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Sample records for hydrocarbon miscible flood

  1. Review of the Lobstick Cardium miscible flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillund, G.N.

    1969-05-26

    The Lobstick Cardium unit lies along the N. edge of the Pembina field. The formation in this portion is characterized by a conglomerate bar overlying the sand. The conglomerate permeabilities reach one darcy or more. Wells in this area exhibit high production rates due to this high capacity. A pattern waterflood covers 12,560 acres and an interior miscible flood, 2,240 acres. The miscible flood has one central injector and 36 offsetting producers. The solvent bank was formed by injecting alternate slugs of LPG, largely propane, and a dry lean gas in a 1.1 mole ratio. A buffer layer of normal sales gas was introduced, followed by alternate gas-water injection to reduce the mobility of the driving gas bank and improve sweep efficiency.With 4.3 million bbl of oil production to the end of 1968, performance predictions have been exceeded. There has been no significant water breakthrough and solvent cuts have been less then predicted. There is a varying degree of communication between the highly permeable conglomerate and the sand in which most of the wells are perforated.

  2. Miscibility Development Computation in Enhanced Oil Recovery by Flare Gas Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of flare gas as injection gas in miscible gas flooding enhanced oil recovery (MGF-EOR presents a potential synergy between oil production improvement and greenhouse gases emission mitigation. This work is a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of miscible flare gas injection based on phase behavior computations of a model oil (43%n-C5H12 : 57%n-C16H34 and a model flare gas (91%CH4 : 9%C2H6. The computations employed the multiple mixing-cell model with Peng-Robinson and PC-SAFT equations of state, and compared the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP value in the cases of flare gas injection and CO2 injection. For CO2 injection, both equations of state produced MMP values close to the measured value of 10.55 MPa. Flare gas injection MMP values were predicted to be 3.6-4.5 times those of CO2 injection. This very high MMP implies high gas compression costs, and may compromise the integrity of the reservoir. Subsequent studies shall explore the gas-oil miscibility behavior of mixtures of flare gas with intermediate hydrocarbon gases and CO2, in order to identify a suitable approach for rendering flare gas feasible as an injection gas in MGF-EOR.

  3. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

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    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  4. Incorporation of vertical permeability test results in vertical miscible flood design and operation

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    Gillund, G.N.; Kamal, M.

    1983-01-01

    The original analysis of the Bigoray Nisku B Pool miscible flood indicated potential coning problems related to the level of vertical permeability. This work presents the results of a vertical permeability test which were incorporated into a coning study. Additional reservoir data along with the rate information from the coning study will be used to revise the original reservoir simulation prediction and depletion strategy.

  5. Miscibility Development Computation in Enhanced Oil Recovery by Flare Gas Flooding

    OpenAIRE

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi; Utjok W.R. Siagian; Angga P. Budiono

    2012-01-01

    The use of flare gas as injection gas in miscible gas flooding enhanced oil recovery (MGF-EOR) presents a potential synergy between oil production improvement and greenhouse gases emission mitigation. This work is a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of miscible flare gas injection based on phase behavior computations of a model oil (43%n-C5H12 : 57%n-C16H34) and a model flare gas (91%CH4 : 9%C2H6). The computations employed the multiple mixing-cell model with Peng-Robinson and PC-SAFT...

  6. Incorporation of vertical permeability test results in vertical miscible flood design and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillund, G.N.; Kamal, M.

    1984-03-01

    The original analysis of the Bigoray Nisku B miscible flood in Alberta, Canada indicated potential coning problems related to the level of vertical permeability. This paper presents the results of a vertical permeability test which were incorporated into a coning study. Additional reservoir data, along with the rate information from the coning study, will be used to revise the original reservoir simulation prediction and depletion strategy.

  7. Flow of miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons in heterogeneous porous media

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    Butts, M.B.

    1996-12-31

    A series of large-scale two-dimensional physical model studies has been carried out in order to better understand and predict the multiphase flow of hydrocarbon contaminants and the release of the water-soluble fraction of such contaminants into the groundwater stream. The detailed measurements of the fluid saturations within the bulk hydrocarbon plume as well as the aqueous concentrations recorded downstream should provide a useful data set for testing and improving numerical models of both multiphase flow and transport. Predictions of a numerical model of immiscible multiphase flow developed in the petroleum industry were found to compare favourably with the observed oil plume for the case of an immiscible oil spill. Nevertheless, subtle layering within the experimental flume altered the long-term development of the oil plume in a manner not predicted by the numerical model. A stochastic model for three-dimensional, two-phase incompressible flow in heterogeneous soil and rock formations is developed. Analytical solutions for the resulting stochastic differential equations are derived for asymptotic flows using a perturbation approach. These solutions were used to derive general expressions for the large-scale (effective) properties for large-scale two-phase flow in porous media. An important observation from this analysis is that general large-scale flow in heterogeneous soils cannot be predicted on the basis of simple averages of the soil hydraulic properties alone. The large-scale capillary pressure saturation relation is evaluated for imbibition into a wet soil or rock formation. (EG) 194 refs.

  8. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  9. Incorporation of vertical permeability test results in vertical miscible flood design and operation. Vol. 83-34-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillund, G.N.; Kamal, M.

    1983-01-01

    The original analysis of the Bigoray Nisku B miscible flood indicated potential coning problems related to the level of vertical permeability. This paper presents the results of a vertical permeability test which were incorporated into a coning study. Additional reservoir data along with the rate information from the coning study will be used to revise the original reservoir simulation prediction and depletion strategy.

  10. Mechanism evaluation of carbon dioxide miscible flooding : Caoshe oilfield case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.; Du, Z.; Sun, L. [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Chengdu (China); Southwest Petroleum Univ., Chengdu (China); Yu, K.; Liu, W.; Chen, Z. [SINOPEC (China). East China Oil Field Branch

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigated the mechanisms of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) miscible flooding project at an oilfield in China. Laboratory tests included pressure-volume-temperature (PVT), CO{sub 2} injection swelling, and slim tube tests. Results of the experimental tests were then used to construct an equations-of-state (EOS) compositional model with a 1D and 2D profile of an injector-production well group. Changes in fluid composition and the viscosity and density of the oil and vapor phases were characterized as well as the interfacial tension between oil and gas along the grids during the CO{sub 2} injection process. The effect of gas volume and injection pressure on fluid properties was also investigated. the study showed that the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) of the project is 30 MPa. The model content of the CO{sub 2} in oil phase can be reacted at a formation pressure of 32 MPa with a 70 per cent oil phase. A continuous CO{sub 2} injection method with formation pressures above the MMP was recommended for the field. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 22 figs.

  11. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  12. Optimal control policies for carbon dioxide miscible flooding enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Methos, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Optimal control theory of distributed parameter systems has been used to develop improved operational strategies for carbon dioxide miscible flooding. The optimization criterion was to maximize the net profitability of the CO/sub 2/ flood. A two-dimensional, three-phase, modified black-oil model was used to describe miscible displacement of oil. Calculus of variations was applied to find control functions that provide extreme for an objective functional which related injection costs and production revenue. Lagrange multipliers, or costate variables, were used to ensure that the constraints given by the equations of the simulation model were satisfied. Control functions computed were the carbon dioxide and water injection policies and the production wellbore pressure history. In order to avoid difficulties in obtaining a stable numerical scheme for the costate equation, a discrete formulation of the optimal control problem was developed. A steepest decent gradient search method was used to find the optimal control law. Starting functions for the algorithm described currently used strategies: a large slug of CO/sub 2/ followed by drive water; carbon dioxide injected simultaneously with water; and injection of small slugs of CO/sub 2/ alternately with slugs of water. Improvements in the cost functional from the starting functions ranged from four to eleven percent. While the optimal control law found was highly dependent upon the starting functions used to initiate the algorithm, the shape of the optimal control law was found to be unique, as was the optimal total volume of carbon dioxide injected and the optimal value of the cost functional.

  13. Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

    2008-09-30

    Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

  14. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR by Miscible CO2 and Water Flooding of Asphaltenic and Non-Asphaltenic Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. Chukwudeme

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An EOR study has been performed applying miscible CO2 flooding and compared with that for water flooding. Three different oils are used, reference oil (n-decane, model oil (n-C10, SA, toluene and 0.35 wt % asphaltene and crude oil (10 wt % asphaltene obtained from the Middle East. Stearic acid (SA is added representing a natural surfactant in oil. For the non-asphaltenic oil, miscible CO2 flooding is shown to be more favourable than that by water. However, it is interesting to see that for first years after the start of the injection (< 3 years it is shown that there is almost no difference between the recovered oils by water and CO2, after which (> 3 years oil recovery by gas injection showed a significant increase. This may be due to the enhanced performance at the increased reservoir pressure during the first period. Maximum oil recovery is shown by miscible CO2 flooding of asphaltenic oil at combined temperatures and pressures of 50 °C/90 bar and 70 °C/120 bar (no significant difference between the two cases, about 1% compared to 80 °C/140 bar. This may support the positive influence of the high combined temperatures and pressures for the miscible CO2 flooding; however beyond a certain limit the oil recovery declined due to increased asphaltene deposition. Another interesting finding in this work is that for single phase oil, an almost linear relationship is observed between the pressure drop and the asphaltene deposition regardless of the flowing fluid pressure.

  15. Improved minimum miscibility pressure correlation for CO2 flooding using various oil components and their effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fengpeng; Li, Zhiping; Hu, Xiaoqing

    2017-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding is an effective method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) that has become one of the most important EOR processes. One of the key factors in the design of a CO2 injection project is the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP), whereas local sweeping efficiency during gas injection is dependent on the MMP. There are many empirical correlation analyses for the MMP calculation. However, these analyses focus on the molecular weight of the C5+ or C7+ fraction, and do not emphasize the effects of various components on MMP. Our study aims to develop an improved CO2-oil MMP correlation analysis that includes parameters such as reservoir temperature and various oil mole fractions. Here, correlation analysis was performed to define the influence of various components on the MMP using various data from 45 oilfields which have experimental CO2-oil MMP and oil compositions readily available. Thirty of the data sets were used to develop an improved correlation, and the other 15 data sets were used to verify the correlation. It was found that the mole fraction of C3 and C6 were the main factors that affected MMP. There was a good quadratic polynomial relationship between the mole fraction of C3 and MMP, and the relationship also existed between the mole fraction of C6 and MMP. The results do not include the molecular weight of the C5+ or C7+ fraction like other common correlations. Nine popular correlations were then used to also predict the MMP, and the comparison showed that the improved CO2-oil MMP correlation defined here was a better estimate. The correlation was then used in Dongshisi and Fuyu oilfields to assess EOR potential, the results also indicated that MMP increased over the course of the CO2 flooding process. This increase shows that it would be more difficult to achieve a mixed phase between crude oil and CO2, therefore the oil recovery would be difficult to further improve towards the end of injection.

  16. Dynamic Interactions between Matrix and Fracture in Miscible Solvent Flooding of Fractured Reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerighasrodashti, A.; Farajzadeh, R.; Verlaan, M.; Suicmez, V.S.; Bruining, J.

    2013-01-01

    Miscible solvent injection has received increasing attention in recent years as an efficient method to improve oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. Due to the large permeability difference between fracture and matrix, the success of this method depends to large extent on the degree of enhancement

  17. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)

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    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.

  18. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal), Class I

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    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    This project outlines a proposal to improve the recovery of light oil from waterflooded fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoir through a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) flood. The site is the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The field is well explored and well exploited. The project area is 270 acres within the Port Neches Field.

  19. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir, Class I

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    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    This report demonstrates the effectiveness of the CO2 miscible process in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoirs. It also evaluated the use of horizontal CO2 injection wells to improve the overall sweep efficiency. A database of FDD reservoirs for the gulf coast region was developed by LSU, using a screening model developed by Texaco Research Center in Houston. The results of the information gained in this project is disseminated throughout the oil industry via a series of SPE papers and industry open forums.

  20. Research on carbon dioxide miscible flooding by Technology Research Center of Japan National Oil Corporation. Current status of CO/sub 2/ flooding field application, Work honored with the 31st JAPT award

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    Tanakadate, Tadao

    1988-03-01

    The application examples in world on carbon dioxide miscible flooding which is an enhanced oil recovery method and the outline of field pilot test in Japan which will start from fiscal 1989 were reported. In the USA, there are fifty three examples on carbon dioxide miscible flooding and thirty one examples on carbon dioxide immiscible flooding. The enhanced rates of oil recovery by carbon dioxide miscible flooding are 7 to 13 %. In Hungary, the oil reservior pressures were increased rapidly due to the carbon dioxide injection and the push by water, and the recovery rates of 24 % and more were achieved. In Turkey, carbon dioxide immiscible flooding is in a trial stage. In these countries, carbon dioxide can be provided comparatively easily owing to the existences of the carbon dioxide fields, and the advantageous conditions are utilized. In Japan, the pilot tests are carried out with main research subjects on the phase behavior of carbon dioxide-oil system, prospect for performance of carbon dioxide miscible flooding by oil reservior simulation. (10 figs, 2 tabs, 5 refs)

  1. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

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    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscible simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  2. Indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents by salting-out effect for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshfar, Ali; Khezeli, Tahere

    2014-12-01

    A simple and low-cost method that indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents (ISDME) by salting-out effect before high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different samples. The ISDME is a combination of salting-out extraction of water-miscible organic solvent and directly suspended droplet microextraction (DSDME). Ninety-five microliters water-miscible organic solvent (1-propanol) was added to a 500-µL sample. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. To produce a steady vortex at the top of the solution, the sample was agitated at 700 rpm using a magnetic stirrer. By the addition of ammonium sulfate (saturated solution) to the homogeneous solution, 1-propanol was separated and collected at the bottom of the steady vortex. Finally, 20 µL 1-propanol was injected into HPLC-UV. The effects of important parameters such as water-miscible organic solvent (type and volume), type of salt, and extraction time were evaluated. Under optimum conditions, the method has a good linear calibration range (0.1 µg/L-300 µg/L), coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.998), low limits of detection (between 0.02 µg/L and 0.27 µg/L), and acceptable recovery (>85.0%).

  3. Development and verification of simplified prediction models for enhanced oil recovery applications. CO/sub 2/ (miscible flood) predictive model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    A screening model for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding has been developed consisting of a reservoir model for oil rate and recovery and an economic model. The reservoir model includes the effects of viscous fingering, reservoir heterogeneity, gravity segregation and areal sweep. The economic model includes methods to calculate various profitability indices, the windfall profits tax, and provides for CO/sub 2/ recycle. The model is applicable to secondary or tertiary floods, and to solvent slug or WAG processes. The model does not require detailed oil-CO/sub 2/ PVT data for execution, and is limited to five-spot patterns. A pattern schedule may be specified to allow economic calculations for an entire project to be made. Models of similar architecture have been developed for steam drive, in-situ combustion, surfactant-polymer flooding, polymer flooding and waterflooding. 36 references, 41 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Improved efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhanced prospects for CO2 flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report, April 17, 1991--May 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

    1998-02-01

    From 1986 to 1996, oil recovery in the US by gas injection increased almost threefold, to 300,000 bbl/day. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection projects make up three-quarters of the 191,139 bbl/day production increase. This document reports experimental and modeling research in three areas that is increasing the number of reservoirs in which CO{sub 2} can profitably enhance oil recovery: (1) foams for selective mobility reduction (SMR) in heterogeneous reservoirs, (2) reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} floods, and (3) low interfacial tension (97) processes and the possibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in naturally fractured reservoirs. CO{sub 2} injection under miscible conditions can effectively displace oil, but due to differences in density and viscosity the mobility of CO{sub 2} is higher than either oil or water. High CO{sub 2} mobility causes injection gas to finger through a reservoir, causing such problems as early gas breakthrough, high gas production rates, excessive injection gas recycling, and bypassing of much of the reservoir oil. These adverse effects are exacerbated by increased reservoir heterogeneity, reaching an extreme in naturally fractured reservoirs. Thus, many highly heterogeneous reservoirs have not been considered for CO{sub 2} injection or have had disappointing recoveries. One example is the heterogeneous Spraberry trend in west Texas, where only 10% of its ten billion barrels of original oil in place (OOIP) are recoverable by conventional methods. CO{sub 2} mobility can be reduced by injecting water (brine) alternated with CO{sub 2} (WAG) and then further reduced by adding foaming agents-surfactants. In Task 1, we studied a unique foam property, selective mobility reduction (SMR), that effectively reduces the effects of reservoir heterogeneity. Selective mobility reduction creates a more uniform displacement by decreasing CO{sub 2} mobility in higher permeability zones more than in lower permeability zones.

  5. IMPACTS OF THE NUMERICAL DISPERSION ON CO2 MISCIBLE FLOODING%数值弥散对CO2混相驱的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪勇; 汤勇; 王长权; 徐建; 姚陆峰

    2013-01-01

    数值弥散效应影响油藏数值模拟结果的精度.基于实际油藏流体和CO2-原油体系室内实验,建立一维均质模型,研究数值弥散对CO2多级接触混相驱替过程的影响,比较数值弥散与物理弥散对CO2混相驱替的影响.结果表明,数值弥散会影响驱替过程中相间传质,数值弥散越大,CO2会越早突破,导致采收率越低,驱替前缘变得模糊化.数值弥散与物理弥散作用相似,具有相同的数量级,二者存在细微的差别.%Numerical dispersion effect will influence the accuracy of oil reservoir numerical simulation. Based on the actual reservoir fluids and the indoor experiment of CO2-oil system, the 1D homogeneous model is set up to study the influence of the numerical dispersion on the process of CO2 multiple-contact miscible flooding and compare the influences of the numerical and physical dispersions on CO2 miscible flooding. The numerical dispersion will affect the mass transfer between CO2 and oil. The results show that the former dispersion can impact the inter-phase mass transfer in the above process, the more serious the numerical dispersion is, the earlier the CO2 breakthrough will be, and finally the lower the recovery will be, and the displacing front will become smeared. Physical and numerical dispersions have similar impacts and the same magnitude, but there are subtle differences between them.

  6. Estimation of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) of CO2 and liquid n-alkane systems using an improved MRI technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Song, Yongchen; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-02-01

    Minimum miscible pressure (MMP) of gas and oil system is a key parameter for the injection system design of CO2 miscible flooding. Some industrial standard approaches such as the experiment using a rising bubble apparatus (RBA), the slim tube tests (STT), the pressure-density diagram (PDD), etc. have been applied for decades to determine the MMP of gas and oil. Some theoretical or experiential calculations of the MMP were also applied to the gas-oil miscible system. In the present work, an improved technique based on our previous research for the estimation of the MMP by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was proposed. This technique was then applied to the CO2 and n-alkane binary and ternary systems to observe the mixing procedure and to study the miscibility. MRI signal intensities, which represent the proton concentration of n-alkane in both the hydrocarbon rich phase and the CO2 rich phase, were plotted as a reference for determining the MMP. The accuracy of the MMP obtained by using this improved technique was enhanced comparing with the data obtained from our previous works. The results also show good agreement with other established techniques (such as the STT) in previous published works. It demonstrates increases of MMPs as the temperature rise from 20 °C to 37.8 °C. The MMPs of CO2 and n-alkane systems are also found to be proportional to the carbon number in the range of C10 to C14.

  7. 4D seismic to image a thin carbonate reservoir during a miscible C02 flood: Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Franseen, E.K.; Byrnes, A.P.; Watney, W.L.; Harrison, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of miscible CO2 injected into a shallow (900 m) thin (3.6-6m) carbonate reservoir was monitored using the high-resolution parallel progressive blanking (PPB) approach. The approach concentrated on repeatability during acquisition and processing, and use of amplitude envelope 4D horizon attributes. Comparison of production data and reservoir simulations to seismic images provided a measure of the effectiveness of time-lapse (TL) to detect weak anomalies associated with changes in fluid concentration. Specifically, the method aided in the analysis of high-resolution data to distinguish subtle seismic characteristics and associated trends related to depositional lithofacies and geometries and structural elements of this carbonate reservoir that impact fluid character and EOR efforts.

  8. Spreading of miscible liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  9. Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  10. Target reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding. Task two: summary of available reservoir and geological data. Vol. II: Rocky Mountain states geological and reservoir data. Part 4: Paradox, Uinta, eastern Utah overthrust, Big Horn, Wind River, Powder River, Red Desert, and Great Divide basins; CACHE-Ismay through WERTZ-Madison fields. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, L.B.; Marlow, R.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes work performed by Gruy Federal, Inc., as the second of six tasks under contract with the US Department of Energy. The stated objective of this study is to build a solid engineering foundation to serve as the basis for field mini- and pilot tests in both high and low oil saturation carbonate reservoirs for the purpose of extending the technology base in carbon dioxide miscible flooding. The six tasks in this study are: (1) summary of available CO/sub 2/ field test data; (2) summary of existing reservoir and geological data; (3) selection of target reservoirs; (4) selection of specific reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ injection tests; (5) selection of specific sites for test wells in carbonate reservoirs; and (6) drilling and coring activities. The report for Task Two consists of a summary of existing reservoir and geological data on carbonate reservoirs located in west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and the Rocky Mountain states. It is contained in two volumes, each with several parts. The present volume, in four parts, is a summary of reservoir data for fields in the Rocky Mountain states. Volume One contains data for Permian basin fields in west Texas and southeast New Mexico. While a serious effort was made to obtain all publicly available data for the fields considered, sufficiently reliable data on important reservoir parameters were not always available for every field. The data in Volume II show 143 carbonate reservoirs in the study area may be suitable for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding. Using a general estimate of enhanced oils recovery by CO/sub 2/ flooding of 10% of original oil in place, some 619 million barrels of oil could be recovered by widespread application of CO/sub 2/ flooding in the study area. Mississippian and Ordovician reservoirs appear to be the most promising targets for the process.

  11. An Improved CO2-Crude Oil Minimum Miscibility Pressure Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimum miscibility pressure (MMP, which plays an important role in miscible flooding, is a key parameter in determining whether crude oil and gas are completely miscible. On the basis of 210 groups of CO2-crude oil system minimum miscibility pressure data, an improved CO2-crude oil system minimum miscibility pressure correlation was built by modified conjugate gradient method and global optimizing method. The new correlation is a uniform empirical correlation to calculate the MMP for both thin oil and heavy oil and is expressed as a function of reservoir temperature, C7+ molecular weight of crude oil, and mole fractions of volatile components (CH4 and N2 and intermediate components (CO2, H2S, and C2~C6 of crude oil. Compared to the eleven most popular and relatively high-accuracy CO2-oil system MMP correlations in the previous literature by other nine groups of CO2-oil MMP experimental data, which have not been used to develop the new correlation, it is found that the new empirical correlation provides the best reproduction of the nine groups of CO2-oil MMP experimental data with a percentage average absolute relative error (%AARE of 8% and a percentage maximum absolute relative error (%MARE of 21%, respectively.

  12. OIL DISPLACEMENT IN MISCIBLE CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Juttner

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available After primary oil recovery in reservoirs remains about 70% of unexploited oil. To improve the recovery of the remaining reserves, injection of a fluid provide the extra energy in a mchunical form. Oil displacement can he achieved by gas injection of lean natural gas, mainly methane, carbon dioxide etc. Oil displacement can be in immiscible or miscible conditions. This paper deals with mechanism of miscible gas drive. On the basis of simulation of the oil displacement process by gas injection into oil field Žutica the character of process, i. c. a degree of miscibility or immiscibility between the injected fluid and reservoir oil was determined.

  13. Hydrocarbon contamination in groundwaters: Removal by alcohol flooding. Technical completion report, 1 May 1988-30 April 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farley, K.J.; Boyd, G.R.; Patwardhan, S.

    1992-05-01

    Present pump-and-treat remediation strategies employed to remove hydrocarbon contaminants that exist in groundwater as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) can displace only a fraction of the contaminant due to the trapping effects of capillary forces. These effects however are shown to be effectively eliminated by injecting alcohol solutions through the contamination zone. A laboratory column apparatus was developed to simulate NAPL contamination, free product recovery, and residual NAPL removal by alcohol flooding. Columns were packed with either glass beads or a South Carolina aquifer soil, and contaminated in preliminary experiments with benzene (a light NAPL) and in final experiments with trichloroethylene (TCE) (a dense NAPL). Proper scaling of the column was found to be critical in ensuring that the laboratory results adequately represented field-scale conditions.

  14. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) inputs from the Rhône River to the Mediterranean Sea in relation with the hydrological cycle: impact of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Fernandes, Milena B; Pont, Didier

    2008-11-01

    The concentrations of dissolved and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in waters of the Rhône River (France) every fortnight for a full calendar year, from June 1994 to May 1995. All flood events occurring over the course of the experiment were sampled at higher frequency to better quantify the impact of these extreme hydrological episodes on the annual export of PAHs to the Mediterranean Sea. This time-series indicates that more than 90% of the annual load of particulate PAHs is transported during flood episodes, with 77% discharged during the course of only one extreme flood event occurring in November 1994. During these intense events, riverine particles are depleted in PAHs while at low river discharge particles are PAH-enriched. Dissolved PAHs were less variable and less abundant than adsorbed PAHs, consistently with the low solubility of these compounds.

  15. Flow cell system for miscible displacement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.H.; Kirkham, D.

    1971-02-01

    The use of a continuous graphic recording system for flow-component measurement in miscible displacement experiments is described. This system measures and continuously records radioactive tracer concentrations of effluents of miscible displacement columns. The recordings are needed breakthrough curves. The use of the system obviates fraction collectors.

  16. Viscous fingering of miscible slices

    CERN Document Server

    De Wit, A; Martin, M; Wit, Anne De; Bertho, Yann; Martin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Viscous fingering of a miscible high viscosity slice of fluid displaced by a lower viscosity fluid is studied in porous media by direct numerical simulations of Darcy's law coupled to the evolution equation for the concentration of a solute controlling the viscosity of miscible solutions. In contrast with fingering between two semi-infinite regions, fingering of finite slices is a transient phenomenon due to the decrease in time of the viscosity ratio across the interface induced by fingering and dispersion processes. We show that fingering contributes transiently to the broadening of the peak in time by increasing its variance. A quantitative analysis of the asymptotic contribution of fingering to this variance is conducted as a function of the four relevant parameters of the problem i.e. the log-mobility ratio R, the length of the slice l, the Peclet number Pe and the ratio between transverse and axial dispersion coefficients $\\epsilon$. Relevance of the results is discussed in relation with transport of vi...

  17. Evaluation of miscible and immiscible CO2 injection in one of the Iranian oil fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref Hashemi Fath

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 flooding is one of the most important methods for enhanced oil recovery (EOR because it not only increases oil recovery efficiency but also causes a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. It is a very complex system, involving phase behavior that could increase the recovery of oil by means of swelling, evaporation and decreasing viscosity of the oil. In this study, a reservoir modeling approach was used to evaluate immiscible and miscible CO2 flooding in a fractured oil field. To reduce simulation time, we grouped fluid components into 10 pseudo-components. The 3-parameter, Peng–Robinson Equation of State (EOS was used to match PVT experimental data by using the PVTi software. A one-dimensional slim-tube model was defined using ECLIPSE 300 software to determine the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP for injection of CO2. We used FloGrid software for making a reservoir static model and the reservoir model was calibrated using manual and assisted history matching methods. Then various scenarios of natural depletion, immiscible and miscible CO2 injection have been simulated by ECLIPSE 300 software and then the simulation results of scenarios have been compared. Investigation of simulation results shows that the oil recovery factor in miscible CO2 injection scenario is more than other methods.

  18. Effects of flooding and aging on phytoremediation of typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mangrove sediments by Kandelia obovata seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Long; Liu, Bei-Bei; Zhu, Ya-Xian; Zhang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of flooding and aging on the phytoremediation of naphthalene (Nap), anthracene (Ant) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in mangrove sediment by Kandelia obovata (K. obovata) Druce seedlings. Flooding increased dissipation efficiency in the rhizosphere zone from 69.47% to 82.45%, 64.27% to 80.41%, and 61.55% to 78.31% for Nap, Ant and B[a]P, respectively. Aging decreased dissipation efficiency significantly. Further investigation demonstrated that increased enzyme activity was one of important factors for increasing PAHs dissipation rates in flooded mangrove sediments. Moreover, a novel method for in situ quantitative investigation of PAHs distribution in root tissues was established using microscopic fluorescence spectra analysis. Subsequently, the effects of flooding and aging on the distribution of PAHs in root tissues were evaluated using this established method. The order of bioavailable fractions of PAHs after phytoremediation was as follows: non-aging/non-flooding>flooding>aging.

  19. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  20. MISCIBILITY IN COPOLYMER/HOMOPOLYMER BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the miscibility of a copolymer with its corresponding homopolymers, varieties of multicomponent polymers including simple graft, multibranch, diblock, triblock and four-arm block copolymers and so-called ABCPs were synthesized and characterized. The morphologies of the blends comprising the covolymers and the corresponding homopolymers were examined by electron microscopy. It is concluded that beeides molecular weight, architecture of a copolymers has apparent effect on the miscibility, i.e. the more complex is molecular architecture, the greater is conformation restriction in microdomain formation and the less is solubility of homopolymer in corresponding domains. In addition, a density gradient model is suggested for describing the segment distribution of the bound and free chains in block-homopolymer systems. Using this model, Helfand's theory is extended to the blends of copolymer and homopolymer predicting the miscibility which is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Miscibility of polymer blends with engineering models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilis, Harismiadis; van Bergen, A. R. D.; Goncalves, Ana Saraiva;

    1996-01-01

    The miscibility behavior of polymer blends that do not exhibit strong specific interactions is examined. Phase equilibrium calculations are presented with the van der Waals equation of state and three group-contribution models (UNIFAC, Entropic-FV, and GC-Flory). Performance of these models is al...

  2. Floods and Flash Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  3. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  4. How Pure Components Control Polymer Blend Miscibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald; Lipson, Jane; Higgins, Julia

    2012-02-01

    We present insight into some intriguing relationships revealed by our recent studies of polymer mixture miscibility. Applying our simple lattice-based equation of state, we discuss some of the patterns observed over a sample of experimental blends. We focus on the question of how much key information can one determine from a knowledge of just the pure components only, and further, on the role of separate enthalpic and entropic contributions to the miscibility behavior. One interesting correlation connects the value of the difference in pure component energetic parameters with that of the mixed segment interactions, suggesting new possibilities for predictive modeling. We also show how in some cases these two parameter groupings act as separate controls determining the entropy and enthalpy of mixing. Also discussed are the different patterns exhibited for UCST-type and LCST-type blends, these being revealed in some cases by simple examination of the underlying microscopic parameters.

  5. Dynamics of miscible displacements in round tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiburg, E.; Maxworthy, T.; Chen, C.Y. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Petitjeans, P. [Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation of miscible two-phase flow in a capillary tube is reported. The fraction of fluid left behind on the wall is obtained as a function of the Peclet, Atwood, and Froude numbers. Scaling arguments are presented for two distinct flow regimes, dominated by diffusion and convection, respectively. In the latter one, an effective surface tension value can be estimated.

  6. Flooding and Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  7. Respiratory exposure to components of water-miscible metalworking fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suuronen, Katri; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Riala, Riitta; Tuomi, Timo

    2008-10-01

    Water-miscible metalworking fluids (MWFs) are capable of causing respiratory symptoms and diseases. Recently, much emphasis has been put on developing new methods for assessing respiratory exposure to MWF emulsions. The air concentrations of ingredients and contaminants of MWF and inhalable dust were measured in 10 metal workshops in southern Finland. Oil mist was determined by infra red spectroscopy analysis after tetrachloroethylene extraction from the filter. Aldehydes were collected on Sep-Pak chemosorbents and analysed by liquid chromatography. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected on Tenax adsorbents and analysed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection after thermal desorption. Endotoxins were collected on glass fibre filter and analysed by enzyme-based spectrophotometry, and viable microbes were collected on polycarbonate filter and cultured. Inhalable dust was collected on cellulose acetate filter and quantified gravimetrically. Associations between the different exposures were calculated with Spearman's correlations. The mean concentration of oil mist was 0.14 (range aliphatic hydrocarbons. Several potential sensitizing chemicals such as terpenes were found in small quantities. The concentration of microbial contaminants was low. All the measured air concentrations were below the Finnish occupational exposure limits. The exposure in machine shops was quantitatively dominated by volatile compounds. Additional measurements of MWF components such as aldehydes, alkanolamines and VOCs are needed to get more information on the chemical composition of workshops' air. New air cleaning methods should be introduced, as oil mist separators are insufficient to clean the air of small molecular impurities.

  8. Experimental study on viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryuta; Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Mishra, Manoranjan; Ban, Takahiko

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering (VF) instability occurs when a more viscous fluid is displaced by a less viscous one in porous media or Hele-Shaw cells. So far, studies of VF have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or immiscible. However, little attention has been paid to VF in partially miscible fluids. Here, we have experimentally investigated VF in a radial Hele-Shaw cell using an aqueous two phase system (Ban et al. Soft Matter, 2012) which is an example of partially miscible fluids system. We have found novel instabilities that are counter-intuitive in miscible and immiscible systems. These include multiple droplets formation for low flow rate and widening of fingers at intermediate flow rate. The occurrence of the new instability patterns is induced by Korteweg effect in which convection is induced during phase separation in partially miscible systems.

  9. Miscible, porous media displacements with density stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Amir; Meiburg, Eckart

    2004-11-01

    High accuracy, three-dimensional numerical simulations of miscible displacements with gravity override, in both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, are discussed for the quarter five-spot configuration. The influence of viscous and gravitational effects on the overall displacement dynamics is described in terms of the vorticity variable. Density differences influence the flow primarily by establishing a narrow gravity layer, in which the effective Peclet number is enhanced due to the higher flow rate. Although this effect plays a dominant role in homogeneous flows, it is suppressed to some extent in heterogeneous displacements. This is a result of coupling between the viscous and permeability vorticity fields. When the viscous wavelength is much larger than the permeability wavelength, gravity override becomes more effective because coupling between the viscous and permeability vorticity fields is less pronounced. Buoyancy forces of a certain magnitude can lead to a pinch-off of the gravity layer, thereby slowing it down.

  10. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  11. Miscibility studies of Polyethylene Glycol with Polystyrene in Toluene by Various Physical and Advanced Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, R.; Venkatramanan, K.

    2016-10-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a chemical that has an extensive variety of applications in the world of medicine. It is used as a base to manufacture certain medicines, assist in drug delivery, and is also used as an agent in some medical procedures. It is an osmotic laxative. Polyethylene glycol works by retaining water in the stool, resulting in softer stools and more frequent bowel movements. Polyethylene glycol does not affect glucose and electrolytes in the body. PEG refers to a hydrocarbon molecule that can have a variable size, and different sizes can have different physical properties, giving this compound a great deal of flexibility in its application. In the present study, Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) (Molar mass: 1500) is blended with Polystyrene (PS) (Molar mass: 35000) in Toluene. The miscibility nature of the poly blend is analyzed by Ultrasonic velocity, viscosity, density and refractive index techniques at 303K. The compatibility nature of the blend is confirmed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies.

  12. Miscibility comparison for three refrigerant mixtures and four component refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1999-07-01

    Miscibility data were taken and compared for seven different refrigerants when mixed with the same polyol ester (POE) lubricant. Four of the seven refrigerants were single-component refrigerants while three of the refrigerants were mixtures composed of various combinations of the pure refrigerants. The purpose of this research was to investigate the difference in miscibility characteristics between refrigerant mixtures and their respective component refrigerants. The POE lubricant was a penta erythritol mixed-acid type POE which has a viscosity ISO32. The four pure refrigerants were R-32, R-125, R-134a, and R-143a and the three refrigerant mixtures were R-404A, R407C, and R-410A. The miscibility tests were performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The test cells were constructed to allow for complete visibility of the refrigerant/lubricant mixtures under all test conditions. The tests were performed over a concentration range of 0 to 100% and a temperature range of {minus}40 to 194 F. The miscibility test results for refrigerant mixtures are compared to component refrigerants. In all cases, the refrigerant mixtures appear to have better miscibility than their most immiscible pure component.

  13. Process for increasing oil recovery by miscible displacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiel, O.M.; Malinowsky, C.F.

    1966-08-02

    This is a miscible displacement method which involves a linear, gas-driven gravity-controlled flow mechanism. The formation is fractured and a condensible gas is injected into the fracture which has a substantial degree of miscibility with the reservoir oil. Thereafter a relatively non-condensible gas is injected through the fracture and into the reservoir. The volume of the non-condensible gas is sufficient to raise the reservoir pressure at least 50 psi above the vapor pressure of the condensible gas. Injection of the non-condensible gas is then stopped and oil is produced through the fracture with a controlled back pressure to offset the tendency of the miscible liquid to finger through the reservoir oil. (7 claims)

  14. Simulation Study on Miscibility Effect of CO2/Solvent Injection for Enhanced Oil Recovery at Nonisothermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sik Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The minimum miscibility pressure (MMP determines the main mechanism of CO2 flooding, which is either an immiscible or miscible process. This paper examines the recovery improvements of CO2 flooding in terms of both the injection temperature and solvent composition. The results show that a lower temperature injection and LPG (liquefied petroleum gas mixture can considerably improve oil recovery due to the reduced MMP in the swept area caused by the injected solvent. For the pure CO2 injection at the reservoir temperature, oil recovery is 59% after 1.0 PV CO2 injection. The oil recoveries by CO2-LPG mixtures are improved to 73% with 0.1 mole fractions of LPG and 81% with 0.2 mole fractions of LPG. The recovery factor from low-temperature CO2 injection is 78%, which is 32% higher compared to the isothermal case. The recoveries obtained by low-temperature CO2-LPG injection increase up to 87% of the initial oil. Heat transfer between the reservoir and the formation of over/underburden should be considered in order to describe the process more accurately. Additionally, the recovery factors from the heat transfer models are decreased by 4–12% in comparison with the original nonisothermal models.

  15. The liquid metastable miscibility gap in Cu-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curiotto, S.; Greco, R.; Pryds, Nini

    2007-01-01

    . In order to predict the phase equilibria and the mechanisms of microstructure formation, a determination of the metastable monotectics in the phase diagrams is essential. This paper focuses on the up-to-date findings on the Cu–Co, Cu–Fe and Cu–Co–Fe metastable miscibility gap in the liquid phase...

  16. Miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene blends during compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, Kristoffer; Johannsen, Ib

    2002-01-01

    polymer in the other. The observed solubility strongly depends on blend composition and blending method. The T-g measurements showed maximum mutual solubility around 50/50 composition. The miscibility of PC/PS blended after the third stage (melt injection molding) was higher than that after the first...... stages (melt extrusion) and the second stages (remelt extrusion)....

  17. Experimental and simulation determination of minimum miscibility pressure for a Bakken tight oil and different injection gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effective development of unconventional tight oil formations, such as Bakken, could include CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR technologies with associated benefits of capturing and storing large quantities of CO2. It is important to conduct the gas injection at miscible condition so as to reach maximum recovery efficiency. Therefore, determination of the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP of reservoir live oil–injection gas system is critical in a miscible gas flooding project design. In this work, five candidate injection gases, namely CO2, CO2-enriched flue gas, natural gas, nitrogen, and CO2-enriched natural gas, were selected and their MMPs with a Bakken live oil were determined experimentally and numerically. At first, phase behaviour tests were conducted for the reconstituted Bakken live oil and the gases. CO2 outperformed other gases in terms of viscosity reduction and oil swelling. Rising bubble apparatus (RBA determined live oil–CO2 MMP as 11.9 MPa and all other gases higher than 30 MPa. The measured phase behaviour data were used to build and tune an equation-of-state (EOS model, which calculated the MMPs for different live oil-gas systems. The EOS-based calculations indicated that CO2 had the lowest MMP with live oil among the five gases in the study. At last, the commonly-accepted Alston et al. equation was used to calculate live oil–pure CO2 MMP and effect of impurities in the gas phase on MMP change. The Bakken oil–CO2 had a calculated MMP of 10.3 MPa from the Alston equation, and sensitivity analysis showed that slight addition of volatile impurities, particularly N2, can increase MMP significantly.

  18. 以烃类为碳源的微生物驱油探索研究%STUDY ON MICROBIAL FLOODING WITH HYDROCARBON AS CARBON SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩培慧; 石梅; 孙凤荣

    2001-01-01

    According to the physical and chemical environment, this paper separates and selects 8 stems of facultative anaerobic bacteria from hundreds of oil bearing sewage and performs a systematic performance evaluation and effect evaluation of the physical simulation experimental displacement efficiency with long tube filling oil sand. The experimental result shows that the selected stems of bacteria can grow with oil as the only carbon source in anaerobic condition and has the effect of degrading oil, reducing oil viscosity, producing active matter and decreasing interfacial tension. Core displacement experiment shows that microbial flooding can improve recovery by 10%.%针对大庆油田油层的物化环境,从数百个含油污水中分离、筛选了8株以烃类为碳源的兼性厌氧菌,并进行了系统的性能评价和长管填充油砂模型物理模拟实验驱油效果评价。实验结果表明,所筛选的8株菌种,在厌氧条件下,能以原油为唯一碳源生长、繁殖,并具有降解原油,降低原油粘度,产生活性物质,降低界面张力的作用。岩心驱替实验表明,微生物驱比水驱提高采收率10%左右。

  19. Fluid characterization for miscible EOR projects and CO2 sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kristian; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2007-01-01

    Accurate performance prediction of miscible enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) projects or CO, sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs relies in part on the ability of an equation-of-state (EOS) model to adequately represent the properties of a wide range of mixtures of the resident fluid...... and the injected fluid(s). The mixtures that form when gas displaces oil in a porous medium will, in many cases, differ significantly from compositions created in swelling tests and other standard pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) experiments. Multicontact experiments (e.g., slimtube displacements) are often used...... in the data reduction and demonstrate that for some gas/oil systems, swelling tests do not contribute to a more accurate prediction of multicontact miscibility. Finally, we report on the impact that use of EOS models based on different characterization procedures can have on recovery predictions from dynamic...

