol isomers initiated by OH radicals were performed in the 1080 l quartz glass reactor with analyses by in situ FT-IR absorption spectroscopy. The primary focus of the investigations was on the determination of product yields. This work represents the first determination and quantification of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes in the OH oxidation of phenolic compounds. Possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products have been elucidated. (orig.)

  11. Density functional calculations on hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Selmi, Massimo

    1994-06-01

    Hartree—Fock, Hartree—Fock-plus-correlation and self-consistent Kohn—Sham calculations are performed on a set of hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions, i.e. reactions among hydrocarbons in which the number and type of carbon—carbon and carbon—hydrogen bonds is conserved. It is found that neither Hartree—Fock nor Kohn—Sham methods correctly predict standard enthalpies, Δ Hr(298 K), of these reactions, even though — for reactions involving molecules containing strained double bonds — the agreement between the theoretical estimates and the experimental values of Δ Hr seems to be improved by the self-consistent solution of the Kohn—Sham equations. The remaining discrepancies are attributed to intramolecular dispersion effects, that are not described by ordinary exchange—correlation functionals, and are eliminated by introducing corrections based on a simple semi-empirical model.

  12. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  13. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed ...

  14. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed ...

  15. A new comprehensive reaction mechanism for combustion of hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranzi, E.; Sogaro, A.; Gaffuri, P.; Pennati, G. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria Chimica; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-03

    A chemical kinetic model has been developed which describes pyrolysis, ignition and oxidation of many small hydrocarbon fuels over a wide range of experimental conditions. Fuels include carbon monoxide and hydrogen, methane and other alkane species up to n-butane, ethylene, propene, acetylene, and oxygenated species such as methanol, acetaldehyde and ethanol. Formation of some larger intermediate and product species including benzene, butadiene, large olefins, and cyclopentadiene has been treated in a semi-empirical manner. The reaction mechanism has been tested for conditions that do not involve transport and diffusional processes, including plug flow and stirred reactors, batch reactors and shock tubes. The present kinetic model and its validation differ from previous reaction mechanisms in two ways. First, in addition to conventional combustion data, experiments more commonly associated with chemical engineering problems such as oxidative coupling, oxidative pyrolysis and steam cracking are used to test the reaction mechanism, making it even more general than previous models. In addition, H atom abstraction and some other reaction rates, even for the smaller C{sub 2}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, are treated using approximations that facilitate future extensions to larger fuels in a convenient manner. Construction of the reaction mechanism and comparisons with experimental data illustrate the generality of the model.

  16. Heterogeneous OH oxidation of motor oil particles causes selective depletion of branched and less cyclic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacman, Gabriel; Chan, Arthur W H; Nah, Theodora; Worton, David R; Ruehl, Chris R; Wilson, Kevin R; Goldstein, Allen H

    2012-10-02

    Motor oil serves as a useful model system for atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures typical of anthropogenic atmospheric particulate matter, but its complexity often prevents comprehensive chemical speciation. In this work we fully characterize this formerly "unresolved complex mixture" at the molecular level using recently developed soft ionization gas chromatography techniques. Nucleated motor oil particles are oxidized in a flow tube reactor to investigate the relative reaction rates of observed hydrocarbon classes: alkanes, cycloalkanes, bicycloalkanes, tricycloalkanes, and steranes. Oxidation of hydrocarbons in a complex aerosol is found to be efficient, with approximately three-quarters (0.72 ± 0.06) of OH collisions yielding a reaction. Reaction rates of individual hydrocarbons are structurally dependent: compared to normal alkanes, reaction rates increased by 20-50% with branching, while rates decreased ∼20% per nonaromatic ring present. These differences in rates are expected to alter particle composition as a function of oxidation, with depletion of branched and enrichment of cyclic hydrocarbons. Due to this expected shift toward ring-opening reactions heterogeneous oxidation of the unreacted hydrocarbon mixture is less likely to proceed through fragmentation pathways in more oxidized particles. Based on the observed oxidation-induced changes in composition, isomer-resolved analysis has potential utility for determining the photochemical age of atmospheric particulate matter with respect to heterogeneous oxidation.

  17. Zeolites Modified Metal Cations as Catalysts in Hydrocarbon Oxidation and the Alkyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadadsh Makhmud Aliyev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the creation of highly metalltceolitnyh systems and the study of their catalytic activities in the oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons (ethylene to acetaldehyde, acetone, propylene, butylene methyl ethyl ketone; aliphatic C1-C5 alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid esters; oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes in the alicyclic diene hydrocarbons and the oxidative dimerization of methane to acetylene. It has been established that the selectivity of these catalysts determined optimal combination of metal components with the acidity and the structure of the zeolite. Selected highly effective catalysts for the reactions studied. Based on the results of experimental studies of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons and aliphatic alcohols, the oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes and oxidative coupling of methane on the synthesized catalysts are represented by their probable stepwise mechanism and kinetic models developed reactions.

  18. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... revealed that all catalysts were more active in combination with ceria nanoparticles and that under the tested reaction conditions silver was equally or even more efficient than the gold catalysts. Calcination at 900 °C of silver on silica prepared by impregnation afforded a catalyst which was used...

  19. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Wesley D. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry; Schaefer, III, Henry F. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry

    2015-11-14

    This is the final report of the theoretical studies of elementary hydrocarbon species and their reactions. Part A has a bibliography of publications supported by DOE from 2010 to 2016 and Part B goes into recent research highlights.

  20. Safety of water treatment by chlorine dioxide oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons commonly found in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taymaz, K.; Williams, D.T.; Benoit, F.M.

    1979-01-01

    The safety of water treatment by chlorine dioxide oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons commonly found in water and industrial wastewaters in the US was studied by observing the reactions of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes in essentially chlorine-free, aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions. Naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes yielded chlorinated derivatives and oxidation products. Further research is recommended.

  1. Novel, benign, solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasamy, Paul; Raja, Robert; Srinivas, Darbha

    2005-04-15

    The catalytic properties of two classes of solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid phase are discussed: (i) microporous solids, encapsulating transition metal complexes in their cavities and (ii) titanosilicate molecular sieves. Copper acetate dimers encapsulated in molecular sieves Y, MCM-22 and VPI-5 use dioxygen to regioselectively ortho-hydroxylate L-tyrosine to L-dopa, phenol to catechol and cresols to the corresponding o-dihydroxy and o-quinone compounds. Monomeric copper phthalocyanine and salen complexes entrapped in zeolite-Y oxidize methane to methanol, toluene to cresols, naphthalene to naphthols, xylene to xylenols and phenol to diphenols. Trimeric mu3-oxo-bridged Co/Mn cluster complexes, encapsulated inside Y-zeolite, oxidize para-xylene, almost quantitatively, to terephthalic acid. In almost all cases, the intrinsic catalytic activity (turnover frequency) of the metal complex is enhanced very significantly, upon encapsulation in the porous solids. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies suggest that the geometric distortions of the complex on encapsulation change the electron density at the metal ion site and its redox behaviour, thereby influencing its catalytic activity and selectivity in oxidation reactions. Titanosilicate molecular sieves can oxidize hydrocarbons using dioxygen when loaded with transition metals like Pd, Au or Ag. The structure of surface Ti ions and the type of oxo-Ti species generated on contact with oxidants depend on several factors including the method of zeolite synthesis, zeolite structure, solvent, temperature and oxidant. Although, similar oxo-Ti species are present on all the titanosilicates, their relative concentrations vary among different structures and determine the product selectivity.

  2. Initiation Chemistries in Hydrocarbon (Aut)Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhiya, Lakshmanan; Zipse, Hendrik

    2015-09-28

    For the (aut)oxidation of toluene to benzyl hydroperoxide, benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, and benzoic acid, the thermochemical profiles for various radical-generating reactions have been compared. A key intermediate in all of these reactions is benzyl hydroperoxide, the heat of formation of which has been estimated by using results from CBS-QB3, G4, and G3B3 calculations. Homolytic O-O bond cleavage in this hydroperoxide is strongly endothermic and thus unlikely to contribute significantly to initiation processes. In terms of reaction enthalpies the most favorable initiation process involves bimolecular reaction of benzyl hydroperoxide to yield hydroxy and benzyloxy radicals along with water and benzaldehyde. The reaction enthalpy and free energy of this process is significantly more favorable than those for the unimolecular dissociation of known radical initiators, such as dibenzoylperoxide or dibenzylhyponitrite.

  3. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  4. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes can eithe

  5. Oxidative stress in entomopathogenic fungi grown on insect-like hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Juárez, M Patricia; Pedrini, Nicolás

    2015-08-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi mostly attack their insect hosts by penetration through the cuticle. The outermost insect surface is covered by a lipid-rich layer, usually composed of very long chain hydrocarbons. These fungi are apt to grow on straight chain hydrocarbons (alkanes) as the sole carbon source. Insect-like hydrocarbons are first hydroxylated by a microsomal P450 monooxygenase system, and then fully catabolized by peroxisomal β-oxidation reactions in Beauveria bassiana. In this review, we will discuss lipid metabolism adaptations in alkane-grown fungi, and how an oxidative stress scenario is established under these conditions. Fungi have to pay a high cost for hydrocarbon utilization; high levels of reactive oxygen species are produced and a concomitant antioxidant response is triggered in fungal cells to cope with this drawback.

  6. Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using molecular oxygen as an environmentally benign oxidant, these processes face tremendous difficulties, most importantly in control

  7. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  8. OXIDATION OF DRY HYDROCARBONS AT HIGH-POWER DENSITY ANODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Krist; O. Spaldon-Stewart; R. Remick

    2004-03-01

    This work builds upon discoveries by the University of Pennsylvania and others pertaining to the oxidation of dry hydrocarbon fuels in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The work reported here was restricted primarily to dry methane and confirms that YSZ-based cells, having ceria in the anode as a catalyst and copper in the anode as a current collector, can operate on dry methane for extended periods. Thirty-three lab-scale cells of various designs were fabricated and operated under a variety of conditions. The longest-lived cell gave stable performance on dry methane at 800 C for over 305 hours. Only slight carbon deposition was noted at the completion of the test. A corresponding nickel/YSZ-based anode would have lasted for less than an hour under these test conditions (which included open circuit potential measurements) before carbon fouling essentially destroyed the cell. The best performing cell achieved 112 mW/cm{sub 2} on dry methane at 800 C. Several problems were encountered with carbon fouling and declining open circuit voltages in many of the test cells after switching from operation on hydrogen to dry methane. Although not rigorously confirmed by experimentation, the results suggested that air infiltration through less than perfect perimeter seals or pinholes in the electrolytes, or both gave rise to conditions that caused the carbon fouling and OCV decline. Small amounts of air reacting with methane in a partial oxidation reaction could produce carbon monoxide that, in turn, would deposit the carbon. If this mechanism is confirmed, it implies that near perfect hardware is required for extended operation. Some evidence was also found for the formation of electrical shorts, probably from carbon deposits bridging the electrolyte. Work with odorized methane and with methane containing 100-ppm hydrogen sulfide confirmed that copper is stable at 800 C in dry hydrocarbon fuels in the presence of sulfur. In a number of cases, but not exclusively, the

  9. Development of direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Steven

    The focus of this dissertation is the development of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) that can operate with hydrocarbon fuels without the need for pre-reforming. The design of an active SOFC anode requires the consideration of a number of factors including the catalytic activity of the electrode towards fuel oxidation and electronic conductivity. This work focuses on a novel system for anode fabrication that allows the catalytically active and electronically conducting components of the anode to be easily varied. The catalytic properties of the SOFC anode were examined and a strong link between SOFC performance and oxidation activity demonstrated. Of the rare-earth catalysts investigated ceria was found to have the highest activity leading to the highest fuel cell power density. This activity was further improved, especially for methane fuel, by doping with a precious metal. Furthermore, it was shown that the catalyst not only increased the rate of reaction but increased the cell Open-Circuit Voltage (OCV) suggesting a change in mechanism that increased the cell efficiency. The necessity for high electronic conductivity and connectivity in the electrode was elucidated by studying the impact of anode copper content on cell performance. Low copper loading led to reduced cell performance due to a lack of conductive pathways from the active electrode region to the external circuit. It was observed that additional conductivity was provided by a thermally deposited carbonaceous phase formed upon exposure to hydrocarbon fuels. The electrochemical characterization of SOFC electrodes is a non-trivial problem. Literature reports on the properties of similar electrodes are inconsistent and often contradictory. Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, significant problems were found with common experimental procedures used to separate the losses associated the cell cathode from those of the anode. By calculating the effect of test geometry on this separation, it

  10. Non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林胜; 徐奕德; 陶龙骧

    1997-01-01

    The non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons such as aroma tics and C2 hydrocarbons in a low temperature range of 773-973 K with Mo/HZSM-5,Mo-Zr/HZSM-5 and Mo-W/HZSM-5 catalysts is studied.The means for enhancing the activity and stability of the Mo-containing catalysts under the reaction conditions is reported.Quite a stable methane conversion rate of over 10% with a high selectivity to the higher hydrocarbons has been obtained at a temperature of 973 K.Pure methane conversions of about 5.2% and 2.0% have been obtained at 923 and 873 K,respectively.In addition,accompanied by the C2-C3 mixture,tht- methane reaction can be initiated even at a lower temperature and the conversion rate of methane is enhanced by the presence of tne initiator of C2-C3 hydrocarbons.Compared with methane oxidative coupling to ethylene,the novel way for methane transformation is significant and reasonable for its lower reaction temperatures and high selectivity to the desired prod

  11. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Jr., Lawrence [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  12. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  13. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Cu and Co exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites: activity towards no reduction and hydrocarbon oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Leandro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available |Cu x|[Si yAl]-MFI and |Co x|[Si yAl]-MFI catalysts were prepared by ion exchange from |Na|[Si yAl]-MFI zeolites (y = 12, 25 and 45. The activity of the catalysts was evaluated in the reduction of NO to N2 in an oxidative atmosphere using propane or methane as reducing agents. The Cu catalysts were only active with propane and they presented higher activity than the Co-based catalysts, the latter being active with both hydrocarbons. H2-TPR and DRS-UV/Vis data allowed correlation between the activity towards NO reduction and the presence of cationic charge-compensating species in the zeolite. It was also verified that the hydrocarbons are preferentially oxidised by O2, a reaction that occurs simultaneously with their oxidation with NO.

  15. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons in Solid State Oxide Electrolyte Membrane Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHAO Ling; ZHU Zhong-nan; XI Dan-li

    2005-01-01

    Provskite-type catalysts, Ln0.6 Sr0.4 FexCo1-x O3 (Ln = Nd,Pr, Gd, Sm, La, 0<x<1) and Ln0.8Na0.2CoO3(Ln= La,Gd, Sm) were synthesized, their catalytic properties in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) were examined in a fixed-bed reactor. The former group presented higher activity in the OCM, but the main product was carbon dioxide. While the later group showed lower activity but much higher selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons compared with the former. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a solid oxide membrane reactor with La0.8 Na0.2CoO3 as catalyst. The results showed that methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide and ethane by two parallel reactions. Ethane was oxidized to ethene and carbon dioxide. A fraction of ethene was oxidized deeply to carbon dioxide. The total selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons exceeded 70%. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model was suggested to describe the reaction results.

  16. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot in fuel-rich oxidation of methane in a laminar flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Østberg, M.

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and soot was investigated under fuel-rich conditions in a laminar flow reactor. The effects of stoichiometry, dilution, and water vapor addition were studied at temperatures between 1073 and 1823 K. A chemical...... decrease with increasing addition of water vapor. The effect is described qualitatively by the reaction mechanism. The enhanced oxidation of acetylene is attributed to higher levels of hydroxyl radicals, formed from the reaction between the water vapor and hydrogen atoms....

  17. Final Report, "Molecular Design of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Catalytic Processes"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Francisco Zaera

    2007-08-09

    production of small amounts of ethylene and water, most likely via the concerted decomposition or disproportionation of the adsorbed molecular species. The bulk of the 2-iodoethanol decomposes at about 150 K via an initial carbon-iodine scission to form –O(H)CH2CH2– (~80%) and 2-hydroxyethyl (~20%) intermediates. Two competing reactions are involved with the subsequent conversion of the 2-hydroxyethyl species around 160 K, a reductive elimination with surface hydrogen to yield ethanol, and a β-H elimination to surface vinyl alcohol. The –O(H)CH2CH2–, on the other hand, dehydrogenates to a –OCH2CH2– oxametallacycle species about the same temperature. Both 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle species tautomerize to acetaldehyde, around 210 K and above 250 K, respectively, and some of that acetaldehyde desorbs while the rest decomposes to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. We contend that a better understanding of the surface chemistry of oxygen-containing surfaces can lead to better selectivities in catalysis. This is arguably the most important issue in the field of catalysis in the near future, and one that impacts several technologies of interest to DOE such as the manufacturing of speciality chemicals and the control and removal of pollutants. Additional work was performed on the characterization of the chemistry of methyl and methylene adsorbed species on oxygen-treated nickel surfaces. Complex chemistry was observed involving not only hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, but also C-C couplings and methylene insertions to produce heavier hydrocarbons, and oxygen insertion reactions that yield oxygenates. Finally, a dual titration technique employing xenon and a chemically sensitive probe was developed to identify minority catalytic sites on oxide surfaces. In the case of oxygen-treated Ni(110) single crystals, it was found that both hydrogen transfer with adsorbed water or ammonia and certain hydrocarbon hydrogenation reactions take place at the end of the

  18. An experimental and theoretical study of reaction steps relevant to the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svelle, Stian

    2004-07-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to obtain new insight into the reaction mechanism of the zeolite catalyzed methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction. It was decided to use both experimental and computational techniques to reach this goal. An investigation of the n-butene + methanol system was therefore initiated. Over time, it became apparent that it was possible to determine the rate for the methylation of n-butene by methanol. The ethene and propene systems were therefore reexamined in order to collect kinetic information also for those cases. With the development of user-friendly quantum chemistry programs such as the Gaussian suite of programs, the possibility of applying quantum chemical methods to many types of problems has become readily available even for non-experts. When performing mechanistic studies, there is quite often a considerable synergy effect when combining experimental and computational approaches. The methylation reactions mentioned above turned out to be an issue well suited for quantum chemical investigations. The incentive for examining the halomethane reactivity was the clear analogy to the MTH reaction system. Alkene dimerization was also a reaction readily examined with quantum chemistry. As discussed in the introduction of this thesis, polymethylbenzenes, or their cationic counterparts, are suspected to be key intermediates in the MTH reaction. It was therefore decided to investigate the intrinsic reactivity of these species in the gas-phase by employing sophisticated mass spectrometric (MS) techniques in collaboration with the MS group at the Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo The data thus obtained will also be compared with results from an ongoing computational study on gas phase polymethylbenzenium reactivity. 6 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) A Theoretical Investigation of the Methylation of Alkenes with Methanol over Acidic Zeolites. 2) A Theoretical Investigation of the

  19. Mechanistic studies on the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of selected aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehr, Sascha

    2012-07-01

    Benzene, toluene, the xylenes, and the trimethylbenzenes are among the most abundant aromatic trace constituents of the atmosphere mainly originating from anthropogenic sources. The OH-initiated atmospheric photo-oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons is the predominant removal process resulting in the formation of O{sub 3} and secondary organic aerosol. Therefore, aromatics are important trace constituents regarding air pollution in urban environments. Our understanding of aromatic photo-oxidation processes is far from being complete. This work presents novel approaches for the investigation of OH-initiated atmospheric degradation mechanisms of aromatic hydrocarbons. Firstly, pulsed kinetic studies were performed to investigate the prompt HO{sub 2} formation from OH+ aromatic hydrocarbon reactions under ambient conditions. For these studies, the existing OH reactivity instrument, based on the flash photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (FP/LIF) technique, was extended to the detection of HO{sub 2} radicals. The experimental design allows for the determination of HO{sub 2} formation yields and kinetics. Results of the pulsed kinetic experiments complement previous product studies and help to reduce uncertainties regarding the primary oxidation steps. Secondly, experiments with aromatic hydrocarbons were performed under atmospheric conditions in the outdoor atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction chamber) located at Forschungszentrum Juelich. The experiments were aimed at the evaluation of up-to-date aromatic degradation schemes of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.2). The unique combination of analytical instruments operated at SAPHIR allows for a detailed investigation of HO{sub x} and NO{sub x} budgets and for the determination of primary phenolic oxidation product yields. MCMv3.2 deficiencies were identified and most likely originate from shortcomings in the mechanistic representation of ring

  20. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  1. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Scott; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Turco, Richard P.; Drdla, Katja; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1994-02-01

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO2 and N2O5, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HOx radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HOx removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases.

  2. Investigating the chemical mechanisms of the functionalization and fragmentation of hydrocarbons in the heterogeneous oxidation by OH using a stochastic kinetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegel, A. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Hinsberg, B.; Houle, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    While the heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols influences their effects on climate, air quality, and visibility, a more detailed understanding of the chemical mechanisms in heterogeneous oxidation is crucial for improving models of their chemical evolution in the atmosphere. Previous experimental work in our lab has shown two general reaction pathways for organic aerosol upon oxidation: functionalization, which adds additional oxygen functional groups to the carbon skeleton, and fragmentation, which leads to C-C bond scission and lower molecular weight oxidized products. Furthermore, these pathways were also found to be dependent on molecular structure, with more branched or oxidized hydrocarbons undergoing more fragmentation than less branched or oxidized hydrocarbons. However, while the mechanisms of hydrocarbon oxidation have been studied extensively in the gas phase, to what extent the gas phase mechanisms of hydrocarbon oxidation can be reliably applied to heterogeneous or bulk oxidation in aerosol remains unclear. To investigate the role of the condensed phase and molecular structure in the mechanism of heterogeneous organic aerosol oxidation, stochastic kinetics models are developed and compared to measurements of the products in the oxidation of hydrocarbons. Within the aerosol bulk, condensed phase rate coefficients and product branching ratios for peroxy reactions lead to different product distributions than those expected from gas phase peroxy reactions due to the presence of the liquid radical cage at the reaction site. As a result, tertiary alcohols and ketones were found to be the predominate products in the oxidation of squalane as observed in experiments. As the aerosol becomes further oxidized, β-scission of alkoxy radicals with neighboring functional groups is the primary fragmentation pathway leading to lower volatility products. In conjunction with this fragmentation mechanism, elimination of CO2 from acyloxy radicals was

  3. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.;

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  4. Humate effect on oil-oxidizing activity of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizulina Elmira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of humic substances on the activity of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms is studied. It is shown that sodium humate, aminogumic and sulfogumic acids did not have a negative impact on the growth of oiloxidizing microorganisms. Introduction of sodium humate in the culture medium stimulated the destructive activity of oil-oxidizing microorganisms. At its addition the degree of oil degradation was 72.5-84.5%, and atits absence – 70.7-78.3%.

  5. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  6. Problems in Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons and Detailed Simulation of Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yuxuan

    This dissertation research consists of two parts, with Part I on the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons and Part II on aspects on the detailed simulation of combustion processes. In Part I, the catalytic oxidation of C1--C3 hydrocarbons, namely methane, ethane, propane and ethylene, was investigated for lean hydrocarbon-air mixtures over an unsupported Pd-based catalyst, from 600 to 800 K and under atmospheric pressure. In Chapter 2, the experimental facility of wire microcalorimetry and simulation configuration were described in details. In Chapter 3 and 4, the oxidation rate of C1--C 3 hydrocarbons is demonstrated to be determined by the dissociative adsorption of hydrocarbons. A detailed surface kinetics model is proposed with deriving the rate coefficient of hydrocarbon dissociative adsorption from the wire microcalorimetry data. In Part II, four fundamental studies were conducted through detailed combustion simulations. In Chapter 5, self-accelerating hydrogen-air flames are studied via two-dimensional detailed numerical simulation (DNS). The increase in the global flame velocity is shown to be caused by the increase of flame surface area, and the fractal structure of the flame front is demonstrated by the box-counting method. In Chapter 6, skeletal reaction models for butane combustion are derived by using directed relation graph (DRG) and DRG-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA), and uncertainty minimization by polynomial chaos expansion (MUM-PCE) mothodes. The dependence of model uncertainty is subjected to the completeness of the model. In Chapter 7, a systematic strategy is proposed to reduce the cost of the multicomponent diffusion model by accurately accounting for the species whose diffusivity is important to the global responses of the combustion systems, and approximating those of less importance by the mixture-averaged model. The reduced model is validated in an n-heptane mechanism with 88 species. In Chapter 8, the influence of Soret

  7. The role of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxuan; ZHAO Zhen

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the role of catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites (active sites: supported atoms f≤0.5 % ) in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane and propane, into oxygenatesand the epoxidation of olefins. The plausible structures of the highly dispersed and isolated active species, as well as their effects on the catalytic performances are discussed. The special physico-chemical properties and the functional mechanism of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites, as well as the preparation, characterization of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites and their applications in other types of reactions of lower hydrocarbons are summarized.

  8. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules are... and approved for the SIP, remain federally enforceable: (1) Los Angeles County APCD, Regulation IV...

  9. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels with the largest chemical species being pyrene (C 16H 10), this new mechanism is generated by adding PAH sub-mechanisms to account for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C 24H 12). The density functional theory (DFT) and the transition state theory (TST) have been adopted to evaluate the rate constants for several PAH reactions. The mechanism is validated in the premixed laminar flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, benzene and ethylene. The characteristics of PAH formation in the counterflow diffusion flames of iso-octane/toluene and n-heptane/toluene mixtures have also been tested for both the soot formation and soot formation/oxidation flame conditions. The predictions of the concentrations of large PAHs in the premixed flames having available experimental data are significantly improved with the new mechanism as compared to the base mechanism. The major pathways for the formation of large PAHs are identified. The test of the counterflow diffusion flames successfully predicts the PAH behavior exhibiting a synergistic effect observed experimentally for the mixture fuels, irrespective of the type of flame (soot formation flame or soot formation/oxidation flame). The reactions that lead to this synergistic effect in PAH formation are identified through the rate-of-production analysis. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Hydrocarbon oxidation catalyzed by vanadium polyoxometalate supported on mesoporous MCM-41 under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangestaninejad, Shahram; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Shams, Esmaeil; Salavati, Hossein

    2008-04-01

    Vanadium polyoxometalate (PVMo) supported on mesoporous MCM-41, MCM-41-NH(2), as efficient and heterogeneous catalysts, with large surface area, for hydrocarbon oxidation with hydrogen peroxide is reported. Oxidation of the alkenes and alkanes gave product selectivities, which are similar to those observed for corresponding homogeneous catalyst. PVMo-MCM was prepared by introduction of PVMo into the mesoporous molecule sieves of MCM-41 by impregnation and adsorption techniques. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis and cyclic voltametry (CV). Ultrasonic irradiation has a particular effect on MCM-41 structural uniformity and reduced the reaction times and improved the product yields. In addition, the solid catalysts could be recovered and reused several times without loss of its activity.

  11. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized.

  12. Gaseous hydrocarbon production by the reaction of coal char with hydrogen plasma at relatively lower microwave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, S.; Nishikubo, K.; Imamura, T. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Tosu (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Experimental conditions such as reaction temperature, microwave power and reaction pressure were changed in the reaction of carbon with hydrogen plasma. Methane was major product and other hydrocarbons such as acetylene and C2-C4 hydrocarbons were also produced. Methane production shows its maximum at 700-900 K and at 30W of microwave power. 2 figs.

  13. Zeolites Modified Metal Cations as Catalysts in Hydrocarbon Oxidation and the Alkyl Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Agadadsh Makhmud Aliyev; Zumrud Abdulmutallib Shabanova; Fikret Vakhid Aliyev; Alla M. Guseynova

    2014-01-01

    The results of studies on the creation of highly metalltceolitnyh systems and the study of their catalytic activities in the oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons (ethylene to acetaldehyde, acetone, propylene, butylene methyl ethyl ketone); aliphatic C1-C5 alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid esters; oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes in the alicyclic diene hydrocarbons and the oxidative dimerization of methane to acetylene. It has bee...

  14. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Cold Plasma Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons via cold plasma reaction with catalysts has been studied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Methane can be converted into C2 hydrocarbons in different selectivity depending on the form of the reactor, power of plasma, flow rate of methane, ratio of N2/CH4 and nature of the catalysts. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can reach as high as 98.64%, and the conversion of methane as high as 60% and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons as high as 50% are obtained. Coking can be minimized under the conditions of: proper selection of the catalysts,appropriate high flow rate of inlet methane and suitable ratio of N2 to CH4. The catalyst surface provides active sites for radical recombination.

  15. Facile Synthesis of Highly Active and Robust Ni-Mo Bimetallic Electrocatalyst for Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Chen, J.; Sun, Y.-F.; Yan, N.; Li, J.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel Ni–Mo bimetallic alloy decorated with multimicrocrystals as an efficient anode catalyst for hydrocarbon-fueled solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). We show that these Ni–Mo bimetallic alloys are highly active, thermally stable, and sulfur/coke tolerant electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon o

  16. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions involving hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Intrinsic barriers (formally the barrier in the absence of driving force) for H-atom transfer reactions are key parameters in Evans-Polyanyi and Marcus equations for estimating exothermic reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few of these barriers have been measured due to experimental difficulties in measuring rates for identity reactions. Thus, the authors have used semiempirical Molecular Orbital theoretical methods (MNDO/PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom transfer identity reactions involving alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl radicals and donors. Briefly stated, they find that barriers decrease with the degree of alkyl substitution at the radical site whereas barriers increase with the degree of conjugation with the radical site. Details of the methodology and analyses of how these barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  17. Partially oxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons show an increased bioavailability and biodegradability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, R.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Doddema, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have a low water solubility and tend to adsorb on soil particles, which both result in slow bioremediation processes. Many microorganisms, known for their ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, only partially oxidize these compounds. White rot fungi, fo

  18. Treatment of hydrocarbon contamination under flow through conditions by using magnetite catalyzed chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, M; Faure, P; Lorgeoux, C; Ruby, C; Hanna, K

    2013-01-01

    Soil pollution by hydrocarbons (aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons) is a major environmental issue. Various treatments have been used to remove them from contaminated soils. In our previous studies, the ability of magnetite has been successfully explored to catalyze chemical oxidation for hydrocarbon remediation in batch slurry system. In the present laboratory study, column experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of magnetite catalyzed Fenton-like (FL) and activated persulfate (AP) oxidation for hydrocarbon degradation. Flow-through column experiments are intended to provide a better representation of field conditions. Organic extracts isolated from three different soils (an oil-contaminated soil from petrochemical industrial site and two soils polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) originating from coking plant sites) were spiked on sand. After solvent evaporation, spiked sand was packed in column and was subjected to oxidation using magnetite as catalyst. Oxidant solution was injected at a flow rate of 0.1 mL min(-1) under water-saturated conditions. Organic analyses were performed by GC-mass spectrometry, GC-flame ionization detector, and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Significant abatement of both types of hydrocarbons (60-70 %) was achieved after chemical oxidation (FL and AP) of organic extracts. No significant by-products were formed during oxidation experiment, underscoring the complete degradation of hydrocarbons. No selective degradation was observed for FL with almost similar efficiency towards all hydrocarbons. However, AP showed less reactivity towards higher molecular weight PAHs and aromatic oxygenated compounds. Results of this study demonstrated that magnetite-catalyzed chemical oxidation can effectively degrade both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons (enhanced available contaminants) under flow-through conditions.

  19. Oxidative coulometric trace determination of sulphur in hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1973-07-01

    A new combustion system for the oxidative coulometric determination of sulphur in liquid hydrocarbons is described. The conditions were selected so that the recovery as SO(2) was close to 100%. The relative standard deviation was < 1% for sulphur in the range 2-1000 mg/l., with thiophene in cyclohexane as a test substance. Thermodynamic data on the equilibrium between SO(2), O(2) and SO(3) were used to select the operating conditions. To increase the recovery of SO(2) the combustion gas mixture was diluted with an inert gas to lower the partial pressure of oxygen. A temperature of 1000 degrees in the equilibrium zone resulted in a recovery of 99%. The SO(2) was titrated with coulometrically generated iodine, the concentration of which was controlled by a Pt-redox electrode. The response of this electrode has been examined. A rather high concentration of I(-) was used to suppress iodine losses during the analysis. The time of analysis was 2-5 min, and sample sizes were 3-7 mul. An LKB 16300 Coulometric Analyzer governed the titration procedure.

  20. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS IIMichael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  1. Reduced kinetic mechanism of n-heptane oxidation in modeling polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beijing ZHONG; Jun XI

    2008-01-01

    A reduced mechanism, which could couple with the multidimensional computational fluid dynamics code for quantitative description of a reacting flow, was developed for chemical kinetic modeling of polycyclic aro-matic hydrocarbon formation in an opposed-flow dif-fusion flame. The complete kinetic mechanism, which comprises 572 reactions and 108 species, was reduced to a simplified mechanism that includes only 83 reactions and 56 species through sensitivity analysis. The results computed via this reduced mechanism are nearly indistin-guishable from those via the detailed mechanism, which demonstrate that the model based on this reduced mech-anism can properly describe n-heptane oxidation chem-istry and quantitatively predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (such as benzene, naphthalene, phenan-threne and pyrene) formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames.

  2. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  3. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  4. Oxidation state of BZ reaction mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Sabrina G; Hastings, Harold M; Field, Richard J

    2006-01-12

    The unstirred, ferroin (Fe(phen)(3)2+)-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction1-4 is the prototype oscillatory chemical system. After an induction period of several minutes, one sees "spontaneous" formation of "pacemaker" sites, which oscillate between a blue, oxidized state (high [Fe(phen)3(3+)]) and a red, reduced state (low [Fe(phen)(3)3+]). The reaction medium appears red (reduced) during the induction phase, and the pacemaker sites generate target patterns of concentric, outwardly moving waves of oxidation (blue). Auto-oscillatory behavior is also seen in the Oregonator model of Field, Korös, and Noyes (FKN), a robust, reduced model which captures qualitative BZ kinetics in the auto-oscillatory regime. However, the Oregonator model predicts a blue (oxidized) induction phase. Here, we show that including reaction R8 of the FKN mechanism, not incorporated in the original Oregonator, accounts for bromide release during the induction phase, thus producing the observed red oxidation state.

  5. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  6. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  7. Reaction Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Hydrocarbons in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.

    2014-03-24

    This grant supported research in theoretical and computational Chemical Physics that resulted in numerous publications on fitting ab initio potential energy surfaces and dipole moment surfaces of polyatomic molecules and cations. This work made use of novel fitting methods that ensures that these surfaces are invariant with respect to all permutations of like atoms. The surfaces were used in various dynamics calculations, ranging from quantum vibrational dynamics to(quasi)classical trajectory calculations of reaction dynamics. A number of these studies were done in collaboration with experimental groups where the theoretical analyses turned out to be essential to give a proper understanding of the experimental results.

  8. Oxidation Reactions of Ethane over Ba-Ce-O Based Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James E.; Sault, Allen G.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-08-18

    Ethane oxidation reactions were studied over pure and Ca-, Mg-, Sr-, La-, Nd-, and Y-substituted BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites under oxygen limited conditions. Several of the materials, notably the Ca- and Y-substituted materials, show activity for complete oxidation of the hydrocarbon to CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 650 C. At higher temperatures, the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) to ethylene becomes significant. Conversions and ethylene yields are enhanced by the perovskites above the thermal reaction in our system in some cases. The perovskite structure is not retained in the high temperature reaction environment. Rather, a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed. Loss of the perovskite structure correlates with a loss of activity and selectivity to ethylene.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolism by White Rot Fungi and Oxidation by Coriolopsis gallica UAMH 8260 Laccase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Michael A.; Roman, Rosa; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    1999-01-01

    We studied the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using white rot fungi previously identified as organisms that metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls. Bran flakes medium, which has been shown to support production of high levels of laccase and manganese peroxidase, was used as the growth medium. Ten fungi grown for 5 days in this medium in the presence of anthracene, pyrene, or phenanthrene, each at a concentration of 5 μg/ml could metabolize these PAHs. We studied the oxidation of 10 PAHs by using laccase purified from Coriolopsis gallica. The reaction mixtures contained 20 μM PAH, 15% acetonitrile in 60 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6), 1 mM 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), and 5 U of laccase. Laccase exhibited 91% of its maximum activity in the absence of acetonitrile. The following seven PAHs were oxidized by laccase: benzo[a]pyrene, 9-methylanthracene, 2-methylanthracene, anthracene, biphenylene, acenaphthene, and phenanthrene. There was no clear relationship between the ionization potential of the substrate and the first-order rate constant (k) for substrate loss in vitro in the presence of ABTS. The effects of mediating substrates were examined further by using anthracene as the substrate. Hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) (1 mM) supported approximately one-half the anthracene oxidation rate (k = 2.4 h−1) that ABTS (1 mM) supported (k = 5.2 h−1), but 1 mM HBT plus 1 mM ABTS increased the oxidation rate ninefold compared with the oxidation rate in the presence of ABTS, to 45 h−1. Laccase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus had an activity similar to that of C. gallica laccase with HBT alone, with ABTS alone, and with 1 mM HBT plus 1 mM ABTS. Mass spectra of products obtained from oxidation of anthracene and acenaphthene revealed that the dione derivatives of these compounds were present. PMID:10473379

  10. Catalytic reaction energetics by single crystal adsorption calorimetry: hydrocarbons on Pt(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytken, Ole; Lew, Wanda; Campbell, Charles T

    2008-10-01

    Single crystal adsorption calorimetry provides essential information about the energetics of surface reactions on well-defined surfaces where the adsorbed reaction products can be clearly identified. In this tutorial review, we cover the essentials of that technique, with emphasis on our lab's recent advances in sensitivity and temperature range, and demonstrate what can be achieved through a review of selected example studies concerning adsorption and dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons on Pt(111). A fairly complete reaction enthalpy diagram is presented for the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene on Pt(111).

  11. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  12. Gas-phase Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions with Molecules of Interstellar Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-02-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C6H- 5), naphthalenide (C10H- 7), and anthracenide (C14H- 9) with atomic H, H2, and D2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O2, CO2, N2O, C2H2, CH3OH, CH3CN, (CH3)2CO, CH3CHO, CH3Cl, and (CH3CH2)2O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  13. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  14. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  15. Removal of Mercury in Liquid Hydrocarbons using Zeolites Modified with Chitosan and Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusrini, E.; Susanto, B. H.; Nasution, D. A.; Jonathan, R.; Khairul, W. M.

    2017-07-01

    Clinoptilolite zeolites were chemically modified with chitosan (Chit) and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) were synthesized for removal of mercury from liquid condensate hydrocarbon. The mercury content was in liquid hydrocarbon which was measured by Lumex mercury analyzer. The performance of sorbents based on zeolites modified chitosan and magnetic nanoparticles were examined on the real liquid condensate hydrocarbon. Removal of mercury using a prestine clinoptilolite zeolites, and zeolites modified chitosan (zeolites-Chit) were ∼4.5, and ∼35%, respectively. The effects of magnetic nanoparticles in zeolites-Chit sorbents were significant to reduce the mercury content in liquid condensate hydrocarbon which were from ∼63 to ∼66%. Increasing the mass ratio of Fe3O4 that influenced to the BET surface area of natural zeolites. Zeolites-Chit-Fe3O4NPs as an efficient sorbents are potential ideal to remove mercury in hydrocarbon for practical applications.

  16. Advances and perspectives in catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons in liquid phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This review article summarizes recent advances in catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons, especially presents two strategies for activation of C-H bonds or molecular oxygen. Based on our own research results, the applications of the two methods in the oxidation of cyclohexane, toluene and ethyl benzene, etc. are introduced, and the perspectives of the two methods are also discussed.

  17. Product analysis during the thermo-oxidation of amorphous deuterated hydrocarbon films with NO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alegre

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The excellent thermo-oxidation properties of NO2 have been previously reported, pointing to fast carbon co-deposits removal even at temperatures as low as 200 °C. On the other hand, CO, CO2 and water have been found as the main gas products in oxidation by O2, but in NO2 they have not been confirmed. To make a more accurate assessment, the use of in-situ deposited deuterated hydrocarbon films—to be able to distinguish products from ambient, protonated ones—in a fully-baked chamber have been used in the present work, mainly aimed at detecting heavy (deuterated water among the reaction products. Other products from hydrogen isotopes could not be identified, but their production would be much lower than water. The ratio of the total deuterium to carbon products detected is lower by an order of magnitude than the D/C ratio of the film (0.04–0.07 to 0.4, probably associated to the difficulties of measuring water in a vacuum system, and the relatively large quantity of background water found. Furthermore, post-oxidation of CO to CO2 has been found for NO2 at any studied temperature, while for O2 a faster post-oxidation which only occurs at T > 275 °C was found. Finally, the implications of the water production in the use of thermo-oxidation in actual and future nuclear fusion devices are also addressed.

  18. Enhanced utilization of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Namgoo

    Potentially viable strategies were sought for enhanced utilization of potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and Fenton's reagent during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). An innovative concept of controlled release of oxidant was introduced and organic-coated, completely or partially microencapsulated KMnO4 (MEPP) particles (874 +/- 377 mum) were created to serve a material that can be specifically targeted to a contaminant source zone. Paraffin wax was employed as the coating material because it is biodegradable, inert to KMnO4, insoluble in water and yet soluble in hydrophobic contaminants such as perchloroethylene (PCE). KMnO4 was released very slowly into water, but the oxidant was rapidly released into PCE. The estimated times for 90% release of the oxidant were 1.6 months, 19.3 years, and 472 years for paraffin wax to KMnO4 mass ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 5:1, respectively. The MEPP particles preferentially accumulated at the PCE-water interface, and the KMnO4 was rapidly released into PCE (contaminant and the locally high concentrations of KMnO 4 could be achieved at the interfacial region between PCE and water. Fenton's oxidative destruction was investigated for aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene; BTEX) present as dissolved and adsorbed phases, and chlorinated hydrocarbon (PCE) present mostly as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) (>93% of total PCE mass) in batch reactors (soil: solution = 1 g/L). An enhanced mass removal was observed by combining 300 mM H2O2, 2 mM Fe(III) and 2 mM N-(2-hydroxyethyl)iminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) at near-neutral pH. The PCE degradation was maximal at 600 mM H2O2, 5 mM Fe(III) and 5 mM HEIDA at pH 3. The observed BTEX mass removal rate constants (3.6--7.8 x 10-4 s-1) were compared to the estimated ones (4.1--10.1 x 10-3 s-1) using a semi-quantitative kinetic model. The model sensitivity analyses indicate that iron oxides and soil organic matter could play important roles in the non-specific losses of

  19. OPERATION OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES WITH PRACTICAL HYDROCARBON FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott A. Barnett; Jiang Liu; Yuanbo Lin

    2004-07-30

    This work was carried out to achieve a better understanding of how SOFC anodes work with real fuels. The motivation was to improve the fuel flexibility of SOFC anodes, thereby allowing simplification and cost reduction of SOFC power plants. The work was based on prior results indicating that Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs can be operated directly on methane and natural gas, while SOFCs with novel anode compositions can work with higher hydrocarbons. While these results were promising, more work was clearly needed to establish the feasibility of these direct-hydrocarbon SOFCs. Basic information on hydrocarbon-anode reactions should be broadly useful because reformate fuel gas can contain residual hydrocarbons, especially methane. In the Phase I project, we have studied the reaction mechanisms of various hydrocarbons--including methane, natural gas, and higher hydrocarbons--on two kinds of Ni-containing anodes: conventional Ni-YSZ anodes and a novel ceramic-based anode composition that avoid problems with coking. The effect of sulfur impurities was also studied. The program was aimed both at achieving an understanding of the interactions between real fuels and SOFC anodes, and providing enough information to establish the feasibility of operating SOFC stacks directly on hydrocarbon fuels. A combination of techniques was used to provide insight into the hydrocarbon reactions at these anodes during SOFC operation. Differentially-pumped mass spectrometry was be used for product-gas analysis both with and without cell operation. Impedance spectroscopy was used in order to understand electrochemical rate-limiting steps. Open-circuit voltages measurements under a range of conditions was used to help determine anode electrochemical reactions. Life tests over a wide range of conditions were used to establish the conditions for stable operation of anode-supported SOFC stacks directly on methane. Redox cycling was carried out on ceramic-based anodes. Tests on sulfur tolerance of

  20. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  1. Ab initio study of the influence of resonance stabilization on intramolecular ring closure reactions of hydrocarbon radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2016-03-28

    The intramolecular ring closure reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbon radicals potentially play an important role for the formation of molecular weight growth species, especially during the pyrolysis and oxidation of alkenes under low to intermediate temperatures. In this work we investigated a series of intramolecular cycloaddition reactions of both allylic- and alkyl-type dienyl radicals. In the first set of reactions, a resonant linear radical is converted into a non-resonant cyclic radical. In the second set, a non-resonant linear alkenyl radical isomerizes to either a resonant cyclic radical or a cyclic carbinyl radical. In both cases, three different reaction schemes are examined based on the location of the partially-formed resonance structure in the cyclic transition state. For each reaction scheme, both the endo- and exo-pathways were investigated. High pressure rate parameters are obtained from the results of CBS-QB3 electronic structure calculations combined with canonical transition state theory calculations. The results are discussed in the context of a Benson-type model to examine the impact of the partially-formed resonance stabilization on both the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The results are compared to previously reported rate parameters for cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals. The differences in the activation energies are primarily due to the bimolecular component of the activation energy. However, in some cases, the presence of the partial resonance structure significantly increases the strain energy for the ring that is formed in the transition state. The pre-exponential factors are also impacted by the formation of a partial resonance structure in the transition state. Lastly, the C6H9 potential energy surface is examined to show how the trends that are outlined here can be used to estimate rate parameters, which are needed to analyze pressure-dependent reaction systems.

