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Sample records for hydrocarbon gravimetric method

  1. Gravimetric and titrimetric methods of analysis

    Rives, R.D.; Bruks, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Gravimetric and titrimetric methods of analysis are considered. Methods of complexometric titration are mentioned, as well as methods of increasing sensitivity in titrimetry. Gravimetry and titrimetry are applied during analysis for traces of geological materials

  2. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, C.G.; Souza, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The zirconium determination in refractories is described, consisting in two separation methods for eliminating the interferences. The formatted product is calcined at 1100 0 C and determined gravimetrically as Zr P z 07. (author)

  3. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, P.G.; Souza, J.R. de

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric method for zirconium determination in refractories is described. X-ray fluorescence analysis is also employed in this experiment and considerations about interfering elements are presented. (M.V.M.)

  4. Residual gravimetric method to measure nebulizer output.

    Vecellio None, Laurent; Grimbert, Daniel; Bordenave, Joelle; Benoit, Guy; Furet, Yves; Fauroux, Brigitte; Boissinot, Eric; De Monte, Michele; Lemarié, Etienne; Diot, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a residual gravimetric method based on weighing dry filters to measure the aerosol output of nebulizers. This residual gravimetric method was compared to assay methods based on spectrophotometric measurement of terbutaline (Bricanyl, Astra Zeneca, France), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurement of tobramycin (Tobi, Chiron, U.S.A.), and electrochemical measurements of NaF (as defined by the European standard). Two breath-enhanced jet nebulizers, one standard jet nebulizer, and one ultrasonic nebulizer were tested. Output produced by the residual gravimetric method was calculated by weighing the filters both before and after aerosol collection and by filter drying corrected by the proportion of drug contained in total solute mass. Output produced by the electrochemical, spectrophotometric, and HPLC methods was determined after assaying the drug extraction filter. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between the residual gravimetric method (x axis) and assay methods (y axis) in terms of drug mass output (y = 1.00 x -0.02, r(2) = 0.99, n = 27). We conclude that a residual gravimetric method based on dry filters, when validated for a particular agent, is an accurate way of measuring aerosol output.

  5. Determining the better solvent and time for extracting soil by soxhlet in TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon) gravimetric method; A determinacao de qual o melhor solvente e o melhor tempo de extracao de sedimento em aparato Soxhlet na metodologia do TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon) gravimetrico

    Koike, Renato S.; Lima, Guilherme; Baisch, Paulo R. [Fundacao Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    There are several methods of TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminants in sediment. The TPH gravimetric has been widely used in many studies and in oil spill monitoring case. The present work examined three different solvents (DCM, DCM/N-HEX and N-HEX), in three different times, to the purpose to optimize the contaminants extraction using USEPA 9071 and 3540 reference method. Then was realized analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) for monitoring the reproducible extracts. The sediments used in this experiment was collected in the Cavalos Island, localized in the city of Rio Grande, RS-Brasil. The sediment was 'washed' and after then contaminated with petroleum. The extracts were realized in Soxhlet apparatus, in three different times (4, 8 and 12 hours), and TOC analysis were realized before and after the extraction. The result demonstrated that eight hours with DCM/N-HEX solvent is more indicated for TPH gravimetric in sediment analysis with high concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons. TOC analysis demonstrated inappropriate for monitoring extract reproducibility. (author)

  6. Gravimetric method for the determination of diclofenac in pharmaceutical preparations.

    Tubino, Matthieu; De Souza, Rafael L

    2005-01-01

    A gravimetric method for the determination of diclofenac in pharmaceutical preparations was developed. Diclofenac is precipitated from aqueous solution with copper(II) acetate in pH 5.3 (acetic acid/acetate buffer). Sample aliquots had approximately the same quantity of the drug content in tablets (50 mg) or in ampules (75 mg). The observed standard deviation was about +/- 2 mg; therefore, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was approximately 4% for tablet and 3% for ampule preparations. The results were compared with those obtained with the liquid chromatography method recommended in the United States Pharmacopoeia using the statistical Student's t-test. Complete agreement was observed. It is possible to obtain more precise results using higher aliquots, for example 200 mg, in which case the RSD falls to 1%. This gravimetric method, contrary to what is expected for this kind of procedure, is relatively fast and simple to perform. The main advantage is the absolute character of the gravimetric analysis.

  7. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  8. Gravimetric method for in vitro calibration of skin hydration measurements.

    Martinsen, Ørjan G; Grimnes, Sverre; Nilsen, Jon K; Tronstad, Christian; Jang, Wooyoung; Kim, Hongsig; Shin, Kunsoo; Naderi, Majid; Thielmann, Frank

    2008-02-01

    A novel method for in vitro calibration of skin hydration measurements is presented. The method combines gravimetric and electrical measurements and reveals an exponential dependency of measured electrical susceptance to absolute water content in the epidermal stratum corneum. The results also show that absorption of water into the stratum corneum exhibits three different phases with significant differences in absorption time constant. These phases probably correspond to bound, loosely bound, and bulk water.

  9. Determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions - Gravimetric method

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the concentration of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions and reference solutions, containing between 100 and 300 g of plutonium per litre, in a nitric acid medium. The weighed portion of the plutonium nitrate is treated with sulfuric acid and evaporated to dryness. The plutonium sulfate is decomposed and formed to oxide by heating in air. The oxide is ignited in air at 1200 to 1250 deg. C and weighed as stoichiometric plutonium dioxide, which is stable and non-hygroscopic

  10. A new and simple gravimetric method for determination of uranium

    Saxena, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    A new and simple gravimetric method for determining uranium has been described. Using a known quantity of uranyl nitrate as the test solution, an alcoholic solution of 2-amino-2-methyl 1:3 propanediol (AMP) was added slowly. A yellow precipitate was obtained which was filtered through ashless filter paper, washed with alcohol, dried and ignited at 800 degC for 4h. It gave a black powder as a product which was shown by X-ray diffraction to be U 3 O 8 . The percentage error was found in the range -0.09 to +0.89. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  11. Determination of uranium by a gravimetric-volumetric titration method

    Krtil, J.

    1998-01-01

    A volumetric-gravimetric modification of a method for the determination of uranium based on the reduction of uranium to U (IV) in a phosphoric acid medium and titration with a standard potassium dichromate solution is described. More than 99% of the stoichiometric amount of the titrating solution is weighed and the remainder is added volumetrically by using the Mettler DL 40 RC Memotitrator. Computer interconnected with analytical balances collects continually the data on the analyzed samples and evaluates the results of determination. The method allows to determine uranium in samples of uranium metal, alloys, oxides, and ammonium diuranate by using aliquot portions containing 30 - 100 mg of uranium with the error of determination, expressed as the relative standard deviation, of 0.02 - 0.05%. (author)

  12. Comparison of Potentiometric and Gravimetric Methods for Determination of O/U Ratio

    Farida; Windaryati, L; Putro Kasino, P

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of determination O/U ratio by using potentiometric and gravimetric methods has been done. Those methods are simple, economical and having high precision and accuracy. Determination O/U ratio for UO 2 powder using potentiometric is carried out by adopting the davies-gray method. This technique is based on the redox reaction of uranium species such as U(IV) and U(VI). In gravimetric method,the UO 2 power as a sample is calcined at temperature of 900 C, and the weight of the sample is measured after calcination process. The t-student test show that there are no different result significantly between those methods. However, for low concentration in the sample the potentiometric method has a highed precision and accuracy compare to the gravimetric method. O/U ratio obtained is 2.00768 ± 0,00170 for potentiometric method 2.01089 ± 0,02395 for gravimetric method

  13. A comparison of four gravimetric fine particle sampling methods.

    Yanosky, J D; MacIntosh, D L

    2001-06-01

    A study was conducted to compare four gravimetric methods of measuring fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations in air: the BGI, Inc. PQ200 Federal Reference Method PM2.5 (FRM) sampler; the Harvard-Marple Impactor (HI); the BGI, Inc. GK2.05 KTL Respirable/Thoracic Cyclone (KTL); and the AirMetrics MiniVol (MiniVol). Pairs of FRM, HI, and KTL samplers and one MiniVol sampler were collocated and 24-hr integrated PM2.5 samples were collected on 21 days from January 6 through April 9, 2000. The mean and standard deviation of PM2.5 levels from the FRM samplers were 13.6 and 6.8 microg/m3, respectively. Significant systematic bias was found between mean concentrations from the FRM and the MiniVol (1.14 microg/m3, p = 0.0007), the HI and the MiniVol (0.85 microg/m3, p = 0.0048), and the KTL and the MiniVol (1.23 microg/m3, p = 0.0078) according to paired t test analyses. Linear regression on all pairwise combinations of the sampler types was used to evaluate measurements made by the samplers. None of the regression intercepts was significantly different from 0, and only two of the regression slopes were significantly different from 1, that for the FRM and the MiniVol [beta1 = 0.91, 95% CI (0.83-0.99)] and that for the KTL and the MiniVol [beta1 = 0.88, 95% CI (0.78-0.98)]. Regression R2 terms were 0.96 or greater between all pairs of samplers, and regression root mean square error terms (RMSE) were 1.65 microg/m3 or less. These results suggest that the MiniVol will underestimate measurements made by the FRM, the HI, and the KTL by an amount proportional to PM2.5 concentration. Nonetheless, these results indicate that all of the sampler types are comparable if approximately 10% variation on the mean levels and on individual measurement levels is considered acceptable and the actual concentration is within the range of this study (5-35 microg/m3).

  14. Comparison of fine particle measurements from a direct-reading instrument and a gravimetric sampling method.

    Kim, Jee Young; Magari, Shannon R; Herrick, Robert F; Smith, Thomas J; Christiani, David C

    2004-11-01

    Particulate air pollution, specifically the fine particle fraction (PM2.5), has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality in general population studies. Occupational exposure to fine particulate matter can exceed ambient levels by a large factor. Due to increased interest in the health effects of particulate matter, many particle sampling methods have been developed In this study, two such measurement methods were used simultaneously and compared. PM2.5 was sampled using a filter-based gravimetric sampling method and a direct-reading instrument, the TSI Inc. model 8520 DUSTTRAK aerosol monitor. Both sampling methods were used to determine the PM2.5 exposure in a group of boilermakers exposed to welding fumes and residual fuel oil ash. The geometric mean PM2.5 concentration was 0.30 mg/m3 (GSD 3.25) and 0.31 mg/m3 (GSD 2.90)from the DUSTTRAK and gravimetric method, respectively. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient for the gravimetric and DUSTTRAK PM2.5 concentrations was 0.68. Linear regression models indicated that log, DUSTTRAK PM2.5 concentrations significantly predicted loge gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations (p gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations was found to be modified by surrogate measures for seasonal variation and type of aerosol. PM2.5 measurements from the DUSTTRAK are well correlated and highly predictive of measurements from the gravimetric sampling method for the aerosols in these work environments. However, results from this study suggest that aerosol particle characteristics may affect the relationship between the gravimetric and DUSTTRAK PM2.5 measurements. Recalibration of the DUSTTRAK for the specific aerosol, as recommended by the manufacturer, may be necessary to produce valid measures of airborne particulate matter.

  15. Comparison of neutron scattering, gravimetric and tensiometric methods for measuring soil water content in the field

    Jat, R.L.; Das, D.K.; Naskar, G.C.

    1975-01-01

    Water content of a sandy clay loam soil was measured by neutron scattering, gravimetric and tensiometric methods. Tensiometric measurement based on laboratory moisture retention curve gave comparatively higher moisture content than those obtained by other methods. No significant differences were observed among neutron meter, gravimetric and tensiometric measurement based on field calibration curve. Though for irrigation purposes all the methods can be used equally, use of tensiometric method with field calibration curve is suggested for easy and more accurate soil water content measurement where neutron meter is not available. (author)

  16. Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    1990-01-01

    This international Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the uranium content in uranyl nitrate product solutions of nuclear grade quality at concentrations above 100 g/l of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method. Uranyl nitrate is converted into uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ) by ignition in air to constant mass at 900 deg. C ± 10 deg. C. Calculation of the uranium content in the sample using a gravimetric conversion factor which depends on the isotopic composition of the uranium. The isotopic composition is determined by mass spectrometry

  17. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    2003-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the mass fraction of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality containing more than 100 g/kg of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method

  18. Determination of molybdenum by the gravimetric plumbate method (with the molybdenum content from 50 % and above)

    Stepin, V.V.; Kurbatova, V.I.; Fedorova, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    A gravimetric method of molybdenum determination in ferromolybdenum (Mo content from 50% and higher) after its dissolving in HNO 3 is developed. The method is based on Mo deposition in acetic acid solution in the form of molybdenum oxide lead after separation of Fe and other interfering elements with sodium hydroxide [ru

  19. A gravimetric simplified method for nucleated marrow cell counting using an injection needle.

    Saitoh, Toshiki; Fang, Liu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2005-08-01

    A simplified gravimetric marrow cell counting method for rats is proposed for a regular screening method. After fresh bone marrow was aspirated by an injection needle, the marrow cells were suspended in carbonate buffered saline. The nucleated marrow cell count (NMC) was measured by an automated multi-blood cell analyzer. When this gravimetric method was applied to rats, the NMC of the left and right femurs had essentially identical values due to careful handling. The NMC at 4 to 10 weeks of age in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats was 2.72 to 1.96 and 2.75 to 1.98 (x10(6) counts/mg), respectively. More useful information for evaluation could be obtained by using this gravimetric method in addition to myelogram examination. However, some difficulties with this method include low NMC due to blood contamination and variation of NMC due to handling. Therefore, the utility of this gravimetric method for screening will be clarified by the accumulation of the data on myelotoxicity studies with this method.

  20. Measuring intestinal fluid transport in vitro: Gravimetric method versus non-absorbable marker.

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Genz, Janet; Grosell, Martin; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-04-01

    The gut sac is a long-standing, widely used in vitro preparation for studying solute and water transport, and calculation of these fluxes requires an accurate assessment of volume. This is commonly determined gravimetrically by measuring the change in mass over time. While convenient this likely under-estimates actual net water flux (Jv) due to tissue edema. We evaluated whether the popular in vivo volume marker [(14)C]-PEG 4000, offers a more representative measure of Jvin vitro. We directly compared these two methods in five teleost species (toadfish, flounder, rainbow trout, killifish and tilapia). Net fluid absorption by the toadfish intestine based on PEG was significantly higher, by almost 4-fold, compared to gravimetric measurements, compatible with the latter under-estimating Jv. Despite this, PEG proved inconsistent for all of the other species frequently resulting in calculation of net secretion, in contrast to absorption seen gravimetrically. Such poor parallelism could not be explained by the absorption of [(14)C]-PEG (typically gravimetric method therefore remains the most reliable measure of Jv and we urge caution in the use of PEG as a volume marker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adsorption characteristics of methane on Maxsorb III by gravimetric method

    Thu, Kyaw

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption characteristics of CH4 on the carbonaceous porous material is evaluated for possible application in adsorbed natural gas (ANG) system. Adsorption uptakes at assorted temperatures (25-80 °C) and pressures ranging from ambient to relatively high pressure i.e., 8.0 MPa are experimentally investigated. Surface characteristics such as pore surface area, micropore volume and pore size distribution of the adsorbent (Maxsorb III) are first evaluated using Classical Volumetric Method i.e., the manometric method with N2 gas adsorption at 77 K. The sorption measurements for methane, CH4 gas are carried out by thermogravimetric (TGA) method using magnetic suspension balance coupled with the automatic dosing system. The buoyancy measurements were first conducted using Helium gas as adsorbate. Buoyancy correction is applied to all sets of measured data and the specific uptake capacities (g/g of adsorbent) at various temperatures and pressures were calculated. The isotherm data were then fitted using Langmuir and Tòth isotherm models. It is observed that the data can be satisfactorily fitted using Tòth model with excellent fitting accuracy around 2.2% within the experimental range. The outcome of the present study especially the adsorption data at high pressures is applicable to accurate design and modeling of Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG) systems. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrocarbon productivities in different Botryococcus strains: comparative methods in product quantification.

    Eroglu, Ela; Okada, Shigeru; Melis, Anastasios

    2011-08-01

    Six different strains of the green microalgae Botryococcus belonging to the A-race or B-race, accumulating alkadiene or botryococcene hydrocarbons, respectively, were compared for biomass and hydrocarbon productivities. Biomass productivity was assessed gravimetrically upon strain growth in the laboratory under defined conditions. Hydrocarbon productivities were measured by three different and independent experimental approaches, including density equilibrium of the intact cells and micro-colonies, spectrophotometric analysis of hydrocarbon extracts, and gravimetric quantitation of eluted hydrocarbons. All three hydrocarbon-quantitation methods yielded similar results for each of the strains examined. The B-race microalgae Botryococcus braunii var. Showa and Kawaguchi-1 constitutively accumulated botryococcene hydrocarbons equivalent to 30% and 20%, respectively, of their overall biomass. The A-race microalgae Botryococcus braunii, varieties Yamanaka, UTEX 2441 and UTEX LB572 constitutively accumulated alkadiene hydrocarbons ranging from 14% to 13% and 10% of their overall biomass, respectively. Botryococcus sudeticus (UTEX 2629), a morphologically different green microalga, had the lowest hydrocarbon accumulation, equal to about 3% of its overall biomass. Results validate the density equilibrium and spectrophotometric analysis methods in the quantitation of botryococcene-type hydrocarbons. These analytical advances will serve in the screening and selection of B. braunii and of other microalgae in efforts to identify those having a high hydrocarbon content for use in commercial applications.