  20. Global Approach for Calculation of Minimum Miscibility Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kristian; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for calculation of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) for the displacement of oil by multicomponent gas injection. The algorithm is based on the key tie line identification approach initially addressed by Wang and Orr [Y. Wang and F.M. Orr Jr., Analytical calculation...... of minimum miscibility pressure, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 139 (1997) 101-124]. In this work a new global approach is introduced. A number of deficiencies of the sequential approach have been eliminated resulting in a robust and highly efficient algorithm. The time consumption for calculation of the MMP...... results from the key tie line identification approach are shown to be in excellent agreement with slimtube data and with other multicell/slimtube simulators presented in the literature....

  1. USING PHASE DIAGRAMS TO PREDICT THE PERFORMANCE OF COSOLVENT FLOODS FOR NAPL REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosolvent flooding using water miscible solvents such as alcohols has been proposed as an in-situ NAPL remediation technique. This process is conceptually similar to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using alcohols and some surfactant formulations. As a result of interest in the EOR ...

  2. Miscibility Studies on Polymer Blends Modified with Phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Neelakandan; Kyu, Thein

    2009-03-01

    The miscibility studies related to an amorphous poly(amide)/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) [PA/PVP] blend with a crystalline phytochemical called ``Mangiferin'' is presented. Phytochemicals are plant derived chemicals which intrinsically possess multiple salubrious properties that are associated with prevention of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. Incorporation of phytochemicals into polymers has shown to have very promising applications in wound healing, drug delivery, etc. The morphology of these materials is crucial to applications like hemodialysis, which is governed by thermodynamics and kinetics of the phase separation process. Hence, miscibility studies of PA/PVP blends with and without mangiferin have been carried out using dimethyl sulfoxide as a common solvent. Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed that the binary PA/PVP blends were completely miscible at all compositions. However, the addition of mangiferin has led to liquid-liquid phase separation and liquid-solid phase transition in a composition dependent manner. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy was undertaken to determine specific interaction between the polymer constituents and the role of possible hydrogen bonding among three constituents will be discussed.

  3. Miscibility of Polystyrene and Lighted Sulfonated Polystyrene Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N. C.; Burghardt, W. R.; Composto, R. J.

    2005-03-01

    The blend miscibility of deuterated polystyrene (dPS) and lighted sulfonated poly(styrene-ran-sulfonated polystyrene) (P (S-SS)) has been examined by forward recoil spectrometry (FRES). Equilibrium coexistence compositions were determined for dPS:P(S-SSx) blends where x is the mole percent of sulfonation.At x = 0.2%, the blends are fully miscible at 150°C to 190°C, while at x = 2.6% the system fully immiscible at the same temperatures. Intermediate levels of sulfonation (0.7, 1.0 and 1.2%) are partially miscible and exhibit an upper critical solution temperature (UCST). This behavior is attributed to the dilution of repulsive intra-molecular interaction between the ionic and non-ionic groups in the copolymer due to favorable interactions with the non-ionic group of the homopolymer PS. Estimates using the Flory-Huggins and the copolymer effect theories found a large ( 20) positive monomer-monomer interaction parameter between styrene and styrene sulfonate. This large interaction parameter might drive phase separation within a compositionally disperse random copolymers sample.

  4. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  5. STUDY ON THE MISCIBILITY OF DYNAMICALLY VULCANIZED EPDM/PP BLEND BY POSITRON ANNIHILATION SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Xue-liang Jiang; Shi-yuan Cheng; Yi-qun Dai; Shao-jie Wang; Bo Wang

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) was utilized to investigate the relationship between the free-volume hole properties and miscibility of dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP blend. The results showed that the noncrystalline region of PP and EPDM in the blend was partially miscible and the miscibility of the blend became worse when the weight percent of EPDM was <50%. This was also demonstrated by DMTA and mechanical properties of the blends with various compositions.

  6. An optical criterion to obtain miscible mixed crystals in alkali halides

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This work gives a novel criterion to predict the formation of alkali halide solid solutions and discusses some results obtained in the development of ternary and quaternary miscible crystalline dielectric mixtures of alkali halides. These mixtures are miscible in any concentration of their components. The miscibility of these mixed crystals is quite related to the F center through the behavior observed in the spectral position of the optical absorption F band as a function of the lattice cons...

  7. Antiwear performance and mechanism of an oil-miscible ionic liquid as a lubricant additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Bansal, Dinesh G; Yu, Bo; Howe, Jane Y; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Li, Huaqing; Blau, Peter J; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald J

    2012-02-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate has been investigated as a potential antiwear lubricant additive. Unlike most other ILs that have very low solubility in nonpolar fluids, this IL is fully miscible with various hydrocarbon oils. In addition, it is thermally stable up to 347 °C, showed no corrosive attack to cast iron in an ambient environment, and has excellent wettability on solid surfaces (e.g., contact angle on cast iron lubricating oils. For example, a 5 wt % addition into a synthetic base oil eliminated the scuffing failure experienced in neat oil and, as a result, reduced the friction coefficient by 60% and the wear rate by 3 orders of magnitude. A synergistic effect on wear protection was observed with the current antiwear additive when added into a fully formulated engine oil. Nanostructure examination and composition analysis revealed a tribo-boundary film and subsurface plastic deformation zone for the metallic surface lubricated by the IL-containing lubricants. This protective boundary film is believed to be responsible for the IL's antiscuffing and antiwear functionality.

  8. On the instabilities in miscible fluids under horizontal oscillating forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr

    2012-07-01

    In this research the attention is focused on the mass transfer under vibrations. The pure vibrational effect can be observed in weightlessness only. However, experimental studies addressing vibrational phenomena in weightlessness are very limited. This study was initiated by preparation of VIPIL proposal in the response of ESA AO-2009 call and will continue in the frame of the preparation the experiment VIPIL on the ISS. The current research is an attempt to provide experimental and numerical evidence for the instability in miscible fluids in the case of horizontal vibrations parallel to the interface. We present the results of the pioneer experiment SOVICON on the observation of the interface behavior between miscible liquids and vibrational convection in reduced gravity, conducted in the 49th Parabolic Flight Campaigns organized by the European Space Agency. Two miscible liquid mixtures, water and isopropanol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cell, submitted to horizontal and sinusoidal oscillations at different frequencies and amplitudes. For the certain set of control parameters the localized mean convective flows are emerged in the vicinity of the triple points: the contact point between solid vertical wall and two liquids. These localized convective patterns spread along the solid walls and provide a local mixing along the walls. This type of instability was studied numerically in the averaged approach for high frequency vibrations [1], [2]. During the microgravity experiments we observed another type of instability in the form of standing waves. Above a threshold, a relief appears at the interface between the two fluids. This instability occurs when the vibration amplitude and frequency are above a critical value which is set by the level of viscous dissipation in the liquid. In general, this viscous dissipation will have a few sources: motion in the bulk of the liquid, motion near the boundaries of the liquid container, motion of any

  9. Concentration-Dependent Diffusion Instability in Reactive Miscible Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Mizev, Alexey; Mosheva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We report new chemoconvective pattern formation phenomena observed in a two-layer system of miscible fluids filling a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the concentration-dependent diffusion coupled with the frontal acid-base neutralization can give rise to formation of the local unstable zone low in density resulting in a perfectly regular cell-type convective pattern. The described effect gives an example of yet another powerful mechanism which allows the reaction-diffusion processes to govern the flow of reacting fluids under gravity condition.

  10. Concentration-dependent diffusion instability in reactive miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Kostarev, Konstantin; Mizev, Aleksey; Mosheva, Elena

    2015-07-01

    We report on chemoconvective pattern formation phenomena observed in a two-layer system of miscible fluids filling a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the concentration-dependent diffusion coupled with frontal acid-base neutralization can give rise to the formation of a local unstable zone low in density, resulting in a perfectly regular cell-type convective pattern. The described effect gives an example of yet another powerful mechanism which allows the reaction-diffusion processes to govern the flow of reacting fluids under gravity conditions.

  11. Post Waterflood C02 Miscible Flood in Light Oil Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Tipton

    1998-05-13

    The only remaining active well, Kuhn #14, in the Port Neches CO2 project went off production in October 1997. Production from this project is reached economic limit and the project termination began in the last quarter of 1997.

  12. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

  13. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. 1993 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscable simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  14. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD.

  15. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability

  16. Flood resilience urban territories. Flood resilience urban territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraud, Hélène; Barroca, Bruno; Hubert, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The flood's impact during the last twenty years on French territory reveals our lack of preparation towards large-extended floods which might cause the stopping of companies' activity, services, or lead to housing unavailability during several months. New Orleans' case has to exemplify us: four years after the disaster, the city still couldn't get back its dynamism. In France, more than 300 towns are flood-exposed. While these towns are the mainspring of territory's development, it is likely that the majority of them couldn't get up quickly after a large-extended flood. Therefore, to understand and improve the urban territory's resilience facing floods is a real stake for territory's development. Urban technical networks supply, unify and irrigate all urban territories' constituents. Characterizing their flood resilience can be interesting to understand better urban resilience. In this context, waste management during and after floods is completely crucial. During a flood, the waste management network can become dysfunctional (roads cut, waste storage installations or waste treatment flooded). How can the mayor respect his obligation to guarantee salubrity and security in his city? In post flood the question is even more problematic. The waste management network presents a real stake for territory's restart. After a flood, building materials, lopped-of branches, furniture, business stocks, farm stocks, mud, rubbles, animal cadavers are wet, mixed, even polluted by hydrocarbons or toxic substances. The waste's volume can be significant. Sanitary and environmental risks can be crucial. In view of this situation, waste's management in post crisis period raises a real problem. What to make of this waste? How to collect it? Where to stock it? How to process it? Who is responsible? Answering these questions is all the more strategic since this waste is the mark of disaster. Thus, cleaning will be the first population's and local actor's reflex in order to forget the

  17. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  18. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  19. Effective Algorithm for Calculation of Minimum Miscibility Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kristian; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a new algorithm developed for calculation of the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) for the displacement of oil by a multicomponent injection gas. The algorithm is based on the key tie line identification approach initially studied by Wang and Orr . A new global formulation...... enrichment studies). A case study is presented based on a real reservoir fluid for which PVT studies, swelling test and slimtube experiments have been performed. The study aims at investigating the influence of the characterization, tuning and lumping procedure used for generating a fluid description...... on the prediction of the MMP. Based on the generated fluid description, a gas enrichment study is presented where the optimum mixture of two available injection gasses is determined aiming to optimize the gas injection project....

  20. Miscible displacement fronts of shear thinning fluids inside rough fractures

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Ippolito, I; Chertcoff, R; Hulin, J P; Boschan, Alexandro; Auradou, Harold; Ippolito, Irene; Chertcoff, Ricardo; Hulin, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The miscible displacement of a shear-thinning fluid by another of same rheological properties is studied experimentally in a transparent fracture by an optical technique imaging relative concentration distributions. The fracture walls have complementary self-affine geometries and are shifted laterally in the direction perpendicular to the mean flow velocity {\\bf U} : the flow field is strongly channelized and macro dispersion controls the front structure for P\\'{e}clet numbers above a few units. The global front width increases then linearly with time and reflects the velocity distribution between the different channels. In contrast, at the local scale, front spreading is similar to Taylor dispersion between plane parallel surfaces. Both dispersion mechanisms depend strongly on the fluid rheology which shifts from Newtonian to shear-thinning when the flow rate increases. In the latter domain, increasing the concentration enhances the global front width but reduces both Taylor dispersion (due to the flattening...

  1. Laminar flow of two miscible fluids in a simple network

    CERN Document Server

    Karst, Casey M; Geddes, John B

    2012-01-01

    When a fluid comprised of multiple phases or constituents flows through a network, non-linear phenomena such as multiple stable equilibrium states and spontaneous oscillations can occur. Such behavior has been observed or predicted in a number of networks including the flow of blood through the microcirculation, the flow of picoliter droplets through microfluidic devices, the flow of magma through lava tubes, and two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. While the existence of non-linear phenomena in a network with many inter-connections containing fluids with complex rheology may seem unsurprising, this paper demonstrates that even simple networks containing Newtonian fluids in laminar flow can demonstrate multiple equilibria. The paper describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids of different density and viscosity through a simple network. The fluids stratify due to gravity and remain as nearly distinct phases with some mixing occurring only by d...

  2. Controlling radial fingering patterns in miscible confined flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, C-W; Wang, L-C; Miranda, José A

    2010-11-01

    Injection-driven immiscible flow in radial Hele-Shaw cells results in highly ramified patterns if the injection rate is constant in time. Likewise, time-dependent gap immiscible flow in lifting Hele-Shaw cells leads to intricate morphologies if the cell's gap width grows exponentially with time. Recent studies show that the rising of these complex fingered structures can be controlled by properly adjusting the injection rate, and the time-dependent gap width. We investigate the effectiveness of these control strategies assuming that the fluids involved are miscible. Despite the absence of surface tension effects, intensive numerical simulations support the stabilizing role of these controlling protocols. Splitting, merging and competition of fingers are all inhibited. The sensitivity of the system to changes in the initial conditions and Péclet numbers is also discussed.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Miscibility in Several Polymer Blends

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2009-01-01

    The miscibility in several polymer blend mixtures (polymethylmethacrylate/polystyrene, (1,4-cis) polyisoprene/polystyrene, and polymethylmethacrylate/polyoxyethylene) has been investigated using Molecular Dynamics simulations for atomistic representations of the polymer chains. The trajectories obtained from simulation boxes representing the mixtures have been analyzed in terms of the collective scattering structure function. The Flory-Huggins parameter is determined from fits of the simulation results for this function to the random phase approximation expression. The numerical values of this parameter and its variation with temperature obtained with this procedure show a general qualitative and quantitative agreement with existing experimental data for the different systems. These results together with those previously obtained for the polyvylmethylether/polystyrene blends with the same method are compared with data yielded by other computational simpler approaches.

  4. Fatty acids polymorphism and solid-state miscibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbabode, Gabin [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France)], E-mail: ggbabode@ulb.ac.be; Negrier, Philippe; Mondieig, Denise [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Moreno, Evelyn; Calvet, Teresa; Cuevas-Diarte, Miquel Angel [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-02-05

    The pentadecanoic acid-hexadecanoic acid (C{sub 15}H{sub 29}OOH-C{sub 16}H{sub 31}OOH) binary system is dealt with in this article. The polymorphism of 20 mixed materials has been investigated combining calorimetric measurements, isothermal and versus temperature X-ray powder diffraction and also FTIR spectroscopy. In particular, the cell parameters of the stable forms, temperatures and heats of phase changes for the two constituents and a proposal of phase diagram are given in this article. Three solid forms are created by mixing in addition with the four solid forms of the pure components. All these solid forms are stabilized on narrow domains of composition, implying a reduced solid-state miscibility of the pentadecanoic and hexadecanoic acids.

  5. The Effect of Counterions on the Blend Miscibility of Polystyrene with Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nancy C.; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Composto, Russell J.; Winey, Karen I.

    2006-03-01

    Our previous study probed the miscibility of polystyrene (PS) and sulfonated polystyrene (P(S-SSx)) of differing sulfonation levels (x) and found a narrow window of miscibility. Specifically, the PS:P(S-SSx) blend system becomes completely immiscible at unexpectedly low sulfonation level, x = 2.7 mol% . Here we extend the study of blend miscibility of PS with P(S-SS0.007) to include materials neutralized with sodium, barium and zinc cations. These ionomer blends exhibit an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) behavior with an increase in critical temperature as compared to the blend with unneutralized P(S-SS0.007). Forward recoil spectrometry (FRES) results indicate that Zn^++ and Ba^++ neutralized ionomers are less miscible than Na^+ when fully neutralized, while the blend miscibility for Na^+ and Zn^++ neutralized ionomers behave similarly when partially neutralized. Rheological studies are underway to compliment the blend miscibility studies. These miscibility information gained from PS/P(S-SSx) ionomers blends will serve as a foundation for future ionomer morphology studies.

  6. Récupération assistée des hydrocarbures par injection de CO2. Aspects techniques et économiques Enhanced Hydrocarbon Recovery by CO2 Flooding. Technical and Economic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simandoux P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'injection de gaz carbonique dans les gisements pétroliers a donné lieu depuis une quinzaine d'années à de très nombreuses études de laboratoire et sur modèles. De multiples pilotes ont été réalisés et quelques projets industriels sont en cours. II est donc intéressant de faire un bilan des connaissances et de l'expérience ainsi acquise, afin de tenter de dégager les perspectives de développement du procédé. La première partie rappelle le comportement du CO2 en présence d'hydrocarbures et les principaux mécanismes d'action dans le processus de récupération. On examine ensuite dans une deuxième partie les principales applications pilotes ou industrielles et les problèmes opérationnels rencontrés. Ce bilan permet de dégager les caractéristiques principales du procédé, les difficultés essentielles rencontrées. Un aperçu est donné sur les recherches en cours en vue de résoudre ces difficultés et améliorer le procédé. La dernière partie s'attache à préciser les perspectives d'application de l'injection de CO2 et pour cela trois aspects essentiels pour le développement du procédé sont discutés : les performances et le domaine d'emploi, la disponibilité et le coût des différentes sources potentielles de CO2 et enfin l'évaluation économique du procédé. The injection of carbon dioxide into oil fields has been the subject of extensive laboratory and modeling research for the last 15 years. Many pilot experiments have been performed, and several industrial projects are under way. Therefore it is interesting to review the state-of-the-art of the know-how and experience thus acquired so as to try to determine the outlook for the development of the process. The first part of this article reviews the behavior of CO2 in the presence of hydrocarbons and the leading action mechanisms in the recovery process. The second part examines the leading pilot or industrial applications and the operational problems

  7. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding as water levels in the country's huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued. As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage areas of the Yangtze River had exceeded 50 mm,after three rounds of rainstorms,said Cai Qihua,Deputy Director of the Yangtze River Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters.

  8. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND VISCOSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236EA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, and viscosity measurements of refrigerant R-236ea with three potential lubricants. (NOTE: The data were needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The lubricants...

  9. Influence of Miscibility of Protein-Sugar Lyophilizates on Their Storage Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Maarten A; Nethercott, Matthew J; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Frijlink, Henderik W; Munson, Eric J; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    For sugars to act as successful stabilizers of proteins during lyophilization and subsequent storage, they need to have several characteristics. One of them is that they need to be able to form interactions with the protein and for that miscibility is essential. To evaluate the influence of protein-sugar miscibility on protein storage stability, model protein IgG was lyophilized in the presence of various sugars of different molecular weight. By comparing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy relaxation times of both protein and sugar on two different timescales, i.e., (1)H T1 and (1)H T1ρ, miscibility of the two components was established on a 2-5- and a 20-50-nm length scale, respectively, and related to protein storage stability. Smaller sugars showed better miscibility with IgG, and the tendency of IgG to aggregate during storage was lower for smaller sugars. The largest sugar performed worst and was phase separated on both length scales. Additionally, shorter protein (1)H T1 relaxation times correlated with higher aggregation rates during storage. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay showed overlapping effects of aggregation and chemical degradation and did not correspond as well with the miscibility. Because of the small scale at which miscibility was determined (2-5 nm) and the size of the protein domains (∼2.5 × 2.5 × 5 nm), the miscibility data give an indirect measure of interaction between protein and sugar. This reduced interaction could be the result of steric hindrance, providing a possible explanation as to why smaller sugars show better miscibility and storage stability with the protein.

  10. Phase-field modelling of a miscible system in spinning droplet tensiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobev, Anatoliy; Boghi, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    The spinning drop tensiometry is used for measurements of surface tension coefficients, especially, when interfaces are characterised by low and ultra-low interfacial stresses. A droplet of lighter liquid is introduced into a rotating capillary that was initially saturated with another heavier liquid. The tube is subject to axial rotation that results in droplet's elongation along the tube's axis. The equilibrium shape of the droplet is used to determine the surface tension coefficient. In this work, the evolution of a slowly miscible droplet introduced into a spinning capillary is investigated. This technique is frequently employed for studies of the dynamics of miscible systems, even despite the fact that a strict equilibrium is never achieved in a mixture of fully miscible liquids. The numerical modelling of a miscible droplet is fulfilled on the basis of the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach. The numerical results are compared against the experimental data pursuing two objectives: (i) to verify the use of the phase-field approach as a consistent physics-based approach capable of accurate tracking of the short- and long-term evolution of miscible systems, and (ii) to estimate the values of the phenomenological parameters introduced within the phase-field approach, so making this approach a practical tool for modelling of thermohydrodynamic changes in miscible systems within various configurations.

  11. Combating Floods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In summer and autumn of 1998, the river vatleys of the Changjiang, Songhua and Nenjiang rivers were stricken by exceptionally serious floods, As of the, 22nd of August, the flooded areas stretched over 52.4 million acres. More than 223 million people were affected by the flood. 4.97 million houses were ruined, economic losses totaled RMB 166 billion, and most tragically, 3,004 people lost their byes. It was one of the costliest disasters in Chinese history. Millions of People’s Liberation Army soldiers and local people joined hands to battle the floodwaters. Thanks to their unified efforts and tenacious struggle, they successfully withstood the rising, water, resumed production and began to rebuild their homes.

  12. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  13. Alcohol drops on miscible liquid: mixing or spreading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Muller, Koen; Shardt, Orest; Afkhami, Shahriar; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    We studied how a sessile drop of alcohol behaves when placed on a fully miscible liquid. The dynamics of the subsequent mixing and spreading were captured by using a high-speed camera and investigated by varying parameters (e.g., surface tension, density, and viscosity). We observed that a deposited alcohol drop on a liquid bath remains as a floating lens shape, the alcohol liquid leaks out along the rim of the droplet, and it spreads axi-symmetrically along the bottom liquid interface. To visualize spreading and mixing features, we used time-resolved Particle Tacking Velocimetry and a Schlieren method. We observed a localized mixing flow at the rim of the floating droplet where the maximum flow speed is obtained, driven by a solutal Marangoni effect. Underneath the interface of the bath liquid, a viscous boundary layer develops while the alcohol liquid spreads along the radial direction. We also observed a finite quasi-steady interfacial flow velocity regime after the alcohol droplet touched the bottom liquid surface. In this regime, the flow speed linearly increases inside the floating lens, and outside the lens the flow speed decays along the r-direction with a power-law slope, Ur r - 1 / 2 . Physical arguments to support the observations will be discussed.

  14. Silk fibroin and sodium alginate blend: Miscibility and physical characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini de Moraes, Mariana; Silva, Mariana Ferreira; Weska, Raquel Farias; Beppu, Marisa Masumi, E-mail: beppu@feq.unicamp.br

    2014-07-01

    Films of silk fibroin (SF) and sodium alginate (SA) blends were prepared by solution casting technique. The miscibility of SF and SA in those blends was evaluated and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that SF/SA 25/75 wt.% blends underwent microscopic phase separation, resulting in globular structures composed mainly of SF. X-ray diffraction indicated the amorphous nature of these blends, even after a treatment with ethanol that turned them insoluble in water. Thermal analyses of blends showed the peaks of degradation of pristine SF and SA shifted to intermediate temperatures. Water vapor permeability, swelling capacity and tensile strength of SF films could be enhanced by blending with SA. Cell viability remained between 90 and 100%, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity test. The SF/SA blend with self-assembled SF globules can be used to modulate structural and mechanical properties of the final material and may be used in designing high performance wound dressing. - Highlights: • Blend films of fibroin and alginate were prepared with microscopic phase separation; • Self-assembled globular microdomains were mainly composed by fibroin; • It was possible to obtain a film with better mechanical and physical properties; • Blend films of fibroin and alginate represent a novel material in biomaterials field.

  15. MISCIBILITY, CRYSTALLIZATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PPC/PBS BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, melt blends of poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile testing, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), polarized optical microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of PPC in the 90/10 PPC/PBS blend was decreased by about 11 K comparing with that of pure PPC. The presence of 10% PBS was partially miscible with PPC. The 90/10 PPC/PBS blend had better impact and tensile strength than those of the other PPC/PBS blends. The glass transition temperature of PPC in the 80/20, 70/30, and 60/40 PPC/PBS blends was improved by about 4.9 K, 4.2 K, and 13 K comparing with that of pure PPC, respectively; which indicated the immiscibility between PPC and PBS. The DSC results indicated that the crystallization of PBS became more difficult when the PPC content increased. The matrix of PPC hindered the crystallization process of PBS. While the content of PBS was above 20%, significant crystallization-induced phase separation was observed by polarized optical microscopy.It was found from the WAXD analysis that the crystal structure of PBS did not change, and the degree of crystallinity increased with increasing PBS content in the PPC/PBS blends.

  16. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  17. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding aswater levels in the country’s huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued.As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage

  18. Miscibility of Itraconazole-Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Blends: Insights with High Resolution Analytical Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-12-07

    Drug-polymer miscibility is considered to be a prerequisite to achieve an optimally performing amorphous solid dispersion (ASD). Unfortunately, it can be challenging to evaluate drug-polymer miscibility experimentally. The aim of this study was to investigate the miscibility of ASDs of itraconazole (ITZ) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using a variety of analytical approaches. The phase behavior of ITZ-HPMC films prepared by solvent evaporation was studied before and after heating. Conventional methodology for miscibility determination, that is, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was used in conjunction with emerging analytical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and atomic force microscopy coupled with nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and nanothermal analysis (AFM-nanoIR-nanoTA). DSC results showed a single glass transition event for systems with 10% to 50% drug loading, suggesting that the ASDs were miscible, whereas phase separation was observed for all of the films based on the other techniques. The AFM-coupled techniques indicated that the phase separation occurred at the submicron scale. When the films were heated, it was observed that the ASD components underwent mixing. The results provide new insights into the phase behavior of itraconazole-HPMC dispersions and suggest that the emerging analytical techniques discussed herein are promising for the characterization of miscibility and microstructure in drug-polymer systems. The observed differences in the phase behavior in films prepared by solvent evaporation before and after heating also have implications for processing routes and suggest that spray drying/solvent evaporation and hot melt extrusion/melt mixing can result in ASDs with varying extent of miscibility between the drug and the polymer.

  19. Shell plans big COD/sub 2/U miscible drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-04-18

    Shell Oil Co. is seeking approval from the Texas Railroad Commission for the first field test using COD2U as a miscible slug. The test would take place in the Crossett Field, Crane and Upton Counties, 5 miles West of McCamey. Plan calls for injecting a large slug of COD2U in the Devonian reservoir, and following this with water to maintain reservoir pressure and serve as a sweeping medium. If the method works as anticipated, Shell says it will recover 32.8 million bbl of 44$-gravity crude--or 63.8% of the oil originally in place. Residue gas in now being injected in the field's North Cross unit. Widespread application of the process, if it works as hoped, seems unlikely because of the difficulty and cost of transporting COD2U where it is needed. However, ample supplies of COD2U are available in West Texas. There are at least 3 sources of COD2U in the vicinity. Norhtern Natural Gas Co. is venting some 20 MMcfd at is gas processing plant at Puckett field in Pecos County. Not far away is Hunt Oil Co.'s 57 Elsinore Ranch well, a dry hole that tested COD2U at the rate of 19 MMcfd. The most likely source of COD2U for Shell's proposed test is El Paso Natural Gas Co.'s processing plant at Brown-Basset Field in Terrell County, where gas is now being vented to the atmosphere at the rate of 40 MMscfd.

  20. Anti-Wear Performance and Mechanism of an Oil-Miscible Ionic Liquid as a Lubricant Additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Bansal, Dinesh G [ORNL; Yu, Bo [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Li, Huaqing [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Mordukhovich, Gregory [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Smolenski, Donald [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate has been investigated as a potential anti-wear lubricant additive. Unlike most other ILs that have very low solubility in non-polar fluids, this IL is fully miscible with various hydrocarbon oils. In addition, it is thermally stable up to 347 oC, showed no corrosive attack to cast iron in ambient environment, and has excellent wettability on solid surfaces (e.g., contact angle on cast iron <8o). Most importantly, this phosphonium-based IL has demonstrated effective anti-scuffing and anti-wear characteristics when blended with lubricating oils. For example, a 5 wt.% addition into a synthetic base oil eliminated the scuffing failure experienced by the neat oil and, as a result, reduced the friction coefficient by 60% and the wear rate by three orders of magnitude. A synergistic effect on wear protection was observed with the current anti-wear additive when added into a fully-formulated engine oil. Nanostructure examination and composition analysis revealed a tribo-boundary film and subsurface plastic deformation zone for the metallic surface lubricated by the IL-containing lubricants. This protective boundary film is believed to be responsible for the IL s anti-scuffing and anti-wear functionality.

  1. Effect of PEO molecular weight on the miscibility and dynamics in epoxy/PEO blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shoudong; Zhang, Rongchun; Wang, Xiaoliang; Sun, Pingchuan; Lv, Weifeng; Liu, Qingjie; Jia, Ninghong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the effect of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) molecular weight in blends of epoxy (ER) and PEO on the miscibility, inter-chain weak interactions and local dynamics were systematically investigated by multi-frequency temperature modulation DSC and solid-state NMR techniques. We found that the molecular weight (M(w)) of PEO was a crucial factor in controlling the miscibility, chain dynamics and hydrogen bonding interactions between PEO and ER. A critical PEO molecular weight (M(crit)) around 4.5k was found. PEO was well miscible with ER when the molecular weight was below M(crit), where the chain motion of PEO was restricted due to strong inter-chain hydrogen bonding interactions. However, for the blends with high molecular weight PEO (M(w) > M(crit)), the miscibility between PEO and ER was poor, and most of PEO chains were considerably mobile. Finally, polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle (PISEMA) solid-state NMR experiment further revealed the different mobility of the PEO in ER/PEO blends with different molecular weight of PEO at molecular level. Based on the DSC and NMR results, a tentative model was proposed to illustrate the miscibility in ER/PEO blends.

  2. Miscibility of eudragit/chitosan polymer blend in water determined by physical property measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sk Ershadul; Sheela, A

    2013-01-30

    The interest in the preparation and application of polymeric blends is growing since they can exhibit properties of great industrial interest. The current study focuses on the preparation of polymeric blends of varying compositions of eudragit and chitosan and their miscibility studies. The preparation was carried out by using ethanol and 1% acetic acid in water. FT-IR spectra reveal the possibilities of chemical interactions between eudragit/chitosan. The miscibility of polymeric blend at different composition has been investigated by viscosity, ultrasonic velocity, density, refractive index and adiabatic compressibility values measured at two different temperatures 30 °C and 40 °C. The interaction parameters ΔB, μ and α, were determined from viscosity data. From the values observed, it is found that the blend is miscible in all compositions at 30 °C whereas at 40 °C, it seems to be immiscible in certain compositions. It is found that the blend is miscible, when the chitosan concentration is more than 70% (v/v) at both the temperatures and also observed that variation of temperature has no effect on the miscibility of eudragit/chitosan blend.

  3. The Miscibility of PCBM in Low Band-Gap Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huipeng; You, Wei; Peet, Jeff; Azoulay, Jason; Bazan, Guillermo; Dadmun, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the morphology of the photoactive layer in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is essential to optimizing conjugated polymer-based solar cells to meet the targeted efficiency of 10%. The miscibility and interdiffusion of components are among the key elements that impact the development of morphology and structure in OPV active layers. This study uses neutron reflectivity to correlate the structure of low band gap polymers to their miscibility with PCBM. Several low band gap polymers that exhibit power conversion efficiencies exceeding 7%, including PBnDT-DTffBT were examined. The intermixing of low band-gap polymer and PCBM bilayers was monitored by neutron reflectivity before and after thermal annealing, providing quantification of the miscibility and interdiffusion of PCBM within the low band gap polymer layer. These results indicate that the miscibility of PCBM ranges from 3% to 26% with the low band-gap polymers studied. The correlation between low band gap polymer structure and miscibility of PCBM will also be discussed.

  4. Tsunami flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric; Jones, Henry; McBride, Mark; Fedors, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Panel 5 focused on tsunami flooding with an emphasis on Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) as derived from its counterpart, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) that determines seismic ground-motion hazards. The Panel reviewed current practices in PTHA and determined the viability of extending the analysis to extreme design probabilities (i.e., 10-4 to 10-6). In addition to earthquake sources for tsunamis, PTHA for extreme events necessitates the inclusion of tsunamis generated by submarine landslides, and treatment of the large attendant uncertainty in source characterization and recurrence rates. Tsunamis can be caused by local and distant earthquakes, landslides, volcanism, and asteroid/meteorite impacts. Coastal flooding caused by storm surges and seiches is covered in Panel 7. Tsunamis directly tied to earthquakes, the similarities with (and path forward offered by) the PSHA approach for PTHA, and especially submarine landslide tsunamis were a particular focus of Panel 5.

  5. Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth in Porous Media, in the presence of Water Miscible and Non-Miscible Organic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaho, Sofia; Sygouni, Varvara; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of sparingly soluble salts (scaling) within porous media is a major problem encountered in many industrial and environmental applications. In the oil industry scaling causes severe operational malfunctions and, therefore, increasing the total operating and maintenance cost [1]. The most common types of sparingly soluble salts located in oil fields include carbonate and sulfate salts of calcium, strondium and barium[1,2]. Multiple phase flow and tubing surface properties are some of the factors affecting scale formation [3]. The main purpose of the present work was the investigation of the precipitation mechanisms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) through in situ mixing of two soluble salt solutions in a flow granular medium, in the presence of water miscible organic fluid (ethylene glycol) or non-miscible organic fluid (n-dodecane). All series of experiments were carried out in a two dimensional porous medium made of Plexiglas. For all solutions used in the experiments, the contact angles with the surface of the porous medium and the interfacial tensions were measured. During the experiments, the calcium carbonate crystal growth was continuously monitored and recorded through an optical microscope equipped with a digital programmed video camera. The snap-shots were taken within specific time intervals and their detailed procession gave information concerning the crystal growth rate and kinetics. The pH of the effluent was measured and fluids samples were collected for calcium analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). In all experiments effluent calcium concentration decreased as a function of time, suggesting that CaCO3 precipitation took place inside the porous medium. Crystals of the precipitated salt were identified using Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and the morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The induction time for precipitation of CaCO3 crystals in the presence of n-dodecane was significantly

  6. The Effects of Branching and Deuterium Labeling on Polymer Blend Miscibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, Jeffrey; Higgins, Julia; Lipson, Jane

    Local structural or chemical changes made to one component of a polymer blend can have a significant impact on miscibility. In this talk we will focus on several blends involving linear and 4-arm star polystyrene (PS), both hydrogenous and deuterated, and poly(vinylmethylether) (PVME). We consider the effect of the structural change on the miscibility of PS/PVME, then turn to the added effect of deuterium labeling, both on this blend and for isotopic PS mixtures. Using our Locally Correlated Lattice (LCL) model we are able to identify trends in the physical properties of pure components, such as: free volume, thermal expansion coefficient, and cohesive energy density. We find that branching and labeling, both independently and cumulatively, affect pure component properties. Our ability to correlate structural and chemical changes with trends in physical properties leads to predictions about the compatibility of pure components, and thus their blend miscibility. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1403757 and GAANN.

  7. Shift in membrane miscibility transition temperature upon addition of short-chain alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, M.

    2016-12-01

    I consider the effect of a small concentration of a molecule, such as a short-chain alcohol, on the miscibility transition temperature of a giant plasma membrane vesicle. For concentrations sufficiently small such that the system can be treated as a dilute solution, the change in transition temperature is known to depend upon the extent of the molecule's partition into the coexisting liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases. Preferential partitioning into the former decreases the miscibility temperature, while preferential partitioning into the latter causes an increase. The analysis, combined with calculated values of the partition coefficient of saturated chains, illuminates the results of recent experiments on the change in miscibility transition temperatures with changing alcohol chain length, and makes several testable predictions.

  8. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  9. Data mining of solubility parameters for computational prediction of drug-excipient miscibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Alzghoul, Ahmad; Kaialy, Waseem

    2014-07-01

    Abstract Computational data mining is of interest in the pharmaceutical arena for the analysis of massive amounts of data and to assist in the management and utilization of the data. In this study, a data mining approach was used to predict the miscibility of a drug and several excipients, using Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) as the data set. The K-means clustering algorithm was applied to predict the miscibility of indomethacin with a set of more than 30 compounds based on their partial solubility parameters [dispersion forces (δd), polar forces (δp) and hydrogen bonding (δh)]. The miscibility of the compounds was determined experimentally, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in a separate study. The results of the K-means algorithm and DSC were compared to evaluate the K-means clustering prediction performance using the HSPs three-dimensional parameters, the two-dimensional parameters such as volume-dependent solubility (δv) and hydrogen bonding (δh) and selected single (one-dimensional) parameters. Using HSPs, the prediction of miscibility by the K-means algorithm correlated well with the DSC results, with an overall accuracy of 94%. The prediction accuracy was the same (94%) when the two-dimensional parameters or the hydrogen-bonding (one-dimensional) parameter were used. The hydrogen-bonding parameter was thus a determining factor in predicting miscibility in such set of compounds, whereas the dispersive and polar parameters had only a weak correlation. The results show that data mining approach is a valuable tool for predicting drug-excipient miscibility because it is easy to use, is time and cost-effective, and is material sparing.

  10. STUDIES ON MISCIBILITY OF POLY (ε-CAPROLACTONE) AND ALIPHATIC POLYCARBONATE BLENDS AND DETERMINATION OF THEIR INTERACTION PARAMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li; HUANG Yuhui; SONG Mo; CONG Guangmin

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the miscibility of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and aliphatic polycarbonate (AP C) is studied by using DSC. The results show that PCL and APC are miscible in all ranges of composition. The interaction parameter between the polymers is calculated from the melting point depression data. Using optical microscope, the shapes of the PCL spherulites in the blends are observed.

  11. Influence of the degree of hydrolysis of poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) on miscibility with poly(vinyl acetate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, M.; Vorenkamp, E.J.; Brinke, G. ten; Challa, G.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the hydrolysis of anhydride groups in poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMA) on its miscibility with poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is investigated. The cloudpoint curves of these blends are determined as a function of the degree of hydrolysis. The miscibility is shown to improve wit

  12. Miscibility study of hexanoyl chitosan in blend with epoxidized natural rubber by viscometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Asheila; Chan, C. H.; Muhammad, F. H.; Winie, Tan

    2015-08-01

    Miscibility of blends of hexanoyl chitosan and epoxidized natural rubber with 25 mol% epoxidation level (ENR25) was investigated by dilute solution viscometry (DSV). Experimental results obey the Huggins' equation in the concentration range under investigation. Intrinsic viscosities are found to vary linearly with blend composition. The difference between experimental and ideal Huggins coefficients, κ =K12-√{K1ṡK2 } is proposed to evaluate the miscibility behavior of the blends. Negative deviations from the ideal behavior indicated immiscibility between hexanoyl chitosan and ENR25.

  13. Tuning the phase diagrams: the miscibility studies of multilactate liquid crystalline compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubnov, Alexej; Tykarska, Marzena; Hamplová, Věra; Kurp, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    Design of binary and multicomponent liquid crystalline mixtures is a very powerful tool to reach the desired self-assembling properties. Beyond many advantages, this method has a distinct negativity - it is very material-consuming. While working with unique chiral materials in the research laboratory, this problem can be solved by applying miscibility study by the contact preparation method. In this work, the miscibility studies of lactic acid derivatives and non-chiral/chiral liquid crystalline molecules of different structure have been done in order to establish the phase diagrams. Special attention is focused on the ferro(antiferro)electric smectic phases.

  14. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water Part 3. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 11 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aromatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For nine systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All new data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  15. A mathematical model for preflush treatment in an oil reservoir using a fully miscible fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Vermolen; G.-J. Pieters; P.L.J. Zitha; J. Bruining

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we propose and analyse a mathematical model for preflush treatment in an oil reservoir. The model is based on two phase flow in which both phases are fully miscible. For the case of constant injection rate condition, fully implicit solutions can be constructed. Saturation p

  16. Miscibility of Quillaja Saponins with other Co-surfactants under Different pH Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Corina L; Salminen, Hanna; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The miscibility behavior of mixed surfactant systems and the influence of extrinsic parameters are crucial for their application as emulsifiers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the miscibility behavior of mixed systems composed of commercial Quillaja saponin and a co-surfactant, namely sodium caseinate, pea protein, rapeseed lecithin, or egg lecithin. These mixtures were evaluated macro- and microscopically at different concentration ratios (maximum concentration 5% w/v) at pH 3, 5, and 7 at 25 °C. The individual ingredients were also assessed for their charge properties and surface hydrophobicity. The results showed that Quillaja saponin-caseinate mixtures were miscible only at pH 7, and showed aggregation and precipitation at lower pH due to increasing electrostatic attraction forces. Rheological measurements showed that Quillaja saponin-pea protein mixtures formed gelled structures at all tested pH values mainly via association of hydrophobic patches. Quillaja saponins mixed with rapeseed lecithin were miscible at all tested pH values due to electrostatic repulsion. Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin mixtures aggregated independent of pH and concentration ratio. The microscopic analysis revealed that the lower the pH and the higher the Quillaja saponin ratio, the denser were the formed Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin aggregates. The results are summarized in ternary phase diagrams that provide a useful tool in selecting a surfactant system for food applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236FA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for refrigerant R-236fa and two potential lubricants . (The data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The tested oi...