  2. Magnetic graphene oxide as adsorbent for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linli; Xu, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Detection of monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites in urine is an advisable and valid method to assess human environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this work, novel Fe3O4/graphene oxide composites were prepared and their application in the magnetic solid-phase extraction of monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urine was investigated by coupling with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In the hybrid material, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles provide fast separation to simplify the analytical process and graphene oxide provides a large functional surface for the adsorption. The prepared magnetic nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The experimental conditions were optimized systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the recoveries of these compounds were in the range of 98.3-125.2%, the relative standard deviations ranged between 6.8 and 15.5%, and the limits of detection were in the range of 0.01-0.15 ng/mL. The simple, quick, and affordable method was successfully used in the analysis of human urinary monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two different cities. The results indicated that the monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons level in human urine can provide useful information for environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. A DFT-based investigation of hydrogen abstraction reactions from methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel

    2008-11-10

    The growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is in many areas of combustion and pyrolysis of hydrocarbons an inconvenient side effect that warrants an extensive investigation of the underlying reaction mechanism, which is known to be a cascade of radical reactions. Herein, the focus lies on one of the key reaction classes within the coke formation process: hydrogen abstraction reactions induced by a methyl radical from methylated benzenoid species. It has been shown previously that hydrogen abstractions determine the global PAH formation rate. In particular, the influence of the polyaromatic environment on the thermodynamic and kinetic properties is the subject of a thorough exploration. Reaction enthalpies at 298 K, reaction barriers at 0 K, rate constants, and kinetic parameters (within the temperature interval 700-1100 K) are calculated by using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) geometries and BMK/6-311+G(3df,2p) single-point energies. This level of theory has been validated with available experimental data for the abstraction at toluene. The enhanced stability of the product benzylic radicals and its influence on the reaction enthalpies is highlighted. Corrections for tunneling effects and hindered (or free) rotations of the methyl group are taken into account. The largest spreading in thermochemical and kinetic data is observed in the series of linear acenes, and a normal reactivity-enthalpy relationship is obtained. The abstraction of a methyl hydrogen atom at one of the center rings of large methylated acenes is largely preferred. Geometrical and electronic aspects lie at the basis of this striking feature. Comparison with hydrogen abstractions leading to arylic radicals is also made.

  4. Structure and chemistry of the heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4]•+: a model system for the gas-phase oxidation of small hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Nicolas; Wende, Torsten; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Ling; Schlangen, Maria; Zhang, Xinhao; Asmis, Knut R; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-03-06

    The heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4](•+) is generated via electrospray ionization and investigated with respect to both its electronic structure as well as its gas-phase reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, thus permitting a comparison to the well-known vanadium-oxide cation [V2O4](•+). As described in previous studies, the latter oxide exhibits no or just minor reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and C2H4, while substitution of one vanadium by a phosphorus atom yields the reactive [VPO4](•+) ion; the latter brings about oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of saturated hydrocarbons, e.g., propane and butane as well as oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) to unsaturated hydrocarbons, e.g. ethene, at thermal conditions. Further, the gas-phase structure of [VPO4](•+) is determined by IR photodissociation spectroscopy and compared to that of [V2O4](•+). DFT calculations help to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results underline the crucial role of phosphorus in terms of C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by mixed VPO clusters.

  5. Nitrous oxide emissions in a membrane bioreactor treating saline wastewater contaminated by hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Cosenza, Alida; Di Trapani, Daniele; Laudicina, Vito Armando; Morici, Claudia; Ødegaard, Hallvard

    2016-11-01

    The joint effect of wastewater salinity and hydrocarbons on nitrous oxide emission was investigated. The membrane bioreactor pilot plant was operated with two phases: i. biomass acclimation by increasing salinity from 10gNaClL(-1) to 20gNaClL(-1) (Phase I); ii. hydrocarbons dosing at 20mgL(-1) with a constant salt concentration of 20gNaClL(-1) (Phase II). The Phase I revealed a relationship between nitrous oxide emissions and salinity. During the end of the Phase I, the activity of nitrifiers started to recover, indicating a partial acclimatization. During the Phase II, the hydrocarbon shock induced a temporary inhibition of the biomass with the suppression of nitrous oxide emissions. The results revealed that the oxic tank was the major source of nitrous oxide emission, likely due to the gas stripping by aeration. The joint effect of salinity and hydrocarbons was found to be crucial for the production of nitrous oxide.

  6. Experimental Study on Hydrocarbon Formation Due to Reactions Between Carbonates and Water or Water—Bearing Minerals in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁克难; 汪本善; 等

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the depth of the Earth,experimental research on reactions between carbonates and water or waterbearing minerals was carried out at the pressure of about 1GPa and the temperature range of 800-1500℃.The reactions took place in an open and nonequilibrium state.Chromatographic analyses of the gas products indicate that in the experiments there were generated CH4-dominated hydrocarbons,along with some CO2 and CO.Accordingly,we think there is no essential distinction between free-state water and hydroxy in the minerals in the process of hydrocarbon formation.This study indicates that reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals should be an important factor leading to the formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the Earth's depth.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-21

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations.

  8. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on graphene oxides and reduced graphene oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubing; Yang, Shubin; Zhao, Guixia; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xiangke

    2013-11-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention in multidisciplinary studies because of its unique physical and chemical properties. Herein, the adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as naphthalene (NAP), anthracene (ANT), and pyrene (PYR), on reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and graphene oxides (GOs) as a function of pH, humic acid (HA), and temperature were elucidated by means of a batch technique. For comparison, nonpolar and nonporous graphite were also employed in this study. The increasing of pH from 2 to 11 did not influence the adsorption of PAHs on rGOs, whereas the suppressed adsorption of NAP on rGOs was observed both in the presence of HA and under high-temperature conditions. Adsorption isotherms of PAHs on rGOs were in accordance with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Ashtahhov (PDA) model, providing evidence that pore filling and flat surface adsorption were involved. The saturated adsorbed capacities (in mmol g(-1)) of rGOs for PAHs calculated from the PDA model significantly decreased in the order of NAP>PYR>ANT, which was comparable to the results of theoretical calculations. The pore-filling mechanism dominates the adsorption of NAP on rGOs, but the adsorption mechanisms of ANT and PYR on rGOs are flat surface adsorption.

  9. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-11-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions.

  11. Energetics, transition states, and intrinsic reaction coordinates for reactions associated with O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tianying; Hase, William L.; Doubleday, Charles

    2004-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations based on multiconfiguration wave functions are used to investigate a set of archetypal reactions relevant to O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon molecules and surfaces. These include O(3P) reactions with methane and ethane to give OH plus methyl or ethyl radicals, O(3P)+ethane to give CH3O+CH3, and secondary reactions of the OH product radical with ethane and the ethyl radical. Geometry optimization is carried out with CASSCF/cc-pVTZ for all reactions, and with CASPT2/cc-pVTZ for O(3P)+methane/ethane. Single-point energy corrections are applied with CASPT2, CASPT3, and MRCI+Q with the cc-pVTZ and cc-pVQZ basis sets, and the energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit (CBL). Where comparison of computed barriers and energies of reaction with experiment is possible, the agreement is good to excellent. The best agreement (within experimental error) is found for MRCI+Q/CBL applied to O(3P)+methane. For the other reactions, CASPT2/CBL and MRCI+Q/CBL predictions differ from experiment by 1-5 kcal/mol for 0 K enthalpies of reaction, and are within 1 kcal/mol of the best-estimate experimental range of 0 K barriers for O(3P)+ethane and OH+ethane. The accuracy of MRCI+Q/CBL is limited mainly by the quality of the active space. CASPT2/CBL barriers are consistently lower than MRCI+Q/CBL barriers with identical reference spaces.

  12. Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stegemeier, George Leo

    2009-06-23

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  13. Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stegemeier, George Leo

    2009-06-23

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  14. Tuning functionality of photocatalytic materials: an infrared study on hydrocarbon oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrollahi Buky, Rezvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the research described in this thesis was on the engineering and design of effective photocatalysts able to catalyze the oxidative conversion of hydrocarbons. The prepared catalysts were synthesized by using different procedures involving sol gel precursors, and impregnation or photo-de

  15. Multi-metallic oxides as catalysts for light alcohols and hydrocarbons from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Miguel [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, L; Galindo, H de J; Dominguez, J. M; Salmon, Manuel [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    A series of Cu-Co-Cr oxides doped with alkaline metals (M), were prepared by the coprecipitation method with metal nitrates (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) and (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} in aqueous solution. The calcined products were used as catalysts for the Fisher-Tropsch synthesis in a stainless-steel fixed bed microreactor. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, and the specific surface area, pore size and nitrogen adsorption-desorption properties were also determined. The alkaline metals favored the methanol synthesis and prevent the dehydration reactions whereas the hydrocarbon formation is independent to these metals. [Spanish] Una serie de oxidos Cu-Co-Cr soportados con metales alcalinos (M), fueron preparados por el metodo con nitratos metalicos (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) y (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} en soluciones acuosas. Los productos calcinados fueron usados como catalizadores para la sintesis de Fisher-tropsch en la superficie fija de un microreactor de acero inoxidable. El material fue caracterizado por difraccion de rayos X y el area de superficie especifica, el tamano de poro y propiedades de absorcion-desorcion de nitrogeno fueron determinadas. Los metales alcalinos favorecieron la sintesis de metanol y previnieron las reacciones de deshidratacion, mientras que la formacion de hidrocarburos es independiente de estos metales.

  16. Thermochemical properties, rotation barriers, and group additivity for unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbons and radicals resulting from reaction of vinyl and phenyl radical systems with O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbarand, Nadia; Bockhorn, Henning; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2005-03-17

    Oxidation of unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric and combustion processes results in formation of linear and cyclic unsaturated, oxygenated-hydrocarbon intermediates. The thermochemical parameters delatafH degrees 298, S degrees 298, and C(p)(f298)(T) for these intermediates are needed to understand their stability and reaction paths in further oxidation. These properties are not available for a majority of these unsaturated oxy-hydrocarbons and their corresponding radicals, even via group additivity methods. Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity of a series of 40 oxygenated and non-oxygenated molecules, or radicals corresponding to hydrogen atom loss from the parent stable molecules are determined in this study. Enthalpy (delatafH degrees 298 in kcal mol(-1)) is derived from the density function calculations at the B3LYP/6-311g(d,p) calculated enthalpy of reaction (delatafH degrees rxn,298) and by use of isodesmic (work) reactions. Estimation of error in enthalpy delatafH degrees 298, from use of computational chemistry coupled with work reactions analysis, is presented using comparisons between the calculated and literature enthalpies of reaction. Entropies (S degrees 298) and heat capacities (C(p)(f298)(T)) were calculated using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) determined frequencies and geometries. Potential barriers for internal rotors in each molecule were determined and used (in place of torsion frequencies) to calculate contributions to S and C(p)(T) from the hindered rotors. Twenty-six groups for use in group additivity (GA) are also developed.

  17. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  18. Manganese-lignin peroxidase hybrid from Bjerkandera adusta oxidizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons more actively in the absence of manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Pickard, M. A. [University of Alberta, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Vazquez-Duhalt, R. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-11-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic. As such, they are considered priority pollutants and represent a public health risk. Manganese-lignin peroxidase (MnLiP) is a glycoprotein that normally requires manganese(II) for its activity. Enzymatic oxidation of PAHs has been reported with purified preparations of lignin peroxidase (LiP). In this study the oxidation of PAHs was examined in the presence and absence of manganese ions, using whole cells and a purified MnLiP hybrid isoenzyme derived from Bjerkandera adusta, a white rot fungi. The objective was to demonstrate the ability of the MnLiP hybrid enzyme to oxidize PAHs. Results showed a decrease in the rate of oxidation of PAHs in the presence of Mn. A clear correlation was found between the specific activity of MnLiP and the ionization potential (IP) of the PAH substrate. Aromatic substrates were oxidized by the purified enzyme with an IP lower than 7.43 eV; the lower the IP the faster the rate of oxidation. The PAH metabolites of the Mn-independent reaction were identified as the corresponding quinones. PAH oxidation with MnLiP showed a different pH profile according to the presence or absence of Mn: the Mn-dependent oxidation of PAHs showed a lower optimal pH profile than the Mn-independent oxidation. As reported in the case of other white rot fungi the metabolic degradation of PAHs by B. adusta appears to involve both intracellular enzymatic systems such as cytochrome P450, and extracellular oxidative enzymes. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  19. Measurements of hydrocarbons, oxygenated hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides in an urban basin in Colorado: Implications for Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, P. D.; Trainer, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Parrish, D. D.; Carpenter, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Yee, J. E.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1995-11-01

    Concentrations of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the C3 to C10 range, CO, NOy (total reactive oxidized nitrogen), SO2, and meteorological parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during February 1991. The measurement site, located some 150 m above the Boulder urban basin, receives air masses typifying averaged local sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations observed showed little effects of photochemical loss processes and reflect the pattern of the local emission sources. The observed ratios of CO and the VOCs to NOy are compared to those predicted by the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) inventory.These comparisons indicate (1) good agreement for CO/NOY, (2) significant overpredictions by the NAPAP inventory for many of the hydrocarbon to NOY ratios, (3) much more benzene from mobile sources (and less from area sources) than predicted by the NAPAP inventory, and (4) large underpredictions of the light alcohols and carbonyls by the NAPAP inventory. These first two results are in marked contrast to the conclusions of the recent tunnel study reported by Ingalls in 1989. Source profile reconciliation implies substantial input from both a local propane source and gasoline headspace venting.

  20. Activation parameters as mechanistic probes in the TAML iron(V)-oxo oxidations of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Soumen; Thompson, Jasper Van Kirk; Shen, Longzhu Q; Mills, Matthew R; Bominaar, Emile L; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2015-01-19

    The results of low-temperature investigations of the oxidations of 9,10-dihydroanthracene, cumene, ethylbenzene, [D10]ethylbenzene, cyclooctane, and cyclohexane by an iron(V)-oxo TAML complex (2; see Figure 1) are presented, including product identification and determination of the second-order rate constants k2 in the range 233-243 K and the activation parameters (ΔH(≠) and ΔS(≠)). Statistically normalized k2 values (log k2') correlate linearly with the C-H bond dissociation energies DC-H, but ΔH(≠) does not. The point for 9,10-dihydroanthracene for the ΔH(≠) vs. DC-H correlation lies markedly off a common straight line of best fit for all other hydrocarbons, suggesting it proceeds via an alternate mechanism than the rate-limiting C-H bond homolysis promoted by 2. Contribution from an electron-transfer pathway may be substantial for 9,10-dihydroanthracene. Low-temperature kinetic measurements with ethylbenzene and [D10]ethylbenzene reveal a kinetic isotope effect of 26, indicating tunneling. The tunnel effect is drastically reduced at 0 °C and above, although it is an important feature of the reactivity of TAML activators at lower temperatures. The diiron(IV) μ-oxo dimer that is often a common component of the reaction medium involving 2 also oxidizes 9,10-dihydroanthracene, although its reactivity is three orders of magnitude lower than that of 2.

  1. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit

  2. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  3. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  4. Partial Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in a Segmented Bed Using Oxide-based Catalysts and Oxygen-conducting Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W.

    Two objectives for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons to produce synthesis gas are investigated herein: (1) the effect of oxygen-conducting supports with partially substituted mixed-metal oxide catalysts, and (2) a segmented bed approach using different catalyst configurations. Excess carbon deposition was the primary cause of catalyst deactivation, and was the focus of the experiments for both objectives. The formation and characterization of deposited carbon was examined after reaction for one of the selected catalysts to determine the quantity and location of the carbon on the catalyst surface leading to deactivation. A nickel-substituted barium hexaaluminate (BNHA), with the formula BaAl 11.6Ni0.4O18.8, and a Rh-substituted lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore (LCZR) with the formula La1.89Ca0.11 Zr1.89Rh0.11, were combined with two different doped ceria supports. These supports were gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) and zirconium-doped ceria (ZDC). The active catalyst phases were combined with the supports in different ratios using different synthesis techniques. The catalysts were characterized using several different techniques and were tested under partial oxidation (POX) of n-tetradecane (TD), a diesel fuel surrogate. It was found that the presence of GDC and ZDC reduced the formation of carbon for both catalysts; the optimal ratio of catalyst to support was different for the hexaaluminate and the pyrochlore; a loading of 20 wt% of the pyrochlore with ZDC produced the most stable performance in the presence of common fuel contaminants (>50 h); and, the incipient wetness impregnation synthesis method of applying the active catalyst to the support produced more stable product yields than the catalyst prepared by a solid-state mixing technique. Different hexaaluminate and pyrochlore catalysts were used in different configurations in a segmented bed approach. The first strategy was to promote the indirect reforming mechanism by placing a combustion catalyst in the

  5. Reaction pathways of NO oxidation by sodium chlorite powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Youngchul; Ko, Kyoung Bo; Cho, Moohyun; Namkung, Won; Lee, Kiman; Shin, Dong Nam; Koh, Dong Jun

    2009-07-01

    NO oxidation is an important prerequisite step to assist selective catalytic reduction at low temperatures (sodium chlorite powder (NaClO2(s)) can oxidize NO to NO2, the injection of NaClO2(s) can be simply adapted to NO oxidation. Therefore, we explored the reaction pathways of NO oxidation by NaClO2(s). Known concentrations of NO and NO2 in N2 balance were injected into packed-bed reactor containing NaClO2(s) at 130 degreesC. NaClO2(s) oxidized NO to NO2 which reacts again with NaClO2(s) to produce OClO. Comparison of experimental data with simulation results demonstrates that each NO2 molecule removed by the reaction with NaClO2(s) generated one OClO molecule, which also oxidized NO to NO2 with the production of ClNO and ClNO2. Using these results, we conclude that the oxidation of NO by NaClO2(s) occurred by two pathways. One is through the direct reaction of NO with NaClO(s). The other is through both the reaction of NO with OlCO produced by the reaction of NO2 with NaClO2(s) and the reaction of NO with ClO produced by the reaction of NO with OClO.

  6. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using partially purified laccase from residual compost of agaricus bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayolo-Deloisa, K. [Center for Biotechnology Research, Autonomous University of Morelos State, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Center for Biotechnology-FEMSA, Monterrey Institute of Technology, Campus Monterrey, Monterrey (Mexico); Machin-Ramirez, C. [Center for Biotechnology Research, Autonomous University of Morelos State, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Faculty of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Autonomous University of Morelos State, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Rito-Palomares, M. [Center for Biotechnology-FEMSA, Monterrey Institute of Technology, Campus Monterrey, Monterrey (Mexico); Trejo-Hernandez, M.R. [Center for Biotechnology Research, Autonomous University of Morelos State, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Laccase partially purified from residual compost of Agaricus bisporus by an aqueous two-phase system (Lac ATPS) was used in degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: fluorene (Flu), phenanthrene (Phe), anthracene (Ant), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and benzo[a]anthracene (BaA). The capacity of the enzyme to oxidize polyaromatic compounds was compared to that of the crude laccase extract (CE). After treatment of 72 h, Lac ATPS and CE were not capable of oxidizing Flu and Phe, while Ant, BaP, and BaA were oxidized, resulting in percentages of oxidation of 11.2 {+-} 1, 26 {+-} 2, and 11.7 {+-} 4 % with CE, respectively. When Lac ATPS was used, the following percentages of oxidation were obtained: 11.4 {+-} 3 % for Ant, 34 {+-} 0.1 % for BaP, and 13.6 {+-} 2 % for BaA. The results reported here demonstrate the potential application of Lac ATPS for the oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Low temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons using an electrochemical reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ippolito, Davide

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic porous electrochemical reactor for the deep oxidation of propene. Two electrode composites, La0.85Sr0.15MnO3±d/Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (LSM/CGO) and La0.85Sr0.15FeMnO3/Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (LSF/CGO), were produced in a 5 single cells stacked configuration and used ...

  8. BIODEGRADATION OF MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS USING OXYGEN, NITRATE, OR NITROUS OXIDE AS THE TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcosms were prepared from aquifer material, spiked with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and amended with oxygen, nitrate, and nitrous oxide. Benzene and alkylbenzenes were degraded to concentrations below 5 µg/liter within 7 days under aerobic conditions, whereas only the alkylbe...

  9. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O(3 P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Mhairi; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Reed, Stewart K.; Westacott, Robin E.; Costen, Matthew L.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2007-09-01

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O(3P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  10. Non-oxidative dehydroaromatization of methane:an effective reaction regeneration cyclic operation for catalyst life extension

    OpenAIRE

    Portilla Ovejero, Mª Teresa; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO JAVIER; Martínez, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane aromatization is an attractive direct route for producing higher hydrocarbons. It is highly selective to benzene despite the low conversion due to thermodynamic limitations, and Mo/H-ZSM-5, the first catalyst proposed for this reaction, is still considered as one of the most adequate. The major problem of this process is the severe catalyst deactivation due to the rapid build-up of carbonaceous deposits on the catalysts. Here we present an effective regeneration procedur...

  11. Sputtering yields and surface chemical modification of tin-doped indium oxide in hydrocarbon-based plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hu; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Hamaguchi, Satoshi, E-mail: hamaguch@ppl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Fukasawa, Masanaga; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya [Device and Material R& D Group, RDS Platform, Sony Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Sputtering yields and surface chemical compositions of tin-doped indium oxide (or indium tin oxide, ITO) by CH{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +}, and inert-gas ion (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +}, and Ar{sup +}) incidence have been obtained experimentally with the use of a mass-selected ion beam system and in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that etching of ITO is chemically enhanced by energetic incidence of hydrocarbon (CH{sub x}{sup +}) ions. At high incident energy incidence, it appears that carbon of incident ions predominantly reduce indium (In) of ITO and the ITO sputtering yields by CH{sup +} and CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions are found to be essentially equal. At lower incident energy (less than 500 eV or so), however, a hydrogen effect on ITO reduction is more pronounced and the ITO surface is more reduced by CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions than CH{sup +} ions. Although the surface is covered more with metallic In by low-energy incident CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions than CH{sup +} ions and metallic In is in general less resistant against physical sputtering than its oxide, the ITO sputtering yield by incident CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions is found to be lower than that by incident CH{sup +} ions in this energy range. A postulation to account for the relation between the observed sputtering yield and reduction of the ITO surface is also presented. The results presented here offer a better understanding of elementary surface reactions observed in reactive ion etching processes of ITO by hydrocarbon plasmas.

  12. Some Environmentally Relevant Reactions of Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janoš Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive forms of cerium oxide were prepared by a thermal decomposition of various precursors, namely carbonates, oxalates and citrates, commercially available nanocrystalline cerium oxide (nanoceria was involved in the study for comparison. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD were used to examine the morphology and crystallinity of the samples, respectively, whereas the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET method of nitrogen adsorption was used to determine surface areas. Interactions of cerium oxide with some phosphorus-containing compounds were investigated. Some of the examined samples, especially those prepared by annealing from carbonate precursors, exhibited an outstanding ability to destroy highly toxic organophosphates, such as pesticides (parathion methyl, or nerve agents (soman, VX. There were identified some relations between the degradation efficiency of cerium oxides and their crystallinity. It was also shown that cerium oxide is able to destroy one of widely used flame retardants - triphenyl phosphate. A phosphatase-mimetic activity of various cerium oxides was examined with the aid of a standardized phosphatase test.

  13. The Pathophysiology of Extracellular Hemoglobin Associated with Enhanced Oxidative Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Rifkind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC, oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV-ferrylHb and oxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(IIIHb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers enter cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern for increased hemolysis due to hemolytic anemia. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, does not further increase extracellular Hb.

  14. Dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of O(3P) atoms with hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Hailey; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Henderson, David A.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2003-11-01

    We describe an experimental approach to the determination of the nascent internal state distribution of gas-phase products of a gas-liquid interfacial reaction. The system chosen for study is O(3P) atoms with the surface of liquid deuterated squalane, a partially branched long-chain saturated hydrocarbon, C30D62. The nascent OD products are detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Both OD (v'=0) and (v'=1) were observed in significant yield. The rotational distributions in both vibrational levels are essentially the same, and are characteristic of a Boltzmann distribution at a temperature close to that of the liquid surface. This contrasts with the distributions in the corresponding homogeneous gas-phase reactions. We propose a preliminary interpretation in terms of a dominant trapping-desorption mechanism, in which the OD molecules are retained at the surface sufficiently long to cause rotational equilibration but not complete vibrational relaxation. The significant yield of vibrationally excited OD also suggests that the surface is not composed entirely of -CD3 endgroups, but that secondary and/or tertiary units along the backbone are exposed.

  15. Pattern of explosive reaction between uranium hexafluoride and hydrocarbon oils. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, K.E.

    1986-03-21

    Examination of uranium hexafluoride release incidents occurring over the past three decades of ORGDP experience has identified only four which apparently involved an explosion of a container resulting from reaction between uranium hexafluoride and an impurity. These four incidents exhibit a certain degree of commonality. Each has involved: (1) condensed phase uranium hexafluoride, (2) a moderately elevated temperature, (3) a sufficient quantity of uranium hexafluoride for a significant partial pressure to be maintained independently above that which can be consumed by chemical reaction, and (4) an organic liquid (probably hydrocarbon oil) accidentally present in the container as a contaminant. The purpose of this investigative search was to establish some conditional pattern for these four incidents to which their violent consequences could be attributed. Fortunately, the number of such incidents is relatively small, which emphasizes even more pointedly the unfortunate fact that documentation ranges from thorough to very limited. Documented sources of information are given in the bibliography. Copies of those which are not readily available are contained in six appendices. 8 refs.

  16. Role of glyoxal in SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: gas-phase reaction trumps reactive uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the significance of glyoxal acting as an intermediate species leading to SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under humid conditions. Rapid SOA formation from glyoxal uptake onto aqueous (NH42SO4 seed particles is observed; however, glyoxal did not partition to SOA or SOA coated aqueous seed during all aromatic hydrocarbon experiments (RH up to 80%. Glyoxal is found to only influence SOA formation by raising hydroxyl (OH radical concentrations. Four experimental approaches supporting this conclusion are presented in this paper: (1 increased SOA formation and decreased SOA volatility in the toluene + NOx photooxidation system with additional glyoxal was reproduced by matching OH radical concentrations through H2O2 addition; (2 glyoxal addition to SOA seed formed from toluene + NOx photooxidation did not increase observed SOA volume; (3 SOA formation from toluene + NOx photooxidation with and without deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed resulted in similar SOA growth, consistent with a coating of SOA preventing glyoxal uptake onto deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed; and (4 the fraction of a C4H9+ fragment (observed by Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS from SOA formed by 2-tert-butylphenol (BP oxidation was unchanged in the presence of additional glyoxal despite enhanced SOA formation. This study suggests that glyoxal uptake onto aerosol is minor when the surface (and near-surface of aerosols are primarily composed of secondary organic compounds.

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene by iron oxides and identification of degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himanshu; Gupta, Bina

    2015-11-01

    Photocatalytic decay profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been investigated on various synthesized iron oxides and on soil surfaces under a set of diverse conditions. Samples were analysed using the developed HPLC procedure. Results of the present study demonstrate fastest photodisintegration of B[a]P on goethite followed by haematite, magnetite, akaganeite and maghemite, respectively. The effect of soil pH, irradiation wavelength and iron oxide and oxalic acid dose on the degradation of B[a]P was evaluated. The studies revealed enhancement in photodegradation in the presence of oxalic acid due to the occurrence of fenton like reaction. The results showed faster B[a]P degradation under short wavelength UV radiation. Rate constants in acidic, neutral and alkaline soils under optimum dissipation conditions were 1.11×10(-2), 7.69×10(-3) and 9.97×10(-3) h(-1), respectively. The study indicates that iron oxides along with oxalic acid are effective photocatalyst for the remediation of benzo[a]pyrene contaminated soil surfaces. The degradation products of B[a]P in the soils of different pH in presence of goethite were identified and degradation pathways proposed. Peaks due to toxic metabolites such as diones, diols and epoxides disappear after 120 h in all the three soils.

  18. Positive patch test reactions to oxidized limonene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R-Limonene is a common fragrance terpene found in domestic and industrial products. R-Limonene autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. In a recent multicentre study, 5.2% (range 2.3-12.1%) of 2900 patients showed a positive patch test reactio...

  19. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase...

  20. Chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of paraffinic hydrocarbons needed for primary reference fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is described which simulates the oxidation of the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The high temperature subset of these mechanisms is identified, and the extensions to deal with low temperature conditions are also explained. The algorithms used to assign reaction rates to elementary steps in the reaction mechanism are described, and the means of identifying the different chemical species and the relevant reactions are outlined. Finally, we show how interested kinetic modeling researchers can obtain copies of this reaction mechanism.

  1. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  2. Measurements of vertical distributions of bromine oxide, iodine oxide, oxygenated hydrocarbons and ozone over the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, R. M.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pierce, B.; Gao, R.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogen species and Oxygenated VOC (TORERO) field experiment 17 research flights were conducted with the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft equipped with a combination of chemical in-situ sensors, and remote sensing instruments to characterize air-sea exchange of reactive halogen species, oxygenated hydrocarbons, and aerosols, and their transport into the free troposphere, over different ocean environments of the Humboldt current in the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (42S to 14N Lat.; 70W to 105W Long.). This presentation presents measurements of the spatial distributions of halogen oxide radicals, oxygenated hydrocarbons, and discusses their impact on ozone destruction rates, and the oxidation of atmospheric mercury. Air mass history is assessed by means of the Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS), a global meteorological, chemical and aerosol assimilation/forecasting system that assimilates real-time stratospheric ozone retrievals from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), total column ozone from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Reactive halogen species and organic carbon are important in the atmosphere, because they modify HOx radical abundances, influence the reactive chemistry and lifetime of climate active gases (e.g., ozone, methane, dimethyl sulfide), modify aerosol-cloud interactions; halogen radicals can further oxidize atmospheric mercury.

  3. Kinetics of oxytetracycline reaction with a hydrous manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Kennedy F; Pedersen, Joel A

    2006-12-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics comprise a class of broad spectrum antimicrobial agents finding application in human therapy, animal husbandry, aquaculture, and fruit crop production. To better understand the processes affecting these antibiotics in soils and sediments, the kinetics of oxytetracycline transformation by a hydrous manganese oxide (MnO2) were investigated as a function of reactant concentration, pH, and temperature. Oxytetracycline was rapidly degraded by MnO2. Initial reaction rates exhibited pronounced pH-dependence, increasing as pH decreased. Reaction of oxytetracycline with MnO2 was accompanied by generation of Mn(II) ions, suggesting oxidative transformation of the antibiotic. At pH 5.6, apparent reaction orders for oxytetracycline and MnO2 were 0.7 and 0.8. Reaction order with respect to H+ was 0.6 between pH 4 and 9. Initial reaction rates increased by a factor of approximately 2.4 for 10 degrees C temperature increases; the apparent activation energy (60 kJ x mol(-1)) was consistent with a surface-controlled reaction. Reactivity of tetracycline antibiotics toward MnO2 increased in the following order: rolitetracyline oxytetracycline manganese oxides in soils and sediments are likely to promote appreciable degradation of tetracycline antibiotics, and that reaction rates are strongly dependent on reaction time scale and solution conditions.

  4. Low temperature removal of surface oxides and hydrocarbons from Ge(100) using atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M.; Tedder, M. S.; Palmer, J. D.; Mudd, J. J.; McConville, C. F.

    2016-08-01

    Germanium is a group IV semiconductor with many current and potential applications in the modern semiconductor industry. Key to expanding the use of Ge is a reliable method for the removal of surface contamination, including oxides which are naturally formed during the exposure of Ge thin films to atmospheric conditions. A process for achieving this task at lower temperatures would be highly advantageous, where the underlying device architecture will not diffuse through the Ge film while also avoiding electronic damage induced by ion irradiation. Atomic hydrogen cleaning (AHC) offers a low-temperature, damage-free alternative to the common ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) technique which is widely employed. In this work, we demonstrate with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the AHC method is effective in removing surface oxides and hydrocarbons, yielding an almost completely clean surface when the AHC is conducted at a temperature of 250 °C. We compare the post-AHC cleanliness and (2 × 1) low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern to that obtained via IBA, where the sample is annealed at 600 °C. We also demonstrate that the combination of a sample temperature of 250 °C and atomic H dosing is required to clean the surface. Lower temperatures prove less effective in removal of the oxide layer and hydrocarbons, whilst annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions only removes weakly bound hydrocarbons. Finally, we examine the subsequent H-termination of an IBA-cleaned sample using XPS, LEED and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in order to examine changes in the work function of Ge(100) upon hydrogenation.

  5. Catalytic activity of copper (II) oxide prepared via ultrasound assisted Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angı, Arzu; Sanlı, Deniz; Erkey, Can; Birer, Özgür

    2014-03-01

    Copper (II) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an ultrasound assisted Fenton-like aqueous reaction between copper (II) cations and hydrogen peroxide. The reactions were initiated with the degradation of hydrogen peroxide by ultrasound induced cavitations at 0 °C or 5 °C and subsequent generation of the OH radical. The radical was converted into hydroxide anion in Fenton-like reactions and copper hydroxides were readily converted to oxides without the need of post annealing or aging of the samples. The products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. Catalytic activity of the nanoparticles for the hydrogen peroxide assisted degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the dark was tested by UV-visible spectroscopy with methylene blue as the model compound. The rate of the reaction was first order, however the rate constants changed after the initial hour. Initial rate constants as high as 0.030 min(-1) were associated with the high values of surface area, i.e. 70 m(2)/g. Annealing of the products at 150 °C under vacuum resulted in the decrease of the catalytic activity, underlying the significance of the cavitation induced surface defects in the catalytic process.

  6. Low temperature removal of surface oxides and hydrocarbons from Ge(100) using atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M., E-mail: m.walker@warwick.ac.uk; Tedder, M.S.; Palmer, J.D.; Mudd, J.J.; McConville, C.F.

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Preparation of a clean, well-ordered Ge(100) surface with atomic hydrogen. • Surface oxide layers removed by AHC at room temperature, but not hydrocarbons. • Increasing surface temperature during AHC dramatically improves efficiency. • AHC with the surface heated to 250 °C led to a near complete removal of contaminants. • (2 × 1) LEED pattern from IBA and AHC indicates asymmetric dimer reconstruction. - Abstract: Germanium is a group IV semiconductor with many current and potential applications in the modern semiconductor industry. Key to expanding the use of Ge is a reliable method for the removal of surface contamination, including oxides which are naturally formed during the exposure of Ge thin films to atmospheric conditions. A process for achieving this task at lower temperatures would be highly advantageous, where the underlying device architecture will not diffuse through the Ge film while also avoiding electronic damage induced by ion irradiation. Atomic hydrogen cleaning (AHC) offers a low-temperature, damage-free alternative to the common ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) technique which is widely employed. In this work, we demonstrate with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the AHC method is effective in removing surface oxides and hydrocarbons, yielding an almost completely clean surface when the AHC is conducted at a temperature of 250 °C. We compare the post-AHC cleanliness and (2 × 1) low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern to that obtained via IBA, where the sample is annealed at 600 °C. We also demonstrate that the combination of a sample temperature of 250 °C and atomic H dosing is required to clean the surface. Lower temperatures prove less effective in removal of the oxide layer and hydrocarbons, whilst annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions only removes weakly bound hydrocarbons. Finally, we examine the subsequent H-termination of an IBA-cleaned sample using XPS, LEED and ultraviolet

  7. CO2 as an Oxidant for High Temperature Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibudjing eKawi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the developments in catalyst technology for the reactions utilizing CO2 for high temperature applications. These include dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins, the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and finally CO2 reforming of hydrocarbon feedstock (i.e. methane and alcohols. Aspects on the various reaction pathways are also highlighted. The literature on the role of promoters and catalyst development is critically evaluated. Most of the reactions discussed in this review are exploited in industries and related to on-going processes, thus providing extensive data from literature. However some reactions, such as CO2 reforming of ethanol and glycerol which have not reached industrial scale are also reviewed owing to their great potential in terms of sustainability which are essential as energy for the future. This review further illustrates the building-up of knowledge which shows the role of support and catalysts for each reaction and the underlying linkage between certain catalysts which can be adapted for the multiple CO2-related reactions.

  8. 气相光催化氧化降解卤代烃的研究%Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李功虎; 安纬珠

    2000-01-01

      本文介绍了气相光催化作用的基本原理,从光催化剂的改性技术、反应动力学和反应机理三个方面综述了近年来气相光催化氧化降解卤代烃的研究。%  This paper introduced the photocatalyzing principle of semiconductor in gas phase,and summarized the recent studies on the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of halogenated hydrocarbons,including modification of semiconductor,reaction kinetics and the degradation mechanism of TCE.

  9. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  10. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  11. Study of the Radical Chain Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Oxidation for In Situ Combustion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ushakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundance of in situ combustion models of oil oxidation, many of the effects are still beyond consideration. For example, until now, initial stages of oxidation were not considered from a position of radical chain process. This is a serious difficulty for the simulation of oil recovery process that involves air injection. To investigate the initial stages of oxidation, the paper considers the sequence of chemical reactions, including intermediate short-living compounds and radicals. We have attempted to correlate the main stages of the reaction with areas of heat release observed in the experiments. The system of differential equations based on the equations of oxidation reactions was solved. Time dependence of peroxides formation and start of heat release is analytically derived for the initial stages. We have considered the inhibition of initial oxidation stages by aromatic oil compounds and have studied the induction time in dependence on temperature. Chain ignition criteria for paraffins and crude oil in presence of core samples were obtained. The calculation results are compared with the stages of oxidation that arise by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry. According to experimental observations we have determined which reactions are important for the process and which can be omitted or combined into one as insignificant.

  12. Unification of catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions: amorphous beat crystalline cobalt iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Das, Chittaranjan; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    Catalytic water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered as one of the convenient routes for the sustainable energy conversion. Bifunctional catalysts for the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are pivotal for the energy conversion and storage, and alternatively, the photochemical water oxidation in biomimetic fashion is also considered as the most useful way to convert solar energy into chemical energy. Here we present a facile solvothermal route to control the synthesis of amorphous and crystalline cobalt iron oxides by controlling the crystallinity of the materials with changing solvent and reaction time and further utilize these materials as multifunctional catalysts for the unification of photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation as well as for the oxygen reduction reaction. Notably, the amorphous cobalt iron oxide produces superior catalytic activity over the crystalline one under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation and oxygen reduction conditions.

  13. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  14. Dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of O(1D) with a liquid hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Carla; King, Kerry L; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2011-06-30

    The dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of the first electronically excited state of the oxygen atom, O((1)D), with the surface of a liquid hydrocarbon, squalane (C(30)H(62); 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) has been studied experimentally. Translationally hot O((1)D) atoms were generated by 193 nm photolysis of a low pressure (nominally 1 mTorr) of N(2)O a short distance (mean = 6 mm) above a continually refreshed liquid squalane surface. Nascent OH (X(2)Π, v' = 0) reaction products were detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on the OH A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π (1,0) band at the same distance above the surface. The speed distribution of the recoiling OH was characterized by measuring the appearance profiles as a function of photolysis-probe delay for selected rotational levels, N'. The rotational (and, partially, fine-structure) state distributions were also measured by recording LIF excitation spectra at selected photolysis-probe delays. The OH v' = 0 rotational distribution is bimodal and can be empirically decomposed into near thermal (~300 K) and much hotter (~6000 K) Boltzmann-temperature components. There is a strong positive correlation between rotational excitation and translation energy. However, the colder rotational component still represents a significant fraction (~30%) of the fastest products, which have substantially superthermal speeds. We estimate an approximate upper limit of 3% for the quantum yield of OH per O((1)D) atom that collides with the surface. By comparison with established mechanisms for the corresponding reactions in the gas phase, we conclude that the rotationally and translationally hot products are formed via a nonstatistical insertion mechanism. The rotationally cold but translationally hot component is most likely produced by direct abstraction. Secondary collisions at the liquid surface of products of either of the previous two mechanisms are most likely responsible for the rotationally and translationally cold

  15. Mechanistic and kinetic investigations on the role of methanol and dimethyl ether in the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Espín, Juan Salvador Martínez

    2017-01-01

    The main scope of this PhD thesis was to gain knowledge on the mechanistic and kinetic behavior of methanol and DME in the industrially relevant Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction with the use of zeolitic materials as catalysts. Industrial MTH processes use methanol, DME or combined methanol/DME feeds over zeolitic catalysts. Methanol and its dehydration product, DME, are conventionally attributed an analogous behavior in MTH; however, a thorough investigation on the theme is still missi...

  16. Design of heterogeneous photocatalysts based on metal oxides to control the selectivity of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldotti, Andrea; Molinari, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalysis is particularly relevant in order to realize chemical transformations of interest in synthesis and, at the same time, to move towards a "sustainable chemistry" with a minimal environmental impact. Heterogeneous systems with well-defined textural characteristics represent a suitable means to tailor the selectivity of photocatalytic processes. Here, we summarize and classify the significant features of photocatalysts consisting of photoactive metal oxides dispersed on high-surface-area solid supports, or constrained inside their porous network. These systems are based on the use of titanium dioxide, highly dispersed oxides of titanium, chromium, vanadium, and polyoxotungstates. They share similar primary photoprocesses: light absorption induces a charge separation process with formation of positive holes able to oxidize organic substrates. A great number of the papers discussed here concern oxidation reactions carried out in the presence of O₂ for inducing partial oxidation of alcohols and monooxygenation of hydrocarbons. We also devote some attention to photocatalysis in the absence of O₂. In these conditions, the photogenerated charge separation offers the possibility to induce the formation of C-C and C-N bonds. We emphasize that the optimal tailoring of photoactive materials for synthetic purposes can be achieved by combining recent advances in the preparation of nanostructured materials with mechanistic knowledge derived from surface science and molecular level investigations.

  17. A novel layered perovskite as symmetric electrode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Chen, Kongfa; Liu, Yuanxu; He, Beibei

    2017-02-01

    Layered perovskite oxides are well known to possess significant electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Herein, we highlight a novel layered perovskite PrBaMn1.5Fe0.5O5+δ (PBMFO) as electrodes of symmetrical solid oxide fuel cells (SSOFCs). The layered PBMFO shows high electrical conductivity of 112.5 and 7.4 S cm-1 at 800 °C in air and 5% H2/Ar, respectively. The single cell with PBMFO symmetric electrodes achieves peak power density of 0.54 W cm-2 at 800 °C using humidified hydrogen as fuel. Moreover, PBMFO electrodes demonstrate good redox stability and high coking tolerance against hydrocarbon fuel.