  3. Comparison of macro-gravimetric and micro-colorimetric lipid determination methods.

    Inouye, Laura S; Lotufo, Guiherme R

    2006-10-15

    In order to validate a method for lipid analysis of small tissue samples, the standard macro-gravimetric method of Bligh-Dyer (1959) [E.G. Bligh, W.J. Dyer, Can. J. Biochem. Physiol. 37 (1959) 911] and a modification of the micro-colorimetric assay developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1 (1985) 302] were compared. No significant differences were observed for wet tissues of two species of fish. However, limited analysis of wet tissue of the amphipod, Leptocheirusplumulosus, indicated that the Bligh-Dyer gravimetric method generated higher lipid values, most likely due to the inclusion of non-lipid materials. Additionally, significant differences between the methods were observed with dry tissues, with the micro-colorimetric method consistently reporting calculated lipid values greater than as reported by the gravimetric method. This was most likely due to poor extraction of dry tissue in the standard Bligh-Dyer method, as no significant differences were found when analyzing a single composite extract. The data presented supports the conclusion that the micro-colorimetric method described in this paper is accurate, rapid, and minimizes time and solvent use.

  4. Some technical details concerning a new method of gravimetric-seismic inversion

    Strykowski, Gabriel

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a number of technical details related to a new method of gravimetric-seismic inversion, which is still under development, are explained. Although the present contribution aims on providing general statements on how to formulate and solve complex gravimetric-seismic modeling; problems......, the inspiration comes from the practical modeling problems in the area of Jutland peninsula (Denmark). More specifically, the methodological aspects of the proposed inversion method are illustrated on a problem of 3D modeling of the intra crustal intrusion associated with the Silkeborg Gravity High. The existing...... refraction seismic profile locates the source of the anomaly in depths 10 km - 18 km. In an earlier publication, (Strykowski, 1998), and for the same test area, a method of complex geological stripping is described. The present contribution is a continuation of this paper in the direction of inversion...

  5. Technical note: Comparison of metal-on-metal hip simulator wear measured by gravimetric, CMM and optical profiling methods

    Alberts, L. Russell; Martinez-Nogues, Vanesa; Baker Cook, Richard; Maul, Christian; Bills, Paul; Racasan, R.; Stolz, Martin; Wood, Robert J. K.

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of wear in artificial joint implants is critical for evaluating implant designs and materials. Traditional protocols employ the gravimetric method to determine the loss of material by measuring the weight of the implant components before and after various test intervals and after the completed test. However, the gravimetric method cannot identify the location, area coverage or maximum depth of the wear and it has difficulties with proportionally small weight changes in relatively heavy implants. In this study, we compare the gravimetric method with two geometric surface methods; an optical light method (RedLux) and a coordinate measuring method (CMM). We tested ten Adept hips in a simulator for 2 million cycles (MC). Gravimetric and optical methods were performed at 0.33, 0.66, 1.00, 1.33 and 2 MC. CMM measurements were done before and after the test. A high correlation was found between the gravimetric and optical methods for both heads (R 2  =  0.997) and for cups (R 2  =  0.96). Both geometric methods (optical and CMM) measured more volume loss than the gravimetric method (for the heads, p  =  0.004 (optical) and p  =  0.08 (CMM); for the cups p  =  0.01 (optical) and p  =  0.003 (CMM)). Two cups recorded negative wear at 2 MC by the gravimetric method but none did by either the optical method or by CMM. The geometric methods were prone to confounding factors such as surface deformation and the gravimetric method could be confounded by protein absorption and backside wear. Both of the geometric methods were able to show the location, area covered and depth of the wear on the bearing surfaces, and track their changes during the test run; providing significant advantages to solely using the gravimetric method.

  6. Uncertainty associated with assessing semen volume: are volumetric and gravimetric methods that different?

    Woodward, Bryan; Gossen, Nicole; Meadows, Jessica; Tomlinson, Mathew

    2016-12-01

    The World Health Organization laboratory manual for the examination of human semen suggests that an indirect measurement of semen volume by weighing (gravimetric method) is more accurate than a direct measure using a serological pipette. A series of experiments were performed to determine the level of discrepancy between the two methods using pipettes and a balance which had been calibrated to a traceable standard. The median weights of 1.0ml and 5.0ml of semen were 1.03 g (range 1.02-1.05 g) and 5.11 g (range 4.95-5.16 g), respectively, suggesting a density for semen between 1.03g and 1.04 g/ml. When the containers were re-weighed after the removal of 5.0 ml semen using a serological pipette, the mean residual loss was 0.12 ml (120 μl) or 0.12 g (median 100 μl, range 70-300 μl). Direct comparison of the volumetric and gravimetric methods in a total of 40 samples showed a mean difference of 0.25ml (median 0.32 ± 0.67ml) representing an error of 8.5%. Residual semen left in the container by weight was on average 0.11 g (median 0.10 g, range 0.05-0.19 g). Assuming a density of 1 g/ml then the average error between volumetric and gravimetric methods was approximately 8% (p gravimetric measurement of semen volume. Laboratories may therefore prefer to provide in-house quality assurance data in order to be satisfied that 'estimating' semen volume is 'fit for purpose' as opposed to assuming a lower uncertainty associated with the WHO recommended method.

  7. Simplified method for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium with α-hydroxy carboxylic acids

    Barbieri, R.S.; Rocha, J.C.; Terra, V.R.; Marques Netto, A.

    1989-01-01

    The conditions for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium by glicoloc acids derivatives were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The method utilized shownd that after precipitation, washing and drying of precipitates at 150 o C, the resulting solid was weighed in the form of [M (RCH(OH)COO) 4 ] (M = Zr, Hf; R + C 6 H 5 , β-C 10 H 7 , p-BrC 6 H 4 ). (author)

  8. Modified method for zirconium or hafnium gravimetric determination with glycolic acid derivatives

    Barbieri, R.S.; Rocha, J.C.; Terra, V.R.; Marques Neto, A.

    1989-01-01

    The conditions for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium by glicolic acid derivatives were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The method utilized shown that after precipitation, washing and drying of precipitates at 150 0 C, the resulting solid was weighed in the form of [M{RCH(OH)COO} 4 ] (M = Zr,Hf;R = C 6 H 5 , β-C 10 H 7 ,p-BrC 6 H 4 ). (author) [pt

  9. A highly accurate method for determination of dissolved oxygen: Gravimetric Winkler method

    Helm, Irja; Jalukse, Lauri; Leito, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Probably the most accurate method available for dissolved oxygen concentration measurement was developed. ► Careful analysis of uncertainty sources was carried out and the method was optimized for minimizing all uncertainty sources as far as practical. ► This development enables more accurate calibration of dissolved oxygen sensors for routine analysis than has been possible before. - Abstract: A high-accuracy Winkler titration method has been developed for determination of dissolved oxygen concentration. Careful analysis of uncertainty sources relevant to the Winkler method was carried out and the method was optimized for minimizing all uncertainty sources as far as practical. The most important improvements were: gravimetric measurement of all solutions, pre-titration to minimize the effect of iodine volatilization, accurate amperometric end point detection and careful accounting for dissolved oxygen in the reagents. As a result, the developed method is possibly the most accurate method of determination of dissolved oxygen available. Depending on measurement conditions and on the dissolved oxygen concentration the combined standard uncertainties of the method are in the range of 0.012–0.018 mg dm −3 corresponding to the k = 2 expanded uncertainty in the range of 0.023–0.035 mg dm −3 (0.27–0.38%, relative). This development enables more accurate calibration of electrochemical and optical dissolved oxygen sensors for routine analysis than has been possible before.

  10. [Determination of total, soluble and insoluble dietary fiber in foods by enzymatic-gravimetric method].

    Yang, X; Yang, Y; Zhou, R; Bian, L

    2001-11-01

    For studying the contents of dietary fiber in general foods and functional foods, a enzymatic-gravimetric method recommended by AOAC was established in our laboratory. The method for the determination of total, soluble and insoluble dietary fiber in foods and functional foods could be used for many other kind of foods. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of reproducibility between-run and within-run were 2.04%-7.85%, 3.42%-55.23% respectively. The repeatability of the methods was good, and the methods are suitable for many foods.

  11. Erosion of water-based cements evaluated by volumetric and gravimetric methods.

    Nomoto, Rie; Uchida, Keiko; Momoi, Yasuko; McCabe, John F

    2003-05-01

    To compare the erosion of glass ionomer, zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements using volumetric and gravimetric methods. For the volumetric method, the eroded depth of cement placed in a cylindrical cavity in PMMA was measured using a dial gauge after immersion in an eroding solution. For the gravimetric method, the weight of the residue of a solution in which a cylindrical specimen had been immersed was measured. 0.02 M lactic acid solution (0.02 M acid) and 0.1 M lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer solution (0.1 M buffer) were used as eroding solutions. The pH of both solutions was 2.74 and the test period was 24 h. Ranking of eroded depth and weight of residue was polycarboxylate>zinc phosphate>glass ionomers. Differences in erosion were more clearly defined by differences in eroded depth than differences in weight of residue. In 0.02 M acid, the erosion of glass ionomer using the volumetric method was effected by the hygroscopic expansion. In 0.1 M buffer, the erosion for polycarboxylate and zinc phosphate using the volumetric method was much greater than that using the gravimetric method. This is explained by cryo-SEM images which show many holes in the surface of specimens after erosion. It appears that zinc oxide is dissolved leaving a spongy matrix which easily collapses under the force applied to the dial gauge during measurement. The volumetric method that employs eroded depth of cement using a 0.1 M buffer solution is able to quantify erosion and to make material comparisons.

  12. Comparison of Metal-on-Metal Hip Simulator Wear Measured by Gravimetric, CMM and Optical Profiling Methods

    Alberts, Larry Russell; Martinez-Nogues, Vanesa; Cook, Richard; Maul, Christian; Bills, Paul J.; Racasan, Radu; Stolz, Martin; Wood, Robert J. K.

    2018-01-01

    Simulation of wear in artificial joint implants is critical for evaluating implant designs and materials. Traditional protocols employ the gravimetric method to determine the loss of material by measuring the weight of the implant components before and after various test intervals and after the completed test. However, the gravimetric method cannot identify the location, area coverage or maximum depth of the wear and it has difficulties with proportionally small weight changes in relatively h...

  13. Gravimetric water distribution assessment from geoelectrical methods (ERT and EMI) in municipal solid waste landfill.

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Dzaomuho-Lenieregue, Phidias; Hiligsmann, Serge; Delvigne, Frank; Thonart, Philippe; Robert, Tanguy; Nguyen, Frédéric; Hermans, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The gravimetric water content of the waste material is a key parameter in waste biodegradation. Previous studies suggest a correlation between changes in water content and modification of electrical resistivity. This study, based on field work in Mont-Saint-Guibert landfill (Belgium), aimed, on one hand, at characterizing the relationship between gravimetric water content and electrical resistivity and on the other hand, at assessing geoelectrical methods as tools to characterize the gravimetric water distribution in a landfill. Using excavated waste samples obtained after drilling, we investigated the influences of the temperature, the liquid phase conductivity, the compaction and the water content on the electrical resistivity. Our results demonstrate that Archie's law and Campbell's law accurately describe these relationships in municipal solid waste (MSW). Next, we conducted a geophysical survey in situ using two techniques: borehole electromagnetics (EM) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). First, in order to validate the use of EM, EM values obtained in situ were compared to electrical resistivity of excavated waste samples from corresponding depths. The petrophysical laws were used to account for the change of environmental parameters (temperature and compaction). A rather good correlation was obtained between direct measurement on waste samples and borehole electromagnetic data. Second, ERT and EM were used to acquire a spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity. Then, using the petrophysical laws, this information was used to estimate the water content distribution. In summary, our results demonstrate that geoelectrical methods represent a pertinent approach to characterize spatial distribution of water content in municipal landfills when properly interpreted using ground truth data. These methods might therefore prove to be valuable tools in waste biodegradation optimization projects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photometrically measured continuous personal PM(2.5) exposure: levels and correlation to a gravimetric method.

    Lanki, Timo; Alm, Sari; Ruuskanen, Juhani; Janssen, Nicole A H; Jantunen, Matti; Pekkanen, Juha

    2002-05-01

    There is evidence that hourly variations in exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) may be associated with adverse health effects. Still there are only few published data on short-term levels of personal exposure to PM in community settings. The objectives of the study were to assess hourly and shorter-term variations in personal PM(2.5) exposure in Helsinki, Finland, and to compare results from portable photometers to simultaneously measured gravimetric concentrations. The effect of relative humidity on the photometric results was also evaluated. Personal PM(2.5) exposures of elderly persons were assessed for 24 h every second week, resulting in 308 successful measurements from 47 different subjects. Large changes in concentrations in minutes after cooking or changing microenvironment were seen. The median of daily 1-h maxima was over twice the median of 24-h averages. There was a strong significant association between the two means, which was not linear. Median (95th percentile) of the photometric 24-h concentrations was 12.1 (37.7) and of the 24-h gravimetric concentrations 9.2 (21.3) microg/m3. The correlation between the photometric and the gravimetric method was quite good (R2=0.86). Participants spent 94.1% of their time indoors or in a vehicle, where relative humidity is usually low and thus not likely to cause significant effects on photometric results. Even outdoors, the relative humidity had only modest effect on concentrations. Photometers are a promising method to explore the health effects of short-term variation in personal PM(2.5) exposure.

  15. Near infrared spectrometry for faecal fat measurement: comparison with conventional gravimetric and titrimetric methods.

    Benini, L; Caliari, S; Guidi, G C; Vaona, B; Talamini, G; Vantini, I; Scuro, L A

    1989-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at comparing a new method for measuring faecal fat excretion, carried out with a semi-automated instrument by using near infrared analysis (NIRA), with the traditional titrimetric (Van de Kamer) and gravimetric (Sobel) methods. Near infrared analysis faecal fat was assayed on the three day stool collection from 118 patients (68 chronic pancreatitis, 19 organic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, 19 alcoholic liver disease, 12 functional gastrointestinal disorders). A strict linear correlation was found between NIRA and both the titrimetric (r = 0.928, p less than 0.0001) and the gravimetric (r = 0.971, p less than 0.0001) methods. On homogenised faeces, a mean coefficient of variation of 2.1 (SD 1.71)% was found. Before homogenisation (where a mean coefficient of variation of 7% was found) accurate results were obtained when the mean of five measurements was considered. In conclusion, the assay of faecal fat excretion by the near infrared reflessometry appears a simple, rapid and reliable method for measuring steatorrhoea. PMID:2583563

  16. The Comparison Of Silicon Analysis For The Uranium Silicide Fuel Using Spectrophotometrical And Gravimetrical Methods

    Putro, P. K.; Suripto, A.; Putra, S.; Gunanjar

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of silicon content in the uranium silicide fuel spectro-photometrical and gravimetrical method have been performed. The nitrous oxide-acetylene was used in the atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) on the wave length of 251.6 nm, and the mixture of ammonium hepta molybdate complexes and SnC1 2 as reductor were applied during analysis by UV-VIS spectrophotometry (UV-VIS) on the wave length of 757.5 mm. The reagent of HCLO 4 and HNO 3 were used for determining Si content by gravimetrical methods. The results of this comparison is as follows: the accuracy result is around 96.37 % + 0.24 % for the Si concentration up to 300 ppm (the AAS), is 138.60 % = 0.43 % for the Si concentration range between 0.1-1.5 ppm (UV-VIS), and is 51.13 % + 0.8 % for 1 gram of Si (gravimetry). The results also show that the lowest analytical error is obtained by AAS method

  17. Determination of uranium in coated fuel particle compact by potassium fluoride fusion-gravimetric method

    Ito, Mitsuo; Iso, Shuichi; Hoshino, Akira; Suzuki, Shuichi.

    1992-03-01

    Potassium fluoride-gravimetric method has been developed for the determination of uranium in TRISO type-coated fuel particle compact. Graphite matrix in the fuel compact is burned off by heating it in a platinum crucible at 850degC. The coated fuel particles thus obtained are decomposed by fusion with potassium fluoride at 900degC. The melt was dissolved with sulfuric acid. Uranium is precipitated as ammonium diuranate, by passing ammonia gas through the solution. The resulting precipitate is heated in a muffle furnace at 850degC, to convert uranium into triuranium octoxide. Uranium in the triuranium octoxide was determined gravimetrically. Ten grams of caoted fuel particles were completely decomposed by fusion with 50 g of potassium fluoride at 900degC for 3 hrs. Analytical result for uranium in the fuel compact by the proposed method was 21.04 ± 0.05 g (n = 3), and was in good agreement with that obtained by non-destructive γ-ray measurement method : 21.01 ± 0.07 g (n = 3). (author)

  18. Comparison of gravimetric, creamatocrit and esterified fatty acid methods for determination of total fat content in human milk.

    Du, Jian; Gay, Melvin C L; Lai, Ching Tat; Trengove, Robert D; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2017-02-15

    The gravimetric method is considered the gold standard for measuring the fat content of human milk. However, it is labor intensive and requires large volumes of human milk. Other methods, such as creamatocrit and esterified fatty acid assay (EFA), have also been used widely in fat analysis. However, these methods have not been compared concurrently with the gravimetric method. Comparison of the three methods was conducted with human milk of varying fat content. Correlations between these methods were high (r(2)=0.99). Statistical differences (Pmethods. Overall, stronger correlation with lower mean (4.73g/L) and percentage differences (5.16%) was observed with the creamatocrit than the EFA method when compared to the gravimetric method. Furthermore, the ease of operation and real-time analysis make the creamatocrit method preferable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable highpressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method.