  18. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236EA WITH FOUR DIFFERENT EXXON LUBRICANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density data for the refrigerant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea (or R-236ea) and four lubricants supplied by Exxon Corporation. Such data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for ...

  19. The Consequence of Donor-acceptor Miscibility on Charge Transport and Photovoltaic Device Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhshouri, Kiarash; Kozub, Derek; Wang, Chenchen; Salleo, Alberto; Gomez, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Recent energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that amorphous mixed phases are ubiquitous within mesostructured polythiophene/fullerene mixtures. The role of mixing within nanophases on charge transport of organic semiconductor mixtures, however, is not fully understood. Through the combination of Flory-Huggins theory and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, we have estimated the miscibility limit of polythiophene/fullerene blends. We have also demonstrated the interplay between miscibility and percolation to describe field-effect mobilities as a measure of the conductive pathways present in a model organic semiconductor mixture (amorphous polythiophene/fullerene blends). Our studies reveal that the miscibility of the components strongly affects electron transport within amorphous blends. Immiscibility promotes efficient electron transport by promoting percolating pathways within organic semiconductor mixtures. However, strongly immiscible systems would readily phase separate into large domains, preventing efficient charge separation in organic photovoltaics. Consequently, an optimum degree of miscibility between donor/acceptor mixtures exists for the application of such mixtures to organic solar cells.

  20. The impact of miscibility on organic solar cell performance and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian A.; Tumbleston, John R.; Bartelt, Jon A.; McGehee, Michael D.; McNeill, Christopher R.; Ade, Harald

    2013-03-01

    The recent demonstration of molecular miscibility/solubility between polymers and fullerenes has revealed a much more complex picture of nanostructure, charge dynamics, and device stability - aspects that are all entangled. Here we show that miscibility is important in several ways that depends on the particular material blend. For example, recent absolute measurements on domain size and composition have revealed nanostructure in PTB7:PC71BM blends that is controlled by miscibility and that well-mixed regions likely hinder charge separation in this system. On the other hand, PBDTTPD:PC61BM blends rely on high levels of mixing for electron percolation. Such evidence leads to a complex interplay between charge separation, electron trapping, and percolation. Miscibility, a thermodynamic parameter, can, furthermore, determine the thermal stability of device active layers, which we show varies widely between materials systems. This suggests tailoring of the molecular interactions between donor and acceptor materials in solar cells may be the key to high-performing, highly stable and, therefore, economically viable organic electronics technologies.

  1. Exploratory studies on the carboxymethylation of cassava starch in water-miscible organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, J; Chen, WR; Manurung, RM; Ganzeveld, KJ; Heeres, HJ; Manurung, Robbert M.; Chen, Wen-ren

    2004-01-01

    The carboxymethylation of cassava starch using sodium monochloroacetate (SMCA) as an etherification agent was investigated. Mixtures of water and water-miscible organic liquids were selected as carboxymethylation reaction medium to obtain a high degree of substitution (DS) without changing the granu

  2. Characteristics of remaining oil viscosity in water-and polymer-flooding reservoirs in Daqing Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of 21 crude oil samples shows a good correlation between high molecular-weight hydrocarbon components (C 40+) and viscosity.Forty-four remaining oil samples extracted from oil sands of oilfield development coring wells were analyzed by high-temperature gas chromatography (HTGC),for the relative abundance of C 21-,C 21-C 40 and C 40+ hydrocarbons.The relationship between viscosity of crude oil and C 40+ (%) hydrocarbons abundance is used to expect the viscosity of remaining oil.The mobility characteristics of remaining oil,the properties of remaining oil,and the next displacement methods in reservoirs either water-flooded or polymer-flooded are studied with rock permeability,oil saturation of coring wells,etc.The experimental results show that the hydrocarbons composition,viscosity,and mobility of remaining oil from both polymer-flooding and water-flooding reservoirs are heterogeneous,especially the former.Relative abundance of C 21- and C 21-C 40 hydrocarbons in polymer-flooding reservoirs is lower than that of water-flooding,but with more abundance of C 40+ hydrocarbons.It is then suggested that polymer flooding must have driven more C 40- hydrocarbons out of reservoir,which resulted in relatively enriched C 40+,more viscous oils,and poorer mobility.Remaining oil in water-flooding reservoirs is dominated by moderate viscosity oil with some low viscosity oil,while polymer-flooding mainly contained moderate viscosity oil with some high viscosity oil.In each oilfield and reservoir,displacement methods of remaining oil,viscosity,and concentration by polymer-solution can be adjusted by current viscosity of remaining oil and mobility ratio in a favorable range.A new basis and methods are suggested for the further development and enhanced oil recovery of remaining oil.

  3. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  4. Flooding and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  5. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  6. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  7. Non-modal linear stability analysis of miscible viscous fingering in a Hele-Shaw cell

    CERN Document Server

    Hota, Tapan Kumar; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    For miscible viscous fingering (VF) in a Hele-Shaw cell or in two dimensional homogeneous porous media, the transient growth of disturbances is investigated by non-modal linear stability analysis (NMA). Due to the non-autonomous nature of the linearized perturbed equations, the linear stability theory prohibits using the normal mode analysis. The linearized perturbed equations for Darcy's law coupled with a convection-diffusion equation is discretized using finite difference method. The resultant matrix valued initial value problem is then solved by fourth order Runge-Kutta method, followed by a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the propagator matrix. We demonstrate the dominant perturbation that experiences the maximum amplification within the linear regime which lead to the transient growth. This feature was previously unattained in the existing linear stability methods for miscible VF. To explore the relevance of the optimal perturbation obtained from non-modal analysis of the physical system, we perfo...

  8. Study on the nonexistence of liquid miscibility gap in the Ce-Mn system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain whether the liquid miscibility gap exists in the Ce-Mn system, 3 key alloys are prepared by arc melting the pure elements, annealed at specified temperature for 20 minutes, quenched in ice water and then subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis for phase identification and to scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray analysis for microstructure observation and composition analysis. The XRD examination indicated that terminal solutions based on Ce and Mn exist in the water-quenched alloys. No compound was detected. Microstructure observation and composition analysis indicate the nonexistence of the liquid miscibility gap. The newly assessed Ce-Mn phase diagram was presented. .

  9. Fluid-fluid interaction during miscible and immiscible displacement under ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamida, T.; Babadagli, T.

    2007-12-01

    This paper aims at identifying and analyzing the influence of high-frequency, high-intensity ultrasonic radiation at the interface between immiscible (different types of oils and aqueous solutions) and miscible (different types of oil and solvent) fluids. An extensive set of Hele-Shaw type experiments were performed for several viscosity ratios, and interfacial tension. Fractal analysis techniques were applied to quantify the degree of fingering and branching. This provided a rough assessment of the degree of perturbation generated at the interface when the capillary forces along with the viscous forces are effective. Miscible Hele-Shaw experiments were also presented to isolate the effect of viscous forces. We found that ultrasound acts to stabilize the interfacial front, and that such effect is most pronounced at low viscosity ratios.

  10. Study on the Miscibility and Phase Behavior of Polyoxymethylene with Novolak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The miscibility and phase behavior of the blends of polyoxymethylene (POM)/Novolak were investigated by the cloud point method, which showed that the POM/Novolak blends exhibited a lower critical solution temperature. The melting point of POM decreased when diluted with Novolak. From the melting temperature depression of POM, a negative interaction parameter (X) between POM and Novolak was obtained. The IR spectrum revealed that the miscibility between POM and Novolak was caused by the specific interaction between the OH groups of Novolak and the ether oxygen atoms of POM. The morphology of the blends investigated by polarized light microscopy showed that the size of spherulites of POM was sharply decreased by its mixing with Novolak. This suggests that Novolak be used as a compatibilizer for POM.

  11. Miscibility of Semi-flexible Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Copolyesteramide with Polyamide 66

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Liquid crystalline polymer-polyamide 66 (LCP/PA66) blends were compounded by usingaBrabender mixing followed by compression moulding. The LCP employed was a semi-flexible liquid crystalline copolyesteramide based on 30% (molar fraction) of p-amino benzoic acid (ABA)and 70% (molar fraction) of poly (ethylene terephthalate)(PET). The LCP/PA66 blends wereinvestigated in terms of the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties. It was found that PA66and LCP components of the blends are miscible in the molten state, but are partially miscible inthe solid state. The inclusion of the semi-flexible LCP into PA66 retards the crystallization rateof PA66. Furthermore, the melting temperature and the degree of crystallinity of PA66 are reduced considerably due to the LCP addition.

  12. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional simulations of miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, W

    2006-02-23

    A comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional high-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of planar, miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability flows are presented. The resolution of the three-dimensional simulation is sufficient to attain a fully turbulent state. A number of different statistics from the mixing region (e.g., growth rates, PDFs, mixedness measures, and spectra) are used to demonstrate that two-dimensional flow simulations differ substantially from the three-dimensional one. It is found that the two-dimensional flow grows more quickly than its three-dimensional counterpart at late times, develops larger structures, and is much less well mixed. These findings are consistent with the concept of inverse cascade in two-dimensional flow, as well as the influence of a reduced effective Atwood number on miscible flow.

  13. Understanding surface interactions in aqueous miscible organic solvent treated layered double hydroxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Erastova, Valentina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; O'Hare, Dermot; Greenwell, H. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials are of interest for use in a wealth of technological applications, many of which require a high surface area for optimal properties and performance. Recently, an industrially scalable method to create high surface area layered double hydroxide (LDH) materials, which may be readily dispersed in non-polar solvents, has been developed. This method involves treatment of LDHs with aqueous miscible organic (AMO) solvents. Here, molecular modeling is exploited to elucidate the AMO ...

  14. Miscibility of Methylmethacrylate-co-methacrylic Acid Polymer with Magnesium, Zinc, and Manganese Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers

    OpenAIRE

    ALKAN, Cemil; YURTSEVEN, Nebahat; ARAS, Leyla

    2005-01-01

    The miscibility of methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid polymer (MMA-MAA) with metal neutralized sulfonated polystyrene ionomers was investigated by viscometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared radiation spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. Polystyrene (PS) was sulfonated by acetic anhydride and sulfuric acid and the sulfonation degree was found to be 2.6 mole percent, and 2.6 mole percent sulfonated polystyrene was neutralized by Mg, Zn, and Mn sa...

  15. Miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes of the displacing fluid by chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Chika; Matsuda, Kenji; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2010-02-01

    In our previous study, we experimentally studied the effects of changes in the viscosity of the displaced more-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions on miscible viscous fingering pattern [Y. Nagatsu, K. Matsuda, Y. Kato, and Y. Tada, "Experimental study on miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes induced by variations in chemical species concentrations due to chemical reactions," J. Fluid Mech. 571, 475 (2007)]. In the present study, experiments have been performed on the miscible viscous fingering involving changes in the viscosity of the displacing less-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. We have found that the shielding effect is suppressed and the fingers are widened when the viscosity is increased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern denser. In contrast, the shielding effect is enhanced, and the fingers are narrowed when the viscosity is decreased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern less dense. These results are essentially same as those obtained by the above-mentioned previous study. This shows that the effects of changes in the viscosity due to the instantaneous reactions are independent of whether the changes occur in the displaced liquid or in the displacing liquid. A mechanism for the independence is discussed.

  16. Buoyancy-driven instability of a miscible horizontal displacement in a Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudin, F.; Riolfo, L. A.; Knaepen, B.; de Wit, A.

    2012-11-01

    In Hele-Shaw cells, viscous fingers are forming when a fluid is injected into a more viscous one. If the two fluids are reversed, with the less mobile fluid injected into the low viscosity one, the situation is expected to be stable from a viscous point of view. Nevertheless, a destabilization of the interface can be observed due to a buoyancy-driven effect if a density difference exists between the two miscible fluids. As a result, the Poiseuille profile established in the gap of the cell locally destabilizes and convection rolls are forming. In a view from above, a striped pattern is observed at the miscible interface between the two fluids. To characterize the development of this instability, we have performed an experimental study of viscously stable miscible displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell with radial injection. The displacing fluids are aqueous solutions of glycerol and the displaced ones are either dyed water or dyed glycerol solutions. The way the relative properties of the two fluids is influencing the onset time of the instability and the characteristic size of the pattern is studied. The influence of the gap width and of the flow rate on the buoyantly unstable dynamics is also characterized.

  17. Polymer-polymer miscibility in PEO/cationic starch and PEO/hydrophobic starch blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purposes were evaluating the influence of different starches on the miscibility with Poly(ethylene oxide (PEO and their effects on the spherulite growth rate. Polymer-polymer miscibility in PEO/cationic starch and PEO/hydrophobic starch blends consisting of different w/w ratios (100/0, 95/05, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 65/35 and 60/40 was investigated. This analysis was based on the depression in the equilibrium melting temperature (Tm0. By treating the data of thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry – DSC with Nishi-Wang equation, a positive value (0.68 was found for the interaction parameter of PEO/cationic starch. For PEO/hydrophobic starch blends, a negative value (–0.63 was obtained for the interaction parameter. The results suggested that PEO/cationic starch system should be immiscible. However, the system PEO/hydrophobic starch was considered to be miscible in the whole range of studied compositions. Through optical microscopy analysis, it was concluded that the spherulite growth rate is significantly affected by changing the amount and the type of starch as well.

  18. The effect of additives interaction on the miscibility and crystal structure of two immiscible biodegradable polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed El-Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly lactic acid (PLLA is a promising biopolymer, obtained from polymerization of lactic acid that is derived from renewable resources through fermentation. The characteristic brittleness of PLLA is attributed to slow crystallization rates, which results in the formation of the large spherulites. Its glass temperature is relative high, above room temperature and close to 60 ºC, and therefore its applications are limited. The additives poly((R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB, poly(vinyl acetate (PVAc and tributyl citrate (TBC were used as compatibilizers in the biodegradable polymer blend of (PLLA/PPC. Results from DSC and POM analysis indicated that the blends of PLLA and PPC are immiscible. However, the blends with additives are miscible. TBC as plasticizer was added to PLLA to reduce its Tg. PVAc was used as compatibilizer to improve the miscibility between PLLA and PPC. FT-IR showed about 7 cm-1 shift in the C=O peak in miscible blends due to physical interactions. POM experiments together with the results of DSC and WAXD showed that PHB enhances the crystallization behavior of PLLA by acting as bio nuclei and the crystallization process can occur more quickly. Consequently an increase was observed in the peak intensity in WAXD.

  19. Solid state drug-polymer miscibility studies using the model drug ABT-102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Rajan; Gokhale, Rajeev; Burgess, Diane J

    2016-07-25

    Amorphous solid dispersions typically suffer storage stability issues due to: their amorphous nature, high drug loading, uneven drug:stabilizer ratio and plasticization effects as a result of hygroscopic excipients. An extensive solid state miscibility study was conducted to aid in understanding the mechanisms involved in drug/stabilizer interactions. ABT-102 (model drug) and nine different polymers with different molecular weights and viscosities were selected to investigate drug/polymer miscibility. Three different polymer:drug ratios (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1, w/w) were analyzed using: DSC, FTIR and PXRD. Three different techniques were used to prepare the amorphous solid dispersions: serial dilution, solvent evaporation and spray drying. Spray drying was the best method to obtain amorphous solid dispersions. However, under certain conditions amorphous formulations could be obtained using solvent evaporation. Melting point depression was used to calculate interaction parameters and free energy of mixing for the various drug polymer mixtures. The spray dried solid dispersions yielded a negative free energy of mixing which indicated strong drug-polymer miscibility compared to the solvent evaporation and serial dilution method. Soluplus was the best stabilizer compared to PVP and HPMC, which is probably a consequence of strong hydrogen bonding between the two CO moieties of soluplus and the drug NH moieities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. 4D seismic monitoring of the miscible CO2 flood of Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Byrnes, A.P.; Harrison, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    A cost-effective, highly repeatable, 4D-optimized, single-pattern/patch seismic data-acquisition approach with several 3D data sets was used to evaluate the feasibility of imaging changes associated with the " water alternated with gas" (WAG) stage. By incorporating noninversion-based seismic-attribute analysis, the time and cost of processing and interpreting the data were reduced. A 24-ms-thick EOR-CO 2 injection interval-using an average instantaneous frequency attribute (AIF) was targeted. Changes in amplitude response related to decrease in velocity from pore-fluid replacement within this time interval were found to be lower relative to background values than in AIF analysis. Carefully color-balanced AIF-attribute maps established the overall area affected by the injected EOR-CO2.

  1. South China Flooded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Vehicles traverse a flooded street in Liuzhou, guangxi zhuang Autonomous Region, on May 19.heavy rainstorms repeatedly struck China this month, triggering floods, mudflows and landslides. hunan, guangdong and Jiangxi provinces and Chongqing Municipality were the worst hit.

  2. Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  4. Flooding: Prioritizing protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    With climate change, urban development and economic growth, more assets and infrastructures will be exposed to flooding. Now research shows that investments in flood protection are globally beneficial, but have varied levels of benefit locally.

  5. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  6. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  7. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an

  8. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an ext

  9. Flood Impact Modelling and Natural Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; ODonnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Local implementation of Natural Flood Management methods are now being proposed in many flood schemes. In principal it offers a cost effective solution to a number of catchment based problem as NFM tackles both flood risk and WFD issues. However within larger catchments there is the issue of which subcatchments to target first and how much NFM to implement. If each catchment has its own configuration of subcatchment and rivers how can the issues of flood synchronisation and strategic investment be addressed? In this study we will show two key aspects to resolving these issues. Firstly, a multi-scale network water level recorder is placed throughout the system to capture the flow concentration and travel time operating in the catchment being studied. The second is a Flood Impact Model (FIM), which is a subcatchment based model that can generate runoff in any location using any hydrological model. The key aspect to the model is that it has a function to represent the impact of NFM in any subcatchment and the ability to route that flood wave to the outfall. This function allows a realistic representation of the synchronisation issues for that catchment. By running the model in interactive mode the user can define an appropriate scheme that minimises or removes the risk of synchornisation and gives confidence that the NFM investment is having a good level of impact downstream in large flood events.

  10. Urban pluvial flood prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically both...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0–2 h lead time, and numerical weather models with lead times up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps...

  11. Investigating miscibility and molecular mobility of nifedipine-PVP amorphous solid dispersions using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoda; Sperger, Diana; Munson, Eric J

    2014-01-06

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) (1)H T1 and T1ρ relaxation times were used to evaluate the miscibility of amorphous solid dispersions of nifedipine (NIF) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) prepared by three different methods: melt quenching in the typical lab setting, spray drying and melt quenching in the NMR rotor while spinning. Of the five compositions prepared by melt quenching in the lab setting, the 95:5 and 90:10 NIF:PVP (w:w) amorphous solid dispersions were not miscible while 75:25, 60:40, and 50:50 NIF:PVP dispersions were miscible by the (1)H T1ρ measurements. The domain size of the miscible systems was estimated to be less than 4.5 nm. Amorphous solid dispersions with composition of 90:10 NIF:PVP prepared by spray drying and melt quenching in the NMR rotor showed miscibility by (1)H T1ρ values. Variable-temperature SSNMR (1)H T1ρ relaxation measurements revealed a change in relaxation time at approximately 20 °C below Tg, suggesting increased molecular mobility above that temperature.

  12. Correlation Between Miscibility and Rheological Characteristics of the Polystyrene (PS) and Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwat, Zafrullah Khan; Baloch, Musa Kaleem

    2016-11-01

    Rheological measurement has been an effective technique to characterize the miscibility of polymer blends. This article investigates the viscoelastic behavior of poly(styrene) (PS) and poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) binary solutions in tetrahydrofuran (THF) relative to PS/PSAN/THF ternary solutions mainly reporting the findings of the authors involving the correlation between the miscibility and rheological behavior. Rheological properties, such as shear viscosity, and shear stress as a function of shear rate were investigated for different blend compositions. Moreover, complex viscosity, loss and storage moduli were also investigated as functions of both the frequency and blend composition. The criterion of miscibility based on the rule of mixture has been discussed. The present study revealed very small window of miscibility as only composition, 50/50 showed values close to the additivity rule or intermediate to those of the neat polymers, thereby indicating very weak interactions between the blend components. On the basis of various findings during the rheological investigation, the blend under study is classified almost immiscible. Moreover, the obtained results also suggested that the miscibility depends on the blend composition and frequency.

  13. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  14. Predicting CO2 Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP Using Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alomair O.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Miscible gas injection is one of the most important enhanced oil recovery (EOR approaches for increasing oil recovery. Due to the massive cost associated with this approach a high degree of accuracy is required for predicting the outcome of the process. Such accuracy includes, the preliminary screening parameters for gas miscible displacement; the “Minimum Miscibility Pressure” (MMP and the availability of the gas. All conventional and stat-of-art MMP measurement methods are either time consuming or decidedly cost demanding processes. Therefore, in order to address the immediate industry demands a nonparametric approach, Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE, is used in this study to estimate MMP. This algorithm Breiman and Friedman [Brieman L., Friedman J.H. (1985 J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 80, 391, 580-619]estimates the transformations of a set of predictors (here C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7+, CO2, H2S, N2, Mw5+, Mw7+ and T and a response (here MMP that produce the maximum linear effect between these transformed variables. One hundred thirteen MMP data points are considered both from the relevant published literature and the experimental work. Five MMP measurements for Kuwaiti Oil are included as part of the testing data. The proposed model is validated using detailed statistical analysis; a reasonably good value of correlation coefficient 0.956 is obtained as compare to the existing correlations. Similarly, standard deviation and average absolute error values are at the lowest as 139 psia (8.55 bar and 4.68% respectively. Hence, it reveals that the results are more reliable than the existing correlations for pure CO2 injection to enhance oil recovery. In addition to its accuracy, the ACE approach is more powerful, quick and can handle a huge data.

  15. Mixed Method for Compressible Miscible Displacement with Dispersion in Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunguang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Compressible miscible displacement of one fluid by another in porous media is modelled by a nonlinear parabolic system. A finite element procedure is introduced to approximate the concentration of one fluid and the pressure of the mixture. The concentration is treated by a Galerkin method while the pressure is treated by a parabolic mixed finite element method. The effect of dispersion,which is neglected in [1],is considered. Optimal order estimates in L2 are derived for the errors in the approximate solutions.

  16. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS MEDIA INFLUENCED BY MOBILE WATER AND IMMOBILE WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔明; 梁栋

    2002-01-01

    The numerical methods for miscible displacment in aggregated or sorbing medium areconsidered. A mixed finite element method is adopted for the pressure equation. The concentra-tion in the mobile water is approximated by a combination of a Galerkin finite element method andthe method of characteristics and the concentration in immobile water is approximated by a stan-dard Galerkin method. The moving mesh technique which depends on time t is adopted here. Themoving meshes can vary in different spacial domains with different variable times. Optima errorestimates in energy norm and L2 norm are obtained under certain constraints.

  17. Measurements of viscosity and permeability of two phase miscible fluid flow in rock cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J L; Taylor, D G

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the application of 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the measurement of fluid viscosity and rock core plug permeability during two phase miscible displacements in certain rock types. The core plug permeability was determined by monitoring glycerol solutions displacing D2O. Simple physical principles were used to calculate the core permeability from the measured displacement angle for a set of Lochaline sandstone core plugs. In a further experiment the viscosity of polyacrylamide solution 1500 ppm was determined in the core plug. The permeability and viscosity results compared well to conventional core analysis methods.

  18. Low-Temperature Miscibility of Ethanol-Gasoline-Water Blends in Flex Fuel Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T.; Schramm, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The miscibility of blends of gasoline and hydrous ethanol was investigated experimentally at - 25 degrees C and - 2 degrees C. Furthermore, the maximum water content was found for ethanol in flex fuel blends. The results strongly indicate that blends containing ethanol with a water content above...... that of the ethanol/water azeotrope (4.4% water by mass) can be used as Flex Fuel blends together with gasoline at ambient temperatures of 25 degrees C and 2 degrees C, without phase separation occurring. Additionally, it was shown that the ethanol purity requirement of ethanol-rich flex fuel blends falls...... with increasing ethanol content in the gasoline-rich flex fuel blend....

  19. Miscibility and Molecular Orientation of Carbazole in Mixed Langmuir and Langrnuir-Blodgett Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. N. Islam; D. Bhattacharjee; S. A. Hussain

    2007-01-01

    We report the miscibility and molecular orientation of carbazole (CA) molecules in the mixed Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of CA in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and stearic acid (SA) matrices. The r-A isotherm confirms the formation of stable Langmuir films of CA mixed with either PMMA or SA at airwater interface. Characteristics of area per molecule versus molefraction and collapse pressure versus molefraction reveal complete demixing of CA and the matrix PMMA/SA molecules in the mixed films. Absorption spectroscopy certainly confirms the fact that CA molecules have preferred orientation on the substrate of the LB films.

  20. Effect of pseudo-gravitational acceleration on the dissolution rate of miscible drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viner, Gloria; La Monica, Tatiana; Lombardo, Renato; Pojman, John A.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of pseudo-gravitational acceleration on the dissolution process of two phase miscible systems has been investigated at high acceleration values using a spinning drop tensiometer with three systems: 1-butanol/water, isobutyric acid/water, and triethylamine/water. We concluded that the dissolution process involves at least three different transport phenomena: diffusion, barodiffusion, and gravitational (buoyancy-driven) convection. The last two phenomena are significantly affected by the centrifugal acceleration acting at the interface between the two fluids, and the coupling with the geometry of the dissolving drop leads to a change of the mass flux during the course of the dissolution process.

  1. Investigating the Correlation between Miscibility and Physical Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Fluorescence-Based Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bin; Tang, Xing; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate drug-polymer miscibility and to probe the correlation between miscibility and physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). Indomethacin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (IDM-HPMC), indomethacin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, and indomethacin-polyvinylpyrrolidone (IDM-PVP) were used as model systems. The miscibility of the IDM-polymer systems was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The physical stability of IDM-polymer ASDs stored at 40 °C was evaluated using fluorescence imaging and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimentally determined miscibility limit of IDM with the polymers was 50-60%, 20-30%, and 70-80% drug loading for HPMC, HPMCAS, and PVP, respectively. The X-ray results showed that for IDM-HPMC ASDs, samples with a drug loading of less than 50% were maintained in amorphous form during the study period, while samples with drug loadings higher than 50% crystallized within 15 days. For IDM-HPMCAS ASDs, samples with drug loading less than 30% remained amorphous, while samples with drug loadings higher than 30% crystallized within 10 days. IDM-PVP ASDs were found to be resistant to crystallization for all compositions. Thus, a good correlation was observed between phase separation and reduced physical stability, suggesting that miscibility is indeed an important ASDs characteristic. In addition, fluorescence-based techniques show promise in the evaluation of drug-polymer miscibility.

  2. RASOR flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Joost; Buckman, Lora; Bachmann, Daniel; Visser, Martijn; Tollenaar, Daniel; Vatvani, Deepak; Kramer, Nienke; Goorden, Neeltje

    2015-04-01

    Decision making in disaster management requires fast access to reliable and relevant information. We believe that online information and services will become increasingly important in disaster management. Within the EU FP7 project RASOR (Rapid Risk Assessment and Spatialisation of Risk) an online platform is being developed for rapid multi-hazard risk analyses to support disaster management anywhere in the world. The platform will provide access to a plethora of GIS data that are relevant to risk assessment. It will also enable the user to run numerical flood models to simulate historical and newly defined flooding scenarios. The results of these models are maps of flood extent, flood depths and flow velocities. The RASOR platform will enable to overlay historical event flood maps with observations and Earth Observation (EO) imagery to fill in gaps and assess the accuracy of the flood models. New flooding scenarios can be defined by the user and simulated to investigate the potential impact of future floods. A series of flood models have been developed within RASOR for selected case study areas around the globe that are subject to very different flood hazards: • The city of Bandung in Indonesia, which is prone to fluvial flooding induced by heavy rainfall. The flood hazard is exacerbated by land subsidence. • The port of Cilacap on the south coast of Java, subject to tsunami hazard from submarine earthquakes in the Sunda trench. • The area south of city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, prone to coastal and/or riverine flooding. • The island of Santorini in Greece, which is subject to tsunamis induced by landslides. Flood models have been developed for each of these case studies using mostly EO data, augmented by local data where necessary. Particular use was made of the new TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement) product from the German Aerospace centre (DLR) and EADS Astrium. The presentation will describe the flood models and the

  3. Modeling and Simulation of the Microstructure Evolution during a Cooling of Immiscible Alloys in the Miscibility Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure development during a cooling period of alloys being immiscible in the liquid state such as AlPb or Al-Bi has gained renewed scientific and technical interest during the last decades. Experiments have been performed to investigate the phase transformation kinetics in the liquid miscibility gap and numerical models have been developed to simulate and analyze the solidification process. The recently developed computational modeling techniques can, to some extent, be applied to describe the decomposition, the spatial phase separation and the microstructure evolution during a cooling period of an immiscible alloy through the miscibility gap. This article overviews the researches in this field.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  5. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble growth. Comparisons between miscible and immiscible mixing layer distributions are made from the resulting interface concentration profiles.

  6. MISCIBILITY AND THERMAL DEGRADATION KINETICS OF POLY-β-ALANINE/POLY(3-HYDROXYPROPIONATE BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efkan CATIKER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly-β-alanine (PBA and poly(3-hidroxypropionate (PHP were synthesized via base-catalyzed hydrogen transfer polymerization (HTP of acrylamide and acrylic acid, respectively. Blends of PBA/PHP with different composition (PHP content, 5% to 75% were studied using FTIR, DSC, TGA, XRD and polarized optical microscope to reveal both miscibility and thermal degradation kinetics of PBA/PHP blends.  Optical images of blends were transparent and entirely uniform. Characteristic IR bands of both components shifted in higher frequencies with increasing fraction of other component.  Melting temperature (Tm, thermal decomposition temperatures (Td and enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf of PHP decreased with increasing PBA fraction in blends. Thermal degradation kinetics of both components were studied by Freeman-Carroll method. Activation energies of thermal degradations of blend components were determined with a good regression coefficients (at least 0.994. Activation energies of decomposition decreased from 224.14 to 86.125 kJmol-1 with increasing PHP content. XRD spectra of blends exhibited lower peak intensities than those of neat polymers. The spectroscopic, thermal and optic methods revealed that PBA and PHP were miscible with a good compatibility in amorphous phase.

  7. Stability of viscosity stratified flows down an incline: Role of miscibility and wall slip

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sukhendu

    2016-01-01

    The effects of wall velocity slip on the linear stability of a gravity-driven miscible two-fluid flow down an incline are examined. The fluids have the matched density but different viscosity. A smooth viscosity stratification is achieved due to the presence of a thin mixed layer between the fluids. The results show that the presence of slip exhibits a promise for stabilizing the miscible flow system by raising the critical Reynolds number at the onset and decreasing the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers beyond the threshold of the dominant instability. This is different from its role in the case of a single fluid down a slippery substrate where slip destabilizes the flow system at the onset. Though the stability properties are analogous to the same flow system down a rigid substrate, slip is shown to delay the surface mode instability for any viscosity contrast. It has a damping/promoting effect on the overlap modes (which exist due to the overlap of critical layer of dominant disturbance with the mixed lay...

  8. Experimental study of 3D Rayleigh-Taylor convection between miscible fluids in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Yuji; Hyodo, Akimitsu; Wang, Lei; Suekane, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    The natural convection of miscible fluids in porous media has applications in several fields, such as geoscience and geoengineering, and can be employed for the geological storage of CO2. In this study, we used X-ray computer tomography to visualize 3D fingering structures associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability between miscible fluids in a porous medium. In the early stages of the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a fine crinkling pattern gradually appeared at the interface. As the wavelength and amplitude increased, descending fingers formed on the interface and extended vertically downward; in addition, ascending and highly symmetric fingers formed. The adjacent fingers were cylindrical in shape and coalesced to form large fingers. The fingers appearing on the interface tended to become finer with increasing Rayleigh number, which is consistent with linear perturbation theory. When the Péclet number exceeded 10, transverse dispersion increased the finger diameter and enhanced the finger coalescence, strongly impacting the decrease in finger number density. When mechanical dispersion was negligible, the finger-extension velocity and the dimensionless mass-transfer rate scaled with the characteristic velocity and the Rayleigh number with an appropriate length scale. Mechanical dispersion not only reduced the onset time but also enhanced the mass transport.

  9. Characterization of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Miscible Lactose-Sugars Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runjing; Roos, Yrjö H; Miao, Song

    2017-09-01

    Lactose-sugars systems were produced by spray drying. They were lactose, lactose-glucose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-maltose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-sucrose (4:1) mixtures, lactose-trehalose (4:1) mixtures, and lactose-corn syrup solids (CSS) (4:1) mixtures. The physical characteristics, water sorption behavior, glass transition, and mechanical properties of miscible lactose-sugars systems were investigated. Lactose-glucose mixtures had larger particle size than other lactose-sugars systems after spray drying. The presence of glucose or sucrose in lactose-sugars mixtures decreased the glass transition temperatures of amorphous systems, while the presence of maltose and trehalose had only minor impact on the glass transition temperatures. Moreover, glucose accelerated the crystallization of amorphous system at 0.44 aw , but its presence delayed the loss of sorbed water at higher water activities (≥0.54 aw ). Mechanical property study indicated that glucose and sucrose in amorphous system could result in an increase of molecular mobility, while the presence of CSS could decrease the free volume and maintain the stiffness of the miscible systems. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Direct Measurement of the Metastable Liquid Miscibility Gap in Fe-Co-Cu Ternary Alloy System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Chong-De; Georg P.G(O)RLER

    2005-01-01

    @@ The metastable liquid-liquid phase separation in undercooled Fe-Co-Cu ternary alloy melts (XCu = 0.10-0.84;XCo:XFe = 1:3,1:1 and 3:1) is investigated by differential thermal analysis in combination with glass fluxing technique. In almost every case, the undercooling of the homogeneous alloy melt was sufficient to reach the boundary line of the submerged miscibility gap. The differential-thermal-analysis signals indicate that this separation into a (Fe, Co)-rich liquid phase L1 and a Cu-rich liquid L2 is exothermic and proceeds until the rapid solidification of the L1 phase occurs. At a given Cu concentration and with the increase of Co content, the phase separation temperatures decrease monotonically between the corresponding values of the boundary systems Fe-Cu and Co-Cu. The boundary lines of the miscibility gap, which are determined for the three quasi-binary cross-sections of the (Fe, Co)-Cu alloy system, show remarkably flat domes. The occurrence of the liquid phase separation shows an evident influence on the subsequent γ-Fe(Co, Cu)→α-Fe(Co, Cu) solid phase transformation.

  11. Low temperature synthesis of Ru–Cu alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynova, S.A. [Nicolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Filatov, E.Yu., E-mail: decan@niic.nsc.ru [Nicolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Korenev, S.V.; Kuratieva, N.V. [Nicolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sheludyakova, L.A. [Nicolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Plusnin, P.E.; Shubin, Yu.V. [Nicolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Slavinskaya, E.M. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Boronin, A.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    A complex salt [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Cl][Cu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]—the precursor of nanoalloys combining ruthenium and copper was prepared. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n. Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres (helium, hydrogen, oxygen). Thermal decomposition of the precursor in inert atmosphere was thoroughly examined and the intermediate products were characterized. Experimental conditions for preparation of copper-rich (up to 12 at% of copper) metastable solid solution Cu{sub x}Ru{sub 1−x} (based on Ru structure) were optimized, what is in sharp contrast to the bimetallic miscibility gap known for the bulk counterparts in a wide composition range. Catalytic properties of copper–ruthenium oxide composite were tested in catalytic oxidation of CO. - Highlights: • We synthesized new precursor of CuRu metastable nanoalloys. • Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres. • Thermodestruction mechanism of precursor are studied. • Cu{sub 0.12}Ru{sub 0.88} nanoalloy with the compositions in the miscibility gap is obtained. • Catalytic conversion of CO on copper–ruthenium oxide composite were examined.

  12. MISCIBILITY, THERMAL STABILITY AND RETENTION OF PVP FOR CROSSLINKED PVA/PVP BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Guomei; ZHANG Kun; FENG Rongyin

    1994-01-01

    The thermal behavior, miscibility, crystallite conformation and thermal stability of crosslinked(CL-) PVA/PVP blends were studied by DSC and TG methods, respectively. DSC results showed that in the blend, the crystallinity,Tm and Tc of PVA were obviously lower than those of pure PVA; the crystal growth changed from three dimensional to two dimensional and only a single Tg was detected . These facts demonstrated that this crystalline and amorphous blend have good miscibility. TG curves showed that providing the quantity of K2S2O8 added is more than 3 wt % ,in the blends PVA will form a stable CL-network, whose thermal degradation temperature was near to that of PVP. But crosslinking reaction will not take place for PVP. The processes of thermal degradation of CL-blends are based on combining both the thermal degradation of PVP and that of PVA crosslinked with corresponding quantity of K2S2O8 CL-agent, respectively.The UV measurements showed that 75 wt% of PVP may be remained in CL-blend hydrogels crosslinked by adding (3- 5 wt % )K2S2O8.This is mainly due to the stable CL-network formed and the good compatibility and proper entanglement between the composites in the CL-blends.

  13. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Size-dependent spinodal and miscibility gaps for intercalation in nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Damian; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-11-01

    Using a recently proposed mathematical model for intercalation dynamics in phase-separating materials ( Singh , G. K. , Ceder , G. and Bazant , M. Z. Electrochimica Acta 2008 , 53 , 7599. ), we show that the spinodal and miscibility gaps generally shrink as the host particle size decreases to the nanoscale. Our work is motivated by recent experiments on the high-rate Li-ion battery material LiFePO(4); this serves as the basis for our examples, but our analysis and conclusions apply to any intercalation material. We describe two general mechanisms for the suppression of phase separation in nanoparticles, (i) a classical bulk effect, predicted by the Cahn-Hilliard equation in which the diffuse phase boundary becomes confined by the particle geometry; and (ii) a novel surface effect, predicted by chemical-potential-dependent reaction kinetics, in which insertion/extraction reactions stabilize composition gradients near surfaces in equilibrium with the local environment. Composition-dependent surface energy and (especially) elastic strain can contribute to these effects but are not required to predict decreased spinodal and miscibility gaps at the nanoscale.

  15. Miscibility and Hydrogen Bonding in Blends of Poly(4-vinylphenol/Poly(vinyl methyl ketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Bourara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The miscibility and phase behavior of poly(4-vinylphenol (PVPh with poly(vinyl methyl ketone (PVMK was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was shown that all blends of PVPh/PVMK are totally miscible. A DSC study showed the apparition of a single glass transition (Tg over their entire composition range. When the amount of PVPh exceeds 50% in blends, the obtained Tgs are found to be significantly higher than those observed for each individual component of the mixture, indicating that these blends are capable of forming interpolymer complexes. FTIR analysis revealed the existence of preferential specific interactions via hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which intensified when the amount of PVPh was increased in blends. Furthermore, the quantitative FTIR study carried out for PVPh/PVMK blends was also performed for the vinylphenol (VPh and vinyl methyl ketone (VMK functional groups. These results were also established by scanning electron microscopy study (SEM.

  16. Forming Nanoparticle Monolayers at Liquid-Air Interfaces by Using Miscible Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Datong; Hu, Jiayang; Kennedy, Kathleen M; Herman, Irving P

    2016-08-23

    One standard way of forming monolayers (MLs) of nanoparticles (NPs) is to drop-cast a NP dispersion made using one solvent onto a second, immiscible solvent; after this upper solvent evaporates, the NP ML can be transferred to a solid substrate by liftoff. We show that this previously universal use of only immiscible solvent pairs can be relaxed and close-packed, hexagonally ordered NP monolayers can self-assemble at liquid-air interfaces when some miscible solvent pairs are used instead. We demonstrate this by drop-casting an iron oxide NP dispersion in toluene on a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) liquid substrate. The NPs are energetically stable at the DMSO surface and remain there even with solvent mixing. Excess NPs coagulate and precipitate in the DMSO, and this limits NPs at the surface to approximately 1 ML. The ML domains at the surface nucleate independently, which is in contrast to ML growth at the receding edge of the drying drop, as is common in immiscible solvent pair systems and seen here for the toluene/diethylene glycol immiscible solvent pair system. This new use of miscible solvent pairs can enable the formation of MLs for a wider range of NPs.

  17. Improving oil recovery in the CO2 flooding process by utilizing nonpolar chemical modifiers☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Xiangliang Li; Ping Guo; Yayun Zhuo; Yong Sha

    2016-01-01

    By means of experiments of CO2 miscibility with crude oil, four nonpolar chemicals were evaluated in order to enhance the miscibility of CO2 with crude oil. Through pre-slug injection and joint injection of toluene in CO2, crude oil displacement experiments in the slim-tube were conducted to investigate effects of the toluene-enhanced CO2 flooding under simulated subterranean reservoir conditions. Experimental results showed that toluene can enhance extraction of oil into CO2 and dissolution of CO2 into oil with the increment of 251%and 64%respectively. Addition of toluene can obviously improve the oil recovery in either pre-slug injection or joint injection, and the crude oil recovery increased with the increase of the toluene concentration. The oil recov-ery can increase by 22.5%in pre-slug injection with the high toluene concentration. Pre-slug injection was recom-mended because it can consume less toluene than joint injection. This work could be useful to development and application of the CO2 flooding in the oil recovery as wel as CO2 emission reduction.