  18. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N., E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Enright, Ryan [Thermal Management Research Group, Efficient Energy Transfer (etaET) Department, Bell Labs Ireland, Dublin 15 (Ireland)

    2014-07-07

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5 − 7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ≈0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  19. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Enright, Ryan; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5 - 7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ≈0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  20. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C4 hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhi -Yang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  1. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C{sub 4} hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Z.Y.

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  2. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  3. Low-Temperature CO Oxidation over a Ternary Oxide Catalyst with High Resistance to Hydrocarbon Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew J; Toops, Todd J; Unocic, Raymond R; Parks, James E; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. This catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  5. Selective Oxidation of Light Hydrocarbons Using Lattice Oxygen Instead of Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈师孔; 李然家; 周吉萍; 余长春

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride (MA) and partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas with lattice oxygen instead of molecular oxygen are investigated. For the oxidation of butane to MA in the absence of molecular oxygen, the Ce-Fe promoted VPO catalyst has more available lattice oxygen and provides higher conversion and selectivity than that of the unpromoted one. It is supposed that the introduction of Ce-Fe complex oxides improves redox performance of VPO catalyst and increases the activity of lattice oxygen.For partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over LaFeO3 and Lao.8Sro.gFeO3 oxides, the reaction with flow switched between 11% O2-Ar and 11% CH4-He at 900℃ was carried out. The results show that methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 with selectivity over 93% by the lattice oxygen of the catalyst in an appropriate reaction condition, while the lost lattice oxygen can be supplemented by air re-oxidation. It is viable for the lattice oxygen of the LaFeO3 and La0.8Sr0.2FeO3 catalyst instead of molecular oxygen to react with methane to synthesis gas in the redox mode.

  6. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic

  7. The bacterial catabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Characterization of three hydratase-aldolase-catalyzed reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake A. LeVieux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are highly toxic, pervasive environmental pollutants with mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic properties. There is interest in exploiting the nutritional capabilities of microbes to remove PAHs from various environments including those impacted by improper disposal or spills. Although there is a considerable body of literature on PAH degradation, the substrates and products for many of the enzymes have never been identified and many proposed activities have never been confirmed. This is particularly true for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. As a result, pathways for the degradation of these compounds are proposed to follow one elucidated for naphthalene with limited experimental verification. In this pathway, ring fission produces a species that can undergo a non-enzymatic cyclization reaction. An isomerase opens the ring and catalyzes a cis to trans double bond isomerization. The resulting product is the substrate for a hydratase-aldolase, which catalyzes the addition of water to the double bond of an α,β-unsaturated ketone, followed by a retro-aldol cleavage. Initial kinetic and mechanistic studies of the hydratase-aldolase in the naphthalene pathway (designated NahE and two hydratase-aldolases in the phenanthrene pathway (PhdG and PhdJ have been completed. Crystallographic work on two of the enzymes (NahE and PhdJ provides a rudimentary picture of the mechanism and a platform for future work to identify the structural basis for catalysis and the individual specificities of these hydratase-aldolases.

  8. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  9. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by heterogeneous reactions with N 2O 5 on atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, Richard M.; Guo, Jiazhen; Guo, Zhishi; McDow, Stephen R.

    The degradation of particulate polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on atmospheric soot particles in the presence of gas phase dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2O 5) was explored. Dilute diesel and wood soot particles containing PAH were reacted with˜10ppm of N 2O 5 in a 200 ℓ continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). To provide a stable source of particles for reaction in the CSTR, diesel or wood soot particles were injected at night into a 25 m 3 Teflon outdoor chamber. The large chamber served as a reservoir for the feed aerosol, and the aerosol could then be introduced at a constant flow rate into the CSTR. PAH-N 2O 5 heterogeneous rate constants for wood soot at 15°C ranged from2 × 10 -18to5 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. For diesel soot the rate constants at 16°C were higher and ranged from5 × 10 -18to30 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. Comparisons with other studies suggest that sunlight is the most important factor which influences PAH decay. This is followed by ozone, NO 2, N 2O 5 and nitric acid. The rate constants of nitro-PAH formation from a parent PAH and N 2O 5 were of the order of1 × 10 -19-1 × 10 -18 molecules -1s -1. The uncertainty associated with all of these rate constants is± a factor of 3. Given, however, the small magnitude of the rate constants and the low levels of N 2O 5 present in the atmosphere, we concluded that PAH heterogeneous reactions with gas phase N 2O 5 degrade particle-bound PAH or to form nitro-PAH from PAH are not very important. (Direct application of the specific rate constants derived in this study to ambient atmospheres should not be undertaken unless the ambient particle size distributions and chemical composition of the particles are similar to the ones reported in this study.)

  10. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. L.; Goltz, M. N.; Agrawal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~ 1.9 mg L- 1, and initial aqueous [CAH] ~ 150 μg L- 1; cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.07 d- 1, respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  11. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  12. 固体氧化物电解池H2O-C02共电解制取烃类燃料反应特性研究%Reaction Characteristics of Hydrocarbon Production by H20-C02 Co-electrolysis in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡佳雯; 史翊翔; 蔡宁生; 王洪建; 李汶颖

    2012-01-01

    Co-electrolysis of H20-CO2 in solid oxide electrolysis cells is one of the efficient ways to reduce CO2 emission and to store renewable power. H20-CO2 co-electrolysis performance in a solid oxide electrolysis button cell was tested. Methane composition was discovered in the reduction product gas. The results indicate that the electrochemical performance of H20-CO2 coelectrolysis reaction is between those of steam electrolysis and CO2 electrolysis, and CO is primarily produced via reverse water gas shift reaction. The concentration of methane in reduction product can be raised by increasing operating voltage or increasing CO2 concentration in inlet gas. Different with direct H2-CO methanation, little H2 can be found in H20-CO2 coelectrolysis product. A reaction pathway of CH4 production via in-situ H20-CO2 electrochemical conversion on the Ni catalyst surface is proposed.%固体氧化物电解池(solidoxideelectrolysiscells,SOEC、共电解H2O-C02是减少C02排放和进行可再生能源转化储存的潜在有效途径之一。该文开展了SOEC共电解H2O-CO2实验研究,在产物中发现甲烷气体生成。不同原料气配比条件下的共电解实验结果表明,SOEC共电解H2O-CO2电化学性能介于电解水蒸气和电解C02之间。增加工作电压和反应气体中C02的分压有利于提高产物中CH4的浓度,逆向水气变换反应是CO生成的主要途径。与H2-CO在SOEC阴极的反应产物组成相比,H2O-C02共电解产物中H2浓度非常低,据此推测产物CH4主要由H20和C02在Ni催化剂表面原位电化学转化生成。

  13. Estimates for biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons and nitric oxide emissions in the Valley of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Erik

    Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (methylbutenol or MBO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions were estimated for the Valley of Mexico developing a spatially and temporally resolved emission inventory for air quality models. The modeling domain includes all the Metropolitan Mexico City Area, the surrounding forests and agriculture fields. The estimates were based on several sources of land use and land cover data and a biogenic emission model; the biomass density and tree characteristics were obtained from reforestation program data. The biogenic emissions depend also on climatic conditions, mainly temperature and solar radiation. The temperature was obtained from a statistical revision of the last 10 yr data reported by the Mexico City Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network, while the solar radiation data were obtained from measurements performed in a typical oak forest in the Valley and from sources of total solar radiation data for Mexico City. The results indicated that 7% of total hydrocarbon emissions in Mexico Valley are due to vegetation and NO emissions from soil contribute with 1% to the total NO x emissions.

  14. A Gallium Oxide-Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite for Enhanced Photocatalytic Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungdu Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites (HCs made up of gallium oxide (GaO and graphene oxide (GO were investigated with the intent of enhancing a photocatalytic reaction under ultraviolet (UV radiation. The material properties of both GaO and GO were preserved, even after the formation of the HCs. The incorporation of the GO into the GaO significantly enhanced the photocatalytic reaction, as indicated by the amount of methylene blue (MB degradation. The improvements in the reaction were discussed in terms of increased surface area and the retarded recombination of generated charged carriers.

  15. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-12-20

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  16. A modified oxidative microcoulometric method for determination of sulphur in hydrocarbons containing large amounts of chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1977-01-01

    The oxidative coulometric method for trace sulphur determinations has been modified and a procedure is described which includes the elimination of the interferences caused by chlorine whilst retaining a high recovery of sulphur. The liquid hydrocarbon sample is combusted in an excess of oxygen at 1000 K followed by dilution with a proper flow of carbon monoxide at 1300 K. In this way the partial pressure of oxygen is kept small and the interfering chlorine compounds are effectively converted into hydrogen chloride which does not interfere with the coulometric titration. A recovery of sulphur of 96 +/- 1% was found for thiophene in mixtures of chlorobenzene (0-10%) and cyclohexane, thus indicating the absence of significant interference.

  17. REMOVAL OF SELECTED CONGENERS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS FROM THE BOTTOM SEDIMENTS USING CHEMICAL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Książek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bottom sediments are the part of the aquatic ecosystem, which accumulates most of pollution emitted into environment and flowing into surface waters. This concerns of nutrients, heavy metals and Persistent Organic Pollutants, which include, among others, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. PAHs are toxic, carcinogenic mutagenic and teratogenic compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of chemical oxidation to remove selected PAH contained in bottom sediments. Oxidation of the impurities were carried out using 30% solution of hydrogen peroxide and with the addition of H2O2 with the catalyst FeSO4x7H2O (the Fenton’s method. The efficiency of oxidation was evaluated on the basis of changes in the content of tested impurities, which was determined by gas chromatography coupled with the mass spectrometer (GC-MS after extraction of analytes from bottom sediments. Preliminary studies have shown the efficacy of the use of H2O2 and the Fenton’s method to remove of selected PAHs.

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in polluted concrete of the residential buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aćimović, Danka D; Karić, Slavko D; Nikolić, Željka M; Brdarić, Tanja P; Tasić, Gvozden S; Marčeta Kaninski, Milica P; Nikolić, Vladimir M

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been listed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and by the European Community as priority environmental pollutants. The removal of PAHs from soils, sediments and waste water has attracted attention of scientists and engineers for several decades. Electrochemical oxidation of PAH compounds in water, is receiving increasing attention, due to its convenience and simplicity. In this study we performed electrochemical oxidation of 16 EPA PAHs mixture in 10% NaCl aqueous solution in potentiostatic conditions, at voltage 1 V. Decrease of concentration of some individual PAHs, up to 70% referred to their starting concentration, after 60 min of electrolysis, was confirmed by UPLC/PDA analysis. In further work investigation was extrapolated to in situ removal of PAHs from concrete, as the medium where, to our knowledge, such way of PAH removal has not been investigated before. High concentrations of PAH contamination occurred in the concrete structure of the residential buildings in Belgrade in 2014. Application of DC voltage of 50 V between nickel and stainless steel electrodes packed in the concrete wall, moisturized with the 10% NaCl solution, led to considerable removal of the pollutants by oxidation process throughout the concrete. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  20. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shu, Jinian; Zhang, Yuanxun; Yang, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber, respectively. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed. Meanwhile, the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes. The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr, respectively. The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Anthrone, anthraquinone, 9,10-dihydroxyanthracene, and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene, while anthrone, anthraquinone, 9-nitroanthracene, and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  1. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhang; Jinian Shu; Yuanxun Zhang; Bo Yang

    2013-01-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber,respectively.The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed.Meanwhile,the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes.The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr,respectively.The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUVATOFMS).Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.Anthrone,anthraquinone,9,10-dihydroxyanthracene,and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene,while anthrone,anthraquinone,9-nitroanthracene,and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of the reactions between neutral vanadium oxide clusters and ethane, ethylene, and acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Xie, Yan; Rocca, Jorge J; Bernstein, Elliot R; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Deng, Ke; He, Sheng-Gui

    2008-02-13

    Reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters with small hydrocarbons, namely C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2, are investigated by experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Single photon ionization through extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.5 eV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 118 nm, 10.5 eV) lasers is used to detect neutral cluster distributions and reaction products. The most stable vanadium oxide clusters VO2, V2O5, V3O7, V4O10, etc. tend to associate with C2H4 generating products V(m)O(n)C2H4. Oxygen-rich clusters VO3(V2O5)(n=0,1,2...), (e.g., VO3, V3O8, and V5O13) react with C2H4 molecules to cause a cleavage of the C=C bond of C2H4 to produce (V2O5)(n)VO2CH2 clusters. For the reactions of vanadium oxide clusters (V(m)O(n)) with C2H2 molecules, V(m)O(n)C2H2 are assigned as the major products of the association reactions. Additionally, a dehydration reaction for VO3 + C2H2 to produce VO2C2 is also identified. C2H6 molecules are quite stable toward reaction with neutral vanadium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations are employed to investigate association reactions for V2O5 + C2H(x). The observed relative reactivity of C2 hydrocarbons toward neutral vanadium oxide clusters is well interpreted by using the DFT calculated binding energies. DFT calculations of the pathways for VO3+C2H4 and VO3+C2H2 reaction systems indicate that the reactions VO3+C2H4 --> VO2CH2 + H2CO and VO3+C2H2 --> VO2C2 + H2O are thermodynamically favorable and overall barrierless at room temperature, in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Reactions of ethynyl radicals as a source of C 4 and C 5 hydrocarbons in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, F.; Schleyer, P. v. R.; Schaefer, H. F., III; Kaiser, R. I.

    2002-06-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments augmented by electronic structure computations of neutral-neutral reactions of the ethynyl radical (C 2H, X 2Σ+) with the unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C 2H 2), methylacetylene (CH 3CCH), and allene (H 2CCCH 2) are reviewed briefly. All reactions are characterized by a C 2H versus H atom exchange and in the case of the C 2H/C 2H 2 system by an additional molecular hydrogen (H 2) elimination pathway. The attack of the ethynyl radical onto the π-electron density of the unsaturated hydrocarbons has no entrance barrier and initializes each reaction. Consecutive hydrogen atom migrations may precede the exit channels. Diacetylene (HCCCCH), the butadiynyl radical (HCCCC), methyldiacetylene (CH 3CCCCH), ethynylallene (H 2CCH(C 2H)), and penta-4-diyne (HCC(CH 2)C 2H) were identified as products of which only diacetylene has yet been observed in Titan's atmosphere. Our results, however, strongly suggest the presence of all these species on Titan, and the Cassini-Huygens mission is likely to detect these upon arrival in the Saturnian system in 2004.

  4. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  5. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies of the reaction between cationic vanadium oxide clusters and acetylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Shi; MA YanPing; DU Lin; HE ShengGui; GE MaoFa

    2008-01-01

    The time of flight mass spectrometer coupled with a laser ablation/supersonic expansion cluster source and a fast flow reactor was adopted to study the reactivity of cationic vanadium oxide clusters (VmO+n) toward acetylene (C2H2) molecules under gas phase (P, ~ 1.14 kPa), under near room temperature (T, ~ 350 K) conditions. Association products, VmOnC2H+2 (m,n = 2,4; 2,6; 3,7-8; 4,9-11; 5,12-13;6,13-16, and 7,17), are observed. The oxidation of C2H2 by (V2O5)+n, (n = 1-3) is experimentally identified.The reactivity of (V2O5)+n decreases as n increases. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to interpret the reaction mechanisms. The DFT results indicate that a terminal oxygen atom from V2O+5 can transfer overall barrierlessly to C2H2 at room temperature, which is in agreement with the experimental observation. Other experimental results such as the observation of V2O6C2H+2 and nonobservation of V2O7,8C2H+2 in the experiments are also well interpreted based on the DFT calculations.The reactivity of vanadium oxide clusters toward acetylene and other hydrocarbons may be considered in identifying molecular level mechanisms for related heterogeneous catalysis.

  7. Hydrocarbon oxidation over catalysts prepared by the molecular layer deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltsov, S.I.; Smirnov, V.M.; Postnov, V.N.; Postnova, A.M.; Aleskovskii, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    By depositing consecutive uniform monolayers of phosphorus pentoxide and vanadium pentoxide on a large-surface-area (240 sq m/g) silica gel, active and selective catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation were obtained. Thus, in piperylene oxidation by air at 330/sup 0/-430/sup 0/C and 2000-18,000/hr space velocity, a productive capacity of 220 g/l./hr with 41 mole % each maleic anhydride yield and selectivity was achieved over a SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst (120 sq cm/g surface area), compared with 80 g/l./hr for a P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst prepared by impregnation. In benzene oxidation, maleic anhydride yields of 52 and 60% and selectivities of 63 and 79% were achieved over SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts, respectively, compared with a 6% yield and very low selectivity over the impregnated P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst. The molecular-layer catalysts retained their total activity for 100 hr on stream and permitted to reduce the oxidation temperature by 50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/C.

  8. Effect of vegetable oil oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantari, Faranak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenation has been carried out in a batch reactor with three different oxidized bleached oils in order to discover the effect of oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process. Specifications of hydrogenated oils such as melting point, Iodine value, solid fat content and fatty acid composition of the oxidized oils were compared with their un-oxidized reference oils. Oxidized bleached sunflower oil was hydrogenated to target melting points (34, 39 and 42°C at higher iodine values vs. its reference oil with the same reaction time. Oxidized bleached soybean and canola oils were hydrogenated to target melting points (34, 39 and 42°C at higher iodine values as well, but reaction times were longer than their reference oils. The resulting solid fat content and total trans fatty acids of all hydrogenated oils were less than their references. A peroxide value above 0.5meq O2/kg for non auto-oxidized oils and above 5meq O2/kg for auto-oxidized oils will significantly change the hydrogenation process.

    La hidrogenación fue llevada cabo en un reactor discontinuo con tres aceites decoloradas y oxidadas con objeto de estudiar el efecto de la oxidación en el proceso de hidrogenación. Las especificaciones de los aceites hidrogenados tales como el punto de fusión, índice de yodo, contenido de grasa sólida y composición de ácidos grasos de los aceites oxidados fueron comparados con sus correspondientes aceites de referencia sin oxidar. El aceite de girasol decolorado y oxidado fue hidrogenado hasta alcanzar un punto de fusión (34, 39 and 42°C con altos índices de yodo versus su aceite de referencia con el mismo tiempo de reacción. Aceites decolorado y oxidado de soja y de canola fueron hidrogenados hasta alcanzar puntos de fusión (34,39 y 42°C con altos valores de yodo, pero los tiempo de reacción fueron más largos que en sus aceites de referencia. Los resultados del contenido de grasa sólida y ácidos grasos

  9. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-04-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  10. Identification of Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps by Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, M.; Ding, H.; Friedrich, M. W.; Valentine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps emit substantial amounts of oil and natural gas into the marine environment, where they can be oxidized by microorganisms in the sediment and water column. Here, we used stable isotope probing of DNA and lipid biomarkers to identify the microorganisms actively consuming 13C-labeled natural gas compounds in seep sediment samples. Surface sediment was collected from the Coal Oil Point seep field (offshore Santa Barbara, California, USA) and incubated under aerobic conditions with 13C labeled methane, ethane, or propane for up to 37 days, with sediment sub-samples taken at 3-4 intermediate time points. DNA was extracted from sediment and separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The microbial community in each fraction was profiled using T-RFLP, and bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from un-incubated hydrocarbon seep sediment and selected isotopically 'heavy' (13C) and 'light' (12C) gradient fractions from ethane incubations. All clone libraries were dominated by sequences from members of the family Rhodobacteraceae (>25% of sequences) and a diverse group of Gammaproteobacteria, including sequences related to those of methylotrophs and to those of bacteria known to consume the longer-chain alkanes present in crude oil. After 14 days of incubation, the relative abundance of Rhodobacteraceae was higher in 'heavy' fractions from the 13C-ethane incubation than in 'light' fractions, suggesting incorporation of 13C label. The Rhodobacteraceae are very diverse metabolically, but have often been observed in abundance in oil contaminated seawater. Several members of this group have been shown to oxidize longer chain alkanes (C10 or higher), but none have been previously linked to the consumption of the gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, and butane. For the final time point, 13C content of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were also analyzed, showing substantial incorporation of 13C over 37 days. In the methane incubation

  11. Final Technical Report: Tandem and Bimetallic Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Light Hydrocarbon with Renewable Feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-01-06

    An estimated 490 million metric tons of lignocellulosic biomass is available annually from U.S. agriculture and forestry. With continuing concerns over greenhouse gas emission, the development of efficient catalytic processes for conversion of biomass derived compounds is an important area of research. Since carbohydrates and polyols are rich in oxygen, approximately one oxygen atom per carbon, removal of hydroxyl groups via deoxygenation is needed. The necessary hydrogen required for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) would either come from reforming biomass itself or from steam reforming of natural gas. Both processes contribute to global CO2 emission. The hope is that eventually renewable sources such as wind and solar for hydrogen production will become more viable and economic in the future. In the meantime, unconventional natural gas production in North America has boomed. As a result, light hydrocarbons present an opportunity when coupled with biomass derived oxygenates to generate valuable products from both streams without co-production of carbon dioxide. This concept is the focus of our current funding period. The objective of the project requires coupling two different types of catalysis, HDO and dehydrogenation. Our hypothesis was formulated around our success in establishing oxorhenium catalysts for polyol HDO reactions and known literature precedence for the use of iridium hydrides in alkane dehydrogenation. To examine our hypothesis we set out to investigate the reaction chemistry of binuclear complexes of oxorhenium and iridium hydride.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, Lih-Ann, E-mail: lihann@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  13. Direct partial oxidation of methane to methanol: Reaction zones and role of catalyst location

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijian Zhang; Dehua He; Qiming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Direct partial oxidation of methane to methanol was investigated in a specially designed reactor. Methanol yield of about 7%-8% was obtained in gas phase partial oxidation. It was proposed that the reactor could be divided into three reaction zones, namely pre-reaction zone, fierce reaction zone, and post-reaction zone, when the temperature was high enough to initiate a reaction. The oxidation of methane proceeded and was completed mostly in the fierce reaction zone. When the reactant mixture entered the post-reaction zone, only a small amount of produced methanol would bring about secondary reactions, because molecular oxygen had been exhausted in the fierce reaction zone. A catalyst, if necessary, should be placed either in the pre-reaction zone, to initiate a partial oxidation reaction at a lower temperature, or in the fierce reaction zone to control the homogeneous free radical reaction.

  14. Covalently Bonded Chitosan on Graphene Oxide via Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M. Castaño

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures have played an important role in creating a new field of materials based on carbon. Chemical modification of carbon nanostructures through grafting has been a successful step to improve dispersion and compatibility in solvents, with biomolecules and polymers to form nanocomposites. In this sense carbohydrates such as chitosan are extremely valuable because their functional groups play an important role in diversifying the applications of carbon nanomaterials. This paper reports the covalent attachment of chitosan onto graphene oxide, taking advantage of this carbohydrate at the nanometric level. Grafting is an innovative route to modify properties of graphene, a two-dimensional nanometric arrangement, which is one of the most novel and promising nanostructures. Chitosan grafting was achieved by redox reaction using different temperature conditions that impact on the morphology and features of graphene oxide sheets. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Energy Dispersive spectroscopies were used to study the surface of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide. Results show a successful modification indicated by the functional groups found in the grafted material. Dispersions of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide samples in water and hexane revealed different behavior due to the chemical groups attached to the graphene oxide sheet.

  15. Covalently Bonded Chitosan on Graphene Oxide via Redox Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Ramírez, Karina; Martínez-Hernández, Ana L.; Martínez-Barrera, Gonzalo; de Icaza, Miguel; Castaño, Víctor M.; Velasco-Santos, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures have played an important role in creating a new field of materials based on carbon. Chemical modification of carbon nanostructures through grafting has been a successful step to improve dispersion and compatibility in solvents, with biomolecules and polymers to form nanocomposites. In this sense carbohydrates such as chitosan are extremely valuable because their functional groups play an important role in diversifying the applications of carbon nanomaterials. This paper reports the covalent attachment of chitosan onto graphene oxide, taking advantage of this carbohydrate at the nanometric level. Grafting is an innovative route to modify properties of graphene, a two-dimensional nanometric arrangement, which is one of the most novel and promising nanostructures. Chitosan grafting was achieved by redox reaction using different temperature conditions that impact on the morphology and features of graphene oxide sheets. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Energy Dispersive spectroscopies were used to study the surface of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide. Results show a successful modification indicated by the functional groups found in the grafted material. Dispersions of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide samples in water and hexane revealed different behavior due to the chemical groups attached to the graphene oxide sheet. PMID:28809348

  16. Evaluation of antioxidants using oxidation reaction rate constants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yan; ZHAN Xiancheng; MA Lie; LI Linli; LI Chengrong

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation method for the capacity of antioxidants to protect drugs against oxidation is presented.As a new viewpoint,to determine the priority of the competitive oxidations between the antioxidant and the protected drug,and to compare the drug-protection capacity of antioxidants,it is important to determine their oxidation rate constants using chemical kinetics instead of standard oxidation (or reduction) potentials.Sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite and sodium pyrosulfite were used as models for the determination of oxidation reaction rate constants in aqueous solutions.In the experiments,sufficient air was continually infused into the solution to keep the concentration of dissolved oxygen constant.The residual concentrations of the antioxidants were determined by iodimetry,and the concentration of dissolved oxygen by oxygen electrode.The data were fitted by linear regressions to obtain the reaction rate constants.It was found that the degradation of sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite or sodium pyrosulfite obeyed pseudo zero-order kinetics in the buffer solutions.Because of the ionization equilibrium,these three antioxidants have the same ion form in solutions at a definite pH value and therefore their apparent rate constants were essentially the same.The average apparent rate constants of the three antioxidants at 25~C are (1.34±0.03)×10-3 at pH 6.8,(1.20±0.02) x 10-3 at pH 4.0 and (6.58±0.02)×10-3 mol.L-1.h-1 at pH 9.2,respectively.

  17. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-05

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process.

  18. Electrochemical removal of NOx and hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Anja Zarah

    on the electrodes during polarisation, probably because of strong adsorption of the hydrocarbon relative to NO. On LSF/CGO electrode the impregnation of ionic conducting material increased the oxidation of NO to NO2 which is an important step before nitrogen formation. The propene inhibited this reaction because....... This could only be done if the electrode was impregnated with BaO. The nitrate formation did not seem to be inhibited by the presence of the hydrocarbon. However, the oxidation of propene was inhibited by the BaO because the active sites for oxidations were partially covered by the BaO nanoparticles...

  19. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using

  20. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  1. Application of Moessbauer Spectroscopy to the Carbon Oxides Hydrogenation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubeiro, M. L. [UCV, Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: mcubeiro@strix.ciens.ucv.ve; Gonzalez-Jimenez, F.; Goldwasser, M. R.; Perez-Zurita, M. J.; Pietri, E.; Garcia, L. [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, UCV (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2001-05-15

    Iron-based catalysts have favorable activity and selectivity properties for the CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reactions. Several Fe phases (oxides and carbides) can be present in these catalysts. The interaction of Fe with the other components of the catalyst (support, promoters) can affect the ease of reduction and also its transformation during the reactions. In this work, the relationship between catalytic behavior in the CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reactions and the Fe phase composition of fresh and reacted catalysts was studied. Two types of catalysts were tested: a laterite and the other one made of iron supported on alumina, both unpromoted and promoted with K and Mn. Only those Fe species which can be reduced-carburized, by means of a pretreatment or by an in situ transformation under the reaction, seem to be able to perform the CO or CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The reoxidation of the Fe carbide to magnetite was not associated to deactivation. The selectivity seems to be more affected by Fe species difficult to reduce than by magnetite produced by reoxidation.

  2. Quantum chemical investigation of the reaction of O(32) with certain hydrocarbon radicals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashutosh Gupta; R P Singh; V B Singh; Brijesh Kumar Mishra; N Sathyamurthy

    2007-09-01

    The reaction of ground-state atomic oxygen [O(32)] with methyl, ethyl, -propyl and isopropyl radicals has been studied using the density functional method and the complete basis set model. The energies of the reactants, products, reaction intermediates and various transition states as well as the reaction enthalpies have been computed. The possible product channels and the reaction pathways are identified in each case. In the case of methyl radical the minimum energy reaction pathway leads to the products CO + H2 + H. In the case of ethyl radical the most facile pathway leads to the products, methanal + CH3 radical. For propyl radical (- and iso-), the minimum energy reaction pathway would lead to the channel containing ethanal + methyl radical.

  3. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene onto graphene (GNS) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was investigated to probe the potential adsorptive sites and molecular mechanisms. The microstructure and morphology of GNS and GO were characterized by elemental analysis, XPS, FTIR, Raman, SEM, and TEM. Graphene displayed high affinity to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whereas GO adsorption was significantly reduced after oxygen-containing groups were attached to GNS surfaces. An unexpected peak was found in the curve of adsorption coefficients (Kd) with the PAH equilibrium concentrations. The hydrophobic properties and molecular sizes of the PAHs affected the adsorption of G and GO. The high affinities of the PAHs to GNS are dominated by π-π interactions to the flat surface and the sieving effect of the powerful groove regions formed by wrinkles on GNS surfaces. In contrast, the adsorptive sites of GO changed to the carboxyl groups attaching to the edges of GO because the groove regions disappeared and the polar nanosheet surfaces limited the π-π interactions. The TEM and SEM images initially revealed that after loading with PAH, the conformation and aggregation of GNS and GO nanosheets dramatically changed, which explained the observations that the potential adsorption sites of GNS and GO were unusually altered during the adsorption process.

  4. A theoretical study of the interference from chlorine in the oxidative coulometric method for trace determination of sulphur in hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1975-12-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the interference from chlorine in the oxidative coulometric method for trace sulphur determinations. A computer program (SOLGAS), based on the free-energy minimization principle, has been used to predict equilibrium compositions of the products resulting from combustion of a hydrocarbon sample containing sulphur and chlorine. The theoretical possibilities of overcoming the interference from chlorine and maintaining a high recovery of sulphur are described.

  5. Mechanistic implications of the active species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by Iron complexes of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanase, Stefania; Marques-Gallego, Patricia; Browne, Wesley R.; Hage, Ronald; Bouwman, Elisabeth; Feringa, Ben L.; Reedijk, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The reactivity towards H2O2 of the complexes [Fe(pca)(2)(py)(2)]center dot py (1) and Na-2{[Fe(pca(3))](2)O}center dot 2H(2)O center dot CH3CN (2) (where pca(-) is pyrazine-2-carboxylate) and their catalytic activity in the oxidation of hydrocarbons is reported. Addition of H2O2 to 1 results in the

  6. CORONA-INDUCED PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS AND HYDROCARBONS OVER TIO2 IN THE ABSENCE OF A UV LIGHT SOURCE - A NOVEL AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY METHOD FOR OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-induced photooxidation is a novel oxidation methodology for the efficient oxidation of alcohols and hydrocarbons utilizing the advantage of both the high oxidizing power of ozone formed in the reactor as well as the photooxidation capability of the UV light generated durin...

  7. Effects of methyl group on aromatic hydrocarbons on the nanostructures and oxidative reactivity of combustion-generated soot

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrero Peña, Gerardo D.J.

    2016-07-23

    The substituted and unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons, present in transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel, are thought to be responsible for most of the soot particles produced during their combustion. However, the effects of the substituted alkyl groups on the aromatic hydrocarbons on their sooting tendencies, and on the physical and chemical properties of soot produced from them are not well understood. In this work, the effect of the presence of methyl groups on aromatic hydrocarbons on their sooting propensity, and on the oxidative reactivity, morphology, and chemical composition of soot generated from them in diffusion flames is studied using benzene, toluene, and m-xylene as fuels. Several experimental techniques including high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to identify the morphological changes in soot, whereas the elemental and thermo-gravimetric analyses, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to study the changes in its chemical properties and reactivity. The activation energies for soot oxidation are calculated at different conversion levels, and a trend in the reactivity of soots from benzene, toluene and m-xylene is reported. It is observed that the sizes of primary particles and graphene-like sheets, and the concentrations of aliphatics and oxygenated groups in soot particles decreased with the addition of methyl group(s) on the aromatic ring. The physicochemical changes in soot are found to support the oxidative reactivity trends. © 2016 The Combustion Institute

  8. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  9. Thermodynamic study of characteristics of the converter with separated supply of hydrocarbon fuel for thermo-oxidative and steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassina, I. A.; Malkov, Yu. P.; Molchanov, O. N.; Stepanov, S. G.; Troshchinenko, G. A.; Zasypkin, I. M.

    2014-04-01

    Thermodynamic studies of the converter characteristics were performed to produce hydrogen-containing syngas from hydrocarbon fuel (kerosene) with its separated supply for thermo-oxidative and steam reforming. It is demonstrated that the optimal conditions of the converter performance correlate with the oxidant ratio of α > 0.5 at the heattransfer wall temperature of 1200 K. Hydrogen content in the final syngas reaches 60 % by volume, free carbon (soot) deposition in reforming products is excluded, and there is no need to apply walls water cooling in the converter.

  10. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  11. Controlled oxidation of aliphatic CH bonds in metallo-monooxygenases: mechanistic insights derived from studies on deuterated and fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Sheng; Luo, Wen-I; Yang, Chung-Ling; Tu, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Chi-Yao; Chan, Sunney I; Yu, Steve S-F

    2014-05-01

    The control over the regio- and/or stereo-selective aliphatic CH oxidation by metalloenzymes is of great interest to scientists. Typically, these enzymes invoke host-guest chemistry to sequester the substrates within the protein pockets, exploiting sizes, shapes and specific interactions such as hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic forces and/or van der Waals interactions to control the substrate specificity, regio-specificity and stereo-selectivity. Over the years, we have developed a series of deuterated and fluorinated variants of these hydrocarbon substrates as probes to gain insights into the controlled CH oxidations of hydrocarbons facilitated by these enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the application of these designed probes in the study of three monooxygenases: (i) the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), which oxidizes straight-chain C1-C5 alkanes and alkenes to form their corresponding 2-alcohols and epoxides, respectively; (ii) the recombinant alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which oxidizes the primary CH bonds of C5-C12 linear alkanes; and (iii) the recombinant cytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium, which oxidizes C12-C20 fatty acids at the ω-1, ω-2 or ω-3 CH positions.

  12. In situ infrared (FTIR) study of the borohydride oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, B. Molina; Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie, des Materiaux et des Interfaces (LEPMI), UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Coutanceau, C.; Hahn, F. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Av. du, Recteur Pineau, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2009-01-15

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is an interesting alternative for the electrochemical power generation at lower temperatures due to its high anode theoretical specific capacity (5 A h g{sup -1}). However, the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) is a very complex eight-electron reaction, influenced by the nature of the electrode material (catalytic or not with respect to BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis), the [BH{sub 4}{sup -}][OH{sup -}] ratio and the temperature. In order to understand the BOR mechanism, we performed in situ infrared reflectance spectroscopy measurements (SPAIRS technique) in 1 M NaOH/1 M NaBH{sub 4} with the aim to study intermediate reactions occurring on a gold electrode (a poor BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis catalyst). We monitored several bands in B-H (1184 cm{sup -1}) and B-O bond regions (1326 and 1415 cm{sup -1}), appearing sequentially with increasing electrode polarisation. Thanks to these experimental findings, we propose possible initial elementary steps for the BOR. (author)

  13. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O({sup 3} P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Mhairi [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bagot, Paul A J [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Koehler, Sven P K [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Reed, Stewart K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Westacott, Robin E [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Costen, Matthew L [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); McKendrick, Kenneth G [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O({sup 3}P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  14. Electrode Reaction Pathway in Oxide Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan

    Oxide anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with the advantage of fuel flexibility, resistance to coarsening, small chemical expansion and etc. have been attracting increasing interest. Good performance has been reported with a few of perovskite structure anodes, such as (LaSr)(CrMn)O3. However, more improvements need to be made before meeting the application requirement. Understanding the oxidation mechanism is crucial for a directed optimization, but it is still on the early stage of investigation. In this study, reaction mechanism of oxide anodes is investigated on doped YCrO 3 with H2 fuel, in terms of the origin of electrochemical activity, rate-determining steps (RDS), extension of reactive zone, and the impact from overpotential under service condition to those properties. H2 oxidation on the YCs anodes is found to be limited by charge transfer and H surface diffusion. A model is presented to describe the elementary steps in H2 oxidation. From the reaction order results, it is suggested that any models without taking H into the charge transfer step are invalid. The nature of B site element determines the H2 oxidation kinetics primarily. Ni displays better adsorption ability than Co. However, H adsorption ability of such oxide anode is inferior to that of Ni metal anode. In addition, the charge transfer step is directly associated with the activity of electrons in the anode; therefore it can be significantly promoted by enhancement of the electron activity. It is found that A site Ca doping improves the polarization resistance about 10 times, by increasing the activity of electrons to promote the charge transfer process. For the active area in the oxide anode, besides the traditional three-phase boundary (3PB), the internal anode surface as two-phase boundary (2PB) is proven to be capable of catalytically oxidizing the H2 fuel also when the bulk lattice is activated depending on the B site elements. The contribution from each part is estimated by switching

  15. Impact of oxidation process on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content in bitumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliet, Christophe; Juery, Catherine; Thiebaut, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the oxidation process on the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in blown bitumen and identified some key contributing parameters. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's PAH list was used for this study. PAHs are considered a good toxicological marker, and measurement of PAHs in bitumen can be performed easily. The results of PAH content in blown bitumen and the corresponding feedstock was determined from the limit of detection up to 120 mg/kg for 24 samples. Compared to PAH levels in coal tar pitch, PAH levels in bitumen are very low. Measurements were performed by three laboratories using different methods to allow robust conclusions. The results highlight the difficulties in measuring PAHs in bitumen with accuracy for values below 30 mg/kg; therefore the discussion is based on summary statistics by adding concentrations of PAHs with common ring sizes. Incorporation of flux oil in the feed of the blowing bitumen unit tends to increase PAH content in feed stock and in blown bitumen, particularly the 4- to 6-ring PAHs, which are the most carcinogenic as identified by an animal skin painting test. The amount of PAH content from blown bitumen with flux oil can be at least three times higher than the amount in blown bitumen without flux oil, depending on the quality and quantity of the flux oil used. This study shows that the blowing process does not produce PAHs in bitumen. Conversely, it appears to reduce them in the final product. Close to 10 to 30% of PAHs are probably stripped from the liquid phase of bitumen during the blowing operation.

  16. X-Ray Imaging of SAPO-34 Molecular Sieves at the Nanoscale : Influence of Steaming on the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Sommer, Linn; Arstad, Bjornar; Buitrago-Sierra, Robison; Sepulveda-Escribano, Antonio; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Olsbye, Unni; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a severe steaming treatment on the physicochemical properties and catalytic performance of H-SAPO-34 molecular sieves during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction has been investigated with a combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), catalytic testing, and bul

  17. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  18. Nitric oxide-assisted atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization for the analysis of automobile hydrocarbon emission species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearth, M A; Komiski, T J

    1994-12-01

    Nitric oxide reagent gas has been found to improve the sensitivity and robustness of the atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) process. Sensitivity has been increased by a factor of 20-100, depending on the compound, over APCDI without nitric oxide. The robustness (defined as the sensitivity to matrix interferences) of APCDI in the presence of water has been improved by a factor of 3 over normal APCDI. These improvements are due in part to a modification of the commercial inlet system and ionization chamber that allows the chamber and sample gases to be heated to 100 and 350°C, respectively. Nitric oxide was chosen as the reagent gas because of the variety and selectivity of its interaction with hydrocarbons with differing functional groups. Product ions of nitric oxide ionization and their subsequent tandem mass spectra are presented and discussed for selected alkanes; alkenes, alkylbenzenes, alcohols; aldehydes, and an ether. A tandem mass spectrometry (unique parent ion-daughter ion transition) method was developed to quantify compounds of specific interest in vehicle emissions. The absolute sensitivity for these compounds, under ideal conditions, was determined and ranges from 0.006 ppb for xylene (most sensitive) to 80 ppb for C8 (or larger) normal alkanes. Routine sensitivity for real-world samples was in the single parts per billion range for aromatic and olefinic species. Potential applications include the real-time, on-line monitoring of selected hydrocarbons in automobile exhaust.

  19. Nonmethane hydrocarbons at Pico Mountain, Azores: 1. Oxidation chemistry in the North Atlantic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, D.; Tanner, D. M.; Honrath, R. E.; Owen, R. C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2008-10-01

    Measurements of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) at the Pico Mountain observatory at 2225 m asl on Pico Island, Azores, Portugal, from August 2004 to August 2005 (in part overlapping with the field campaign of the International Consortium on Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation study) were used to investigate NMHC sources and seasonal oxidation chemistry in the central North Atlantic region. Levels of anthropogenic NMHC were characteristic of the marine free troposphere. Their concentrations were low compared to continental sites at higher northern latitudes, but higher than data reported from a similarly located Pacific mountain site at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These higher NMHC levels are indicative of a greater influence of the adjacent continents on air composition at Pico. Substantially enhanced NMHC concentrations during the summers of 2004 and 2005 were attributed to long-range transport of biomass burning plumes originating from fires in northern Canada, Alaska, and Siberia. This finding exemplifies the continuing impact of biomass burning plumes on atmospheric composition and chemistry many days downwind of these emission sources. Seasonal cycles with lower NMHC concentrations and lower ratios of more reactive to less reactive NMHC during summer reflect the higher degree of photochemical processing occurring during transport. The NMHC concentrations indicate no significant role of chlorine atom oxidation on NMHC. Ozone above 35 ppbv was measured at Pico Mountain throughout all seasons. Enhanced ozone levels were observed in air that had relatively "fresh" photochemical signatures (e.g., ln [propane]/[ethane] > -2.5). During spring-summer air that was more processed ("older" air with ln [propane]/[ethane] < -2.5) on average had lower ozone levels (down to <20 ppbv). This relationship indicates that conditions in the lower free troposphere over the mid-North Atlantic during the spring and summer lead to net photochemical ozone destruction

  20. A linear energy relationship between activation energy and absolute hardness: a case study with the O(3P) atom-addition reactions to polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, Juan F; Truong, Thanh N; Mondragón, Fanor

    2008-09-11

    A new linear relationship between absolute hardness and global activation energy of O-addition reaction to a series of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) is presented. A total of seventeen O((3)P)-addition reactions were evaluated. Thermal rate constants were calculated for each elementary reaction and used to estimate the total rate constants. This information was employed to obtain the global activation energy. A new linear relationship is shown and is estimated that it can be used within the RC-TST framework to predict relative rate constants for any reaction within an O-addition to PAH class from just absolute hardness values.

  1. The effects of oxygen on the yields of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formed during the pyrolysis and fuel-rich oxidation of catechol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiju Thomas; Mary J. Wornat [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-05-15

    To better understand the effects of oxygen on the formation and destruction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during the burning of complex solid fuels, we have performed pyrolysis and fuel-rich oxidation experiments in an isothermal laminar-flow reactor, using the model fuel catechol (ortho-dihydroxybenzene), a phenol-type compound representative of structural entities in coal, wood, and biomass. The catechol pyrolysis experiments are conducted at a fixed residence time of 0.3 s, at nine temperatures spanning the range of 500-1000{sup o}C, and under varying oxygen ratios ranging from 0 (pure pyrolysis) to 0.92 (near stoichiometric oxidation). The PAH products, ranging in size from two to nine fused aromatic rings, have been analyzed by gas chromatography with flame-ionization and mass spectrometric detection, and by high-pressure liquid chromatography with diode-array ultraviolet-visible absorbance detection. The quantified PAH products fall into six structural classes. A comparison of product yields from pyrolysis and fuel-rich oxidation of catechol reveals that at temperatures {lt}800{sup o}C, where only two-ring PAH are produced in significant quantities, increases in oxygen concentration bring about increases in yields of the two-ring aromatics indene and naphthalene. At temperatures {gt}800{sup o}C, increases in oxygen concentration bring about dramatic decreases in the yields of all PAH products, due to oxidative destruction reactions. The smaller-ring-number PAH are produced in higher abundance under all conditions studied, and the oxygen-induced decreases in the yields of PAH are increasingly more pronounced as the PAH ring number is increased. These observations fully support our finding from catechol pyrolysis in the absence of oxygen: that PAH formation and growth occur by successive ring-buildup reactions involving the C1-C5 and single-ring aromatic products of catechol's thermal decomposition. 51 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Permeation Characteristics of Light Hydrocarbons Through Poly(amide-6-β-ethylene oxide) Multilayer Composite Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiaoling; REN Jizhong; LI Hui; DENG Maicun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,poly(amide-6-β-ethylene oxide) (PEBA1657) copolymer was used to prepare multilayer polyetherimide (PEI)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/PEBA1657/PDMS composite membranes by dip-coating method.Permeation behaviors of ethylene,ethane,propylene,propane,n-butane,methane and nitrogen through the multilayer composite membranes were investigated over a range of operating temperature and pressure.The permeances of light hydrocarbons through PEI/PDMS/PEBA1657/PDMS composite membranes increase with their increasing condensability,and the olefins are more permeable than their corresponding paraffins.For light hydrocarbons,the gas permeances increase significantly as temperature increasing.When the transmembrane pressure difference increases,the gas permeance increases moderately due to plasticization effect,while their apparent activation energies for permeation decrease.