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T; Horn, Jarod C; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO 2 and supercritical N 2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  20. Evaluation of the gravimetric tetraphenylarsonium method for the determination of Tc(VII)

    Pacer, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Solubility losses in the gravimetric tetraphenylarsonium method for determining pertechnetate have been evaluated. Liquid scintillation counting was used to measure the β - activity of 99 Tc in the filtrate, and indicated solubility losses of about 1% in analyses yielding 40 to 50 mg of precipitate. The solubility product of (C 6 H 5 ) 4 AsTcO 4 is estimated to be (8.6 +- 0.2) x 10 -10 at room temperature (24 to 25 0 ), and Ksub(sp) for (C 6 H 5 ) 4 AsReO 4 at approximately 21 to 23 0 is estimated at (2.6 +- 0.3) x 10 -9 . Both values are satisfactory for gravimetric purposes, but to keep solubility losses within 1% at least 40 mg of (C 6 H 5 ) 4 AsTcO 4 or 80 mg of (C 6 H 5 ) 4 AsReO 4 should be obtained (assuming 20 ml of solution, 20 to 30% excess of precipitant, and 6 or 7 washes with 5-ml portions of distilled water). (author)

  1. Comparison between thermo balance and classic gravimetric method for determination of suspended solids in sludge from wastewater treatment plant

    Bruzzone, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper two methods for determination of suspended solids in sludge from wastewater treatment plants (activated, thickened and dry, in a range from 0.1 to 20-25%) are compared. Results are similar from statistic point of view between classic gravimetric method and thermo balance method. However the later seems better for its rapid and easy execution. [it

  2. Time-Resolved Gravimetric Method To Assess Degassing of Roasted Coffee.

    Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Suzuki, Tomonori; Balsiger, Franz; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2018-05-30

    During the roasting of coffee, thermally driven chemical reactions lead to the formation of gases, of which a large fraction is carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Part of these gases is released during roasting while part is retained inside the porous structure of the roasted beans and is steadily released during storage or more abruptly during grinding and extraction. The release of CO 2 during the various phases from roasting to consumption is linked to many important properties and characteristics of coffee. It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup. Indeed, and in view of the multiple roles it plays, CO 2 is a much underappreciated and little examined molecule in coffee. Here, we introduce an accurate, quantitative, and time-resolved method to measure the release kinetics of gases from whole beans and ground coffee using a gravimetric approach. Samples were placed in a container with a fitted capillary to allow gases to escape. The time-resolved release of gases was measured via the weight loss of the container filled with coffee. Long-term stability was achieved using a customized design of a semimicro balance, including periodic and automatic zero value measurements and calibration procedures. The novel gravimetric methodology was applied to a range of coffee samples: (i) whole Arabica beans and (ii) ground Arabica and Robusta, roasted to different roast degrees and at different speeds (roast air temperatures). Modeling the degassing rates allowed structural and mechanistic interpretation of the degassing process.

  3. Mass change distribution inverted from space-borne gravimetric data using a Monte Carlo method

    Zhou, X.; Sun, X.; Wu, Y.; Sun, W.

    2017-12-01

    Mass estimate plays a key role in using temporally satellite gravimetric data to quantify the terrestrial water storage change. GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) only observes the low degree gravity field changes, which can be used to estimate the total surface density or equivalent water height (EWH) variation, with a limited spatial resolution of 300 km. There are several methods to estimate the mass variation in an arbitrary region, such as averaging kernel, forward modelling and mass concentration (mascon). Mascon method can isolate the local mass from the gravity change at a large scale through solving the observation equation (objective function) which represents the relationship between unknown masses and the measurements. To avoid the unreasonable local mass inverted from smoothed gravity change map, regularization has to be used in the inversion. We herein give a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to objectively determine the regularization parameter for the non-negative mass inversion problem. We first apply this approach to the mass inversion from synthetic data. Result show MCMC can effectively reproduce the local mass variation taking GRACE measurement error into consideration. We then use MCMC to estimate the ground water change rate of North China Plain from GRACE gravity change rate from 2003 to 2014 under a supposition of the continuous ground water loss in this region. Inversion result show that the ground water loss rate in North China Plain is 7.6±0.2Gt/yr during past 12 years which is coincident with that from previous researches.

  4. Dynamic study of adsorbers by a new gravimetric version of the Large Temperature Jump method

    Sapienza, Alessio; Santamaria, Salvatore; Frazzica, Andrea; Freni, Angelo; Aristov, Yuri I.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have carried out a dynamic study of adsorbers. • Activity performed by new gravimetric version of the Large Temperature Jump method. • The kinetics measurements have been carried out under real operating conditions. • Results can support the design of adsorbers for adsorption cooling systems. - Abstract: This paper presents a new experimental setup devoted to measure the ad-/desorption kinetics of an Ad-HEX (adsorbent + heat exchanger) under typical boundary conditions of an Adsorption Heat Transformer (AHT) as well as the results of the first test campaign carried out. The experimental apparatus can be considered as a gravimetric version of the known Large Temperature Jump method. In fact, the dynamic evolution of the uptake during the isobaric ad-/desorption stages is directly measured by a weighing system suitable to work in the range of 5–600 g of sample mass (adsorbent + HEX) with the accuracy ±0.1 g and the time response shorter than 0.1 s The experimental campaign was conducted on an Ad-HEX composed of granules of a commercial SAPO-34 adsorbent placed on a flat type aluminum HEX, under operating conditions reproducing two different thermodynamic cycles (T h = 90 °C, T e = 10 °C, T c = 30 and 35 °C), typical for adsorption air conditioning. The influence of the grain size (ranging from 0.350 to 2.5 mm) on the adsorption dynamics both in monolayer and multilayer configurations at variable and constant “heat transfer surface/adsorbent mass” ratios (S/m) was studied. The results showed that, for the Ad-HEX configurations tested, the adsorption dynamics can be properly described by a modified Linear Driving Force approach by the use of a single temperature-invariant characteristic time τ. The invariance of the specific cooling power was revealed when the S/m ratio was kept constant (S/m = 1.23 m 2 /kg). This ratio is found to be a useful parameter for both assessment of the dynamic perfection and optimization of various Ad

  5. Determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides by a gravimetric alkaline earth addition method

    Fujino, T.; Tagawa, H.

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of a gravimetric method based on alkaline earth metal addition for the determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides of the tupe M-U-O (M=La, Ce and Th) is described. The oxide sample is mixed with MgO or Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) and heated in air under suitable conditions. Because uranium is completely oxidized to the hexavalent state during the reaction, oxygen can be determined from the weight change. Oxygen in Lasub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) is determined up to y = 0.8 with a standard deviation for x of +- 0.006 with MgO. For Thsub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) the value of x is determined with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) with a standard deviation of +- 0.01 at y = 0.8. For Cesub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x), the method can be applied only for low cerium concentrations where y = 0-0.2; the value for x with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) at y = 0.2 showed a standard deviation of +- 0.002. (Auth.)

  6. A gravimetric method for the measurement of total spontaneous activity in rats.

    Biesiadecki, B J; Brand, P H; Koch, L G; Britton, S L

    1999-10-01

    Currently available methods for the measurement of spontaneous activity of laboratory animals require expensive, specialized equipment and may not be suitable for use in low light conditions with nocturnal species. We developed a gravimetric method that uses common laboratory equipment to quantify the total spontaneous activity of rats and is suitable for use in the dark. The rat in its home cage is placed on a top-loading electronic balance interfaced to a computer. Movements are recorded by the balance as changes in weight and transmitted to the computer at 10 Hz. Data are analyzed on-line to derive the absolute value of the difference in weight between consecutive samples, and the one-second average of the absolute values is calculated. The averages are written to file for off-line analysis and summed over the desired observation period to provide a measure of total spontaneous activity. The results of in vitro experiments demonstrated that: 1) recorded weight changes were not influenced by position of the weight on the bottom of the cage, 2) values recorded from a series of weight changes were not significantly different from the calculated values, 3) the constantly decreasing force exerted by a swinging pendulum placed on the balance was accurately recorded, 4) the measurement of activity was not influenced by the evaporation of a fluid such as urine, and 5) the method can detect differences in the activity of sleeping and waking rats over a 10-min period, as well as during 4-hr intervals recorded during active (night-time) and inactive (daytime) periods. These results demonstrate that this method provides an inexpensive, accurate, and noninvasive method to quantitate the spontaneous activity of small animals.

  7. Comparison of gravimetric and gas chromatographic methods for assessing performance of textile materials against liquid pesticide penetration.

    Shaw, Anugrah; Abbi, Ruchika

    2004-01-01

    Penetration of liquid pesticides through textile materials is a criterion for determining the performance of protective clothing used by pesticide handlers. The pipette method is frequently used to apply liquid pesticides onto textile materials to measure penetration. Typically, analytical techniques such as Gas Chromatography (GC) are used to measure percentage penetration. These techniques are labor intensive and costly. A simpler gravimetric method was developed, and tests were conducted to compare the gravimetric and GC methods of analysis. Three types of pesticide formulations and 4 fabrics were used for the study. Diluted pesticide formulations were pipetted onto the test specimens and percentage penetration was measured using the 2 methods. For homogeneous formulation, the results of the two methods were fairly comparable. However, due to the filtering action of the textile materials, there were differences in the percentage penetration between the 2 methods for formulations that were not homogeneous.

  8. Comparison of gravimetric and spectrophotometric methods for the determination of O/U ratios in uranium oxides

    Esteban, Adolfo; Eppis, Maria Rosa

    2004-01-01

    One important parameter to specify in nuclear fuels is the oxygen-metal ratio; many tests were described in literature to determine it. Possibly, gravimetric methods are the most used and usually a good precision was obtained analysing sintered materials. However, the humidity sorbed in the samples and impurities affect these methods, especially in powders. On the other hand, the spectrophotometric methods determine oxygen-uranium ratio by measuring the absorbances of different ionic species in phosphoric acid. This technique is simply and is not affected by humidity and impurities. Owing to discrepancy in the results between both methods, it was carried out in our laboratory, a study on various gravimetric and spectrophotometric methods. Several assays and analysis were performed comparing test procedures, trying to obtain better precision and accuracy. This work presents the results obtained and the recommend procedure to use with sintered and unsintered materials

  9. Method for the Collection, Gravimetric and Chemical Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) on Surfaces

    Gordon, Keith; Rutherford, Gugu; Aranda, Denisse

    2017-01-01

    Nonvolatile residue (NVR), sometimes referred to as molecular contamination is the term used for the total composition of the inorganic and high boiling point organic components in particulates and molecular films deposited on critical surfaces surrounding space structures, with the particulate and NVR contamination originating primarily from pre-launch operations. The "nonvolatile" suggestion from the terminology NVR implies that the collected residue will not experience much loss under ambient conditions. NVR has been shown to have a dramatic impact on the ability to perform optical measurements from platforms based in space. Such contaminants can be detected early by the controlled application of various detection techniques and contamination analyses. Contamination analyses are the techniques used to determine if materials, components, and subsystems can be expected to meet the performance requirements of a system. Of particular concern is the quantity of NVR contaminants that might be deposited on critical payload surfaces from these sources. Subsequent chemical analysis of the contaminant samples by infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectrometry identifies the components, gives semi-quantitative estimates of contaminant thickness, indicates possible sources of the NVR, and provides guidance for effective cleanup procedures. In this report, a method for the collection and determination of the mass of NVR was generated by the authors at NASA Langley Research Center. This report describes the method developed and implemented for collecting NVR contaminants, and procedures for gravimetric and chemical analysis of the residue obtained. The result of this NVR analysis collaboration will help pave the way for Langley's ability to certify flight hardware outgassing requirements in support of flight projects such as Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Materials International

  10. Method for the conversion of hydrocarbon charges

    Whittam, T V

    1976-11-11

    The basis of the invention is the application of defined zeolites as catalysts to hydrocarbon conversion processes such as reformation, isomerization, dehydrocyclization, and cracking. By charging the zeolite carrier masses with 0.001 to 5% metal of the 8th group of the periodic system, preferably noble metals, a wide region of applications for the catalysts is achieved. A method for the isomerization of an alkyl benzene (or mixture of alkyl benzenes) in the liquid or gas phase under suitable temperature, pressure and flow-rate conditions, as well as in the presence of a cyclic hydrocarbon, is described as preferential model form of the invention; furthermore, a method for the reformation of a hydrocarbon fraction boiling in the gasoline or benzene boiling region and a method for the hydrocracking of hydrocarbon charge (e.g. naphtha, kerosine, gas oils) are given. Types of performance of the methods are explained using various examples.

  11. [Evaluation of the AOAC 985.29 enzimic gravimetric method for determination of dietary fiber in oat and corn grains].

    da Silva, Leila Picolli; Ciocca, Maria de Lourdes Santorio; Furlong, Eliana Badiale

    2003-12-01

    The precision attributes and use of the enzymatic-gravimetric method of Prosky et al. (1992) (AOAC 985.29) were evaluated using corn (BR 5202 Pampa) and oat (UFRGS 15) samples. The effect of laboratory batches carried out in different days were evaluated in six laboratory batches, using for each material one duplicate for total fiber (FT) determination, one duplicate for insoluble fiber (FI) determination and blank ones for FT and for FI (both in duplicate). In order to characterize repetitive aspects, five other FT and FI determinations added to each sample were evaluated, summing up 11 data. The low coefficients of variation in the first six batches were considered acceptable as an expression of expected total intralaboratory variation. The repetitive of the method was considered good for FT determinations (CVs gravimetric corrections varies with the kind of the sample and is especially influenced by the protein content.

  12. Method of recovering hydrocarbons from oil shale

    Walton, D.K.; Slusser, M.S.

    1970-11-24

    A method is described for recovering hydrocarbons from an oil-shale formation by in situ retorting. A well penetrating the formation is heated and gas is injected until a pressure buildup within the well is reached, due to a decrease in the conductivity of naturally occurring fissures within the formation. The well is then vented, in order to produce spalling of the walls. This results in the formation of an enlarged cavity containing rubberized oil shale. A hot gas then is passed through the rubberized oil shale in order to retort hydrocarbons and these hydrocarbons are recovered from the well. (11 claims)

  13. Comparison Of Metal Corrosion Inhibition By Gravimetric And Linear Polarization Resistance Methods

    Banerji, Shankha

    1992-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various dosages of the selected silicate and phosphate compounds applied for corrosion inhibition of cast iron, copper, lead, and galvanized steel specimens. The compounds selected for study were zinc polyphosphate (Calgon C-39), zinc orthophosphate (Virchem V-931), sodium metasilicate and glassy silicate. The effectiveness of these compounds for corrosion inhibition were studied under differing water quality conditions using gravimetric...

  14. Comparison of gas chromatographic and gravimetric methods for quantization of total fat and fatty acids in foodstuffs

    Sabria Aued-Pimentel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Different methods to determine total fat (TF and fatty acids (FA, including trans fatty acids (TFA, in diverse foodstuffs were evaluated, incorporating gravimetric methods and gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID, in accordance with a modified AOAC 996.06 method. Concentrations of TF and FA obtained through these different procedures diverged (p< 0.05 and TFA concentrations varied beyond 20 % of the reference values. The modified AOAC 996.06 method satisfied both accuracy and precision, was fast and employed small amounts of low toxicity solvents. Therefore, the results showed that this methodology is viable to be adopted in Brazil for nutritional labeling purposes.

  15. A problem in gravimetric method for the determination of rare earth elements as oxide after the fluoride separation

    Takada, Kunio

    1979-01-01

    For the gravimetric determination of lanthanum, it was precipitated as fluoride and converted to oxide by igniting (ca. 930 0 C) in a town gas flame. However, the oxidation of lanthanum fluoride by ignition was incomplete, the major part of the precipitate being converted to oxyfluoride (LaOF) and a mixture of oxide and oxyfluoride resulted. Therefore, analytical results were generally (5 -- 7)% higher than theoretically expected. The lanthanum fluoride became converted into the oxide by repeating ignition (ca. 1070 0 C) three times, each for (30 -- 40)min. However, the weight was lower than that of the corresponding sesquioxide, La 2 O 3 . Except for ytterbium and lutetium, gravimetric results as oxides for the other rare earth elements (Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) were higher than theoretical values. Therefore, the precipitation of the rare earth elements as fluoride and the subsequent determination as oxide by ignition of the fluoride could not be recommended as the gravimetric method for the rare earths. In order to obtain accurate results for major to minor amounts of the rare earth elements, an EDTA titration at pH 6 should be used after the dissolution of fluoride in acid, if the fluoride precipitation separation is involved. (author)

  16. Alternatives to the gravimetric method for quantification of diesel particulate matter near the lower level of detection.

    Swanson, Jacob; Kittelson, David; Pui, David; Watts, Winthrop

    2010-10-01

    This paper is part of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association's 2010 special issue on combustion aerosol measurements. The issue is a combination of papers that synthesize and evaluate ideas and perspectives that were presented by experts at a series of workshops sponsored by the Coordinating Research Council that aimed to evaluate the current and future status of diesel particulate matter (DPM) measurement. Measurement of DPM is a complex issue with many stakeholders, including air quality management and enforcement agencies, engine manufacturers, health experts, and climatologists. Adoption of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2007 heavy-duty engine DPM standards posed a unique challenge to engine manufacturers. The new standards reduced DPM emissions to the point that improvements to the gravimetric method were required to increase the accuracy and the sensitivity of the measurement. Despite these improvements, the method still has shortcomings. The objectives of this paper are to review the physical and chemical properties of DPM that make gravimetric measurement difficult at very low concentrations and to review alternative metrics and methods that are potentially more accurate, sensitive, and specific. Particle volatility, size, surface area, and number metrics are considered, as well as methods to quantify them. Although the authors believe that an alternative method is required to meet the needs of engine manufacturers, the methods reviewed in the paper are applicable to other areas where the gravimetric method detection limit is approached and greater accuracy and sensitivity are required. The paper concludes by suggesting a method to measure active surface area, combined with a method to separate semi-volatile and solid fractions to further increase the specificity of the measurement, has potential for reducing the lower detection limit of DPM and enabling engine manufacturers to reduce DPM emissions in the future.

  17. Investigations on vertical crustal movements in the Venezuelan Andes by gravimetric methods

    Drewes, H.

    1978-01-01

    A precise gravimetric network has been installed in the Venezuelan Andes to study eventual gravity changes due to vertical tectonic movements. The design and the measurements of the network are described and the accuracy is estimated. In the center of the region a local gravity network has been reobserved three times. The detected variations are discussed. In order to obtain a genuine statement as far as possible about the significance of observed gravity changes, requirements for the procedure of monitoring precise gravity networks are pointed out.