  18. NASA Global Flood Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policelli, Fritz; Slayback, Dan; Brakenridge, Bob; Nigro, Joe; Hubbard, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Product utility key factors: Near real time, automated production; Flood spatial extent Cloudiness Pixel resolution: 250m; Flood temporal extent; Flash floods short duration on ground?; Landcover--Water under vegetation cover vs open water

  19. On Flood Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    lina braces fora particularly dangerous flood season in the wake of disastrous rainstorms Aseries of heavy storms since early May led to severe flooding and landslides in south and southwest China,causing heavy casualties and economic losses. Severe convective weather such as downpours,

  20. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  1. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  2. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  3. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  4. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  5. Chemical Method to Improve CO{sub 2} Flooding Sweep Efficiency for Oil Recovery Using SPI-CO{sub 2} Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle D.

    2009-04-14

    hydrocarbon combustion for energy, chemical and fertilizer plants. For example, coal fired power plants emit large amounts of CO{sub 2} in order to produce electrical energy. Carbon dioxide sequestration is gaining attention as concerns mount over possible global climate change caused by rising emissions of greenhouse gases. Removing the CO{sub 2} from the energy generation process would make these plants more environmentally friendly. In addition, CO{sub 2} flooding is an attractive means to enhance oil and natural gas recovery. Capture and use of the CO{sub 2} from these plants for recycling into CO{sub 2} flooding of marginal reservoirs provides a “dual use” opportunity prior to final CO{sub 2} sequestration in the depleted reservoir. Under the right pressure, temperature and oil composition conditions, CO{sub 2} can act as a solvent, cleaning oil trapped in the microscopic pores of the reservoir rock. This miscible process greatly increases the recovery of crude oil from a reservoir compared to recovery normally seen by waterflooding. An Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) project that uses an industrial source of CO{sub 2} that otherwise would be vented to the atmosphere has the added environmental benefit of sequestering the greenhouse gas.

  6. A miscibility gap in LiF-BeF₂ and LiF-BeF₂-ThF₄

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P.M. van der; Konings, R.J.M.; Jacobs, M.H.G.; Oonk, H.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    LiF BeF₂ and LiF BeF₂ ThF₄ are key systems for Molten Salt Reactor fuel. The liquid phase of these systems has been assessed using Redlich Kister polynomials. The result shows a miscibility gap on the BeF₂-rich side. This has never been proven experimentally. Nevertheless, evidence for a two liquids

  7. Influence of miscibility phenomenon on crystalline polymorph transition in poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic rubber/clay nanocomposite hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Mohammad Mahdi; Naebe, Minoo; Jalali-Arani, Azam; Guo, Qipeng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, intercalation of nanoclay in the miscible polymer blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and acrylic rubber(ACM) was studied. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the formation of nanoscale polymer blend/clay hybrid. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray analysis revealed the coexistence of β and γ crystalline forms in PVDF/Clay nanocomposite while α crystalline form was found to be dominant in PVDF/ACM/Clay miscible hybrids. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (B) was used to further explain the miscibility phenomenon observed. The B parameter was determined by combining the melting point depression and the binary interaction model. The estimated B values for the ternary PVDF/ACM/Clay and PVDF/ACM pairs were all negative, showing both proper intercalation of the polymer melt into the nanoclay galleries and the good miscibility of PVDF and ACM blend. The B value for the PVDF/ACM blend was almost the same as that measured for the PVDF/ACM/Clay hybrid, suggesting that PVDF chains in nanocomposite hybrids interact with ACM chains and that nanoclay in hybrid systems is wrapped by ACM molecules.

  8. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  9. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  10. Miscibility and Langmuir Studies of the Interaction of E2 (279-298) Peptide Sequence of Hepatitis G Virus/GB Virus-C with Dipalmitoylphosphatidyl Choline and Dimiristoylphosphatidyl Choline Phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñones, J; Muñoz, M; Miñones Trillo, J; Haro, I; Busquets, M A; Alsina, M A

    2015-09-22

    Mixed monolayers of E2(279-298), a synthetic peptide belonging to the structural protein E2 of the GB virus C (GBV-C), formerly know as hepatitis G virus (HGV), and the phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and dimiristoylphosphatidyl choline (DMPC),which differ in acyl chains length, were obtained at the A/W interface (monolayers of extension) in order to provide new insights on E2/phospholipids interaction. Analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy images, relative thickness, and mean areas per molecule has allowed us to establish the conditions under which the mixed components of the monolayer are miscible or immiscible and know how the level of the E2/phospholipid interaction varies with the composition of the mixed films, the surface pressure, and the hydrocarbon chains length of the phospholipids. The steric hindrance caused by the penetration of the polymer strands into the more or less ordered hydrocarbon chains of the phospholipids was suggested to explain the differences in the peptide interaction with the phospholipids studied. Therefore, the novelty of results obtained with the Langmuir film balance technique, supplemented with BAM images allow us to achieve a deeper understanding of the interaction.

  11. Nanoscale Infrared, Thermal, and Mechanical Characterization of Telaprevir-Polymer Miscibility in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Prepared by Solvent Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-03-07

    Miscibility is of great interest for pharmaceutical systems, in particular, for amorphous solid dispersions, as phase separation can lead to a higher tendency to crystallize, resulting in a loss in solubility, decreased dissolution rate, and compromised bioavailability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the miscibility behavior of a model poorly water-soluble drug, telaprevir (TPV), with three different polymers using atomic force microscopy-based infrared, thermal, and mechanical analysis. Standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging together with nanoscale infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR), nanoscale thermal analysis (nanoTA), and Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) measurements were used to evaluate the miscibility behavior of TPV with three polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), HPMC acetate succinate (HPMCAS), and poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA), at different drug to polymer ratios. Phase separation was observed with HPMC and PVPVA at drug loadings above 10%. For HPMCAS, a smaller miscibility gap was observed, with phase separation being observed at drug loadings higher than ∼30-40%. The domain size of phase-separated regions varied from below 50 nm to a few hundred nanometers. Localized infrared spectra, nano-TA measurements, images from AFM-based IR, and LCR measurements showed clear contrast between the continuous and discrete domains for these phase-separated systems, whereby the discrete domains were drug-rich. Fluorescence microscopy provided additional evidence for phase separation. These methods appear to be promising to evaluate miscibility in drug-polymer systems with similar Tgs and submicron domain sizes. Furthermore, such findings are of obvious importance in the context of contributing to a mechanistic understanding of amorphous solid dispersion phase behavior.

  12. Simulation of miscible displacement using mixed methods and a modified method of characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.E.; Russell, T.F.; Wheeler, M.F.

    1983-11-01

    Numerical dispersion and grid orientation problems with adverse mobility ratios are two of the major difficulties in the numerical simulation of enhanced recovery processes. An efficient method for modeling convection-dominated flows which greatly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation problems is presented and applied to miscible displacement in a porous medium. The base method utilizes characteristic flow directions to model convection and finite elements to treat the diffusion and dispersion. The characteristic approach also minimizes certain overshoot difficulties which accompany many finite element methods for problems with sharp fluid interfaces. The truncation error caused by the characteristic time-stepping technique is small, so large stable time-steps can be taken as in fully-implicit methods without the corresponding loss in accuracy.

  13. Optimal Control of Partially Miscible Two-Phase Flow with Applications to Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by applications in subsurface CO2 sequestration, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. The objective is, e.g., to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, where the time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system and formulate the optimal control problem. For the discretization we use a variant of the BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method. The timestep-wise Lagrangian of the control problem is implemented as a functional in the PDE toolbox Sundance, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. The resulting MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT. Finally, we present some numerical results in a heterogeneous model reservoir.

  14. On miscible flow in porous media: A numerical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baigorria, R.; Ottone, L.O. (Gerencia General de Activos Tecnologicos, Florencia Varela (Argentina)); Pousa, J.L.; Filomena, D.L.; Maranon, J. (La Plata Univ. (Argentina))

    1992-01-01

    A diamond-shaped, random, two-dimensional network of interconnected capillary tubes was constructed to simulate miscible displacement numerically in porous media. An experimental technique was specially developed to measure the ratio between pore volume of displacing fluid injected up to the time of breakthrough and the total pore volume of the sample, PVI[sub b]/TPV. For low heterogeneity media, a unimodal, asymmetric, Gaussian-like tube-radius distribution was used to construct several networks from which a set of values of PVBI[sub b]/PVT was calculated and matched against those determined experimentally. For high heterogeneity media, however, a kind of ad-hoc, bimodal, tube-radius distribution had to be constructed to obtain a reasonable match. The experimental and computational difficulties that arise for very highly heterogeneous media are also discussed. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Miscible and immiscible, forced and unforced experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael; Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Experiments are presented in which an incompressible system of two liquids is accelerated to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In these experiments, the initially stable, stratified liquid combination is accelerated downward on a vertical rail system in one of two experimental apparatuses: an apparatus in which a system of weights and pulleys accelerates the liquid filled tank, or a new apparatus which uses linear induction motors to accelerate the tank to produce much greater acceleration levels. Both miscible and immiscible liquid combinations are used. In both apparatuses the resulting fluid flows are visualized with backlit imaging using LED backlights in conjunction with monochrome high-speed video cameras, both of which travel with the moving fluid filled containers. Initial perturbations are either unforced and allowed to progress from background noise or forced by vertically oscillating the liquid combination to produce parametric internal waves. The mixing layer growth rate α is determined for all cases and compared to numerical simulations and past experiments.

  16. Microstructure evolution of immiscible alloys during rapid cooling through miscibility gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘源; 郭景杰; 贾均; 李言祥; 赵九洲

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model was developed to describe the coarsening of the second phase droplets under the common action of nucleation, diffusional growth and Brownian collision between minority phase droplets during rapidly cooling a hypermonotectic alloy through its miscibility gap. The simulated results show that Brownian motion is an important factor influencing the coarsening process. A faster cooling rate leads the supersaturation of the matrix liquid and the nucleation rate to grow up to a higher level, but leads to a smaller droplet radius and a higher number density. This model is used to predict the microstructural evolution of melt-spun Al-30%In ribbon. The model reflects the real physical processes well and is expected to be applicable to other immiscible alloys or other preparing processes.

  17. Upwind finite difference method for miscible oil and water displacement problem with moving boundary values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-rang YUAN; Chang-feng LI; Cheng-shun YANG; Yu-ji HAN

    2009-01-01

    The research of the miscible oil and water displacement problem with moving boundary values is of great value to the history of oil-gas transport and accumulation in the basin evolution as well as to the rational evaluation in prospecting and exploiting oil-gas resources. The mathematical model can be described as a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations with moving boundary values. For the two-dimensional bounded region, the upwind finite difference schemes are proposed. Some techniques, such as the calculus of variations, the change of variables, and the theory of a priori estimates, are used. The optimal order l2-norm estimates are derived for the errors in the approximate solutions. The research is important both theoretically and practically for the model analysis in the field, the model numerical method, and the software development.

  18. Dynamics, Miscibility, and Morphology in Polymer-Molecule Blends: The Impact of Chemical Functionality

    KAUST Repository

    Do, Khanh

    2015-10-22

    In the quest to improve the performance of organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells, many recent efforts have focused on developing molecular and polymer alternatives to commonly used fullerene acceptors. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate polymer-molecule blends comprised of the polymer donor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with a series of acceptors based on trialkylsilylethynyl-substituted pentacene. A matrix of nine pentacene derivatives, consisting of systematic chemical variation both in the nature of the alkyl groups and electron-withdrawing moieties appended to the acene, is used to draw connections between the chemical structure of the acene acceptor and the nanoscale properties of the polymer-molecule blend. These connections include polymer and molecular diffusivity, donor-acceptor packing and interfacial (contact) area, and miscibility. The results point to the very significant role that seemingly modest changes in chemical structure play during the formation of polymer-molecule blend morphologies.

  19. Wavelength Analysis of Interface between Two Miscible Solutions Observed in Formation of Fractal Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Takami, Toshiya

    2014-04-01

    When a droplet of a higher-density solution (HDS) is placed on top of a lower-density solution (LDS), the HDS draws a fractal pattern on the surface of the LDS. Before the fractal pattern is formed, a stick-like pattern with a periodic structure emerges in a region surrounding the surface pattern due to interfacial instability. We experimentally measure the wavelength of this stick-like pattern. The wavelength increases with the volume of the HDS and is independent of the viscosities of the two solutions. To understand the stick generation, we propose a model of miscible viscous fingering whose boundary conditions are similar to those of the experiments. The wavelength obtained from the model agrees with the experimentally obtained wavelength. The formation of the fractal pattern is discussed by comparing it with the viscous fingering.

  20. Adaptive enriched Galerkin methods for miscible displacement problems with entropy residual stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel approach to the simulation of miscible displacement by employing adaptive enriched Galerkin finite element methods (EG) coupled with entropy residual stabilization for transport. In particular, numerical simulations of viscous fingering instabilities in heterogeneous porous media and Hele-Shaw cells are illustrated. EG is formulated by enriching the conforming continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG) with piecewise constant functions. The method provides locally and globally conservative fluxes, which are crucial for coupled flow and transport problems. Moreover, EG has fewer degrees of freedom in comparison with discontinuous Galerkin (DG) and an efficient flow solver has been derived which allows for higher order schemes. Dynamic adaptive mesh refinement is applied in order to reduce computational costs for large-scale three dimensional applications. In addition, entropy residual based stabilization for high order EG transport systems prevents spurious oscillations. Numerical tests are presented to show the capabilities of EG applied to flow and transport.

  1. Three-dimensional miscible, porous media displacements for the quarter five-spot configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Amir

    Three-dimensional miscible displacements with gravity override are investigated in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media using high accuracy numerical simulations. Special emphasis is placed on the interpretation of the dynamics in terms of the vorticity production related to viscosity, permeability and gravity. Comparison with experimental results show that three-dimensional neutrally buoyant displacements give a better estimate of the displacement efficiency than two-dimensional displacements. Gravity override profoundly influences the flow dynamics both by creating a gravity layer where most of the displaced fluid is bypassed as well as by enhancing the horizontal and vertical mode interactions. Heterogeneous displacements are classified into regimes of viscous fingering, harmonic resonance and channeling depending upon the relative magnitudes of the viscous and permeability length scales. A complex coupling between the viscous instability and permeability spectra leads to intricate fingering patterns that profoundly influence the displacement efficiency.

  2. Aggregation behavior and total miscibility of fluorinated ionic liquids in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereiro, Ana B; Araújo, João M M; Teixeira, Fabiana S; Marrucho, Isabel M; Piñeiro, Manuel M; Rebelo, Luis Paulo N

    2015-02-01

    In this work, novel and nontoxic fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) that are totally miscible in water and could be used in biological applications, where fluorocarbon compounds present a handicap because their aqueous solubility (water and biological fluids) is in most cases too low, have been investigated. The self-aggregation behavior of perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solutions has been characterized using conductometric titration, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), viscosity and density measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregation and interfacial parameters have been computed by conductimetry, calorimetry, and surface tension measurements in order to study various thermodynamic and surface properties that demonstrate that the aggregation process is entropy-driven and that the aggregation process is less spontaneous than the adsorption process. The novel perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ILs studied in this work show improved surface activity and aggregation behavior, forming distinct self-assembled structures.

  3. Evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop on a non-miscible liquid bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirat, Christophe; Ramos-Canut, Stella; Caupin, Frederic; wetting Team

    2016-11-01

    When a liquid drop sits on a solid surface, it is well known that the wetting and evaporation properties strongly depend on the environmental and wetting conditions. In this experimental study, we investigate the coupled spreading-evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop, made of a mixture of water and ethanol, gently deposited on a non-miscible oil bath. After a fast spreading stage due to a positive spreading parameter, the drop starts to recede while the evaporation is going on. Subsequently, a Marangoni instability develops as alcohol evaporates faster than water. In particular, depending on the initial alcohol-water ratio, a set of rim instabilities takes place. Radial droplet ejections can be observed, with various droplet speeds, sizes and frequencies.

  4. Acousto-optic method used to control water pollution by miscible liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferria, Kouider; Griani, Lazhar; Laouar, Naamane

    2012-05-01

    An acousto-optic (A.O.) method has been developed for controlling the quality of water mixed by miscible liquids like acetone or ethanol… The liquid mixture is filled in a rectangular glass cell, which is placed orthogonally to the incident collimated beam of light. This cell consists of a piezoelectric transducer for generating ultrasonic waves. The collimated light while passing through this cell undergoes a diffraction phenomenon. The diffracted dots are collected by a converging photographic objective and displayed in its back focal plane. The location of the diffracted dots and their intensity are sensitive to any variation of the interaction medium. This result leads to decide about the quality of the water.

  5. Theoretical study of miscibility and glass-forming trends in mixtures of polystyrene spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of glass-forming trends and miscibility in mixtures of polystyrene spheres (polyballs) of different diameters, suspended in an aqueous solution, is presented. The polyballs are assumed to be charged and to interact via a Debye-Hueckel screened Coulomb potential. The Helmholtz free energy is calculated from a variational principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality, in which a mixture of hard spheres of different diameters is chosen as the reference system. It is found that when the charges of the two types of polyballs are sufficiently different, the variationally determined ratio of hard-sphere diameters differs substantially, leading to packing difficulties characteristic of glass formation. The experimentally observed range of glass formation corresponds to a ratio of hard-sphere diameters of 0.8 or less. Calculations of the free energy as a function of concentration indicate that the liquid polyball mixture is stable against the phase separation, even for widely different polyball charges.

  6. Derivation of models of compressible miscible displacement in partially fractured reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Choquet

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We derive rigorously homogenized models for the displacement of one compressible miscible fluid by another in fractured porous media. We denote by $epsilon$ the characteristic size of the heterogeneity in the medium. A parameter $alpha in [0,1]$ characterizes the cracking degree of the rock. We carefully define an adapted microscopic model which is scaled by appropriate powers of $epsilon$. We then study its limit as $epsilon o 0$. Assuming a totally fractured or a partially fractured medium, we obtain two effective macroscopic limit models. The first one is a double porosity model. The second one is of single porosity type but it still contains some effects due to the partial storage in the matrix part. The convergence is shown using two-scale convergence techniques.

  7. Experimental study of the growth of mixing zone in miscible viscous fingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M.; Lehman, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to quantify the growth of the mixing zone in miscible viscous fingering. Rectilinear flow displacement experiments are performed in a Hele-Shaw cell over a wide range of viscosity ratios (1-1225) by injecting water into glycerol solutions at different flow rates. All the experiments are performed at high Peclet numbers and linear growth in mixing zone is observed. The mixing zone velocity increases with the viscosity ratio up to viscosity ratios of 340 and the trend is consistent with Koval's model. However, at higher viscosity ratios, the mixing velocity plateaus signifying no further effect of viscosity contrast on the growth of mixing zone. The front (fingertip) velocities also increase up to viscosity ratios of 340 above which the velocities plateau.

  8. Flood insurance in Canada: implications for flood management and residential vulnerability to flood hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  9. Flood Insurance in Canada: Implications for Flood Management and Residential Vulnerability to Flood Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  10. Health impacts of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiwei; FitzGerald, Gerard Joseph; Clark, Michele; Hou, Xiang-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Floods are the most common hazard to cause disasters and have led to extensive morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The impact of floods on the human community is related directly to the location and topography of the area, as well as human demographics and characteristics of the built environment. The aim of this study is to identify the health impacts of disasters and the underlying causes of health impacts associated with floods. A conceptual framework is developed that may assist with the development of a rational and comprehensive approach to prevention, mitigation, and management. This study involved an extensive literature review that located >500 references, which were analyzed to identify common themes, findings, and expert views. The findings then were distilled into common themes. The health impacts of floods are wide ranging, and depend on a number of factors. However, the health impacts of a particular flood are specific to the particular context. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, injuries, hypothermia, and animal bites. Health risks also are associated with the evacuation of patients, loss of health workers, and loss of health infrastructure including essential drugs and supplies. In the medium-term, infected wounds, complications of injury, poisoning, poor mental health, communicable diseases, and starvation are indirect effects of flooding. In the long-term, chronic disease, disability, poor mental health, and poverty-related diseases including malnutrition are the potential legacy. This article proposes a structured approach to the classification of the health impacts of floods and a conceptual framework that demonstrates the relationships between floods and the direct and indirect health consequences.

  11. Stability of viscosity stratified flows down an incline: Role of miscibility and wall slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of wall velocity slip on the linear stability of a gravity-driven miscible two-fluid flow down an incline are examined. The fluids have the matched density but different viscosity. A smooth viscosity stratification is achieved due to the presence of a thin mixed layer between the fluids. The results show that the presence of slip exhibits a promise for stabilizing the miscible flow system by raising the critical Reynolds number at the onset and decreasing the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers beyond the threshold of the dominant instability. This is different from its role in the case of a single fluid down a slippery substrate where slip destabilizes the flow system at the onset. Though the stability properties are analogous to the same flow system down a rigid substrate, slip is shown to delay the surface mode instability for any viscosity contrast. It has a damping/promoting effect on the overlap modes (which exist due to the overlap of critical layer of dominant disturbance with the mixed layer) when the mixed layer is away/close from/to the slippery inclined wall. The trend of slip effect is influenced by the location of the mixed layer, the location of more viscous fluid, and the mass diffusivity of the two fluids. The stabilizing characteristics of slip can be favourably used to suppress the non-linear breakdown which may happen due to the coexistence of the unstable modes in a flow over a substrate with no slip. The results of the present study suggest that it is desirable to design a slippery surface with appropriate slip sensitivity in order to meet a particular need for a specific application.

  12. Core-annular miscible two-fluid flow in a slippery pipe: A stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Geetanjali; Usha, Ranganathan; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-09-01

    This study is motivated by the preliminary direct numerical simulations in double-diffusive (DD) core-annular flows with slip at the wall which displayed elliptical shaped instability patterns as in a rigid pipe case; however, slip at the pipe wall delays the onset of instability for a range of parameters and increases the phase speed. This increased our curiosity to have a thorough understanding of the linear stability characteristics of the miscible DD two-fluid flow in a pipe with slip at the pipe wall. The present study, therefore, addresses the linear stability of viscosity-stratified core-annular Poiseuille flow of miscible fluids with matched density in a slippery pipe in the presence of two scalars diffusing at different rates. The physical mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of instabilities in the DD system are explained through an energy budget analysis. The differences and similarities between core-annular flow in a slippery pipe and in a plane channel with velocity slip at the walls are explored. The stability characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of slip. The diffusivity effect is non-monotonic in a DD system. A striking feature of instability is that only a band of wavenumbers is destabilized in the presence of moderate to large inertial effects. Both the longwave and shortwave are stabilized at small Reynolds numbers. Slip exhibits a dual role of stabilizing or destabilizing the flow. The preliminary direct numerical simulations confirm the predictions of the linear stability analysis. The present study reveals that it may be possible to control the instabilities in core-annular pressure driven pipe flows by imposing a velocity slip at the walls.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study on the Miscibility of a CO2/n-Decane System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yong-Chen; ZHU Ning-Jun; LIU Yu; ZHAO Jia-Fei; LIU Wei-Guo; ZHANG Yi; ZHAO Yue-Chao; JIANG Lan-Lan

    2011-01-01

    @@ We provide a feasible method to estimate the minimum miscibility pressure(MMP)of a CO2/n-decane system by using high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging(MRI).During the measurement,the signal intensity of n-decane with CO2 dissolved is measured.The MRI images show that the signal intensity of n-decane decreases to zero and the interface disappears at the MMP.A good exponential growth relation is found between the signal intensity and the pressure of the CO2/n-decane system.The relationship between the MMP and the temperature is established quantitatively,which is in close agreement with previous studies.Moreover it could be used to predict the MMP of the CO2/n-decane system.%We provide a feasible method to estimate the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) of a CO2/n-decane system by using high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the measurement, the signal intensity of n-decane with CO2 dissolved is measured. The MRI images show that the signal intensity of n-decane decreases to zero and the interface disappears at the MMP. A good exponential growth relation is found between the signal intensity and the pressure of the Coi/n-decane system. The relationship between the MMP and the temperature is established quantitatively, which is in close agreement with previous studies. Moreover it could be used to predict the MMP of the CO2/'n-decane system.

  14. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  15. Nogales flood detention study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Levick, Lainie; Guertin, D. Phillip; Callegary, James; Guadarrama, Jesus Quintanar; Anaya, Claudia Zulema Gil; Prichard, Andrea; Gray, Floyd; Castellanos, Edgar; Tepezano, Edgar; Huth, Hans; Vandervoet, Prescott; Rodriguez, Saul; Nunez, Jose; Atwood, Donald; Granillo, Gilberto Patricio Olivero; Ceballos, Francisco Octavio Gastellum

    2010-01-01

    Flooding in Ambos Nogales often exceeds the capacity of the channel and adjacent land areas, endangering many people. The Nogales Wash is being studied to prevent future flood disasters and detention features are being installed in tributaries of the wash. This paper describes the application of the KINEROS2 model and efforts to understand the capacity of these detention features under various flood and urbanization scenarios. Results depict a reduction in peak flow for the 10-year, 1-hour event based on current land use in tributaries with detention features. However, model results also demonstrate that larger storm events and increasing urbanization will put a strain on the features and limit their effectiveness.

  16. FLOODPLAIN, FLOOD COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. Localized Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    practitioners will cover a range of practices that can help communities build flood resilience, from small scale interventions such as rain gardens and permeable pavement to coordinated open space and floodplain preservation

  18. Floods and Mold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  19. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  20. The Terrible Flood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan. ’Several times a week, no matter which of the major television news networksI turn to, the screen is filled with tragic pictures of flooding along the YangtzeRiver, and I grieve for the suffering people whose lives are being so terriblydisrupted by this disaster. Even more to be grieved is the terrible number of peoplewho have been killed by the floods and their effects.

  1. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  2. Explorers Presentation: Flooding and Coastal Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2015-01-01

    : Explorers Flooding and Coastal Communities presentation provides an introduction to flooding. This can be used with the lesson plan on building flood defences. It covers: What is a flood? Why does it flood? Where does the water come from? The water cycle; Where is water stored? Examples of Pluvial vs. Coastal flooding; Impacts of flooding; Flood defences; What else influences flooding - Human impacts, Urbanisation, Deforestation, Sea level rise

  3. Mitigating flood exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs Jr, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city’s worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods. We applied the “trauma signature analysis” (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results. Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion. In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation. PMID:28228985

  4. Flood Risk Analysis and Flood Potential Losses Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The heavy floods in the Taihu Basin showed increasing trend in recent years. In thiswork, a typical area in the northern Taihu Basin was selected for flood risk analysis and potentialflood losses assessment. Human activities have strong impact on the study area' s flood situation (asaffected by the polders built, deforestation, population increase, urbanization, etc. ), and havemade water level higher, flood duration shorter, and flood peaks sharper. Five years of differentflood return periods [(1970), 5 (1962), 10 (1987), 20 (1954), 50 (1991)] were used to cal-culate the potential flood risk area and its losses. The potential flood risk map, economic losses,and flood-impacted population were also calculated. The study's main conclusions are: 1 ) Humanactivities have strongly changed the natural flood situation in the study area, increasing runoff andflooding; 2) The flood risk area is closely related with the precipitation center; 3) Polder construc-tion has successfully protected land from flood, shortened the flood duration, and elevated waterlevel in rivers outside the polders; 4) Economic and social development have caused flood losses toincrease in recent years.

  5. Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Tom; Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Booij, Martijn J.; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Verkade, Jan S.; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, create a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. In this paper we present and evaluate a method to create deterministic and probabilistic flood maps from Twitter messages that mention locations of flooding. A deterministic flood map created for the December 2015 flood in the city of York (UK) showed good performance (F(2) = 0.69; a statistic ranging from 0 to 1, with 1 expressing a perfect fit with validation data). The probabilistic flood maps we created showed that, in the York case study, the uncertainty in flood extent was mainly induced by errors in the precise locations of flood observations as derived from Twitter data. Errors in the terrain elevation data or in the parameters of the applied algorithm contributed less to flood extent uncertainty. Although these maps tended to overestimate the actual probability of flooding, they gave a reasonable representation of flood extent uncertainty in the area. This study illustrates that inherently uncertain data from social media can be used to derive information about flooding.

  6. Effect of doped and undoped POMA on the morphology and miscibility of blends with Poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Rocha

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of small amounts of doped and undoped poly(o-methoxyaniline (POMA on the morphology of melt crystallized PVDF was investigated by means of polarized light optical microscopy. Undoped POMA (POMA-EB inhibits nucleation and growth of non ringed spherulites, partially formed by the polar gphase, whereas POMA doped with toluene sulfonic acid (POMA-TSA favors this process. Moreover, the doping of POMA increases the miscibility between the components of the PVDF/POMA blends, resulting in more homogeneous films. A possible cause of this miscibility increase and for the favoring of the polar gphase, is the higher polarity of the POMA chains as a result of the doping.

  7. The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin and cholesterol is affected by temperature and surface pressure in mixed Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ken; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Lopez, Christelle

    2017-06-01

    The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin (milk-SM) and cholesterol was investigated in this study. The effect of different physical states of milk-SM on its interactions with cholesterol was determined by the recording of isotherms of compression of Langmuir films for temperatures above and below the gel to Lα phase transition of milk-SM (Tm∼34°C). For T=15°CTm, the milk-SM molecules were in a LE phase regardless of the surface pressure applied. A phase diagram pressure - milk-SM/cholesterol composition was established. This study demonstrated that both temperature and surface pressure affected the miscibility between the milk-SM and cholesterol. The strongest attractive forces (i.e. condensing effect) were identified for 30mol% cholesterol when the milk-SM was in the LE phase state.

  8. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  9. Solution of the Burger’s Equation for Longitudinal Dispersion Phenomena Occurring in Miscible Phase Flow through Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika N. Mehta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An approximate solution of longitudinal dispersion phenomena occurring in two phase miscible fluid flow through porous media has been obtained by using the group theoretic approach. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient is assumed to be directly proportional to the concentration of the fluid for a distance x and at any time t > 0. The graphical representation for the concentration of the fluid for a distance x and at time t > 0 has been obtained using Mat lab coding.

  10. Assessing Flood Risk Using Reservoir Flood Control Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Fu; Yadong Mei; Zhihuai Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The application of conventional flood operation regulation is restricted due to insufficient description of flood control rules for the Pubugou Reservoir in southern China. Based on the require-ments of different flood control objects, this paper proposes to optimize flood control rules with punish-ment mechanism by defining different parameters of flood control rules in response to flood inflow fore-cast and reservoir water level. A genetic algorithm is adopted for solving parameter optimization problem. The failure risk and overflow volume of the downstream insufficient flood control capacity are assessed through the reservoir operation policies. The results show that an optimised regulation can provide better performance than the current flood control rules.

  11. Investigation and correlation of drug polymer miscibility and molecular interactions by various approaches for the preparation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Trivino, Anne; Prasad, Dev; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-04-25

    Curcumin (CUR) was used as a poorly soluble drug whereas polyvinyl pyrrolidone K90 (PVP), Eudragit EPO (EPO), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose E5 (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG) were used as hydrophilic polymers. CUR polymer miscibility was evaluated by solubility parameter, melting point depression and glass transition temperature (Tg) measurements. Molecular interactions between CUR and polymers were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman. Amorphous solid dispersions were prepared with CUR-polymer ratio of 70:30 (w/w) by solvent evaporation technique and were evaluated for dissolution enhancement using USP II method. Physical states of solid dispersions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) whereas thermal behaviors were investigated using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). CUR-EPO system showed good miscibility through all the approaches, whereas immiscibility was found in other CUR-polymer systems. CUR-EPO and CUR-HPMC systems showed significant molecular interactions whereas CUR-PVP and CUR-PEG showed no molecular interactions. All solid dispersions showed significant dissolution enhancement with CUR-EPO showing highest dissolution rate during first 1h whereas CUR-HPMC was effective in maintaining high CUR concentrations for 6h. The study highlights the importance of investigating and correlating drug polymer miscibility and molecular interactions by various approaches for successful formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

  12. Composite Flood Risk for New Jersery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the...

  13. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the...

  14. Flood Risk Management In Europe: European flood regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegger, D.L.T.; Bakker, M.H.; Green, C.; Driessen, Peter; Delvaux, B.; Rijswick, H.F.M.W. van; Suykens, C.; Beyers, J-C.; Deketelaere, K.; Doorn-Hoekveld, W. van; Dieperink, C.

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, water management is moving from flood defense to a risk management approach, which takes both the probability and the potential consequences of flooding into account. In this report, we will look at Directives and (non-)EU- initiatives in place to deal with flood risk in Europe indirectly

  15. Improving Global Flood Forecasting using Satellite Detected Flood Extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Romero, B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding is a natural global phenomenon but in many cases is exacerbated by human activity. Although flooding generally affects humans in a negative way, bringing death, suffering, and economic impacts, it also has potentially beneficial effects. Early flood warning and forecasting systems, as well

  16. Improving Global Flood Forecasting using Satellite Detected Flood Extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Romero, B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding is a natural global phenomenon but in many cases is exacerbated by human activity. Although flooding generally affects humans in a negative way, bringing death, suffering, and economic impacts, it also has potentially beneficial effects. Early flood warning and forecasting systems, as well

  17. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  18. Miscellaneous hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat; DeWitt, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The solvents discussed in this article are common solvents not categorized as halogenated, aromatic, or botanical. The solvents discussed are categorized into two groups: hydrocarbon mixtures and single agents. The hydrocarbon mixtures discussed are Stoddard solvent, naphtha, and kerosene. The remaining solvents described are n-hexane, methyl n-butyl ketone, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and butyl mercaptans. Effects common to this group of agents and their unique effects are characterized. Treatment of exposures and toxic effects of these solvents is described, and physiochemical properties and occupational exposure levels are listed.

  19. The Global Flood Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Huddelston, M.; Michel, G.; Thompson, S.; Heynert, K.; Pickering, C.; Abbott Donnelly, I.; Fewtrell, T.; Galy, H.; Sperna Weiland, F.; Winsemius, H.; Weerts, A.; Nixon, S.; Davies, P.; Schiferli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, a Global Flood Model (GFM) initiative has been proposed by Willis, UK Met Office, Esri, Deltares and IBM. The idea is to create a global community platform that enables better understanding of the complexities of flood risk assessment to better support the decisions, education and communication needed to mitigate flood risk. The GFM will provide tools for assessing the risk of floods, for devising mitigation strategies such as land-use changes and infrastructure improvements, and for enabling effective pre- and post-flood event response. The GFM combines humanitarian and commercial motives. It will benefit: - The public, seeking to preserve personal safety and property; - State and local governments, seeking to safeguard economic activity, and improve resilience; - NGOs, similarly seeking to respond proactively to flood events; - The insurance sector, seeking to understand and price flood risk; - Large corporations, seeking to protect global operations and supply chains. The GFM is an integrated and transparent set of modules, each composed of models and data. For each module, there are two core elements: a live "reference version" (a worked example) and a framework of specifications, which will allow development of alternative versions. In the future, users will be able to work with the reference version or substitute their own models and data. If these meet the specification for the relevant module, they will interoperate with the rest of the GFM. Some "crowd-sourced" modules could even be accredited and published to the wider GFM community. Our intent is to build on existing public, private and academic work, improve local adoption, and stimulate the development of multiple - but compatible - alternatives, so strengthening mankind's ability to manage flood impacts. The GFM is being developed and managed by a non-profit organization created for the purpose. The business model will be inspired from open source software (eg Linux): - for non-profit usage

  20. FEMA DFIRM Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA flood hazard delineations are used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to designate the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and for insurance rating...

  1. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  2. 2013 FEMA Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. FLOOD CHARACTERISTICS AND MANAGEMENT ADAPTATIONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2011-10-26

    , bearing flood losses and land ... Engineering control of the major tributaries of the Imo River system is required to ..... on previous knowledge of physical nature of flood ... uptake; other factors include a lack of formal titles to.

  4. 2013 FEMA Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  5. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  6. National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) is a compilation of GIS data that comprises a nationwide digital Flood Insurance Rate Map. The GIS data and services are...

  7. FEMA Q3 Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Q3 Flood Data are derived from the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS) published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The file is georeferenced to...

  8. FEMA 100 year Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Q3 Flood Data product is a digital representation of certain features of FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) product, intended for use with desktop mapping...

  9. 2013 FEMA Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  10. Miscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2011-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified miscible liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Experiments are presented with and without forced initial perturbations produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble mixing layer growth rates.

  11. Miscible and immiscible liquid experiments and simulations on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael; Mokler, Matthew; Cabot, William; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2011-11-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are presented in which an incompressible system of two liquids is accelerated to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In these experiments, the initially stable, stratified liquid combination is accelerated downward on a vertical rail system in one of two experimental apparatuses: an apparatus in which a system of weights and pulleys accelerates the liquid filled tank (which is affixed to a test sled), or a new apparatus which uses linear induction motors to accelerate the tank (which is attached to an aluminum plate) to produce much greater acceleration levels. Both miscible and immiscible liquid combinations are used. In both apparatuses the resulting fluid flows are visualized with backlit imaging using LED backlights in conjunction with monochrome high-speed video cameras, both of which travel with the moving fluid filled containers. Initial perturbations are either unforced and allowed to progress from background noise or forced by vertically oscillating the liquid combination to produce parametric internal waves. The results of these experiments are compared to numerical simulations performed using the CFD code Miranda.

  12. Investigation of miscibility of p(3hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyhexanoate) and epoxidized natural rubber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Faridah; Chan, Chin Han; Natarajan, Valliyappan David

    2015-08-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate [P(3HB-co-3HHx)] produced by C. necator PHB-4 harboring phaCcs from crude palm kernel oil with 21 mol% of 3-hydroxyhexanoate and epoxidized natural rubber with 25 mol% of epoxy content (ENR-25) were used to study the miscibility of the blends by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polymers used were purified and the blends were prepared by solution casting method. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra confirm the purity and molecular structures of P(3HB-co-3HHx) and ENR-25. FTIR spectra for different compositions of P(3HB-co-3HHx) and ENR-25 blends show absorbance change of the absorbance bands but with no significant shifting of the absorbance bands as the P(3HB-co-3HHx) content decreases, which shows that there is no intermolecular interaction between the parent polymer blends. On top of that, there are two Tgs present for the blends and both remain constant for different compositions which corresponds to the Tgs of the parent polymers. This indicates that the blends are immiscible.

  13. Study of rheological behavior and miscibility of epoxidized natural rubber modified neoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien-Tang; Tsai, Peir-An; Cheng, Tzu-Chi

    2006-02-01

    The Mooney viscosity, curing rates, vulcanization behavior, and the relationship between molecular motion of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) and neoprene (CR) blends at different blending ratios have been studied. The experimental results of ENR/CR blends show that the Mooney viscosity decreased gradually. Plasticization was most pronounced at an ENR/CR ratio of 75/25 and is thus the easiest to process. Owing to the ring opening of the epoxy group of ENR, the rate of crosslink formation is much faster than that of CR at higher temperature. The vulcanized rate increased with increasing ENR content. The results indicated that 175 °C and 5 min were the optimum processing conditions for ENR/CR blends. The DMA spectra showed a single damping peak for the ENR/CR blends, which suggests that ENR and CR are miscible. As seen in the Arrhenius plot of frequency against T g, the activation energy increased with increasing ENR contents. This suggests the existence of interpenetration of these two rubber molecular networks.

  14. Investigation of miscibility of p(3hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyhexanoate) and epoxidized natural rubber blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Faridah; Chan, Chin Han; Natarajan, Valliyappan David [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, 40450 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate [P(3HB-co-3HHx)] produced by C. necator PHB{sup −}4 harboring phaC{sub cs} from crude palm kernel oil with 21 mol% of 3-hydroxyhexanoate and epoxidized natural rubber with 25 mol% of epoxy content (ENR-25) were used to study the miscibility of the blends by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polymers used were purified and the blends were prepared by solution casting method. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra confirm the purity and molecular structures of P(3HB-co-3HHx) and ENR-25. FTIR spectra for different compositions of P(3HB-co-3HHx) and ENR-25 blends show absorbance change of the absorbance bands but with no significant shifting of the absorbance bands as the P(3HB-co-3HHx) content decreases, which shows that there is no intermolecular interaction between the parent polymer blends. On top of that, there are two T{sub g}s present for the blends and both remain constant for different compositions which corresponds to the T{sub g}s of the parent polymers. This indicates that the blends are immiscible.

  15. Three-dimensional miscible displacement simulations in homogeneous porous media with gravity override

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, A.; Meiburg, E.

    2003-11-01

    High-accuracy three-dimensional numerical simulations of miscible displacements with gravity override in homogeneous porous media are carried out for the quarter five-spot configuration. Special emphasis is placed on describing the influence of viscous and gravitational effects on the overall displacement dynamics in terms of the vorticity variable. Even for neutrally buoyant displacements, three-dimensional effects are seen to change the character of the flow significantly, in contrast to earlier findings for rectilinear displacements. At least in part this can be attributed to the time dependence of the most dangerous vertical instability mode. Density differences influence the flow primarily by establishing a narrow gravity layer, in which the effective Péclet number is enhanced owing to the higher flow rate. However, buoyancy forces of a certain magnitude can lead to a pinch-off of the gravity layer, thereby slowing it down. Overall, an increase of the gravitational parameter is found to enhance mostly the vertical perturbations, while larger Pe values act towards amplifying horizontal disturbances. The asymptotic rate of growth of the mixing length varies only with Péclet number. For large Péclet numbers, an asymptotic value of 0.7 is observed. A scaling law for the thickness of the gravity layer is obtained as well. In contrast to immiscible flow displacements, it is found to increase with the gravity parameter.

  16. Miscible porous media displacements driven by non-vertical injection wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, E.; Meiburg, E.