  3. Reactions of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with chlorine and chlorine dioxide in coal tar lined pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, T.; Maier, M.; Sacher, F.; Maier, D. [University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler Bunte Institut

    1997-12-31

    In the presence of disinfectants, PAH are remobilised from the coal tar lining of water distribution mains. Reactions of the PAH with chlorine and chlorine dioxide can lead to chlorinated PAH that might show higher mutagenic effects that the parent PAH. Detection limits in the lower nanogram-per-litre level for the determination of PAH and chlorinated PAH were achieved by using solid phase micro extraction and a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric device. Thus, the reactions of four PAH (anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene) with chlorine and chlorine dioxide under conditions and at concentrations of common practice in the drinking water distribution system could be investigated. In batch experiments with demineralised and drinking water at pH 7, the concentrations of fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene remained constant, whereas anthracene reacted quantitatively with both disinfectants. The reaction of anthracene followed by pseudo-first order kinetics. In these reactions no chlorinated products could be detected, only monohydroxyanthracene and anthraquinone were identified. The toxic effect of a set of chlorinated and oxidised PAH was also examined.

  4. Synthesis of ordered conjugated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polymers through polymerization reaction on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongping; Zhao, Huiling; Lu, Yan;

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional pi-conjugated polymer chains with variable lengths have been synthesized successfully via thermal polymerization reaction on the Au(111) surface. Such polymer chains form parallel arrays along specific directions according to the initial assembly orientations of the close-packed Br...

  5. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  6. Remediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons using combined in-vessel composting ‎and oxidation by activated persulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Asgari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated the efficiency of activated persulfate and ‎in-vessel composting for removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons. ‎Remediation by activated persulfate with ferrous sulfate as pre-treatment was done at batch system. In the chemical oxidation, various variables including persulfate concentrations (10-3000 mg/g as waste, pH (3-7, ferrous sulfate (0.5-4 mg/g as wasteand temperature (20-60°C were studied. In the biological system, premature compost was added as an amendment. The filter cake to compost ratio were 1:0 (as control and 1:5 to 15 (as dry basis. C: N: P ratio and moisture content were 100:5:1 and 45-60%, respectively. The results showed that acidic pH (pH=3 had high efficiency for the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons by activated persulfate. Temperature had the significant effect during the persulfate oxidation. When ferrous sulfate was used as an activator for degradation at acidic condition and 60°C, removal efficiency increased to 47.32%. The results of biological process showed that the minimum total petroleum hydrocarbons removal in all reactors was 62 percent. The maximum and minimum removal efficiency was obtained at 1:5 (69.46% and 1:10 (62.42% mixing ratios, respectively. Kinetic study showed that second order kinetic model (R2>0.81 shows the best agreement with the experimental data and the rate of TPH degradation at low mixing ratio (1:3 was faster than high mixing ratio (1:15. Therefore, according to the results, in-vessel composting after pre-treatment by activated persulfate is suggested as an efficient process for degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons.

  7. Oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction modulation by white wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Alberto A E; Migliori, Massamiliano; Panichi, Vincenzo; Longoni, Bianamaria; Origlia, Nicola; Ferretti, Agnese; Cuttano, Maria Giuseppa; Giovannini, Luca

    2002-05-01

    Wine and olive oil, essential components of the Mediterranean diet, are considered important factors for a healthy life style. Tyrosol (T) and caffeic acid (CA) are found in both extra virgin olive oil and in white wine. Three white wines from the northeast Italy and four white wines from Germany were analyzed for their content of T and CA. These compounds were tested for their antioxidant activity and their capacity to modulate three different cytokines: IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are currently considered to be the major cytokines influencing the acute phase of the inflammatory response. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of T and CA was analyzed by monitoring the oxidation of a redox-sensitive probe by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. T and CA, applied at nanomolar range, were found to significantly reduce the generation of oxidants induced by azobis-amidinopropanedihydrochloride. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy volunteers were incubated at 37 degrees C for 12 hours with 100 ng LPS (E. coli and P. maltofilia). Increasing doses of T and CA (150 nM to 300 microM) were added and cell-associated IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha were determined by immunoreactive tests after three freeze-thaw cycles. IL-6 release was also determined in cell surnatants. LPS-stimulated PBMC showed a significant increase in cytokine release, while T and CA, used at nanomolar concentrations, were able to modulate their expression. Taken together, these results suggest a remarkable effect of white wine non-alcoholic compounds on oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction.

  8. Enhanced reactivity of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to birnessite in soil: reaction kinetics and nonextractable residue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Woong; Lee, Seunghwan; Ryu, Hyerim; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kang, Ki-Hoon

    2008-05-01

    Phenanthrene and pyrene were not transformed by birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the presence of phenol. The phenoxy radicals generated from phenol by birnessite did not act as a mediator for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical reaction under the studied conditions. In contrast, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene and 1-hydroxypyrene were remarkably sensitive to birnessite. The disappearance patterns of the test compounds both in the aqueous phase and soil followed first-order kinetics, with a linear relationship found between the rate constants and the surface area of birnessite. Moreover, the data indicated that the reaction was faster in the presence of soil than in the aqueous phase probably because of the presence of hydroxyl groups in soil organic matter. Sequential solvent extraction was not successful in the recovery of 9-hydroxyphenanthrene from the birnessite-treated soil samples, and capillary electrophoresis data suggest the formation of nonextractable residues of the compound in soil. In addition, the acute toxicity determined by Microtox declined approximately 8.3 times in the soil samples treated with birnessite compared to untreated samples, demonstrating that the toxic compound was no longer present as its parent form.

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Coherently Synchronized Oxidation and Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamammadova S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on this experimental researches, the complex reaction, consisting of parallel-sequential oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions, which are coherently synchronized, proceeds during the process of cyclohexane oxidation with biomimetic catalyst. Depending on the reaction parameters it is possible to deliberately adjust the direction of oxidation reaction and reaction rate.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of quaternary ammonium electrolytes : Unexpected side reactions in organic electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri Nigjeh, Eslam; de Vries, Marcel; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P.

    2012-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts are among the most widely used electrolytes in organic electrochemistry, but there is little known about their unwanted side oxidation reactions. We have, therefore, studied the constant potential oxidation products of quaternary ammonium electrolytes using mass spectrometr

  11. Electrochemical oxidation of quaternary ammonium electrolytes : Unexpected side reactions in organic electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri Nigjeh, Eslam; de Vries, Marcel; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P.

    Quaternary ammonium salts are among the most widely used electrolytes in organic electrochemistry, but there is little known about their unwanted side oxidation reactions. We have, therefore, studied the constant potential oxidation products of quaternary ammonium electrolytes using mass

  12. Oxidative Condensation of Methane — a New Pathway to the Synthesis of Ethane, Ethylene, and Other Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minachev, Khabib M.; Usachev, Nikolay Ya; Udut, V. N.; Khodakov, Yu S.

    1988-03-01

    During the last five years, the chemistry of methane has been enriched by the possibility of obtaining C2 and other hydrocarbons as a result of the oxidative condensation of methane in the presence of a series of catalytic systems. The availability of the starting materials (CH4 and O2) leads to extensive prospects for the replacement of the petroleum raw materials by natural gas in single-stage syntheses of valuable compounds and in the first place ethylene. This review gives a systematic account of the results of the selection of effective catalysts and surveys the information leading to the elucidation of the mechanism for the formation of the products of the extensive oxidation and oxidative condensation of methane. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  13. Time- and space-resolved study of the methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction - influence of zeolite topology on axial deactivation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Gama, Daniel; Etemadi, Samaneh; Kirby, Eliot; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Beato, Pablo; Svelle, Stian; Olsbye, Unni

    2017-02-10

    Zeolites representing seven different topologies were subjected to life-time assessment studies as methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) catalysts at 400 °C, P(MeOH) = 13 kPa and P(tot) = 100 kPa. The following topologies were studied: ZSM-22 (TON), ZSM-23 (MTT), IM-5 (IMF), ITQ-13 (ITH), ZSM-5 (MFI), mordenite (MOR) and beta (BEA). Two experimental approaches were used. In the first approach, each catalyst was tested at three different contact times, all giving 100% initial conversion. The life-time before conversion decreased to 50% at each contact time was measured and used to calculate critical contact times (i.e. the contact time needed to launch the autocatalytic MTH reaction) and deactivation rates. It was found that the critical contact time is strongly correlated with pore size: the smaller the pore size, the longer the critical contact time. The second experimental approach consisted of testing the catalysts in a double tube reactor with 100% initial conversion, and quenching the reaction after 4 consecutive times on stream, representing full, partial, and zero conversion. After quenching, the catalyst bed was divided into four segments, which were individually characterised for coke content (temperature-programmed oxidation) and specific surface area (N2 adsorption). The axial deactivation pattern was found to depend on pore size. With increasing pore size, the main source of coke formation changed from methanol conversion (1D 10-ring structures), to partly methanol, partly product conversion (3D 10-ring structures) and finally mainly product conversion (3D 12-ring structure). As a result, the methanol conversion capacity changed little with contact time for ZSM-5, while it increased with increasing contact time for the catalysts with smaller pore sizes, and decreased with increasing contact time for pore sizes larger than ZSM-5.

  14. Catalysis of Reduction and Oxidation Reactions for Application in Gas Particle Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udron, L.; Turek, T.

    2002-09-19

    The present study is a first part of an investigation addressing the simultaneous occurrence of oxidation and reduction reactions in catalytic filters. It has the objectives (a) to assess the state of knowledge regarding suitable (types of) catalysts for reduction and oxidation, (b) to collect and analyze published information about reaction rates of both NOx reduction and VOC oxidation, and (c) to adjust a lab-scale screening method to the requirements of an activity test with various oxidation/reduction catalysts.

  15. Nitrosation Reaction Without Nitrogen Oxide Waste Gas Emission and Its Engineering Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunguang; FENG Yaqing; NIU Weiwei; CHEN Xuexi

    2013-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase equilibrium is used in controlling the nitrosation reaction process.Decomposition of nitrous acid and oxidation side reaction are suppressed in a closed reaction system.The system pressure is used as the criterion of the end of reaction,avoiding excessive feeding and reducing the decomposition of nitrous acid.The head space of the reactor is used as the gas buffer,stabilizing the feeding fluctuations and inhibiting the side reaction,decomposition of nitrous acid.Nitrogen oxide concentration is controlled at the minimum level.Thus the zero release of nitrogen oxide waste gas can be achieved without using any absorption process.

  16. Tandem Reaction of Deprotonation-Oxidation-Wittig Reaction:Stereoselective Synthesis of (E)-α, β-Unsaturated Enoates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG,Zhi-Zhen(黄志真); SUN,Ruo-Jun(孙若君)

    2002-01-01

    Phosphonium or arsonium salt with primary alcohol can undergo the tandem reaction of deprotonation-oxidation-Witting reaction in the presence of sodium hydroxide and manganese dioxide, providing a general and efficient method for the stereoselective synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated enoates.

  17. Reaction of niobium and tantalum neutral clusters with low pressure, unsaturated hydrocarbons in a pickup cell: From dehydrogenation to Met-Car formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S.-G.; Xie, Y.; Dong, F.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2006-10-01

    Neutral niobium and tantalum clusters (Nbn and Tan) are generated by laser ablation and supersonic expansion into a vacuum and are reacted in a pickup cell with various low pressure (˜1mTorr) unsaturated hydrocarbons (acetylene, ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene) under nearly single collision conditions. The bare metal clusters and their reaction products are ionized by a 193nm laser and detected by a time of flight mass spectrometer. Partially and fully dehydrogenated products are observed for small (n⩽m) and large (n⩾m) neutral metal clusters, respectively, with m ranging from 2 to 5 depending on the particular hydrocarbon. In addition to primary, single collision products, sequential addition products that are usually fully dehydrogenated are also observed. With toluene used as the reactant gas, carbon loss products are observed, among which Nb8C12 and Ta8C12 are particularly abundant, indicating that the Met-Car molecule M8C12 can be formed from the neutral metal cluster upon two collisions with toluene molecules. The dehydrogenation results for low pressure reactions are compared with those available from previous studies employing flow tube (high pressure) reactors. Low pressure and high pressure cluster ion reactions are also compared with the present neutral metal cluster reactions. Reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and metal surfaces are discussed in terms of the present neutral cluster results.

  18. Ring opening reaction dynamics in the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ethylene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S. K.; Jarek, R. L.; Böhmer, E.; Wittig, C.

    1994-10-01

    Ethylene oxide, C2H4O, is a three-membered ring with a single oxygen atom bridging the two carbons. Reactions of H and D atoms with ethylene oxide have been studied in the gas phase to provide insight into the dynamics of three-membered ring opening. H atoms were produced by photolyzing HI in the wavelength range 240-266 nm. The channel leading to OH+C2H4 was monitored via laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the OH A 2Σ←X 2Π system. The D atom reaction yields OD with no hydrogen scrambling. With an available energy of 23 000 cm-1, the average OH D rotational energy is ˜350 cm-1 for OH(v=0) and OD(v=0) and ˜250 cm-1 for OD(v=1). OH(v=1) was not observed, while the OD(v=1) population was about one-tenth that of OD(v=0). There was no apparent bias in populations between Λ doublets in each of the spin-orbit states for both OH and OD. Doppler broadening of OH(v=0) rotational lines was measured to evaluate the average center-of-mass (c.m.) translational energy, which was found to be ˜2300 cm-1. On average, the ring opening process deposits ˜10% of the available energy into c.m. translation, ˜2% into OH rotation, and ˜88% into ethylene internal energy. Comparison with CH2CH2OH unimolecular dissociation dynamics and theoretical transition state calculations leads to a likely mechanism in which hydrogen abstracts oxygen via sequential C-O bond fission without involving a long-lived CH2CH2OH intermediate.

  19. Hydrogen oxidation reaction at the Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cells from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-11-11

    By means of ab initio simulations we here provide a comprehensive scenario for hydrogen oxidation reactions at the Ni/zirconia anode of solid oxide fuel cells. The simulations have also revealed that in the presence of water chemisorbed at the oxide surface, the active region for H oxidation actually extends beyond the metal/zirconia interface unraveling the role of water partial pressure in the decrease of the polarization resistance observed experimentally.

  20. Enhanced Removal of Biogenic Hydrocarbons in Power Plant Plumes Constrains the Dependence of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Concentrations on Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S. W.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Wolfe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere provide one of the main chemical mechanisms for the removal of trace gases. OH plays a central role in determining the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing of greenhouse gases like methane. OH also plays a major role in the oxidation of organic trace gases, which can lead to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. Due to its very short atmospheric lifetime of seconds or less, OH concentrations are extremely variable in space and time, which makes measurements and their interpretation very challenging. Several recent measurements have yielded higher than expected OH concentrations. To explain these would require the existence of unidentified, radical recycling processes, but issues with the measurements themselves are also still being discussed. During the NOAA airborne SENEX study in the Southeast U.S., the biogenic hydrocarbons isoprene and monoterpenes were consistently found to have lower mixing ratios in air masses with enhanced nitrogen oxides from power plants. We attribute this to faster oxidation rates of biogenic hydrocarbons due to increased concentrations of OH in the power plant plumes. Measurements at different downwind distances from the Scherer and Harllee Branch coal-fired power plants near Atlanta are used to constrain the dependence of OH on nitrogen oxides. It is found that OH concentrations were highest at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 1-2 ppbv and decreased at higher and at lower concentrations. These findings agree with the expected dependence of OH on nitrogen oxide concentrations, but do not appear to be consistent with the reports in the literature that have shown high OH concentrations in regions of the atmosphere with high biogenic emissions and low NOx concentrations that would require unidentified radical recycling processes to be explained.

  1. Modification of the performance of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts by metal addition in hydrocarbon reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Gerardo Carlos; Manuale, Debora Laura; Benitez, Viviana Monica; Vera, Carlos Roman; Yori, Juan Carlos, E-mail: jyori@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientifica y Tecnicas, Santiago del Estero Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    A study of the different hydrocarbon reactions over Ni doped WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts was performed. Ni was found as NiO at low Ni concentration while at high Ni concentrations a small fraction was present as a metal. For both cases, Ni strongly modified total acidity and concentration of strong acid sites. In the cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction, Ni addition promotes both benzene and methyl cyclopentane production. The hydroconversion activity (n-butane and n-octane) increases with the augment of total acidity produced by Ni. The selectivity to reaction products is modified according to the acid strength distribution changes produced by Ni addition. (author)

  2. Thermochemical benchmarking of hydrocarbon bond separation reaction energies: Jacob's ladder is not reversed!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Helge; Grimme, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    We reinvestigate the performance of Kohn-Sham density functional (DF) methods for a thermochemical test set of bond separation reactions of alkanes (BSR36) published recently by Steinmann et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2950 (2009)]. According to our results, the tested approximations perform for this rather special benchmark as usual. We show that the choice of reference enthalpies plays a crucial role in the assessment. Due to the large stoichiometric factors involved, errors of various origin are strongly amplified. Inconsistent reference data are avoided by computing reference energies at the CCSD(T)/CBS level. These are compared to results for a variety of standard DFs. Two different versions of London dispersion corrections (DFT-D2 and DFT-D3) are applied and found to be very significant. The most accurate results are obtained with B2GPPLYP-D2 (MAD = 0.4 kcal mol-1) B2PLYP-D2 (MAD = 0.5 kcal mol-1) and B97-D2 (MAD = 0.9 kcal mol-1 methods. Dispersion corrections not only improve the computed BSR energies but also diminish the accuracy differences between the DFs. The previous DFT-D2 version performs better due to error compensation of medium-range correlation effects between the semi-classical and the density-based description. We strongly recommend not to overinterpret results regarding DF accuracy when based on a single set of chemical reactions and to use high-level theoretical data for benchmarking purposes.

  3. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of syngas (CO + H2 to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent. Methanol was synthesized from syngas over Cu-ZnO; subsequently, was converted to hydrocarbons through the formation of dimethyl ether (DME over the metal-loaded ZSM-5. When 0.5 wt% Pd/ZSM-5 and 5 wt% Cu/ZSM-5 among the metal-loaded ZSM-5 catalysts with Pd, Co, Fe or Cu were employed as a portion of the hybrid catalyst, the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons were selectively produced (the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons in all hydrocarbons: 59% for the hybrid catalyst with Pd/ZSM-5 and 64% for that with Cu/ZSM-5 with a similar CO conversion during the reaction. An increase in the Cu loading on ZSM-5 resulted in increasing the yield of the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons, and in decreasing the yield of DME. Furthermore, the hybrid catalyst with Cu/ZSM-5 exhibited no deactivation for 30 h of the reaction. It was revealed that a hybrid catalyst containing Cu/ZSM-5 was efficient in the selective synthesis of gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons from syngas via methanol in the near-critical n-hexane fluid.

  4. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using Bacillus subtilis CotA with high laccase activity and copper independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Qinghe; Wu, Yucheng; Lin, Xiangui

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial laccase CueO from Escherichia coli can oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, its application in the remediation of PAH-contaminated soil mainly suffers from a low oxidation rate and copper dependence. It was reported that a laccase with a higher redox potential tended to have a higher oxidation rate; thus, the present study investigated the oxidation of PAHs using another bacterial laccase CotA from Bacillus subtilis with a higher redox potential (525 mV) than CueO (440 mV). Recombinant CotA was overexpressed in E. coli and partially purified, exhibiting a higher laccase-specific activity than CueO over a broad pH and temperature range. CotA exhibited moderate thermostability at high temperatures. CotA oxidized PAHs in the absence of exogenous copper. Thereby, secondary heavy metal pollution can be avoided, another advantage of CotA over CueO. Moreover, this study also evaluated some unexplained phenomena in our previous study. It was observed that the oxidation of PAHs with bacterial laccases can be promoted by copper. The partially purified bacterial laccase oxidized only two of the 15 tested PAHs, i.e., anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene, indicating the presence of natural redox mediators in crude cell extracts. Overall, the recombinant CotA oxidizes PAHs with high laccase activity and copper independence, indicating that CotA is a better candidate for the remediation of PAHs than CueO. Besides, the findings here provide a better understanding of the oxidation of PAHs using bacterial laccases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental study and kinetic analysis of the oxidation of light hydrocarbons mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rota, R.; Bonini, F.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata

    1996-07-01

    The combustion of various C{sup 1}-C{sub 2} hydrocarbon mixtures has been experimentally investigated in a continuous perfectly stirred reactor, in a temperature range from 1,000 to 1,300 K, and at stoichiometric ratio values between 0.5 and 1.5. The concentration values of several molecular species have been measured by GC analysis. The data obtained have been compared with the predictions of two different detailed kinetic models; both fail to predict the experimental trends in various situations. This leads to the conclusion that experimental data based on mixtures of hydrocarbons must be obtained to validate detailed kinetic mechanisms.

  6. Fracture of flash oxidized, yttria-doped sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govila, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a slip cast, yttria-doped, sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride after 'flash oxidation' was investigated. It was found that both the static oxidation resistance and flexural stress rupture life (creep deformation) were improved at 1000 C in air compared to those of the same material without flash oxidation. Stress rupture data at high temperatures (1000 to 1200 C) are presented to indicate applied stress levels for oxidation-dependent and independent failures.

  7. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  8. Targeting of insect epicuticular lipids by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: hydrocarbon oxidation within the context of a host-pathogen interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas ePedrini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Broad host range entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana attack insect hosts via attachment to cuticular substrata and the production of enzymes for the degradation and penetration of insect cuticle. The outermost epicuticular layer consists of a complex mixture of non-polar lipids including hydrocarbons, fatty acids, and wax esters. Long chain hydrocarbons are major components of the outer waxy layer of diverse insect species, where they serve to protect against desiccation and microbial parasites, and as recognition molecules or as a platform for semiochemicals. Insect pathogenic fungi have evolved mechanisms for overcoming this barrier, likely with sets of lipid degrading enzymes with overlapping substrate specificities.. Alkanes and fatty acids are substrates for a specific subset of fungal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in insect hydrocarbon degradation. These enzymes activate alkanes by terminal oxidation to alcohols, which are further oxidized by alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, whose products can enter β-oxidation pathways. B. bassiana contains at least 83 genes coding for cytochrome P450s (CYP, a subset of which are involved in hydrocarbon oxidation, and several of which represent new CYP subfamilies/families. Expression data indicated differential induction by alkanes and insect lipids and 4 CYP proteins have been partially characterized after heterologous expression in yeast. Gene knockouts revealed a phenotype for only one (cyp52X1 out of 6 genes examined to date. CYP52X1 oxidizes long chain fatty acids and participates in the degradation of specific epicuticular lipid components needed for breaching the insect waxy layer. Examining the hydrocarbon oxidizing CYP repertoire of pathogens involved in insect epicuticle degradation can lead to the characterization of enzymes with novel substrate specificities. Pathogen targeting may also represent an important co-evolutionary process regarding insect cuticular

  9. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3

  10. Comparative analysis of oxidation methods of reaction-sintered silicon carbide for optimization of oxidation-assisted polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Dai, Yifan; Deng, Hui; Guan, Chaoliang; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-11-04

    Combination of the oxidation of reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) and the polishing of the oxide is an effective way of machining RS-SiC. In this study, anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation, and plasma oxidation were respectively conducted to obtain oxides on RS-SiC surfaces. By performing scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analysis and scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) measurement, the oxidation behavior of these oxidation methods was compared. Through ceria slurry polishing, the polishing properties of the oxides were evaluated. Analysis of the oxygen element on polished surfaces by SEM-EDX was conducted to evaluate the remaining oxide. By analyzing the three oxidation methods with corresponding polishing process on the basis of schematic diagrams, suitable application conditions for these methods were clarified. Anodic oxidation with simultaneous polishing is suitable for the rapid figuring of RS-SiC with a high material removal rate; polishing of a thermally oxidized surface is suitable for machining RS-SiC mirrors with complex shapes; combination of plasma oxidation and polishing is suitable for the fine finishing of RS-SiC with excellent surface roughness. These oxidation methods are expected to improve the machining of RS-SiC substrates and promote the application of RS-SiC products in the fields of optics, molds, and ceramics.

  11. Computational studies of the isomerization and hydration reactions of acetaldehyde oxide and methyl vinyl carbonyl oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Keith T; Hermes, Matthew R; Carlson, Matthew J; Zogg, Cheryl K

    2010-09-02

    Alkene ozonolysis is a major source of hydroxyl radical (*OH), the most important oxidant in the troposphere. Previous experimental and computational work suggests that for many alkenes the measured *OH yields should be attributed to the combined impact of both chemically activated and thermalized syn-alkyl Criegee intermediates (CIs), even though the thermalized CI should be susceptible to trapping by molecules such as water. We have used RRKM/master equation and variational transition state theory calculations to quantify the competition between unimolecular isomerization and bimolecular hydration reactions for the syn and anti acetaldehyde oxide formed in trans-2-butene ozonolysis and for the CIs formed in isoprene ozonolysis possessing syn-methyl groups. Statistical rate theory calculations were based on quantum chemical data provided by the B3LYP, QCISD, and multicoefficient G3 methods, and thermal rate constants were corrected for tunneling effects using the Eckart method. At tropospheric temperatures and pressures, all thermalized CIs with syn-methyl groups are predicted to undergo 1,4-hydrogen shifts from 2 to 8 orders of magnitude faster than they react with water monomer at its saturation number density. For thermalized anti acetaldehyde oxide, the rates of dioxirane formation and hydration should be comparable.

  12. Silicon-technology based microreactors for high-temperature heterogeneous partial oxidation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, Roald Michel

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the results of a study into the feasibility of silicon-technology based microreactors for fast oxidation reactions have been discussed. When designed properly, silicon microreactors are suitable for studying heterogeneous gas phase reactions, such as reaction kinetics of direct cataly

  13. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  14. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  15. The hydrothermal synthesis of tetragonal tungsten bronze-based catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Pablo; Solsona, Benjamín; García-González, Ester; González-Calbet, José M; López Nieto, José M

    2007-12-21

    Mixed metal oxides with tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) structure, showing high activity and selectivity for the gas phase partial oxidation of olefins, have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis from Keggin-type heteropolyacids.

  16. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  17. [Investigation of the oxidation reaction of O3 with bromide ion in aqueous solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Jia-Hui; Pan, Xun-Xi; Zhang, Ren-Xi; Hou, Hui-Qi

    2012-09-01

    The reaction mechanism of O3 with bromide ion in aqueous solution was studied by ion chromatography and UV-Vis spectrometry instruments. Ion chromatography analysis showed that only 10% of Br- which was oxidized by ozone was formed into bromate ion. The results demonstrated that the final products of the oxidation reaction were identified as Br2 and Br3- except for BrO3-. The formation of Br3- which was yielded from the reaction of Br2 with Br- was the major process in the reaction of Br attacked by O3. The characteristic absorption spectrum of Br3- with an absorption peak at 260 nm was also investigated. The results may provide helpful information about the mechanism of the oxidation reaction of Br- with O3 and fate of Br- or its derivatives in the environment by the oxidation processes.

  18. Reaction Kinetics for Heterogeneous Oxidation of Mn(Ⅲ)—Toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彰; 朱宪

    2002-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation oftoluene with Mn3+ was studied by considering the effects of disproportionation of Mn3+ in reaction system,a “parallel”modulus was set up.And then the concentration of Mn3+ in disproportionation and the concentration of benzaldehyde in oxidation were respectively determined in turn.the rate constant,order and pseudo-activation energy of the heterogeneous oxidation were obtained by mathematical deduction and the kinetic equation was concluded.In addition,the reaction mechanism was analyzed.It shows that the results are completely consistent with modulus.

  19. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  20. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  1. Reaction Mechanism and Control of Selectivity in Catalysis by Oxides: Some Challenges and Open Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siglinda Perathoner

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects of the reaction mechanisms in multistep selective (ammoxidation reactions over oxide surfaces are discussed evidencing some of the challenges for surface science and theory in describing these reactions, and for applied catalysis in order to have a more in deep identification of the key factors governing surface reactivity and which may be used to improve catalytic performances. In particular, the role of chemisorbed species in the modification of the surface reactivity and the presence of multiple pathways of reaction are evidenced by comparing the behavior of V-based catalysts in C3-C4 alkanes and alkene oxidation.

  2. Escherichia coli as a potential hydrocarbon conversion microorganism. Oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds by recombinant E. coli in two-liquid phase (aqueous-organic) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favre-Bulle, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    The increased interest in the study of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms in recent years has been stimulated by the possibility of using their monooxygenases in the selective oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. As an example, long chain (>C16) n-alkanes are converted to dicarboxylic

  3. SYNTHESIS, REACTIVITY, AND CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF IRON/ZINC-CONTAINING SPECIES INVOLVED IN OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS UNDER GIF-TYPE CONDITIONS. (R823377)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the nature and reactivity of iron- and zinc-containing speciesgenerated in hydrocarbon-oxidizing Gif(IV)-type solutions Fe catalyst/Zn/O-2 in pyridine/acetic acid(10:1 v/v). The ultimate goal of this investigation is to unravel the role of metal...

  4. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  5. Dioxygen oxidation of hydrocarbons by a methane monooxygenase-like system: diiron complex-O2-Zn/HOAc-MV2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏俊发; 何地平; 俞贤达

    1999-01-01

    The activation of dioxygen and incorporation into hydrocarbons have been achieved under mild conditions by a methane monooxygenase (MMO)-like system using a dinuclear iron complex [Fe2Dhist(OAc)2]BPh4·3H2O as the model complex, zinc powder as the electron donor, HOAc as the proton source and methylviologen as the electron transfer agent. The results show that styrene is oxygenated predominantly to styrene oxide (1 396 mol/100 mol of the Fe2 complex), benzaldehyde (16160) and acetophenone (986), and cyclohexane to cyclohexanol (9370) and cyclohexanone (2670). EPR studies indicate that the hypervalent ironoxo spiecs FeⅣFeⅣ(?)O, derived from FeⅢFeⅢ core via reduction, O2-binding and protonation, is the active intermediate which inserts the activated oxygen atom into C(?)C or C—H bond giving each product. The system closely resembles MMO and its close relative hemerythrin in the aspects of reaction phenomena, EPR characteristics and product distributions. The Mn2 analog cmplex、Fe-Zn hetero

  6. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  7. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  8. Propan-1-ol Oxidation Reaction on Au/TiO2 Catalysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-11-27

    Nov 27, 2014 ... Department of pure and applied Chemistry, Bayero University, Kano P.M.B 3011, Kano State, Nigeria ... using Pulse Flow reactor, TPFRP, TPD, and XRD,. ... complete oxidation reaction of propan-1-ol on the catalysts.

  9. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  10. Reaction mechanism for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1): A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuping; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Donghui; Hao, Ce; Yang, Xueming

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic reaction mechanism for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1) surface has been thoroughly investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations. The adsorption geometries and energies were obtained for all the adsorbates, including the reactants, the products, and various possible intermediates on the metal. According to different oxygen conditions, we propose two possible reaction pathways for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1): (1) HCHO esterification: the intermediate formaldehyde and methoxy couple to yield methyl formate at low oxygen coverage or without the presence of oxygen atoms; (2) HCHO oxidation: the formaldehyde is oxidized to form formate at high oxygen coverage, which further dissociates to give CO2. Our study emphasizes the critical role of oxygen coverage during the methanol oxidation reaction, and can perfectly explain the difference in product distributions observed in previous experiments.

  11. Crossed beam investigation of elementary reactions relevant to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-like molecules in extraterrestrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Asvany, O.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-04-01

    The reactions of ground state carbon atoms, C( 3P j), with benzene, C 6H 6, and phenyl radicals, C 6H 5, with methylacetylene, CH 3CCH, were investigated in crossed beam experiments at collision energies of 21.8 and 140 kJ mol -1 to investigate elementary reactions relevant to the formation and chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in extraterrestrial environments. The C( 3P j) reaction proceeds via complex formation and gives a cyclic, seven-membered C 7H 5 doublet radical plus atomic hydrogen. This pathway has neither an entrance nor exit barrier, and is exothermic. Together with the experimental verification of the carbon versus hydrogen exchange under single collision conditions, the findings have an important impact on the chemistry of aromatic molecules in interstellar clouds and outflow of carbon stars. Even in the coldest molecular clouds ( T=10 K), the benzene molecule can be destroyed upon reaction with carbon atoms, whereas they are resistant toward an attack of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Since the aromatic benzene unit is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial, PAH-like material, our results suggest that PAHs might react with carbon atoms as well. On the other side, the reaction of C 6H 5 radicals with methylacetylene to form phenylmethylacetylene is direct. Since an entrance barrier inhibits the reaction in cold molecular clouds and in the atmospheres of hydrocarbon rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn and satellites such as Titan, this reaction is expected to play a role in PAH synthesis only in high temperature interstellar environments, such as circumstellar outflows of carbon stars.

  12. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  13. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

    2007-09-25

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

  14. Optimization of reaction parameters for the electrochemical oxidation of lidocaine with a Design of Experiments approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, Turan; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    Identification of potentially toxic oxidative drug metabolites is a crucial step in the development of new drugs. Electrochemical methods are useful to study oxidative drug metabolism, but are not widely used to synthesize metabolites for follow-up studies. Careful optimization of reaction parameter

  15. Synthesis of Quinoxaline Derivatives via Tandem Oxidative Azidation/Cyclization Reaction of N-Arylenamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haichao; Li, Dianjun; Yu, Wei

    2016-02-19

    A new method was developed for the synthesis of quinoxalines. This method employs N-arylenamines and TMSN3 as the starting materials and implements two oxidative C-N bond-forming processes in a tandem pattern by using (diacetoxyiodo)benzene as the common oxidant. The present reaction conditions are mild and simple and thus are useful in practical synthesis.

  16. Sulfur poisoning of hydrocarbon oxidation by palladium. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Using a differential bed recycle reactor the oxidation of ethane and diethyl ketone by a Pd catalyst was studied at the 0-30 ppm level in air. In both cases first order kinetics were observed. The ethane oxidation rate was characterized n the Arrhenius form by a pre-exponential of 1.0 x 10 to the 8th power cm/sec and an E sub a of 27 kcal/mole. The diethyl ketone oxidation rate was characterized by a pre-exponential of 5.7 x -1000 cm/sec and E sub a of 14 kcal/mole. Poisoning of ethan oxidation was also investigated by hydrogen sulfide and to a smaller extent by the refrigerants Freon 22 and Gentron 142-B. Poisoning by Gentron 142-B was much more severe than by hydrogen sulfide. Kinetic experiments indicated that only the pre-exponential was changing.

  17. Co-oxidation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with some biologically active compounds (BAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubergrits, M.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) initiated by UV or gamma irradiation was promoted by benz(a)anthracene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and inhibited by pyrene, dibenz(a,c)anthracene, and asymmetric benz(a)antharacene. The effects of these BAC commonly occurring together with BP in industrial wastes, increased with their concentrations. Phenol and 3-methylcholanthrene strongly promoted BP oxidation when present at low concentrations and inhibited it at high concentrations. Consistent promoting effect was also observed in BP co-oxidation with adipic acid, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavon, and vitamin E, whereas succinic, azelaic, ferulic, gallic, and chlorogenic acids, rutin, and vitamin C acted as inhibitors. Most saturated dicarboxylic acids studied did not affect BP oxidation at 1:1 acid-BP molar ratio. The kinetics of 7,12-DMBA photooxidation inhibition by some metabolic intermediates, e.g., DMBA endo-peroxide, were also studied.

  18. Oxidation as an important factor of protein damage: Implications for Maillard reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Trnková; J Dršata; I Boušová

    2015-06-01

    Protein oxidation, the process caused especially by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, is thought to play a major role in various oxidative processes within cells and is implicated in the development of many human diseases. This review provides a brief overview of the protein oxidation with the emphasis on the types of oxidation (oxidation of protein backbone and amino acid residues side chains, site-specific metal-catalysed protein oxidation), oxidation-dependent generation of protein hydroperoxides, carbonyl derivatives and protein–protein cross-linkages. Non-enzymatic glycoxidation (also known as Maillard reaction) as an important factor of protein damage, consequences of oxidative protein impairment and related diseases as well as means of monitoring and assessment of protein modifications are discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons using a coupled model for bio-geochemical reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, I. S.; Molson, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) are a major source of groundwater contamination, being a worldwide and well-known problem. Formed by a complex mixture of hundreds of organic compounds (including BTEX - benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), many of which are toxic and persistent in the subsurface and are capable of creating a serious risk to human health. Several remediation technologies can be used to clean-up PHC contamination. In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and intrinsic bioremediation (IBR) are two promising techniques that can be applied in this case. However, the interaction of these processes with the background aquifer geochemistry and the design of an efficient treatment presents a challenge. Here we show the development and application of BIONAPL/Phreeqc, a modeling tool capable of simulating groundwater flow, contaminant transport with coupled biological and geochemical processes in porous or fractured porous media. BIONAPL/Phreeqc is based on the well-tested BIONAPL/3D model, using a powerful finite element simulation engine, capable of simulating non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution, density-dependent advective-dispersive transport, and solving the geochemical and kinetic processes with the library Phreeqc. To validate the model, we compared BIONAPL/Phreeqc with results from the literature for different biodegradation processes and different geometries, with good agreement. We then used the model to simulate the behavior of sodium persulfate (NaS2O8) as an oxidant for BTEX degradation, coupled with sequential biodegradation in a 2D case and to evaluate the effect of inorganic geochemistry reactions. The results show the advantages of a treatment train remediation scheme based on ISCO and IBR. The numerical performance and stability of the integrated BIONAPL/Phreeqc model was also verified.

  20. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  1. Silicone-modified graphene oxide fillers via the Piers-Rubinsztajn reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Liang, Shuai; Yu, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    While graphene or graphene oxide can make significantimprovements in the properties of a wide variety of polymericmaterials, their incorporation can be challenged byincompatibility with the polymeric matrix. The modification ofgraphene oxide with silicones or silanes using the Piers......-Rubinsztajn reaction improves dispersibility in nonpolar materials,including organic solvents and silicone pre-elastomers. Ahigh loading (up to 10 wt %) of modified graphene oxide insilicone elastomers could be achieved, which resulted inenhanced mechanical performance and reduced gas permeability....

  2. A comparative theoretical study of CO oxidation reaction by O2 molecule over Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Sharifi, Fahimeh; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-09-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, the probable CO oxidation reaction mechanisms are investigated over Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide (GO). The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of these metal decorated-GOs along with the O2/CO adsorption configurations are studied in detail. The relatively large adsorption energies reveal that both Al and Si atoms can disperse on GO quite stably without clustering problem. Hence, both Al- and Si-decorated GOs are stable enough to be utilized in catalytic oxidation of CO by molecular O2. The two possible reaction pathways proposed for the oxidation of CO with O2 molecule are as follows: O2+CO→CO2+Oads and CO+Oads→CO2. The estimated energy barriers of the first oxidation reaction on Si-decorated GOs, following the Eley-Rideal (ER) reaction, are lower than that on Al-decorated ones. This is most likely due to the larger atomic charge on the Si atom than the Al one, which tends to stabilize the corresponding transition state structure. The results of this study can be useful for better understanding the chemical properties of Al- and Si-decorated GOs, and are valuable for the development of an automobile catalytic converter in order to remove the toxic CO molecule.

  3. Highly efficient oxidation of alcohols using Oxone(R) as oxidant catalyzed by ruthenium complex under mild reaction conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi Qiang Lei; Jian Qiang Wang; Peng Hua Yan

    2008-01-01

    Aromatic and alkyl alcohols were oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones at room temperature with high conversion and selectivity using Oxone (2KHSO5·KHSO4·K2SO4) as oxidant catalyzed by ruthenium complex Quin-Ru-Quin (where Quin = 8-hydroxyquinoline). The reaction time is very short and the preparation of complex is simple. 2008 Zi Qiang Lei. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of hydrocarbons on plasma treatment of NOx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Lean burn gasoline engine exhausts contain a significant amount of hydrocarbons in the form of propene. Diesel engine exhausts contain little gaseous hydrocarbon; however, they contain a significant amount of liquid-phase hydrocarbons (known as the volatile organic fraction) in the particulates. The objective of this paper is to examine the fate of NO{sub x} when an exhaust gas mixture that contains hydrocarbons is subjected to a plasma. The authors will show that the hydrocarbons promote the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}, but not the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} is strongly coupled with the hydrocarbon oxidation chemistry. This result suggests that gas-phase reactions in the plasma alone cannot lead to the chemical reduction of NO{sub x}. Any reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} can only be accomplished through heterogeneous reactions of NO{sub 2} with surfaces or particulates.

  5. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  6. Method of CO and/or CO.sub.2 hydrogenation to higher hydrocarbons using doped mixed-metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Haynes, Daniel J.; Abdelsayed, Victor; Smith, Mark W.; Spivey, James J.

    2017-03-21

    A method of hydrogenation utilizing a reactant gas mixture comprising a carbon oxide and a hydrogen agent, and a hydrogenation catalyst comprising a mixed-metal oxide containing metal sites supported and/or incorporated into the lattice. The mixed-metal oxide comprises a pyrochlore, a brownmillerite, or mixtures thereof doped at the A-site or the B-site. The metal site may comprise a deposited metal, where the deposited metal is a transition metal, an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, or mixtures thereof. Contact between the carbon oxide, hydrogen agent, and hydrogenation catalyst under appropriate conditions of temperature, pressure and gas flow rate generate a hydrogenation reaction and produce a hydrogenated product made up of carbon from the carbon oxide and some portion of the hydrogen agent. The carbon oxide may be CO, CO.sub.2, or mixtures thereof and the hydrogen agent may be H.sub.2. In a particular embodiment, the hydrogenated product comprises olefins, paraffins, or mixtures thereof.

  7. Investigation of the solid-state reaction between nickel oxide and alumina by Rutherford backscattering (RBS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, G. de; Geus, John W.; Fluit, J.M.; Wit, J.H. de

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of NiO and Al2O3 to form NiAl2O4 was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering of 3 MeV He+-ions. The NiO was obtained by oxidation at 900°C of a nickel film vapour-deposited onto alumina substrates. The reaction of NiO and Al2O3 did not proceed markedly at 900°C. The reaction

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide as an innovative reaction medium for selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeker, F.; Leitner, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Although the catalytic efficiency of all catalytic oxidation processes studied in scCO{sub 2} up to now is far from being satisfactory, the principle possibility to carry out such reactions in this medium is clearly evident. Future research in our group will be directed towards the development of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts that are adopted to the special requirements of both the oxidation process and the supercritical reaction medium. Preliminary results from these studies regarding the epoxidation of olefins with molecular oxygen as oxidant will be presented on the conference poster. (orig.)

  9. Evidence concerning oxidation as a surface reaction in Baltic amber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    , obtained from pressed amber powder, were subjected to accelerated thermal ageing. Cross-sections of the pellets were analyzed by infrared micro-spectroscopy, in order to identify and quantify changes in chemical properties. The experimental results showed strong oxidation exclusively at the exterior part...