  18. Comparison of the gravimetric, phenol red, and 14C-PEG-3350 methods to determine water absorption in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion model.

    Sutton, S C; Rinaldi, M T; Vukovinsky, K E

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the gravimetric method provided an accurate measure of water flux correction and to compare the gravimetric method with methods that employ nonabsorbed markers (eg, phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350). Phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and 4-[2-[[2-(6-amino-3-pyridinyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]ethoxy]-, methyl ester, (R)-benzene acetic acid (Compound I) were co-perfused in situ through the jejunum of 9 anesthetized rats (single-pass intestinal perfusion [SPIP]). Water absorption was determined from the phenol red,14C-PEG-3350, and gravimetric methods. The absorption rate constant (ka) for Compound I was calculated. Both phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350 were appreciably absorbed, underestimating the extent of water flux in the SPIP model. The average +/- SD water flux microg/h/cm) for the 3 methods were 68.9 +/- 28.2 (gravimetric), 26.8 +/- 49.2 (phenol red), and 34.9 +/- 21.9 (14C-PEG-3350). The (average +/- SD) ka for Compound I (uncorrected for water flux) was 0.024 +/- 0.005 min(-1). For the corrected, gravimetric method, the average +/- SD was 0.031 +/- 0.001 min(-1). The gravimetric method for correcting water flux was as accurate as the 2 "nonabsorbed" marker methods.

  19. Validation of phenol red versus gravimetric method for water reabsorption correction and study of gender differences in Doluisio's absorption technique.

    Tuğcu-Demiröz, Fatmanur; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Marta; Bermejo, Marival

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a method for water flux reabsorption measurement in Doluisio's Perfusion Technique based on the use of phenol red as a non-absorbable marker and to validate it by comparison with gravimetric procedure. The compounds selected for the study were metoprolol, atenolol, cimetidine and cefadroxil in order to include low, intermediate and high permeability drugs absorbed by passive diffusion and by carrier mediated mechanism. The intestinal permeabilities (Peff) of the drugs were obtained in male and female Wistar rats and calculated using both methods of water flux correction. The absorption rate coefficients of all the assayed compounds did not show statistically significant differences between male and female rats consequently all the individual values were combined to compare between reabsorption methods. The absorption rate coefficients and permeability values did not show statistically significant differences between the two strategies of concentration correction. The apparent zero order water absorption coefficients were also similar in both correction procedures. In conclusion gravimetric and phenol red method for water reabsorption correction are accurate and interchangeable for permeability estimation in closed loop perfusion method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Champ, Martine; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A method for the determination of total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates high- and low-molecular-weight dietary fiber (HMWDF and LMWDF, respectively). In 2007, McCleary described a method of extended enzymatic digestion at 37 degrees C to simulate human intestinal digestion followed by gravimetric isolation and quantitation of HMWDF and the use of LC to quantitate low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF). The method thus quantitates the complete range of dietary fiber components from resistant starch (by utilizing the digestion conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02) to digestion resistant oligosaccharides (by incorporating the deionization and LC procedures of AOAC Method 2001.03). The method was evaluated through an AOAC collaborative study. Eighteen laboratories participated with 16 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 11.57 to 47.83%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02 followed by the isolation and gravimetric procedures of AOAC Methods 985.29 and 991.43 results in quantitation of HMWDF. The filtrate from the quantitation of HMWDF is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the LMWSDF, i.e., all nondigestible oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization > or =3. TDF is calculated as the sum of HMWDF and LMWSDF. Repeatability standard deviations (Sr) ranged from 0.41 to 1.43, and reproducibility standard deviations (S(R)) ranged from 1.18 to 5.44. These results are comparable to other official dietary fiber methods, and the method is recommended for adoption as Official First Action.

  1. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable high-pressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T.; Horn, Jarod C.; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D.; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO2 and supercritical N2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  2. Determination of hydrogen in zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride by inert gas exraction-gravimetric method

    Hoshino, Akira; Iso, Shuichi

    1976-01-01

    An inert gas extraction-gravimetric method has been applied to the determination of hydrogen in zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride which are used as neutron moderator and fuel of nuclear safety research reactor (NSRR), respectively. The sample in a graphite-enclosed quartz crucible is heated inductively to 1200 0 C for 20 min in a helium stream. Hydrogen liberated from the sample is oxidized to water by copper(I) oxide-copper(II) oxide at 400 0 C, and the water is determined gravimetrically by absorption in anhydrone. The extraction curves of hydrogen for zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride samples are shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Hydrogen in the samples is extracted quantitatively by heating at (1000 -- 1250) 0 C for (10 -- 40) min. Recoveries of hydrogen in the case of zirconium hydride were examined as follows: a weighed zirconium rod (5 phi x 6 mm, hydrogen -5 Torr. After the chamber was filled with purified hydrogen to 200 Torr, the rod was heated to 400 0 C for 15 h, and again weighed to determine the increase in weight. Hydrogen in the rod was then determined by the proposed method. The results are in excellent agreement with the increase in weight as shown in Table 1. Analytical results of hydrogen in zirconium hydride samples and an uranium-zirconium hydride sample are shown in Table 2. (auth.)

  3. Comparison of the gravimetric, phenol red, and 14C-PEG-3350 methods to determine water absorption in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion model

    Sutton, Steven C.; Rinaldi, M. T. S.; Vukovinsky, K. E.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the gravimetric method provided an accurate measure of water flux correction and to compare the gravimetric method with methods that employ nonabsorbed markers (eg, phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350). Phenol red, 14C-PEG-3350, and 4-[2-[[2-(6-amino-3-pyridinyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]ethoxy]-methyl ester, (R)-benzene acetic acid (Compound I) were co-perfused in situ through the jejunum of 9 anesthetized rats (single-pass intestinal perfusion [SPIP]). Wat...

  4. Determinations of total residue, total oxide and density of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) by gravimetric method

    Li Yun; Gao Yueying; Yang Ming; Jin Liyun

    1992-01-01

    Gravimetric method for determination of total residue, total oxide and density of HLLW is developed. An aliquot of the original HLLW solution is piped on to the small quartz disc and put into the mini muffle furnace carefully. It is first heated to below 100 degree C (for 1.5 hours to remove the free water, and then heated to 180 degree C for 2 hours to remove the crystal water in a furnace. The total residue is weighed at room temperature. The precision is better than 3% for the determination of total residue and total oxide. An aliquot of the original HLLW solution is piped into the weighing bottle and weighed. The precision is better than 1%

  5. Determination of insoluble, soluble, and total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of insoluble (IDF), soluble (SDF), and total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates water-insoluble and water-soluble dietary fiber. This method extends the capabilities of the previously adopted AOAC Official Method 2009.01, Total Dietary Fiber in Foods, Enzymatic-Gravimetric-Liquid Chromatographic Method, applicable to plant material, foods, and food ingredients consistent with CODEX Definition 2009, including naturally occurring, isolated, modified, and synthetic polymers meeting that definition. The method was evaluated through an AOAC/AACC collaborative study. Twenty-two laboratories participated, with 19 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 10.45 to 29.90%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC 2002.02 followed by the isolation, fractionation, and gravimetric procedures of AOAC 985.29 (and its extensions 991.42 and 993.19) and 991.43 results in quantitation of IDF and soluble dietary fiber that precipitates (SDFP). The filtrate from the quantitation of water-alcohol-insoluble dietary fiber is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the SDF that remains soluble (SDFS), i.e., all dietary fiber polymers of degree of polymerization = 3 and higher, consisting primarily, but not exclusively, of oligosaccharides. SDF is calculated as the sum of SDFP and SDFS. TDF is calculated as the sum of IDF and SDF. The within-laboratory variability, repeatability SD (Sr), for IDF ranged from 0.13 to 0.71, and the between-laboratory variability, reproducibility SD (SR), for IDF ranged from 0.42 to 2.24. The within

  6. A method of refining aromatic hydrocarbons from coal chemical production

    Zieborak, K.; Koprowski, A.; Ratajczak, W.

    1979-10-01

    A method is disclosed for refining aromatic hydrocarbons of coal chemical production by contact of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons and their mixtures with a strongly acid macroporous sulfocationite in the H-form at atmospheric pressure and high temperature. The method is distinguished in that the aromatic hydrocarbons and their mixtures, from which alkali compounds have already been removed, are supplied for refinement with the sulfocationite with simultaneous addition of olefin derivatives of aromatic hydrocarbons, followed by separation of pure hydrocarbons by rectification. Styrene or alpha-methylstyrene is used as the olefin derivatives of the aromatic hydrocarbons. The method is performed in several stages with addition of olefin derivatives of aromatic hydrocarbons at each stage.

  7. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss.

    Vitello, Dominic J; Ripper, Richard M; Fettiplace, Michael R; Weinberg, Guy L; Vitello, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R (2) = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R (2) value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R (2) value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water.

  8. Comprehensive measurement of total nondigestible carbohydrates in foods by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography.

    Nishibata, Toyohide; Tashiro, Kouichi; Kanahori, Sumiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Kitagawa, Machiko; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Gordon, Dennis T

    2009-09-09

    Total nondigestible carbohydrate (NDC) in foods was determined by combining, not modifications, AOAC Official Methods 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02. Total NDC included insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) + high-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (HMWSDF), nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) not precipitated in ethanol solution, and resistant starch (RS). Eight sources of NDC (cellulose, wheat bran, gum arabic, resistant maltodextrin, polydextrose, fructooligosaccharide, galactooligosaccharides, and RS) were incorporated in different combinations into standard formula bread samples. All of the NDC sources and bread samples were analyzed for their (1) IDF + HMWSDF content with corrections for residual RS amount using AOAC Official Method 991.43, (2) NDO by liquid chromatography (LC) in AOAC Official Method 2001.03, and (3) RS by AOAC Official Method 2002.02. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) comparing calculated amounts versus measured amounts of total NDC in 11 bread samples was 0.92. Analysis of commercial food samples was also well matched with the DF + NDO value on their nutritional label. Consequently, we confirmed a single measurement of LC can determine all NDO in foods, and total NDC in foods can be determined by unifying existing AOAC Official Methods.

  9. Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1985-04-16

    A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

  10. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of the O/M ratio in MOX pellets - Gravimetric method

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio in mixed uranium-plutonium oxide pellets. The (U,Pu)O 2 x sample is submitted to controlled oxidation-reduction under thermodynamic conditions designed to change the O/M ratio to a value of 2,000. The initial stoichiometric deviation, X, is determined from the sample mass difference before and after heat treatment

  11. Gravimetric screening method for fungal decay of paper: inoculation with Trametes versicolor.

    Råberg, Ulrika; Hafrén, Jonas

    2009-10-01

    The European standard test EN 113 for fungal degradation of solid wood has been adapted for degradation of paper by white rot fungus (Trametes versicolor). Fungal degradation of paper sheets may potentially be used for screening different wood preservatives on paper instead of solid wood. The paper samples showed higher relative mass losses compared to wood, and samples pretreated with boric acid, copper sulfate and polymerized linseed oil were successfully tested for biodegradation using the paper sheet method. The results on paper degradation were compared with wood, both as wood blocks (according to standard test) and wood cut in sections forming layered structures mimicking paper layers.

  12. Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) in Environmentally Controlled Areas for Spacecraft

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue (NVR) fallout in environmentally controlled areas used for the assembly, testing, and processing of spacecraft. 1.2 The NVR of interest is that which is deposited on sampling plate surfaces at room temperature: it is left to the user to infer the relationship between the NVR found on the sampling plate surface and that found on any other surfaces. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  13. Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue From Cleanroom Wipers

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of solvent extractable nonvolatile residue (NVR) from wipers used in assembly, cleaning, or testing of spacecraft, but not from those used for analytical surface sampling of hardware. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 The NVR of interest is that which can be extracted from cleanroom wipers using a specified solvent that has been selected for its extractive qualities. Alternative solvents may be selected, but since their use may result in different values being generated, they must be identified in the procedure data sheet. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue from Cleanroom Gloves

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of solvent extractable nonvolatile residue (NVR) from gloves used in cleanrooms where spacecraft are assembled, cleaned, or tested. 1.2 The NVR of interest is that which can be extracted from gloves using a specified solvent that has been selected for its extracting qualities, or because it is representative of solvents used in the particular facility. Alternative solvents may be used, but since their use may result in different values being generated, they must be identified in the procedure data sheet. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Evaluation of purity with its uncertainty value in high purity lead stick by conventional and electro-gravimetric methods.

    Singh, Nahar; Singh, Niranjan; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Soni, Daya; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K

    2013-06-26

    A conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry study has been carried out for the precise and accurate purity determination of lead (Pb) in high purity lead stick and for preparation of reference standard. Reference materials are standards containing a known amount of an analyte and provide a reference value to determine unknown concentrations or to calibrate analytical instruments. A stock solution of approximate 2 kg has been prepared after dissolving approximate 2 g of Pb stick in 5% ultra pure nitric acid. From the stock solution five replicates of approximate 50 g have been taken for determination of purity by each method. The Pb has been determined as PbSO4 by conventional gravimetry, as PbO2 by electro gravimetry. The percentage purity of the metallic Pb was calculated accordingly from PbSO4 and PbO2. On the basis of experimental observations it has been concluded that by conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry the purity of Pb was found to be 99.98 ± 0.24 and 99.97 ± 0.27 g/100 g and on the basis of Pb purity the concentration of reference standard solutions were found to be 1000.88 ± 2.44 and 1000.81 ± 2.68 mg kg-1 respectively with 95% confidence level (k = 2). The uncertainty evaluation has also been carried out in Pb determination following EURACHEM/GUM guidelines. The final analytical results quantifying uncertainty fulfills this requirement and gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. Gravimetry is the most reliable technique in comparison to titremetry and instrumental method and the results of gravimetry are directly traceable to SI unit. Gravimetric analysis, if methods are followed carefully, provides for exceedingly precise analysis. In classical gravimetry the major uncertainties are due to repeatability but in electro-gravimetry several other factors also affect the final results.

  16. New method dynamically models hydrocarbon fractionation

    Kesler, M.G.; Weissbrod, J.M.; Sheth, B.V. [Kesler Engineering, East Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A new method for calculating distillation column dynamics can be used to model time-dependent effects of independent disturbances for a range of hydrocarbon fractionation. It can model crude atmospheric and vacuum columns, with relatively few equilibrium stages and a large number of components, to C{sub 3} splitters, with few components and up to 300 equilibrium stages. Simulation results are useful for operations analysis, process-control applications and closed-loop control in petroleum, petrochemical and gas processing plants. The method is based on an implicit approach, where the time-dependent variations of inventory, temperatures, liquid and vapor flows and compositions are superimposed at each time step on the steady-state solution. Newton-Raphson (N-R) techniques are then used to simultaneously solve the resulting finite-difference equations of material, equilibrium and enthalpy balances that characterize distillation dynamics. The important innovation is component-aggregation and tray-aggregation to contract the equations without compromising accuracy. This contraction increases the N-R calculations` stability. It also significantly increases calculational speed, which is particularly important in dynamic simulations. This method provides a sound basis for closed-loop, supervisory control of distillation--directly or via multivariable controllers--based on a rigorous, phenomenological column model.

  17. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  18. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    Cha, Min; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  19. A gravimetric and an X-ray fluorescence method for the determination of rubidium in Rb2U(SO4)3

    Mudher, K.D.S.; Krishnan, K.; Jayadevan, N.C.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical characterization of rubidium uranium(IV) trisulfate, RB 2 U(SO 4 ) 3 , a new chemical assay standard for uranium requires accurate analysis of rubidium. A gravimetric and an X-ray fluorescence method (XRF) for the determination of rubidium in this compound are described. In the gravimetric method, rubidium is determined as Rb 2 Na[Co(NO 2 ) 6 ].H 2 O without separating uranium with a precision of the order of ±0.5%. In the XRF method, the concentration ratio of rubidium to uranium, C Rb /C U , is determined in the solid samples by the binary ratio method using calibration between intensity ratios (I Rb /I U ) and concentration ratios (C Rb /C U ). (author) 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  20. Detection of irradiated meats by hydrocarbon method

    Goto, Michiko; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Fujinuma, Kenji; Ozawa, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Meats, for example, lamb, razorback, wild duck and turkey were irradiated by gamma ray, and the amounts of hydrocarbons formed from fatty acids were measured. Since C 20:0 was found from wild duck and turkey. C 1-18:1 was recommended for internal standard. Good correlation was found between the amount of hydrocarbons and the doses of gamma irradiation. This study shows that such hydrocarbons induced after radiation procedure as C 1,7-16:2 , C 8-17:1 , C 1-14:1 , and C 15:0 may make it possible to detect irradiated lamb, razorback, wild duck and turkey. (author)

  1. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID; Nelson, Lee O [Idaho Falls, ID; Detering, Brent A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  2. Hydrocarbons from plants: Analytical methods and observations

    Calvin, Melvin

    1980-11-01

    We have suggested that certain plants rich in hydrocarbon-like materials might be cultivated for renewable photosynthetic products. Two species were selected for experimental plantations: Euphorbia lathyris, an annual from seed and Euphorbia tirucalli, a perennial from cuttings, The yield from each species is over 10 barrels of oil/acre/year without genetic or agronomic improvement. In addition to plants, there are trees, such as species of Copaifera in Brazil and other tropical areas, which produce a diesel-like oil upon tapping. Each tree produces approximately 40 liters of hydrocarbon per year, and this material can be used directly by a diesel-powered car. Further efforts to develop plants as alternate energy sources are underway, as well as a continuing search for additional plant species throughout the world which have a similar capability.