    High-resolution simulations are employed to identify and analyse the mechanisms dominating miscible porous media displacements generated by inclined injection wells. Compared to vertical injection wells, significant differences are observed that strongly influence breakthrough times and recovery rates. Constant density and viscosity displacements, for which the velocity field is potential in nature, demonstrate the existence of pronounced flow non-uniformities, due to the interaction of the inclined well with the reservoir boundaries. These non-uniformities deform the fronts during the initial displacement stages.In the presence of a viscosity difference, the non-uniformities of the potential flow field result in a focusing of the fingering instability. If the fluids also have different densities, a gravity tongue will reinforce the dominant finger along one front, while a gravitational instability leads to the disintegration of the dominant finger along the other front. Hence, the two fronts emerging from the inclined injection well usually evolve very differently from each other for variable density and viscosity displacements.For inclined injection wells and sufficiently large mobility ratios, gravity tongues are seen to evolve dendritically for an intermediate range of density contrasts. While mild gravitational forces are necessary to create the gravity tongue in the first place, large density differences will suppress the growth of the dendritic side branches. Since the dendritic branches appear along the side of the gravity tongue that should be stable according to traditional stability criteria, it can be concluded that the tip region plays a crucial role in their formation.

  17. Influence of rheology on buoyancy driven instabilities of miscible displacements in 2D micromodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, M. V.; Auradou, H.; Rosen, M.; Hulin, J. P.

    2009-05-01

    The stability of miscible displacements of Newtonian and shear-thinning fluids of slightly different densities (Δρ/ρ approx 3× 10-4) with a mean flow velocity U is investigated in a 2D transparent network of channels (average width = 0.33 mm). Concentration maps providing information at both the global and local scale are obtained through optical absorption measurements and compared in gravitationally stable and unstable vertical flow configurations; the influence of buoyant flows of typical velocity Ug is characterized by the gravity number Ng = Ug/|U|. For Ng glycerol solution, ld is only the same in the stable and unstable configurations for |Ng| 0.2, front spreading is not diffusive any more. In the stable configuration, in contrast, the front is flattened by buoyancy for Ng solution, both the concentration maps and the value of ld are the same in the stable and unstable configurations over the full range of U values investigated: this stabilization is explained by their high effective viscosity at low shear rates keeping Ng below the instability threshold even at the lowest velocities.

  18. Fluid flow behaviour of gas-condensate and near-miscible fluids at the pore scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawe, Richard A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Grattoni, Carlos A. [Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Retrograde condensate reservoir behaviour is complex with much of the detailed mechanisms of the multiphase fluid transport and mass transfer between the phases within the porous matrix still speculative. Visual modelling of selected processes occurring at the pore level under known and controlled boundary conditions can give an insight to fluid displacements at the core scale and help the interpretation of production behaviour at reservoir scale. Visualisation of the pore scale two-phase flow mechanisms has been studied experimentally at low interfacial tensions, < 0.5 mN/m, using a partially miscible fluid system in glass visual micro models. As the interfacial tension decreases the balance between fluid-fluid forces (interfacial, spreading and viscous) and fluid-solid interactions (wettability and viscous interactions) changes. Data measurements in the laboratory, particularly relative permeability, will therefore always be difficult especially for condensate fluids just below their dew point. What is certain is that gas production from a gas-condensate leads to condensate dropout when pressure falls below the dew point, either within the wellbore or, more importantly, in the reservoir. This paper illustrates some pore scale physics, particularly interfacial phenomena at low interfacial tension, which has relevance to appreciating the flow of condensate fluids close to their dew point either near the wellbore (which affects well productivity) or deep inside the reservoir (which affects condensate recovery). (author)

  19. Estimation of CE–CVM energy parameters from miscibility gap data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Srinivasa Gupta; G Vamsi Madhav; A Pandey; B Nageswara Sarma; S Lele

    2005-04-01

    The powerful framework of cluster expansion–cluster variation methods (CE–CVM) expresses alloy free energy in terms of energy (model) parameters, macroscopic variables (composition and temperature) and microscopic variables (correlation functions). A simultaneous optimization of thermodynamic and phase equilibria data using CE–CVM is critically dependent on giving good initial values of energy parameters, macroscopic and microscopic variables, respectively. No standard method for obtaining the initial values of the energy parameters is available in literature. As a starting point, a method has been devised to estimate the values of energy parameters from consolute point (miscibility gap maximum) data. Empirical relations among energy parameters, temperature (c), composition (c) and 2}/2 at the consolute point, have been developed using CE–CVM free energy functions for bcc and fcc structures in the tetrahedron and tetrahedron–octahedron approximations, respectively. Thus from the observed data of c, c and 2}/2 in the above relations, good initial values of energy parameters can be obtained. Further, a necessary modification to the classical NR method for solving simultaneous nonlinear/transcendental equations with a double root in one variable and a simple root in the other has been presented.

  20. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  1. Optimal strategies for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Carel; Brekelmans, Ruud; den Hertog, Dick; Roos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flood prevention policy is of major importance to the Netherlands since a large part of the country is below sea level and high water levels in rivers may also cause floods. In this paper we propose a dike height optimization model to determine economically efficient flood protection standards. We i

  2. Floods in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa K. Andersen; Marshall J. Shepherd

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric warming and associated hydrological changes have implications for regional flood intensity and frequency. Climate models and hydrological models have the ability to integrate various contributing factors and assess potential changes to hydrology at global to local scales through the century. This survey of floods in a changing climate reviews flood...

  3. Immiscible and Miscible Gas-Oil Gravity Drainage in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ameri, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the phase of declining oilfields and at a time when recovering hydrocarbons has becoming more difficult, effective techniques are the key to extract more oil from mature fields. The difficulty of developing effective techniques is often the real obstacle when dealing with heterogeneous formations

  4. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  5. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  6. Rethinking the relationship between flood risk perception and flood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, S; Muro, M; Jeffrey, P; Smith, H M

    2014-04-15

    Although flood risk perceptions and their concomitant motivations for behaviour have long been recognised as significant features of community resilience in the face of flooding events, there has, for some time now, been a poorly appreciated fissure in the accompanying literature. Specifically, rationalist and constructivist paradigms in the broader domain of risk perception provide different (though not always conflicting) contexts for interpreting evidence and developing theory. This contribution reviews the major constructs that have been applied to understanding flood risk perceptions and contextualises these within broader conceptual developments around risk perception theory and contemporary thinking around flood risk management. We argue that there is a need to re-examine and re-invigorate flood risk perception research, in a manner that is comprehensively underpinned by more constructivist thinking around flood risk management as well as by developments in broader risk perception research. We draw attention to an historical over-emphasis on the cognitive perceptions of those at risk to the detriment of a richer understanding of a wider range of flood risk perceptions such as those of policy-makers or of tax-payers who live outside flood affected areas as well as the linkages between these perspectives and protective measures such as state-supported flood insurance schemes. Conclusions challenge existing understandings of the relationship between risk perception and flood management, particularly where the latter relates to communication strategies and the extent to which those at risk from flooding feel responsible for taking protective actions.

  7. Flooding on Elbe River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea. Credit:Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  8. On Flood Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Aseries of heavy storms since early May led to severe flooding and landslides in south and southwest China,causing heaw casualties and economic losses.Severe convective weather such as downpours,gusts,hail and thunderstorms attacked these areas over a week from May 5.

  9. Fast Flooding over Manhattan

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, Andrea; Silvestri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    We consider a Mobile Ad-hoc NETwork (MANET) formed by n agents that move at speed V according to the Manhattan Random-Way Point model over a square region of side length L. The resulting stationary (agent) spatial probability distribution is far to be uniform: the average density over the "central zone" is asymptotically higher than that over the "suburb". Agents exchange data iff they are at distance at most R within each other. We study the flooding time of this MANET: the number of time steps required to broadcast a message from one source agent to all agents of the network in the stationary phase. We prove the first asymptotical upper bound on the flooding time. This bound holds with high probability, it is a decreasing function of R and V, and it is tight for a wide and relevant range of the network parameters (i.e. L, R and V). A consequence of our result is that flooding over the sparse and highly-disconnected suburb can be as fast as flooding over the dense and connected central zone. Rather surprisin...

  10. Flood model for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palán, Ladislav; Punčochář, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Looking on the impact of flooding from the World-wide perspective, in last 50 years flooding has caused over 460,000 fatalities and caused serious material damage. Combining economic loss from ten costliest flood events (from the same period) returns a loss (in the present value) exceeding 300bn USD. Locally, in Brazil, flood is the most damaging natural peril with alarming increase of events frequencies as 5 out of the 10 biggest flood losses ever recorded have occurred after 2009. The amount of economic and insured losses particularly caused by various flood types was the key driver of the local probabilistic flood model development. Considering the area of Brazil (being 5th biggest country in the World) and the scattered distribution of insured exposure, a domain covered by the model was limited to the entire state of Sao Paolo and 53 additional regions. The model quantifies losses on approx. 90 % of exposure (for regular property lines) of key insurers. Based on detailed exposure analysis, Impact Forecasting has developed this tool using long term local hydrological data series (Agencia Nacional de Aguas) from riverine gauge stations and digital elevation model (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística). To provide most accurate representation of local hydrological behaviour needed for the nature of probabilistic simulation, a hydrological data processing focused on frequency analyses of seasonal peak flows - done by fitting appropriate extreme value statistical distribution and stochastic event set generation consisting of synthetically derived flood events respecting realistic spatial and frequency patterns visible in entire period of hydrological observation. Data were tested for homogeneity, consistency and for any significant breakpoint occurrence in time series so the entire observation or only its subparts were used for further analysis. The realistic spatial patterns of stochastic events are reproduced through the innovative use of d-vine copula

  11. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  12. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Langworthy, T. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  13. GIS Support for Flood Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Gengsheng; Mioc, Darka; Anton, François

    2007-01-01

    Under flood events, the ground traffic is blocked in and around the flooded area due to damages to roads and bridges. The traditional transportation network may not always help people to make a right decision for evacuation. In order to provide dynamic road information needed for flood rescue, we...... developed an adaptive web-based transportation network application using Oracle technology. Moreover, the geographic relationships between the road network and flood areas are taken into account. The overlay between the road network and flood polygons is computed on the fly. This application allows users...... to retrieve the shortest and safest route in Fredericton road network during flood event. It enables users to make a timely decision for flood rescue. We are using Oracle Spatial to deal with emergency situations that can be applied to other constrained network applications as well....

  14. Flood marks of the 1813 flood in the Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklanek, Pavol; Pekárová, Pavla; Halmová, Dana; Pramuk, Branislav; Bačová Mitková, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    In August 2013, 200 years have passed since the greatest and most destructive floods known in the Slovak river basins. The flood affected almost the entire territory of Slovakia, northeastern Moravia, south of Poland. River basins of Váh (Orava, Kysuca), Poprad, Nitra, Hron, Torysa, Hornád, upper and middle Vistula, Odra have been most affected. The aim of this paper is to map the flood marks documenting this catastrophic flood in Slovakia. Flood marks and registrations on the 1813 flood in the Váh river basin are characterized by great diversity and are written in Bernolák modification of Slovak, in Latin, German and Hungarian. Their descriptions are stored in municipal chronicles and Slovak and Hungarian state archives. The flood in 1813 devastated the entire Váh valley, as well as its tributaries. Following flood marks were known in the Vah river basin: Dolná Lehota village in the Orava river basin, historical map from 1817 covering the Sučany village and showing three different cross-sections of the Váh river during the 1813 flood, flood mark in the city of Trenčín, Flood mark in the gate of the Brunovce mansion, cross preserved at the old linden tree at Drahovce, and some records in written documents, e.g. Cifer village. The second part of the study deals with flood marks mapping in the Hron, Hnilec and Poprad River basins, and Vistula River basin in Krakow. On the basis of literary documents and the actual measurement, we summarize the peak flow rates achieved during the floods in 1813 in the profile Hron: Banská Bystrica. According to recent situation the 1813 flood peak was approximately by 1.22 m higher, than the flood in 1974. Also in the Poprad basin is the August 1813 flood referred as the most devastating flood in last 400 years. The position of the flood mark is known, but the building was unfortunately removed later. The water level in 1813 was much higher than the water level during the recent flood in June 2010. In Cracow the water level

  15. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Miscibility behavior and formation mechanism of stabilized felodipine-polyvinylpyrrolidone amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavas, Evangelos; Ktistis, Georgios; Xenakis, Aristotelis; Georgarakis, Emmanouel

    2005-07-01

    In the present study, solid dispersion systems of felodipine (FEL) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were developed, in order to enhance solid state stability and release kinetics. The prepared systems were characterized by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, X-Ray Diffraction, and Scanning Electron Microscopy techniques, while the interactions which take place were identified by using Fourier Transformation-Infrared Spectroscopy. Due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl group of PVP and the amino groups of FEL, transition of FEL from crystalline to amorphous state was achieved. The dispersion of FEL was found to be in nano-scale particle sizes and dependent on the FEL/PVP ratio. This modification leads to partial miscibility of the two components, as it was verified by DSC and optimal glass dispersion of FEL into the polymer matrix since no crystalline structure was detected with XRD. The above deformation has a significant effect on the dissolution enhancement and the release kinetics of FEL, as it causes the pattern to change from linear to logarithmic. An impressive optimization of the dissolution profile is observed corresponding to a rapid release of FEL in the system containing 10% w/w of FEL, releasing 100% in approximately 20 min. The particle size of dispersed FEL into PVP matrix could be classified as the main parameter affecting dissolution optimization. The mechanism of such enhancement consists of the lower energy required for the dissolution due to the amorphous transition and the fine dispersion, which leads to an optimal contact surface of the drug substance with the dissolution media. The prepared systems are stable during storage at 40 +/- 1 degrees C and relative humidity of 75 +/- 5%. Addition of sodium docusate as surfactant does not affect the release kinetics, but only the initial burst due to its effect on the surface tension and wettability of the systems.

  17. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  18. Citizen involvement in flood risk governance: flood groups and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twigger-Ross Clare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade has been a policy shift withinUK flood risk management towards localism with an emphasis on communities taking ownership of flood risk. There is also an increased focus on resilience and, more specifically, on community resilience to flooding. This paper draws on research carried out for UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs to evaluate the Flood Resilience Community Pathfinder (FRCP scheme in England. Resilience is conceptualised as multidimensional and linked to exisiting capacities within a community. Creating resilience to flooding is an ongoing process of adaptation, learning from past events and preparing for future risks. This paper focusses on the development of formal and informal institutions to support improved flood risk management: institutional resilience capacity. It includes new institutions: e.g. flood groups, as well as activities that help to build inter- and intra- institutional resilience capacity e.g. community flood planning. The pathfinder scheme consisted of 13 projects across England led by local authorities aimed at developing community resilience to flood risk between 2013 – 2015. This paper discusses the nature and structure of flood groups, the process of their development, and the extent of their linkages with formal institutions, drawing out the barriers and facilitators to developing institutional resilience at the local level.

  19. Comparative studies of empirical correlations for calculation of minimum miscibility pressure; Estudo comparativo de correlacoes empiricas para o calculo da pressao minima de miscibilidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, P.S. [PETROBRAS, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bahia]. E-mail: psrocha@petrobras.com.br; Meirelles, C.P.; Santos, R.B.; Costa, G.M.N. [Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Estudos em Petroleo e Gas Natural (CEPGN)]. E-mail: gloria.costa@unifacs.br

    2003-07-01

    The miscible recovery of oil can be obtained by displacing it using CO{sub 2} at a pressure greater than a minimum level, called minimum miscibility pressure. In this study we used three correlations for the calculation of the minimum miscibility pressure in multiple contact: Yellig and Metcalfe method; Alston, Kokolis and James method; and Enick, Holden and Morsi method. For a carefully evaluation of the range of application and restrictions, a data base from the literature containing 125 combinations of oils, temperatures and solvents, for which the minimum miscibility pressures were available using pure or impure CO{sub 2} from experiments in slim tube apparatus. This study revealed that the best method is the Alston, Kokolis and James one, although the average relative error and the standard deviation are greater than the values cited by the authors. An evaluation of the correlation coefficient revealed that the number of independent variables in each method is insufficient. Although the second and third methods consider the impurities in the CO{sub 2}, the error obtained in the calculation of the minimum miscibility pressure using pure CO{sub 2} is lower than the one for impure CO{sub 2}, showing that the effects of the contaminants are not well described by the correlations as the authors say. (author)

  20. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  1. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  2. Floods and tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Floods and tsunamis cause few severe injuries, but those injuries can overwhelm local areas, depending on the magnitude of the disaster. Most injuries are extremity fractures, lacerations, and sprains. Because of the mechanism of soft tissue and bone injuries, infection is a significant risk. Aspiration pneumonias are also associated with tsunamis. Appropriate precautionary interventions prevent communicable dis-ease outbreaks. Psychosocial health issues must be considered.

  3. Miscibility and interactions of animal and plant sterols with choline plasmalogen in binary and multicomponent model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Luty, Katarzyna

    2014-04-01

    In this work miscibility and interactions of sterols with choline plasmalogen (PC-plasm) in Langmuir monolayers were studied. Moreover, the properties of cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine/plasmalogen mixtures of different PC-plasm concentration were investigated. The foregoing systems were treated as a model of cancer cell membranes, which are of higher plasmalogen level than normal cells. Finally, the influence of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol (phytosterols differing in anticancer potency) on these mixtures was verified. The properties of monolayers were analyzed based on the parameters derived from the surface pressure-area isotherms and images taken with Brewster Angle Microscope. It was found that at 30% of sterol in sterol/plasmalogen monolayer the lipids are immiscible and 3D crystallites are formed within the film. Cholesterol molecules mix favorably with PC-plasm at Xchol ≥ 0.5, while the investigated phytosterols only at their prevailing proportion in binary system. The increase of choline plasmalogen in cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine monolayer causes destabilization of the system. Moreover, the incorporation of phytosterols into cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine+PC-plasm mixtures disturbed membrane morphology and this effect was stronger for β-sitosterol as compared to stigmasterol. It was concluded that the presence of vinyl ether bond at sn-1 position in PC-plasm molecule strongly affects miscibility of choline plasmalogen with sterols. The comparison of the collected data with those reported in literature allowed one to conclude that miscibility and interactions of sterols with PC-plasm are less favorable than those with phosphatidylcholine. It was also suggested that overexpression of plasmalogens in cancer cell membranes may be a factor differentiating sensitivity of cells to anticancer effect of phytosterols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  5. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis on the in-situ mixing zone of CO2 miscible displacement flows in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Yang, Wenzhe; Wang, Dayong; Yang, Mingjun; Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Yuechao; Dou, Binlin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2014-06-01

    The in-situ mixing zone represents dynamic characteristics of CO2 miscible displacement flows, which is important for carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) projects. However, the migration characteristics of the in-situ mixing zone under reservoir conditions has been neither well studied nor fully understood. The in-situ mixing zone with the flowing mixture of supercritical CO2 and n-decane (nC10) was investigated by using a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus at a reservoir condition of 8.5 MPa and 37.8 °C in porous media. The experimental results showed that the CO2-frontal velocity was larger than the mixing-frontal velocity. The mixing zone length was linearly declined in the miscible displacement process. And the declining rate of the mixing zone length was increased with injection rate. It indicates that the mixing zone length is not constant in a vertically stable CO2 misible displacement and a volume contraction due to phase behavior effects may occur. Then, an error function based on the convection-dispersion equation was fitted with CO2 miscible displacement experiments. The error function was well fitted both at a series of fixed core positions and a series of fixed displacement times. Furthermore, the longitudinal dispersion coefficients (Klx and Klt) and the longitudinal Peclet numbers (Ped and PeL) were quantified from the fitting results. The evolutions of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient were reduced along the displacement time. And the declining rate was increased with injection rate. And with proceeding, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient was tending towards stability and constant. But the evolutions of the longitudinal Peclet numbers were increased along the displacement time. And the increasing rate was increased with injection rate.

  7. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  8. Atmospheric Rivers, Floods, and Flash Floods in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, Klint T.

    Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) are long (>2000 km), narrow (<1000 km) corridors of enhanced vertically integrated water vapor (IWV) and enhanced IWV transport (IVT). The landfall of ARs along the U.S. West Coast have been linked to extreme precipitation and flooding/flash flooding in regions of complex topography. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between a 10 water-year (2005-2014) climatology of floods, flash floods, and landfalling ARs. The ARs in this study are defined using IVT following the Rutz et al. (2013) methodology, whereas floods and flash floods are identified by the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Storm Events Database. The results of this study indicate that landfalling ARs are present on a majority of days that there are floods in northern California. Landfalling ARs are predominantly present on a majority of days that there are flash flood reports during the cold-season (November-March); however, the North American monsoon is present on days that there are flash flood reports during the warm-season (April-October). Two exemplary case studies are provided to illustrate the hydrologic impact of landfalling ARs. The first case study illustrated a flood event that occurred in associated with three landfalling ARs that produced 800 mm in regions over the Russian River watershed in northern California and the second case study illustrated a flash flood event that occurred in association with a landfalling AR that produced ˜225 mm of precipitation in regions over the Santa Ynez xii watershed in which produced a flash flood over the southern portions of Santa Barbara County in southern California.

  9. Relative role of convective and diffusive mixing in the miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, S. S.; Carballido-Landeira, J.; De Wit, A.; Knaepen, B.

    2017-01-01

    The relative role of convection and diffusion is characterized both numerically and experimentally for porous media flows due to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a horizontal interface between two miscible solutions in the gravity field. We show that, though globally convection dominates over diffusion during the nonlinear regime, diffusion can locally be as important as convection and even dominates over lateral convection far away from the fingertips. Our experimental and numerical computations of the temporal evolution of the mixing length, the width of the fingers, and their wavelength are in good agreement and show that the lateral evolution of fingers is governed by diffusion.

  10. Modified Method of Characteristics Combined with Finite Volume Element Methods for Incompressible Miscible Displacement Problems in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incompressible miscible displacement problem in porous media is modeled by a coupled system of two nonlinear partial differential equations, the pressure-velocity equation and the concentration equation. In this paper, we present a mixed finite volume element method (FVEM for the approximation of the pressure-velocity equation. Since modified method of characteristics (MMOC minimizes the grid orientation effect, for the approximation of the concentration equation, we apply a standard FVEM combined with MMOC. A priori error estimates in L∞(L2 norm are derived for velocity, pressure and concentration. Numerical results are presented to substantiate the validity of the theoretical results.

  11. Evidence of a Surface-Mediated Magnetically Induced Miscibility Gap in Co-Pt Alloy Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, P.W.; Shapiro, A.L.; Tran, M.Q.; Hellman, F. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    1995-08-28

    (100) and (111) oriented single-crystal CoPt{sub 3} films were deposited over a range of growth temperatures from {minus}50 to 800 {degree}C. The Curie temperature is increased by 200 {degree}C over the value expected for the homogeneous alloy in the as-deposited films (of both orientations) grown near 400 {degree}C. We interpret this as evidence for a previously unobserved, surface-mediated, magnetically driven miscibility gap in vapor-deposited CoPt{sub 3} films. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is also observed in the as-deposited films (of both orientations) grown near 400 {degree}C.

  12. Superconvergence of a Combined Mixed Finite Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Method for a Compressible Miscible Displacement Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-ming Yang; Yanping Chen

    2011-01-01

    A combined mixed finite element and discontinuous Galerkin method for a compressible miscible displacement problem which includes molecular diffusion and dispersion in porous media is investigated. That is to say, the mixed finite element method with Raviart-Thomas space is applied to the flow equation, and the transport one is solved by the symmetric interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin (SIPG) approximation. Based on projection interpolations and induction hypotheses, a superconvergence estimate is obtained. During the analysis, an extension of the Darcy velocity along the Gauss line is also used in the evaluation of the coefficients in the Galerkin procedure for the concentration.

  13. Recent advances in flood forecasting and flood risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arduino

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent large floods in Europe have led to increased interest in research and development of flood forecasting systems. Some of these events have been provoked by some of the wettest rainfall periods on record which has led to speculation that such extremes are attributable in some measure to anthropogenic global warming and represent the beginning of a period of higher flood frequency. Whilst current trends in extreme event statistics will be difficult to discern, conclusively, there has been a substantial increase in the frequency of high floods in the 20th century for basins greater than 2x105 km2. There is also increasing that anthropogenic forcing of climate change may lead to an increased probability of extreme precipitation and, hence, of flooding. There is, therefore, major emphasis on the improvement of operational flood forecasting systems in Europe, with significant European Community spending on research and development on prototype forecasting systems and flood risk management projects. This Special Issue synthesises the most relevant scientific and technological results presented at the International Conference on Flood Forecasting in Europe held in Rotterdam from 3-5 March 2003. During that meeting 150 scientists, forecasters and stakeholders from four continents assembled to present their work and current operational best practice and to discuss future directions of scientific and technological efforts in flood prediction and prevention. The papers presented at the conference fall into seven themes, as follows.

  14. Controlling the Melt Resistance to Flow as a Possibility of Improving the Miscibility and the Time Behavior of Some Blends Based on Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Dimonie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proves that the miscibility of some blends based on starch can be improved by finding for each of them the melt resistance to flow at which the nonstationary flow and the melt degradation are avoided and the developed shear rate homogenizes optimally the material composition. The obtained results show that, for process sensitive materials like starches, the border between good and less miscibility is so narrow that the window of melt processing conditions and the best formulation must be found for each of them. The improving of miscibility by controlling the melt resistance to flow proves to be a good method to prevent retrogradation and plasticizer leaching and so to handle the new compounds behavior during usage.

  15. Fault tree analysis for urban flooding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional methods to evaluate flood risk mostly focus on storm events as the main cause of flooding. Fault tree analysis is a technique that is able to model all potential causes of flooding and to quantify both the overall probability of flooding and the contributions of all causes of flooding to

  16. Prediction of Instability for Miscible Displacements in a Hele-Shaw Cell Prévision de l'instabilité pour des déplacements miscibles dans une cellule Hele-Shaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskuner G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A universal dimensionless scaling group and its critical value at the onset of instability for a miscible displacement in a Hele-Shaw cell is derived. The derivation is based on a variational technique and it is capable of considering, for the first time, the effect of the length of a Hele-Shaw cell on the criterion for the onset of instability. The theory is verified by comparing it with forty-four Hele-Shaw cell experiments. On calcule un groupe universel sans dimension de mise à l'échelle et sa valeur critique au départ de l'instabilité dans un déplacement miscible dans une cellule Hele-Shaw. Ce calcul est basé sur une technique variationnelle et permet, pour la première fois, de prendre en compte l'effet de la longueur d'une cellule Hele-Shaw sur le critère d'apparition d'instabilité. La théorie est vérifiée en la comparant avec des expériences réalisées avec quarante-quatre cellules Hele-Shaw.

  17. Formation of silk fibroin nanoparticles in water-miscible organic solvent and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuqing, E-mail: yqzhang@public1.sz.js.cn; Shen Weide; Xiang Ruli [Soochow University, Silk Biotechnol. Lab., School of Life Science (China); Zhuge Lanjian; Gao Weijian; Wang Wenbao [Soochow University, Analytical Center (China)

    2007-10-15

    When Silk fibre derived from Bombyx mori, a native biopolymer, was dissolved in highly concentrated neutral salts such as CaCl{sub 2}, the regenerated liquid silk, a gradually degraded peptide mixture of silk fibroin, could be obtained. The silk fibroin nanoparticles were prepared rapidly from the liquid silk by using water-miscible protonic and polar aprotonic organic solvents. The nanoparticles are insoluble but well dispersed and stable in aqueous solution and are globular particles with a range of 35-125 nm in diameter by means of TEM, SEM, AFM and laser sizer. Over one half of the {epsilon}-amino groups exist around the protein nanoparticles by using a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) method. Raman spectra shows the tyrosine residues on the surface of the globules are more exposed than those on native silk fibers. The crystalline polymorph and conformation transition of the silk nanoparticles from random-coil and {alpha}-helix form (Silk I) into anti-parallel {beta}-sheet form (Silk II) are investigated in detail by using infrared, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, DSC, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR and electron diffraction. X-ray diffraction of the silk nanoparticles shows that the nanoparticles crystallinity is about four fifths of the native fiber. Our results indicate that the degraded peptide chains of the regenerated silk is gathered homogeneously or heterogeneously to form a looser globular structure in aqueous solution. When introduced into excessive organic solvent, the looser globules of the liquid silk are rapidly dispersed and simultaneously dehydrated internally and externally, resulting in the further chain-chain contact, arrangement of those hydrophobic domains inside the globules and final formation of crystalline silk nanoparticles with {beta}-sheet configuration. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles are relative to the kinds, properties and even molecular structures of organic solvents, and more significantly to the looser globular

  18. Flood Risk and Flood hazard maps - Visualisation of hydrological risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spachinger, Karl; Dorner, Wolfgang; Metzka, Rudolf [University of Applied Sciences Deggendorf (Germany); Serrhini, Kamal [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Genie des Systemes Urbains, France, and Universite Francois Rabelais, Unite Mixte de Recherche, Tours (France); Fuchs, Sven [Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: karl.spachinger@fhd.edu

    2008-11-01

    Hydrological models are an important basis of flood forecasting and early warning systems. They provide significant data on hydrological risks. In combination with other modelling techniques, such as hydrodynamic models, they can be used to assess the extent and impact of hydrological events. The new European Flood Directive forces all member states to evaluate flood risk on a catchment scale, to compile maps of flood hazard and flood risk for prone areas, and to inform on a local level about these risks. Flood hazard and flood risk maps are important tools to communicate flood risk to different target groups. They provide compiled information to relevant public bodies such as water management authorities, municipalities, or civil protection agencies, but also to the broader public. For almost each section of a river basin, run-off and water levels can be defined based on the likelihood of annual recurrence, using a combination of hydrological and hydrodynamic models, supplemented by an analysis of historical records and mappings. In combination with data related to the vulnerability of a region risk maps can be derived. The project RISKCATCH addressed these issues of hydrological risk and vulnerability assessment focusing on the flood risk management process. Flood hazard maps and flood risk maps were compiled for Austrian and German test sites taking into account existing national and international guidelines. These maps were evaluated by eye-tracking using experimental graphic semiology. Sets of small-scale as well as large-scale risk maps were presented to test persons in order to (1) study reading behaviour as well as understanding and (2) deduce the most attractive components that are essential for target-oriented risk communication. A cognitive survey asking for negative and positive aspects and complexity of each single map complemented the experimental graphic semiology. The results indicate how risk maps can be improved to fit the needs of different user

  19. Application of flood index in monitoring Flood-plain ecosystems (by the example of the Middle Ob flood-plain)

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotnov, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of regional hydroecological monitoring has been developed for the flood-plain of the Middle Ob. Its object is to control the state of flood-plain ecosystem productivity for organization of scientific, regional-adopted and ecologically regulated nature management. For this purpose hydroecological zoning of flood-plain territory performed, the most representative stations of water-gauge observations for each flood-plain zone organized, the scheme of flood-plain flooding was prepared...

  20. Development and evaluation of lafutidine solid dispersion via hot melt extrusion: Investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Fule

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In current study, immediate release solid dispersion (SD formulation of antiulcer drug lafutidine (LAFT was developed using hot melt extrusion (HME technique. Amphiphilic Soluplus® used as a primary solubilizing agent, with different concentrations of selected surfactants like PEG 400, Lutrol F127 (LF127, Lutrol F68 (LF68 were used to investigate their influence on formulations processing via HME. Prepared amorphous glassy solid dispersion was found to be thermodynamically and physicochemically stable. On the contrary, traces of crystalline LAFT not observed in the extrudates according to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Raman micro spectrometry had the lowest detection limit of LAFT crystals compared with XRD and DSC. Atomic Force microscopy (AFM studies revealed drug- polymer molecular miscibility and surface interaction at micro level. 1H–COSY NMR spectroscopy confirmed miscibility and interaction between LAFT and Soluplus®, with chemical shift drifting and line broadening. MD simulation studies using computational modelling showed intermolecular interaction between molecules. Dissolution rate and solubility of LAFT was enhanced remarkably in developed SD systems. Optimized ratio of polymer and surfactants played crucial role in dissolution rate enhancement of LAFT SD. The obtained results suggested that developed LAFT has promising potential for oral delivery and might be an efficacious approach for enhancing the therapeutic potential of LAFT.

  1. Miscibility and interaction between 1-alkanol and short-chain phosphocholine in the adsorbed film and micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takajo, Yuichi; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji; Aratono, Makoto; Yamanaka, Michio

    2007-09-01

    The miscibility and interaction of 1-hexanol (C6OH) and 1-heptanol (C7OH) with 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) in the adsorbed films and micelles were investigated by measuring the surface tension of aqueous C6OH-DHPC and aqueous C7OH-DHPC solutions. The surface density, the mean molecular area, the composition of the adsorbed film, and the excess Gibbs energy of adsorption g(H,E), were estimated. Further, the critical micelle concentration of the mixtures was determined from the surface tension versus molality curves; the micellar composition was calculated. The miscibility of the 1-alkanols and DHPC molecules in the adsorbed film and micelles was examined using the phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) and that of micellization (PDM). The PDA and the composition dependence of g(H,E) indicated the non-ideal mixing of the 1-alkanols and DHPC molecules due to the attractive interaction between the molecules in the adsorbed film, while the PDM indicated that the 1-alkanol molecules were not incorporated in the micelles within DHPC rich region. The dependence of the mean molecular area of the mixtures on the surface composition suggested that the packing property of the adsorbed film depends on the chain length of 1-alkanol: C6OH expands the DHPC adsorbed film more than C7OH.

  2. Experimental Measurements of Longitudinal and Transverse Dispersion in Miscible Fluids with a High Viscosity and Density Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkindi, A.; Bijeljic, B.; Muggeridge, A.

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion and advective dispersion may have a significant influence on the mixing between miscible fluids during displacement processes in porous media. This is particularly important when intimate mixing may result in important changes to the fluid behaviour. For example in oil recovery, mixing between injected and connate water will tend to reduce the efficiency of low salinity water injection. On the other hand recovery may be increased if injected gas mixes with high viscosity oil increasing its mobility. Most experimental data for longitudinal and transverse dispersion have been obtained using fluid pairs with very similar viscosities and densities. The traditional description (Perkins and Johnston, 1963) suggests that longitudinal dispersion decreases as mobility ratio increases. It also suggests that gravity will tend to reduce transverse dispersion. We provide experimental measurements of longitudinal (KL) and transverse (KT) dispersion at low Reynolds number as a function of Peclet number for the first contact miscible ethanol- glycerol fluid system flowing in a porous media formed from glass beads. These fluids have a high viscosity ratio of over 1000 and a significant density difference of 470 kg m-3. We show that both KL and KT are similar to values measured for a water-brine system but that KT is reduced when the less dense ethanol is flowing above the denser glycerol.

  3. Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior of Miscible Polymer Blends in the Presence of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nicholas Philip

    The design of environmentally-benign polymer processing techniques is an area of growing interest, motivated by the desire to reduce the emission of volatile organic compounds. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2) has gained traction as a viable candidate to process polymers both as a solvent and diluent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the nature of the interactions between scCO2 and polymers in order to provide rational insight into the molecular interactions which result in the unexpected mixing thermodynamics in one such system. The work also provides insight into the nature of pairwise thermodynamic interactions in multicomponent polymer-polymer-diluent blends, and the effect of these interactions on the phase behavior of the mixture. In order to quantify the strength of interactions in the multicomponent system, the binary mixtures were characterized individually in addition to the ternary blend. Quantitative analysis of was made tractable through the use of a model miscible polymer blend containing styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (dPMMA), a mixture which has been considered for a variety of practical applications. In the case of both individual polymers, scCO2 is known to behave as a diluent, wherein the extent of polymer swelling depends on both temperature and pressure. The solubility of scCO 2 in each polymer as a function of temperature and pressure was characterized elsewhere. The SAN-dPMMA blend clearly exhibited lower critical solution temperature behavior, forming homogeneous mixtures at low temperatures and phase separating at elevated temperature. These measurements allowed the determination of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter chi23 for SAN (species 2) and dPMMA (species 3) as a function of temperature at ambient pressure, in the absence of scCO2 (species 1). Characterization of the phase behavior of the multicomponent (ternary) mixture was also carried out by SANS. An in situ SANS

  4. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The WTI2017 project is responsible for the development of flood defence assessment tools for the 3600 km of Dutch primary flood defences, dikes/levees, dunes and hydraulic structures. These tools are necessary, as per January 1st 2017, the new flood risk management policy for the Netherlands will be implemented. Then, the seven decades old design practice (maximum water level methodology of 1958 and two decades old safety standards (and maximum hydraulic load methodology of 1996 will formally be replaced by a more risked based approach for the national policy in flood risk management. The formal flood defence assessment is an important part of this new policy, especially for flood defence managers, since national and regional funding for reinforcement is based on this assessment. This new flood defence policy is based on a maximum allowable probability of flooding. For this, a maximum acceptable individual risk was determined at 1/100 000 per year, this is the probability of life loss of for every protected area in the Netherlands. Safety standards of flood defences were then determined based on this acceptable individual risk. The results were adjusted based on information from cost -benefit analysis, societal risk and large scale societal disruption due to the failure of critical infrastructure e.g. power stations. The resulting riskbased flood defence safety standards range from a 300 to a 100 000 year return period for failure. Two policy studies, WV21 (Safety from floods in the 21st century and VNK-2 (the National Flood Risk in 2010 provided the essential information to determine the new risk based safety standards for flood defences. The WTI2017 project will provide the safety assessment tools based on these new standards and is thus an essential element for the implementation of this policy change. A major issue to be tackled was the development of user-friendly tools, as the new assessment is to be carried out by personnel of the

  5. Temporal clustering of floods in Germany: Do flood-rich and flood-poor periods exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Bruno; Nguyen, Viet Dung; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2016-10-01

    The repeated occurrence of exceptional floods within a few years, such as the Rhine floods in 1993 and 1995 and the Elbe and Danube floods in 2002 and 2013, suggests that floods in Central Europe may be organized in flood-rich and flood-poor periods. This hypothesis is studied by testing the significance of temporal clustering in flood occurrence (peak-over-threshold) time series for 68 catchments across Germany for the period 1932-2005. To assess the robustness of the results, different methods are used: Firstly, the index of dispersion, which quantifies the departure from a homogeneous Poisson process, is investigated. Further, the time-variation of the flood occurrence rate is derived by non-parametric kernel implementation and the significance of clustering is evaluated via parametric and non-parametric tests. Although the methods give consistent overall results, the specific results differ considerably. Hence, we recommend applying different methods when investigating flood clustering. For flood estimation and risk management, it is of relevance to understand whether clustering changes with flood severity and time scale. To this end, clustering is assessed for different thresholds and time scales. It is found that the majority of catchments show temporal clustering at the 5% significance level for low thresholds and time scales of one to a few years. However, clustering decreases substantially with increasing threshold and time scale. We hypothesize that flood clustering in Germany is mainly caused by catchment memory effects along with intra- to inter-annual climate variability, and that decadal climate variability plays a minor role.

  6. Towards Interactive Flood Governance: changing approaches in Dutch flood policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. van Ast (Jacko)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In the course of history, flooding of rivers and the sea brought misery to humanity. Low lying delta’s of large rivers like Bangladesh, New Orleans, the Nile delta or the Netherlands belong to the most vulnerable for flood disasters. Since ancient times people pondered

  7. FLOOD AND FLOOD CONTROL OF THE YELLOW RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxue LI; Huirang WANG; Yunqi SU; Naiqian JIANG; Yuanfeng ZHANG

    2002-01-01

    The Yellow River is the cradle of China. It had long been the center of politics, economics and culture of China in history. Large coverage flood disaster occurred frequently in the Yellow River basin and the losses were often heavy. Thus, the Yellow River is also considered as the serious hidden danger of China. Since the founding of new China, structural and non-structural systems of flood control have been established basically. Tremendous successes have been made on flood control. Into the 21century, flood control standard of the Lower Yellow River has been increased significantly with the operation of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir. However, problems of the Yellow River are complicated and the tasks for solving these problems are arduous. Particularly, the sedimentation problem can't be solved completely in the near future. The situation of "suspended river" and threat of flood will long exist.Therefore, supported by rapid social and economical development of the nation and relied on advanced technology, the flood control system shall be perfected. Meantime, study of the Yellow River shall be enhanced in order to better understand the flood, get with it and use it thus to reduce flood disaster.

  8. Storage and flood routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R.W.; Godfrey, R.G.

    1960-01-01

    The basic equations used in flood routing are developed from the law of continuity. In each method the assumptions are discussed to enable the user to select an appropriate technique. In the stage-storage method the storage is related to the mean gage height in the reach under consideration. In the discharge-storage method the storage is determined, from weighted values of inflow and outflow discharge. In the reservoir-storage method the storage is considered as a function of outflow discharge alone. A detailed example is given for each method to illustrate that particular technique.

  9. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  10. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2010 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevations (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each...

  11. Estancia Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This vector dataset depicts the 1% annual flood boundary (otherwise known as special flood hazard area or 100 year flood boundary) for its specified area. The data...

  12. Elephant Butte Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This vector dataset depicts the 1% annual flood boundary (otherwise known as special flood hazard area or 100 year flood boundary) for its specified area. The data...

  13. Sierra County Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This vector dataset depicts the 1% annual flood boundary (otherwise known as special flood hazard area or 100 year flood boundary) for its specified area. The data...