  10. Amphiphilic Polyphosphazene with Poly(ethylene oxide) Side Chains Prepared through the Decker-Forster Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chengmei; HU Fuzhen; QIU Jinjun; LEI Guofu; BAO Rui

    2006-01-01

    Poly(4-methylphenoxyphosphazene)-graft-poly(ethylene oxide) (PPZ-g-PEO), a novel amphiphilic grafting polymer was prepared via the Decker-Forster reaction. It is found that the graft efficiency increased with extension of reaction time. Low molecular weight of poly(ethylene oxide) favored the grafting reaction. The grafted polymer has two different glass transition temperatures(Tg) with those of pure poly(4-methylphenoxy-phopsphazene) and PEO. The emulsifying ability of grafted polymer was studied with benzene-water mixture. The emulsifying volumes increased with the decreasing of PEO's molecular weight. The contact angle of film forming from grafted polymer decreased after introduction of PEO grafting chain.

  11. Interplay between nanoscale reactivity and bulk performance of H-ZSM-5 catalysts during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Teketel, Shewangizaw; Svelle, Stian; Bare, Simon R.; Arstad, Bjornar; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Olsbye, Unni; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    H-ZSM-5 catalyst powders before and after a steaming post-treatment have been investigated during the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) process at 350 degrees C. Bulk and surface characterization techniques have been combined with in situ Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the aluminum an

  12. Things fall apart: Fragmentation reactions in the oxidative aging of organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J. H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Daumit, K. E.; Kessler, S. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds involves a wide array of chemical transformations, including functionalization reactions (addition of polar functional groups to the carbon skeleton), fragmentation reactions (formation of lower carbon-number products via C-C bond scission), and accretion reactions (increases in molecular weight by the combination of two chemical species). Each of these reaction classes can lead to large changes in volatility, and hence can have major implications for atmospheric organic aerosol (OA). For example, the formation of OA is predominantly driven by functionalization and accretion reactions, which generally lead to decreases in volatility. Here we describe a series of laboratory studies of the subsequent organic "aging", the multiday oxidation processes that occur after the initial OA formation and growth. In these studies, the multigenerational oxidation of organic compounds in various phases (the gas phase, the condensed OA phase, and the aqueous phase) is carried out within either an environmental chamber or a flow reactor, and monitored using various high-resolution mass spectrometric techniques. In all cases it is found that fragmentation reactions play a major role in the observed aging chemistry, dominated by the formation of small, volatile oxidation products. These results suggest that multi-day oxidative aging processes do not lead to sustained aerosol growth, but rather may serve as a chemical sink for atmospheric OA.

  13. Heterogeneous Photo-Fenton Reaction Catalyzed by Nanosized Iron Oxides for Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts have been exerted in overcoming the drawbacks of the Fenton reaction for water treatment applications. The drawbacks include pH confinement, handling of iron sludge, slow regeneration of Fe(II, and so forth. This paper highlights the recent developments in the heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction which utilizes nanosized iron oxides as catalyst for maximizing the activity due to the enhanced physical or chemical properties brought about by the unique structures. This paper also summarizes the fundamentals of the Fenton reaction, which determine the inherent drawbacks and associated advances, to address the advantages of iron oxides and nanosized iron oxides. Tips for applying this method in water treatment are also provided. Given that the environmental effect of nanosized iron oxides is not yet well established, rapid research growth may occur in the near future to advance this promising technology toward water treatment once it is smartly coupled with conventional technologies.

  14. Hysteresis in the solid oxide fuel cell cathode reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Bay, Lasse

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen electrode reaction at the Pt/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interface is investigated at 1000degreesC on Pt point electrodes on YSZ and YSZ point contacts on Pt. Linear potential sweeps show a pronounced non-linear current-voltage relation and inductive hysteresis, in particular at l...

  15. Controlled Nitric Oxide Production via O(1D) + N2O Reactions for Use in Oxidation Flow Reactor Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; hide

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO+NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D)+N2O->2NO, followed by the reaction NO+O3->NO2+O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D)+N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 +NO reactions relative to RO2 +HO2 and/or RO2+RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO-3 ) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and -pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  16. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D) + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; Kolb, Charles; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas; Brune, William

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D) + N2O → 2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3 → NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D) + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO3-) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  17. Evaluation of Salivary Nitric Oxide Levels in Smokers, Tobacco Chewers and Patients with Oral Lichenoid Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joy Idiculla; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Sabarinath, B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, acts as a signalling molecule affecting numerous physiological and pathological processes. Role of nitric oxide as a mediator in tobacco related habits and the resultant oral lichenoid reactions was assessed. Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the salivary nitric oxide levels in normal patients with that of smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study which included 30 healthy patients without any chronic inflammatory lesion and habit as controls (group I), 30 smokers without the habit of tobacco/betel nut chewing and any oral lesion (group II), 30 tobacco chewers without the habit of smoking and any oral lesion (group III) and 30 histologically confirmed cases of oral lichenoid reaction with the habit of tobacco usage (group IV). Saliva from these patients was collected and the nitrite concentration was assessed. Results Our results concluded that there was highly significant increase in the nitric oxide levels in smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions compared to that of controls. Also, there was a significant increase in nitric oxide levels in patients with smoking associated oral lichenoid reactions in comparison with smokers and in patients with lichenoid reactions associated with tobacco chewing in comparison with tobacco chewers. Conclusion Estimation of salivary nitric oxide levels is a simple, non-invasive procedure and could be analysed to suggest the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The increased activity of the enzyme may indicate that nitric oxide has a pathophysiological role in these lesions. PMID:26894179

  18. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Asiri, Abdullah M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-01

    This Concept is aimed at describing the current state of the art in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as heterogeneous catalysts for liquid-phase oxidations, focusing on three important substrates, namely, alkenes, alkanes and alcohols. Emphases are on the nature of active sites that have been incorporated within MOFs and on future targets to be set in this area. Thus, selective alkene epoxidation with peroxides or oxygen catalyzed by constitutional metal nodes of MOFs as active sites are still to be developed. Moreover, no noble metal-free MOF has been reported to date that can act as a general catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. In contrast, in the case of alkanes, a target should be to tune the polarity of MOF internal pores to control the outcome of the autooxidation process, resulting in the selective formation of alcohol/ketone mixtures at high conversion.

  19. Reduction reaction analysis of nanoparticle copper oxide for copper direct bonding using formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Masahisa; Akaike, Masatake; Matsuoka, Naoya; Suga, Tadatomo

    2017-04-01

    Copper direct bonding is required for electronics devices, especially power devices, and copper direct bonding using formic acid is expected to lower the bonding temperature. In this research, we analyzed the reduction reaction of copper oxide using formic acid with a Pt catalyst by electron spin resonance analysis and thermal gravimetry analysis. It was found that formic acid was decomposed and radicals were generated under 200 °C. The amount of radicals generated was increased by adding the Pt catalyst. Because of these radicals, both copper(I) oxide and copper(II) oxide start to be decomposed below 200 °C, and the reduction of copper oxide is accelerated by reactants such as H2 and CO from the decomposition of formic acid above 200 °C. The Pt catalyst also accelerates the reaction of copper oxide reduction. Herewith, it is considered that the copper surface can be controlled more precisely by using formic acid to induce direct bonding.

  20. Combustion kinetics of light hydrocarbons in the presence of nitrogen oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rota, R.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata

    1998-11-01

    An experimental analysis of the interactions between different hydrocarbons and NO is reported. All the experiments have been carried out in a perfectly stirred reactor, operated isothermally in the temperature range 1,050--1,250 K, with stoichiometric ratios ranging between 1.0 and 1.3. It has been found that, close to the higher temperature values investigated, the NO conversion as a function of the stoichiometric ratio shows a maximum around 1.15--1.20, both in the case of pure methane and methane-ethane mixtures in the feed. Moreover, the addition of NO significantly enhances the system reactivity at the lower temperatures investigated. The ethane content in the feed plays a different role depending upon the temperature value considered. At the lowest temperatures investigated the larger the amount of ethane, the higher the NO abatement, while at the higher temperatures the methane-ethane mixtures always show a larger NO conversion than that of pure methane. However, when increasing the ethane content in the feed, the NO conversion decreases. Finally, various detailed kinetic models (with particular reference to that developed by Miller and Bowman) have been discussed and used to interpret the experimental results.

  1. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  2. Assessing Effects of Oxidizer Characteristics on Composite Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    these 2 reactants react to form the products shown. For a complete reaction it was necessary to have two oxygen molecules for each methane molecule. A...properties such as high density (13.31 g cm-3) and large neutron capture cross section such that Hf and HfH2 are widely used for nuclear reactor and...volume can be calculated. In this case, plastic work per volume is = = 2 (−) , where Y is the yield strength of the plate

  3. Role of vanadium in Keggin heteropoly molybdate supported on titania catalysts for oxidation reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Srivani; K T Venkateswara Rao; P S Sai Prasad; N Lingaiah

    2014-03-01

    Vanadium-incorporated molybdophosporic acid catalysts supported on titania were prepared and characterized by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction and laser Raman spectroscopy. Characterization data reveals the incorporation of vanadium into the primary structure of Keggin ion of MPA. Catalysts activities were evaluated for oxidation of 1,2-benzenedimethanol using H2O2 and O2 as oxidants. Vanadium-containing catalysts showed high activity compared to their parent heteropoly acids. Oxidation ability depended on the number of V atoms present in Keggin heteropoly molybdate. Effect of reaction parameters on the oxidation ability was also evaluated.

  4. Chemical oxidation of anthracite with hydrogen peroxide via the Fenton reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, I.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solutions of 30% H2O2 ranging from pH = 0 to pH = 11.5 have been used to oxidize anthracite at room temperature. The inorganic impurities, primarily pyrite, catalysed the oxidation and reduction of H2O2 (the Fenton reaction) to form the hydroxyl radical; the oxidation of the organic matter was minimal and was observed only in strong acidic solutions (pH activated carbon sites in the coal surface is used to explain the oxidation of the demineralized anthracite. ?? 1984.

  5. Synthesis of indium tin oxide powder by solid-phase reaction with microwave heating

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Kunihiro; Kanayama, Keiji; Katoh, Manabu; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hideto

    2009-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) powder was synthesized from indium oxide and tin oxide powders by a solid-phase method using microwave heating and conventional heating methods. Microwave heating could reduce the treatment time necessary for the completion of the solid-phase reaction by 1/30. This decrease was attributed to an increase in the diffusion rate of Sn at the local heat spot in the indium oxide formed by microwave irradiation. However, microwave heating also decreased the amount of ITO produ...

  6. Partial oxidation of jet fuels over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Design and reaction kinetics of sulfur-containing surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Julian Nicolaas

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of logistic fuels via catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) on Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at short contact times is an efficient method for generating hydrogen-rich synthesis gas. Depending on the inlet conditions, fuel, and catalyst, high syngas yields, low by-product formation, and rates of high fuel conversion can be achieved. CPOX is relevant for mobile hydrogen generation, e.g., on board of airplanes in order to increase the fuel efficiency via fuel cell-based auxiliary power units. Jet fuels contain hundreds of different hydrocarbons and a significant amount of sulfur. The hydrocarbon composition and sulfur content of a jet fuel vary depending on distributor, origin, and refinement of the crude oil. Little is known about the influence of the various compounds on the synthesis-gas yield and the impact of sulfur on the product yield. In this work, the influence of three main chemical compounds of a jet fuel (aromatics, alkanes, and sulfur compounds) on syngas selectivity, the catalyst deactivation process, and reaction sequence is unraveled. As representative components of alkanes and aromatics, n-dodecane and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were chosen for ex-situ and in-situ investigations on the CPOX over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. Additionally, for a fixed paraffin-to-aromatics ratio, benzothiophene or dibenzothiophene were added as a sulfur component in three different concentrations. The knowledge gained about the catalytic partial oxidation of jet fuels and their surrogates is used to identify requirements for jet fuels in mobile applications based on CPOX and to optimize the overall system efficiency. The results show an influence of the surrogate composition on syngas selectivity. The tendency for syngas formation increases with higher paraffin contents. A growing tendency for by-product formation can be observed with increasing aromatics contents in the fuel. The impact of sulfur on the reaction system shows an immediate change in the product

  7. The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Reaction Studies of Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles in Mesoporous Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst design program was implemented in which Pt nanoparticles, either of monodisperse size and/or shape were synthesized, characterized and studied in a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The novel preparation of these materials enables exquisite control over their physical and chemical properties that could be controlled (and therefore rationally tuned) during synthesis. The ability to synthesize rather than prepare catalysts followed by thorough characterization enable accurate structure-function relationships to be elucidated. This thesis emphasizes all three aspects of catalyst design: synthesis, characterization and reactivity studies. The precise control of metal nanoparticle size, surface structure and composition may enable the development of highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts.

  8. Equilibrating metal-oxide cluster ensembles for oxidation reactions using oxygen in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira A. Weinstock; Elena M. G. Barbuzzi; Michael W. Wemple; Jennifer J. Cowan; Richard S. Reiner; Dan M. Sonnen; Robert A. Heintz; James S. Bond; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Although many enzymes can readily and selectively use oxygen in water--the most familiar and attractive of all oxidants and solvents, respectively–-the design of synthetic catalysts for selective water-based oxidation processes utilizing molecular oxygen remains a daunting task. Particularly problematic is the fact that oxidation of substrates by O2 involves radical...

  9. A predictive tool for selective oxidation of hydrocarbons: optical basicity of catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriceau, P.; Lebouteiller, A.; Bordes, E.; Courtine, P. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, 60 (France). Dept. de Genie Chimique

    1998-12-31

    Whatever the composition of the catalyst (promoted, supported, multicomponent, etc.) is, it is possible to calculate its electron donor capacity {Lambda}. However, one important question remains: How are the surface and the bulk values of {Lambda} related? Most oxidation catalysts exhibit either a layered structure as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and approximately {Lambda}{sub th}{proportional_to}{Lambda}{sub surf}, or a molecular structure as polyoxometallates, and no correction seems to be needed. Work is in progress on that point. Of great importance is also the actual oxidation and coordination states of cations at the stedy state: {Lambda}s have been calculated from the composition determined by XANES and XPS. Finally, the model is able to discriminate between `paraffins` and olefins as reactants. These calibration curves should help to find new catalysts. (orig.)

  10. Modeling the Electrochemical Hydrogen Oxidation and Evolution Reactions on the Basis of Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skulason, Egill; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed for the three elementary steps―Tafel, Heyrovsky, and Volmer―involved in the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and its reverse, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). For the Pt(111) surface a detailed model consisting of a negatively...... charged Pt(111) slab and solvated protons in up to three water bilayers is considered and reaction energies and activation barriers are determined by using a newly developed computational scheme where the potential can be kept constant during a charge transfer reaction. We determine the rate limiting...

  11. Effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on brain oxidative reactions induced by pentylenetetrazole in a convulsion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yukiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Shimada, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2012-04-01

    Brain oxidative reactions are involved in epilepsy as well as neurodegenerative diseases. In animal convulsion models, some anticonvulsants have been found to suppress oxidative reactions associated with convulsions. However, the effect of anticonvulsants on brain oxidative reactions has not fully been clarified. Midazolam and phenobarbital are often used as an intravenous anesthetic, and are known to have anticonvulsive effect, but antioxidative effect of these drugs has rarely been studied. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of these drugs on the degree of convulsions and brain oxidative reactions in an animal convulsion model. In order to evaluate brain oxidative reactions, we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) level and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA expression level in the brain of mice in a convulsion model generated by a single injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). We evaluated the effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on the degree of PTZ-induced convulsions and on the changes in brain MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level. After PTZ injection, severe convulsions were observed in all mice. MDA level was increased in the whole brain, while HO-1 mRNA expression level was increased only in the hippocampus. Both midazolam and phenobarbital prevented the convulsions and suppressed the increase in both MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level in the brain. In this study, both midazolam and phenobarbital suppressed PTZ-induced MDA and HO-1 reactions in the brain, suggesting that these drugs inhibit brain oxidative reactions in a convulsion model.

  12. Utilizing carbon dioxide as a reaction medium to mitigate production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the thermal decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-10-02

    The CO(2) cofeed impact on the pyrolysis of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The direct comparison of the chemical species evolved from the thermal degradation of SBR in N(2) and CO(2) led to a preliminary mechanistic understanding of the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C(1-4)), aromatic derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), clarifying the role of CO(2) in the thermal degradation of SBR. The identification and quantification of over 50 major and minor chemical species from hydrogen and benzo[ghi]perylene were carried out experimentally in the temperature regime between 300 and 500 °C in N(2) and CO(2). The significant amounts of benzene derivatives from the direct bond dissociation of the backbone of SBR, induced by thermal degradation, provided favorable conditions for PAHs by the gas-phase addition reaction at a relatively low temperature compared to that with conventional fuels such as coal and petroleum-derived fuels. However, the formation of PAHs in a CO(2) atmosphere was decreased considerably (i.e., ∼50%) by the enhanced thermal cracking behavior, and the ultimate fates of these species were determined by different pathways in CO(2) and N(2) atmospheres. Consequently, this work has provided a new approach to mitigate PAHs by utilizing CO(2) as a reaction medium in thermochemical processes.

  13. Allosteric effects on oxidative and nitrosative reactions of cell-free hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2007-01-01

    A review of the oxidative and nitrosative reactions of cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) shows that these reactions are intimately linked and are subject to allosteric control. Cross-linking reactions used to produce HBOCs introduce conformational constraints and result in Hbs with reduced responses to heterotropic and homotropic allosteric effectors. The Nernst plots of heme oxidation of cross-linked HBOCs are shifted to higher potentials relative to unmodified Hb in the absence of allosteric effectors, in accord with their T-state stabilization and right-shifted Hill plots of O(2) binding. They exhibit enhanced rates of autoxidation and nitrite-induced oxidation, features that appear due to their having more solvent-accessible heme pockets. The stability of their NO-Hb derivatives varies as a result of allosteric effects on the extent of formation of pentacoordinate NO-heme geometry by alpha chains and subsequent oxidation of partner beta chains. The physiological implications of these findings on the safety, efficacy and design of second generation HBOCs are discussed in the framework of a reaction scheme showing linkages between Hb-mediated redox reactions. These redox reactions can drive formation of SNO-Hb and other reactive species and are of significance for the use of cell-free Hbs in vivo.

  14. Desulfurization of Hydrocarbon Fuels at Ambient Conditions Using Supported Silver Oxide-Titania Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    reaction pathways for hydrotreating [3]. Adsorptive desulfurizing units can provide low sulfur fuel for sulfur intolerant systems such as fuel...considered to be an alternative to process intensification of hydrotreating processes to cope with tightening sulfur regulations which calls for higher...remove the sulfur species that represent the hardest species to hydrotreat may be operated in tandem to traditional hydrotreating units. Large scale

  15. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Porollo, Aleksey; Lam, Ying Wai; Grimmett, Paul E; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2013-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons, albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was found to possess a broad oxidizing capability toward structurally diverse hydrocarbons belonging to mutagenic/carcinogenic fused-ring higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs), endocrine-disrupting long-chain alkylphenols (APs), and crude oil aliphatic hydrocarbon n-alkanes. A homology-based three-dimensional (3D) model revealed the presence of an extraordinarily large active-site cavity in CYP63A2 compared to the mammalian PAH-oxidizing (CYP3A4, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1) and bacterial aliphatic-hydrocarbon-oxidizing (CYP101D and CYP102A1) P450s. This structural feature in conjunction with ligand docking simulations suggested potential versatility of the enzyme. Experimental characterization using recombinantly expressed CYP63A2 revealed its ability to oxidize HMW-PAHs of various ring sizes, including 4 rings (pyrene and fluoranthene), 5 rings [benzo(a)pyrene], and 6 rings [benzo(ghi)perylene], with the highest enzymatic activity being toward the 5-ring PAH followed by the 4-ring and 6-ring PAHs, in that order. Recombinant CYP63A2 activity yielded monohydroxylated PAH metabolites. The enzyme was found to also act as an alkane ω-hydroxylase that oxidized n-alkanes with various chain lengths (C9 to C12 and C15 to C19), as well as alkyl side chains (C3 to C9) in alkylphenols (APs). CYP63A2 showed preferential oxidation of long-chain APs and alkanes. To our knowledge, this is the first P450 identified from any of the biological kingdoms that possesses such broad substrate specificity toward structurally diverse xenobiotics (PAHs, APs, and alkanes), making it a potent enzyme biocatalyst candidate to handle mixed pollution (e.g., crude oil spills).

  16. Extensive Bone Reaction From Catastrophic Oxidized Zirconium Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar-Gheiti, Adrian J; Collins, Dennis; McCarthy, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty has become popular to minimize wear and increase longevity, especially in young patients. Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) femoral heads were introduced in the past decade for use in total hip arthroplasty. The advantages of oxidized zirconium include less risk of fracture compared with traditional ceramic heads. This case report describes a patient with a history of bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nonoperative management of avascular necrosis failed, and the patient was treated with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The patient was followed at regular intervals and had slow eccentric polyethylene wear during a 10-year period. After 10 years, the patient had accelerated wear, with femoral and acetabular bone changes as a result of Oxinium and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene wear during a 6-month period. This article highlights the unusual accelerated bone changes that occurred as a result of Oxinium wear particles.

  17. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  18. Time resolved studies of the addition reactions of silylenes and unsaturated hydrocarbons in the gas phase (an investigation of the strain energies of silirane and silirene rings)

    CERN Document Server

    Dormer, G

    1999-01-01

    This thesis reports the measurement of absolute rate constants for number of silylene addition reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons. The reactions of SiH sub 2 , SiD sub 2 and Me sub 2 Si with alkene and alkynes were studied. The silylenes were formed, in situ, by the photolysis of an organosilicon precursor, and the rate constants obtained by the direct observation of the absorption decay of the silylene reactant. The reactions were studied in the gas phase and their temperature and pressure dependence investigated. The reaction of SiH sub 2 and 1,3-butadiene was investigated and found to be pressure dependent. The following Arrhenius equation was yielded at infinite pressure; log(k supinfinity/cm sup 3 molecule sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1) = (-9.57 +- 0.05) + (3.22 +- 0.35) kJmol sup - sup 1 /RT ln 10. The reaction was found to proceed via a two-channel pathway, leading to the products vinylsilirane and silacyclopentane. RRKM modelling of the system was carried out and led to the calculation of the strain ...

  19. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. V. Chemical dynamics of n-C4H3 formation from reaction of C(3Pj) with allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Chang, A. H. H.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1999-06-01

    The crossed molecular beams technique was employed to investigate the reaction between ground state carbon atoms, C(3Pj), and allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1), at two averaged collision energies of 19.6 and 38.8 kJ mol-1. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C4H3 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields weakly polarized center-of-mass angular flux distributions isotropic at lower, but forward scattered with respect to the carbon beam at a higher collision energy. The maximum translational energy release and the angular distributions combined with ab initio and RRKM calculations are consistent with the formation of the n-C4H3 radical in its electronic ground state. The channel to the i-C4H3 isomer contributes less than 1.5%. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental data indicate that the carbon atom attacks the π-orbitals of the allenic carbon-carbon double bond barrierless via a loose, reactant-like transition state located at the centrifugal barrier. The initially formed cyclopropylidene derivative rotates in a plane almost perpendicular to the total angular momentum vector around its C-axis and undergoes ring opening to triplet butatriene. At higher collision energy, the butatriene complex decomposes within 0.6 ps via hydrogen emission to form the n-C4H3 isomer and atomic hydrogen through an exit transition state located 9.2 kJ mol-1 above the products. The explicit identification of the n-C4H3 radical under single collision represents a further example of a carbon-hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This channel opens a barrierless route to synthesize extremely reactive hydrocarbon radicals in combustion processes, interstellar chemistry, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, as well as Triton.

  20. Mn(II) Oxidation in Fenton and Fenton Type Systems: Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-03-07

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced through Fe(II) oxidation. Manganese(II) removal was enhanced when the accumulation of aqueous Fe(II) was minimized, which was achieved at low Fe(II) production rates, high pH, the presence of H2O2 instead of O2 as the initial Fe(II) oxidant, or a combination of all three. In addition, in the EC-H2O2 system, Mn(II) removal efficiency increased as pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 and as pH increased from 6.5 to 8.5, which implicates different reactive oxidants in acidic and alkaline solutions. Chemical analyses and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that Mn(II) removal during Fe(0) EC leads to the formation of Mn(III) (0.02 to >0.26 Mn·Fe(-1) molar ratios) and its incorporation into the resulting Fe(III) coprecipitates (lepidocrocite and hydrous ferric oxide for EC-O2 and EC-H2O2, respectively), regardless of pH and Fe(II) production rate. The Mn(II) oxidation pathways elucidated in this study set the framework to develop kinetic models on the impact of Mn(II) during EC treatment and in other Fenton type systems.

  1. Graphene oxide bound silica for solid-phase extraction of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Yan, Lihong; Xu, Tongguang; Liu, Dongye; Zhu, Yongfa; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were considered as a source of carcinogenicity in mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS). Accurate quantification of these components was necessary for assessing public health risk. In our study, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using graphene oxide (GO) bound silica as adsorbent for purification of 14 PAHs in MSS was developed. During SPE process, large matrices interferences of MSS were adsorbed on SPE column. The result of FTIR spectra demonstrated that these matrices interferences were adsorbed on GO mainly through OH and CO groups. The concentrations of PAHs in MSS extract were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the developed method for 14 PAHs ranged from 0.05 to 0.36 ng/cig and 0.17 to 1.19 ng/cig, respectively. The accuracy of the measurement of 14 PAHs was from 73 to 116%. The relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day analysis were less than 7.8% and 13.9%, respectively. Moreover, the developed method was successfully applied for analysis of real cigarette containing 1R5F reference cigarette and 12 top-selling commercial cigarettes in China.

  2. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  3. Self-ignition and oxidation of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 K at high pressure: experimental study with fast compression machine and modeling; Autoinflammation et oxydation de divers hydrocarbures entre 600 et 1000 K a haute pression: etude experimentale en machine a compression rapide et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaucour, M.

    2002-12-01

    Low- and intermediate-temperature oxidation and self-ignition of hydrocarbons play a major role in spark ignition, diesel and HCCI (homogenous charge compression ignition) engines. A deep understanding of the chemistry linked with both phenomena is necessary to improve the engines efficiency and to reduce the formation of pollutants. This document treats of works about the self-ignition and oxidation at high pressure of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 deg. K. The experimental tool used is a fast compression machine fitted with a fast sampling system for the measurement of self-ignition delays and of the concentrations of intermediate oxidation products. The advantages and limitations of this tool are discussed. The self-ignition of various hydrocarbons is compared using pre-defined data which characterize the phenomenologies like cold flames, negative temperature coefficients and self-ignition limits. The hydrocarbons considered are pure or binary mixtures of alkanes, pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The development of high pressure oxidation reaction schemes of alkanes between 600 and 1000 deg. K is described. It is directly based on the analysis of intermediate oxidation products. This methodology is also applied to pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The construction of detailed thermo-kinetic models of oxidation and the modeling of phenomena are made for n-butane, n-heptane, for the 3 pentane isomers, for pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. Finally, the perspectives of future works are evoked. They concern new modeling and new methodologies to be applied in more predictive thermo-kinetic models and the reduction of detailed models in order to include them inside fluid dynamics codes. (J.S.)

  4. Measuring the complex behavior of the SO2 oxidation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahzad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The two step reversible chemical reaction involving five chemical species is investigated. The quasi equilibrium manifold (QEM and spectral quasi equilibrium manifold (SQEM are used for initial approximation to simplify the mechanisms, which we want to utilize in order to investigate the behavior of the desired species. They show a meaningful picture, but for maximum clarity, the investigation method of invariant grid (MIG is employed. These methods simplify the complex chemical kinetics and deduce low dimensional manifold (LDM from the high dimensional mechanism. The coverage of the species near equilibrium point is investigated and then we shall discuss moving along the equilibrium of ODEs. The steady state behavior is observed and the Lyapunov function is utilized to study the stability of ODEs. Graphical results are used to describe the physical aspects of measurements.

  5. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  6. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  7. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  8. Reaction Mechanism of Thiophene on Vanadium Oxides under FCC Operating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Peng; Zheng Aiguo; Tian Huiping; Long Jun

    2004-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of thiophene on vanadium oxides under FCC operating conditions had been preliminary studied using in-situ FT-IR analysis of thiophene and atmospheric pressure continuous fixed-bed reaction, followed by characterization via pyridine adsorption-temperature programmed desorption method, and FT-IR and XPS spectra. The research had discovered that, under 500C thiophene could undergo the redox reaction with V2O5, while being converted into CO, CO2 as well as SO2 with its conversion rate reaching 41.2%. At the same time the oxidation number of vanadium decreased. The existence of a few Bronsted acid centers on V2O5 could lead to an increase of H2S yield among the products derived from the reaction with thiophene.

  9. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartling, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.bartling@uni-rostock.de; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo [Department of Physics, University of Rostock, Universitätsplatz 3, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Pohl, Marga-Martina [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. an der Universität Rostock (LIKAT), Albert-Einstein-Str. 29a, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  10. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation.

  11. Surface reaction network of CO oxidation on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liangbing; Xiong, Feng; Jin, Yuekang; Wang, Zhengming; Sun, Guanghui; Huang, Weixin

    2016-11-30

    CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts were prepared and their activity toward the adsorption and co-adsorption of O2, CO, CO2 and water was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, thermal desorption spectra and temperature-programmed reaction spectra. The Au surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs CO, CO2 and water, and the polycrystalline CeO2 surface of CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts molecularly adsorbs O2, and molecularly and reactively adsorbs CO, CO2 and water. By controllably preparing co-adsorbed surface species on CeO2/Au(110) inverse model catalysts, we successfully identified various surface reaction pathways of CO oxidation to produce CO2 with different barriers both on the CeO2 surface and at the Au-CeO2 interface, including CO oxidation by various oxygen species, and water/hydroxyl group-involved CO oxidation. These results establish a surface reaction network of CO oxidation catalyzed by Au/CeO2 catalysts, greatly advancing the fundamental understandings of catalytic CO oxidation reactions.

  12. Inclusion property and Diels-Alder reaction of bis (diphenyl-phosphine oxide) butadiyne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Ming-Xia(李明霞); LI, Jin-Liang(李金亮); WANG, Yong-Mei(王永梅); MENG, Ji-Ben(孟继本)

    2000-01-01

    The host molecule, bis( diphenylphosphine oxide ) butadiyne (2), includes a variety of guests to form five complexes (2a-2e). In addition, the Diels-Alder reaction between 2 and anthracene gives 9, 9', 10, 10'-tetrahedron-9, 9', 10, 10'-bi-ethenoantracene- 11, 11'-bis ( diphenylphosphine oxide ) ( 3 )which is a potential di-π-methane reactant and can undergo photorearrangement.

  13. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  15. Interfacial Reactions of Metal Oxide Stack Dielectrics Studied with Medium Energy Ion Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, M.; Reuter, M. C.; Cartier, E.; Callegari, A.; Guha, S.; Gousev, E. P.; Jamison, P.; Narayanan, V.; Neumayer, D.

    2003-03-01

    Application of a metal oxide as a gate dielectric for Si CMOS requires an understanding of the materials reactions that occur with thermal processing. A number of metal oxides have been examined for use as a gate dielectric, with varying degrees of reactivity. Reactions between Y and La oxides and SiO2 are facile, forming interfacial silicates that can extend many nanometers. For the case of Y_2O_3, this reaction can completely consume an SiO2 or SiO_xNy buffer layer, resulting in a silicate/Si(001) interface with no interfacial layer detectable by medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). In contrast, Zr and Hf oxides tend to remain unmixed with SiO_2, due to either sluggish kinetics or instability of the silicates. Interfacial reaction zones can be extremely limited, extending less than 1 nanometer for chemically deposited films. We will report MEIS results for gate dielectric stacks, using in situ processing to illustrate the materials reactions that are commonly encountered.

  16. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  17. The influence of reactive side products in electrocatalytic reactions: methanol oxidation as case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Robert; Schnaidt, Johannes; Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, R Jürgen

    2013-11-11

    The role and impact of follow-up processes involving reactive side products in an electrocatalytic reaction is demonstrated for the electrooxidation of methanol at a Pt electrode. By using combined in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry and employing isotope-labeling techniques, it is shown that even small amounts of the incomplete oxidation products formaldehyde and formic acid have pronounced effects on the reaction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Influence of reaction parameters on the synthesis of surfactant-assisted tin oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; ADNAN, Prisca TAN and Rohana

    2012-01-01

    Tin oxide nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal method using a non-ionic surfactant, oleyl amine (OLM), in the presence of urea. The reactions were carried out at different calcination temperatures and varying concentrations of surfactant and urea. The effect of these reaction parameters on the particles' size, distribution, surface area, and the average pore diameter were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electro...

  19. On the activation energy of the formic acid oxidation reaction on platinum electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Perales-Rondón, Juan V.; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    A temperature dependent study on the formic acid oxidation reaction has been carried out in order to determine the activation energy of this reaction on different platinum single crystal electrodes, namely Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 1), Pt(5 5 4) and Pt(5 4 4) surfaces. The chronoamperometric transients obtained with pulsed voltammetry have been analyzed to determine the current densities through the active intermediate and the CO formation rate. From the temperature dependency of those parameters, th...

  20. Seasonal variability of atmospheric nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbons at the GEOSummit station, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Kramer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric NOx (NOx = NO + NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, NOy and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC were taken at the GEOSummit Station, Greenland (72.34° N, 38.29° W, 3212 m.a.s.l from July 2008 to July 2010. The data set represents the first year-round concurrent record of these compounds sampled at a high latitude Arctic site in the free troposphere. Here, the study focused on the seasonal variability of these important ozone (O3 precursors in the Arctic free troposphere and the impact from transported anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions. Our analysis shows that PAN is the dominant NOy species in all seasons at Summit, varying from 49% to 78%, however, we find that odd NOy species (odd NOy = NOy − PAN-NOx contribute a large amount to the total NOy speciation with monthly means of up to 95 pmol mol−1 in the winter and ∼40 pmol mol−1 in the summer, and that the level of odd NOy species at Summit during summer is greater than that of NOx. We hypothesize that the source of this odd NOy is most likely alkyl nitrates from transported pollution, and photochemically produced species such as HNO3 and HONO. FLEXPART retroplume analysis and tracers for anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, were used to identify periods when the site was impacted by polluted air masses. Europe contributed the largest source of anthropogenic emissions during the winter and spring months, with up to 82% of the simulated anthropogenic black carbon originating from this region between December 2009 and March 2010, whereas, North America was the primary source of biomass burning emissions. Polluted air masses were typically aged, with median transport times to the site from the source region of 11 days for anthropogenic events in winter, and 14 days for BB plumes. Overall we find that the transport of polluted air masses to the high altitude Arctic typically resulted in high variability in levels of O3 and O3 precursors. During winter

  1. An investigation of oxidation products and SOA yields from OH + pesticide reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murschell, T.; Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Pesticides are used globally in agricultural and residential areas. After application and/or volatilization from a surface, these compounds can be transported over long distances in the atmosphere. However, their chemical fate, including oxidation and gas-particle partitioning in the atmosphere, is not well understood. We present gas and particle measurements of oxidation products from pesticide + OH reactions using a dynamic solution injection system coupled to an Oxidative Flow Reactor. Products were detected with a High Resolution Time of Flight Iodide Chemical Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) and a Size Mobility Particle Scanner (SMPS). The OFR allows pesticides to react with variable OH radical exposures, ranging from the equivalent of one day to a full week of atmospheric oxidative aging. In this work, we explore pesticide oxidation products from reaction with OH and ozone, and compare those products to photolysis reactions. Pesticides of similar chemical structures were explored, including acetochlor / metolachlor and permethrin / cypermethrin, to explore mechanistic differences. We present chemical parameters including average product oxidation state, average oxygen to carbon ratio, and potential secondary organic aerosol formation for each of these compounds.

  2. Unexpected Scholl Reaction of 6,7,13,14-Tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene: Selective Formation of Five-Membered Rings in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzhi; Narita, Akimitsu; Osella, Silvio; Zhang, Wen; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Beljonne, David; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-03-02

    Cyclodehydrogenation is a versatile reaction that has enabled the syntheses of numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We now describe a unique Scholl reaction of 6,7,13,14-tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene, which "unexpectedly" forms five-membered rings accompanying highly selective 1,2-shift of aryl groups. The geometric and optoelectronic nature of the resulting bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is comprehensively investigated by single-crystal X-ray, NMR, UV-vis absorption, and cyclic voltammetry analyses. Furthermore, a possible mechanism is proposed to account for the selective five-membered-ring formation with the rearrangement of the aryl groups, which can be rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The theoretical results suggest that the formation of the bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is kinetically controlled while an "expected" product with six-membered rings is thermodynamically more favored. These experimental and theoretical results provide further insights into the still controversial mechanism of the Scholl reaction as well as open up an unprecedented entry to extend the variety of PAHs by programing otherwise unpredictable rearrangements during the Scholl reaction.

  3. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  4. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene o

  5. Enhanced ethanol electro-oxidation reaction on carbon supported Pd-metal oxide electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hameed, R M

    2017-11-01

    Various Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts were fabricated using ethylene glycol as a reducing agent in modified microwave-assisted polyol process. The crystal structure and surface morphology were studied using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. All prepared Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts exhibited a shift of Pd diffraction planes in the positive direction in relation to that of Pd/C. Highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles were formed on different metal oxide/C supports. The electrocatalytic performance of these electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation was examined in NaOH solution using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. An improvement in electrochemical parameters including onset potential, oxidation current density and If/Ib values was recorded at different Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts, especially Pd-NiO/C. Three folds increment in steady state oxidation current density value was also displayed by investigated Pd-metal oxide/C electrocatalysts when contrasted to that of Pd/C to reflect their enhanced stability behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Gaseous species as reaction tracers in the solvothermal synthesis of the zinc oxide terephthalate MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorf, Steffen; Baitalow, Felix; Seidel, Jürgen; Mertens, Florian O R L

    2007-05-24

    Gaseous species emitted during the zinc oxide/zinc hydroxide 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate metal organic framework synthesis (MOF-5, MOF-69c) have been used to investigate the reaction scheme that leads to the framework creation. Changes of the gas-phase composition over time indicate that the decomposition of the solvent diethylformamide occurs at least via two competing reaction pathways that can be linked to the reaction's overall water and pH management. From isotope exchange experiments, we deduce that one of the decomposition pathways leads to the removal of water from the reaction mixture, which sets the conditions when the synthesis of an oxide-based (MOF-5) instead of an hydroxide-based MOF (MOF-69c) occurs. A quantitative account of most reactants and byproducts before and after the MOF-5/MOF-69c synthesis is presented. From the investigation of the reaction intermediates and byproducts, we derive a proposal of a basic reaction scheme for the standard synthesis zinc oxide carboxylate MOFs.

  8. Fenton's reagent as a remediation process in water treatment: application to the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters and sewage sludges; La reaction de fenton comme procede de rehabilitation dans le traitement des eaux: application a la degradation des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques dans les eaux et les boues residuaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotron, V.

    2004-05-15

    This study is related to the application of Fenton's reagent to remedy matrices contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In aqueous solution, the choice of the reagent implementation is important, in order to generate enough radicals to oxidize pollutants. Degradation of the organic compounds is possible, but a large difference in reactivity is observed between 'alternant' and 'non-alternant' PAHs (with a five carbon atoms cycle). Besides, if a few specific precautions are omitted, the PAHs can sorb onto the flask inside surface, and therefore not undergo oxidation. The results on sewage sludges show that under certain conditions (high reagent concentrations), the pollutants can be oxidised although they are adsorbed. Moreover, it appears that the matrix itself plays an important role, as the iron oxides seem to be able to decompose hydrogen peroxide, and thus initiate Fenton reaction. Its application to contaminated soils and sediments is also possible. (author)

  9. Sulphation reactions of oxidic dust particles in waste heat boiler environment. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranki, T.

    1999-09-01

    Sulphation of metal oxides has an important role in many industrial processes. In different applications sulphation reactions have different aims and characteristics. In the flash smelting process sulphation of oxidic flue dust is a spontaneous and inevitable phenomena, which takes place in the waste heat boiler (WHB) when cooling down hot dust laden off-gases from sulphide smelters. Oxidic dust particles (size 0 - 50 {mu}m) react with O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} in a certain temperature range (500 - 800 deg C). Sulphation reactions are highly exothermic releasing large amount of heat, which affects the gas cooling and thermal performance of the boiler. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the system have to be known to improve the process and WHB operation. The rate of sulphation is affected by the prevailing conditions (temperature, gas composition) and particle size and microstructure (porosity, surface area). Some metal oxides (CuO) can react readily with SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and act as self-catalysts, but others (NiO) require the presence of an external catalyst to enhance the SO{sub 3} formation and sulphation to proceed. Some oxides (NiO) sulphate directly, some (CuO) may form first intermediate phases (basic sulphates) depending on the reaction conditions. Thus, the reaction mechanisms are very complex. The aim of this report was to search information about the factors affecting the dust sulphation reactions and suggested reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Many investigators have studied sulphation thermodynamics and reaction kinetics and mechanisms of macroscopical metal oxide pieces, but only few articles have been published about sulphation of microscopical particles, like dust. All the found microscale studies dealt with sulphation reactions of calcium oxide, which is not present in the flash smelting process, but used as an SO{sub 2} absorbent in the combustion processes. However, also these investigations may give some hints about the sulphation

  10. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  11. Reactions of lactones with tropospheric oxidants: A kinetics and products study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M. P.; Sharma, A.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric lifetimes of two lactones, gamma-valerolactone (GVL) and alpha-methyl gamma-butyrolactone (AMGBL) in terms of their reactions with two important tropospheric oxidants- OH and Cl - are estimated, after determining the respective rate coefficients of their reactions in the gas phase using relative rate method. Values of the rate coefficients of the reactions of GVL (kOH = (1.95 ± 0.58) x 10-12; kCl = 2.26 ± 0.53 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) and AMGBL (kOH = 1.81 ± 0.43 × 10-12; kCl = 3.42 ± 0.63 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) at 298 K imply that reaction with OH is the dominant reaction in the ambient conditions, and that reaction with Cl atom becomes relevant under marine boundary layer (MBL) conditions, reducing the tropospheric lifetimes to almost half. The tropospheric life times of GVL and AMGBL based on their reaction with OH under ambient conditions are comparable, 71.2 and 76.7 h respectively. However, the products of the reactions are found to be different. In GVL, a promising second generation biofuel component, only ring opening reactions are important, acetic acid and CO2 being the only observed volatile products. In AMGBL, additional ring oxidized products are also formed, of which 3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione is the most dominant one. The absence of such ring oxidized products in GVL is assigned to the difference in the preferred position of H atom abstraction, based on the computed rate coefficients of individual channels reported in the literature. This suggests that the impact in terms of aerosol generation in the troposphere may also be different for GVL and AMGBL, which differ only in the position of methyl substitution.

  12. Experimental Study on Reaction Energy Release Characteristics of Hydrocarbon and Chlorine Trifluoride%三氟化氯与碳氢燃料反应放能试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪泉; 卢芳云; 王少龙; 罗永锋; 闫华; 刘志勇

    2011-01-01

    Using a designed experimental device,explosion experiments of hydrocarbon with chlorine trifluoride in confined space were carried out,based on the analysis of the hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride reaction mechanism. The energy released from the reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride without oxygen was calculated based on experimental results. Results show that (1) The reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride accompanies an intense release of great deal of energy,so that part of the hydrocarbon is vaporized and dispersed,a violent deflagrating would be ignited once the vaporized hydrocarbon be mixed with the air. (2) The TNT equivalence of the explosion reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride without oxygen is about 1.8.%在对三氟化氯与碳氢燃料反应机理进行分析的基础上,进行了密闭环境下三氟化氯与碳氢燃料的反应放能试验研究.结果表明:三氟化氯与碳氢燃料可以发生剧烈反应,释放大量的能量,将碳氢燃料部分雾化并喷出密闭空间,激活的碳氢燃料一旦接触空气,便诱发碳氢燃料的剧烈爆燃;在无氧条件下,三氟化氯与碳氢燃料爆炸反应所释放的能量相当于1.8倍TNT当量.