  3. Determination of oxygen to metal ratio for varying UO2 content in sintered (U,Th)O2 pellet by oxidation-reduction method using thermo-gravimetric analyser

    Mahanty, B.N.; Khan, F.A.; Karande, A.P.; Prakash, A.; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine oxygen to metal ratio in 4%, 6%, 10%, 20%, 50% and 80% UO 2 in sintered (U, Th) O 2 pellets by oxidation-reduction method using thermo gravimetric analyser. (author)

  4. Method of removing deterioration product in hydrocarbon type solvent

    Ito, Yoshifumi; Takashina, Toru; Murasawa, Kenji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remarkably reduce radioactive wastes by bringing adsorbents comprising titanium oxide and/or zirconium oxide into contact with hydrocarbon type solvents. Method: In a nuclear fuel re-processing step, an appropriate processing is applied to extraction solvents suffering from radioactive degradation, to separate the hydrocarbon solvents and store them in a solvent tank. Then, titanium oxide and/or zirconium oxide adsorbents are continuously mixed and agitated therewith to adsorb degradation products on the adsorbents. Then, they are introduced with adsorbent separators to recover purified hydrocarbon type solvents. Meanwhile, the separated adsorbents are discharged from pipeways. This enables to regenerate the hydrocarbon type solvents for reuse, as well as remarkably reduce the radioactive wastes. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. Gravimetric determination of uranium in SALE samples

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    As a participant in the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at General Atomic routinely assays uranium dioxide and uranyl nitrate SALE samples for uranium content. Gravimetric methods are relatively easy and inexpensive to apply when the samples for uranium content. Gravimetric methods are relatively easy and inexpensive to apply when the samples are free from substantial amounts of metallic impurities. Clearly the gravimetric procedure alone is not specific for uranium and must be enhanced by the use of impurity corrections. Emission spectrography is used routinely as the technique of choice for making such corrections. In cases where it is essential to assay specifically for uranium, the modified Davies-Gray titration using a weighed titrant method is applied. In this paper some essential features of these gravimetric and titrimetric procedures are discussed

  6. Quartz analysis in gravimetric sampling

    Rex, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the methods employed in the assessment of quartz exposure is provided. The principles and some of the problems associated with each method is discussed. The methods reviewed include wet chemical methods, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption of which the latter two methods are deemed appropriate for analysing quartz on personal gravimetric collected samples. The implications of combining area samples collected over a six month period, and performing only a single quartz analysis rather than separate analyses, are considered. Finally, various options open to mines with regard to their involvement with quartz analysis are also briefly discussed. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. A method for producing a hydrocarbon resin

    Tsachev, A B; Andonov, K S; Igliyev, S P

    1980-11-25

    Rock coal resin (KS), for instance, with a relative density of 1,150 to 1,190 kilograms per cubic meter, which contains 8 to 10 percent naphthaline, 1.5 to 2.8 percent phenol and 6 to 15 percent substances insoluble in toluene, or its mixture with rock coal or oil fractions of resin are subjected to distillation (Ds) in a pipe furnace with two evaporators (Is) and a distillation tower with a temperature mode in the second stage of 320 to 360 degrees and 290 to 340 degrees in the pitch compartment. A hydrocarbon resin is produced with a high carbon content, especially for the production of resin and dolomite refractory materials, as well as fuel mixtures for blast furnace and open hearth industry.

  8. Method for upgrading diene-containing hydrocarbon mixtures

    Kidwell, L.E. Jr.; Holcomb, D.E.

    1984-05-22

    There is disclosed a method for upgrading of hydrocarbon mixtures, so as to reduce their content of gum precursors such as diolefins and pseudo-diolefins, and provide a resulting product mixture suitable for mild hydrogenation, for use as a motor fuel or as a feed stock to an extraction unit. The process comprises obtaining a hydrocarbon mixture containing about 60-90 wt. % of aromatic components, about 3-40 wt. % of dienes and pseudodienes, and monoolefins, and up to about 6 wt. % of relatively unreactive organic compounds, reacting this mixture with elemental sulfur in the approximate weight ratio of about 5-95 wt. % of the hydrocarbon mixture with about 95-5 wt. % of elemental sulfur, the reaction being carried out at a temperature in the range of 100/sup 0/-150/sup 0/ C. for about 10 minutes to 24 hours with good mixing, removing the unreacted materials by distillation and separating a sulfur-hydrocarbon reaction product to provide the upgraded hydrocarbon mixture.

  9. Method for depth referencing hydrocarbon gas shows on mud logs

    Dion, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for identifying hydrocarbon formations surrounding a borehole, comprising the steps of: a. measuring hydrocarbon gas in the entrained formation cuttings obtained during drilling operations in which a drilling mud is continually circulated past a drill bit to carry the cuttings to the earth's surface, b. simultaneously measuring natural gamma radiation in the cuttings, c. identifying the depths at which the cuttings were obtained within the borehole, d. measuring natural gamma radiation within the borehole following completion of the drilling operations, e. correlating the natural gamma radiation measurements in steps (b) and (d), and f. identifying the depths within the borehole from which the entrained cuttings containing hydrocarbon gas were obtained during drilling operations when there is correlation between the natural gamma radiation measurements in steps (b) and (d)

  10. Hydrocarbons

    1927-02-22

    Coal tar, mineral oils, bitumens, coal extraction products, hydrogenation products of coal, oil schists can be atomized and heated with steam to decompose pyrogenetically and form gases rich in olefins which may be heated with or without pressure and with or without catalysts to produce liquid hydrocarbons of low boiling point, some of which may be aromatic. The apparatus should be lined with copper, silica, or ferrosilicon to prevent contact of the bases with iron which causes deposition of soot. Catalysts used may be metal oxides, silica, graphite, active charcoal, mica, pumice, porcelain, barium carbonate, copper, silver, gold, chromium, boron, or their compounds. At temperatures from 300 to 400/sup 0/C, olefins are produced. At higher temperatures, naphthenes and benzene hydrocarbons are produced.

  11. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  12. A method for predicting the extent of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils

    Huesemann, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of solid- and slurry-phase soil bioremediation experiments involving different crude oils and refined petroleum products were performed to investigate the factors which affect the maximum extent of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation. The authors used a comprehensive petroleum hydrocarbon characterization procedure involving group-type separation analyses, boiling-point distributions, and hydrocarbon typing by field ionization mass spectroscopy. Initial and final concentrations of specified hydrocarbon classes were determined in each of seven different bioremediation treatments. Generally, they found that the degree of TPH biodegradation was affected mainly by the type of hydrocarbons in the contaminant matrix. In contrast, the influence of experimental variables such as soil type, fertilizer concentrations, microbial plate counts, and treatment type (slurry versus landfarming) on the overall extent of TPH biodegradation was insignificant. Based on these findings, a predictive algorithm was developed to estimate the extent of TPH biodegradation from the average reduction of 86 individual hydrocarbon classes and their respective initial concentrations. Model predictions for gravimetric TPH removals were in close agreement with analytical results from two independent laboratories

  13. Evaluation and performance analysis of hydrocarbon detection methods using hyperspectral data

    Lenz, Andreas; Schilling, Hendrik; Gross, Wolfgang; Middelmann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Different methods for the detection for hydrocarbons in aerial hyperspectral images are analyzed in this study. The scope is to find a practical method for airborne oil spill mapping on land. Examined are Hydrocarbon index and Hydrocarbon detection index. As well as spectral reidentification algorithms, like Spectral angle mapper, in comparison to the indices. The influence of different ground coverage and different hydrocarbons was tested and evaluated. A ground measurement campaign was cond...

  14. Method for production of unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons, particularly ethylene, and of aromatic hydrocarbons, adapted as motor fuels

    1952-10-24

    A method is described for the production of unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons, in particular of ethylene, and of aromatic hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon oils or from fractions of the same, characterized by the fact that the raw materials are brought into contact with porous, inert substances in the form of fine distribution or of pieces at a temperature of above 500 and in particular from 600 to about 700/sup 0/C and with a traversing speed of from 0.3 up to about 3.0 volumetric parts, preferably up to 1.5 volumetric parts of raw material per volumetric part of the chamber and per hour.

  15. Comparison of a direct-reading device to gravimetric methods for evaluating organic dust aerosols in an enclosed swine production environment.

    Taylor, C D; Reynolds, S J

    2001-01-01

    The production of livestock in enclosed facilities has become an accepted practice, driven by the need for increased efficiency. Exposure to organic dusts, containing various bioactive components, has been identified an important risk factor for the high rate of lung disease found among workers in these environments. Assessment of organic dust exposure requires technical skills and instrumentation not readily available to most agricultural enterprises. Development of a simple, cost-effective method for measuring organic dust levels would be useful in evaluating and controlling exposures in these environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the direct reading MIE PDM-3 Miniram for estimating organic dust concentrations in enclosed swine production facilities. Responses from the MIE PDM-3 Miniram were compared to gravimetric methods for total and inhalable dust. Total dust determinations were conducted in accordance with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 0500. Inhalable particulate mass (IPM) sampling was conducted using SKC brand IOM (Institute of Occupational Medicine) sampling cassettes, which meet the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists ACGIH criteria for inhalable dust sampling. This study design also allowed for the comparison of traditional total dust method to the IPM method, in collecting organic dusts in an agricultural setting. Fifteen sets of side-by-side samples (Miniram, total dust, and IPM) were collected over a period of six months in a swine confinement building. There were statistically significant differences in the results provided by the three sampling methods. Measurements for inhalable dust exceeded those for total dust in eleven of fifteen samples. The Miniram time-weighted average (TWA) response to the organic dust was always the lower of the three methods. A high degree of correlation was found among all three methods. The Miniram performed well under

  16. Application of the gravimetric method to closing the material balance around the chop-leach cell of a spent-fuel reprocessing plant

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    For a spent-fuel reprocessing plant handling commercial light-water-reactor fuel, plutonium accounting is traditionally done for the material balance area (MBA) extending from the input accountability tank to the product accountability tank - the process MBA. Consider an MBA comprising the chop-leach cell, with an inward flow consisting of the intact spent-fuel assemblies and outward flows consisting of leached hulls and dissolver solution. Given knowledge of the original uranium mass in the fuel and a measurement of the uranium-plutonium concentration ratio in the dissolver solution, the gravimetric method can be used to determine the amount of plutonium in the spent-fuel assemblies. A measurement of residual plutonium in the leached hulls would then permit the determination of a plutonium material balance for the chop-leach cell alone, since the volumetrically determined plutonium in the input accountability tank yields the plutonium in the flow leaving the chop-leach cell for the process MBA. The uncertainty in the balance can be estimated given the individual measurement uncertainties

  17. Thermal treatment investigation of natural lizardite at the atmospheric pressure, based on XRD and differential thermal analysis/thermal gravimetric analysis methods

    Dabiri, R.; Karimi Shahraki, B.; Mollaei, H.; Ghaffari, M.

    2009-01-01

    Determination of stability limits, mineralogical changes and thermal reaction of serpentine minerals are very important for the investigation of magmatism, mechanism and depth of plates of subduction. During the subduction process, serpentine (Lizardite) minerals will release their water due to thermal reactions. This dehydration can play an important role in volcanism processes related to the subduction, In this study, serpentine minerals (Lizardite) collected from the Neyriz Ophiolite Complex were dehydrated under the constant atmospheric pressure. These mineralogical changes were determined by X-Ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis-thermal gravimetric analyses methods. This study shows natural lizardites that heated for about one hour is stable up to 550 d eg C . Dehydration reactions on lizardite started at approximately between 100 to 150 d eg C and dehydroxylation reactions started at approximately 550-690 d eg C . As a result of thermal reaction, the decomposition of lizardite will take place and then changes in to olivine (forsterite). Crystallization of olivine (forsterite) will start at 600 d eg C . This mineral is stable up to 700 d eg C and then crystallization of enstatite will start at 700 d eg C . During this dehydration and crystallization reaction, amorphous processes will start at 600 d eg C and some amount water and silica will release.

  18. The kinetic of mass loss of grades A and B of melted TNT by isothermal and non-isothermal gravimetric methods

    Hamid Reza Pouretedal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and activation energy of mass loss of two grades of melted TNT explosive, grade A and grade B, with freezing points of 80.57 and 78.15 °C, respectively, were studied by isothermal and non-isothermal gravimetric methods. In isothermal method, the mass loss of samples in containers of glass and aluminum was followed in temperatures of 80, 90 and 100 °C. The kinetic of the mass loss of the samples in the aluminum container was higher than the kinetic of it in the glass container that can be related to the effects of heat transfer and catalytic of aluminum metal. Also, the presence of impurities in grade B was due to increasing of kinetic of mass loss of it versus grade A. The non-isothermal curves were obtained in range of 30–330 °C at heating rates of 10, 15 and 20 °C⋅min−1. The TG/DTG data were used for determination of activation energy (Ea of mass loss of TNT samples upon degradation by using Ozawa, Kissinger, Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods as model free methods. The activation energies of grades of A and B of TNT was obtained 99–120 and 66–70 kJ mol−1, respectively. The lower values of activation energy of the degradation reaction of grade B confirm the effect of impurities in the kinetics of mass loss of this grade. Keywords: TNT, Isothermal, Non-isothermal, Kinetic, Mass loss

  19. Comparison of real-time instruments and gravimetric method when measuring particulate matter in a residential building.

    Wang, Zuocheng; Calderón, Leonardo; Patton, Allison P; Sorensen Allacci, MaryAnn; Senick, Jennifer; Wener, Richard; Andrews, Clinton J; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2016-11-01

    This study used several real-time and filter-based aerosol instruments to measure PM 2.5 levels in a high-rise residential green building in the Northeastern US and compared performance of those instruments. PM 2.5 24-hr average concentrations were determined using a Personal Modular Impactor (PMI) with 2.5 µm cut (SKC Inc., Eighty Four, PA) and a direct reading pDR-1500 (Thermo Scientific, Franklin, MA) as well as its filter. 1-hr average PM 2.5 concentrations were measured in the same apartments with an Aerotrak Optical Particle Counter (OPC) (model 8220, TSI, Inc., Shoreview, MN) and a DustTrak DRX mass monitor (model 8534, TSI, Inc., Shoreview, MN). OPC and DRX measurements were compared with concurrent 1-hr mass concentration from the pDR-1500. The pDR-1500 direct reading showed approximately 40% higher particle mass concentration compared to its own filter (n = 41), and 25% higher PM 2.5 mass concentration compared to the PMI 2.5 filter. The pDR-1500 direct reading and PMI 2.5 in non-smoking homes (self-reported) were not significantly different (n = 10, R 2 = 0.937), while the difference between measurements for smoking homes was 44% (n = 31, R 2 = 0.773). Both OPC and DRX data had substantial and significant systematic and proportional biases compared with pDR-1500 readings. However, these methods were highly correlated: R 2 = 0.936 for OPC versus pDR-1500 reading and R 2 = 0.863 for DRX versus pDR-1500 reading. The data suggest that accuracy of aerosol mass concentrations from direct-reading instruments in indoor environments depends on the instrument, and that correction factors can be used to reduce biases of these real-time monitors in residential green buildings with similar aerosol properties. This study used several real-time and filter-based aerosol instruments to measure PM 2.5 levels in a high-rise residential green building in the northeastern United States and compared performance of those instruments. The data show that while the use of real

  20. Review of selected non-seismic methods for onshore hydrocarbon exploration in Denmark. ALTKUL project report part 1

    Rasmussen, T.M.; Thorning, L.

    2012-09-15

    Project ALTKUL was commissioned by DONG E and P A/S and Nordsoefonden; the Danish Energy Agency followed the project closely. The starting point of the study was the need in Danish onshore areas for more knowledge on alternative methods that could be used for hydrocarbon exploration, as an alternative to seismic investigations. DONG E and P A/S and Nordsoefonden approached GEUS, suggesting a study of seven different methods. The Danish Energy Agency was interested in the subject and requested that an actual test of a method be carried out as a part of the project. The seven methods considered and reviewed are: 1: Surface geochemistry; 2: Gravimetric modelling; 3: Magnetotellurics (MT, AMT and ZTEM); 4: High-Moment Electromagnetics (HMEM); 5: High-Powered Spectral Induced Polarization (HPSIP); 6: Electron Para-magnetic Resonance (EPR); 7: Airborne Transient Pulse Surveys. Getting a test of one of the methods based on electromagnetic theory organised caused some difficulties. An experiment with a galvanic controlled source was considered to be the optimum choice. However, based on various contacts and failed attempts to organise a test, a contract was entered with Uppsala University for some initial tests of the MT method. The test is to be carried out in August 2012 and will be reported in a separate report (ALTKUL Project Report Part 2). (LN)

  1. Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre [Rijswijk, NL; Schoeling, Lanny Gene [Katy, TX

    2009-07-14

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  2. Mobile geophysics for searching and exploration of Domanic hydrocarbon deposits

    Borovsky, M. Ya; Uspensky, B. V.; Valeeva, S. E.; Borisov, A. S.

    2018-05-01

    There are noted features of shale hydrocarbons occurrence. It is shown the role of geophysical prospecting in the geological prospecting process for non-traditional sources of hydrocarbon. There are considered the possibilities of non-seismic methods for forecasting, prospecting, exploration and preparation of Domanikovian hydrocarbons accumulations for exploration. It is emphasized the need for geophysical studies of tectonic disturbances. Modern aerogeophysical instrumentation and methodological support allows to combine high-precision magneto-prospecting with gravimetric and gamma spectrometry. This combination of geophysical methods contributes to the diagnosis of active and latent faults.

  3. Downhole fluid injection systems, CO2 sequestration methods, and hydrocarbon material recovery methods

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-07-28

    Downhole fluid injection systems are provided that can include a first well extending into a geological formation, and a fluid injector assembly located within the well. The fluid injector assembly can be configured to inject a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion into the surrounding geological formation. CO2 sequestration methods are provided that can include exposing a geological formation to a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to sequester at least a portion of the CO2 from the emulsion within the formation. Hydrocarbon material recovery methods are provided that can include exposing a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to a geological formation having the hydrocarbon material therein. The methods can include recovering at least a portion of the hydrocarbon material from the formation.