  14. The Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, Charles

    2015-04-01

    As population growth and economic growth take place, and as climate change accelerates, many regions across the globe are finding themselves increasingly vulnerable to flooding. A recent OECD study of the exposure of the world's large port cities to coastal flooding found that 40 million people were exposed to a 1 in 100 year coastal flood event in 2005, and the total value of exposed assets was about US 3,000 billion, or 5% of global GDP. By the 2070s, those numbers were estimated to increase to 150 million people and US 35,000 billion, or roughly 9% of projected global GDP. Impoverished people in developing countries are particularly at risk because they often live in flood-prone areas and lack the resources to respond. WRI and its Dutch partners - Deltares, IVM-VU University Amsterdam, Utrecht University, and PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency - are in the initial stages of developing a robust set of river flood and coastal storm surge risk measures that show the extent of flooding under a variety of scenarios (both current and future), together with the projected human and economic impacts of these flood scenarios. These flood risk data and information will be accessible via an online, easy-to-use Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer. We will also investigate the viability, benefits, and costs of a wide array of flood risk reduction measures that could be implemented in a variety of geographic and socio-economic settings. Together, the activities we propose have the potential for saving hundreds of thousands of lives and strengthening the resiliency and security of many millions more, especially those who are most vulnerable. Mr. Iceland will present Version 1.0 of the Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer and provide a preview of additional elements of the Analyzer to be released in the coming years.

  15. Flood Risk, Flood Mitigation, and Location Choice: Evaluating the National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qin; Davlasheridze, Meri

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is expected to worsen the negative effects of natural disasters like floods. The negative impacts, however, can be mitigated by individuals' adjustments through migration and relocation behaviors. Previous literature has identified flood risk as one significant driver in relocation decisions, but no prior study examines the effect of the National Flood Insurance Program's voluntary program-the Community Rating System (CRS)-on residential location choice. This article fills this gap and tests the hypothesis that flood risk and the CRS-creditable flood control activities affect residential location choices. We employ a two-stage sorting model to empirically estimate the effects. In the first stage, individuals' risk perception and preference heterogeneity for the CRS activities are considered, while mean effects of flood risk and the CRS activities are estimated in the second stage. We then estimate heterogeneous marginal willingness to pay (WTP) for the CRS activities by category. Results show that age, ethnicity and race, educational attainment, and prior exposure to risk explain risk perception. We find significant values for the CRS-creditable mitigation activities, which provides empirical evidence for the benefits associated with the program. The marginal WTP for an additional credit point earned for public information activities, including hazard disclosure, is found to be the highest. Results also suggest that water amenities dominate flood risk. Thus, high amenity values may increase exposure to flood risk, and flood mitigation projects should be strategized in coastal regions accordingly.

  16. Water NOT wanted - Coastal Floods and Flooding Protection in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass

    2016-01-01

    vulnerability towards coastal flooding, the country has experienced severe storm surges throughout history, and hitherto safe areas will become increasingly at risk this century as the climate changes. Historically a seafarers’ nation, Denmark has always been connected with the sea. From medieval time ports...... acceptance of floods has decreased from a “this is a natural consequence of living by the sea” to an explicit: Water Not Wanted! This paper provides a brief overview of floods and flooding protection issues in Denmark (Ch. 2 & Ch. 3), the current legislation (Ch. 4), and discusses challenges in relation...... to climate change adaptation, risk reduction, and to potential ways of rethinking flooding protection in strategies that also incorporate other uses (Ch. 5)....

  17. Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. Second quarterly technical progress report, [January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Production from the Marg Area 1 at Port Neches is averaging 392 barrels of oil per day (BOPD) for this quarter. The production drop is due to fluctuation in both GOR and BS&W on various producing well, coupled with low water injectivity in the reservoir. We were unable to inject any tangible amount of water in the reservoir since late January. Both production and injection problems are currently being evaluated to improve reservoir performance. Well Kuhn (No. 6) was stimulated with 120 MMCF of CO{sub 2}, and was placed on production in February 1, 1995. The well was shut in for an additional month after producing dry CO{sub 2} initially. The well was opened again in early April and is currently producing about 40 BOPD. CO{sub 2} injection averaged 11.3 MMCFD including 4100 MMCFD purchased from Cardox, while water injection averaged 1000 BWPD with most of the injection occurring in the month of January.

  18. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  19. Flood Risk and Asset Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Within the UK for example, the flooding of the village of Boscastle (August, 2004), that took place over a day, Roca -Collel and Davison (2010), can...Hazard Research Centre. Roca -Collel, M. and Davison, M. (2010). "Two dimensional model analysis of flash- flood processes: application to the Boscastle

  20. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  1. Extreme flooding tolerance in Rorippa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akman, M.; Bhikharie, A.; Mustroph, A.; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen stress imposed by floods creates a strong selection force shaping plant ecosystems in flood-prone areas. Plants inhabiting these environments adopt various adaptations and survival strategies to cope with increasing water depths. Two Rorippa species, R. sylvestris and R. amphibia that gro

  2. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  3. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  4. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  5. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  6. Flash Flooding and 'Muddy Floods' on Arable Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flash flooding is often associated with upland, grazed catchments. It does, however, occur in lowland arable-dominated areas. In southern England, notable examples have occurred at Rottingdean (Brighton) in 1987, at Faringdon (Oxfordshire) in 1993 and at Breaky Bottom vineyard (near Brighton) in 1987 and 2000. All resulted in damage to nearby property. Runoff was largely from recently cultivated ground. The characteristics of such floods are: Rapid runoff from bare soil surfaces. Saturated excess overland flow is likely in the early parts of storms but high intensity rainfall on loamy soils results in crusting and Hortonian overland flow; High rates of erosion; Sediment transport to downvalley sites causing property damage ('muddy flooding'). Muddy floods are known from several areas of Europe e.g. Belgium, northern France, South Limburg (Netherlands) and Slovakia (Boardman et al 2006). In other areas they occur but have gone unreported or are classified under different terms. The necessary conditions for occurrence are areas of arable land which is bare at times of the year when there is a risk of storms. For muddy floods to cause damage (and hence be reported), vulnerable property must lie downstream from such areas of arable land. In some areas the incidence of muddy floods relates to autumn and early winter rainfall and winter cereal crops (e.g. southern England). In continental Europe, flooding is more common in summer and is associated with convectional storms and land uses including sugar beet, maize and potatoes. Predictions of increased numbers of high-intensity storms with future climate change, suggest that arable areas will continue to generate both flash floods and muddy floods.

  7. The calculation of ternary miscibility gaps using the linear contributions method: Problems, benchmark systems and an application to (K, Li, Na)Br

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H.G.; Oonk, H.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hypothetical systems are useful to enhance the rigor of computerized algorithms and to enhance the applicability of the developed software to physically realistic systems. This paper deals with the calculation of miscibility gaps using the method of the addition of linear contributions. We derived a

  8. Miscibility of poly(lactic acid) and poly(ethylene oxide) solvent polymer blends and nanofibers made by solution blow spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    The miscibility of blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in polymer solutions by dilute solution viscometry and in solution blow spun nanofibers by microscopy (SEM, TEM) and by thermal and spectral analysis. Three blends of PLA and PEO were solution blended in...

  9. Modeling the Impact of Deformation on Unstable Miscible Displacements in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán, D.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.

    2014-12-01

    Coupled flow and geomechanics is a critical research challenge in engineering and the geosciences. The simultaneous flow of two or more fluids with different densities or viscosities through deformable media is ubiquitous in environmental, industrial, and biological processes, including the removal of non-aqueous phase liquids from underground water bodies, the geological storage of CO2, and current challenges in energy technologies, such as enhanced geothermal systems, unconventional hydrocarbon resources or enhanced oil recovery techniques. Using numerical simulation, we study the interplay between viscous-driven flow instabilities (viscous fingering) and rock mechanics, and elucidate the structure of the displacement patterns as a function of viscosity contrast, injection rate and rock mechanical properties. Finally, we discuss the role of medium deformation on transport and mixing processes in porous media.

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of drug-polymer interaction and miscibility and its impact on drug supersaturation in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) have the potential to offer higher apparent solubility and bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. Knowledge of the solid state drug-polymer solubility/miscibility and their mutual interaction are fundamental requirements for the effective design and development of such systems. To this end, we have carried out a comprehensive investigation of various ASD systems of dipyridamole and cinnarizine in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) at different drug loadings. Theoretical and experimental examinations (by implementing binary and ternary Flory-Huggins (F-H) theory) related to drug-polymer interaction/miscibility including solubility parameter approach, melting point depression method, phase diagram, drug-polymer interaction in the presence of moisture and the effect of drug loading on interaction parameter were performed. The information obtained from this study was used to predict the stability of ASDs at different drug loadings and under different thermal and moisture conditions. Thermal and moisture sorption analysis not only provided the composition-dependent interaction parameter but also predicted the composition dependent miscibility. DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA systems have shown molecular level mixing over the complete range of drug loading. For CNZ-PVP, the presence of a single Tg at lower drug loadings (10, 20 and 35%w/w) indicates the formation of solid solution. However, drug recrystallization was observed for samples with higher drug weight fractions (50 and 65%w/w). Finally, the role of polymer in maintaining drug supersaturation has also been explored. It has been found that drug-polymer combinations capable of hydrogen-bonding in the solution state (DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA) are more effective in preventing drug crystallization compared to the drug-polymer systems without such interaction (CNZ-PVP). The DPM-PAA system outperformed all other ASDs in various stability conditions (dry-state, in

  11. Flood hazard and management: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, Howard S

    2006-08-15

    This paper discusses whether flood hazard in the UK is increasing and considers issues of flood risk management. Urban development is known to increase fluvial flood frequency, hence design measures are routinely implemented to minimize the impact. Studies suggest that historical effects, while potentially large at small scale, are not significant for large river basins. Storm water flooding within the urban environment is an area where flood hazard is inadequately defined; new methods are needed to assess and manage flood risk. Development on flood plains has led to major capital expenditure on flood protection, but government is attempting to strengthen the planning role of the environmental regulator to prevent this. Rural land use management has intensified significantly over the past 30 years, leading to concerns that flood risk has increased, at least at local scale; the implications for catchment-scale flooding are unclear. New research is addressing this issue, and more broadly, the role of land management in reducing flood risk. Climate change impacts on flooding and current guidelines for UK practice are reviewed. Large uncertainties remain, not least for the occurrence of extreme precipitation, but precautionary guidance is in place. Finally, current levels of flood protection are discussed. Reassessment of flood hazard has led to targets for increased flood protection, but despite important developments to communicate flood risk to the public, much remains to be done to increase public awareness of flood hazard.

  12. Somerset County Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  13. Lateral Flooding Associated to Wave Flood Generation on River Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Núñez, C.; Parrot, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    This research provides a wave flood simulation using a high resolution LiDAR Digital Terrain Model. The simulation is based on the generation of waves of different amplitudes that modify the river level in such a way that water invades the adjacent areas. The proposed algorithm firstly reconstitutes the original river surface of the studied river section and then defines the percentage of water loss when the wave floods move downstream. This procedure was applied to a gently slope area in the lower basin of Coatzacoalcos river, Veracruz (Mexico) defining the successive areas where lateral flooding occurs on its downstream movement.

  14. Mathematical and numerical analysis of a multi-velocity multi-fluid model for interpenetration of miscible fluids; Analyse mathematique et numerique d'un modele multifluide multivitesse pour l'interpenetration de fluides miscibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enaux, C

    2007-11-15

    The simulation of indirect laser implosion requires an accurate knowledge of the inter-penetration of the laser target materials turned into plasma. This work is devoted to the study of a multi-velocity multi-fluid model recently proposed by Scannapieco and Cheng (SC) to describe the inter-penetration of miscible fluids. In this document, we begin with presenting the SC model in the context of miscible fluids flow modelling. Afterwards, the mathematical analysis of the model is carried out (study of the hyperbolicity, existence of a strictly convex mathematical entropy, asymptotic analysis and diffusion limit). As a conclusion the problem is well set. Then, we focus on the problem of numerical resolution of systems of conservation laws with a relaxation source term, because SC model belongs to this class. The main difficulty of this task is to capture on a coarse grid the asymptotic behaviour of the system when the source term is stiff. The main contribution of this work lies in the proposition of a new technique, allowing us to construct a Lagrangian numerical flux taking into account the presence of the source term. This technique is applied first on the model-problem of a one-dimensional Euler system with friction, and then on the multi-fluid SC model. In both cases, we prove that the new scheme is asymptotic-preserving and entropic under a CFL-like condition. The two-dimensional extension of the scheme is done by using a standard alternate directions method. Some numerical results highlight the contribution of the new flux, compared with a standard Lagrange plus Remap scheme where the source term is processed using an operator splitting. (author)

  15. Socio-hydrological flood models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendrecht, Marlies; Viglione, Alberto; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Long-term feedbacks between humans and floods may lead to complex phenomena such as coping strategies, levee effects, call effects, adaptation effects, and poverty traps. Such phenomena cannot be represented by traditional flood risk approaches that are based on scenarios. Instead, dynamic models of the coupled human-flood interactions are needed. These types of models should include both social and hydrological variables as well as other relevant variables, such as economic, environmental, political or technical, in order to adequately represent the feedbacks and processes that are of importance in human-flood systems. These socio-hydrological models may play an important role in integrated flood risk management by exploring a wider range of possible futures, including unexpected phenomena, than is possible by creating and studying scenarios. New insights might come to light about the long term effects of certain measures on society and the natural system. Here we discuss a dynamic framework for flood risk and review the models that are presented in literature. We propose a way forward for socio-hydrological modelling of the human-flood system.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. IR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela); Synthesis and Biotics Div., Indian Oil Corp., Research and Development Center, Haryana (India); Leon, V.; Materano, A.D.S.; Ilzins, O.A.; Galindo-Castro, I.; Fuenmayor, S.L. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela)

    2006-03-15

    We characterized a newly isolated bacterium, designated as IR1, with respect to its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to produce biosurfactants. Isolated IR1 was identified as Pseudomonas putida by analysis of 16S rRNA sequences (99.6% homology). It was capable of utilizing two-, three- and four-ring PAHs but not hexadecane and octadecane as a sole carbon and energy source. PCR and DNA hybridization studies showed that enzymes involved in PAH metabolism were related to the naphthalene dioxygenase pathway. Observation of both tensio-active and emulsifying activities indicated that biosurfactants were produced by IR1 during growth on both water miscible and immiscible substrates. The biosurfactants lowered the surface tension of medium from 54.9 dN cm{sup -1} to 35.4 dN cm{sup -1} and formed a stable and compact emulsion with an emulsifying activity of 74% with diesel oil, when grown on dextrose. These findings indicate that this isolate may be useful for bioremediation of sites contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.)

  17. Miscible transfer of solute in different types of rough fractures: from random to multiscale fracture walls heights

    CERN Document Server

    Auradou, Harold; Chertcoff, Ricardo; D'Angelo, Maria Veronica; Hulin, Jean-Pierre; Ippolito, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Miscible tracer dispersion measurements in transparent model fractures with different types of wall roughness are reported. The nature (Fickian or not) of dispersion is determined by studying variations of the mixing front as a function of the traveled distance but also as a function of the lateral scale over which the tracer concentration is averaged. The dominant convective dispersion mechanisms (velocity profile in the gap, velocity variations in the fracture plane) are established by comparing measurements using Newtonian and shear thinning fluids. For small monodisperse rugosities, front spreading is diffusive with a dominant geometrical dispersion (dispersion coefficient $D \\propto Pe$) at low P\\'eclet numbers $Pe$; at higher $Pe$ values one has either $D \\propto Pe^2$ ({\\it i.e.} Taylor dispersion) for obstacles of height smaller than the gap or $D \\propto Pe^{1.35}$ for obstacles bridging the gap. For a self affine multiscale roughness like in actual rocks and a relative shear displacement $\\vec{\\delt...

  18. Spin-dipole oscillation and polarizability of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate near the miscible-immiscible phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienaimé, Tom; Fava, Eleonora; Colzi, Giacomo; Mordini, Carmelo; Serafini, Simone; Qu, Chunlei; Stringari, Sandro; Lamporesi, Giacomo; Ferrari, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    We report on the measurement of the spin-dipole (SD) polarizability and of the frequency of the SD oscillation of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms occupying the |3 2S1 /2,F =1 ,mF=±1 > hyperfine states. This binary spin mixture presents the important properties of being, at the same time, fully miscible and rid of the limit set by buoyancy. It is also characterized by a huge enhancement of the SD polarizability and by the consequent softening of the frequency of the SD oscillation, due to the vicinity to the transition to the immiscible phase. The experimental data are successfully compared with the predictions of theory.

  19. Microstructure Evolution in a Rapidly Solidified Cu85Fe15 Alloy Undercooled into the Metastable Miscibility Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie HE; Jiuzhou ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    A model has been developed to describe the microstructure evolution in the atomized droplets of Cu-Fe alloy during cooling through the metastable miscibility gap. Calculations have been performed for Cu85Fe15 alloy to investigate the process of liquid-liquid phase transformation. The numerical results indicate that the minority phase droplets are nucleated in a temperature region around the peak of the supersaturation. The average radius of the Fe-rich droplets decreases and the number density of the minority phase droplets increases with decreasing the atomized droplet size.The simulated results were compared with the experimental ones. The kinetic process of the liquid-liquid phase transformation was discussed in detail.

  20. From flood management systems to flood resilient systems: integration of flood resilient technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagnac, J.-L.; Diez, J.; Tourbier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flooding has always been a major risk world-wide. Humans chose to live and develop settlements close to water (rivers, seas) due to the resources water brings, i.e. food, energy, capacity to economically transport persons and goods, and recreation. However, the risk from flooding, including pluvial flooding, often offsets these huge advantages. Floods sometimes have terrible consequences from both a human and economic point of view. The permanence and growth of urban areas in flood-prone zones despite these risks is a clear indication of the choices of concerned human groups. The observed growing concentration of population along the sea shore, the increase of urban population worldwide, the exponential growth of the world population and possibly climate change are factors that confirm flood will remain a major issue for the next decades. Flood management systems are designed and implemented to cope with such situations. In spite of frequent events, lessons look to be difficult to draw out and progresses are rather slow. The list of potential triggers to improve flood management systems is nevertheless well established: information, education, awareness raising, alert, prevention, protection, feedback from events, ... Many disciplines are concerned which cover a wide range of soft and hard sciences. A huge amount of both printed and electronic literature is available. Regulations are abundant. In spite of all these potentially favourable elements, similar questions spring up after each new significant event: • Was the event forecast precise enough? • Was the alert system efficient? • Why were buildings built in identified flood prone areas? • Why did the concerned population not follow instructions? • Why did the dike break? • What should we do to avoid it happens again? • What about damages evaluation, wastes and debris evacuation, infrastructures and buildings repair, activity recovery, temporary relocation of inhabitants, health concerns, insurance

  1. Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tahhan, Antonio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Muchmore, Cody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nichols, Larinda [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bhandari, Bishwo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pope, Chad [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the work that has been performed on flooding fragility, both the experimental tests being carried out and the probabilistic fragility predictive models being produced in order to use the text results. Flooding experiments involving full-scale doors have commenced in the Portal Evaluation Tank. The goal of these experiments is to develop a full-scale component flooding experiment protocol and to acquire data that can be used to create Bayesian regression models representing the fragility of these components. This work is in support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway external hazards evaluation research and development.

  2. Highly pressurized partially miscible liquid-liquid flow in a micro-T-junction. I. Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning; Wen, John Z.; Ren, Carolyn L.

    2017-04-01

    This is the first part of a two-part study on a partially miscible liquid-liquid flow (liquid carbon dioxide and deionized water) which is highly pressurized and confined in a microfluidic T-junction. Our main focuses are to understand the flow regimes as a result of varying flow conditions and investigate the characteristics of drop flow distinct from coflow, with a capillary number, C ac , that is calculated based on the continuous liquid, ranging from 10-3 to 10-2 (10-4 for coflow). Here in part I, we present our experimental observation of drop formation cycle by tracking drop length, spacing, frequency, and after-generation speed using high-speed video and image analysis. The drop flow is chronologically composed of a stagnating and filling stage, an elongating and squeezing stage, and a truncating stage. The common "necking" time during the elongating and squeezing stage (with C ac˜10-3 ) for the truncation of the dispersed liquid stream is extended, and the truncation point is subsequently shifted downstream from the T-junction corner. This temporal postponement effect modifies the scaling function reported in the literature for droplet formation with two immiscible fluids. Our experimental measurements also demonstrate the drop speed immediately following their generations can be approximated by the mean velocity from averaging the total flow rate over the channel cross section. Further justifications of the quantitative analysis by considering the mass transfer at the interface of the two partially miscible fluids are provided in part II.

  3. Melting and crystallization behavior of partially miscible high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (HDPE/EVA) blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang; Zou, Huawei, E-mail: hwzou@163.com; Liang, Mei, E-mail: liangmeiww@163.com; Cao, Ya

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • HDPE/EVA blends undergo phase separation, making it an interesting topic to investigate the relationships between miscibility and crystallization. • Influences from blending on the crystallization kinetics were successfully evaluated by Friedman's and Khanna's method. • X-ray diffraction studies revealed that blending with EVA the unit length of the unit cell of the HDPE increases. • Thermal fractionation method was successfully used to characterize the co-crystallization in HDPE/EVA blends. - Abstract: Crystallization studies on HDPE/EVA blends and the individual components were performed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). Influences of blending on the crystallization kinetics of each component in HDPE/EVA mixture were evaluated by Friedman's activation energy and Khanna's crystallization rate coefficient (CRC). The addition of more HDPE into the EVA matrix causes more heterogeneous nucleation while the addition of EVA would hinder the nucleation of HDPE at the beginning of cooling process. Inter-molecular interaction in the melt facilitated the crystallization of both EVA and HDPE components. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that HDPE and EVA have orthorhombic unit cell. Blending with EVA did not affect the crystalline structure of HDPE. In addition, a little shift of (1 1 0), (2 0 0) and (0 2 0) crystalline peaks toward lower 2θ values of samples indicating a little increase of unit cell parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell of polyethylene. Thermal fractionation results showed that co-crystallization took place in the HDPE/EVA blend. All those results indicated that the polymer pair we choose was partially miscible.

  4. Adaptive flood risk management in urban areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, H.L.P.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Runhaar, H.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent times a shift has occurred from traditional flood management focused on the prevention of flooding (reduction of the probability) only, to more adaptive strategies focused on the reduction of the impacts of floods as a means to improve the resilience of occupied flood plains to increased r

  5. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Flood Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Bruce D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes events leading to a flood in the Wehr Chemistry Laboratory at Marquette University, discussing steps taken to minimize damage upon discovery. Analyzes the problem of flooding in the chemical laboratory and outlines seven steps of flood control: prevention; minimization; early detection; stopping the flood; evaluation; clean-up; and…

  6. Local Flood Action Groups: Governance And Resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrest, Steven; Trell, Elen-Maarja; Woltjer, Johan; Macoun, Milan; Maier, Karel

    2015-01-01

    A diverse range of citizen groups focusing on flood risk management have been identified in several European countries. The paper discusses the role of flood action (citizen) groups in the context of flood resilience and will do this by analysing the UK and its diverse range of flood groups. These c

  7. Flood damage, vulnerability and risk perception - challenges for flood damage research

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in flood damage analysis mainly focuses on the economic evaluation of tangible flood effects. It is contended in this discussion paper that important economic, social and ecological aspects of flood-related vulnerabilities are neglected. It is a challenge for flood research to develop a wider perspective for flood damage evaluation.

  8. A Framework for Flood Risk Analysis and Benefit Assessment of Flood Control Measures in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaochao; Cheng, Xiaotao; Li, Na; Du, Xiaohe; Yu, Qian; Kan, Guangyuan

    2016-08-05

    Flood risk analysis is more complex in urban areas than that in rural areas because of their closely packed buildings, different kinds of land uses, and large number of flood control works and drainage systems. The purpose of this paper is to propose a practical framework for flood risk analysis and benefit assessment of flood control measures in urban areas. Based on the concept of disaster risk triangle (hazard, vulnerability and exposure), a comprehensive analysis method and a general procedure were proposed for urban flood risk analysis. Urban Flood Simulation Model (UFSM) and Urban Flood Damage Assessment Model (UFDAM) were integrated to estimate the flood risk in the Pudong flood protection area (Shanghai, China). S-shaped functions were adopted to represent flood return period and damage (R-D) curves. The study results show that flood control works could significantly reduce the flood risk within the 66-year flood return period and the flood risk was reduced by 15.59%. However, the flood risk was only reduced by 7.06% when the flood return period exceeded 66-years. Hence, it is difficult to meet the increasing demands for flood control solely relying on structural measures. The R-D function is suitable to describe the changes of flood control capacity. This frame work can assess the flood risk reduction due to flood control measures, and provide crucial information for strategy development and planning adaptation.

  9. Urban flood risk assessment using sewer flooding databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Granger, Damien; Chapgier, Jean; Cherqui, Frédéric; Chocat, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Sustainable water management is a global challenge for the 21st century. One key aspect remains protection against urban flooding. The main objective is to ensure or maintain an adequate level of service for all inhabitants. However, level of service is still difficult to assess and the high-risk locations difficult to identify. In this article, we propose a methodology, which (i) allows water managers to measure the service provided by the urban drainage system with regard to protection against urban flooding; and (ii) helps stakeholders to determine effective strategies for improving the service provided. One key aspect of this work is to use a database of sewer flood event records to assess flood risk. Our methodology helps urban water managers to assess the risk of sewer flooding; this approach does not seek to predict flooding but rather to inform decision makers on the current level of risk and on actions which need to be taken to reduce the risk. This work is based on a comprehensive definition of risk, including territorial vulnerability and perceptions of urban water stakeholders. This paper presents the results and the methodological contributions from implementing the methodology on two case studies: the cities of Lyon and Mulhouse.

  10. Flood Progression Modelling and Impact Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Nickerson, B.

    People living in the lower valley of the St. John River, New Brunswick, Canada, frequently experience flooding when the river overflows its banks during spring ice melt and rain. To better prepare the population of New Brunswick for extreme flooding, we developed a new flood prediction model...... that computes floodplain polygons before the flood occurs. This allows emergency managers to access the impact of the flood before it occurs and make the early decisions for evacuation of the population and flood rescue. This research shows that the use of GIS and LiDAR technologies combined with hydrological...... modelling can significantly improve the decision making and visualization of flood impact needed for emergency planning and flood rescue. Furthermore, the 3D GIS application we developed for modelling flooded buildings and infrastructure provides a better platform for modelling and visualizing flood...

  11. Smoky River coal flood risk mapping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    The Canada-Alberta Flood Damage Reduction Program (FDRP) is designed to reduce flood damage by identifying areas susceptible to flooding and by encouraging application of suitable land use planning, zoning, and flood preparedness and proofing. The purpose of this study is to define flood risk and floodway limits along the Smoky River near the former Smoky River Coal (SRC) plant. Alberta Energy has been responsible for the site since the mine and plant closed in 2000. The study describes flooding history, available data, features of the river and valley, calculation of flood levels, and floodway determination, and includes flood risk maps. The HEC-RAS program is used for the calculations. The flood risk area was calculated using the 1:100 year return period flood as the hydrological event. 7 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs., 3 apps.

  12. Flood Resilient Systems and their Application for Flood Resilient Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, N.; Gabalda, V.; Antanaskovic, D.; Gershovich, I.; Pasche, E.

    2012-04-01

    Following the paradigm shift in flood management from traditional to more integrated approaches, and considering the uncertainties of future development due to drivers such as climate change, one of the main emerging tasks of flood managers becomes the development of (flood) resilient cities. It can be achieved by application of non-structural - flood resilience measures, summarised in the 4As: assistance, alleviation, awareness and avoidance (FIAC, 2007). As a part of this strategy, the key aspect of development of resilient cities - resilient built environment can be reached by efficient application of Flood Resilience Technology (FReT) and its meaningful combination into flood resilient systems (FRS). FRS are given as [an interconnecting network of FReT which facilitates resilience (including both restorative and adaptive capacity) to flooding, addressing physical and social systems and considering different flood typologies] (SMARTeST, http://www.floodresilience.eu/). Applying the system approach (e.g. Zevenbergen, 2008), FRS can be developed at different scales from the building to the city level. Still, a matter of research is a method to define and systematise different FRS crossing those scales. Further, the decision on which resilient system is to be applied for the given conditions and given scale is a complex task, calling for utilisation of decision support tools. This process of decision-making should follow the steps of flood risk assessment (1) and development of a flood resilience plan (2) (Manojlovic et al, 2009). The key problem in (2) is how to match the input parameters that describe physical&social system and flood typology to the appropriate flood resilient system. Additionally, an open issue is how to integrate the advances in FReT and findings on its efficiency into decision support tools. This paper presents a way to define, systematise and make decisions on FRS at different scales of an urban system developed within the 7th FP Project

  13. Evaluation of miscibility of poly(epichlorohydrin-co-ethylene oxide) and poly(methylmethacrylate) blends; Avaliacao da miscibilidade de blendas de poli(epicloridrina-co-oxido de etileno) e poli(metacrilato de metila)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchete, Renato; Felisberti, Maria Isabel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1999-07-01

    The miscibility of blends of poly(methylmethacrylate), (PMMA) and poly(epichlorohydrin-co-ethylene oxide), (ECO) were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The ECO was fractionated using two different systems: a solvent-non solvent system and by cooling the solution in tetrahydrofuran in the temperature range from 20 to 0 deg C. The fractions with different composition and molecular weight were used to prepare the blends by casting from solution in tetrahydrofuran. The blends exhibit two glass transitions shifted in relation to the glass transitions of the pure polymers, indicating a partial miscibility. Blends containing copolymer richer in epichlorohydrin segments were more miscible than blends of non-fractionated ECO. (author)

  14. Flood Fighting Products Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A wave research basin at the ERDC Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory has been modified specifically for testing of temporary, barrier-type, flood fighting products....

  15. Cyber surveillance for flood disasters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-01-01

    ... river areas and sections. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an easy method to automatically monitor the flood object of a specific area, based on the currently widely used remote cyber surveillance systems and image...

  16. Flash floods: forecasting and warning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sene, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    .... Floods of this type are often characterised by fast flowing deep water and a high debris content which - combined with the short lead time available for warnings - add to the risk to people and property...

  17. FEMA Flood Insurance Studies Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital data set provides an inventory of Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Studies (FIS) that have been conducted for communities and...

  18. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  19. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  20. NASA's Support to Flood Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. S.; Murray, J. J.; Stough, T.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of flood and inundation, the impacts on people and infrastructure, and generally the situational awareness on all scales for decision making are areas where NASA is mobilizing scientific results, advanced sensing and technologies, experts and partnerships to support response. NASA has targeted mature application science and ready technology for flood and inundation monitoring and assessment. This includes supporting timely data management and product dissemination with users and partners. Requirements are captured in the form of science-area questions, while solutions measure readiness for use by considering standard tools and approaches that make information more accessible, interoperable, understandable and reliable. The program collaborates with capacity building and areas of education and outreach needed to create and leverage non-traditional partnerships in transdisciplinary areas including socio-economic practice, preparedness and resilience assessment, early warning and forecast response, and emergency management, relief and recovery. The program outcomes also seek alignment with and support to global and community priorities related to water resources and food security. This presentation will examine the achievements of individual projects and the challenges and opportunities of more comprehensive and collaborative teams behind NASA's response to global flooding. Examples from recent event mobilization will be reviewed including to the serious of domestic floods across the south and Midwest United States throughout 2015 and 2016. Progress on the combined use of optical, microwave and SAR remote sensing measurements, topographic and geodetic data and mapping, data sharing practices will be reviewed. Other response case studies will examine global flood events monitored, characterized and supported in various boundary regions and nations. Achievements and future plans will be described for capabilities including global flood modeling, near real

  1. Elk River Watershed - Flood Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. C.; Byrne, J. M.; MacDonald, R. J.; Lewis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding has the potential to cause significant impacts to economic activities as well as to disrupt or displace populations. Changing climate regimes such as extreme precipitation events increase flood vulnerability and put additional stresses on infrastructure. Potential flooding from just under 100 (2009 NPRI Reviewed Facility Data Release, Environment Canada) toxic tailings ponds located in Canada increase risk to human safety and the environment. One such geotechnical failure spilt billions of litres of toxic tailings into the Fraser River watershed, British Columbia, when a tailings pond dam breach occurred in August 2014. Damaged and washed out roadways cut access to essential services as seen by the extensive floods that occurred in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in July 2014, and in Southern Alberta in 2013. Recovery efforts from events such as these can be lengthy, and have substantial social and economic impacts both in loss of revenue and cost of repair. The objective of this study is to investigate existing conditions in the Elk River watershed and model potential future hydrological changes that can increase flood risk hazards. By analyzing existing hydrology, meteorology, land cover, land use, economic, and settlement patterns a baseline is established for existing conditions in the Elk River watershed. Coupling the Generate Earth Systems Science (GENESYS) high-resolution spatial hydrometeorological model with flood hazard analysis methodology, high-resolution flood vulnerability base line maps are created using historical climate conditions. Further work in 2015 will examine possible impacts for a range of climate change and land use change scenarios to define changes to future flood risk and vulnerability.

  2. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  3. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  4. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  5. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  6. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  7. Extreme flooding tolerance in Rorippa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Melis; Bhikharie, Amit; Mustroph, Angelika; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen stress imposed by floods creates a strong selection force shaping plant ecosystems in flood-prone areas. Plants inhabiting these environments adopt various adaptations and survival strategies to cope with increasing water depths. Two Rorippa species, R. sylvestris and R. amphibia that grow in naturally flooded areas, have high submergence tolerance achieved by the so-called quiescence and escape strategies, respectively. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in these strategies, we investigated submergence-induced changes in gene expression in flooded roots of Rorippa species. There was a higher induction of glycolysis and fermentation genes and faster carbohydrate reduction in R. amphibia, indicating a higher demand for energy potentially leading to faster mortality by starvation. Moreover, R. sylvestris showed induction of genes improving submergence tolerance, potentially enhancing survival in prolonged floods. Additionally, we compared transcript profiles of these 2 tolerant species to relatively intolerant Arabidopsis and found that only Rorippa species induced various inorganic pyrophosphate dependent genes, alternatives to ATP demanding pathways, thereby conserving energy, and potentially explaining the difference in flooding survival between Rorippa and Arabidopsis.

  8. FLOODING ATTACK AWARE SECURE AODV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Madhavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing security in a Mobile Ad hoc Network (MANET is a challenging task due to its inherent nature. Flooding is a type of Denial of Service (DoS attack in MANET. Intentional flooding may lead to disturbances in the networking operation. This kind of attack consumes battery power, storage space and bandwidth. Flooding the excessive number of packets may degrade the performance of the network. This study considers hello flooding attack. As the hello packets are continuously flooded by the malicious node, the neighbor node is not able to process other packets. The functioning of the legitimate node is diverted and destroys the networking operation. Absence of hello packet during the periodical hello interval may lead to wrong assumption that the neighbor node has moved away. So one of the intermediate neighbor nodes sends Route Error (RERR message and the source node reinitiates the route discovery process. In a random fashion the hello interval values are changed and convey this information to other nodes in the network in a secured manner. This study identifies and prevents the flooding attack. This methodology considers the performance parameters such as packet delivery ratio, delay and throughput. This algorithm is implemented in Secure AODV and tested in ad hoc environment. The result of the proposed algorithm decreases the control overhead by 2%.

  9. Scales of Natural Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; Owen, Gareth; Hetherington, David; Piedra Lara, Miguel; O'Donnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    The scientific field of Natural flood Management (NFM) is receiving much attention and is now widely seen as a valid solution to sustainably manage flood risk whilst offering significant multiple benefits. However, few examples exist looking at NFM on a large scale (>10km2). Well-implemented NFM has the effect of restoring more natural catchment hydrological and sedimentological processes, which in turn can have significant flood risk and WFD benefits for catchment waterbodies. These catchment scale improvements in-turn allow more 'natural' processes to be returned to rivers and streams, creating a more resilient system. Although certain NFM interventions may appear distant and disconnected from main stem waterbodies, they will undoubtedly be contributing to WFD at the catchment waterbody scale. This paper offers examples of NFM, and explains how they can be maximised through practical design across many scales (from feature up to the whole catchment). New tools to assist in the selection of measures and their location, and to appreciate firstly, the flooding benefit at the local catchment scale and then show a Flood Impact Model that can best reflect the impacts of local changes further downstream. The tools will be discussed in the context of our most recent experiences on NFM projects including river catchments in the north east of England and in Scotland. This work has encouraged a more integrated approach to flood management planning that can use both traditional and novel NFM strategies in an effective and convincing way.

  10. Cyber Surveillance for Flood Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Lo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional heavy rainfall is usually caused by the influence of extreme weather conditions. Instant heavy rainfall often results in the flooding of rivers and the neighboring low-lying areas, which is responsible for a large number of casualties and considerable property loss. The existing precipitation forecast systems mostly focus on the analysis and forecast of large-scale areas but do not provide precise instant automatic monitoring and alert feedback for individual river areas and sections. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an easy method to automatically monitor the flood object of a specific area, based on the currently widely used remote cyber surveillance systems and image processing methods, in order to obtain instant flooding and waterlogging event feedback. The intrusion detection mode of these surveillance systems is used in this study, wherein a flood is considered a possible invasion object. Through the detection and verification of flood objects, automatic flood risk-level monitoring of specific individual river segments, as well as the automatic urban inundation detection, has become possible. The proposed method can better meet the practical needs of disaster prevention than the method of large-area forecasting. It also has several other advantages, such as flexibility in location selection, no requirement of a standard water-level ruler, and a relatively large field of view, when compared with the traditional water-level measurements using video screens. The results can offer prompt reference for appropriate disaster warning actions in small areas, making them more accurate and effective.

  11. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  12. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  13. Understanding the effects of past flood events and perceived and estimated flood risks on individuals' voluntary flood insurance purchase behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wanyun; Xian, Siyuan; Lin, Ning; Kunreuther, Howard; Jackson, Nida; Goidel, Kirby

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the economic damage from flooding in the coastal areas has greatly increased due to rapid coastal development coupled with possible climate change impacts. One effective way to mitigate excessive economic losses from flooding is to purchase flood insurance. Only a minority of coastal residents however have taken this preventive measure. Using original survey data for all coastal counties of the United States Gulf Coast merged with contextual data, this study examines the effects of external influences and perceptions of flood-related risks on individuals' voluntary behaviors to purchase flood insurance. It is found that the estimated flood hazard conveyed through the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) flood maps, the intensities and consequences of past storms and flooding events, and perceived flood-related risks significantly affect individual's voluntary purchase of flood insurance. This behavior is also influenced by home ownership, trust in local government, education, and income. These findings have several important policy implications. First, FEMA's flood maps have been effective in conveying local flood risks to coastal residents, and correspondingly influencing their decisions to voluntarily seek flood insurance in the U.S. Gulf Coast. Flood maps therefore should be updated frequently to reflect timely and accurate information about flood hazards. Second, policy makers should design strategies to increase homeowners' trust in the local government, to better communicate flood risks with residents, to address the affordability issue for the low-income, and better inform less educated homeowners through various educational programs. Future studies should examine the voluntary flood insurance behavior across countries that are vulnerable to flooding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Beyond Flood Hazard Maps: Detailed Flood Characterization with Remote Sensing, GIS and 2d Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, J. R.; Marqueso, J. T.; Makinano-Santillan, M.; Serviano, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Flooding is considered to be one of the most destructive among many natural disasters such that understanding floods and assessing the risks associated to it are becoming more important nowadays. In the Philippines, Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) are two main technologies used in the nationwide modelling and mapping of flood hazards. Although the currently available high resolution flood hazard maps have become very valuable, their use for flood preparedness and mitigation can be maximized by enhancing the layers of information these maps portrays. In this paper, we present an approach based on RS, GIS and two-dimensional (2D) flood modelling to generate new flood layers (in addition to the usual flood depths and hazard layers) that are also very useful in flood disaster management such as flood arrival times, flood velocities, flood duration, flood recession times, and the percentage within a given flood event period a particular location is inundated. The availability of these new layers of flood information are crucial for better decision making before, during, and after occurrence of a flood disaster. The generation of these new flood characteristic layers is illustrated using the Cabadbaran River Basin in Mindanao, Philippines as case study area. It is envisioned that these detailed maps can be considered as additional inputs in flood disaster risk reduction and management in the Philippines.

  15. BEYOND FLOOD HAZARD MAPS: DETAILED FLOOD CHARACTERIZATION WITH REMOTE SENSING, GIS AND 2D MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Santillan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Flooding is considered to be one of the most destructive among many natural disasters such that understanding floods and assessing the risks associated to it are becoming more important nowadays. In the Philippines, Remote Sensing (RS and Geographic Information System (GIS are two main technologies used in the nationwide modelling and mapping of flood hazards. Although the currently available high resolution flood hazard maps have become very valuable, their use for flood preparedness and mitigation can be maximized by enhancing the layers of information these maps portrays. In this paper, we present an approach based on RS, GIS and two-dimensional (2D flood modelling to generate new flood layers (in addition to the usual flood depths and hazard layers that are also very useful in flood disaster management such as flood arrival times, flood velocities, flood duration, flood recession times, and the percentage within a given flood event period a particular location is inundated. The availability of these new layers of flood information are crucial for better decision making before, during, and after occurrence of a flood disaster. The generation of these new flood characteristic layers is illustrated using the Cabadbaran River Basin in Mindanao, Philippines as case study area. It is envisioned that these detailed maps can be considered as additional inputs in flood disaster risk reduction and management in the Philippines.