  13. Reaction pattern and mechanism of light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot; Kühn, Philipp

    2007-06-01

    This mini review is an attempt to briefly summarize our current knowledge on light driven oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis. The reaction leading to molecular oxygen and four protons via photosynthesis comprises thermodynamic and kinetic constraints that require a balanced fine tuning of the reaction coordinates. The mode of coupling between electron (ET) and proton transfer (PT) reactions is shown to be of key mechanistic relevance for the redox turnover of Y(Z) and the reactions within the WOC. The WOC is characterized by peculiar energetics of its oxidation steps in the WOC. In all oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms the redox state S(1) is thermodynamically most stable and therefore this general feature is assumed to be of physiological relevance. Available information on the Gibbs energy differences between the individual redox states S(i+1) and S(i) and on the activation energies of their oxidative transitions are used to construct a general reaction coordinate of oxidative water splitting in photosystem II (PS II). Finally, an attempt is presented to cast our current state of knowledge into a mechanism of oxidative water splitting with special emphasis on the formation of the essential O-O bond and the active role of the protein environment in tuning the local proton activity that depends on time and redox state S(i). The O-O linkage is assumed to take place within a multistate equilibrium at the redox level of S(3), comprising both redox isomerism and proton tautomerism. It is proposed that one state, S(3)(P), attains an electronic configuration and nuclear geometry that corresponds with a hydrogen bonded peroxide which acts as the entatic state for the generation of complexed molecular oxygen through S(3)(P) oxidation by Y(Z)(ox).

  14. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Redmond, Molly C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Valentine, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane and CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems.

  15. Catalytic Reaction Synthesis for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Galindo, Maria-Guadalupe

    Catalytic reaction synthesis for the partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde has been studied by combining microkinetic analysis with molecular orbital calculations. This strategy is used to establish microscopic correlations between the structure and composition of the active site and the kinetic parameters of the reaction mechanism. Using atom clusters to represent the active site of transition metal oxide catalysts, the relationship was probed between coordination number, oxidation state, and ionization potential of the active cation and the reaction steps of methane activation and surface reactions leading to formaldehyde formation. The analysis suggests that in transition metal oxide catalysts, the d-band orbitals of the metal cation should be empty, since otherwise CO_2 formation from CO oxidation will be excessive. Furthermore, the transition metal oxide d-band must be located at sufficiently low energy that it may accept electrons during methane activation. Oxygen O- species, representing vacancies in the 2p cluster band, will favor methane activation. However, clusters with fully occupied 2p bands (O^ {2-}^ecies) will favor formaldehyde production. Such inferences illustrate how experimental and theoretical information already incorporated into an existing microkinetic model for the reaction over V _2O_5 and MoO _3 catalysts can be extended to describe the reaction over new materials in the search for more active and selective catalysts. Using parameters estimated from the molecular orbital calculations, microkinetic reaction simulations were also shown to be useful to identify reactor operating conditions that may favor the production of formaldehyde. The simulation can be used to identify key experiments necessary to test the performance of postulated catalytic materials. The economic evaluation of the process design sets important target goals for methane conversion and formaldehyde selectivity that a catalytic material must satisfy to create a new

  16. Electrochemistry coupled to (LC-)MS for the simulation of oxidative biotransformation reactions of PAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Tina; Seidel, Albrecht; Karst, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry was used for simulating the biological and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as for studying the PAH degradation behavior during electrochemical remediation. Pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene were selected as model compounds and oxidized within an electrochemical thin-layer cell equipped with boron-doped diamond electrode. At potentials of 1.2 and 1.6 V vs. Pd/H2, quinones were found to be the major oxidation products for both investigated PAHs. These quinones belong to a large group of PAH derivatives referred to as oxygenated PAHs, which have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their high abundance in the environment and their significant toxicity. Separation of oxidation products allowed the identification of two pyrene quinone and three benzo[a]pyrene quinone isomers, all of which are known to be formed via photooxidation and during mammalian metabolism. The good correlation between electrochemically generated PAH quinones and those formed in natural processes was also confirmed by UV irradiation experiments and microsomal incubations. At potentials higher than 2.0 V, further degradation of the initial oxidation products was observed which highlights the capability of electrochemistry to be used as remediation technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene oxide-enzyme layers present in the nanostructure. The fGO-TvL nanoassemblies exhibit an enhanced thermal stability at 60 °C, as demonstrated by a 4.7-fold higher activity as compared to the free enz...

  18. Promotional effect of upper Ru oxides as methanol tolerant electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montiel, M.; Hernandez-Fernandez, P.; Ocon, P. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada C-II, Campus UAM, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fierro, J.L.G.; Rojas, S. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    The role of Ru on the oxygen reduction reaction in the presence of methanol has been investigated. To this end a series of carbon supported Pt based electrocatalysts containing Ru and Co have been prepared and thoroughly characterized. The catalytic performance on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) both in the presence and in the absence of methanol by linear sweep voltammetry on rotating disk electrode has been studied. In spite of its documented ability towards methanol and CO oxidation, when Ru-containing catalysts are subjected to excursions to potentials more positive than 0.8 V vs. NHE they develop a certain tolerance to the presence of methanol. This feature is attributed to the formation of upper oxide Ru species that impede the methanol oxidation reaction to occur under the typical reaction conditions of the oxygen reduction process, i.e. potentials more positive than 0.7 V vs. NHE and oxygen saturated atmospheres. The evolution of Ru species with the applied potential has been investigated by XPS, identifying the presence of upper oxidized Ru phases. (author)

  19. Porphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Heterogeneous Catalysts in Oxidation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla F; Simões, Mário M Q; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-10-12

    Porphyrin-based Metal-Organic Frameworks (Por-MOFs) constitute a special branch of the wide MOF family that has proven its own value and high potential in different applications. In this mini-review the application of these materials as catalysts in oxidation reactions is highlighted.

  20. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  1. Influence of Adsorbed Water on the Oxygen Evolution Reaction on Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    We study the interface between adsorbed water and stoichiometric, defect-free (110) rutile oxide surfaces of TiO2, RuO2, and IrO2 in order to understand how water influences the stabilities of the intermediates of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In our model the water is treated as explicitl...

  2. Oxidation induced ionization and reactions of metal carbide clusters (Nb, Zr, V, Ta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, H. T.; Kerns, K. P.; Bell, R. C.; Castleman, A. W.

    1997-11-01

    Following our recent report of the oxidation induced formation of Ti8C12+ (H.T. Deng, K.P. Kerns, and A.W. Castleman, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 4862), the oxidation induced ionization of niobium and zirconium carbide clusters are studied using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a laser induced plasma reaction source. It was found that reactions of both of these neutral carbide clusters with dioxygen leads to formation of carbide ions. The ion product distributions show that zirconium carbide clusters mainly take the form of Met--Car cations, but niobium carbide clusters favor a cubic-like crystalline pattern. Furthermore, reactions of mass-selected NbxCy+ with dioxygen result in a sequential loss of C2 units from NbxCy+, and leads to formation of Nbx+ and NbxC+ depending on y being an even or odd number. However, NbxCy+ shows comparably low reactivity towards nitrous oxide through a single oxygen abstraction mechanism. In comparison with the reaction products of VxCy+ with dioxygen, the complementary information obtained in the present study suggests that the C2 unit is a basic building block for formation of small early transition metal carbide clusters. The oxidation induced ionization mechanisms are also discussed in relation with the stability, ionization potentials, and structures of the clusters.

  3. In vitro mimicry of metabolic oxidation reactions by electrochemistry/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurva, U; Wikstrom, HV; Bruins, AP

    2000-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to investigate the scope and limitations of electrochemistry on-line with mass spectrometry as a quick and convenient way to mimic phase I:oxidative reactions in drug metabolism. A compound with previously reported in vitro and in vivo metabolism, the dopamine agonist 2-

  4. Porphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Heterogeneous Catalysts in Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrin-based Metal-Organic Frameworks (Por-MOFs constitute a special branch of the wide MOF family that has proven its own value and high potential in different applications. In this mini-review the application of these materials as catalysts in oxidation reactions is highlighted.

  5. Iron(III Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana L. H. Rebelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H2TPFPP and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPPCl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPPCl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H2TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPPCl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(IIIporphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide and green solvent (ethanol. Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  6. Surface electronic structure and isomerization reactions of alkanes on some transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrib, A.; Logie, V.; Saurel, N.; Wehrer, P.; Hilaire, L.; Maire, G.

    1997-04-01

    XP spectra of some reduced transition metal oxides are presented. Different number of free nd,( n + 1)s valence electrons in each case could be observed by the presence of a certain density of states (DOS) at the Fermi-level in the valence band (VB) energy region of the XP spectrum. Catalytic isomerization reactions of 2-methylpentane yielding 3-methylpentane and n-hexane at 350°C have been observed on these reduced valence surface states. The bifunctionel mechanism in terms of metallic and acidic sites required for such reactions is proposed by considering the metallic properties of the rutile deformed structure through the C-axis in the case of MoO 2 and WO 2, while the oxygen atom(s) in the lattice structure exhibit Brönsted acidic properties. On the other hand, highly reduced or clean surfaces of these transition metals yield hydrogenolysis catalytic reactions for the same reactant with methane as the major product. In all cases, the exposure of the lower valence oxidation states of bulk transition metal oxides to air results in the surface partial oxidation to the stable oxides such as MoO 3, WO 3, V 2O 5 and Nb 2O 5.

  7. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-04-12

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  8. On the biologic role of the reaction of NO with oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Fernando; Boveris, Alberto; Cadenas, Enrique

    2007-10-01

    The inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX) by nitric oxide (NO) is analyzed with a mathematical model that simulates the metabolism in vivo. The main results were the following: (a) We derived novel equations for the catalysis of CcOX that can be used to predict CcOX inhibition in any tissue for any [NO] or [O(2)]; (b) Competitive inhibition (resulting from the reversible binding of NO to reduced CcOX) emerges has the sole relevant component of CcOX inhibition under state 3 in vivo; (c) In state 4, contribution of uncompetitive inhibition (resulting from the reaction of oxidized CcOX with NO) represents a significant nonmajority fraction of inhibition, being favored by high [O(2)]; and (d) The main biologic role of the reaction between NO and oxidized CcOX is to consume NO. By reducing [NO], this reaction stimulates, rather than inhibits, respiration. Finally, we propose that the biologic role of NO as an inhibitor of CcOX is twofold: in state 4, it avoids an excessive buildup of mitochondrial membrane potential that triggers rapid production of oxidants, and in state 3, increases the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing the ADP/O ratio, supporting the therapeutic use of NO in situations in which mitochondria are dysfunctional.

  9. Effect of magnetic field on the zero valent iron induced oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-hyo; Kim, Jungwon; Choi, Wonyong

    2011-08-30

    The magnetic field (MF) effect on the zero valent iron (ZVI) induced oxidative reaction was investigated for the first time. The degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in the ZVI system was employed as the test oxidative reaction. MF markedly enhanced the degradation of 4-CP with the concurrent production of chlorides. The consumption of dissolved O(2) by ZVI reaction was also enhanced in the presence of MF whereas the competing reaction of H(2) production from proton reduction was retarded. Since the ZVI-induced oxidation is mainly driven by the in situ generated hydroxyl radicals, the production of OH radicals was monitored by the spin trap method using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. It was confirmed that the concentration of trapped OH radicals was enhanced in the presence of MF. Since both O(2) and Fe(0) are paramagnetic, the diffusion of O(2) onto the iron surface might be accelerated under MF. The magnetized iron can attract oxygen on itself, which makes the mass transfer process faster. As a result, the surface electrochemical reaction between Fe(0) and O(2) can be accelerated with the enhanced production of OH radicals. MF might retard the recombination of OH radicals as well.

  10. Women are more susceptible than men to oxidative stress and chromosome damage caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huan; Huang, Kun; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Wangzhen; Guan, Lei; Kuang, Dan; Deng, Qifei; Deng, Huaxin; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Christiani, David; Wu, Tangchun

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been associated with increased risk of cancer, but evidence for gender differences in this association is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the gender differences in PAHs caused early genotoxic effects such as oxidative stress and chromosome damage, which are potential carcinogenic etiology of PAHs. A total of 478 nonsmoking workers (272 men and 206 women) from a coke oven plant were recruited. We determined 16 environmental PAHs in their workplaces, and measured concentrations of 12 urinary PAH metabolites (OH-PAHs), plasma benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydotetrol-albumin (BPDE-Alb) adducts, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α), and micronucleus frequencies in lymphocytes in all subjects. It showed that, women working at the office, adjacent to the coke oven, and on the bottom or side of the coke oven displayed significantly higher levels of urinary 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α, and lymphocytic micronucleus frequencies compared with men working at above areas, respectively (all P PAHs or plasma BPDE-Alb adducts. A significant interaction existed between gender and BPDE-Alb adducts on increasing micronucleus frequencies (Pinteraction  PAHs or plasma BPDE-Alb adducts, and the above gender differences were more evident in the median- and high-exposure groups (all P PAHs, which may add potential evidence underlying gender differences in PAH exposure-related lung cacinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Oxidative IonsWith Decoloring Reaction Using HCPCF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zongyan; NIU Jiwei; WANG Shuwen; GONG Xiaoming; KOU Mingze

    2001-01-01

    @@ HCPCF is a color reagent for the determination of vanadium, zinc and magnesium, etc. To the best of our knowledge, no work on the decoloring reaction for analytical use of HCPCF for the determination of oxidative anions has been report. In this work, we found that some oxidative anions can oxidize HCPCF in acid medium, forming a colorless product. In addition, surfactant was used in this work, because of the low solubility of HCPCF in aqueous solutions. The purpose of this work is to establish a new, rapid and simple spectrophotometric method for the determination of NO2-, BrO3-,IO3-, IO4-and Cr2O7-based on the reaction between HCPCF and analytes in the presence of emulsion OP.

  12. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Oxidative IonsWith Decoloring Reaction Using HCPCF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU; Zongyan

    2001-01-01

    HCPCF is a color reagent for the determination of vanadium, zinc and magnesium, etc. To the best of our knowledge, no work on the decoloring reaction for analytical use of HCPCF for the determination of oxidative anions has been report. In this work, we found that some oxidative anions can oxidize HCPCF in acid medium, forming a colorless product. In addition, surfactant was used in this work, because of the low solubility of HCPCF in aqueous solutions. The purpose of this work is to establish a new, rapid and simple spectrophotometric method for the determination of NO2-, BrO3-,IO3-, IO4-and Cr2O7-based on the reaction between HCPCF and analytes in the presence of emulsion OP.……

  13. Electrocatalysis of hydrogen peroxide reactions on perovskite oxides: experiment versus kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, T; Bonnefont, A; Ryabova, A; Kéranguéven, G; Tsirlina, G A; Savinova, E R

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a stable intermediate of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction on various electrodes including metal, metal oxide and carbon materials. In this article we study the hydrogen peroxide oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) method on oxides of the perovskite family (LaCoO3, LaMnO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) which are considered as promising electrocatalytic materials for the cathode of liquid and solid alkaline fuel cells. The experimental findings, such as the higher activity of Mn-compared to that of Co-perovskites, the shape of RDE curves, and the influence of the H2O2 concentration, are rationalized with the help of a microkinetic model.

  14. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system.

  15. Synthesis of propylene carbonate from urea and propylene glycol over zinc oxide: A homogeneous reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, several metal oxides and zinc salts were used to catalyze propylene carbonate (PC synthesis from urea and propylene glycol (PG. According to the results of catalytic test and characterization, the catalytic pattern of ZnO was different from that of other metal oxides such as CaO, MgO and La2O3, but similar to that of zinc salts. In fact, the leaching of Zn species took place during reaction for ZnO. And ZnO was found to be the precursor of homogenous catalyst for reaction of urea and PG. Thus, the relationship between the amount of dissolved zinc species and the catalytic performance of employed ZnO was revealed. In addition, a possible reaction mechanism over ZnO was discussed based on the catalytic runs and the characterization of XRD, FTIR, and element analysis.

  16. Effect of magnetic field on the zero valent iron induced oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-hyo; Kim, Jungwon [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Scienceand Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wonyong, E-mail: wchoi@postech.edu [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Scienceand Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} We investigate the zero valent iron induced oxidation in the presence of magnetic field. {yields} The oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol is enhanced by the magnetic field. {yields} ESR measurement confirms that more OH radicals are generated in the presence of magnetic field. {yields} The magnetic field affects the mass transfer of O{sub 2} and the recombination of radicals. - Abstract: The magnetic field (MF) effect on the zero valent iron (ZVI) induced oxidative reaction was investigated for the first time. The degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in the ZVI system was employed as the test oxidative reaction. MF markedly enhanced the degradation of 4-CP with the concurrent production of chlorides. The consumption of dissolved O{sub 2} by ZVI reaction was also enhanced in the presence of MF whereas the competing reaction of H{sub 2} production from proton reduction was retarded. Since the ZVI-induced oxidation is mainly driven by the in situ generated hydroxyl radicals, the production of OH radicals was monitored by the spin trap method using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. It was confirmed that the concentration of trapped OH radicals was enhanced in the presence of MF. Since both O{sub 2} and Fe{sup 0} are paramagnetic, the diffusion of O{sub 2} onto the iron surface might be accelerated under MF. The magnetized iron can attract oxygen on itself, which makes the mass transfer process faster. As a result, the surface electrochemical reaction between Fe{sup 0} and O{sub 2} can be accelerated with the enhanced production of OH radicals. MF might retard the recombination of OH radicals as well.

  17. Oxidation of triclosan by ferrate: Reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Bin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guang-guo.ying@csiro.au [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao Jianliang; Zhang Lijuan; Fang Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Nghiem, Long Duc [School of Civil Mining and Environmental Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Triclosan reacted rapidly with ferrate. {yields} Oxidation resulted in a decrease in algal toxicity. {yields} No inhibition of algae growth from ferrate. - Abstract: The oxidation of triclosan by commercial grade aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) was investigated and the reaction kinetics as a function of pH (7.0-10.0) were experimentally determined. Intermediate products of the oxidation process were characterized using both GC-MS and RRLC-MS/MS techniques. Changes in toxicity during the oxidation process of triclosan using Fe(VI) were investigated using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth inhibition tests. The results show that triclosan reacted rapidly with Fe(VI), with the apparent second-order rate constant, k{sub app}, being 754.7 M{sup -1} s{sup -1} at pH 7. At a stoichiometric ratio of 10:1 (Fe(VI):triclosan), complete removal of triclosan was achieved. Species-specific rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of Fe(VI) with both the protonated and deprotonated triclosan species. The value of k determined for neutral triclosan was 6.7({+-}1.9) x 10{sup 2} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while that measured for anionic triclosan was 7.6({+-}0.6) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The proposed mechanism for the oxidation of triclosan by the Fe(VI) involves the scission of ether bond and phenoxy radical addition reaction. Coupling reaction may also occur during Fe(VI) degradation of triclosan. Overall, the degradation processes of triclosan resulted in a significant decrease in algal toxicity. The toxicity tests showed that Fe(VI) itself dosed in the reaction did not inhibit green algae growth.

  18. Strategies for catalyst development: possibilities of the ``rational approach`` illustrated with partial oxidation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.; Schedel-Niedrig, T.; Schloegl, R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Oberflaechenphysik

    1998-12-31

    The paper discusses two petrochemical selective oxidation reactions namely the practised formation of styrene (STY) and the desired oxidative functionalisation of propane. The present knowledge about the mode of operation of oxide catalysts is critically considered. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) should be described by an oxidehydration with water acting as oxidant. The potential role of the coke formed during catalytic reaction as co-catalyst will be discussed. Selective oxidation is connected with the participation of lattice oxygen mechanism which transforms unselective gas phase oxygen into selective oxygen. The atomistic description of this process is still quite unclear as well as the electron structural properties of the activated oxygen atom. The Role of solid state acidity as compared to the role of lattice oxygen is much less well investigated modern multiphase-multielement oxide (MMO) catalysts. The rationale is that the significant efforts made to improve current MMO systems by chemical modifications can be very much more fruitful when in a first step the mode of action of a catalyst is clarified on the basis of suitable experiments. Such time-consuming experiments at the beginning of a campaign for catalyst improvement pay back their investment in later stages of the project when strategies of chemical development can be derived on grounds of understanding. (orig.)

  19. Electrochemical reaction and oxidation of lecithin under pulsed electric fields (PEF) processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Ruijin; Liang, Qi; Zhang, Wenbin; Hua, Xiao; Tang, Yali

    2012-12-12

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) processing is a promising nonthermal food preservation technology, which is ongoing from laboratory and pilot plant scale levels to the industrial level. Currently, greater attention has been paid to side effects occurring during PEF treatment and the influences on food qualities and food components. The present study investigated the electrochemical reaction and oxidation of lecithin under PEF processing. Results showed that electrochemical reaction of NaCl solutions at different pH values occurred during PEF processing. Active chlorine, reactive oxygen, and free radicals were detected, which were related to the PEF parameters and pH values of the solution. Lecithin extracted from yolk was further selected to investigate the oxidation of food lipids under PEF processing, confirming the occurrence of oxidation of lecithin under PEF treatment. The oxidative agents induced by PEF might be responsible for the oxidation of extracted yolk lecithin. Moreover, this study found that vitamin C as a natural antioxidant could effectively quench free radicals and inhibit the oxidation of lipid in NaCl and lecithin solutions as model systems under PEF processing, representing a way to minimize the impact of PEF treatment on food qualities.

  20. Hydrogen production with short contact time. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds: Recent advances in pilot- and bench-scale testing and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarinoni, A.; Ponzo, R.; Basini, L. [ENI Refining and Marketing Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    ENI R and D has been active for fifteen years in the development of Short Contact Time - Catalytic Partial Oxidation (SCT-CPO) technologies for producing Hydrogen/Synthesis Gas. From the beginning the experimental work addressed either at defining the fundamental principles or the technical and economical potential of the technology. Good experimental responses, technical solutions' simplicity and flexibility, favourable techno-economical evaluations promoted the progressive widening of the field of the investigations. From Natural Gas (NG) the range of ''processable'' Hydrocarbons extended to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Gasoils, including those characterised by high levels of unsaturated and sulphurated molecules and, lately, to other compounds with biological origin. The extensive work led to the definition of different technological solutions, grouped as follows: Technology 1: Air Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 2: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 3: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Liquid Hydrocarbons and/or Compounds with biological origin Recently, the licence rights on a non-exclusive basis for the commercialisation of SCT-CPO based processes for H{sub 2}/Synthesis gas production from light hydrocarbons with production capacity lower than 5,000 Nm{sup 3}/h of H{sub 2} or 7,500 Nm3/h of syngas have been assigned to two external companies. In parallel, development of medium- and large-scale plant solutions is progressing within the ENI group framework. These last activities are addressed to the utilisation of SCT-CPO for matching the variable Hydrogen demand in several contexts of oil refining operation. This paper will report on the current status of SCT-CPO with a focus on experimental results obtained, either at pilot- and bench- scale level. (orig.)

  1. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation at circumneutral pH: Reaction kinetics, mineral products, and distribution of neutrophilic iron oxidizers in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizers can conserve energy from Fe(II) oxidation, however, it is still unclear how they can compete against the fast abiotic reaction at neutral pH, or to which extent these bacteria increase the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate. Similar to

  2. Lipoxidation products as biomarkers of oxidative damage to proteins during lipid peroxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, J R; Fu, M X; Ahmed, M U; Jenkins, A J; Lyons, T J; Thorpe, S R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disease processes including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischaemia reperfusion injury and rheumatoid arthritis. Chemical modification of amino acids in protein during lipid peroxidation results in the formation of lipoxidation products which may serve as indicators of oxidative stress in vivo. The focus of the studies described here was initially to identify chemical modifications of protein derived exclusively from lipids in order to assess the role of lipid peroxidative damage in the pathogenesis of disease. Malondialdehye (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are well characterized oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and adducts of these compounds have been detected by immunological means in atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, we first developed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays for the Schiff base adduct of MDA to lysine, the lysine-MDA-lysine diimine cross-link and the Michael addition product of HNE to lysine. Using these assays, we showed that the concentrations of all three compounds increased significantly in LDL during metal-catalysed oxidation in vitro. The concentration of the advanced glycation end-product N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) also increased during LDL oxidation, while that of its putative carbohydrate precursor the Amadori compound N epsilon-(1-deoxyfructose-1-yl)lysine did not change, demonstrating that CML is a marker of both glycoxidation and lipoxidation reactions. These results suggest that MDA and HNE adducts to lysine residues should serve as biomarkers of lipid modification resulting from lipid peroxidation reactions, while CML may serve as a biomarker of general oxidative stress resulting from both carbohydrate and lipid oxidation reactions.

  3. Mathematical modeling of an exothermic leaching reaction system: pressure oxidation of wide size arsenopyrite participates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papangelakis, V. G.; Berk, D.; Demopoulos, G. P.

    1990-10-01

    In the design of processes involving exothermic reactions, as is the case of several sulfide leaching systems, it is desirable to utilize the energy liberated by the reaction to drive the reactor toward autogenous operation. For optimal reactor design, models which couple leaching kinetics and heat effects are needed. In this paper, the principles of modeling exothermic leaching reactions are outlined. The system investigated is the high-temperature (160 °C to 200 °C) pressure (O2) oxidation of arsenopyrite (FeAsS). The reaction system is characterized by three consecutive reactions: (1) heterogeneous dissolution of arsenopyrite particles, (2) homogeneous oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III), and (3) precipitation of scorodite (FeAsO4-2H2O). The overall kinetics is controlled by the arsenopyrite surface reaction. There was good agreement between laboratory-scale batch tests and model predictions. The model was expanded to simulate the performance of large-scale batch and single-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the same rate-limiting regime. Emphasis is given to the identification of steady-state temperatures for autogenous processing. The effects of operating variables, such as feed temperature, slurry density, and retention time, on reactor operation and yield of leaching products are discussed.

  4. Phenol by direct hydroxylation of benzene with nitrous oxide - role of surface oxygen species in the reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitzmann, A.; Klemm, E.; Emig, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie 1; Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Technical Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Transient experiments in a Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) Reactor were performed to elucidate the role of surface oyxgen species in the oxidation of benzene to phenol on ZSM-5 type zeolites with nitrous oxide as a selective oxidant. It was shown by puls experiments with nitrous oxide that the mean lifetime of the generated surface oxygen species is between 0.2s at 500 C and about 4.2 s at 400 C. Afterwards the surface oxygen species desorb as molecular oxygen into the gas phase where total oxidation will take place if hydrocarbons are present. Dual puls experiments consisting of a nitrous oxide puls followed by a benzene puls allowed studying the reactivity of the surface oxygen species formed during the first puls. The observation of the phenol formation was impeded due to the strong sorption of phenol. Multipulse experiments were necessary to reach a pseudo steady state phenol yield. (orig.)

  5. Aryl Ketone Synthesis via Tandem Orthoplatinated Triarylphosphite-Catalyzed Addition Reactions of Arylboronic Acids with Aldehydes Followed by Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan-Xi; Hu, Qiao-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Tandem orthoplatinated triarylphosphite-catalyzed addition reactions of arylboronic acids with aldehydes followed by oxidation to yield aryl ketones is described. 3-Pentanone was identified as a suitable oxidant for the tandem aryl ketone formation reaction. By using microwave energy, aryl ketones were obtained in high yields with the catalyst loading as low as 0.01%. PMID:20849092

  6. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Herrera Delgado; Lubow Maier; Steffen Tischer; Alexander Zellner; Henning Stotz; Olaf Deutschmann

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented i...

  7. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  8. Deep catalytic oxidation of heavy hydrocarbons on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Oxydation catalytique totale des hydrocarbures lourds sur Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, F.

    1998-12-09

    Deep oxidation by air on Pt supported on alumina of a large number of heavy hydrocarbons representative of those found in a real Diesel car exhaust has been studied. Light-off temperatures between 140 and 320 deg. C on 1%Pt/alumina (80% metal dispersion) have been found. Results show that not only the physical state around the conversion area but also the chemical nature of the hydrocarbon plays an important role. Heavy hydrocarbons deep oxidation behaviour has been classified as a function of their chemical category (alkane, alkene, aromatics etc..). Oxidation of binary mixtures of hydrocarbons has shown strong inhibition effects on n-alkane or CO oxidation by polycyclic compounds like 1-methyl-naphthalene. In some cases, by-product compounds in the gas effluent (other than CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) have been identified by mass-spectrometry leading to oxidation mechanism proposals for different hydrocarbons. Catalyst nature (metal dispersion, content) influence has also been studied. It is shown that turn-over activity is favoured by the increase of the metal bulk size. Acidity influence of the carrier has shown only very little influence on n-alkane or di-aromatic compound oxidation. (author)

  9. Supercritical water oxidation of Quinazoline: Effects of conversion parameters and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan

    2016-09-01

    The supercritical water oxidation reaction of quinazoline and a set of related reaction products were investigated in batch reactors by varying the temperature (T, 400-600 °C), time (t, 0-400 s), water density (ρ, 70.79-166.28  kg m(-3)) and oxidation coefficient (OC, 0-4.0). The TOC removal efficiency (CRE) increased significantly as the OC increased, whereas this effect was very limited at high OC (>2.0). Lack of oxygen resulted in low CRE and TN removal efficiency (NRE), also cause coke-formation, and giving high yield of NH3 and nitrogenous organic intermediates. Prolonging reaction time did not provide an appreciable improvement on CRE but remarkably increased NRE at temperature higher than 500 °C. Pyrimidines and pyridines as the nitrogenous intermediates were largely found in GC-MS spectrum. Polymerization among benzene, phenyl radical and benzyl radical played important roles in the formation of PAHs, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, phenanthrene. These collective results showed how the yield of intermediate products responded to changes in the process variables, which permitted the development of a potential reaction network for supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline.

  10. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  11. Reaction Mechanism for m- Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Sourab

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  12. Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the “Reduction-Sintering” process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H2, CH4 and N2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures

  13. Self-assembled platinum nanoflowers on polydopamine-coated reduced graphene oxide for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xueqing; Wang, Huan; Guo, Liping; Wang, Liang

    2014-11-01

    The morphology- and size-controlled synthesis of branched Pt nanostructures on graphene is highly favorable for enhancing the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt. Herein, a facile approach is developed for the efficient synthesis of well-dispersed Pt nanoflowers (PtNFs) on the surface of polydopamine (PDA)-modified reduced graphene oxide (PDRGO), denoted as PtNFs/PDRGO, in high yield. The synthesis was performed by a simple heating treatment of an aqueous solution that contained K2PtCl4 and PDA-modified graphene oxide (GO) without the need for any additional reducing agent, seed, surfactant, or organic solvent. The coated PDA serves not only as a reducing agent, but also as cross-linker to anchor and stabilize PtNFs on the PDRGO support. The as-prepared PtNFs/PDRGO hybrid, with spatially and locally separated PtNFs on PDRGO, exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity and stability toward both methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solutions.

  14. Role of cobalt catalyst porosity in the reaction of hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Tsapkina, V.; Davydov, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; United Research and Development Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-30

    Effect of surface properties on catalyst performance is challenging problem for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We have studied a number of cobalt-alumina and cobalt-silica-alumina catalysts prepared by wet impregnation technique. Average pore diameter of supports varied from 6 to 100 nm. All the catalysts were activated uniformly in hydrogen and tested in FT synthesis. Non-linear dependence of cobalt crystallite size on average pore diameter of support have been found. For large pore aluminas with pore diameter 40 nm and more, cobalt crystallite size in activated Co-alumina catalysts reaches 14 nm and almost independent on pore diameter. Catalytic tests demonstrate that large-pore, low surface area supports are preferable in terms of activity. Calculated turnover rates reach 2.6-3.7 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} at 190 C for these catalysts. On the contrary, catalysts based on narrow-pore silica-aluminas display smaller turnover rate of about 0.4-0.8 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. Thus, specific activity of small cobalt crystallites, 6 nm or less, was found to be lower than that of large particles. Molar selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches maximal values of 88-90% for supports with 7-12 nm average pore diameter. These samples provide lowest CH{sub 4} selectivity, 5-7 mol.%. (orig.)

  15. Adsorption and reaction of silver on an oxidized Si(0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S., E-mail: sohno@ynu.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Kamada, M. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Honjo 1, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Electronic states associated with silver adsorption processes on oxidized silicon surfaces were investigated. • Characterization of oxide thin films on Si surfaces was performed using photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. • The changes in the Si 2p oxide components upon silver adsorption are ascribed to charge transfer rather than a conformation change. - Abstract: The adsorption and reaction of silver on an oxidized Si(0 0 1) surface were investigated on the basis of Si 2p, Ag 3d and O 1s core-level photoemission measurements at room temperature (RT). We compared the present results with those obtained in the case of titanium in our previous study. We found that silver on an oxidized Si(0 0 1) surface at RT causes a reduction in the intensity of the Si{sup 1+} and Si{sup 2+} states and an increase in the intensity of the Si{sup 3+} and Si{sup 4+} states. Based on an analysis of the Ag 3d and O 1s states, we concluded that the change in the Si 2p oxidized states upon silver adsorption is due to charge transfer rather than conformation change, although the applicability of the charge transfer scheme may be dependent on the thickness of the silver layer. We also deduced that penetration of silver atoms through a thin silicon oxide film occurs.

  16. Highly efficient oxidation of amines to imines by singlet oxygen and its application in Ugi-type reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gaoxi; Chen, Jian; Huang, Jie-Sheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2009-10-15

    A variety of secondary benzylic amines were oxidized to imines in 90% to >99% yields by singlet oxygen generated from oxygen and a porphyrin photosensitizer. On the basis of these reactions, a protocol was developed for oxidative Ugi-type reactions with singlet oxygen as the oxidant. This protocol has been used to synthesize C1- and N-functionalized benzylic amines in up to 96% yields.

  17. Reaction behavior between the oxide film of LY12 aluminum alloy and the flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛松柏; 董健; 吕晓春; 顾文华

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the brazing mechanism of LY12 aluminum alloy at middle range temperature was presented. The CsF-AlF3 non-corrosive flux was utilized to remove the complex oxide film on the surface of LY12 aluminum alloy. The results revealed that the oxide film was removed by the improved CsF-AlF3 flux accompanied with the occurrence of reaction as well as dissolution and the compounds CsF played an important role to remove the oxide film. Actually, the high activity of flux, say, the ability to remove the oxide film, was due to the presence of the compounds, such as NH4F,NH4AlF4 and composite molten salt. The production of HF was the key issue to accelerate the reaction and enhance to eliminate the oxide film by dissolution. It was found that the rare earth element La at small percentage was not enriched at the interface. Moreover, the rare earth fluoride enhanced the dissolution behavior.

  18. Hydrogen evolution reaction on titanium and oxide-covered titanium electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M.W.; Abdel Rahim, M.A. (Cairo Univ., Gizeh (Egypt). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-10-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ti electrodes in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} of various concentrations in the pH range of 0.24-1.88 was studied. Cathodic Tafel lines were measured potentiodynamically at a scan rate 1.0 mVs{sup -1} within the H{sub 2} evolution potential range. Linear parallel Tafel lines of a slope of 152 mVdecade{sup -1} were obtained. A value of 0.73 was calculated for the reaction order wrt asub(H{sup +})using the exchange cd, i{sub 0}. Tafel lines measured on oxide covered electrodes showed three deviations from linearity. An attempt was made to explain the deviations in terms of hydride formation and chemical oxide dissolution. Tafel slopes of 152 mVdecade{sup -1} were also observed for the HER on oxide-covered electrodes. The nature and compositions of the oxide did not depend on the electrolyte in which the oxides were formed. (orig.).

  19. Novel Stereoselective Synthesis of (E)-α,β-Unsaturated Esters by the Tandem Reaction of Deprotonation-Oxidation-Wittig Reaction from Phosphonium and Arsonium Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Phosphonium or arsonium salt 1 can undergo the tandem reaction of deprotonation -oxidation-Wittig reaction with alcohol 2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide and manganese dioxide, which affords a general simplified method for the stereoselective synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated esters 3.

  20. Selective oxidation of alcohols with alkali metal bromides as bromide catalysts: experimental study of the reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Katsuhiko; Takemura, Misato; Togo, Hideo

    2014-07-03

    A bromide-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols was developed which proceeded in the presence of an alkali metal bromide and an oxidant under mild conditions. The reaction involved an organic-molecule-free oxidation using KBr and Oxone and a Brønsted acid assisted oxidation using KBr and aqueous H2O2 solution to provide a broad range of carbonyl compounds in high yields. Moreover, the bromide-catalyzed oxidation of primary alcohols enabled the divergent synthesis of carboxylic acids and aldehydes under both reaction conditions in the presence of TEMPO. A possible catalytic mechanism was suggested on the basis of various mechanistic studies.

  1. Methanol oxidation in a flow reactor: Implications for the branching ratio of the CH3OH+OH reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Wassard, K.H.; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methanol in a flow reactor has been studied experimentally under diluted, fuel-lean conditions at 650-1350 K, over a wide range of O-2 concentrations (1%-16%), and with and without the presence of nitric oxide. The reaction is initiated above 900 K, with the oxidation rate...

  2. RRKM and master equation kinetic analysis of parallel addition reactions of isomeric radical intermediates in hydrocarbon flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Pierre M.; Rheaume, Michael; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    2017-08-01

    We have calculated the temperature-dependent rate coefficients of the addition reactions of butadien-2-yl (C4H5) and acroylyl (C3H3O) radicals with ethene (C2H4), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (H2CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and ketene (H2CCO), in order to explore the balance between kinetic and thermodynamic control in these combustion-related reactions. For the C4H5 radical, the 1,3-diene form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,2-diene, but the 1,2-diene form of the radical intermediate is stabilized by an allylic delocalization, which may influence the relative activation energies. For the reactions combining C3H3O with C2H4, CO, and HCN, the opposite is true: the 1,2-enone form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,3-enone, whereas the 1,3-enone is the slightly more stable radical species. Optimized geometries and vibrational modes were computed with the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level and basis, followed by single-point CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12 energy calculations. Our findings indicate that the kinetics in all cases favor reaction along the 1,3 pathway for both the C4H5 and C3H3O systems. The Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) microcanonical rate coefficients and subsequent solution of the chemical master equation were used to predict the time-evolution of our system under conditions from 500 K to 2000 K and from 10-5 bar to 10 bars. Despite the 1,3 reaction pathway being more favorable for the C4H5 system, our results predict branching ratios of the 1,2 to 1,3 product as high as 0.48 at 1 bar. Similar results hold for the acroylyl system under these combustion conditions, suggesting that under kinetic control the branching of these reactions may be much more significant than the thermodynamics would suggest. This effect may be partly attributed to the low energy difference between 1,2 and 1,3 forms of the radical intermediate. No substantial pressure-dependence is found for the overall forward reaction rates until pressures

  3. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  4. Efficient oxidation of benzyl alcohol with heteropolytungstate as reaction-controlled phase-transfer catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of heteropolytungstates has been synthesized and utilized as catalysts to catalyze oxidation of benzyl alcohol with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. The results indicated that three of these catalysts showed the properties of reaction-controlled phasetransfer catalysis, and they had excellent catalytic ability to the oxidation of benzyl alcohol. No other by-products were detected by gas chromatography. Once the hydrogen peroxide was consumed completely, the catalyst precipitated from solvent, and the results of the catalyst recycle showed that the catalyst had high stability.

  5. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  6. Free radical reaction characteristics of coal low-temperature oxidation and its inhibition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zenghua; Kong, Biao; Wei, Aizhu; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Yinbo; Zhang, Lanzhun

    2016-12-01

    Study on the mechanism of coal spontaneous combustion is significant for controlling fire disasters due to coal spontaneous combustion. The free radical reactions can explain the chemical process of coal at low-temperature oxidation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to measure the change rules of the different sorts and different granularity of coal directly; ESR spectroscopy chart of free radicals following the changes of temperatures was compared by the coal samples applying air and blowing nitrogen, original coal samples, dry coal samples, and demineralized coal samples. The fragmentation process was the key factor of producing and initiating free radical reactions. Oxygen, moisture, and mineral accelerated the free radical reactions. Combination of the free radical reaction mechanism, the mechanical fragmentation leaded to the elevated CO concentration, fracturing of coal pillar was more prone to spontaneous combustion, and spontaneous combustion in goaf accounted for a large proportion of the fire in the mine were explained. The method of added diphenylamine can inhibit the self-oxidation of coal effectively, the action mechanism of diphenylamine was analyzed by free radical chain reaction, and this research can offer new method for the development of new flame retardant.

  7. Substrate activation for O2 reactions by oxidized metal centers in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Monita Y M; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-11-20

    The uncatalyzed reactions of O(2) (S = 1) with organic substrates (S = 0) are thermodynamically favorable but kinetically slow because they are spin-forbidden and the one-electron reduction potential of O(2) is unfavorable. In nature, many of these important O(2) reactions are catalyzed by metalloenzymes. In the case of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes, either Fe(II) or Fe(III) can play the catalytic role in these spin-forbidden reactions. Whereas the ferrous enzymes activate O(2) directly for reaction, the ferric enzymes activate the substrate for O(2) attack. The enzyme-substrate complex of the ferric intradiol dioxygenases exhibits a low-energy catecholate to Fe(III) charge transfer transition that provides a mechanism by which both the Fe center and the catecholic substrate are activated for the reaction with O(2). In this Perspective, we evaluate how the coupling between this experimentally observed charge transfer and the change in geometry and ligand field of the oxidized metal center along the reaction coordinate can overcome the spin-forbidden nature of the O(2) reaction.

  8. Interfacial reaction between the oxidized SiC particles and Al-Mg alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The interfacial reactions of oxidized SiC particles reinforced Al-Mg matrix composites were investigated by the field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE- SEM), TEM and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the nanoscale MgO forms initially due to the interfacial reaction, then whether it reacts with molten Al continuously or not depends on the content of Mg in the matrix and its covering densification at the surface of particles. When there is not enough Mg in the matrix for the formation of dense MgO layer, MgO will transform into MgAl2O4 crystal owing to the continuous reaction with SiO2 and molten Al. When dense MgO layer forms at the surface of the particles due to the affluence of Mg for the initial reaction, it will protect the inner SiC from the attack of molten Al. However, the reaction products of both MgO and MgAl2O4 are thermo-stable phases at the surface of the particles under high temperature. The results clarify the interfacial reaction route and they are of great value to the control of the interfacial reactions and their interfacial design of the composites.

  9. A Study on Side Reactions of Hydroxyethylation of 3-Nitro-4-chlorobenzenesulfinic Acid with Ethylene Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Tang DONG; Zu Wang WU; Zhi Wei WANG; Yun De WANG; Yin Zhou YU

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of 3-nitro-4-chlorobenzenesulfinic acid and ethylene oxide to obtain 2-nitro-4-(β-hydroxyethylsulfonyl)chlorobenzene had been studied. Except hydroxyethylation on the sulfur atom of 3-nitro-4-chlorobenzenesulfinic acid to form the target product, 2-nitro-4-(β-hydroxyethylsulfonyl)chlorobenzene, there presented three kinds of side reactions: 1. Condensation and elimination of HCl to form biphenyl sulfone derivatives; 2. Addition to give bisulfonyl ethane derivative via vinyl sulfone; and 3. Hydroxylethylation on O-atom to produce hydroxylethylsulfinate due to the tautomerism of sulfinic acid.

  10. Nitrile Oxide-Norbornene Cycloaddition as a Bioorthogonal Crosslinking Reaction for the Preparation of Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Vinh X; Zhou, Kun; Simon, George P; Forsythe, John S

    2015-10-01

    This communication describes the first application of cycloaddition between an in situ generated nitrile oxide with norbornene leading to a polymer crosslinking reaction for the preparation of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels under physiological conditions. Hydrogels with high water content and robust physical strength are readily formed within 2-5 min by a simple two-solution mixing method which allows 3D encapsulation of neuronal cells. This bioorthogonal crosslinking reaction provides a simple yet highly effective method for preparation of hydrogels to be used in bioengineering.