  4. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibration

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric measurements of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,00 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within ±0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. In this paper the weighting design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed

  5. Role of Aquaporin-4 in Airspace-to-Capillary Water Permeability in Intact Mouse Lung Measured by a Novel Gravimetric Method

    Song, Yuanlin; Ma, Tonghui; Matthay, Michael A.; Verkman, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    a simple gravimetric method to quantify osmosis and filtration in intact mouse lung and provide direct evidence for a contribution of the distal airways to airspace-to-capillary water transport. PMID:10613915

  6. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  7. Method of cleansing and refining of liquid hydrocarbons and derivatives of hydrocarbons

    Hahn, C A; Nielsen, H

    1934-10-11

    A process is described for cleaning and refining liquid hydrocarbons and derivatives by utilization of acids, followed by washing partly with a basic solution, partly with clean water. The process is characterized by using, in connection with the acid solutions mentioned, a strong solution of a mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid.

  8. Method and apparatus for preventing agglomeration within fluid hydrocarbons

    Woodbridge, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for treating a fluid hydrocarbon fuel for retarding the agglomeration between particles thereof and for retarding the growth of bacteria and fungi therein. The process includes that steps of transporting a plurality of unit volumes of said fluid hydrocarbon fuel through an irradiating location and irradiating each unit of the plurality of unit volumes at the irradiating location with either neutron or gamma radiation. An apparatus for treating the fluid hydrocarbon fuels with the nuclear radiation also is provided. The apparatus includes a generally conical central irradiating cavity which is surrounded by a spiral outer irradiating cavity. The fluid hydrocarbon fuel is transported through the cavities while being irradiated by the nuclear radiation

  9. Composition and method for coke retardant during hydrocarbon processing

    Reid, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for inhibiting the formation and deposition of filamentous coke on metallic surfaces in contact with a hydrocarbon having a temperature of 600 0 -1300 0 F which comprises adding to the hydrocarbon a sufficient amount for the purpose of a boron compound selected from the group of boron oxide compounds, boric acid and metal borides, with the proviso that when boric acid is used, it is substantially free of water

  10. Microbial Hydrocarbon and ToxicPollutant Degradation Method

    Schlueter, Dietrich [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Janabi, Mustafa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Neil, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Budinger, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-16

    The goal of this project is to determine optimum conditions for bacterial oxidation of hydrocarbons and long-chain alkanes that are representative of petroleum contamination of the environment. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of concern because of their toxicity, low volatility, and resistance to microbial degradation, especially under anaerobic conditions. The uniqueness of our approach is to use carbon-11 in lieu of the traditional use of carbon-14.

  11. Method of thermal reprocessing of hydrocarbon raw material

    Feygin, Ye.A.; Bakhshiyan, Ts.A.; Barashkov, R.Ya.; Kazhdan, A.Z.; Raud, E.A.; Umanchik, N.P.

    1979-09-30

    In the method of thermal reprocessing of hydrocarbon raw material, to raise the efficiency of the process the heat exchange is done using a heat carrier in the form of a melt of metals or their salts, circulating in a closed system with a forced heating source in sequence through the pyrolysis zone, cooling zone, and heating zone. For example, the benzine fraction with initial boiling temperatures of 80-186 degrees C, together with steam, in the amount of 20% at 20 degrees C and pressure of 2 atmospheres, goes to the heating zone. Liquid Li goes there from the cooling zone through a closed circuit at 749 degrees C. The benzine, evaporated and heated to 300 degrees C, together with the melt, go to the pyrolysis zone, where the benzine is heated through the wall by the liquid Li coming from the heat carrier heating zone at 1000 degrees C. From the pyrolysis zone, the products, containing 41% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, 15% C/sub 3/H/sub 6/ and 21% heavy fractions, go with the melt at 900 degrees C to the cooling zone, where they are cooled through the wall to 400 degrees C by the circulating liquid Li. The Li temperature at the entry into the cooling zone is 350 degrees C. The degree of raw material conversion is over 98%; the melt/raw material weight ratio is 0.2. Using this method enables a reduction in the pyrolysis zone from 80 to 8 m and the cooling zone area from 13 to 0.6 m/sup 2/ compared with the existing one, and transition from a multiple-tube cooling zone design to a tube one. The volume of the furnace unit is reduced from 500 to 10 m/sup 3/; the C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ yield is increased from 26-28 to 40-42%.

  12. Method for thermal recovery of hydrocarbons from an underground formation

    1962-11-13

    In a thermal recovery procedure for hydrocarbons from an underground formation, an oxygen-containing gas is injected through at least one input well into the formation. A part of the hydrocarbons in the formation is then ignited and an oxidation front is created. This front moves under the influence of the injected gas to at least one production well in the formation. The temperature in the burning front is higher than approximately 200/sup 0/C but lower than approximately 350/sup 0/C. (4 claims)

  13. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    Bladford, J.

    1996-07-18

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. (author) figs.

  14. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  15. Laboratory analytical methods for the determination of the hydrocarbon status of soils (a review)

    Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Korotkov, L. A.; Smirnova, M. A.; Kovach, R. G.

    2017-10-01

    Laboratory analytical methods suitable for the determination of the hydrocarbon status of soils (a specific soil characteristic involving information on the total content and qualitative features of soluble (bitumoid) carbonaceous substances and individual hydrocarbons (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, etc.) in bitumoid, as well as the composition and content of hydrocarbon gases) have been considered. Among different physicochemical methods of study, attention is focused on the methods suitable for the wide use. Luminescence-bituminological analysis, low-temperature spectrofluorimetry (Shpolskii spectroscopy), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography, chromatography-mass spectrometry, and some other methods have been characterized, as well as sample preparation features. Advantages and limitations of each of these methods are described; their efficiency, instrumental complexity, analysis duration, and accuracy are assessed.

  16. Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Mo, Weijian [Sugar Land, TX; Muylle, Michel Serge Marie [Houston, TX; Mandema, Remco Hugo [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

    2009-09-01

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

  17. Offshore gravimetric and subsidence monitoring

    Stenvold, Torkjell

    2008-06-15

    The introduction (Chapter 1) is complemented by the introductions given in Chapters 2 to 8. I am the first author of the articles in chapter 2 and 8. For the 5 articles in between I am a coauthor, and the sum of my contributions to those articles (as quantified by the respective first authors) represents about one article. Chapter 2 contains the article 'High-precision relative depth and subsidence mapping from seafloor water-pressure measurements' by Stenvold et al. (2006), published in the SPE Journal. It was submitted in March 2005, and a revised version that also contained results from the Troll 2005 survey (August) was submitted in February 2006. The method of obtaining high-precision relative depth measurements by the use of mobile pressure gauges is presented. Intra-survey and inter-survey depth repeatabilities from six surveys are presented, and the individual contributing errors are discussed and estimated. Average reservoir compressibility for the Troll field between 2002 and 2005 is obtained by matching measured subsidence with modeled subsidence. Chapter 3 contains the article 'A new seafloor gravimeter' by Sasagawa et al. (2003), published in Geophysics. It was submitted in September 2001, and a revised version was submitted in August 2002. This article describes the ROVDOG (Remotely operated Vehicledeployed Deep-Ocean Gravimeter) in detail. Gravity and pressure repeatability results from the two first Troll surveys in 1998 and 2000 are presented. Data reduction, instrumental and environmental corrections are also presented. Chapter 4 contains the article 'Precision of seafloor gravity and pressure measurements for reservoir monitoring' by Zumberge et al., and was submitted 29 February 2008 to Geophysics. This builds on the article by Sasagawa et al. (Chapter 3). Improvements and upto date intra- and inter survey repeatability results are presented. The emphasis is on gravity results since the relative depth measurements

  18. Gravimetric Analysis of Uranium in Yellow Cake

    Srinuttrakul, Wannee; Jantha, Suwat

    2007-08-01

    Full text: The gravimetric analysis of uranium in yellow cake is composed of several stages. The analysis takes a long time, which is the disadvantage of this method. However, this gravimetric method provides accurate result for determining the major content of sample. Uranium is the main composition of yellow cake, while Thorium, rare earths and other elements are minor and trace elements. In this work, anion exchange resin was used to separate uranium from other elements to yield highly pure uranium suitable for precipitation. This pure uranium was burnt to U3O8, a form that is stable enough to be weighed. From the optimal condition, the recovery of U3O8 after separating uranium from rare earths and iron is 99.85 ± 0.21%. The application of anion exchange separation was used to analyze uranium in yellow cake obtained from monazite digestion process. It was found that U3O8 in yellow cake is 78.85 ± 2.03%

  19. Tandem Gravimetric and Volumetric Apparatus for Methane Sorption Measurements

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald

    Concerns about global climate change have driven the search for alternative fuels. Natural gas (NG, methane) is a cleaner fuel than gasoline and abundantly available due to hydraulic fracturing. One hurdle to the adoption of NG vehicles is the bulky cylindrical storage vessels needed to store the NG at high pressures (3600 psi, 250 bar). The adsorption of methane in microporous materials can store large amounts of methane at low enough pressures for the allowance of conformable, ``flat'' pressure vessels. The measurement of the amount of gas stored in sorbent materials is typically done by measuring pressure differences (volumetric, manometric) or masses (gravimetric). Volumetric instruments of the Sievert type have uncertainties that compound with each additional measurement. Therefore, the highest-pressure measurement has the largest uncertainty. Gravimetric instruments don't have that drawback, but can have issues with buoyancy corrections. An instrument will be presented with which methane adsorption measurements can be performed using both volumetric and gravimetric methods in tandem. The gravimetric method presented has no buoyancy corrections and low uncertainty. Therefore, the gravimetric measurements can be performed throughout an entire isotherm or just at the extrema to verify the results from the volumetric measurements. Results from methane sorption measurements on an activated carbon (MSC-30) and a metal-organic framework (Cu-BTC, HKUST-1, MOF-199) will be shown. New recommendations for calculations of gas uptake and uncertainty measurements will be discussed.

  20. Reduction Of Gravimetric Data Using An Integrated Computer ...

    The rigour of gravimetric data collection, and the non-availability of comprehensive data reduction software that takes care of local peculiarities, have always constituted hindrance to the application of the gravity method of geophysical studies. However, in recent time, the importance of the gravity method in mineral ...

  1. A method for eliminating sulfur compounds from fluid, saturated, aliphatic hydrocarbons

    Fakhriev, A.M.; Galiautdinov, N.G.; Kashevarov, L.A.; Mazgarov, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The method for eliminating sulfur compounds from fluid, saturated, aliphatic hydrocarbons, which involves extracting hydrocarbons using a dimethylsulfoxide extractant, is improved by using a dimethylsulfoxide blend and 10-60 percent (by volume) diethylenetriamine or polyethylenepolyamine which contains diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine and tetraethylenepentamine, in order to eliminate the above compounds. Polyethylenepolyamine is produced as a by-product during the production of ethylenediamine. Elimination is performed at 0-50 degrees and 1-60 atmospheres of pressure. Here, the extractant may contain up to 10 percent water. The use of the proposed method, rather than the existing method, will make it possible to increase hydrocarbon elimination from mercaptans by 40 percent and from H/sub 2/S by 10 percent when the same amount is eliminated from dialkylsulfides.

  2. Methods of reforming hydrocarbon fuels using hexaaluminate catalysts

    Gardner, Todd H [Morgantown, WV; Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-27

    A metal substituted hexaaluminate catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas of the general formula AB.sub.yAl.sub.12-yO.sub.19-.delta., A being selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and lanthanide metals or mixtures thereof. A dopant or surface modifier selected from a transitions metal, a spinel of an oxygen-ion conductor is incorporated. The dopant may be Ca, Cs, K, La, Sr, Ba, Li, Mg, Ce, Co, Fe, Ir, Rh, Ni, Ru, Cu, Pe, Os, Pd, Cr, Mn, W, Re, Sn, Gd, V, Ti, Ag, Au, and mixtures thereof. The oxygen-ion conductor may be a perovskite selected from M'RhO.sub.3, M'PtO.sub.3, M'PdO.sub.3, M'IrO.sub.3, M'RuO.sub.3 wherein M'=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca; a spinel selected from MRh.sub.2O.sub.4, MPt.sub.2O.sub.4, MPd.sub.2O.sub.4, MIr.sub.2O.sub.4, MRu.sub.2O.sub.4 wherein M=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca and mixtures thereof; a florite is selected from M''O.sub.2.

  3. A method of estimating the knock rating of hydrocarbon fuel blend

    Sanders, Newell D

    1943-01-01

    The usefulness of the knock ratings of pure hydrocarbon compounds would be increased if some reliable method of calculating the knock ratings of fuel blends was known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of developing a method of predicting the knock ratings of fuel blends.

  4. Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system

    Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

    2014-01-14

    A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

  5. A method for removing sulfur bearing compounds from paraffinous hydrocarbons or a directly distilled benzine fraction

    Konyukhova, T.P.; Bolotskaya, I.A.; Mikhaylova, L.A.; Sadykov, A.N.; Shitovkin, N.T.; Vlasov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    In the known method for removing sulfurorganic compounds from paraffinous hydrocarbons or a directly distilled gasoline fraction through their adsorption using natural zeolite, in order to increase the degree of purification, clinoptilolite (Kp), which contains SiO2 and A12O3 in a molar ratio of 10.6 to 16.7 is used as the natural zeolite. The purification of the paraffinous hydrocarbons through clinoptilolite adsorption as compared with mordenite adsorption makes it possible to increase the degree of their purification of ethylmercaptane and dimethylsulfide. The effectiveness of clinoptilolite is also confirmed in removing mercaptanes and sulfides from directly distilled gasoline fractions.

  6. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  7. Petroleum hydrocarbons

    Farrington, J.W.; Teal, J.M.; Parker, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine samples are presented. Types of hydrocarbons present and their origins are discussed. Principles and methods of analysis are outlined. Infrared spectrometry, uv spectrometry, gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and carbon 14 measurements are described

  8. Development of a new method for hydrogen isotope analysis of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples

    Xibin Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method had been developed for the analysis of hydrogen isotopic composition of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples by using solid phase microextraction (SPME combined with gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS. In this study, the SPME technique had been initially introduced to achieve the enrichment of trace content of hydrocarbons with low abundance and coupled to GC/IRMS for hydrogen isotopic analysis. The main parameters, including the equilibration time, extraction temperature, and the fiber type, were systematically optimized. The results not only demonstrated that high extraction yield was true but also shows that the hydrogen isotopic fractionation was not observed during the extraction process, when the SPME device fitted with polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene/carbon molecular sieve (PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber. The applications of SPME-GC/IRMS method were evaluated by using natural gas samples collected from different sedimentary basins; the standard deviation (SD was better than 4‰ for reproducible measurements; and also, the hydrogen isotope values from C1 to C9 can be obtained with satisfying repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS method fitted with PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons, and provides a reliable hydrogen isotopic analysis for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples.

  9. Methods for treating hydrocarbon recovery operations and industrial waters

    Thompson, N.E.S.; Asperger, R.G.

    1989-05-02

    This patent describes a method for consisting adding to the emulsion an effective demulsifying amount of a composition comprising a compound containing: an alkane triyl group of 1 to 30 carbon atoms; an alkylene group of 1 to 30 carbon atoms; and an alkali or alkaline earth metal group or an ammonium group.

  10. Determination of total dietary fiber in selected foods containing resistant maltodextrin by a simplified enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: interlaboratory study in China.

    Fu, Boqiang; Wang, Jing; Roturier, Jean Michel; Tang, Zhiyu; Li, Huan; Wei, Guangyan

    2008-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was conducted in China to validate the modified AOAC Official Method 2001.03 for the determination of total dietary fiber (TDF) in foods containing resistant maltodextrin (RMD), which will be adopted as the National Standard Method of China. The kind of buffer solution, the volume of filtrate evaporation, the volume of eluent for desalting and residual solution after evaporation, etc. were modified, which had been proved to have acceptable accuracy and precision in the routine assay. TDF contents in 3 representative foods and 2 kinds of RMD ingredient (i.e., NUTRIOSE 06 and NUTRIOSE 10) were measured using the modified method in 6 eligible laboratories representing commercial, industrial, and governmental laboratories in China. The results of the interlaboratory study indicated that the intralaboratory repeatability, interlaboratory reproducibility, and precision of the modified method are adequate for reliable analysis of TDF in food containing RMD, as well as resistant dextrin. Compared to AOAC Official Method 2001.03, the modified method is time- and cost-saving.

  11. Simulation Opportunity Index, A Simple and Effective Method to Boost the Hydrocarbon Recovery

    Saputra, Wardana

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how the SOI software helps as a simple, fast, and accurate way to obtain the higher hydrocarbon production than that of trial-error method and previous studies in two different fields located in offshore Indonesia. On one hand, the proposed method could save money by minimizing the required number of wells. On the other hand, it could maximize profit by maximizing recovery.

  12. A high-order 3-D spectral-element method for the forward modelling and inversion of gravimetric data—Application to the western Pyrenees

    Martin, Roland; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Seoane, Lucia; Spangenberg, Hannah; Wang, Yi; Dufréchou, Grégory; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We image the internal density structure of the Pyrenees by inverting gravity data using an a priori density model derived by scaling a Vp model obtained by full waveform inversion of teleseismic P-waves. Gravity anomalies are computed via a 3-D high-order finite-element integration in the same high-order spectral-element grid as the one used to solve the wave equation and thus to obtain the velocity model. The curvature of the Earth and surface topography are taken into account in order to obtain a density model as accurate as possible. The method is validated through comparisons with exact semi-analytical solutions. We show that the spectral-element method drastically accelerates the computations when compared to other more classical methods. Different scaling relations between compressional velocity and density are tested, and the Nafe-Drake relation is the one that leads to the best agreement between computed and observed gravity anomalies. Gravity data inversion is then performed and the results allow us to put more constraints on the density structure of the shallow crust and on the deep architecture of the mountain range.