  16. Stabilité d'un écoulement miscible radial en milieu poreux : étude théorique et expérimentale Stabilitv of a Radial Miscible Flow in Porous Media: Theoretical and Experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les instabilités de déplacements miscibles radiaux en milieu poreux dues à un contraste de mobilité sont étudiées de manière théorique et expérimentale. Dans une première partie, la mise au point d'un modèle numérique bidimensionnel permet la visualisation mathématique d'une configuration instable. A partir des équations aux perturbations linéarisées, l'étude nous permet d'évaluer l'influence de chacun des paramètres conditionnant la stabilité d'un tel écoulement. Ces résultats, dans la gamme des paramètres étudiés, nous permettent d'établir un critère d'instabilité. La deuxième partie, expérimentale, nous permet de visualiser, grâce à une méthode optique basée sur l'effet Christiansen, des instabilités dues au contraste de mobilité (développement notable de digitations. L'interprétation des résultats expérimentaux est comparée aux prédictions théoriques. The instabilities of radial miscible displacements in porous media due to a mobility contrast are examined theoretically and experimentally. The first part describes a two-dimensional numerical model used for the mathematical visualization of an unstable configuration. On the basis of linearized perturbation equations, we can evaluate the influence of each parameter governing the stability of the displacement. In the range of parameters investigated, these results enable an instability criterion to be established. The second part is experimental. An optical method based on the Christiansen effect is used to visualize instabilities due to mobility contrast (appreciable development of fingerings. The interpretation of the experimental results is compared to theoretical predictions.

  17. Evidence for trends in UK flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Alice J

    2002-07-15

    Recent major flooding in the UK has raised concern that climate change is causing increases in flood frequency and flood magnitude. This paper considers whether UK flood data provide evidence of increasing trends in fluvial floods. The analysis examines both local and national flood series and investigates the effect of climate variability on trend detection. The results suggest that there have been trends towards more protracted high flows over the last 30-50 years, but that this could be accounted for as part of climatic variation rather than climate change. There is no statistical evidence of a long-term trend in flooding over the last 80-120 years. Thus, although climate change could be influencing floods, direct analysis of flood records does not yet provide proof.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  19. Flood risks and willingness to purchase flood insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlinger, M.R.; Attanasi, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulation experiments were conducted to determine the effects of alternative sources of uncertainty on the willingness to pay for flood insurance. Two alternative insurance protection schemes were investigated: coinsurance and fixed coverage. The question investigated is to what extent does the insurance scheme influence how purchasers respond to risks? Floods were assumed to be log normally distributed and the effects on the purchase of insurance of uncertainties in the parameters of the distribution were explored using response surface analysis. Results indicate that fixed coverage insurance provisions shift most of the uncertainty in the physical parameters governing natural disaster occurrences away from the insuree and onto the insurer. The results also show that the form of the damage function has little effect on the demand for flood insurance.- Authors

  20. Uncertainty in flood risk mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luisa M. S.; Fonte, Cidália C.; Gomes, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    A flood refers to a sharp increase of water level or volume in rivers and seas caused by sudden rainstorms or melting ice due to natural factors. In this paper, the flooding of riverside urban areas caused by sudden rainstorms will be studied. In this context, flooding occurs when the water runs above the level of the minor river bed and enters the major river bed. The level of the major bed determines the magnitude and risk of the flooding. The prediction of the flooding extent is usually deterministic, and corresponds to the expected limit of the flooded area. However, there are many sources of uncertainty in the process of obtaining these limits, which influence the obtained flood maps used for watershed management or as instruments for territorial and emergency planning. In addition, small variations in the delineation of the flooded area can be translated into erroneous risk prediction. Therefore, maps that reflect the uncertainty associated with the flood modeling process have started to be developed, associating a degree of likelihood with the boundaries of the flooded areas. In this paper an approach is presented that enables the influence of the parameters uncertainty to be evaluated, dependent on the type of Land Cover Map (LCM) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM), on the estimated values of the peak flow and the delineation of flooded areas (different peak flows correspond to different flood areas). The approach requires modeling the DEM uncertainty and its propagation to the catchment delineation. The results obtained in this step enable a catchment with fuzzy geographical extent to be generated, where a degree of possibility of belonging to the basin is assigned to each elementary spatial unit. Since the fuzzy basin may be considered as a fuzzy set, the fuzzy area of the basin may be computed, generating a fuzzy number. The catchment peak flow is then evaluated using fuzzy arithmetic. With this methodology a fuzzy number is obtained for the peak flow

  1. Play-level distributions of estimates of recovery factors for a miscible carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery method used in oil reservoirs in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2016-03-02

    In a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study, recovery-factor estimates were calculated by using a publicly available reservoir simulator (CO2 Prophet) to estimate how much oil might be recovered with the application of a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method to technically screened oil reservoirs located in onshore and State offshore areas in the conterminous United States. A recovery factor represents the percentage of an oil reservoir’s original oil in place estimated to be recoverable by the application of a miscible CO2-EOR method. The USGS estimates were calculated for 2,018 clastic and 1,681 carbonate candidate reservoirs in the “Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States Database” prepared by Nehring Associates, Inc. (2012).

  2. Play-level distributions of estimates of recovery factors for a miscible carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery method used in oil reservoirs in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2016-03-02

    In a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study, recovery-factor estimates were calculated by using a publicly available reservoir simulator (CO2 Prophet) to estimate how much oil might be recovered with the application of a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method to technically screened oil reservoirs located in onshore and State offshore areas in the conterminous United States. A recovery factor represents the percentage of an oil reservoir’s original oil in place estimated to be recoverable by the application of a miscible CO2-EOR method. The USGS estimates were calculated for 2,018 clastic and 1,681 carbonate candidate reservoirs in the “Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States Database” prepared by Nehring Associates, Inc. (2012).

  3. Accurate Determination of Minimum Miscibility Pressure(MMP)of CO2 -Oil System Using Graphical Alternating Conditional Expectation%利用交替条件变换确定二氧化碳与地层原油体系最小混相压力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于萌; 铁磊磊; 李翔; 徐景亮; 刘文辉; 韩蕊

    2016-01-01

    A new MMP prediction model for CO2 miscibility flooding is established using preparing alternative conditional expectation transform( ACE)program based on the statistical data of the reservoir temperature and the crude oil components such as x( C1 -N2 ), x( C2 -C6 )and M( C7+)of 29 oilfields at home and abroad. The predicted MMP values using the model are highly consistent to experi-mental test values,and to use it can finish the efficient processing of large quantities of data. Compared with the existing empirical for-mulas,the improved model has higher accuracy and stability,the average relative error( ARE)is 5. 22%,and the standard deviation (SD)is 7. 87%. The sensitivity of the influencing factors of MMP of CO2 miscibility flooding is analyzed based on Spielman rank corre-lation coefficient,and it is shown that the mole fraction of C1 -N2 and the reservoir temperature are the main influencing factors of MMP.%在对国内外29个典型油田的油藏温度、原油组分( C1-N2、C2-C6、M( C7+))进行数理统计的基础上,通过编制交替条件期望变换( ACE)程序,建立了新的MMP(最小混相压力)预测模型。结果表明:基于ACE方法建立的MMP预测关联式与实验测试值吻合程度较高,且能够高效处理大批量数据。与现有经验公式对比表明:改进模型比其他模型具有更高的计算精度和稳定性,平均相对误差( ARE )为5.22%,标准差(SD)为7.87%。另外,基于斯皮尔曼等级相关系数对各影响因素进行敏感性分析,表明C1-N2的摩尔分数和温度是影响MMP的主要因素。

  4. Flood Loss Model for Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punčochář, P.; Podlaha, A.

    2012-04-01

    A new flood model for Austria quantifying fluvial flood losses based on probabilistic event set developed by Impact Forecasting (Aon Benfield's model development centre) was released in June 2011. It was successfully validated with two serious past flood events - August 2002 and August 2005. The model is based on 10 meters cell size digital terrain model with 1cm vertical step and uses daily mean flows from 548 gauge stations of series of average length ~ 60 years. The even set is based on monthly maxima flows correlation, generating 12 stochastic events per year and allows to calculate annual and occurrence exceedance probability loss estimates. The model contains flood extents for more than 24,000 km of modelled river network compatible with HORA project (HOchwasserRisikoflächen Austria) for design flows ranging from 2 to 10,000 years. Model is primarily constructed to work with postal level resolution insurance data reducing positional uncertainty by weighting over more than 2.5 millions address points from Austria Post's ACGeo database. Countrywide flood protections were provided by the Austrian Ministry of Environment. The model was successfully tested with property portfolios of 8 global and local insurance companies and was also successfully validated with August 2002 and August 2005 past events evaluating their return period on the probabilistic simulation basis.

  5. King Tide floods in Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-C.; Ho, C.-R.; Cheng, Y.-H.

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of sea level rise present regional floods in some certain areas. The low-lying island countries are obviously the spots affected severely. Tuvalu, an atoll island country located in the south-west Pacific Ocean, is suffering the devastating effects of losing life, property, and intending migration caused by floods. They blame the regional flooding to King Tide, a term used but not clearly identified by Pacific islanders. In this study, we clarify what King Tide is first. By the tide gauge and topography data, we estimated the reasonable value of 3.2 m as the threshold of King Tide. This definition also fits to the statement by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of King Tide occurring once or twice a year. In addition, We cross validate the 19 yr data of tide gauge and satellite altimeter (1993-2012), the correlation coefficient indicates King Tide phenomenon is considerable connected to warm water mass. The 28 King Tide events revealed the fact that flooding can be referenced against spring tide levels, so can it be turned up by warm water mass. The warm water mass pushes up sea level; once spring tide, storm surge, or other climate variability overlaps it, the rising sea level might overflow and so has been called "King Tide" for the floods in Tuvalu. This study provides more understanding of the signals of King Tide and an island country case study of regional sea level rise.

  6. Flood hazard and flood risk assessment at the local spatial scale: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Vojtek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to minimizing flood damage, there are measures of different character each of which has its justification and plays an important role in flood protection. Implementation of traditional flood protection measures is still very important; however, an increasing role should be played particularly by flood prevention and flood risk management. The paper presents a case study on flood hazard and flood risk assessment at the local spatial scale using geographic information systems, remote sensing, and hydraulic modelling. As for determining flood hazard in the model area, which has 3.23 km2, the estimation of maximum flood discharges and hydraulic modelling were important steps. The results of one-dimensional hydraulic modelling, which are water depth and flow velocity rasters, were the basis for determining flood hazard and flood risk. In order to define flood risk, the following steps were applied: determining flood intensity on the basis of water depth and flow velocity rasters, determining flood hazard using three categories (low, medium, and high based on flood intensity, defining vulnerability for the classes of functional areas using three categories of acceptable risk (low, medium, and high, and lastly determination of flood risk which represents a synthesis of flood hazard and vulnerability of the model area.

  7. 高分子合金膜体系的相容性%Polymer blend miscibility and compatibility study for polymer alloy membrane material modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙本惠

    2011-01-01

    Polymer alloy technologies enable two or more polymers to be combined to realize new properties and levels of performance that were not possible with the individual polymers themselves. Therefore, they have become the most feasible and effective methods to realize the modification of polymeric membrane materials. The miscibility and compatibility of the various polymeric components, and thus the formation of homogenious phase to multiphase systems in casting solution play a decisive role in influencing the physical properties of the membranes prepared from it. In this article, the principles of thermodynamic to evaluate the miscibility and compatibility between polymers in polymer blend or alloy systems were thoroughly reviewed and discussed, including the basic theory and models for polymer miscibility study, the analysis of the ternary phase diagram of polymer A-polymer Insolvent mixture system, the thermodynamics of polymer blend phase separation during phase inversion, the critical phase separation condition, and the theoretical prediction of the polymer blend miscibility and compatibility.%高分子膜材料的合金化是最为简便有效的膜材料改性方法,不同聚合物之间的相容性是决定高分子合金膜物理性质的关键因素.文章讨论了涉及高分子合金膜体系相容性的几个主要热力学基础问题,包括两组分聚合物相容性的相图分析、高分子共混物在相转化过程中发生相分离的热力学、相分离的临界条件、高分子合金体系相容性的理论预测.

  8. An investigation into the influence of drug-polymer interactions on the miscibility, processability and structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone-based hot melt extrusion formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siok-Yee; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2015-12-30

    While hot melt extrusion is now established within the pharmaceutical industry, the prediction of miscibility, processability and structural stability remains a pertinent issue, including the issue of whether molecular interaction is necessary for suitable performance. Here we integrate the use of theoretical and experimental drug-polymer interaction assessment with determination of processability and structure of dispersions in two polyvinylpyrrolidone-based polymers (PVP and PVP vinyl acetate, PVPVA). Caffeine and paracetamol were chosen as model drugs on the basis of their differing hydrogen bonding potential with PVP. Solubility parameter and interaction parameter calculations predicted a greater miscibility for paracetamol, while ATR-FTIR confirmed the hydrogen bonding propensity of the paracetamol with both polymers, with little interaction detected for caffeine. PVP was found to exhibit greater interaction and miscibility with paracetamol than did PVPVA. It was noted that lower processing temperatures (circa 40°C below the Tg of the polymer alone and Tm of the crystalline drug) and higher drug loadings with associated molecular dispersion up to 50% w/w were possible for the paracetamol dispersions, although molecular dispersion with the non-interactive caffeine was noted at loadings up to 20% w./w. A lower processing temperature was also noted for caffeine-loaded systems despite the absence of detectable interactions. The study has therefore indicated that theoretical and experimental detection of miscibility and drug-polymer interactions may lead to insights into product processing and extrudate structure, with direct molecular interaction representing a helpful but not essential aspect of drug-polymer combination prediction.

  9. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  10. Groundwater flood hazards in lowland karst terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Owen; McCormack, Ted

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal complexity of flooding in karst terrains pose unique flood risk management challenges. Lowland karst landscapes can be particularly susceptible to groundwater flooding due to a combination of limited drainage capacity, shallow depth to groundwater and a high level of groundwater-surface water interactions. Historically the worst groundwater flooding to have occurred in the Rep. of Ireland has been centred on the Gort Lowlands, a karst catchment on the western coast of Ireland. Numerous notable flood events have been recorded throughout the 20th century, but flooding during the winters of 2009 and 2015 were the most severe on record, inundating an area in excess of 20km2 and causing widespread and prolonged disruption and damage to property and infrastructure. Effective flood risk management requires an understanding of the recharge, storage and transport mechanisms during flood conditions, but is often hampered by a lack of adequate data. Using information gathered from the 2009 and 2015 events, the main hydrological and geomorphological factors which influence flooding in this complex lowland karst groundwater system under are elucidated. Observed flood mechanisms included backwater flooding of sinks, overland flow caused by the overtopping of sink depressions, high water levels in turlough basins, and surface ponding in local epikarst watersheds. While targeted small-scale flood measures can locally reduce the flood risk associated with some mechanisms, they also have the potential to exacerbate flooding down-catchment and must be assessed in the context of overall catchment hydrology. This study addresses the need to improve our understanding of groundwater flooding in karst terrains, in order to ensure efficient flood prevention and mitigation in future and thus help achieve the aims of the EU Floods Directive.

  11. 2011 floods of the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The Central United States experienced record-setting flooding during 2011, with floods that extended from headwater streams in the Rocky Mountains, to transboundary rivers in the upper Midwest and Northern Plains, to the deep and wide sand-bedded lower Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of its mission, collected extensive information during and in the aftermath of the 2011 floods to support scientific analysis of the origins and consequences of extreme floods. The information collected for the 2011 floods, combined with decades of past data, enables scientists and engineers from the USGS to provide syntheses and scientific analyses to inform emergency managers, planners, and policy makers about life-safety, economic, and environmental-health issues surrounding flood hazards for the 2011 floods and future floods like it. USGS data, information, and scientific analyses provide context and understanding of the effect of floods on complex societal issues such as ecosystem and human health, flood-plain management, climate-change adaptation, economic security, and the associated policies enacted for mitigation. Among the largest societal questions is "How do we balance agricultural, economic, life-safety, and environmental needs in and along our rivers?" To address this issue, many scientific questions have to be answered including the following: * How do the 2011 weather and flood conditions compare to the past weather and flood conditions and what can we reasonably expect in the future for flood magnitudes?

  12. Determination of the equilibrium miscibility gap in the Pd-Rh alloy system using metal nanopowders obtained by decomposition of coordination compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubin, Yu.V., E-mail: shubin@niic.nsc.ru; Plyusnin, P.E.; Korenev, S.V.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • The Pd-Rh phase diagram has been experimentally reinvestigated. • The true equilibrium was achieved with the two-way approach. • The critical point of the miscibility gap lie at 58 at.% Rh and 820 °C. - Abstract: The Pd-Rh phase diagram has been reinvestigated in the subsolidus region using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The true equilibrium at the miscibility boundary was achieved with the two-way approach. Nanosized powders of metastable solid solutions and two-phase palladium-rhodium mixtures were used to shorten the time required to equilibrate the system. The initial samples were prepared by decomposition of coordination compounds [Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}], [Rh(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Cl]Cl{sub 2}, [Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sub 3}[Rh(NO{sub 2}){sub 6}]{sub 2} and [Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}][Rh(NH{sub 3})(NO{sub 2}){sub 5}]. The obtained phase diagram exhibits miscibility gap wider than generally accepted with the critical point of solubility at 58 at.% Rh and 820 °C.

  13. Miscibility, Morphology and Crystallization Behavior of Poly(Butylene Succinate-co-Butylene Adipate/Poly(Vinyl Phenol/Poly(l-Lactic Acid Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous poly(vinyl phenol (PVPh is introduced into poly(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate/poly(l-lactic acid (PBSA/PLLA blends via solution casting. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis verifies that intermolecular hydrogen bonding formed in PBSA/PVPh/PLLA blends. The miscibility between PBSA and PLLA is improved with PVPh incorporation as evidenced by approaching Tgs of the two components. When PVPh content reaches up to 50 wt %, the blend sample exhibits only one Tg, meaning complete miscibility between PBSA and PLLA. The improved miscibility of PBSA/PLLA blends is further confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Typical “see-island” phase separation structure for PBSA/PLLA blend transforms into homogenous phase structure for blend samples with 5 wt % PVPh and above. Non-isothermal crystallization analysis shows that the crystallization temperature and crystallization enthalpy of PBSA decrease with PVPh addition, and those of PLLA also show a decreasing trend. Isothermal crystallization rate of PBSA in blend samples distinctly decreases with PVPh incorporation, whereas that of PLLA in blend samples increases slightly with PVPh addition. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD analysis indicated that PLLA in blend samples remained partly crystallized, while PBSA turned into amorphous state with increasing PVPh contents.

  14. Implications of surfactant-induced flow for miscible-displacement estimation of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S; Zheng, Zheng; Henry, Eric J; Estabrook, Benjamin D; Littlefield, Malcolm H

    2012-10-16

    Surfactant miscible-displacement experiments represent a conventional means of estimating air-water interfacial area (A(I)) in unsaturated porous media. However, changes in surface tension during the experiment can potentially induce unsaturated flow, thereby altering interfacial areas and violating several fundamental method assumptions, including that of steady-state flow. In this work, the magnitude of surfactant-induced flow was quantified by monitoring moisture content and perturbations to effluent flow rate during miscible-displacement experiments conducted using a range of surfactant concentrations. For systems initially at 83% moisture saturation (S(W)), decreases of 18-43% S(W) occurred following surfactant introduction, with the magnitude and rate of drainage inversely related to the surface tension of the surfactant solution. Drainage induced by 0.1 mM sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, commonly used for A(I) estimation, resulted in effluent flow rate increases of up to 27% above steady-state conditions and is estimated to more than double the interfacial area over the course of the experiment. Depending on the surfactant concentration and the moisture content used to describe the system, A(I) estimates varied more than 3-fold. The magnitude of surfactant-induced flow is considerably larger than previously recognized and casts doubt on the reliability of A(I) estimation by surfactant miscible-displacement.

  15. Effect of pH on the physico-mechanical properties and miscibility of methyl cellulose/poly(acrylic acid) blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negim, E S M; Nurpeissova, Zh A; Mangazbayeva, R A; Khatib, J M; Williams, C; Mun, G A

    2014-01-30

    The miscibility behavior and physico-mechanical properties between methyl cellulose (MC) of different molecular weights (4 × 10(4) and 8.3 × 10(4)g/mol) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were studied by viscometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile strength and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using water as a solvent. Various formulations were designed to investigate the effects of process variables such as pH on the physico-mechanical and miscibility properties of MC/PAA blends. The rheological features for the obtained blends are strongly dependent on the molecular weight of the MC used and pH. The viscosity measurements showed that all blends have non-Newtonian shear thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. These blends have a single glass transition indicating that these blends are able to form a miscible phase due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl group of MC and the carboxyl group of PAA. The MC/PAA blends exhibit good mechanical properties, thermal stability, characteristics of a MC-PAA polymer network. SEM of the blends showed no phase separation, when compared with the pure MC and PAA.

  16. Miscibility/stability considerations in binary solid dispersion systems composed of functional excipients towards the design of multi-component amorphous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-uk; Krill, Steven L; Wang, Zeren; Telang, Chitra

    2009-12-01

    The correlations between amorphous miscibility/physical stability of binary solid dispersions (a highly crystalline additive-an amorphous polymer) and the physicochemical properties of the components were investigated. Crystalline functional excipients including surfactants, organic acids, and organic bases were prepared in binary solid dispersions in amorphous polymers by solvent evaporation method. Amorphous miscibility and physical stability of the systems were characterized using polarized light microscope, differential scanning calorimeter, and powder X-ray diffraction. Physicochemical parameters (solubility parameter (delta), hydrogen bond energy, Log P, pK(a) value as an indicator of acid-base ionic interaction, and T(g) of the dispersion as a surrogate of system's mobility) were selected as thermodynamic and kinetic factors to examine their influences on the systems' amorphous miscibility and physical stability. All systems possessing acid-base ionic interaction formed amorphous state. In the absence of the ionic interaction, solubility parameter and partition coefficient were shown to have major roles on amorphous formation. Upon storage condition at 25 degrees C/60% RH for 50 days, systems having ionic interaction and high T(g) remained in the amorphous state. This binary system study provides an insight and a basis for formation of the amorphous state of multi-component solid dispersions utilizing their physicochemical properties.

  17. Collecting data for quantitative research on pluvial flooding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekkers, M.H.; Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Urban pluvial flood management requires detailed spatial and temporal information on flood characteristics and damaging consequences. There is lack of quantitative field data on pluvial flooding resulting in large uncertainties in urban flood model calculations and ensuing decisions for investments

  18. Collecting data for quantitative research on pluvial flooding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekkers, M.H.; Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Urban pluvial flood management requires detailed spatial and temporal information on flood characteristics and damaging consequences. There is lack of quantitative field data on pluvial flooding resulting in large uncertainties in urban flood model calculations and ensuing decisions for investments

  19. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  20. Flood mapping with remote sensing and hydrochemistry: A new method to distinguish the origin of flood water during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chormanski, J.; Okruszko, T.; Ignar, S.; Batelaan, O.; Rebel, K.T.; Wassen, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    River flooding is important for the ecological functioning of river floodplains. It is implicitly assumed that in many river floodplains during floods, river water is spreading all over the floodplain. We hypothesize that during flood events a spatial distribution of water types exists, which is cor

  1. Multilevel integrated flood management aproach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilly, Mitja; Rusjan, Simon

    2013-04-01

    The optimal solution for complex flood management is integrated approach. Word »integration« used very often when we try to put something together, but should distinguish full multiple integrated approach of integration by parts when we put together and analyse only two variables. In doing so, we lost complexity of the phenomenon. Otherwise if we try to put together all variables we should take so much effort and time and we never finish the job properly. Solution is in multiple integration captures the essential factors, which are different on a case-by-case (Brilly, 2000). Physical planning is one of most important activity in which flood management should be integrated. The physical planning is crucial for vulnerability and its future development and on other hand our structural measures must be incorporate in space and will very often dominated in. The best solution is if space development derived on same time with development of structural measures. There are good examples with such approach (Vienna, Belgrade, Zagreb, and Ljubljana). Problems stared when we try incorporating flood management in already urbanised area or we would like to decrease risk to some lower level. Looking to practice we learn that middle Ages practices were much better than to day. There is also »disaster by design« when hazard increased as consequence of upstream development or in stream construction or remediation. In such situation we have risk on areas well protected in the past. Good preparation is essential for integration otherwise we just lost time what is essential for decision making and development. We should develop clear picture about physical characteristics of phenomena and possible solutions. We should develop not only the flood maps; we should know how fast phenomena could develop, in hour, day or more. Do we need to analyse ground water - surface water relations, we would like to protected area that was later flooded by ground water. Do we need to take care about

  2. Evaluating Flood Resilience Strategies for Coastal Megacities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aerts, J. C. J. H; Botzen, W. J. W; Emanuel, K; Lin, N; de Moel, H; Michel-Kerjan, E. O

    2014-01-01

    ... . Population density in flood-prone coastal zones and megacities is expected to grow by 25% by 2050; projected climate change and sea level rise may further increase the frequency and/or severity of large-scale floods...

  3. Sept 2013 NFHL Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  4. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE,

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk Information And supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  5. Flood-frequency characteristics of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, W.R.; Conger, D.H.; Gebert, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Flood-frequency characteristics for 269 gaged sites on Wisconsin streams are presented for recurrence intervals of 2 to 100 years. Annual flood peaks for the period of record for each gaged site are included.

  6. Sept 2013 NFHL Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  7. Sept 2013 NFHL Flood Risk Project Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  8. Flooding in Thailand: flee, fight or float

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan S Sophonpanich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The severity of recent flooding in Thailand and the probability of future flooding have triggered a re-assessment of coping mechanisms employed by both the Thai population and the government.

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, , USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk Information And supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  10. Sept 2013 NFHL Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  11. Flood Insurance Rate Map, Scott County, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreibich, H.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Apel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing...... trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods...... that occurred in the same area. In analogy to ’Paired catchment studies’ - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow – we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One...

  13. Seismic risks posed by mine flooding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goldbach, OD

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Many South African gold mines will flood when they close, as the groundwater will gradually fill the mining voids. Preliminary investigations have shown that flooding of mines can generate increased levels of seismicity. Examples are given...

  14. Hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion of posaconazole with improved bioavailability: investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fule, Ritesh; Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0-72) and C(max) of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0-72) and C(max) higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  15. Hot Melt Extruded Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Posaconazole with Improved Bioavailability: Investigating Drug-Polymer Miscibility with Advanced Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Fule

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0–72 and Cmax of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0–72 and Cmax higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil. Molecular dynamic (MD simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  16. Effect of water-miscible organic solvents on CYP450-mediated metoprolol and imipramine metabolism in rat liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes is known to be affected by presence of organic solvents in in vitro assays. However, these effects tend to be variable and depend on the substrate and CYP450 isoform in question. In the present study, we have investigated effect of ten water miscible organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dimethylsulphoxide, dimethylformamide, dioxane and PEG400 on water soluble substrates of CYP450, metoprolol and imipramine, at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% v/v concentration in rat liver microsomes. Organic solvents studied had a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on the metoprolol and imipramine metabolism activity. Metoprolol metabolism was found to be more susceptible to the organic solvents, almost all the ten solvents had more or less inhibitory effect compared to imipramine metabolism. Except acetone, PEG400 and dimethylsulphoxide, all solvents had ~50% inhibition of total metoprolol metabolism activity, while in case of imipramine metabolism activity, only n-propanol, isopropanol and PEG400 had ~50% inhibition at 1% v/v. Interestingly, methanol, dimethylsulphoxide and acetonitrile had negligible effect on the imipramine metabolism (less than 10% inhibition at 1% v/v while, total metoprolol metabolism activity was substantially inhibited by these solvents (MeOH 52%, DMSO 29% and ACN 47% at 1% v/v. In both cases, dioxane was found to be the most inhibitory solvent (~90% inhibition at 1% v/v.

  17. Electro-driven extraction of inorganic anions from water samples and water miscible organic solvents and analysis by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Memarzadeh, Farkhondeh; Chalavi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    A simple electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure combined with ion chromatography (IC) was developed to quantify inorganic anions in different pure water samples and water miscible organic solvents. The parameters affecting extraction performance, such as supported liquid membrane (SLM) solvent, extraction time, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, and extraction voltage were optimized. The optimized EME conditions were as follows: 1-heptanol was used as the SLM solvent, the extraction time was 10 min, pHs of the acceptor and donor solutions were 10 and 7, respectively, and the extraction voltage was 15 V. The mobile phase used for IC was a combination of 1.8 mM sodium carbonate and 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate. Under these optimized conditions, all anions had enrichment factors ranging from 67 to 117 with RSDs between 7.3 and 13.5% (n = 5). Good linearity values ranging from 2 to 1200 ng/mL with coefficients of determination (R(2) ) between 0.987 and 0.999 were obtained. The LODs of the EME-IC method ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng/mL. The developed method was applied to different samples to evaluate the feasibility of the method for real applications.

  18. Surface effects on phase distributions of a fast-quenched miscibility gap type system - Succinonitrile-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Fanning, U. S.

    1986-01-01

    If a binary homogeneous melt is cooled into an immiscible region, the newly formed second phase will generally have a density different from the parent phase, and will separate readily by sedimentation. Observation of solidification processes in microgravity indicates that outside of sedimentation, at least two other important effets can separate the phases: (1) preferential wetting, and (2) thermal migration of second-phase droplets due to interfacial tension gradients. The latter effect would drive the minority phase along the thermal gradient toward the hottest part (assuming the interfacial tension decreases with increasing temperature), which is usually away from the crucible wall. On the other hand, if the minority phase preferentially wets the crucible, a minority phase layer which thickens as initial solution compositions approach critical, will form adjacent to the solid surface and remain in the coldest region of the ingot. This study presents compelling preliminary evidence that these two effects do exist and that they compete with one another. However, the temperature dependence of preferential wetting below T(c) for the current system of study is, as yet, undetermined. These effects are sensitive to the initial concentration of a hypermonotectic solution cooling through a miscibility gap.

  19. Effect of Water-miscible Organic Solvents on CYP450-mediated Metoprolol and Imipramine Metabolism in Rat Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, T S; Kamble, S H; Patil, Pranali G; Iyer, K R

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes is known to be affected by presence of organic solvents in in vitro assays. However, these effects tend to be variable and depend on the substrate and CYP450 isoform in question. In the present study, we have investigated effect of ten water miscible organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dimethylsulphoxide, dimethylformamide, dioxane and PEG400) on water soluble substrates of CYP450, metoprolol and imipramine, at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% v/v concentration in rat liver microsomes. Organic solvents studied had a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on the metoprolol and imipramine metabolism activity. Metoprolol metabolism was found to be more susceptible to the organic solvents, almost all the ten solvents had more or less inhibitory effect compared to imipramine metabolism. Except acetone, PEG400 and dimethylsulphoxide, all solvents had ~50% inhibition of total metoprolol metabolism activity, while in case of imipramine metabolism activity, only n-propanol, isopropanol and PEG400 had ~50% inhibition at 1% v/v. Interestingly, methanol, dimethylsulphoxide and acetonitrile had negligible effect on the imipramine metabolism (less than 10% inhibition at 1% v/v) while, total metoprolol metabolism activity was substantially inhibited by these solvents (MeOH 52%, DMSO 29% and ACN 47% at 1% v/v). In both cases, dioxane was found to be the most inhibitory solvent (~90% inhibition at 1% v/v).

  20. Effect of Water Miscible Organic Solvents on p-Nitrophenol Hydroxylase (CYP2E1) Activity in Rat Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pranali G; Kamble, S H; Shah, T S; Iyer, K R

    2015-01-01

    Organic solvents used for solubilization of the substrates/NCEs are known to affect the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Further, this effect varies with the solvents used, the substrates and CYP450 isoforms in question. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ten commonly used water miscible organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, acetonitrile, acetone, dimethyl sulphoxide, N,N-dimethyl formamide, dioxane and polyethylene glycol 400) on p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% v/v concentration in rat liver microsomes. All the solvents studied showed concentration dependent inhibition of the p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity except acetonitrile which showed activation of the activity at concentration range studied. Out of ten solvents studied, dioxane was found to be the most inhibitory solvent (inhibition >90% at 0.25% v/v concentration). Overall, solvents like dimethyl sulphoxide, dimethyl formamide and dioxane appeared to be unsuitable for characterizing p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (CYP2E1-mediated) reactions due to a high degree of inhibition. On the other hand, methanol and acetonitrile at concentrations <0.5% v/v appeared to be appropriate solvents for substrate solubilization while evaluating CYP2E1-mediated catalysis. The results of this study imply that caution should be exercised while choosing solvents for dissolution of substrate during enzyme studies in liver microsomes.

  1. Thermodynamically consistent modeling and simulation of multi-component two-phase flow model with partial miscibility

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-01-01

    A general diffuse interface model with a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state) is proposed to describe the multi-component two-phase fluid flow based on the principles of the NVT-based framework which is a latest alternative over the NPT-based framework to model the realistic fluids. The proposed model uses the Helmholtz free energy rather than Gibbs free energy in the NPT-based framework. Different from the classical routines, we combine the first law of thermodynamics and related thermodynamical relations to derive the entropy balance equation, and then we derive a transport equation of the Helmholtz free energy density. Furthermore, by using the second law of thermodynamics, we derive a set of unified equations for both interfaces and bulk phases that can describe the partial miscibility of two fluids. A relation between the pressure gradient and chemical potential gradients is established, and this relation leads to a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which dem...

  2. The role of magnetism in the formation of the two-phase miscibility gap in β Cu–Al–Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzini, Fernando, E-mail: flanzini@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Instituto de Física de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT), Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (UNCPBA), Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Alés, Alejandro [Instituto de Física de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT), Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (UNCPBA), Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2015-12-01

    A theoretical study of the ground state properties of alloys with compositions along the pseudobinary line Cu{sub 3}Al–Cu{sub 2}AlMn is presented. Cohesive energies, lattice parameters and magnetic moments of the two limiting compounds and three intermediate compositions are calculated by means of density functional theory. In order to evaluate the role of magnetism, both the spin-polarized (SP) and the non spin-polarized (NSP) cases have been considered. It is shown that magnetism plays a central role on the stabilization of the L2{sub 1} crystal structure in Cu{sub 2}AlMn, and in the formation of the miscibility gap in Cu{sub 3}Al–Cu{sub 2}AlMn. The considerable lattice mismatch between the end compounds can be attributed also to magnetic effects. - Highlights: • Alloys with compositions Cu{sub 3−x}AlMn{sub x} were studied by first principles methods. • Both spin-polarized (SP) and non-spin-polarized (NSP) calculations were done. • Cohesive energies, lattice parameters and magnetic moments were determined. • The phase separation Cu{sub 3}Al+Cu{sub 2}AlMn is attributable to magnetic effects. • In the NSP case, L2{sub 1} Cu{sub 2}AlMn is predicted to be unstable against the F43m structure.

  3. Effect of water miscible organic solvents on p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (CYP2E1 activity in rat liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali G Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvents used for solubilization of the substrates/NCEs are known to affect the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Further, this effect varies with the solvents used, the substrates and CYP450 isoforms in question. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ten commonly used water miscible organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, acetonitrile, acetone, dimethyl sulphoxide, N,N-dimethyl formamide, dioxane and polyethylene glycol 400 on p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% v/v concentration in rat liver microsomes. All the solvents studied showed concentration dependent inhibition of the p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity except acetonitrile which showed activation of the activity at concentration range studied. Out of ten solvents studied, dioxane was found to be the most inhibitory solvent (inhibition >90% at 0.25% v/v concentration. Overall, solvents like dimethyl sulphoxide, dimethyl formamide and dioxane appeared to be unsuitable for characterizing p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (CYP2E1-mediated reactions due to a high degree of inhibition. On the other hand, methanol and acetonitrile at concentrations <0.5% v/v appeared to be appropriate solvents for substrate solubilization while evaluating CYP2E1-mediated catalysis. The results of this study imply that caution should be exercised while choosing solvents for dissolution of substrate during enzyme studies in liver microsomes.

  4. Miscible blends of biobased poly(lactide) with poly(methyl methacrylate): Effects of chopped glass fiber incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, Dylan S. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401; Lowe, Corinne [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401; Swan, Dana [Arkema, King of Prussia Pennsylvania; Barsotti, Robert [Arkema, King of Prussia Pennsylvania; Zhang, Mingfu [Johns Manville, Littleton Colorado; Gleich, Klaus [Johns Manville, Littleton Colorado; Berry, Derek [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Snowberg, David [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Dorgan, John R. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401

    2017-02-22

    Poly(lactide) (PLA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are melt compounded with chopped glass fiber using laboratory scale twin-screw extrusion. Physical properties are examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing, impact testing, X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Molecular weight is determined using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Miscibility of the blends is implied by the presence of a single glass transition temperature and homogeneous morphology. PLA/PMMA blends tend to show positive deviations from a simple linear mixing rule in their mechanical properties (e.g., tensile toughness, modulus, and stress at break). The addition of 40 wt % glass fiber to the system dramatically increases physical properties. Across all blend compositions, the tensile modulus increases from roughly 3 GPa to roughly 10 GPa. Estimated heat distortion temperatures (HDTs) are also greatly enhanced; the pure PLA sample HDT increases from 75 degrees C to 135 degrees C. Fiber filled polymer blends represent a sustainable class of earth abundant materials which should prove useful across a range of applications.

  5. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes incorporated into a miscible blend of poly(phenylenether/polystyrene – Processing and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Olowojoba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 4 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were incorporated into a miscible blend of polyphenylenether/polystyrene (PPE/PS on a twin-screw extruder at a screw speed of 600 rpm. The masterbatch obtained was diluted at 400 and 600 rpm to obtain lower MWCNT loadings in PPE/PS. Electron microscopy & optical microscopy images show very good MWCNT dispersion even at high filler loadings of 4 wt%, but slightly larger agglomerate size fractions are observable at higher screw speeds. While MWCNT addition enhanced the thermal stability of PPE/PS, a small change in glass transition was observed on the composites at different filler concentrations compared to PPE/PS. The specific heat capacity at glass transition decreases considerably until 2 wt% MWCNT and levels down thereafter for both processing conditions pointing to enhanced filler-matrix interaction at lower loadings. Storage modulus of the nanocomposites was enhanced significantly on MWCNT incorporation with reinforcing effect dropping considerably as a function of temperature, especially at lower filler contents. The modulus and the tensile strength of PPE/PS were only marginally enhanced in spite of excellent MWCNT dispersion in the matrix. Electrical percolation occurs at 0.4 wt% MWCNT content, and the electrical conductivity of 0.5 wt% MWCNT reinforced PPE/PS was close to 12 orders in magnitude higher compared to PPE/PS.

  6. High Pressure Preignition Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and hydrocarbon blends in our various combustion systems, with emphasis on the effects of elevated pressure using our pressurized flow reactor ( PFR ...facility. Detailed experimental data were generated from the PFR for use in associated kinetic modeling work. We continued to develop and extend both

  7. Flood-induced transport of PAHs from streambed coal tar deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulava, Vijay M; Vaughn, D Syreeta; McKay, Larry D; Driese, Steven G; Cooper, Lee W; Menn, Fu-Min; Levine, Norman S; Sayler, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    We assessed whether coal tar present in contaminated streambed sediments can be mobilized by flood events and be re-deposited in an adjacent floodplain. The study was conducted within a contaminated urban stream where coal tar wastes were released into a 4-km reach from a coke plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. Sediments containing visible amounts of coal tar were dredged from the streambed in 1997-98 and 2007 as part of a cleanup effort. However, post-dredging sampling indicated that very high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remained in streambed sediments. Sampling of sediments in the floodplain at two sites downstream of the coke plant indicated that high concentrations of PAHs were also present in the floodplain, even though no coal tar was observed in the samples. Age-dating of the floodplain sediments using (137)Cs indicated that peak PAH concentrations were contemporary with coke plant operations. While there was little or any direct contamination of the floodplain sediments by coal tar, sediment contamination was likely a result of deposition of suspended streambed sediments containing sorbed PAHs. A flood model developed to delineate the extent of flooding in various flood recurrence scenarios confirmed the potential for contaminated streambed sediments to be transported into the adjacent floodplain. It was hypothesized that coal tar, which was visibly "sticky" during dredging-based stream cleanup, may act as a binding agent for streambed sediments, decreasing mobility and transport in the stream. Therefore, coal tar is likely to remain a persistent contaminant source for downstream reaches of the stream and the adjacent floodplain during flood events. This study also showed that even after excavation of tar-rich streambed sediments, PAH contaminated non-tarry sediments may be a source of flood-related contamination in the adjacent flood plain. A conceptual framework was developed to delineate specific mechanisms that can

  8. Field note from Pakistan floods: Preventing future flood disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Oxley

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Unusually heavy monsoon rains in Northern Pakistan have caused disproportionate levels of extreme flooding and unprecedented flood losses across the entire Indus River basin. Extensive land use changes and environmental degradation in the uplands and lowlands of the river basin together with the construction of a “built environment” out of balance with the functioning, capacities, scale and limits of the local ecosystems have exposed millions of people to an increased risk of extreme #ooding. The catastrophic nature of the August #ooding provides a unique opportunity to fundamentally change Pakistan’s current socio-economic development path by incorporating disaster risk reduction and climate change measures into the post-disaster recovery process to rebuild a safer, more resilient nation. In January 2005 one hundred and sixty-eight nations adopted the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA2005-2015 to bring about a “substantial reduction in disaster losses” by 2015. Despite this global initiative a series of major disasters, including the recent flooding in Pakistan, all indicate that we are not on track to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster losses. The following fieldnote considers what can be done to accelerate progress towards implementation of the Hyogo Framework, drawing on insights and lessons learnt from the August flooding to understand how Pakistan and neighbouring countries can prevent a repeat of such catastrophic disasters in future years.