  11. Employing CO2 as reaction medium for in-situ suppression of the formation of benzene derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during pyrolysis of simulated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jechan; Choi, Dongho; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-05-01

    This study proposes a strategic principle to enhance the thermal efficiency of pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW). An environmentally sound energy recovery platform was established by suppressing the formation of harmful organic compounds evolved from pyrolysis of MSW. Using CO2 as reaction medium/feedstock, CO generation was enhanced through the following: 1) expediting the thermal cracking of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) evolved from the thermal degradation of the MSWs and 2) directly reacting VOCs with CO2. This particular influence of CO2 on pyrolysis of the MSWs also led to the in-situ mitigation of harmful organic compounds (e.g., benzene derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) considering that CO2 acted as a carbon scavenger to block reaction pathways toward benzenes and PAHs in pyrolysis. To understand the fundamental influence of CO2, simulated MSWs (i.e., various ratios of biomass to polymer) were used to avoid any complexities arising from the heterogeneous matrix of MSW. All experimental findings in this study suggested the foreseeable environmental application of CO2 to energy recovery from MSW together with disposal of MSW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A combined experimental and theoretical study of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and oxygenated hydrocarbons relevant to astrochemical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R J; Caravan, R L; Blitz, M A; Heard, D E

    2014-02-28

    The kinetics of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with acetone and dimethyl ether (DME) have been studied between 63-148 K and at a range of pressures using laser-flash photolysis coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection of OH in a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. For acetone, a large negative temperature dependence was observed, with the rate coefficient increasing from k1 = (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 148 K to (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 79 K, and also increasing with pressure. For DME, a similar behaviour was found, with the rate coefficient increasing from k2 = (3.1 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 138 K to (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 63 K, and also increasing with pressure. The temperature and pressure dependence of the experimental rate coefficients are rationalised for both reactions by the formation and subsequent stabilisation of a hydrogen bonded complex, with a non-zero rate coefficient extrapolated to zero pressure supportive of quantum mechanical tunnelling on the timescale of the experiments leading to products. In the case of DME, experiments performed in the presence of O2 provide additional evidence that the yield of the CH3OCH2 abstraction product, which can recycle OH in the presence of O2, is ≥50%. The experimental data are modelled using the MESMER (Master Equation Solver for Multi Energy Well Reactions) code which includes a treatment of quantum mechanical tunnelling, and uses energies and structures of transition states and complexes calculated by ab initio methods. Good agreement is seen between experiment and theory, with MESMER being able to reproduce for both reactions the temperature behaviour between ~70-800 K and the pressure dependence observed at ~80 K. At the limit of zero pressure, the model predicts a rate coefficient of ~10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of OH with acetone at 20 K, providing evidence that the

  13. Effect of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides on ozone formation in smog chambers exposed to solar irradiance of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval F, J; Marroquin de la R, O; Jaimes L, J. L; Zuniga L, V. A; Gonzalez O, E; Guzman Lopez-Figueroa, F [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-01-01

    Outdoor smog chambers experiments were performed on air to determine the answer of maximum ozone levels, to changes in the initial hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxide NO{sub x}. These captive-air experiments under natural irradiation were carried out. Typically, eight chambers were filled with Mexico city air in the morning. In some of those chambers, the initial HC and/or Nox concentrations were varied by {+-}25% to {+-}50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO{sub x} (perturbed chambers). The O{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O{sub 3} (max). The initial HC and NO{sub x} concentration effects were determined by comparing the maximum ozone concentrations measured in the perturbed and unperturbed chambers. Ozone isopleths were constructed from the empirical model obtained of measurements of the eight chambers and plotted in a graph whose axe were the initial HC and NO{sub x} values. For the average initial conditions that were measured in Mexico City, it was found that the most efficient strategy to reduce the maximum concentration of O{sub 3} is the one that reduces NO{sub x}. [Spanish] Se realizaron experimentos de camaras de esmog con el aire de la ciudad de Mexico para determinar las respuestas de los niveles maximos de ozono a los cambios en las concentraciones iniciales de hidrocarburos, HC y oxido de nitrogeno, NO{sub x}. Por lo general, se llenaron 8 bolsas con aire matutino de la Ciudad de Mexico. En algunas camaras, las concentraciones iniciales fueron cambiadas de 25% a 50%, anadiendo varias concentraciones de una mezcla de HC, aire limpio y/o NO{sub x}. La concentracion de O{sub 3} y NO{sub x}, en cada camara, fueron monitoreadas a lo largo del dia para determinar el maximo de O{sub 3}. El efecto de los HC y el NO{sub x} fue determinado por comparacion del maximo de ozono formado en las camaras, que fueron perturbadas por adicion o reduccion de HC y/o Nox

  14. Investigation of lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in marine PL emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline P.

    from PE or amino acids affected the oxidative stability of purified marine PL emulsions. The secondary objective was to study the non-enzymatic browning reactions in the emulsions which included both Strecker degradation (SD) and pyrroles formation. Emulsions were prepared with and without addition...... of amino acids (leucine, methionine and lysine) from 2 authentic standards (PC and PE) and 2 purified marine PL (LC and MPL) through sonication method. Emulsions were incubated at 60 ºC for 0, 2, 4 and 6 days. Non-enzymatic browning reactions were investigated through measurement of i) Strecker aldehydes......, ii) yellowness index (YI), iii) hydrophobic and hydrophilic pyrroles content. On the other hand, the oxidative stability of emulsion was measured through secondary lipid derived volatiles. The result showed that the presence of PE and amino acids caused the formation of pyrroles, generated...

  15. Effect of Ni Loading and Reaction Conditions on Partial Oxidation of Methane to Syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Wang; Zhenhua Li; Shuxun Tian

    2003-01-01

    The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas is studied in this paper over Ni/Al2O3 catalysts under atmospheric pressure. The effects of Ni loading on the activity and stability of catalysts with 5 mm α-Al2O3 and θ-Al2O3 pellets as supports were measured in a continuous fixed bed reactor. It is found that the optimum Ni loading is 10%. And the effect of reaction conditions on partial oxidation of methane is also studied. The methane conversion and CO selectivity increase with the increase of the reaction temperature and the space velocity on 10%Ni/α-Al2O3 catalysts. The best CH4/O2 mole ratio is 2 for CO selectivity, and the optimum space velocity is 5.4×105 h-1.

  16. Theoretical study of the dark-oxidation reaction mechanisms for organic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guixiu; Zhu, Rongxiu; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2006-08-01

    To model the dark-oxidation mechanism of organic polymers, the reactions of the corresponding model compounds, including cumene, methyl 2-methylbutyrate, methyl methacrylate and methylacrylic acid, with triplet O 2 molecule, have been studied by performing density functional theory calculations at the UB3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The calculated results show that these model compounds can be oxygenated by O 2 via an H-abstract mechanism. The structures of initial contact charge transfer complexes, transition states, intermediates of cage-like pairs of radicals, and final hydro-peroxides involved in the reactions have been shown in details. The present results are expected to provide a general guidance for understanding the dark-oxidation mechanism of organic polymers.

  17. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  18. In situ Fourier transform-infrared internal reflection spectroscopic analysis of hydrocarbon chain ordering of surfactants adsorbed at mineral oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, William Murray

    The adsorption of surfactants at mineral oxide surfaces was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/IRS), and contact angle goniometry. FT-IR/IRS was used to determine both adsorption isotherms and the enthalpy of adsorption. Furthermore, the conformation and orientation of the hydrocarbon chain of SDS adsorbed at a sapphire internal reflection element (IRE) were determined. Contact angle goniometry was used to measure the effect of the surface phase of the surfactant on the hydrophobic character of sapphire surfaces in aqueous solutions. For SDS adsorbed by sapphire, in situ FT-IR/IRS experiments indicate that a surface phase transition occurs at an adsorption density of 2 to 3 x 10-10 mol/cm2 for both pD 2.9 and 6.9. This transition is characterized by a two to four wavenumber shift in the position of the asymmetric -CH2 stretching band. Based on solution spectroscopy studies, the surface phase was found to be similar to solution phase micelles and liquid crystals for adsorption densities less than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition. Whereas for adsorption densities in excess of the adsorption density of the surface phase transition, the surface phase resembled a solution phase coagel species. It was also found that the contact angle of an air bubble at the sapphire surface exhibited a sharp decrease at the adsorption density corresponding to the surface phase transition The effect of temperature on adsorption and phase behavior of SDS at the sapphire IRE surface was also determined. It was shown that a surface phase transition similar to that discussed occurred at approximately 298 K. The adsorption reaction was found to be exothermic, with a heat of adsorption of --1.3 kcal/mole for adsorption densities less than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition at 298 K and --4.1 kcal/mole for adsorption densities greater than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition

  19. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  20. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  1. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  2. Dependence of reaction rate of pyrite oxidation on temperature, pH and oxidant concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Long; WANG; Rucheng; XUE; Jiyue; CHEN; Fanrong; CHEN; J

    2005-01-01

    The kinetic sstudy of pyrite oxidation was performed in a series of experiments by a mixed flow reactor. The release rates of Fe(II) are in the order of 3.22×10-9-5.51×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1 at temperature (T ) 25 to 44℃, initial pH (pH )1.4 to 2.7, and initial Fe(III) concentration ([Fe(III)]I) 10-5 to 5×10-3 mol·kg-1. The release rate of Fe(II) increased with increasing T or/and pH or/and [Fe(III)]I in the above range. The rate law and activation energy of pyrite oxidation were derived by statistical analyses of Rfe(II) vs. [Fe(III)]I, Rfe(II) vs. pH and Rfe(II) vs. T, and are given as (1) Rate law: Rfe(II)=104.65e-64.54×103/8.31T[Fe(III)]i0.6./[H+]0.45 ; (2) activation energy: 64.54 ( 8.07 kJ·mol-1. The expression can be applied to more cases (e.g., quantifying the pollutant released from sulfide-rich mining waste and assessing reliable performance of underground repository sites where pyrite acts as an engineered barrier material). Using the rate law derived from this study, the magnitude of the pollutants transferred to secondary phases, soil and water from oxidized pyrite during Jiguanshan mine waste weathering was preliminarily estimated. The estimated magnitude is very high, suggesting that the pile has possibly posed significant impact on the water quality in this region.

  3. Oxidative stress and leukocyte migration inhibition response in cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs may either be immunological or non-immunological. The precise mechanisms, however, are largely obscure. Other concomitant mechanisms may amplify and/or contribute to the severity and duration of a reaction. One such mechanism could be oxidative stress, a state of imbalance between reactive oxygen species, and their subsequent detoxification by antioxidants. Aims: (a to assess the oxidative stress status in the blood of cutaneous drug reaction patients by assaying for reduced glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels, (b to determine the leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI response in these patients in response to the suspected drug (s, and (c to look for the association between oxidative stress parameters and LMI. Methods: Ethical committee approval was obtained for this study. Fresh venous blood samples were obtained from the patients of CADRs (group A during the acute phase of reaction and healthy control subjects (group B. MDA levels, a measure of oxidative lipid damage, and reduced GSH levels, a measure of anti-oxidant capacity, were assayed in the blood samples of both groups using spectrophotometry. LMI response was measured by challenging the patients′ peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the suspected drug to confirm immunological perturbation. Results: Totally 66 participants, 33 cases in group A and equal number of controls in group B, were studied. The mean MDA levels were found to be raised (P < 0.001, but GSH levels were significantly reduced in group A when compared with group B (P = <0.001. LMI response against drug(s was performed in 33 cases (group A, out of which 25 cases showed a positive LMI response as follows: fixed drug eruption (10/25, SJS (5/25, urticaria (3/25, exfoliative dermatitis (2/25, morbilliform rash (2/25, erythroderma (1/25, vasculitis (1/25, and dapsone syndrome (1/25. The mean MDA levels were found to be significantly higher in the LMI positive

  4. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  5. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs.

  6. Visible-light-enhanced catalytic oxidation reactions on plasmonic silver nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Linic, Suljo

    2011-06-01

    Catalysis plays a critical role in chemical conversion, energy production and pollution mitigation. High activation barriers associated with rate-limiting elementary steps require most commercial heterogeneous catalytic reactions to be run at relatively high temperatures, which compromises energy efficiency and the long-term stability of the catalyst. Here we show that plasmonic nanostructures of silver can concurrently use low-intensity visible light (on the order of solar intensity) and thermal energy to drive catalytic oxidation reactions--such as ethylene epoxidation, CO oxidation, and NH₃ oxidation--at lower temperatures than their conventional counterparts that use only thermal stimulus. Based on kinetic isotope experiments and density functional calculations, we postulate that excited plasmons on the silver surface act to populate O₂ antibonding orbitals and so form a transient negative-ion state, which thereby facilitates the rate-limiting O₂-dissociation reaction. The results could assist the design of catalytic processes that are more energy efficient and robust than current processes.

  7. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study.

  8. An improved understanding of the reaction of bis(bromomethyl)quinoxaline 1-N-oxides with amines using substituent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kathryn M; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Lebl, Tomas; Philp, Douglas; Westwood, Nicholas J

    2007-04-27

    The reaction of bis(bromomethyl)quinoxaline N-oxides with amines is interesting from a reaction mechanism perspective and due to the reported biological activity of compounds in this general class. The complex mechanism of this reaction (particularly in the case of primary amines) is complicated further when C6 or C7 substituted mono-N-oxides are considered. In this study, the synthesis and subsequent characterization of a series of 2,3-bis(bromomethyl)quinoxaline 1-N-oxides is reported. Experimental and computational evidence is used to show that the observed product ratios from the reaction with diethylamine reflect the influence of both the C6/C7 substituent and the N-oxide functional group on the initial nucleophilic substitution reaction.

  9. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation.

  10. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  11. Facile synthesis of PdSx/C porous nanospheres and their applications for ethanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Fuhua; Ma, Xuemei; Zheng, Yiqun; Hou, Shifeng

    2016-12-01

    We report a facile approach for the synthesis of carbon-supported palladium polysulphide porous nanospheres (PdSx/C) and their applications for ethanol oxidation reaction. Typical synthesis started with generation of palladium/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(Pd/PEDOT) nanospheres, followed by a calcination process at an optimized temperature to form PdSx/C, with an average size of 2.47 ± 0.60 and 50 nm of PdSx nanoparticles and carbon porous nanospheres, respectively. Various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical techniques were performed to characterize their morphologies, compositions and structures. In contrary to most Pd-based electrochemical catalysts that could be easily poised with trace sulfur during the catalytic oxidation process, the as-prepared PdSx/C porous nanospheres exhibited high electrocatalytic activities and stabilities for the electrochemical catalytic oxidation of ethanol in alkaline medium. In particular, the forward peak current intensity achieved 162.1 mA mg-1 and still maintained at 46.7 mA mg-1 even after 1000 cycles. This current work not only offers a novel type of fuel-cell catalyst for ethanol oxidation reaction, but also provides a possible route for solving the sulfur-poisoning problem in catalysis.

  12. Substrate Oxidation by Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase: EVIDENCE FOR A COMMON REACTION MECHANISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Elizabeth S; Basran, Jaswir; Lee, Michael; Handa, Sandeep; Raven, Emma L

    2015-12-25

    The kynurenine pathway is the major route of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) catabolism in biology, leading ultimately to the formation of NAD(+). The initial and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway involves oxidation of L-Trp to N-formylkynurenine. This is an O2-dependent process and catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. More than 60 years after these dioxygenase enzymes were first isolated (Kotake, Y., and Masayama, I. (1936) Z. Physiol. Chem. 243, 237-244), the mechanism of the reaction is not established. We examined the mechanism of substrate oxidation for a series of substituted tryptophan analogues by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. We observed formation of a transient intermediate, assigned as a Compound II (ferryl) species, during oxidation of L-Trp, 1-methyl-L-Trp, and a number of other substrate analogues. The data are consistent with a common reaction mechanism for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of tryptophan and other tryptophan analogues.

  13. The Effect of Anodic Oxide Films on the Nickel-Aluminum Reaction in Aluminum Braze Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadgell, Colin A.; Wells, Mary A.; Corbin, Stephen F.; Colley, Leo; Cheadle, Brian; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an anodic oxide surface film on the nickel-aluminum reaction at the surface of aluminum brazing sheet has been investigated. Samples were anodized in a barrier-type solution and subsequently sputtered with nickel. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and metallography were used as the main investigative techniques. The thickness of the anodic film was found to control the reaction between the aluminum substrate and nickel coating. Solid-state formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases occurred readily when a relatively thin oxide film (13 to 25 nm) was present, whereas intermetallic formation was suppressed in the presence of thicker oxides ( 60 nm). At an intermediate oxide film thickness of 35 nm, the Al3Ni phase formed shortly after the initiation of melting in the aluminum substrate. Analysis of DSC traces showed that formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases changed the melting characteristics of the aluminum substrate, and that the extent of this change can be used as an indirect measure of the amount of nickel incorporated into the intermetallic phases.

  14. Crossed beam reaction of cyano radicals with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of cyanoacetylene (HCCCN; X 1Σ+) formation from reaction of CN(X 2Σ+) with acetylene, C2H2(X 1Σg+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L. C. L.; Asvany, O.; Chang, A. H. H.; Balucani, N.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.; Osamura, Y.

    2000-11-01

    The chemical reaction dynamics to form cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X 1Σ+), via the radical-neutral reaction of cyano radicals, CN(X 2Σ+;ν=0), with acetylene, C2H2(X 1Σg+), are unraveled in crossed molecular beam experiments at two collision energies of 21.1 and 27.0 kJ mol-1. Laboratory angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of the HCCCN product are recorded at m/e=51 and 50. Experiments were supplemented by electronic structure calculations on the doublet C3H2N potential energy surface and RRKM investigations. Forward-convolution fitting of the crossed beam data combined with our theoretical investigations shows that the reaction has no entrance barrier and is initiated by an attack of the CN radical to the π electron density of the acetylene molecule to form a doublet cis/trans HCCHCN collision complex on the 2A' surface via indirect reactive scattering dynamics. Here 85% of the collision complexes undergo C-H bond rupture through a tight transition state located 22 kJ mol-1 above the cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X 1Σ+) and H(2S1/2) products (microchannel 1). To a minor amount (15%) trans HCCHCN shows a 1,2-H shift via a 177 kJ mol-1 barrier to form a doublet H2CCCN radical, which is 46 kJ mol-1 more stable than the initial reaction intermediate (microchannel 2). The H2CCCN complex decomposes via a rather loose exit transition state situated only 7 kJ mol-1 above the reaction products HCCCN (X 1Σ+) and H(2S1/2). In both cases the geometry of the exit transition states is reflected in the observed center-of-mass angular distributions showing a mild forward/sideways peaking. The explicit identification of the cyanoacetylene as the only reaction product represents a solid background for the title reaction to be included in reaction networks modeling the chemistry in dark, molecular clouds, outflow of dying carbon stars, hot molecular cores, as well as the atmosphere of hydrocarbon rich planets and satellites such as the Saturnian moon Titan.

  15. Reduced graphene oxide as photocatalyst for CO2 reduction reaction(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Chung

    2016-10-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons such as methanol makes possible simultaneous solar energy harvesting and CO2 reduction. Our previous work is using graphene oxide (GO) as a promising photocatalyst for photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to methanol[1].When using graphene oxide as photocatalyst, the photocatalytic efficiency is 4-flod higher than TiO2 powder. GO has a lot of defects on the surface and those defects make sp2 carbon structure become sp3 carbon structure. The carbon structure change cause the GO has large energy gap about 2.7 eV to 3.2 eV. In order to remove the defect and reduce the energy gap of GO, Zhao et al. try to annealing GO powder in the nitrogen atmosphere at 900oC, the GO structure can be reduced to near graphene structure[2]. Zhu et al. do some low temperature annealing, it can control the structure and energy bandgap of GO by control annealing temperature. If the annealing temperature increase the bandgap of GO will be reduce[3]. So, we can using this annealing process to reduce the bandgap of the GO. In the varying temperature thermal reduction process, as the temperature increases from 130oC to 170oC, the functional groups of the graphene oxide will be reduced and band gap of graphene oxide will be narrowed at same time. The characteristic of thermal reduced graphene oxide were analyzed by SEM, XRD and Raman measurements. The band position was determined by UV/Vis. The reduction of functional groups correlates to red shift in light absorption and eventual quenching in the PL signal of RGOs. Combining hydrophobicity, light harvesting and PL quench, we get the highest yield of RGO150 (0.31 μmole g-1 -cat hr-1) is 1.7-fold higher than that of GO (0.18μmole g-1 -cat hr-1). This work investigates a modified method for using a thermal reduction process to reduce the energy gap of graphene oxide.

  16. Reaction of cyclodextrins with propylene oxide or with glycidol: analysis of product distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitha, J; Szabo, L; Fales, H M

    1987-11-01

    Reaction of cyclomalto-hexaose, -heptaose, or -octaose with propylene oxide in strong aqueous alkali gave products in which distribution of the degrees of substitution was relatively narrow and nearly symmetrical, and increased with the average degree of substitution. When an equimolar mixture of cyclomalto-hexaose, heptaose, or -octaose was used, the average degrees of substitution of all three carbohydrates were close to each other. These findings indicate that the reactivities of the hydroxyl groups of cyclomalto-hexaose, -heptaose, or -octaose, and of all their (2-hydroxypropyl) ethers formed in the reactions, are quite similar. Reaction of cyclomaltoheptaose with glycidol also yielded a product having a narrow distribution of degree of substitution, but which was slightly skewed towards the higher degrees. Thus, as it proceeds, this etherification leads to products having higher reactivity towards the epoxide.

  17. Self propagating high temperature synthesis of metal oxides. Reactions in external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Aguas, M D

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of metal oxides by Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis is reported. The reactions are started with a point source of ignition; typically a hot wire. A synthesis wave is observed moving out from the point source and reactions terminate in seconds. Products obtained can be classified into ferrites (magnetic applications) and stannates (gas sensing applications). Ferrites were synthesised under variable external magnetic fields. The synthesis wave is hotter in the presence of an external magnetic field for hard ferrite synthesis. For spinel ferrites the opposite was observed. Materials synthesised in the field show differences in their bulk magnetic properties (coercivity and saturation magnetisation), structures and microstructures. Combustion reactions in large fields revealed changes in unit cell volume (shrinkage was observed for hard ferrites while expansion was observed for spinel ferrites). SHS synthesised hard ferrites show two distinct components; one has large grain structure co...

  18. Photoinduced Oxidation Reaction of Benzotrifluoride with OH Radical by the Laser Flash Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Ren-Xi; YE,Zhao-Lian; SHEN,Yan; DONG,Wen-Bo; HOU,Hui-Qi

    2008-01-01

    The optical transient and kinetics characterizations of the transients formed in the reaction of OH with benzotrifluoride (BTF) were performed by a laser flash photolysis technique. The results indicated that the formation of π-type adduct of C6H5(OH)CF3 was the major reaction channel, and the σ-type adduct of C6H5CF3OH formation was an additional minor process in the oxidation reaction of BTF attacked by OH radicals yielded from the photolysis of H2O2. Addition of OH to the CF3 group led to the fluoride ion elimination to yield α,α-difluorophenylcarbinol (C6H5CF2OH). Trifluoromethylphenol (HOC6H4CF3) of meta-, para- and ortho-substituted isomers resulted from the addition of OH to the BTF aromatic ring.

  19. Solid-State Thermal Reaction of a Molecular Material and Solventless Synthesis of Iron Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debasis; Roy, Madhusudan; Zubko, Maciej; Kusz, Joachim; Bhattacharjee, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state thermal decomposition reaction of a molecular material {As}({C}6{H}5)4[{Fe}^{II}{Fe}^{III} ({C}2{O}4)3]}n has been studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) in an inert atmosphere. By analyzing the TG data collected at multiple heating rates in 300 K-1300 K range, the kinetic parameters (activation energy, most probable reaction mechanism function and frequency factor) are determined using different multi-heating rate analysis programs. Activation energy and the frequency factor are found to be strongly dependent on the extent of decomposition. The decomposed material has been characterized to be hematite using physical techniques (FT-IR and powder XRD). Particle morphology has been checked by TEM. A solid-state reaction pathway leading the molecular precursor to hematite has been proposed illustrating an example of solventless synthesis of iron oxides utilizing thermal decomposition as a technique using innocuous materials.

  20. Synthesis of cubic PtPd alloy nanoparticles as anode electrocatalysts for methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Yeon; Kwak, Da-Hee; Lee, Young-Woo; Lee, Seul; Park, Kyung-Won

    2015-04-14

    The electrocatalytic properties for electro-oxidation reactions of shape-controlled Pt-based catalysts have been improved by alloying with 2nd elements. In this study, we demonstrate cubic PtPd alloy nanoparticles synthesized using a thermal decomposition method. The cubic PtPd nanoparticles exhibit a homogeneous distribution of alloy nanostructures in the presence of Pt and Pd metallic phases. The improved electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation reactions of methanol and formic acid as chemical fuels might be attributed to the cubic alloy nanostructures. Furthermore, the cubic PtPd alloy nanoparticles as electrocatalysts exhibit excellent stability for electro-oxidation reactions.

  1. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  2. The Photochemical Oxidation of Siderite That Drove Hydrogen Based Microbial Redox Reactions in The Archean Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. D.; Yee, N.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and molecular hydrogen (H2) is a rich source of electron in a mildly reducing environment for microbial redox reactions, such as anoxygenic photosynthesis and methanogenesis. Subaerial volcanoes, ocean crust serpentinization and mid-ocean ridge volcanoes have been believed to be the major source of the hydrogen flux to the atmosphere. Although ferrous ion (Fe2+) photooxidation has been proposed as an alternative mechanism by which hydrogen gas was produced, ferruginous water in contact with a CO2-bearing atmosphere is supersaturated with respect to FeCO3 (siderite), thus the precipitation of siderite would have been thermodynamically favored in the Archean environment. Siderite is the critical mineral component of the oldest fossilized microbial mat. It has also been inferred as a component of chemical sedimentary protolith in the >3750 Ma Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt, Canada and the presence of siderite in the protolith suggests the occurrence of siderite extends to Hadean time. Analyses of photooxidation of siderite suggest a significant flux of hydrogen in the early atmosphere. Our estimate of the hydrogen production rate under Archean solar flux is approximately 50 times greater than the estimated hydrogen production rate by the volcanic activity based on a previous report (Tian et al. Science 2005). Our analyses on siderite photooxidation also suggest a mechanism by which banded iron formation (BIF) was formed. The photooxidation transforms siderite to magnetite/maghemite (spinnel iron oxide), while oxygenic oxidation of siderite leads to goethite, and subsequently to hematite (Fe3+2O3) upon dehydration. We will discuss the photochemical reaction, which was once one of the most ubiquitous photochemical reactions before the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere. Photooxidation of siderite over time by UV light From left to right: UV oxidized siderite, pristine siderite, oxidized siderite by oxygen

  3. Gold-TiO{sub 2}-Nickel catalysts for low temperature-driven CO oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinojosa-Reyes, Mariana, E-mail: kittyhinojosa@hotmail.com [División de Materiales Avanzados, IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a. sección C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P., México (Mexico); Zanella, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.zanella@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, A. P. 70-186, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); Maturano-Rojas, Viridiana [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, A. P. 70-186, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nickel-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts (1 wt. %) drive the CO oxidation at low temperature. • DRIFTS reveals the participation of nickel during the CO oxidation. • Ni(CO){sub 2} bridged species are detected by DRIFTS. • Au/TiO{sub 2}-Ni 1 is the most active and stable catalyst with respect to undoped TiO{sub 2}. • Ti{sup 3+} species corroborate Ni doped TiO{sub 2} and surface oxygen vacancies. - Abstract: Nickel-doped-TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by the sol–gel method and surface modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the urea-deposition-precipitation technique. The as-synthesized catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman and XPS spectroscopies, N{sub 2} physisorption, STEM-HAADF microscopy and TPR hydrogen consumption. The Au/TiO{sub 2}-Ni catalysts were evaluated catalytically performing CO oxidation reactions. The catalyst with nickel content of 1 wt. % (Au/TiO{sub 2}-Ni 1) showed the highest CO conversion with respect to the high-nickel-content or bare/commercial TiO{sub 2} at 0 °C. In situ DRIFTS showed a strong participation of both nickel due to the presence of surface-nickel-metallic nanoparticles formed during the CO adsorption process at reaction temperatures above 200 °C, and surface-bridged-nickel-CO species. A minor deactivation rate was observed for the Au/TiO{sub 2}-Ni 1 catalyst in comparison with the Au/TiO{sub 2} one. The oxygen vacancies that were created on the sol–gel-doped TiO{sub 2} improved the catalytic behavior during the performance of CO oxidation reactions, and inhibited the AuNP sintering.

  4. Oxidation of microcystins by permanganate: reaction kinetics and implications for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Majado, María E; Meriluoto, Jussi; Acero, Juan L

    2007-01-01

    A few genera of cyanobacteria produce toxins which contaminate drinking water resources. Microcystins (MC), widely reported cyanotoxins, cause acute and chronic toxicity effects in living beings including humans and warrant removal from drinking water. In the present study, unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), -RR and -YR with potassium permanganate were determined at pH 6.2-8.2 and temperature 10-25 degrees C. The reaction of permanganate with MCs is second-order overall and first-order with respect to both permanganate and toxin. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of MC-LR with permanganate at pH 7 and 20 degrees C was 357.2+/-17.5M(-1)s(-1). The influence of pH on the oxidation process was not appreciable and the activation energy was 28.8 kJ mol(-1). Slightly higher reactivity with permanganate was found for MC-RR (418.0M(-1)s(-1)) and MC-YR (405.9M(-1)s(-1)). According to the results obtained, permanganate likely attacks the Adda moiety of the MC molecule. The oxidation of MCs in a natural surface water was also investigated. A permanganate dose of 1-1.25mgL(-1) was enough to reduce MCs concentration below the guideline value of 1microgL(-1). Permanganate oxidation is therefore a feasible option for microcystin removal during preoxidation processes. However, the oxidant dose must be carefully optimized in order to remove extracellular MCs without causing cell lysis (due to chemical stress) and further release of MCs.

  5. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-04-21

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO˙ is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.

  6. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  7. A matrix-isolation-infrared spectroscopic study of the reactions of nitric oxide with oxygen and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S. C.; Hall, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the oxidation of NO to NO2 by trapping the products of the gas-phase reactions with excess oxygen and ozone identified the transient species by their infrared spectra. The primary products of the NO + NO2 reactions were NO2, N2O3(A), N2O3(B), N2O4, and peroxy nitrate (OONO). The primary products of the NO + O3 reactions were NO2 and peroxy NO3 with the higher nitric oxides in low concentrations compared with the NO + O2 reactions. Isotopic oxygen and ozone were used to identify the infrared absorption frequency of the peroxy nitrate.

  8. Modelling of chalcopyrite oxidation reactions in the Outokumpu flash smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating oxidation reactions of chalcopyrite particles together with momentum, heat and mass transfer between particle and gas phase in a flash smelting furnace reaction shaft is presented. In simulation, the equations governing the gas flow are solved numerically with a commercial fluid flow package, Phoenics. The particle phase is introduced into the gas flow by a Particle Source In Cell (PSIC) - technique, where a number of discrete particles is tracked in a gas flow and the relevant source terms for momentum, mass, and heat transfer are added to the gas phase equations. The gas phase equations used are elliptic in nature and the fluid turbulence is described by the (k-{epsilon}) -model. Thermal gas phase radiation is simulated with a six-flux radiation model. The chemical reactions of concentrate particles are assumed to happen at two sharp interfaces, and a shrinking core model is applied to describe the mass transfer of chemical species through the reaction product layer. In a molten state, the oxygen consumption is controlled by a film penetration concept. The reacting concentrate particles are a mixture of chalcopyrite and silica. Also a certain amount of pure inert silica is fed to the process as flux. In the simulations the calculation domain includes the concentrate burner and a cylindrical reaction shaft of an industrial scale flash smelting furnace. Some examples about the simulations carried out by the combustion model are presented. (author)

  9. Supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline: Reaction kinetics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan; Xu, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a first quantitative kinetic model for supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of quinazoline that describes the formation and interconversion of intermediates and final products at 673-873 K. The set of 11 reaction pathways for phenol, pyrimidine, naphthalene, NH3, etc, involved in the simplified reaction network proved sufficient for fitting the experimental results satisfactorily. We validated the model prediction ability on CO2 yields at initial quinazoline loading not used in the parameter estimation. Reaction rate analysis and sensitivity analysis indicate that nearly all reactions reach their thermodynamic equilibrium within 300 s. The pyrimidine yielding from quinazoline is the dominant ring-opening pathway and provides a significant contribution to CO2 formation. Low sensitivity of NH3 decomposition rate to concentration confirms its refractory nature in SCWO. Nitrogen content in liquid products decreases whereas that in gaseous phase increases as reaction time prolonged. The nitrogen predicted by the model in gaseous phase combined with the experimental nitrogen in liquid products gives an accurate nitrogen balance of conversion process.

  10. A novel mechanism for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a graphite electrode in acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2014-09-01

    With the consideration of optimizing the performance of the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), the oxidation reaction mechanism of VO2+ on a rotating graphite disk electrode has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in sulfuric acid solutions with various pH and vanadium concentrations. Furthermore, the reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ have been calculated from the polarization results and compared with the theoretical results according to the possible reaction mechanisms available in the literature. However, a new oxidation reaction mechanism has been proposed to describe the oxidation of VO2+ at last, and the theoretic reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ based on the new mechanism are consistent with the experimental results when the electrochemical reaction is the rate-limited process. Moreover, a corresponding kinetic equation has been established for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a spectroscopically pure graphite electrode, and can be well used to predict the polarization behavior in V (IV) acidic solutions.

  11. IBX-mediated oxidation of unactivated cyclic amines: application in highly diastereoselective oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, C; Bensch, L; van Lint, Matthijs J; Ruijter, E; Orru, R V A

    2015-10-28

    The first o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) mediated oxidation of unactivated amines to imines is described. A range of meso-pyrrolidines were shown to be suitable substrates. The chemical space was further explored with one-pot oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions, which proved to be highly diastereoselective.

  12. Pathological reactions and recovery of hepatopancreatic digestive cells from the marine snail Littorina littorea following exposure to a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, D M; Moore, M N; Readman, J W

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular pathological responses of hepatopancreatic digestive cells from the periwinkle Littorina littorea exposed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene and to ascertain whether any injurious effects were reversible within the experimental time scale. A secondary objective was to establish the relationship of the various reactions to animal health status, using lysosomal stability as an index of well-being. Exposure of snails to a concentration of 335 microgl(-1) (1.7 microM) fluoranthene (seawater renewed and spiked daily with fluoranthene) for 5 days resulted in a reduction in lysosomal stability (neutral red retention) and endocytosis; and an increase in smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and 7-ethoxycoumarin-o-deethylase (ECOD; measured as cyano-ECOD) activity measured in isolated live digestive cells. Exposed snails treated with clean seawater for a further 8 days resulted in a return to control levels of lysosomal stability, ECOD and ER; endocytosis showed only a partial recovery. Multi-variate and uni-variate analysis showed that there were strong correlations between the various cellular biomarker responses. These findings are interpretable within the current framework of molluscan biomarker responses to PAHs. Principal component analysis was used to derive the first principal component for endocytosis, ER and ECOD reactions and these were plotted against lysosomal stability as a measure of cellular well-being. The resulting significant regression represents the mapping of the individual biomarkers within health status space for a gradient of fluoranthene toxicity. From this analysis, we concluded that endocytosis is an indicator of healthy snails while proliferation of ER and to a lesser extent induced ECOD are indicative of dysfunction and reduced health. Finally, the results indicate that stress induced by chronic exposure to a PAH is reversible.

  13. A fungal P450 (CYP5136A3 capable of oxidizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disrupting alkylphenols: role of Trp(129 and Leu(324.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khajamohiddin Syed

    Full Text Available The model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which is known for its versatile pollutant-biodegradation ability, possesses an extraordinarily large repertoire of P450 monooxygenases in its genome. However, the majority of these P450s have hitherto unknown function. Our initial studies using a genome-wide gene induction strategy revealed multiple P450s responsive to individual classes of xenobiotics. Here we report functional characterization of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP5136A3 that showed common responsiveness and catalytic versatility towards endocrine-disrupting alkylphenols (APs and mutagenic/carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Using recombinant CYP5136A3, we demonstrated its oxidation activity towards APs with varying alkyl side-chain length (C3-C9, in addition to PAHs (3-4 ring size. AP oxidation involves hydroxylation at the terminal carbon of the alkyl side-chain (ω-oxidation. Structure-activity analysis based on a 3D model indicated a potential role of Trp(129 and Leu(324 in the oxidation mechanism of CYP5136A3. Replacing Trp(129 with Leu (W129L and Phe (W129F significantly diminished oxidation of both PAHs and APs. The W129L mutation caused greater reduction in phenanthrene oxidation (80% as compared to W129F which caused greater reduction in pyrene oxidation (88%. Almost complete loss of oxidation of C3-C8 APs (83-90% was observed for the W129L mutation as compared to W129F (28-41%. However, the two mutations showed a comparable loss (60-67% in C9-AP oxidation. Replacement of Leu(324 with Gly (L324G caused 42% and 54% decrease in oxidation activity towards phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively. This mutation also caused loss of activity towards C3-C8 APs (20-58%, and complete loss of activity toward nonylphenol (C9-AP. Collectively, the results suggest that Trp(129 and Leu(324 are critical in substrate recognition and/or regio-selective oxidation of PAHs and APs. To our knowledge, this is the first

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions between H2O2 and copper and copper oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Yang, Miao; Gasparrini, Claudia; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2015-09-28

    One of the main challenges for the nuclear power industry today is the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the most developed methods for its long term storage is the Swedish KBS-3 concept where the spent fuel is sealed inside copper canisters and placed 500 meters down in the bedrock. Gamma radiation will penetrate the canisters and be absorbed by groundwater thereby creating oxidative radiolysis products such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (HO˙). Both H2O2 and HO˙ are able to initiate corrosion of the copper canisters. In this work the kinetics and mechanism of reactions between the stable radiolysis product, H2O2, and copper and copper oxides were studied. Also the dissolution of copper into solution after reaction with H2O2 was monitored by ICP-OES. The experiments show that both H2O2 and HO˙ are present in the systems with copper and copper oxides. Nevertheless, these species do not appear to influence the dissolution of copper to the same extent as observed in recent studies in irradiated systems. This strongly suggests that aqueous radiolysis can only account for a very minor part of the observed radiation induced corrosion of copper.

  15. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    of the activation of NO by O2 with the fast SCR reaction, enabled by the release of NO2. According to the scheme, the SCR reaction can be divided in an oxidation of the catalyst by NO + O2 and a reduction by NO + NH3; these steps together constitute a complete catalytic cycle. Furthermore both NO and NH3...... are required in the reduction, and, nally, oxidation by NO + O2 or NO2 leads to the same state of the catalyst. These points are shown experimentally for a Cu-CHA catalyst, by combining in situ X-ray absorption spectrosocpy (XAS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Fourier transform infrared...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....

  16. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin, E-mail: ntp@dlmu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  17. Abnormal Reactions of Free Radicals and Oxidative Damages in the Bodies of Patients With Chronic Glomerulonephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the abnormal reactions of a series of free radicals and the oxidative damages induced by free radical abnormal reactions in the bodies of patients with chronic glomerulonephritis. Methods Eighty chronic glomerulonephritis patients (CGNP) and eighty healthy adult volunteers (HAV) were enrolled in a random control study, in which concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma, lipoperoxides (LPO) in plasma and in erythrocytes, and vitamin C (VC),vitamin E (VE) and beta-carotene (β-CAR) in plasma as well as activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in erythrocytes were determined with spectrophotometric assays. Results Compared with the average values of the above biochemical parameters in the HAV group, the average values of NO in plasma, and LPO in plasma and erythrocytes in the CGNP group were significantly increased (P = 0.0001), while those of VC, VE and β-CAR in plasma as well as those of SOD, CAT and GPX in erythrocytes in the CGNP group were significantly decreased (P = 0.0001). Pearson product-moment correlation analysis showed that with increase of the concentration of blood creatinine as well as prolongation of the course of disease in the CGNP, the concentrations of NO in plasma, and LPO in plasma and erythrocytes in the CGNP increased gradually, while the concentrations of VC, VE and β-CAR in plasma as well as the activities of SOD, CAT and GPX in erythrocytes in the CGNP decreased gradually (P = 0.002454 - 0.000001).The relative risk ratio (RR) of the above biochemical parameters reflecting oxidative damages in the bodies of CGNP ranged from 6.061 to 72.429. The reliability coefficient (alpha) that the above biochemical parameters were used to reflect the oxidative damages of the CGNP was 0.8137,standardized item alpha = 0.9728, Hotelling's T-Squared = 1135680.191, F = 53274.6478, P =0.000001. Conclusions The findings irt this study show that in the bodies of CGNP a series of free

  18. Gold-TiO2-Nickel catalysts for low temperature-driven CO oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Reyes, Mariana; Zanella, Rodolfo; Maturano-Rojas, Viridiana; Rodríguez-González, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Nickel-doped-TiO2 catalysts were prepared by the sol-gel method and surface modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the urea-deposition-precipitation technique. The as-synthesized catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman and XPS spectroscopies, N2 physisorption, STEM-HAADF microscopy and TPR hydrogen consumption. The Au/TiO2-Ni catalysts were evaluated catalytically performing CO oxidation reactions. The catalyst with nickel content of 1 wt. % (Au/TiO2-Ni 1) showed the highest CO conversion with respect to the high-nickel-content or bare/commercial TiO2 at 0 °C. In situ DRIFTS showed a strong participation of both nickel due to the presence of surface-nickel-metallic nanoparticles formed during the CO adsorption process at reaction temperatures above 200 °C, and surface-bridged-nickel-CO species. A minor deactivation rate was observed for the Au/TiO2-Ni 1 catalyst in comparison with the Au/TiO2 one. The oxygen vacancies that were created on the sol-gel-doped TiO2 improved the catalytic behavior during the performance of CO oxidation reactions, and inhibited the AuNP sintering.

  19. Polytetrafluoroethylene-jacketed stirrer modified with graphene oxide and polydopamine for the efficient extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zinxin; Mwadini, Mwadini Ahmada; Chen, Zilin

    2016-10-01

    Steel stirrers jacketed with polytetrafluoroethylene can be regarded as an ideal substrate for stirrer bar sorptive extraction. However, it is still a great challenge to immobilize graphene onto a polytetrafluoroethylene stirrer due to the high chemical resistance of the surface of a polytetrafluoroethylene stirrer. We describe here a method to modify the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene stirrers with graphene. In this work, graphene was used as the sorbent due to its excellent adsorption capability for aromatic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic compounds. Graphene was successfully immobilized onto polytetrafluoroethylene-stirrer by a bio-inspired polydopamine functionalization method. The graphene-modified polytetrafluoroethylene-stirrer shows good stability and tolerance to stirring, ultrasonication, strong acidic and basic solutions, and to organic solvents. The multilayer coating was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. After the optimization of some experimental conditions, the graphene-modified polytetrafluoroethylene stirrer was used for the stirrer bar sorptive extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in which the binding between the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the graphene layer was mainly based on π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions. The graphene-modified polytetrafluoroethylene-stirrer-based stirrer bar sorptive extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with great extraction efficiency, with enrichment factors from 18 to 62. The method has low limits of detection of 1-5 pg/mL, wide linear range (5-100 and 10-200 pg/mL), good linearity (R ≥ 0.9957) and good reproducibility (RSD ≤ 6.45%). The proposed method has been applied to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real dust samples. Good recoveries were obtained, ranging from 88.53 to 109.43%.