  13. Vapor Pressure Measurements of LiBH4, NaBH 4 and Ca(BH4)2 using Knudsen Torsion Effusion Gravimetric Method

    Danyan, Mohammad Masoumi

    Hydrogen storage is one of the critical technologies needed on the path towards commercialization for mobile applications. In the past few years, a range of new light weight hydrogen containing material has been discovered with good storage properties. Among them, lithium borohydride (LiBH 4) sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and calcium borohydride (Ca(BH 4)2) have shown promising results to be used as solid state hydrogen storage material. In this work, we have determined equilibrium vapor pressures of LiBH 4 NaBH4 and Ca(BH4)2 obtained by Torsion effusion thermogravimetric method. Results for all the three hydrides exhibited that a small fraction of the materials showed congruency, and sublimed as gaseous compound, but the majority of the material showed incongruent vaporization. Two Knudsen cells of 0.3 and 0.6mm orifice size was employed to measure the total vapor pressures. A Whitman-Motzfeldt method is used to extrapolate the measured vapor pressures to zero orifice size to calculate the equilibrium vapor pressures. In the case of LiBH4 we found that 2% of the material evaporated congruently (LiBH4(s) → LiBH4(g)) according to the equation: logPLiBH4/P 0 =-3263.5 +/-309/T + (1.079 +/-0.69) and rest as incongruent vaporization to LiH, B, and hydrogen gas according to the equation logPeq/P0 =(-3263.5 +/-309)/T+ (2.458 +/-0.69) with DeltaH evap.= 62.47+/-5.9 kJ/mol of H2, DeltaSevap. = 47.05+/-13 J/mol of H2.K. The NaBH4 also had somewhat similar behavior, with 9% congruent evaporation and equilibrium vapor pressure equation of logPLiBH4=-7700+/-335/ T+ (6.7+/-1.5) and 91% incongruent decomposition to Na and Boron metal, and hydrogen gas. The enthalpy of vaporization; DeltaHevap. = 147.2+/-6.4kJ/molH2 and DeltaSevap.= 142 +/-28 kJ/molH2.K (550-650K). The Ca(BH4) 2 exhibited similar vaporization behavior with congruency of 3.2%. The decomposition products are CaH2 and Boron metal with evolution of hydrogen gas varying with the pressure equation as logPeq /P0 =(-1562

  14. Combination volumetric and gravimetric sorption instrument for high accuracy measurements of methane adsorption

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald; Troub, Brandon

    2017-05-01

    The accurate measurement of adsorbed gas up to high pressures (˜100 bars) is critical for the development of new materials for adsorbed gas storage. The typical Sievert-type volumetric method introduces accumulating errors that can become large at maximum pressures. Alternatively, gravimetric methods employing microbalances require careful buoyancy corrections. In this paper, we present a combination gravimetric and volumetric system for methane sorption measurements on samples between ˜0.5 and 1 g. The gravimetric method described requires no buoyancy corrections. The tandem use of the gravimetric method allows for a check on the highest uncertainty volumetric measurements. The sources and proper calculation of uncertainties are discussed. Results from methane measurements on activated carbon MSC-30 and metal-organic framework HKUST-1 are compared across methods and within the literature.

  15. Taguchi Method for Development of Mass Flow Rate Correlation Using Hydrocarbon Refrigerant Mixture in Capillary Tube

    Sulaimon, Shodiya; Nasution, Henry; Aziz, Azhar Abdul; Abdul-Rahman, Abdul-Halim; Darus, Amer N

    2014-01-01

    The capillary tube is an important control device used in small vapor compression refrigeration systems such as window air-conditioners, household refrigerators and freezers. This paper develops a non-dimensional correlation based on the test results of the adiabatic capillary tube for the mass flow rate through the tube using a hydrocarbon refrigerant mixture of 89.3% propane and 10.7% butane (HCM). The Taguchi method, a statistical experimental design approach, was employed. This approach e...

  16. Gravimetric Measurements of Filtering Facepiece Respirators Challenged With Diesel Exhaust.

    Satish, Swathi; Swanson, Jacob J; Xiao, Kai; Viner, Andrew S; Kittelson, David B; Pui, David Y H

    2017-07-01

    Elevated concentrations of diesel exhaust have been linked to adverse health effects. Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are widely used as a form of respiratory protection against diesel particulate matter (DPM) in occupational settings. Previous results (Penconek A, Drążyk P, Moskal A. (2013) Penetration of diesel exhaust particles through commercially available dust half masks. Ann Occup Hyg; 57: 360-73.) have suggested that common FFRs are less efficient than would be expected for this purpose based on their certification approvals. The objective of this study was to measure the penetration of DPM through NIOSH-certified R95 and P95 electret respirators to verify this result. Gravimetric-based penetration measurements conducted using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polypropylene (PP) filters were compared with penetration measurements made with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which measures the particle size distribution. Gravimetric measurements using PP filters were variable compared to SMPS measurements and biased high due to adsorption of gas phase organic material. Relatively inert PTFE filters adsorbed less gas phase organic material resulting in measurements that were more accurate. To attempt to correct for artifacts associated with adsorption of gas phase organic material, primary and secondary filters were used in series upstream and downstream of the FFR. Correcting for adsorption by subtracting the secondary mass from the primary mass improved the result for both PTFE and PP filters but this correction is subject to 'equilibrium' conditions that depend on sampling time and the concentration of particles and gas phase hydrocarbons. Overall, the results demonstrate that the use of filters to determine filtration efficiency of FFRs challenged with diesel exhaust produces erroneous results due to the presence of gas phase hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust and the tendency of filters to adsorb organic material. Published by

  17. Comparative analysis of different methods of extraction of present hydrocarbons in industrial residual waters

    Santa, Judith Rocio; Serrano, Martin; Stashenko, Elena

    2002-01-01

    A comparison among four extraction techniques such as: liquid - liquid (LLE) continuous and for lots, solid phase extraction (SPE), solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and static headspace (S-HS) was carried out. The main purpose of this research was to determine the highest recovery efficiencies and how reproducible the tests are while varying parameters such as time, extraction technique, type of solvents and others. Chromatographic parameters were optimized in order to carry out the analyses. Hydrocarbon's quantification of residual waters was achieved by using a high-resolution gas chromatography with a gas flame ionization detector (HRGC-FID). Validation of the method was carried out by analyzing real samples taken in different sampling places of the residual waters treatment plant of Ecopetrol - Barrancabermeja. The use of extraction methods that require big solvent quantities and long time for analysis are losing validity day by day. Techniques such as the HS-SPME and static HS are offered as alternatives for quantifying hydrocarbons. They show total lack of solvents, high sensibility, selectivity and the techniques are reproducible. Solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and static headspace (static HS) techniques were chosen as the extraction techniques to validate the method in real samples. Both techniques showed similar results for the determination of total hydrocarbons (in the gasoline range)

  18. The hydrocarbon accumulations mapping in crystalline rocks by mobile geophysical methods

    Nesterenko, A.

    2013-05-01

    Sedimentary-migration origin theory of hydrocarbons dominates nowadays. However, a significant amount of hydrocarbon deposits were discovered in the crystalline rocks, which corroborates the theory of non-organic origin of hydrocarbons. During the solving of problems of oil and gas exploration in crystalline rocks and arrays so-called "direct" methods can be used. These methods include geoelectric methods of forming short-pulsed electromagnetic field (FSPEF) and vertical electric-resonance sounding (VERS) (FSPEF-VERS express-technology). Use of remote Earth sounding (RES) methods is also actual. These mobile technologies are extensively used during the exploration of hydrocarbon accumulations in crystalline rocks, including those within the Ukrainian crystalline shield. The results of explorations Four anomalous geoelectric zones of "gas condensate reservoir" type were quickly revealed as a result of reconnaissance prospecting works (Fig. 1). DTA "Obukhovychi". Anomaly was traced over a distance of 4 km. Approximate area is 12.0 km2. DTA"Korolevskaya". Preliminary established size of anomalous zone is 10.0 km2. The anomalous polarized layers of gas and gas-condensate type were determined. DTA "Olizarovskaya". Approximate size of anomaly is about 56.0 km2. This anomaly is the largest and the most intense. DTA "Druzhba". Preliminary estimated size of anomaly is 16.0 km2. Conclusions Long experience of a successful application of non-classical geoelectric methods for the solving of variety of practical tasks allow one to state their contribution to the development of a new paradigm of geophysical researches. Simultaneous usage of the remote sensing data processing and interpretation method and FSPEF and VERS technologies can essentially optimize and speed up geophysical work. References 1. S.P. Levashov. Detection and mapping of anomalies of "hydrocarbon deposit" type in the fault zones of crystalline arrays by geoelectric methods. / S.P. Levashov, N.A. Yakymchuk, I

  19. Accelerated solvent extraction method with one-step clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil

    Nurul Huda Mamat Ghani; Norashikin Sain; Rozita Osman; Zuraidah Abdullah Munir

    2007-01-01

    The application of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) using hexane combined with neutral silica gel and sulfuric acid/ silica gel (SA/ SG) to remove impurities prior to analysis by gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) was studied. The efficiency of extraction was evaluated based on the three hydrocarbons; dodecane, tetradecane and pentadecane spiked to soil sample. The effect of ASE operating conditions (extraction temperature, extraction pressure, static time) was evaluated and the optimized condition obtained from the study was extraction temperature of 160 degree Celsius, extraction pressure of 2000 psi with 5 minutes static extraction time. The developed ASE with one-step clean-up method was applied in the extraction of hydrocarbons from spiked soil and the amount extracted was comparable to ASE extraction without clean-up step with the advantage of obtaining cleaner extract with reduced interferences. Therefore in the developed method, extraction and clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil can be achieved rapidly and efficiently with reduced solvent usage. (author)

  20. Gravimetric determination of beryllium in the presence of transition metals

    Morozova, S.S.; Nikitina, L.V.; Dyatlova, N.M.; Serebryakova, G.V.; Vol'nyagina, A.N.

    1976-01-01

    A new organic reagent, nitrolotrimethylphosphonic acid (H 6 L), is proposed for gravimetric determination of beryllium. This complexone forms with Be hardly soluble complexes in a wide pH range. The separated complex has a composition Be 5 (HL) 2 x10H 2 O. To elucidate the possibility of determining Be in the presence of transition metals, often accompanying beryllium in alloys, interaction of cations of these metals with H 6 L at different pH has been studied potentiometrically. It has been established that at pH=1.1 in the presence of masking reagent (diethylentriaminopentacetic acid) Be can be determined when zinc, copper, chromium, cobalt, nickel, iron, manganese and cadmium are present. Gravimetric method of determining Be with the help of H 6 L has been developed. The weight form is obtained by drying the precipitate which reduces considerably the time of analysis and the error of determination

  1. Differential scanning calorimetry method for purity determination: A case study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol

    Kestens, V.; Zeleny, R.; Auclair, G.; Held, A.; Roebben, G.; Linsinger, T.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Purity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol by DSC. → DSC results compared with traditional purity methods. → Different methods give different results, multiple method approach recommended. → DSC sensitive to impurities that have similar structures as main component. - Abstract: In this study the validity and suitability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the purity of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and chloramphenicol has been investigated. The study materials were two candidate certified reference materials (CRMs), 6-methylchrysene and benzo[a]pyrene, and two different batches of commercially available highly pure chloramphenicol. The DSC results were compared with those obtained by other methods, namely gas and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection, liquid chromatography with diode array detection, and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance. The purity results obtained by these different analytical methods confirm the well-known challenges of comparing results of different method-defined measurands. In comparison with other methods, DSC has a much narrower working range. This limits the applicability of DSC as purity determination method, for instance during the assignment of the purity value of a CRM. Nevertheless, this study showed that DSC can be a powerful technique to detect impurities that are structurally very similar to the main purity component. From this point of view, and because of its good repeatability, DSC can be considered as a valuable technique to investigate the homogeneity and stability of candidate purity CRMs.

  2. Prospects of hydrocarbon deposits exploration using the method of induced polarization during geomagnetic-variation profiling

    К. М. Ермохин

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally it is believed that the effect of induced polarization is an interfering factor for the measurement of electromagnetic fields and their interpretation during conducting works using magnetotelluric sounding and geomag-netic-variation profiling methods. A new method is proposed for isolating the effects of induced polarization during geomagnetic-variation profiling aimed at searching for hydrocarbon deposits on the basis of phase measurements during the conduct of geomagnetic-variation profiling. The phenomenon of induced polarization is proposed to be used as a special exploration mark for deep-lying hydrocarbon deposits. The traditional method of induced polarization uses artificial field sources, the powers of which are principally insufficient to reach depths of 3-5 km, which leads to the need to search for alternative - natural sources in the form of telluric and magnetotelluric fields. The proposed method makes it possible to detect and interpret the effects of induced polarization from deep-seated oil and gas reservoirs directly, without relying on indirect signs.

  3. Simulation Opportunity Index, A Simple and Effective Method to Boost the Hydrocarbon Recovery

    Saputra, Wardana

    2016-09-08

    During periods of low oil prices, profitability of field developments drops drastically. To help with this difficulty, a cost-effective method has been proposed to boost the hydrocarbon recovery by optimizing well locations through the Simulated Opportunity Index (SOI). SOI is an intelligent method to identify zones with high potential for production which is empirically calculated from basic rock and fluid properties, and from reservoir pressure as its energy capacity. In order to obtain the best results, the original SOI formula (Molina et al., 2009) was extended to both oil and gas fields. Based on this modified SOI formula, a software program has been developed to locate the best well locations considering multilayer, existing wells, and fault existences. This paper describes how the SOI software helps as a simple, fast, and accurate way to obtain the higher hydrocarbon production than that of trial-error method and previous studies in two different fields located in offshore Indonesia. On one hand, the proposed method could save money by minimizing the required number of wells. On the other hand, it could maximize profit by maximizing recovery.

  4. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  5. Method and apparatus for continuously detecting and monitoring the hydrocarbon dew-point of gas

    Boyle, G.J.; Pritchard, F.R.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a method and apparatus for continuously detecting and monitoring the hydrocarbon dew-point of a gas. A gas sample is supplied to a dew-point detector and the temperature of a portion of the sample gas stream to be investigated is lowered progressively prior to detection until the dew-point is reached. The presence of condensate within the flowing gas is detected and subsequently the supply gas sample is heated to above the dew-point. The procedure of cooling and heating the gas stream continuously in a cyclical manner is repeated.

  6. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  7. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  8. Use of a non-linear method for including the mass uncertainty of gravimetric standards and system measurement errors in the fitting of calibration curves for XRFA freeze-dried UNO3 standards

    Pickles, W.L.; McClure, J.W.; Howell, R.H.

    1978-05-01

    A sophisticated nonlinear multiparameter fitting program was used to produce a best fit calibration curve for the response of an x-ray fluorescence analyzer to uranium nitrate, freeze dried, 0.2% accurate, gravimetric standards. The program is based on unconstrained minimization subroutine, VA02A. The program considers the mass values of the gravimetric standards as parameters to be fit along with the normal calibration curve parameters. The fitting procedure weights with the system errors and the mass errors in a consistent way. The resulting best fit calibration curve parameters reflect the fact that the masses of the standard samples are measured quantities with a known error. Error estimates for the calibration curve parameters can be obtained from the curvature of the ''Chi-Squared Matrix'' or from error relaxation techniques. It was shown that nondispersive XRFA of 0.1 to 1 mg freeze-dried UNO 3 can have an accuracy of 0.2% in 1000 s

  9. Development of an efficient bacterial consortium for the potential remediation of hydrocarbons from contaminated sites

    Kaustuvmani Patowary

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia towards total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples 5 isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1 and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1 and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and Bacillus cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH after five weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Gas-phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in vehicle exhaust: A method for collection and analysis

    Seigl, W.O.; Chladek, E.

    1990-01-01

    Gas-phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted at low levels in vehicle exhaust compared to other hydrocarbon emissions. A method has been developed involving the trapping of gas phase emissions on Tenax, a macrorecticular porous polymer, followed by thermal desorption onto a capillary gas chromatography column. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used for the chemical analysis. A detection limit of 0.05 ng was achieved for several gas-phase PAH. This high sensitivity enables the speciation and quantitation of gas-phase PAH collected from a dilution tube during standard driving (test) cycles. The method was demonstrated for the analysis of 9 PAH in the exhaust from a 1987 vehicle (with and without catalyst) during the hot start transient phase of the EPA urban dynamometer driving schedule. The PAH measured include naphthalene, 2-methyl- and 1-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The four most abundant PAH observed are naphthalene, 2-methyl and 1-methylnaphthalene, and biphenyl, in that order

  11. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    Franck O P Stefani

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods.

  12. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    Stefani, Franck O P; Bell, Terrence H; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods.

  13. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    Cha, Min

    2017-01-01

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured

  14. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Bien, Fritz; Gersh, Michael E.; Goldstein, Neil

    1998-10-13

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution.

  15. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Gravimetric Model of Quasigeoid in the Area of Slovakia

    Juraj Papčo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The gravimetric model of quasigeoid in the area of Slovakia was determined by using the revised and homogenised gravity mapping data in the scale of 1:25 000 from the area of Slovakia, and by using the mean Bouguer gravity anomalies with the resolution of 5´x7.5´ in the area 44°<φ<56° and 12°<λ<30° from abroad and by the digital terrain model DMR-2/ERTS89 with the resolution 3“ in the ellipsoidal latitude and 5“ in the ellipsoidal longitude from the area of Slovakia and the digital terrain model GTOPO30 with the resolution of 30“ in the ellipsoidal latitude and 30“ in the ellipsoidal longitude from abroad. The global part of the height anomaly was determined from the global geopotential model EGM96. The residual part of the height anomaly was determined by the Stokes integral formula. For the solution of the Stokes integra,l the Fast Fourier Transformation method in the spherical approximation was used. The gravimetric quasigeoid was tested by the GPS/levelling method using 46 points distributed on the area of Slovakia. The systematic trend of differences between height anomalies was rejected by the surface polynomial of second degree with 6 coefficients. The standard deviation after removing a systematic trend was 0.017 m

  17. Gravimetric and profilometric measurements of the ablation rates of photosensitive polymers at different wavelengths

    Dumont, Th.; Bischofberger, R.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.