  9. Learning about Flood Risk: Comparing the Web-Based and Physical Flood-Walk Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu; Nyberg, Lars; Evers, Mariele; Alexandersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Numerous of sustainable development related challenges are emerging today, e.g. flooding problems. Our group has developed "the flood walk" project since 2010 to convey flood risk knowledge in an authentic context. Considering the limitation of time and space to educate people the flood risk knowledge, we tried to transform the physical…

  10. A rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment: considering multiple flood sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X.; Tatano, H.

    2015-08-01

    Information about the spatial distribution of flood risk is important for integrated urban flood risk management. Focusing on urban areas, spatial flood risk assessment must reflect all risk information derived from multiple flood sources: rivers, drainage, coastal flooding etc. that may affect the area. However, conventional flood risk assessment deals with each flood source independently, which leads to an underestimation of flood risk in the floodplain. Even in floodplains that have no risk from coastal flooding, flooding from river channels and inundation caused by insufficient drainage capacity should be considered simultaneously. For integrated flood risk management, it is necessary to establish a methodology to estimate flood risk distribution across a floodplain. In this paper, a rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment, which considers the joint effects of multiple flood sources, is proposed. The concept of critical rainfall duration determined by the concentration time of flooding is introduced to connect response characteristics of different flood sources with rainfall. A copula method is then adopted to capture the correlation of rainfall amount with different critical rainfall durations. Rainfall events are designed taking advantage of the copula structure of correlation and marginal distribution of rainfall amounts within different critical rainfall durations. A case study in the Otsu River Basin, Osaka prefecture, Japan was conducted to demonstrate this methodology.

  11. A rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment: considering multiple flood sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Information about the spatial distribution of flood risk is important for integrated urban flood risk management. Focusing on urban areas, spatial flood risk assessment must reflect all risk information derived from multiple flood sources: rivers, drainage, coastal flooding etc. that may affect the area. However, conventional flood risk assessment deals with each flood source independently, which leads to an underestimation of flood risk in the floodplain. Even in floodplains that have no risk from coastal flooding, flooding from river channels and inundation caused by insufficient drainage capacity should be considered simultaneously. For integrated flood risk management, it is necessary to establish a methodology to estimate flood risk distribution across a floodplain. In this paper, a rainfall design method for spatial flood risk assessment, which considers the joint effects of multiple flood sources, is proposed. The concept of critical rainfall duration determined by the concentration time of flooding is introduced to connect response characteristics of different flood sources with rainfall. A copula method is then adopted to capture the correlation of rainfall amount with different critical rainfall durations. Rainfall events are designed taking advantage of the copula structure of correlation and marginal distribution of rainfall amounts within different critical rainfall durations. A case study in the Otsu River Basin, Osaka prefecture, Japan was conducted to demonstrate this methodology.

  12. Learning about Flood Risk: Comparing the Web-Based and Physical Flood-Walk Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu; Nyberg, Lars; Evers, Mariele; Alexandersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Numerous of sustainable development related challenges are emerging today, e.g. flooding problems. Our group has developed "the flood walk" project since 2010 to convey flood risk knowledge in an authentic context. Considering the limitation of time and space to educate people the flood risk knowledge, we tried to transform the physical…

  13. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  14. A surface water flooding impact library for flood risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for improved risk-based Surface Water Flooding (SWF warning systems is evident in EU directives and in the UK Government’s Pitt Review of the 2007 summer floods. This paper presents a novel approach for collating receptor and vulnerability datasets via the concept of an Impact Library, developed by the Health and Safety Laboratory as a depository of pre-calculated impact information on SWF risk for use in a real-time SWF Hazard Impact Model (HIM. This has potential benefits for the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC as the organisation responsible for the issuing of flood guidance information for England and Wales. The SWF HIM takes a pixel-based approach to link probabilistic surface water runoff forecasts produced by CEH’s Grid-to-Grid hydrological model with Impact Library information to generate impact assessments. These are combined to estimate flood risk as a combination of impact severity and forecast likelihood, at 1km pixel level, and summarised for counties and local authorities. The SWF HIM takes advantage of recent advances in operational ensemble forecasting of rainfall by the Met Office and of SWF by the Environment Agency and CEH working together through the FFC. Results are presented for a case study event which affected the North East of England during 2012. The work has been developed through the UK’s Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP, a group of organisations gathered to provide information, research and analysis on natural hazards for civil contingencies, government and responders across the UK.

  15. Economic optimisation of flood risk management projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimopoulou, V.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands has developed a flood risk management policy based on an economic rationale. After the flood disaster of 1953, when a large area of the south-western part of the country was flooded and more than 1800 people lost their lives, the so-called Delta Committee was installed, whose main pu

  16. The August 1975 Flood over Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Smith, James; Liu, Maofeng; Baeck, MaryLynn

    2016-04-01

    The August 1975 flood in Central China was one of the most destructive floods in history, resulting in 26 000 fatalities, leaving about 10 million people with insufficient shelter, and producing long-lasting famine and disease. Extreme rainfall responsible for this flood event was associated with typhoon Nina during 5-7 August 1975. Despite the prominence of the August 1975 flood, analyses of the storms producing the flood and the resulting flood are sparse. Even fewer attempts were made from the perspective of numerical simulations. We examine details of extreme rainfall for the August 1975 flood based on downscaling simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model driven by 20th Century Reanalysis fields. We further placed key hydrometeorological features for the flood event in a climatological context through the analyses of the 20th Century Reanalysis fields. Results indicate interrelated roles of multiple mesoscale ingredients for deep, moist convection in producing extreme rainfall for the August 1975 flood, superimposed over an anomalous synoptic environment. Attribution analyses on the source of water vapor for this flood event will be conducted based on a Lagrangian parcel tracking algorithm LAGRANTO. Analytical framework developed in this study aims to explore utilization of hydrometeorological approach in flood-control engineering designs by providing details on key elements of flood-producing storms.

  17. Economic optimisation of flood risk management projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimopoulou, V.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands has developed a flood risk management policy based on an economic rationale. After the flood disaster of 1953, when a large area of the south-western part of the country was flooded and more than 1800 people lost their lives, the so-called Delta Committee was installed, whose main

  18. Economic optimisation of flood risk management projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimopoulou, V.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands has developed a flood risk management policy based on an economic rationale. After the flood disaster of 1953, when a large area of the south-western part of the country was flooded and more than 1800 people lost their lives, the so-called Delta Committee was installed, whose main pu

  19. The European Flood Risk Directive and Ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, E.; Doorn, N.

    2012-01-01

    The European Flood risk directive (2007/60/EC) requires EU Member States to review their system of flood risk management. In doing so, they will have to face ethical issues inherent in flood risk management. This paper discusses three such issues, using examples from the Netherlands. These issues ar

  20. Resilience to flooding: Draft building code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarkson, J.D.; Braun, K.; Desoto-Duncan, A.; Forsyth, G.; De Gijt, J.G.; Huber, N.P.; Miller, D.; Rigo, P.; Sullivan, D.

    2013-01-01

    A significant issue associated Flood Defence Systems (FDS) is the difficulty of predicting how these structures will behave when inevitably they have been loaded beyond their designed capacity by a flood. The flood can cause these structures to fail catastrophically with loss of life and substantial

  1. Flood forecasting using artificial neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varoonchotikul, P.

    2003-01-01

    Flood disasters continue to occur In many countries around the world and cause tremendous casualtles and properties damage. To mitigate the effects of floods, both structural and non-structural measures can be employed, such as dykes, channelisatlon, flood proofing of properties, land-use regulation

  2. Tangible and Intangible Flood damage evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frongia Sara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flooding and flash floods that cause significant economic and social damage have been widely studied in the last few decades. The European Commission Flood Directive 2007/60 Flood Risk Management Plans require the assessment of potential damage to give an appreciation of the magnitude of the consequences of a flood event and so help stakeholders to use a cost benefit approach to planning flood mitigation measures. This paper evaluates the direct tangible flood damage applying the JRC water depth-damage functions for the European territory to estimate the potential economic damage. Intangible damage is evaluated with the Life Safety Model (LSM to study the dynamic interactions among people, vehicles, buildings and the flood wave. LSM assesses potential flood damage and allows the development of a Flood Evacuation Plan in case of an emergency, underlining the evacuation routes adopted by people and vehicles. This enables emergency managers to avoid evacuation bottleneck problems and identify areas of potential high mortality. The impact of changes such as road network improvements, the location of safe havens and timing of flood warnings can be assessed in terms of potential loss of life. The developed methodology has been applied on the Sardinian Flood Risk Management Plan pilot basin, the Coghinas river lowland basin.

  3. Flood Risk Management in the People’s Republic of China: Learning to Live with Flood Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents a shift in the People’s Republic of China from flood control depending on structural measures to integrated flood management using both structural and non-structural measures. The core of the new concept of integrated flood management is flood risk management. Flood risk management is based on an analysis of flood hazard, exposure to flood hazard, and vulnerability of people and property to danger. It is recommended that people learn to live with flood risks, gaining...

  4. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  5. Compositions and methods for hydrocarbon functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent; Fortman, George; Boaz, Nicholas C.; Groves, John T.

    2017-03-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of hydrocarbon functionalization, methods and systems for converting a hydrocarbon into a compound including at least one group ((e.g., hydroxyl group) (e.g., methane to methanol)), functionalized hydrocarbons, and the like.

  6. Streamflow characterization and summary of water-quality data collection during the Mississippi River flood, April through July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.; Barnes, Kimberlee K.

    2013-01-01

    From April through July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey collected surface-water samples from 69 water-quality stations and 3 flood-control structures in 4 major subbasins of the Mississippi River Basin to characterize the water quality during the 2011 Mississippi River flood. Most stations were sampled at least monthly for field parameters suspended sediment, nutrients, and selected pesticides. Samples were collected at daily to biweekly frequencies at selected sites in the case of suspended sediment. Hydro-carbon analysis was performed on samples collected at two sites in the Atchafalaya River Basin to assess the water-quality implications of opening the Morganza Floodway. Water-quality samples obtained during the flood period were collected at flows well above normal streamflow conditions at the majority of the stations throughout the Mississippi River Basin and its subbasins. Heavy rainfall and snowmelt resulted in high streamflow in the Mississippi River Basin from April through July 2011. The Ohio River Subbasin contributed to most of the flow in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Subbasin during the months of April and May because of widespread rainfall, whereas snowmelt and precipitation from the Missouri River Subbasin and the upper Mississippi River Subbasin contributed to most of the flow in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Subbasin during June and July. Peak streamflows from the 2011 flood were higher than peak streamflow during previous historic floods at most the selected streamgages in the Mississippi River Basin. In the Missouri River Subbasin, the volume of water moved during the 1952 flood was greater than the amount move during the 2011 flood. Median concentrations of suspended sediment and total phosphorus were higher in the Missouri River Subbasin during the flood when compared to the other three subbasins. Surface water in the upper Mississippi River Subbasin contained higher median concentrations of total nitrogen, nitrate

  7. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  8. Fire-safe hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, G.E.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Wright, B.R.

    1979-11-06

    A stabilized, fire-safe, aqueous hydrocarbon fuel emulsion prepared by mixing: a diesel fuel; an emulsifier (consisting of oleyl diethanolamide, diethanolamine, and diethanolamine soap of oleic acid) which has been treated with about 0 to 7 1/2 of oleic acid. A modified version of this fuel also contains 0 to 0.5% of an antimisting agent, and water.

  9. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  10. Modelling dynamic roughness during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic roughness model to predict water levels during floods. Hysteresis effects of dune development are explicitly included. It is shown that differences between the new dynamic roughness model, and models where the roughness coefficient is calibrated, are most

  11. Feedback on flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developped in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which are responsible of the transmission of meteorological alert and of rescue actions. In the crossing of the géo-information stemming from the

  12. Miscible, Equal Mobility Displacement Within Layered Porous Media; the Influence of Transverse Dispersion Déplacement miscible à mobilité égale en milieux poreux stratifié. Influence de la dispersion transversale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright R. J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion within layered porous media is examined under conditions for which no analytical solutions are available. The findings are restricted to miscible displacement in which no fluid density or viscosity differences are present. The region of interest is that of intermediate values of a dimensionless time which quantifies transverse dispersion. Long times, which have been treated by previous authors, allow reduction of the system to a single effective layer in which an increased longitudional dispersion coefficient operates. Shorter times however, correspond to a complex interaction between the convection profile and transverse dispersion and cannot be treated in a one-dimensional manner. An approximate analytical solution for the composition within a given cross-section of an individual layer in a dual-layer model is compared with the result of numerical simulation. The analytical model is then applied to the deconvolution of tracer effluent profiles produced by a multilayered system. It is shown that the fundamental layer characteristics, fluid conductivity and mass-transfer rate, can be obtained from pairs of tracer tests which span a certain range of dimensionless time. Example data from laboratory tests on heterogeneous core samples are used to illustrate application of the method, which should also be applicable to field interwell tracer tests. On examine la dispersion dans un milieu poreux stratifié dans des conditions pour lesquelles il n'y a pas de solution analytique disponible. Les résultats sont limités au déplacement miscible de fluides ayant même viscosité et masse volumique. Le domaine concerné dans cet article est celui des valeurs intermédiaires d'un temps sans dimension qui quantifie la dispersion transversale. Les longues durées de temps, qui ont été traitées par d'autres auteurs, permettent de réduire le système à une simple couche effective dans laquelle intervient un coefficient de dispersion

  13. Characterization of floods in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharia, Manabendra; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vergara, Humberto; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Floods have gained increasing global significance in the recent past due to their devastating nature and potential for causing significant economic and human losses. Until now, flood characterization studies in the United States have been limited due to the lack of a comprehensive database matching flood characteristics such as peak discharges and flood duration with geospatial and geomorphologic information. The availability of a representative and long archive of flooding events spanning 78 years over a variety of hydroclimatic regions results in a spatially and temporally comprehensive flood characterization over the continental U.S. This study, for the first time, employs a large-event database that is based on actual National Weather Service (NWS) definitions of floods instead of the frequently-adopted case study or frequentist approach, allowing us to base our findings on real definitions of floods. It examines flooding characteristics to identify how space and time scales of floods vary with climatic regimes and geomorphology. Flood events were characterized by linking flood response variables in gauged basins to spatially distributed variables describing climatology, geomorphology, and topography. The primary findings of this study are that the magnitude of flooding is highest is regions such as West Coast and southeastern U.S. which experience the most extraordinary precipitation. The seasonality of flooding varies greatly from maxima during the cool season on the West Coast, warm season in the desert Southwest, and early spring in the Southeast. The fastest responding events tend to be in steep basins of the arid Southwest caused by intense monsoon thunderstorms and steep terrain. The envelope curves of unit peak discharge are consistent with those reported for Europe and worldwide. But significant seasonal variability was observed in floods of the U.S. compared to Europe that is attributed to the diversity of causative rainfall ranging from synoptic

  14. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.; Farahi; Saeed; Reza; Khodashenas; B.; Ghahraman; K.; Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplain processes in general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers. Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools. In this paper flood inundation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and observed flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  15. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Farahi; Saeed Reza Khodashenas; B.Ghahraman; K.Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplaln processes In general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers.Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools.In this paper flood in-undation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and ob-served flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  16. Re-thinking urban flood management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sörensen, Johanna; Persson, Andreas; Sternudd, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Urban flooding is of growing concern due to increasing densification of urban areas, changes in land use, and climate change. The traditional engineering approach to flooding is designing single-purpose drainage systems, dams, and levees. These methods, however, are known to increase the long......-term flood risk and harm the riverine ecosystems in urban as well as rural areas. In the present paper, we depart from resilience theory and suggest a concept to improve urban flood resilience. We identify areas where contemporary challenges call for improved collaborative urban flood management. The concept...

  17. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  18. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  20. Coping with Pluvial Floods by Private Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Rözer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pluvial floods have caused severe damage to urban areas in recent years. With a projected increase in extreme precipitation as well as an ongoing urbanization, pluvial flood damage is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, further insights, especially on the adverse consequences of pluvial floods and their mitigation, are needed. To gain more knowledge, empirical damage data from three different pluvial flood events in Germany were collected through computer-aided telephone interviews. Pluvial flood awareness as well as flood experience were found to be low before the respective flood events. The level of private precaution increased considerably after all events, but is mainly focused on measures that are easy to implement. Lower inundation depths, smaller potential losses as compared with fluvial floods, as well as the fact that pluvial flooding may occur everywhere, are expected to cause a shift in damage mitigation from precaution to emergency response. However, an effective implementation of emergency measures was constrained by a low dissemination of early warnings in the study areas. Further improvements of early warning systems including dissemination as well as a rise in pluvial flood preparedness are important to reduce future pluvial flood damage.

  1. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  2. Comparing Simple Flood Reservoir Operation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Connaughton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of three simple flood operating rules in reducing the peak flow is compared for four simplified hydrograph shapes. The Minimize Flood Peak rule uses available flood storage capacity to store peak flows from an accurate hydrograph forecast. The less demanding Minimize Flooding Frequency operating rule releases water at or below channel capacity until the flood storage pool is filled and outflows are forced to exceed the channel capacity. The Short Forecast Peak Minimization rule minimizes flood peak over a short foreseeable future with existing flood storage capacity. Four simplified hydrograph shapes (triangular, abrupt wave, flood pulse and broad peak were used. The Minimize Flood Peak rule reduces peak flows better than alternatives, but is often impractical. The Short Forecast Peak Minimization rule reduces peak flows for a wide range of conditions. The Minimize Flood Frequency rule may be more relevant where damages occur abruptly, as in many leveed systems. All rules reduce peak outflow more efficiently for more steeply rising hydrographs. The approach suggests some general insights for flood operations of reservoirs.

  3. Living behind dikes: mimicking flooding experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaalberg, Ruud; Midden, Cees J H

    2013-05-01

    Delta areas like the Netherlands are threatened by global climate change. Awareness is, however, rather low. Our research objective was to investigate whether coping responses to flooding risks could be enhanced in a virtual environment (VE). A laboratory experiment was conducted in which participants were exposed to a simulated dike breach and consequent flooding of their virtual residence. We tested the hypothesis that an interactive 3D flood simulation facilitates coping responses compared to noninteractive film and slide simulations. Our results showed that information search, the motivation to evacuate, and the motivation to buy flood insurance increased after exposure to the 3D flood simulation compared to the film and slide simulations. Mediation analyses revealed that some of these presentation mode effects were mediated by a greater sense of being present in the VE. Implications to use high-end flood simulations in a VE to communicate real-world flooding risks and coping responses to threatened residents will be discussed.

  4. Flood risk assessment: concepts, modelling, applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tsakiris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural hazards have caused severe consequences to the natural, modified and human systems, in the past. These consequences seem to increase with time due to both higher intensity of the natural phenomena and higher value of elements at risk. Among the water related hazards flood hazards have the most destructive impacts. The paper presents a new systemic paradigm for the assessment of flood hazard and flood risk in the riverine flood prone areas. Special emphasis is given to the urban areas with mild terrain and complicated topography, in which 2-D fully dynamic flood modelling is proposed. Further the EU flood directive is critically reviewed and examples of its implementation are presented. Some critical points in the flood directive implementation are also highlighted.

  5. Can we predict the next urban flood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2015-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numericallyboth...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0-2 hours leadtime, and numerical weather models with leadtimes up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model with the purpose to investigate the potential for predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been recently flooded. Results show that it is possible to generate detailed flood maps in real-time with high resolution...

  6. 75 FR 7522 - United States Section; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, Presidio Flood Control... EIS) for flood control improvements to the Presidio Flood Control Project, Presidio, Texas (Presidio... Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, USIBWC Presidio Flood......

  7. Betwixt Droughts and Floods: Flood Management Politics in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Maier-Knapp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attempting to create greater understanding of the political dynamics that influence domestic disaster relief and management (DRM in Thailand, this article takes a closer look at these dynamics by outlining the main actors involved in flood-related DRM. It acknowledges the importance of international and military actors but emphasises the role of national and subnational authorities. The article then identifies the central issues of DRM governance as capacity and bureaucracy and discusses these through a chronological assessment of the flood crisis in Thailand in 2011, interweaving the colourful domestic politics with various political cleavages and dichotomies, and thereby distinguishing between three main dichotomies which it considers as the central drivers of the political dynamics and institutional development of DRM. These issues can be summarised as old versus new institutions, technocracy versus bureaucracy and centralised (but with direct people-orientation through greater channels of citizenry participation versus decentralised bureaucracy with an indirect orientation towards people.

  8. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  9. Toward more resilient flood risk governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. J. Driessen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Countries all over the world face increasing flood risks because of urbanization and the effects of climate change. In Europe, flooding is the most common of all natural disasters and accounts for the largest number of casualties and highest amount of economic damage. The current scientific debate on how urban agglomerations can be made more resilient to these flood risks includes a discussion on how a diversification, coordination, and alignment of flood risk management strategies (FRMSs, including flood risk prevention through proactive spatial planning, flood defense, flood risk mitigation, flood preparation, and flood recovery, can contribute to flood resilience. Although effective implementation of FRMSs can be considered a necessary precondition for resilience, efficient and legitimate flood risk governance can enhance this societal resilience to flooding. Governance and legal research has the potential to provide crucial insights into the debate on how to improve resilience. Yet the social sciences have only looked into this issue in a fragmented manner, often without a comparative scope. This special feature addresses this knowledge gap by focusing on the scope and workings of FRMSs, but also on cross-cutting topics such as uncertainties, distributional effects, solidarity, knowledge management, and citizen participation. The papers included in this feature are written by both policy analysts and legal scholars. The above-mentioned issues are thus approached via a multidisciplinary perspective. All papers convincingly show that one-size-fits-all solutions for appropriate and resilient flood risk governance arrangements do not exist. Governance arrangements should be tailored to the existing physical, socio-cultural, and institutional context. This requires an open and transparent debate between scientists and practitioners on the normative starting point of flood risk governance, a clear division of responsibilities, the establishment of

  10. Sobre inundaciones y anegamientos / Reflections on floods and flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrando A., Francisco J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Respecto a anegamientos e inundaciones, el autor realiza algunas precisiones conceptuales que afectan la gestión de acciones preventivas, la planificación y el ordenamiento territorial; además se ofrece una sistematización del quehacer sobre las inundaciones./ The author punctualizes the concepts regarding preventive actions and territorial planning. Also the article includes a systematized list of actions related to flood management.

  11. Use of documentary sources on past flood events for flood risk management and land planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cœur, Denis; Lang, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The knowledge of past catastrophic events can improve flood risk mitigation policy, with a better awareness against risk. As such historical information is usually available in Europe for the past five centuries, historians are able to understand how past society dealt with flood risk, and hydrologists can include information on past floods into an adapted probabilistic framework. In France, Flood Risk Mitigation Maps are based either on the largest historical known flood event or on the 100-year flood event if it is greater. Two actions can be suggested in terms of promoting the use of historical information for flood risk management: (1) the development of a regional flood data base, with both historical and current data, in order to get a good feedback on recent events and to improve the flood risk education and awareness; (2) the commitment to keep a persistent/perennial management of a reference network of hydrometeorological observations for climate change studies.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Flooding Technology Research and Field Test in Liuzan North Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanshi; Luo, Pingya; Sun, Lei; Fu, Zhijun

    2014-12-01

    The fault roots of Liuzan north block in Jidong oilfield of China have been long-term explored by solution gas drive. Recently, oil production declined rapidly because of shortage of formation energy and needing high water injection pressure. Carbon dioxide injection pressure is found to be generally low, and CO2 has good solubility in crude oil to supply formation energy and achieve high oil recovery efficiency. In this work, a pilot program of CO2 EOR technology was carried out. The slim tube test results showed that the minimal miscible pressure of Liuzan north block was 28.28 MPa. The injection parameters were optimized by numerical simulation method: the injection method was continuous, the slug size was 0.2 HCPV and the EOR efficiency was 7.23%. After two months of gas injection field test, the formation pressure of two gas injectors just increased by 14.02 MPa and 2.98 MPa, respectively, indicating that carbon dioxide could supply the formation energy effectively. 16 months after gas injection, the CO2 injection amount was 14640 t, and the oil increment was 16424 t. The present work demonstrates the potential applicability of CO2 flooding technology from high water injection reservoirs.

  13. Urban flood simulation based on the SWMM model

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    China is the nation with the fastest urbanization in the past decades which has caused serious urban flooding. Flood forecasting is regarded as one of the important flood mitigation methods, and is widely used in catchment flood mitigation, but is not widely used in urban flooding mitigation. This paper, employing the SWMM model, one of the widely used urban flood planning and management models, simulates the urban flooding of Dongguan City in the rapidly urbanized southern China. SWMM is fir...

  14. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  15. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  16. Real-time flood forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C.; Tsay, T.-K.; Chien, C.-H.; Wu, I.-L.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Hydroinformatic Research and Development Team (HIRDT) of the National Taiwan University undertook a project to create a real time flood forecasting model, with an aim to predict the current in the Tamsui River Basin. The model was designed based on deterministic approach with mathematic modeling of complex phenomenon, and specific parameter values operated to produce a discrete result. The project also devised a rainfall-stage model that relates the rate of rainfall upland directly to the change of the state of river, and is further related to another typhoon-rainfall model. The geographic information system (GIS) data, based on precise contour model of the terrain, estimate the regions that were perilous to flooding. The HIRDT, in response to the project's progress, also devoted their application of a deterministic model to unsteady flow of thermodynamics to help predict river authorities issue timely warnings and take other emergency measures.

  17. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods that occurred in the same area. In analogy to 'Paired catchment studies' - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow - we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One example are the 2002 and 2013 floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in Germany. The 2002 flood caused the highest economic damage (EUR 11600 million) due to a natural hazard event in Germany. Damage was so high due to extreme flood hazard triggered by extreme precipitation and a high number of resulting dyke breaches. Additionally, exposure hotspots like the city of Dresden at the Elbe river as well as some smaller municipalities at the river Mulde (e.g. Grimma, Eilenburg, Bitterfeld, Dessau) were severely impacted. However, affected parties and authorities learned from the extreme flood in 2002, and many governmental flood risk programs and initiatives were launched. Considerable improvements since 2002 occurred on many levels that deal with flood risk reduction and disaster response, in particular in 1) increased flood prevention by improved spatial planning, 2) an increased number of property-level mitigation measures, 3) more effective early warning and improved coordination of disaster response and 4) a more targeted maintenance of flood defence systems and their

  18. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  19. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-08-14

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  20. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Lo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  1. Floods and human health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Katarzyna; Turner, Lyle R; Tong, Shilu

    2012-10-15

    Floods are the most common type of disaster globally, responsible for almost 53,000 deaths in the last decade alone (23:1 low- versus high-income countries). This review assessed recent epidemiological evidence on the impacts of floods on human health. Published articles (2004-2011) on the quantitative relationship between floods and health were systematically reviewed. 35 relevant epidemiological studies were identified. Health outcomes were categorized into short- and long-term and were found to depend on the flood characteristics and people's vulnerability. It was found that long-term health effects are currently not well understood. Mortality rates were found to increase by up to 50% in the first year post-flood. After floods, it was found there is an increased risk of disease outbreaks such as hepatitis E, gastrointestinal disease and leptospirosis, particularly in areas with poor hygiene and displaced populations. Psychological distress in survivors (prevalence 8.6% to 53% two years post-flood) can also exacerbate their physical illness. There is a need for effective policies to reduce and prevent flood-related morbidity and mortality. Such steps are contingent upon the improved understanding of potential health impacts of floods. Global trends in urbanization, burden of disease, malnutrition and maternal and child health must be better reflected in flood preparedness and mitigation programs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Floods in Brno: history, causes and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázdil, R.; Dobrovolný, P.; Halíčková, M.; Macková, J.; Øezníčková, L.; Soukalová, E.; Valášek, H.

    2009-09-01

    Brno is the second largest city in the Czech Republic (cca 400,000 inhabitants), a centre of southern Moravia. It was always endangered by floods occurring on the Svratka River and the Svitava River. Observed floods were related mainly to intense snow-melting (with rains and also ice-damming) in winter/early spring or heavy precipitation in the summer half-year. Historical and recent changes in catchments of the both rivers influencing floods are described (land-use, regulations of rivers, water reservoirs). Basic analysis of floods is presented for the period of systematic hydrological measurements (water stages or discharges) with respect to their severity (expressed by N-year return period) and seasonality of floods for the four hydrological stations in Brno and its surroundings. Examples of selected flood events with analysis of meteorological causes, hydrological course and impacts are presented. The most severe floods occurred in March 1941 and August-September 1938. Information about floods from the instrumental period is extended by flood information derived from different documentary evidence. Long-term chronology of Brno floods (since 1650) combining documentary and instrumental data is presented and discussed in the context of climate variability.

  3. Bayesian flood forecasting methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shasha; Coulibaly, Paulin

    2017-08-01

    Over the past few decades, floods have been seen as one of the most common and largely distributed natural disasters in the world. If floods could be accurately forecasted in advance, then their negative impacts could be greatly minimized. It is widely recognized that quantification and reduction of uncertainty associated with the hydrologic forecast is of great importance for flood estimation and rational decision making. Bayesian forecasting system (BFS) offers an ideal theoretic framework for uncertainty quantification that can be developed for probabilistic flood forecasting via any deterministic hydrologic model. It provides suitable theoretical structure, empirically validated models and reasonable analytic-numerical computation method, and can be developed into various Bayesian forecasting approaches. This paper presents a comprehensive review on Bayesian forecasting approaches applied in flood forecasting from 1999 till now. The review starts with an overview of fundamentals of BFS and recent advances in BFS, followed with BFS application in river stage forecasting and real-time flood forecasting, then move to a critical analysis by evaluating advantages and limitations of Bayesian forecasting methods and other predictive uncertainty assessment approaches in flood forecasting, and finally discusses the future research direction in Bayesian flood forecasting. Results show that the Bayesian flood forecasting approach is an effective and advanced way for flood estimation, it considers all sources of uncertainties and produces a predictive distribution of the river stage, river discharge or runoff, thus gives more accurate and reliable flood forecasts. Some emerging Bayesian forecasting methods (e.g. ensemble Bayesian forecasting system, Bayesian multi-model combination) were shown to overcome limitations of single model or fixed model weight and effectively reduce predictive uncertainty. In recent years, various Bayesian flood forecasting approaches have been

  4. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  5. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  6. Floods Risk Management in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Güiza Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The last rainy season 2010-2011 resulted in Colombia in around 500 casualties and more than 3.6 million of victims. Although this rainfall term accounted for one of the strongest it was not an unprecedented event since for more than fifty years this phenomenon has been taking place in the same Colombian regions producing casualties and victims. This fact makes us to think about the public management by authorities regarding flooding prevention in our country. This article elaborates on this topic explaining the risk management system in case of flooding in Colombia. It shows some national figures of the main ravages brought about by the 2010 2011 rainy seasons. Finally the article analyzes two cases of study of how operational is this public policy in risk management: La Mojana and Canal del Dique regions. It was evident that the state failed in managing the risk management from flooding because despite the important investment, every year the victims, casualties and material damages are increasing steadily.

  7. Predicting floods with Flickr tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Nataliya; Jarvis, Stephen; Procter, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, user generated content (UGC) in social media postings and their associated metadata such as time and location stamps are being used to provide useful operational information during natural hazard events such as hurricanes, storms and floods. The main advantage of these new sources of data are twofold. First, in a purely additive sense, they can provide much denser geographical coverage of the hazard as compared to traditional sensor networks. Second, they provide what physical sensors are not able to do: By documenting personal observations and experiences, they directly record the impact of a hazard on the human environment. For this reason interpretation of the content (e.g., hashtags, images, text, emojis, etc) and metadata (e.g., keywords, tags, geolocation) have been a focus of much research into social media analytics. However, as choices of semantic tags in the current methods are usually reduced to the exact name or type of the event (e.g., hashtags '#Sandy' or '#flooding'), the main limitation of such approaches remains their mere nowcasting capacity. In this study we make use of polysemous tags of images posted during several recent flood events and demonstrate how such volunteered geographic data can be used to provide early warning of an event before its outbreak.

  8. Use of amine oxide surfactants for chemical flooding EOR (enhanced oil recovery)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1989-11-01

    The use of amine oxides with and without alcohols as cosolvents, and in combination with other surfactants as mixed micellar formulations for enhanced oil recovery by surfactant flooding was investigated. Amine oxides are a salt-tolerant class of surfactants that produce low interfacial tension and can develop viscosity without the addition of polymers. These salt-tolerant formulations generate three-phase regions with hydrocarbons over a broad salinity range, develop moderate solubilization, and produce low interfacial tensions, however oil recovery from amine oxide-alcohol phase behavior optimized formulations was directly dependent upon the quantity of surfactant injected. The large pore volume and high concentration of surfactant required prohibits their economic use as the primary surfactant in chemical flooding EOR. Dimethylalkylamine oxides are useful as cosurfactants and viscosifiers in formulations with other surfactants for chemical flooding EOR but the use of ethoxylated and propoxylated amine oxides should be avoided due to the decomposition of these amine oxides under reservoir conditions. Phase behavior, phase inversion temperatures, and viscosity scans have been correlated with surfactant structures to provide a guide for amine oxide applications in chemical flooding. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. THERMAL PROPERTY, MISCIBILITY AND CRYSTALLIZATION BEHAVIOR OF POLY(3-HYDROXYBUTYRATE-co 3-YDROXYHEXANOATE) AND POLY(BUTYLENE SUCCINATE-ADIPATE) (PHBHHX/PBSA) BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) and poly(butylene succinate-adipate) (PBSA), both biodegradable semicrystalline polyesters, were prepared with the ratio of PHBHHx/PBSA ranging from 80/20 to 20/80 by melt mixing method. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA), polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and wide angle X-ray diffractometer (WAXD) were used to study the miscibility and crystallization behavior of PHBHHx/PBSA blends. Experimental results indicate that PHBHHx is immiscible with PBSA as shown by the almost unchanged glass transition temperature and the biphasic melt.

  10. Noncoalescence of sessile drops from different but miscible liquids: hydrodynamic analysis of the twin drop contour as a self-stabilizing traveling wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Riegler, Hans

    2012-08-10

    Capillarity always favors drop fusion. Nevertheless, sessile drops from different but completely miscible liquids often do not fuse instantaneously upon contact. Rather, intermediate noncoalescence is observed. Two separate drop bodies, connected by a thin liquid neck, move over the substrate. Supported by new experimental data, a thin film hydrodynamic analysis of this state is presented. Presumably advective and diffusive volume fluxes in the neck region establish a localized and temporarily stable surface tension gradient. This induces a local surface (Marangoni) flow that stabilizes a traveling wave, i.e., the observed moving twin drop configuration. The theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. Non-coalescence of sessile drops from different but miscible liquids: Hydrodynamic analysis of the twin drop contour as self stabilizing, traveling wave

    CERN Document Server

    Karpitschka, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Capillarity always favors drop fusion. Nevertheless sessile drops from different but completely miscible liquids often do not fuse instantaneously upon contact. Rather, intermediate non-coalescence is observed. Two separate drop bodies, connected by a thin liquid neck move over the substrate. Supported by new experimental data a thin film hydrodynamic analysis of this state is presented. Presumably advective and diffusive volume fluxes in the neck region establish a localized and temporarily stable surface tension gradient. This induces a local surface (Marangoni) flow that stabilizes a traveling wave i.e., the observed moving twin drop configuration. The theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Miscibility,Thermal Stability,Rheological and Mechanical Properties of Blends Derived from Polysulfone Oligomer and Poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guimei WANG; Xigao JIAN; Gongxiong LIAO; Lihao WU

    2004-01-01

    Poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK) was melt blended with bisphenol-A polysulfone oligomer (O-PSF)to produce a thermoplastic polymer blends. The miscibility, thermal stability, theological and mechanical properties of the blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and capillary rheometry. The blends showed single Tg over the composition range and possess homogeneous microstructure. The addition of O-PSF slightly affected the thermal properties of the blends. PSF oligomer, as a processing aid, could markedly improve the processability of the PPESK. In addition, the mechanical properties of the blends were increased, to some degree, by adding O-PSF.

  13. Miscibility of Two Components in a Binary Mixture of 9-Phenyl Anthracene Mixed with Stearic Acid or Polymethyl Methacrylate at Air-Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. K. Paul; Md. N. Islam; D. Bhattacharjee; S. A. Hussain

    2007-01-01

    We report the miscibility characteristics of two components in a binary mixture of 9-phenyl anthracene (PA) mixed with stearic acid (SA) or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The behaviour of surface pressure versus area per molecule isotherms reveal that the area per molecule decreases systematically with increasing molefractions of PA. The characteristics of areas per molecule versus molefractions and collapse pressure vs molefraction indicate that various interactions involved among the sample and matrix molecules. The interaction scheme is found to change with the change in surface pressure and molefraction of mixing. Scanning electron microscopic study confirms the aggregation of PA molecules in the mixed films.

  14. Flood risk modelling based on tangible and intangible urban flood damage quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Veldhuis, J A E; Clemens, F H L R

    2010-01-01

    The usual way to quantify flood damage is by application stage-damage functions. Urban flood incidents in flat areas mostly result in intangible damages like traffic disturbance and inconvenience for pedestrians caused by pools at building entrances, on sidewalks and parking spaces. Stage-damage functions are not well suited to quantify damage for these floods. This paper presents an alternative method to quantify flood damage that uses data from a municipal call centre. The data cover a period of 10 years and contain detailed information on consequences of urban flood incidents. Call data are linked to individual flood incidents and then assigned to specific damage classes. The results are used to draw risk curves for a range of flood incidents of increasing damage severity. Risk curves for aggregated groups of damage classes show that total flood risk related to traffic disturbance is larger than risk of damage to private properties, which in turn is larger than flood risk related to human health. Risk curves for detailed damage classes show how distinctions can be made between flood risks related to many types of occupational use in urban areas. This information can be used to support prioritisation of actions for flood risk reduction. Since call data directly convey how citizens are affected by urban flood incidents, they provide valuable information that complements flood risk analysis based on hydraulic models.

  15. Development of flood risk mapping in Kota Tinggi, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, T. H.

    2014-02-01

    Flood risk maps provide valuable information for development of flood risk management. Geospatial technology and modeling enable us to monitor natural disasters around the world. Flooding is the most severe natural disaster that causing huge economic losses every year. Flood risk maps are an essential tool for assessing the consequences of flooding. The main aim of this study is to initiate a framework to develop a local-based flood risk map. Flood risk maps can be produced by using integration of geospatial technology and hydrodynamic modeling. Results show that a flood risk map for Kota Tinggi is produced with unsatisfactory information in term of flood damage.

  16. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  17. Advances in Remote Sensing of Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the publication of eight original research articles, four types of advances in the remote sensing of floods are achieved. The uncertainty of modeled outputs using precipitation datasets derived from in situ observations and remote sensors is further understood. With the terrestrial laser scanner and airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR coupled with high resolution optical and radar imagery, researchers improve accuracy levels in estimating the surface water height, extent, and flow of floods. The unmanned aircraft system (UAS can be the game changer in the acquisition and application of remote sensing data. The UAS may fly everywhere and every time when a flood event occurs. With the development of urban structure maps, the flood risk and possible damage is well assessed. The flood mitigation plans and response activities become effective and efficient using geographic information system (GIS-based urban flood vulnerability and risk maps.

  18. Effects of increased flooding on riparian vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garssen, Annemarie G.; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Riis, Tenna

    2017-01-01

    In many parts of the world, the magnitude and frequency of cold-season precipitation are expected to increase in the near future. This will result in an increased magnitude and duration of winter and spring flooding by rain-fed streams and rivers. Such climate-driven increases in flooding...... of 3 years. We assessed the responses in riparian plant species richness, biomass, plant-available nitrogen and phosphorus and seed deposition to increased flooding depth (+18 cm on average at the lowest positions along the riparian gradient) and prolonged flooding duration (6 weeks on average). After...... 3 years of increased flooding, there was an overall decline in riparian species richness, while riparian plant biomass increased. Extractable soil nitrogen and phosphorus also increased and are likely to have contributed to the increased biomass. Increased flooding resulted in the arrival of more...

  19. [Climate changes, floods, and health consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelozzi, Paola; de' Donato, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    In the European Region, floods are the most common natural disaster, causing extensive damage and disruption. In Italy, it has been estimated that over 68% of municipalities are at high hydrogeological risk and with the recent intense rainfall events local populations have been facing severe disruptions. The health consequences of floods are wide ranging and are dependent upon the vulnerability of the environment and the local population. Health effects can be a direct or indirect consequence of flooding. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, heart attacks, injuries and hypothermia. The indirect effects include, injuries and infections, water-borne infectious disease, mental health problems, respiratory disease and allergies in both the medium and long term after a flood. Future efforts should be addressed to integrate health preparedness and prevention measures into emergency flood plans and hydrological warning systems.

  20. Visualization and Damage Assessment for Flooded Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Guozhong; YAN Li; LIU Nan; LIU Renyi

    2004-01-01

    A practical method for visualizing flood area and evaluating damage is presented, which consists of two technical approaches: self-programming and adapting commercial GIS platforms. The low-cost and easy-to-use GIS-Based model developed by self-programming can meet current requirements of most local authorities, especially in developing countries. In this model, two cases, non-source flood and source flood, are distinguished and the Seed-spread algorithm suitable for source-flood is discussed; The flood damage is assessed by overlaying the flood area range with thematic maps and other related social and economic data. and all thematic maps are converted to raster format before overlay analysis. Two measures are taken to improve the operation efficiency of speed seed-spread algorithm. The accuracy of the model mainly depends on the resolution and precision of the DEM data, and the accuracy of registering all raster layers and the quality of attribute data.