  20. Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and oxidative stress in people living near e-waste recycling facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shao-You; Li, Yan-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Gui-Hua; Huang, Ming-Zhi; Li, Xiao; Ruan, Ju-Jun; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-waste recycling activities in China is known. However, little is known on the association between PAH exposure and oxidative damage to DNA and lipid content in people living near e-waste dismantling sites. In this study, ten hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) and two biomarkers [8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA)] of oxidative stress were investigated in urine samples collected from people living in and around e-waste dismantling facilities, and in reference population from rural and urban areas in China. The urinary levels of ∑10OH-PAHs determined in e-waste recycling area (GM: 25.4μg/g Cre) were significantly higher (pe-waste workers (36.6μg/g Cre) showed significantly higher (pe-waste recycling site. The differences in urinary Σ10OH-PAHs levels between smokers (23.4μg/g Cre) and non-smokers (24.7μg/g Cre) were not significant (p>0.05) in e-waste dismantling sites, while these differences were significant (pe-waste dismantling site. Furthermore, we found that urinary concentrations of Σ10OH-PAHs and individual OH-PAHs were significantly associated with elevated 8-OHdG, in samples collected from e-waste dismantling site; the levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR) (r=0.284, pe-waste dismantling site may have an effect on oxidative damage to DNA among selected participants, but this needs to be validated in large studies.

  1. Oxidative reactions during early stages of beer brewing studied by electron spin resonance and spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Anne M; Festersen, Rikke M; Andersen, Mogens L

    2008-09-24

    An electron spin resonance (ESR)-based method was used for evaluating the levels of radical formation during mashing and in sweet wort. The method included the addition of 5% (v/v) ethanol together with the spin trap alpha-4-pyridyl(1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (POBN) to wort, followed by monitoring the rate of formation of POBN spin adducts during aerobic heating of the wort. The presence of ethanol makes the spin trapping method more selective and sensitive for the detection of highly reactive radicals such as hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Samples of wort that were collected during the early stages of the mashing process gave higher rates of spin adduct formation than wort samples collected during the later stages. The lower oxidative stability of the early wort samples was confirmed by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption during heating of the wort. The addition of Fe(II) to the wort samples increased the rate of spin adduct formation, whereas the addition of Fe(II) during the mashing had no effect on the oxidative stability of the wort samples. Analysis of the iron content in the sweet wort samples demonstrated that iron added during the mashing had no effect on the iron level in the wort. The moderate temperatures during the early steps of mashing allow the endogenous malt enzymes to be active. The potential antioxidative effects of different redox-active enzymes during mashing were tested by measuring the rate of spin adduct formation in samples of wort. Surprisingly, a high catalase dosage caused a significant, 20% reduction of the initial rate of radical formation, whereas superoxide dismutase had no effect on the oxidation rates. This suggests that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are not the only intermediates that play a role in the oxidative reactions occurring during aerobic oxidation of sweet wort.

  2. Iron oxide and pyrocatechol: a spectroscopy study of the reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner José Barreto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 1,2-dihydroxy-benzene (pyrocatechol (C6H6O2 with iron oxide (Fe2O3 and sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 in aqueous medium (pH 7 was investigated. Pyrocatechol suffers autoxidation and coordinates with Fe3+ in solution. The presence of S2O3(2- in solution was fundamental to generate and stabilize the pyrocatechol oxidation products as o-semiquinones. This compound was isolated and its structure characterized using FT-IR, EPR and UV-Vis Spectroscopy as [CTA][Fe(SQ2(Cat]. A thermal mass loss mechanism was proposed based on Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG to support the structural characterization.

  3. Characteristics of the oxygen evolution reaction on synthetic copper - cobalt - oxide electrodes for water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Sei; Park, Chan Su; Kim, Chi Ho; Kim, Yang Do; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Jae Ho

    2016-10-01

    A nano-sized Cu0.7Co2.3O4 powder was prepared using a thermal decomposition method to achieve an efficient anode catalyst for an economical water electrolysis system for high-purity hydrogen-gas production without using a noble-metal catalyst. This study showed that the calcination temperature should be maintained under 400 °C to obtain a spinel copper - cobalt oxide structure without secondary oxide phases. The powder calcined at 250 °C showed the highest current density at the oxygen evolution reaction. This was due mainly to the increased number of available active sites and the active surface area of the powders. Further systematic analyses of the electrochemical characteristics of Cu x Co3- x O4 synthesized by using the fusion method were performed to assess it as potential anode material for use in alkaline-anion-exchange-membrane water electrolysis.

  4. Graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Liu, Huijuan; Liu, Yang; Qu, Jiuhui; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    The development of low cost, durable and efficient nanocatalysts to substitute expensive and rare noble metals (e.g. Pt, Au and Pd) in overcoming the sluggish kinetic process of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is essential to satisfy the demand for sustainable energy conversion and storage in the future. Graphene based transition metal oxide nanocomposites have extensively been proven to be a type of promising highly efficient and economic nanocatalyst for optimizing the ORR to solve the world-wide energy crisis. Synthesized nanocomposites exhibit synergetic advantages and avoid the respective disadvantages. In this feature article, we concentrate on the recent leading works of different categories of introduced transition metal oxides on graphene: from the commonly-used classes (FeOx, MnOx, and CoOx) to some rare and heat-studied issues (TiOx, NiCoOx and Co-MnOx). Moreover, the morphologies of the supported oxides on graphene with various dimensional nanostructures, such as one dimensional nanocrystals, two dimensional nanosheets/nanoplates and some special multidimensional frameworks are further reviewed. The strategies used to synthesize and characterize these well-designed nanocomposites and their superior properties for the ORR compared to the traditional catalysts are carefully summarized. This work aims to highlight the meaning of the multiphase establishment of graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites and its structural-dependent ORR performance and mechanisms.

  5. Characterization of Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles Obtained by Hydrolysis Reaction of Ethylene Glycol Solution of Alkoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Uekawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and stable sols of titanium oxide nanoparticles were obtained by heating a mixture of ethylene glycol solution of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TIP and a NH3 aqueous solution at 368 K for 24 h. The concentration of NH3 aqueous solution affected the structure of the obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles. For NH3 aqueous solution concentrations higher than 0.2 mol/L, a mixture of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles and layered titanic acid nanoparticles was obtained. The obtained sol was very stable without formation of aggregated precipitates and gels. Coordination of ethylene glycol to Ti4+ ions inhibited the rapid hydrolysis reaction and aggregation of the obtained nanoparticles. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles had a large specific surface area: larger than 350 m2/g. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles showed an enhanced adsorption towards the cationic dye molecules. The selective adsorption corresponded to presence of layered titanic acid on the obtained anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

  6. Kinetic stabilization against the oxidation reaction induced by a silaalkane cage in a thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaka, Wataru; Ohmizu, Soichiro; Kira, Mitsuo

    2014-02-01

    Macrocage molecules with a bridged rotor have been synthesized as molecular gyroscopes. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction of the thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope, whose thiophene ring was bridged inside a silaalkane cage, was investigated. A remarkable kinetic stabilization against the oxidation of the thiophene moiety induced by the molecular cage framework was observed.

  7. Enhanced reversibility and durability of a solid oxide Fe-air redox battery by carbothermic reaction derived energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Huang, Kevin

    2014-01-18

    The recently developed solid oxide metal-air redox battery is a new technology capable of high-rate chemistry. Here we report that the performance, reversibility and stability of a solid oxide iron-air redox battery can be significantly improved by nanostructuring energy storage materials from a carbothermic reaction.

  8. The direct oxidative diene cyclization and related reactions in natural product synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes is a valuable synthetic method for the (diastereoselective preparation of substituted tetrahydrofurans. Closely related reactions start from 5,6-dihydroxy or 5-hydroxyalkenes to generate similar products in a mechanistically analogous manner. After a brief overview on the history of this group of transformations and a survey on mechanistic and stereochemical aspects, this review article provides a summary on applications in natural product synthesis. Moreover, current limitations and future directions in this area of chemistry are discussed.

  9. Catalytic methanation reaction over supported nickel-rhodium oxide for purification of simulated natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar; Rusmidah Ali; Susilawati Toemen

    2011-01-01

    In this research,new catalyst with high industrial impact is developed,which can catalyze the conversion of CO2 to methane through methanation reaction.A series of catalysts based on nickel oxide were prepared using wetness impregnation technique and ageing,followed by calcination at 400 ℃.Rh/Ni (30∶70)/Al2O3 catalyst was revealed as the most potential catalyst based on the results of catalytic activity measurementmonitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography (GC).The results showed 90.1% CO2 conversion and 70.8% yield at 400 ℃.

  10. Radiolytic reactions of nitro blue tetrazolium under oxidative and reductive conditions: a pulse radiolysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; Baranyai, M.; Moussa, A.; Othman, I.; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1999-08-01

    The radiolytic reactions of the ditetrazolium salt nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBTCl 2) were studied by pulse radiolysis technique in aqueous solution under reducing and oxidising conditions with the aim of potential dosimetry application. Under reducing conditions the fast formation of the tetrazolinyl radical is observed that is followed by the appearance of monoformazan (MF +), i.e. one of the tetrazolium rings is reduced to formazan. The formation of the water-insoluble diformazan, i.e. the result of the second reduction step was not observed in pulse radiolysis. Formazan formation was not found under oxidative conditions.

  11. Investigation of reaction conditions on morphology and optical properties of Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodarresiyeh, H. A.; Abakshonok, A. V.; Agabekov, V. E.; Eryomin, A. N.; Shahab, S. N.

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) were synthesized by precipitation method in the presence of various polymers. Rod shaped ZnO NPs (length ~ 1 micron) were obtained at 70 °C in a reaction medium containing 10-20 mM of zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O), 0.05-0.1 mg/ml of polyethylenimine (PEI) and 20 mM of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). Properties of ZnO NPs were characterized by fluorescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Innovative Catalysis in Organic Synthesis Oxidation, Hydrogenation, and C-X Bond Forming Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Pher G

    2012-01-01

    Authored by a European team of leaders in the field, this book compiles innovative approaches for C-X bond forming processes frequently applied in organic synthesis. It covers all key types of catalysis, including homogeneous, heterogeneous, and organocatalysis, as well as mechanistic and computational studies. Special attention is focused on the improvement of efficiency and sustainability of important catalytic processes, such as selective oxidations, hydrogenation and cross-coupling reactions.The result is a valuable resource for both advanced researchers in academia and industry, as well a

  13. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  14. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-03

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed.

  15. Ultrasmooth reaction-sintered silicon carbide surface resulting from combination of thermal oxidation and ceria slurry polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Dai, Yifan; Deng, Hui; Guan, Chaoliang; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-06-17

    An ultrasmooth reaction-sintered silicon carbide surface with an rms roughness of 0.424 nm is obtained after thermal oxidation for 30 min followed by ceria slurry polishing for 30 min. By SEM-EDX analysis, we investigated the thermal oxidation behavior of RS-SiC, in which the main components are Si and SiC. As the oxidation rate is higher in the area with defects, there are no scratches or cracks on the surface after oxidation. However, a bumpy structure is formed after oxidation because the oxidation rates of Si and SiC differ. Through a theoretical analysis of thermal oxidation using the Deal-Grove model and the removal of the oxide layer by ceria slurry polishing in accordance with the Preston equation, a model for obtaining an ultrasmooth surface is proposed and the optimal processing conditions are presented.

  16. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  17. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  18. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, S., E-mail: rajagopalan78@hotmail.com [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Materials Science Group (India); Asthalter, T., E-mail: t.asthalter@web.de [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Germany); Rabe, V.; Laschat, S. [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) in pyridine solution, Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe{sup (III)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} and Fe{sup (II)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 4}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  19. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  20. Synthesis of Cu-HMS Molecular Sieve and Aromatic Hydrocarbon Oxidation Using Cu-HMS%Cu-HMS分子筛的合成及对芳烃氧化反应的催化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美英; 王乐夫; 季山; 黄仲涛; 罗维

    2004-01-01

    采用中性模板法于室温下合成了含铜的分子筛Cu-HMS,并以该分子筛为多相催化剂,对温和条件下异丙苯的氧化进行了研究.结果表明,以硝酸铜为铜源的Cu-HMS-3催化剂具有很高的催化活性,异丙苯转化率和过氧化氢异丙苯选择性都很高,分别达39.6%和98.5%.催化剂可以回收使用.另外,以Cu-HMS-3为催化剂对甲苯和乙苯的氧化进行了研究,发现在本实验条件下,甲苯未发生反应,3种芳烃的活性顺序为甲苯乙苯<异丙苯.%A copper-containing molecular sieve Cu-HMS was synthesized using the neutral templating pathway at room temperature. Then the product was used as heterogeneous catalyst for the oxidation of cumene under mild conditions. The results show that Cu-HMS-3 with copper nitrate as copper source has excellent catalytic activity, high cumene conversion and cumene hydroperoxide selectivity, that is, 39.6% and 98.5%. The catalyst can be recycled. Furthermore, the oxidations of toluene and ethylbenzene were investigated with Cu-HMS-3 as catalyst. It is found that there is no oxidation reaction observed for toluene. The activities of the three aromatic hydrocarbons follow the order of tolueneethylbenzene

  1. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  2. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  3. Effects of non-thermal plasmas and electric field on hydrocarbon/air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Biswa

    2009-10-01

    Need to improve fuel efficiency, and reduce emission from hydrocarbon combustor in automotive and gas turbine engines have reinvigorated interest in reducing combustion instability of a lean flame. The heat generation rate in a binary reaction is HQ =N^2 c1c2 Q exp(-E/RT), where N is the density, c1 and c2 are mol fractions of the reactants, Q is the reaction heat release, E is the activation energy, R is the gas constant and T is the average temperature. For hydrocarbon-air reactions, the typical value of E/R ˜20, so most heat release reactions are confined to a thin reaction sheet at T >=1400 K. The lean flame burning condition is susceptible to combustion instability due to a critical balance between heat generation and heat loss rates, especially at high gas flow rate. Radical injection can increase flame speed by reducing the hydrocarbon oxidation reaction activation barrier and it can improve flame stability. Advances in nonequilibrium plasma generation at high pressure have prompted its application for energy efficient radical production to enhance hydrocarbon-air combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges and short pulse excited corona discharges have been used to enhance combustion stability. Direct electron impact dissociation of hydrocarbon and O2 produces radicals with lower fuel oxidation reaction activation barriers, initiating heat release reaction CnHm+O CnHm-1+ OH (and other similar sets of reactions with partially dissociated fuel) below the typical cross-over temperature. Also, N2 (A) produced in air discharge at a moderate E/n can dissociate O2 leading to oxidation of fuel at lower gas temperature. Low activation energy reactions are also possible by dissociation of hydrocarbon CnHm+e -> CnHm-2+H2+e, where a chain propagation reaction H2+ O OH+H can be initiated at lower gas temperature than possible under thermal equilibrium kinetics. Most of heat release comes from the reaction CO+OH-> CO2 +H, nonthermal OH production seem to improve

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems with integrated reforming or gasification of hydrocarbons; Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)-Systeme mit integrierter Reformierung bzw. Vergasung von Kohlenwasserstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlitzberger, Christian

    2012-07-01

    hydrocarbons as fuel are simulated. The simulation results serve as base for the final evaluation of the stack- and system-design concerning operation and feasibility and show the capability of the concept to meet the demands listed above as high electrical system-efficiencies up to 70% and nearly efficiency-neutral CO{sub 2}-separation. [German] In der Arbeit werden innovative Konzepte fuer baulich, thermisch und stofflich hochintegrierte oxidkeramische Brennstoffzellen (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC))-Systeme mit optionaler CO{sub 2}-Abscheidung entwickelt und untersucht. Zunaechst erfolgt die Ausarbeitung von Moeglichkeiten zur Wirkungsgradsteigerung, wie die Verschaltung der Gaserzeugungseinheit mit der Brennstoffzelle nach dem Prinzip der chemischen Waermepumpe oder die serielle elektrische Verschaltung der Einzelzellen. Diese Optionen werden anschliessend bezueglich ihrer thermodynamischen Grenzen, wie maximal erzielbare Wirkungsgrade oder maximal moeglicher interner Abwaermenutzung, evaluiert. Darauf aufbauend erfolgt unter Beachtung des Stands der Technik eine methodische Konzeption und Konstruktion eines SOFC-Systems, bei dem Reformierungsreaktor, Brennstoffzelle sowie die thermische Gaskonditionierung in einem Stack-Modul vereint sind. Diese Grundeinheit kann den Anwendungs-, Betriebs-und Brennstoffanforderungen angepasst werden und stellt aufgrund des hohen baulichen Integrationsgrades sowie der nur geringen Anzahl an zusaetzlich benoetigten peripheren Komponenten ein sehr kompaktes System dar. Der zweite Teil der Arbeit beschreibt die mathematische Modeliierung der entsprechenden Systemkomponenten sowie die Modellimplementierung in das institutseigene, C++ basierte Kreislaufsimulationsprogramm ENBIPRO (Energie-Bilanz-Programm). Mittels der mathematischen Modelle werden SOFC-Systeme basierend auf dem entwickelten integrierten Stack-und System-Konzept fuer verschiedene Brennstoffe und Systemverschaltungen simuliert. Die Simulationsergebnisse dienen als Grundlage fuer

  5. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  6. Heteropolymolybdate as a New Reaction-controlled Phase-transfer Catalyst for Efficient Alcohol Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Huan WENG; Jin Yan WANG; Xi Gao JIAN

    2006-01-01

    A new catalytic process for the synthesis of aldehyde from alcohol by oxidation with H2O2 with high selectivity was studied. In this system, heteropolymolybdate [C7H7N(CH3)3]3{PO4[MoO(O2)2]4} was utilized as the reaction-controlled phase-transfer catalyst to catalyze oxidation of benzyl and aliphatic alcohols. The molar ratio of H2O2 and alcohol was 0.75, no other by-products were detected by gas chromatography, the results of oxidation reaction indicated that the catalyst has high activity and stability.

  7. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  8. Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Ethanol Oxidation Reaction on Palladium-Silver Nanoparticles via Removable Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hucheng; Shang, Yingying; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Jianji

    2017-05-17

    This work developed a facile colloidal route to synthesize BH4(-)-capped PdxAgy nanoparticles (NPs) in water using the reducing ionic liquids of [Cnmim]BH4, and the resulting NPs were prone to form the nanocomposites with [amim](+)-modified reduced graphene (RG). The removal of the metal-free inorganic ions of BH4(-) can create the profoundly exposed interfaces on the PdxAgy NPs during the electrooxidation, and favor the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in lowering energy barrier. The counterions of [Cnmim](+) can gather ethanol, OH(-) ions, and the reaction intermediates on catalysts, and synergistically interact with RG to facilitate the charge transfer in nanocomposites. The interface-modified RG nanosheets can effectively segregate the PdxAgy NPs from aggregation during the EOR. Along with the small size of 4.7 nm, the high alloying degree of 60.2%, the large electrochemical active surface area of 64.1 m(2) g(-1), and the great peak current density of 1501 mA cm(-2) mg(-1), Pd1Ag2@[C2mim]BH4-amimRG nanocomposite exhibits the low oxidation potentials, strong poison resistance, and stable catalytic activity for EOR in alkaline media, and hence can be employed as a promising anodic catalyst in ethanol fuel cells.

  9. The role of Ile87 of CYP158A2 in oxidative coupling reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bin; Bellamine, Aouatef; Lei, Li; Waterman, Michael R. (Vanderbilt)

    2012-05-15

    Both CYP158A1 and CYP158A2 are able to catalyze an oxidative C-C coupling reaction producing biflaviolin or triflaviolin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The substrate-bound crystal structures of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1 reveal that the side chain of Ile87 in CYP158A2 points to the active site contacting the distal flaviolin molecule, however, the bulkier side chain of Lys90 in CYP158A1 (corresponding to Ile87 in CYP158A2) is toward the distal surface of the protein. These results suggest that these residues could be important in determining product regiospecificity. In order to explore the role of the two residues in catalysis, the reciprocal mutants, Ile87Lys and Lys90Ile, of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1, respectively, were generated and characterized. The mutant Ile87Lys enzyme forms two isomers of biflaviolin instead of three isomers of biflaviolin in wild-type CYP158A2. CYP158A1 containing the substitution of lysine with isoleucine has the same catalytic activity compared with the wild-type CYP158A1. The crystal structure of Ile87Lys showed that the BC loop in the mutant is in a very different orientation compared with the BC loop in both CYP158A1/A2 structures. These results shed light on the mechanism of the oxidative coupling reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450.

  10. COMPETITION BETWEEN THE REACTION MEDIUM AND NANOSTRUCTURED ZnO IN THE PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF ANTHRACENE. TOWARD AN OPTIMAL PROCESS FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca L. Martínez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is considered an important health issue due to the toxicity of these compounds. Photocatalytic degradation of anthracene, a representative molecule of PAHs, using the high quantum yield semiconductor ZnO, has been reported. The solubility of anthracene in water makes necessary to use mixtures with organic solvents in fundamental degradation studies. It is well known that some organic solvents participate in the photochemical transformation of this molecule. In the PAHs photocatalysis, the competition between a semiconductor and solvents has not reported. Therefore, in this work, we decided to study the photocatalytic degradation of anthracene with two common reaction media and nanostructured ZnO. The semiconductor was obtained by a one pot method which consists in an alkaline hydrolysis of Zn(CH3COO2·2H2O in ethanol. Nanoparticles size in colloidal dispersion was calculated using UV-Vis spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microcopy (HR-TEM. ZnO powder was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction to be used in photocatalytic experiments. Surface area determination and photocurrent spectroscopic experiments were also carried out. Linear sweep voltammetries under darkness and UV-Vis irradiation indicate a charge separation due to photoexcitation. Photocatalytic experiments in ethanol:water pH 12 (1:1 and acetone:water pH 12 (1:1, with and without ZnO was explored. The results demonstrated that ethanol:water and acetone:water promotes the photo-transformation of anthracene to 9,10-anthraquinone. Meanwhile, ZnO transformed anthracene to benzoic acid and to 9,10-anthraquinone in ethanol:water and acetone:water, respectively. A faster photochemical kinetic is observed when acetone was used as solvent in the presence and in the absence of ZnO.

  11. Imaging the oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on phospholipids at the interface between aqueous phase and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The lipid peroxidation process has attracted much attention because of the growing evidence of its involvement in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Herein, we report a simple, label-free method to study the oxidation of phospholipids by the Fenton reaction at the interface between an aqueous phase and immiscible liquid crystals (LCs). The different images produced by the orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) corresponded to the presence or absence of oxidized 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DOPG). The oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on DOPG were evaluated by monitoring the orientational response of liquid crystals upon contact with the oxidized DOPG solutions. DOPG was oxidized into chain-changed products containing hydroxy, carbonyl, or aldehyde groups, resulting in the rearrangement of the phospholipid layer. This induced the orientational transition of LCs from homeotropic to planar states; therefore, a dark to bright optical shift was observed. This shift was due to the Fenton reaction preventing DOPG to induce the orientational alignment of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface. We also used an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to confirm the effects of oxidation on phospholipids by the Fenton reaction. Using this simple method, a new approach for investigating phospholipid oxidation was established with high resolution and easy accessibility.

  12. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  13. Association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms with leprosy reactions in northern Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Amit; Biswas, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Ekata; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Kamal, Raj; Arora, Mamta; Sagar, Harish; Natarajan, Mohan; Bhagyawant, Sameer S; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja

    2017-07-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy that affects mainly skin and nerves. Polymorphisms of certain genes are substantiated to be associated with the susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. The present investigation addressed the association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms and leprosy in a population from northern part of India. A total of 323 leprosy cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped for four NOS2 promoter variants (rs1800482, rs2779249, rs8078340 and rs2301369) using FRET technology in Real Time PCR. None of these SNPs in promoter sites was associated with susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. NOS2 rs1800482 was found to be monomorphic with GG genotype. However, NOS2-1026T allele was observed to be in higher frequency with leprosy cases (BL and LL) who were not suffering from any reactional episodes compared to cases with ENL reaction {OR=0.30, 95% CI (0.10-0.86), p=0.024}. NOS2-1026GT genotype was more prevalent in cases without reaction (BT, BB and BL) compared to RR reactional patients {OR=0.38, 95% CI (0.17-0.86), p=0.02}. Although haplotype analysis revealed that no haplotype was associated with leprosy susceptibility/resistance with statistical significance, GTG haplotype was noted to be more frequent in healthy controls. These SNPs are observed to be in linkage disequilibrium. Although, these SNPs are not likely to influence leprosy vulnerability, -1026G>T SNP was indicated to have noteworthy role in leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  15. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  16. Simultaneous NOx and hydrocarbon emissions control for lean-burn engines using low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell at open circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Ying

    2012-02-21

    The high fuel efficiency of lean-burn engines is associated with high temperature and excess oxygen during combustion and thus is associated with high-concentration NO(x) emission. This work reveals that very high concentration of NO(x) in the exhaust can be reduced and hydrocarbons (HCs) can be simultaneously oxidized using a low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). An SOFC unit is constructed with Ni-YSZ as the anode, YSZ as the electrolyte, and La(0.6)Sr(0.4)CoO(3) (LSC)-Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95) as the cathode, with or without adding vanadium to LSC. SOFC operation at 450 °C and open circuit can effectively treat NO(x) over the cathode at a very high concentration in the simulated exhaust. Higher NO(x) concentration up to 5000 ppm can result in a larger NO(x) to N(2) rate. Moreover, a higher oxygen concentration promotes NO conversion. Complete oxidation of HCs can be achieved by adding silver to the LSC current collecting layer. The SOFC-based emissions control system can treat NO(x) and HCs simultaneously, and can be operated without consuming the anode fuel (a reductant) at near the engine exhaust temperature to eliminate the need for reductant refilling and extra heating.

  17. Oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by ozone and nitrogen dioxide: reaction mechanisms and biological and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhiya, L; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-04-01

    The nitration of tyrosine by atmospheric oxidants, O3 and NO2, is an important cause for the spread of allergenic diseases. In the present study, the mechanism and pathways for the reaction of tyrosine with the atmospheric oxidants O3 and NO2 are studied using DFT-M06-2X, B3LYP, and B3LYP-D methods with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The energy barrier for the initial oxidation reactions is also calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The reaction is studied in gas, aqueous, and lipid media. The initial oxidation of tyrosine by O3 proceeds by H atom abstraction and addition reactions and leads to the formation of six different intermediates. The subsequent nitration reaction is studied for all the intermediates, and the results show that the nitration affects both the side chain and the aromatic ring of tyrosine. The rate constant of the favorable oxidation and nitration reaction is calculated using variational transition state theory over the temperature range of 278-350 K. The spectral properties of the oxidation and nitration products are calculated at the TD-M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The fate of the tyrosine radical intermediate is studied by its reaction with glutathione antioxidant. This study provides an enhanced understanding of the oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by O3 and NO2 in the context of improving the air quality and reducing the allergic diseases.

  18. Screening of MgO- and CeO2-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Oxidative Coupling of Methane to C2+ Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Istadi; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2004-01-01

    The catalyst screening tests for carbon dioxide oxidative coupling of methane (CO2-OCM)have been investigated over ternary and binary metal oxide catalysts. The catalysts are prepared by doping MgO- and CeO2-based solids with oxides from alkali (Li2O), alkaline earth (CaO), and transition metal groups (WO3 or MnO). The presence of the peroxide (O22-) active sites on the Li2O2, revealed by Raman spectroscopy, may be the key factor in the enhanced performance of some of the Li2O/MgO catalysts.The high reducibility of the CeO2 catalyst, an important factor in the CO2-OCM catalyst activity, may be enhanced by the presence of manganese oxide species. The manganese oxide species increases oxygen mobility and oxygen vacancies in the CeO2 catalyst. Raman and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopies revealed the presence of lattice vibrations of metal-oxygen bondings and active sites in which the peaks corresponding to the bulk crystalline structures of Li2O, CaO, WO3 and MnO are detected. The performance of 5%MnO/15%CaO/CeO2 catalyst is the most potential among the CeO2-based catalysts,although lower than the 2%Li2O/MgO catalyst. The 2%Li2O/MgO catalyst showed the most promising C2+ hydrocarbons selectivity and yield at 98.0% and 5.7%, respectively.

  19. Assessment of association of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with bronchial asthma and oxidative stress in children: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Ram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH originate from the incomplete combustion of organic matter and ambient air pollution by these is increasing. There is also an increase in the global prevalence of asthma, for which environmental pollution has been recognized as one of the important factors. Exposure to pollutants and other allergens induces chronic airway inflammation by generation of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess association, if any, between exposure to PAH and asthma as well as oxidative stress in children. Method: In this hospital-based case control study, cases of bronchial asthma aged 1-14 years and healthy matched controls were included. Oxidative stress was measured by assessing the levels of enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde (MDA, and reduced glutathione (GSH. Results : Forty-two cases and 20 controls were enrolled. Mean blood level of phenanthrene, a PAH, was 63.11 ppb ± 115.62 and 4.20 ppb ± 10.68 ppb in cases and controls, respectively ( P = 0.02. Mean blood levels of GSH was significantly lower in cases and controls (27.39 mg/ml ± 11.09 versus 47.39 g/ml ± 13.83; P -value = 0.001. Likewise, mean blood level of MDA in nanomole/ml was significantly higher in asthma as compared with controls (12.85 ± 5.40 versus 8.19 ± 5.16; P -value = 0.002, suggestive of increased oxidative stress. Conclusions: Because elevated blood level of phenanthrene is associated with bronchial asthma as well as with oxidative stress, measures to reduce exposure to PAH may possibly lead to reduced incidence and severity of bronchial asthma.

  20. New insights into atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation: kinetics, reaction products and transformation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuefei; Dong, Changxun; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe

    2015-03-21

    The widespread occurrence of atrazine in waters poses potential risk to ecosystem and human health. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms and transformation pathways of atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (Co(II)/PMS). Co(II)/PMS was found to be more efficient for ATZ elimination in aqueous solution than Fe(II)/PMS process. ATZ oxidation by Co(II)/PMS followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the reaction rate constant (k(obs)) increased appreciably with increasing Co(II) concentration. Increasing initial PMS concentration favored the decomposition of ATZ, however, no linear relationship between k(obs) and PMS concentration was observed. Higher efficiency of ATZ oxidation was observed around neutral pH, implying the possibility of applying Co(II)/PMS process under environmental realistic conditions. Natural organic matter (NOM), chloride (Cl(-)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) showed detrimental effects on ATZ degradation, particularly at higher concentrations. Eleven products were identified by applying solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS) techniques. Major transformation pathways of ATZ included dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation, and alkyl chain oxidation. Detailed mechanisms responsible for these transformation pathways were discussed. Our results reveal that Co(II)/PMS process might be an efficient technique for remediation of groundwater contaminated by ATZ and structurally related s-triazine herbicides.

  1. Oxidation reactions of 1,3-diphenylpropane-1,3-dione

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Medha Rele; B S Patro; S Adhikari; G P Kalena; S Chattopadhyay; T Mukherjee

    2002-12-01

    The free radical scavenging properties and possible antioxidant activity of 1,3-diphenylpropane-1,3-dione (1) are reported. Pulse radiolysis technique was employed to study the one-electron oxidation of 1 with various radicals viz. CCl3O$_{2}^{\\bullet}$, N$_{3}^{\\bullet}$ and ${}^{\\bullet}$OH in homogeneous aqueous solution. All these radicals reacted with 1 under ambient conditions at almost diffusion controlled rates producing transient species with an absorption maximum around 420 nm that decayed at first order rates. The transient absorption peak was shifted in the case of CCl3OO$^{\\bullet}$ radical reaction with 1 due to change in the polarity of the medium. Formation of a stable product with a broad absorption band starting from 400 nm and cut off at 230 nm was observed in the oxidation of 1 with ${}^{\\bullet}$OH and ${}^{\\bullet}$N3 radicals. In a biological system also, 1 showed significant inhibitory activity against Fe2+-mediated lipid peroxidation. Based on these observations, a suitable mechanism for the oxidation of 1 has been proposed.

  2. The borohydride oxidation reaction on La-Ni-based hydrogen-storage alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoalino, Waldemir J; Thompson, Stephen J; Russell, Andrea E; Ticianelli, Edson A

    2014-07-21

    This work provides insights into the processes involved in the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media on metal hydride alloys formed by LaNi(4.7)Sn(0.2)Cu(0.1) and LaNi(4.78)Al(0.22) with and without deposited Pt, Pd, and Au. The results confirm the occurrence of hydrolysis of the borohydride ions when the materials are exposed to BH(4)(-) and a continuous hydriding of the alloys during BH(4)(-) oxidation measurements at low current densities. The activity for the direct BOR is low in both bare metal hydride alloys, but the rate of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis and the hydrogen-storage capacity are higher, while the rate of H diffusion is slower for bare LaNi(4.78) Al(0.22). The addition of Pt and Pd to both alloys results in an increase of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis, but the H(2) formed is rapidly oxidized at the Pt-modified catalysts. In the case of Au modification, a small increase in the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis is observed as compared to the bare alloys. The presence of Au and Pd also leads to a reduction of the rates of alloy hydriding/de-hydriding. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Changes to the chemical composition of soot from heterogeneous oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Worsnop, Douglas R; Wilson, Kevin R; Kroll, Jesse H

    2015-02-19

    The atmospheric aging of soot particles, in which various atmospheric processes alter the particles' chemical and physical properties, is poorly understood and consequently is not well-represented in models. In this work, soot aging via heterogeneous oxidation by OH and ozone is investigated using an aerosol flow reactor coupled to a new high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometric technique that utilizes infrared vaporization and single-photon vacuum ultraviolet ionization. This analytical technique simultaneously measures the elemental and organic carbon components of soot, allowing for the composition of both fractions to be monitored. At oxidant exposures relevant to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes (the equivalent of several days of oxidation), the elemental carbon portion of the soot, which makes up the majority of the particle mass, undergoes no discernible changes in mass or composition. In contrast, the organic carbon (which in the case of methane flame soot is dominated by aliphatic species) is highly reactive, undergoing first the addition of oxygen-containing functional groups and ultimately the loss of organic carbon mass from fragmentation reactions that form volatile products. These changes occur on time scales comparable to those of other nonoxidative aging processes such as condensation, suggesting that further research into the combined effects of heterogeneous and condensational aging is needed to improve our ability to accurately predict the climate and health impacts of soot particles.

  4. Metallic oxides for desulphurization catalyst reaction; Oxidos metalicos mistos como catalisadores para reacoes de dessulfurizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.L.B.A.; Melo, D.M.A.; Melo, M.A.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Souza, K.S.G.M. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba - Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, PB (Brazil); Barros, J.M.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande - Campos Cuite, PB (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The mixed metal oxides constitute an important class of catalytic materials widely investigated in different fields of applications. Studies of rare earth nickelates have been carried by several researchers in order to investigate the structural stability afforded by oxide formed and the existence of catalytic properties at room temperature. So, this study aims synthesize the nano sized catalyst of nickelate of lanthanum doped with strontium (La(1- x)Sr{sub x}NiO4-{sigma}; x = 0,2 and 0,3), through the Pechini method and your characterization for subsequent application in the desulfurization of thiophene reaction. The precursor solutions were calcined at 300 degree C/2h for pyrolysis of polyester and later calcinations occurred at temperatures of 500 - 1000 degree C. The resulting powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TG / DTG), surface area for adsorption of N{sub 2} by BET method, Xray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (HR{sub S}EM) and spectrometry dispersive energy (EDS). The results of XRD had show that the perovskites obtained consist of two phases (LSN and NiO) and from 700 degree C have crystalline structure. The results of SEM evidenced the obtainment of nano metric powders. The results of BET show that the powders have surface area within the range used in catalysis (5-50m{sup 2}/g). The characterization of active sites was performed by reaction of desulfurization of thiophene at room temperature and 200 degree C, the relation F/W equal to 0,7 mol h{sup -1}m{sub c}at {sup -1}. The products of the reaction were separated by gas chromatography and identified by the selective detection PFPD sulfur. All samples had presented conversion above 95%. (author)

  5. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  6. Effect of calcination temperature and reaction conditions on methane partial oxidation using lanthanum-based perovskite as oxygen donor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiaoping; YU Changchun; LI Ranjia; WU Qiong; SHI Kaijiao; HAO Zhengping

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of calcination temperature, reaction temperature, and different amounts of replenished lattice oxygen on the partial oxidation of methane (POM) to synthesis gas using perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide as oxygen donor instead of gaseous oxygen, which was prepared by the sol-gel method, and the oxides were characterized by XRD, TG/DTA, and BET. The results indicated that the particle size increased with the calcination temperature increasing, while BET and CH4 conversion declined with the calcination temperature increasing using LaFeO3 oxide as oxygen donor in the absence of gaseous oxygen. CO selectivity remained at a high level such as above 92%, and increased slightly as the calcination temperature increased. Exposure of LaFeO3 oxides to methane atmosphere enhanced the oxygen migration of in the bulk with time online owing to the loss of lattice oxygen and reduction of the oxidative stated Fe ion simultaneously. The high reaction temperature was favorable to the migration of oxygen species from the bulk toward the surface for the synthesis gas production with high CO selectivity. The product distribution and evolution for POM by sequential redox reaction was determined by amounts of replenished lattice oxygen with gaseous oxygen. The optimal process should decline the total oxidation of methane, and increase the selectivity of partial oxidation of methane.

  7. CO oxidation on PtSn nanoparticle catalysts occurs at the interface of Pt and Sn oxide domains formed under reaction conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2014-04-01

    The barrier to CO oxidation on Pt catalysts is the strongly bound adsorbed CO, which inhibits O2 adsorption and hinders CO2 formation. Using reaction studies and in situ X-ray spectroscopy with colloidally prepared, monodisperse ∼2 nm Pt and PtSn nanoparticle catalysts, we show that the addition of Sn to Pt provides distinctly different reaction sites and a more efficient reaction mechanism for CO oxidation compared to pure Pt catalysts. To probe the influence of Sn, we intentionally poisoned the Pt component of the nanoparticle catalysts using a CO-rich atmosphere. With a reaction environment comprised of 100 Torr CO and 40 Torr O2 and a temperature range between 200 and 300 C, Pt and PtSn catalysts exhibited activation barriers for CO2 formation of 133 kJ/mol and 35 kJ/mol, respectively. While pure Sn is readily oxidized and is not active for CO oxidation, the addition of Sn to Pt provides an active site for O2 adsorption that is important when Pt is covered with CO. Sn oxide was identified as the active Sn species under reaction conditions by in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. While chemical signatures of Pt and Sn indicated intermixed metallic components under reducing conditions, Pt and Sn were found to reversibly separate into isolated domains of Pt and oxidic Sn on the nanoparticle surface under reaction conditions of 100 mTorr CO and 40 mTorr O2 between temperatures of 200-275 C. Under these conditions, PtSn catalysts exhibited apparent reaction orders in O2 for CO 2 production that were 0.5 and lower with increasing partial pressures. These reaction orders contrast the first-order dependence in O 2 known for pure Pt. The differences in activation barriers, non-first-order dependence in O2, and the presence of a partially oxidized Sn indicate that the enhanced activity is due to a reaction mechanism that occurs at a Pt/Sn oxide interface present at the nanoparticle surface. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. An analytical model of hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions on electrodes partially covered with a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Lund, Peter D

    2016-05-11

    Our previous theoretical study on the performance limits of the platinum (Pt) nanoparticle catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) had shown that the mass transport losses at a partially catalyst-covered planar electrode are independent of the catalyst loading. This suggests that the two-dimensional (2D) numerical model used could be simplified to a one-dimensional (1D) model to provide an easier but equally accurate description of the operation of these HER electrodes. In this article, we derive an analytical 1D model and show that it indeed gives results that are practically identical to the 2D numerical simulations. We discuss the general principles of the model and how it can be used to extend the applicability of existing electrochemical models of planar electrodes to low catalyst loadings suitable for operating photoelectrochemical devices under unconcentrated sunlight. Since the mass transport losses of the HER are often very sensitive to the H2 concentration, we also discuss the limiting current density of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and how it is not necessarily independent of the reaction kinetics. The results give insight into the interplay of kinetic and mass-transport limitations at HER/HOR electrodes with implications for the design of kinetic experiments and the optimization of catalyst loadings in the photoelectrochemical cells.

  9. Size-Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Free Gold Nanoparticles for the Glucose Oxidation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebié, Seydou; Napporn, Teko W; Morais, Cláudia; Kokoh, K Boniface

    2016-05-18

    Understanding the fundamental relationship between the size and the structure of electrode materials is essential to design catalysts and enhance their activity. Therefore, spherical gold nanoparticles (GNSs) with a mean diameter from 4 to 15 nm were synthesized. UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and under-potential deposition of lead (UPDPb ) were used to determine the morphology, size, and surface crystallographic structure of the GNSs. The UPDPb revealed that their crystallographic facets are affected by their size and the growth process. The catalytic properties of these GNSs toward glucose electrooxidation were studied by cyclic voltammetry, taking into account the scan rate and temperature effects. The results clearly show the size-dependent electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation reactions that are controlled by diffusion. Small GNSs with an average size of 4.2 nm exhibited high catalytic activity. This drastic increase in activity results from the high specific area and reactivity of the surface electrons induced by their small size. The reaction mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Gluconolactone and gluconate were identified as the intermediate and the final reaction product, respectively, of the glucose electrooxidation.

  10. Nanoporous and highly active silicon carbide supported CeO₂-catalysts for the methane oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Claudia; Biemelt, Tim; Lohe, Martin R; Rümmeli, Mark H; Kaskel, Stefan

    2014-01-29

    CeOx @SiO2 nanoparticles are used for the first time for the generation of porous SiC materials with tailored pore diameter in the mesopore range containing encapsulated and catalytically active CeO2 nanoparticles. The nanocasting approach with a preceramic polymer and subsequent pyrolysis is performed at 1300 °C, selective leaching of the siliceous part results in CeOx /SiC catalysts with remarkable characteristics like monodisperse, spherical pores and specific surface areas of up to 438 m(2) ·g(-1) . Porous SiC materials are promising supports for high temperature applications. The catalysts show excellent activities in the oxidation of methane with onset temperatures of the reaction 270 K below the onset of the homogeneous reaction. The synthesis scheme using core-shell particles is suited to functionalize silicon carbide with a high degree of stabilization of the active nanoparticles against sintering in the core of the template even at pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 °C rendering the novel synthesis principle as an attractive approach for a wide range of catalytic reactions.

  11. Effect of atmospheric oxidative plasma treatments on polypropylenic fibers surface: Characterization and reaction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisticò, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.nistico@unito.it [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Centre of Excellence, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Magnacca, Giuliana [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Centre of Excellence, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Faga, Maria Giulia; Gautier, Giovanna [CNR-IMAMOTER, Strada delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino (Italy); D’Angelo, Domenico; Ciancio, Emanuele [Clean-NT Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Torino (Italy); Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna [Herniamesh S.r.l., Via F.lli Meliga 1/C, 10034 Chivasso (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric pressure plasma-dielectric barrier discharge (APP-DBD, open chamber configuration) was used to functionalize polypropylene (PP) fibers surface in order to generate oxidized-reactive groups such as hydroperoxides, alcohols and carbonyl species (i.e. ketones and others). Such a species increased the surface polarity, without causing material degradation. Three different types of plasma mixture (He, He/O{sub 2}, He/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O) under three different values of applied power (750, 1050, 1400 W) were investigated. The formed plasma species (O{sub 2}{sup +}, O single atom and OH radical) and their distribution were monitored via optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements, and the plasma effects on PP surface species formation were followed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Results allowed to better understand the reaction pathways between plasma phase and PP fibers. In fact, two reaction mechanisms were proposed, the first one concerning the plasma phase reactions and the second one involving material surface modifications.

  12. [The use of the [13C]/[12C] ratio for the assay of the microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziakun, A M; Kosheleva, I A; Zakharchenko, V N; Kudriavtseva, A I; Peshenko, V A; Filonov, A E; Boronin, A M

    2003-01-01

    The study deals with a comparative analysis of the relative abundances of the carbon isotopes 12C and 13C in the metabolites and biomass of the Burkholderia sp. BS3702 and Pseudomonas putida BS202-p strains capable of utilizing aliphatic (n-hexadecane) and aromatic (naphthalene) hydrocarbons as sources of carbon and energy. The isotope composition of the carbon dioxide, biomass, and exometabolites produced during the growth of Burkholderia sp. BS3702 on n-hexadecane (delta 13C = -44.6 +/- 0.2@1000) were characterized by the isotope effects delta 13CCO2 = -50.2 +/- 0.4@1000, delta 13Cbiom = -46.6 +/- 0.4@1000 and delta 13