    2005-01-01

    The ablation rates of two polyimides (PMDA and DurimidTM) and one triazene polymer were studied by gravimetric (quartz microbalance) and profilometric (profilometer) methods at irradiation wavelengths of 193, 248 and 308 nm. The ablation rates determined by the two methods are discussed in the context of the absorption behavior of the materials. Furthermore, the consistence of the two experimental methods is discussed for the ablation rates of DurimidTM and the triazene polymer. The gravimetric measurements revealed a good correlation between the ablation rate and the absorption properties of the examined materials. The comparison of the gravimetric and the profilometric measurements suggest a significant mass removal, e.g. by formation of gaseous products, prior to the detection of changes in the surface morphology

  18. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  19. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  20. Sensitive method for the determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the human diet

    Siegmund, B.; Weiss, R.; Pfannhauser, W. [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Food Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    The presence of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) as contaminants in foods is nowadays a legitimate cause of concern, as they are reported to be strong direct-acting mutagens and carcinogens that may pose a risk to human health. Nevertheless, their concentrations in foods are in the ultra-trace region. In this study, we present a very sensitive analytical method for the determination of this compound class in complex food matrices. Special emphasis was put on sample extraction and clean up. Recoveries of 75% could be obtained for 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene; for all other compounds investigated the recoveries were {>=}94%. The determination of the compounds was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that the use of negative chemical ionization (NCI) increases the sensitivity by one order of magnitude in comparison to electron impact ionization (EI) (limits of detection 0.07-0.25 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for EI and 0.01-0.02 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for NCI). The influence of the sample matrix on the sensitivity of the method is demonstrated with extracts of a sample from a duplicate diet study. Due to the lack of a certified reference material the suitability of the method is demonstrated with pumpkin seed oil that was spiked with nitro-PAHs at two different concentration levels. (orig.)

  1. Relative proportions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons differ between accumulation bioassays and chemical methods to predict bioavailability

    Gomez-Eyles, Jose L., E-mail: j.l.gomezeyles@reading.ac.u [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Department of Soil Science, Reading RG6 6DW, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Collins, Chris D.; Hodson, Mark E. [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Department of Soil Science, Reading RG6 6DW, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Chemical methods to predict the bioavailable fraction of organic contaminants are usually validated in the literature by comparison with established bioassays. A soil spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was aged over six months and subjected to butanol, cyclodextrin and tenax extractions as well as an exhaustive extraction to determine total PAH concentrations at several time points. Earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and rye grass root (Lolium multiflorum) accumulation bioassays were conducted in parallel. Butanol extractions gave the best relationship with earthworm accumulation (r{sup 2} <= 0.54, p <= 0.01); cyclodextrin, butanol and acetone-hexane extractions all gave good predictions of accumulation in rye grass roots (r{sup 2} <= 0.86, p <= 0.01). However, the profile of the PAHs extracted by the different chemical methods was significantly different (p < 0.01) to that accumulated in the organisms. Biota accumulated a higher proportion of the heavier 4-ringed PAHs. It is concluded that bioaccumulation is a complex process that cannot be predicted by measuring the bioavailable fraction alone. - The ability of chemical methods to predict PAH accumulation in Eisenia fetida and Lolium multiflorum was hindered by the varied metabolic fate of the different PAHs within the organisms.

  2. Gravimetric determination of the iodine number of carbon black

    Murphy, L.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a gravimetric method for the determination of the iodine adsorption number of carbon black. It comprises determining the concentration of an accurately weighed iodine blank solution by adding a standardized titrant to the iodine solution until a titration endpoint is reached and determining the concentration of the iodine solution by accurately weighing the amount of the standardized titrant necessary to reach the endpoint, accurately weighing an amount of carbon black and adding an appropriate amount of an accurately weighed portion of the iodine solution, equilibrating the carbon black-iodine solution mixture, adding the standardized titrant to an accurately weighed portion of the supernatant from the carbon black-iodine mixture until a titration endpoint is reached and determining the concentration of the supernatant by accurately weighing the amount of the standardized titrant necessary to reach the endpoint, wherein the titration endpoint of the supernatant is obtained using an indicating and a reference electrode, and calculating the iodine adsorption number of the carbon black based on the gravimetrically determined concentration of the titrant, the iodine solution, and the supernatant

  3. Gravimetric determination of cadmium with o-phenanthroline and iodide

    Yoshida, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Kazunori; Taga, Mitsuhiko; Hikime, Seiichiro

    1976-01-01

    Cadmium forms insoluble mixed ligand complex with o-phenanthroline and iodide ions. By using the complex a new gravimetric method for the determination of cadmium was investigated. The recommended analytical procedure is as follows: Adjust pH value of a solution containing 5 to 45 mg cadmium to 4 with 3 M acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution. Add over threefold moles of potassium iodide to the solution and heat to just before boiling. To the solution add 0.1% ascorbic acid solution and then 0.1 M o-phenanthroline solution drop by drop in excess with stirring, and cool the mixture to room temperature. Filter the precipitates and wash first with 0.01% potassium iodide solution and then with water. Dry the precipitates at 110 0 C for two hours and weigh as Cd(o-phen) 2 I 2 (I). The gravimetric factor of the complex for cadmium is 0.1547. Chemical composition of the precipitate is variable when o-phenanthroline is added less than twofold moles to cadmium. Adding the o-phenanthroline solution 2.4-fold moles against cadmium, the ternary complex (I) precipitates quantitatively. Though a large excess of iodide ion in the solution contaminated the precipitate, the contamination was avoided when precipitation was carryed out at high temperature and in the presence of ascorbic acid. By the presented procedure 5 to 45 mg of cadmium are determined with a standard deviation of 0 C. (JPN)

  4. A study on improvement of measurement capability for gravimetric flowmeter calibrator

    Lee, Dong Keun; Park, Jong Ho

    2009-01-01

    The calibration of flowmeter is a very important procedure to set up traceability from the national or international standards. The uncertainty of flow measurement defines reliability for measurement results. The uncertainty of gravimetric method combines uncertainties of each independent variable, including mass, time, water density, air density and the density of dead weight. In this study, it has been found that the uncertainties of mass and time measurement in the gravimetric method have dominant influence on the total measurement uncertainty. After improvements of a constant head tank and a diverter, the best measurement capability for K-water's calibration facility has been reached less than 0.1%.

  5. Accuracy criteria recommended for the certification of gravimetric coal-mine-dust samplers

    Bowman, J.D.; Bartley, D.L.; Breuer, G.M.; Doemeny, L.J.; Murdock, D.J.

    1984-07-01

    Procedures for testing bias and precision of gravimetric coal-mine-dust sampling units are reviewed. Performance criteria for NIOSH certification of personal coal-mine dust samplers are considered. The NIOSH criterion is an accuracy of 25% at the 95% confidence interval. Size distributions of coal-mine-dust are discussed. Methods for determining size distributions are described. Sampling and sizing methods are considered. Cyclone parameter estimation is discussed. Bias computations for general sampling units are noted. Recommended procedures for evaluating bias and precision of gravimetric coal mine dust personal samplers are given. The authors conclude that when cyclones are operated at lower rates, the NIOSH accuracy criteria can be met

  6. The use of cerium(IV) phosphate for the gravimetric determination and separation of cerium

    Masin, V.; Dolezal, J.

    1978-01-01

    A method for the gravimetric determination of cerium as Ce 3 (PO 4 ) 4 is described. Cerium can be separated from many metals in this form, as well as from permanganate and dichromate; the cerium separated can then be titrated with iron(II) solution. The method was verified for the determination of cerium in a rare earth concentrate. (Auth.)

  7. Courtship pheromones in parasitic wasps: comparison of bioactive and inactive hydrocarbon profiles by multivariate statistical methods

    Steiner, S.; Mumm, R.; Ruther, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons play a significant role in the regulation of cuticular permeability and also in the chemical communication of insects. In the parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), male courtship behavior is mediated by a female-produced sex pheromone. Previous

  8. Identification of irradiation treatment in processed food. Pt. 2. Evaluation of a SPE-method for analyzing irradiation induced hydrocarbons

    Hartmann, M.; Ammon, J.; Berg, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with a solid phase extraction (SPE) method for the isolation of irradiation induced hydrocarbons which can replace the column chromatography described in the paragraph 35 LMBG (German Food Law) procedure L06.00-37. Using this new method, only a tenth of solvents and column material is necessary. The SPE method was a good as LC-LC-GC/FID or LC-LC-GC/MS in analyzing new or complex matrices like paprika or salmon. Additionally, it is fast, cheap and easy to perform. As far as we know, the detection of irradiation traetment in paprika powder by analyzing irradiation induced hydrocarbons has not been described before. The new method is a good alternative for the commonly used thermoluminescence procedure. (orig.) [de

  9. A double isotope dilution method for assaying of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cigarette smoke condensate

    Bechtold, W.E.; Chen, B.T.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a double isotope dilution method for analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) phenanthrene, fluor-anthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene in cigarette smoke particulates. The first isotope dilution used deuterated analogues of the first three PAH as internal standards. The second isotope dilution, for benzo[a]pyrene, used the tritiated analogue as an internal standard. The PAH were isolated from extracts of cigarette smoke particulates using a two-step procedure based on selective extraction from aqueous dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by chromatography on silica gel extraction columns. After isolation, aliquots of the samples were analyzed for phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). Separate aliquots of the samples were analyzed for benzo[a]pyrene by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection followed by liquid scintillation spectrometry. PAH levels from cigarette smoke condensates collected from different exposure modes were compared; no exposure-related differences were found. (author)

  10. Taguchi Method for Development of Mass Flow Rate Correlation using Hydrocarbon Refrigerant Mixture in Capillary Tube

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The capillary tube is an important control device used in small vapor compression refrigeration systems such as window air-conditioners, household refrigerators and freezers. This paper develops a non-dimensional correlation based on the test results of the adiabatic capillary tube for the mass flow rate through the tube using a hydrocarbon refrigerant mixture of 89.3% propane and 10.7% butane (HCM. The Taguchi method, a statistical experimental design approach, was employed. This approach explores the economic benefit that lies in studies of this nature, where only a small number of experiments are required and yet valid results are obtained. Considering the effects of the capillary tube geometry and the inlet condition of the tube, dimensionless parameters were chosen. The new correlation was also based on the Buckingham Pi theorem. This correlation predicts 86.67% of the present experimental data within a relative deviation of -10% to +10%. The predictions by this correlation were also compared with results in published literature.

  11. Comparison of analytical methods used to measure petroleum hydrocarbons in soils and their application to bioremediation studies

    Douglas, G.S.; Wong, W.M.; Rigatti, M.J.; McMillen, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical measurements provide a means to evaluate crude oil and refined product bioremediation effectiveness in field and laboratory studies. These measurements are used to determine the net decrease in product or target compound concentrations in complex soil systems. The analytical methods used to evaluate these constituents will have a direct impact on the ability of the investigator to; (1) detect losses due to biodegradation, (2) understand the processes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation and, (3) determine the rates of hydrocarbon degradation. This understanding is critical for the testing and design of bioremediation programs. While standard EPA methods are useful for measuring a wide variety of industrial and agrochemicals, they were not designed for the detection and accurate measurement of petroleum compounds. The chemical data generated with these standard methods are usually of limited utility because they lack the chemical specificity required to evaluate hydrocarbon compositional changes in the oil contamination required to evaluate biodegradation. The applications and limitations of standard EPA methodologies (EPA Methods 418.1, 8270, and modified 8015) will be evaluated and compared to several new analytical methods currently being used by the petroleum industry (e.g., gross compositional analysis, TLC-FID analysis, and enhanced EPA Method 8270) to evaluate bioremediation effectiveness in soils

  12. Analytical method development using functionalized polysulfone membranes for the determination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    Nuhu, Abdulmumin A; Basheer, Chanbasha; Abu-Thabit, Nedal Y; Alhooshani, Khalid; Al-Arfaj, Abdul Rahman

    2011-12-15

    In this study, functionalized polysulfone membrane has been utilized as a sorbent for the extraction of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) in water samples. Two different functionalized polysulfones (i) phosphonic acid functionalized polysulfone (PPSU-A) with different forms (cross-linked and non cross-linked) membranes and (ii) phosphonic ester functionalized polysulfone (PPSU-E) with different forms (cross-linked and non cross-linked) were evaluated for the extraction of CHCs in water. A 10 ml of spiked water sample was extracted with 50mg piece of the functionalized membrane. After extraction, the membrane was desorbed by organic solvent and the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eight CHCs, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB), 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (1,2,3-TCB), 1,1,2,3,4,4-hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD), 1,2,4-trichloro-3-methylbenzene (TCMB), 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (1,2,4,5-TeCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were used as model compounds. Experimental parameters such as extraction time, desorption time, types of polymer membrane as well the nature of desorption solvent were optimized. Using optimum extraction conditions calibration curves were linear with coefficients of determination between 0.9954 and 0.9999 over wide range of concentrations (0.05-100 μgl(-1)). The method detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were in the range of 0.4-3.9 ng l(-1). The proposed method was evaluated for the determination of CHCs in drinking water samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Bacterial Hydrocarbon Degradation Potential in the Red Sea Through Metagenomic and Cultivation Methods

    Bianchi, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Prokaryotes are the main actors in biogeochemical cycles that are fundamental in global nutrient cycling. The characterization of microbial communities and isolates can enhance the comprehension of such cycles. Potentially novel biochemical processes can be discovered in particular environments with unique characteristics. The Red Sea can be considered as a unique natural laboratory due to its peculiar hydrology and physical features including temperature, salinity and water circulation. Moreover the Red Sea is subjected to hydrocarbon pollution by both anthropogenic and natural sources that select hydrocarbon degrading prokaryotes. Due to its unique features the Red Sea has the potential to host uncharacterized novel microorganisms with hydrocarbondegrading pathways. The focus of this thesis is on the characterization at the metagenomic level of the water column of the Red Sea and on the isolation and characterization of novel hydrocarbon-degrading species and genomes adapted to the unique environmental characteristics of the basin. The presence of metabolic genes responsible of both linear and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation has been evaluated from a metagenomic survey and a meta-analysis of already available datasets. In parallel, water column-based microcosms have been established with crude oil as the sole carbon source, with aim to isolate potential novel bacterial species and provide new genome-based insights on the hydrocarbon degradation potential available in the Red Sea.

  14. A novel high-performance thin layer chromatography method for quantification of long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons from Cissus quadrangularis

    Vandana Jain

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: A high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC is an analytical technique, which can be used for the determination of constituents or marker components in various parts of the plants. Earlier studies have estimated phytoconstituents from the stem and other aerial plant parts of Cissus quadrangularis Linn. Estimation of hydrocarbons can also be successfully done using HPTLC technique using suitable derivatization. Aims: To develop and validate a simple and rapid method for the estimation of long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons from the leaves of C. quadrangularis using HPTLC technique. Methods: Precoated silica gel 60 F254 plates were used as stationary phase. The mobile phase used was hexane (100 %. The detection of spots was carried out using berberine sulphate as detecting reagent. Results: The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. Linearity range was found to be 2-10 µg/mL, limit of detection 0.127 µg/mL, and limit of quantification 0.384 µg/mL. Conclusions: A novel, simple, accurate, precise and sensitive HPTLC method has been developed and validated for the estimation of long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons obtained from the leaves of C. quadrangularis Linn.

  15. Characterization of Bacterial Hydrocarbon Degradation Potential in the Red Sea Through Metagenomic and Cultivation Methods

    Bianchi, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the characterization at the metagenomic level of the water column of the Red Sea and on the isolation and characterization of novel hydrocarbon-degrading species and genomes adapted to the unique environmental characteristics of the basin. The presence of metabolic genes responsible of both linear and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation has been evaluated from a metagenomic survey and a meta-analysis of already available datasets. In parallel, water column-based microcosms have been established with crude oil as the sole carbon source, with aim to isolate potential novel bacterial species and provide new genome-based insights on the hydrocarbon degradation potential available in the Red Sea.

  16. Precision gravimetric survey at the conditions of urban agglomerations

    Sokolova, Tatiana; Lygin, Ivan; Fadeev, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Large cities growth and aging lead to the irreversible negative changes of underground. The study of these changes at the urban area mainly based on the shallow methods of Geophysics, which extensive usage restricted by technogenic noise. Among others, precision gravimetry is allocated as method with good resistance to the urban noises. The main the objects of urban gravimetric survey are the soil decompaction, leaded to the rocks strength violation and the karst formation. Their gravity effects are too small, therefore investigation requires the modern high-precision equipment and special methods of measurements. The Gravimetry division of Lomonosov Moscow State University examin of modern precision gravimeters Scintrex CG-5 Autograv since 2006. The main performance characteristics of over 20 precision gravimeters were examined in various operational modes. Stationary mode. Long-term gravimetric measurements were carried at a base station. It shows that records obtained differ by high-frequency and mid-frequency (period 5 - 12 hours) components. The high-frequency component, determined as a standard deviation of measurement, characterizes the level of the system sensitivity to external noise and varies for different devices from 2 to 5-7 μGals. Midrange component, which closely meet to the rest of nonlinearity gravimeter drifts, is partially compensated by the equipment. This factor is very important in the case of gravimetric monitoring or observations, when midrange anomalies are the target ones. For the examined gravimeters, amplitudes' deviations, associated with this parameter may reach 10 μGals. Various transportation modes - were performed by walking (softest mode), lift (vertical overload), vehicle (horizontal overloads), boat (vertical plus horizontal overloads) and helicopter. The survey quality was compared by the variance of the measurement results and internal convergence of series. The measurement results variance (from ±2 to ±4 μGals) and its

  17. A simple method to predict the biodegradation of hydrocarbon in soils: application to soil treatability

    Li, X.; Feng, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in a soil contaminated with crude oil and brine were examined in a field-size, solid state bioreactor. The objective was to develop a tool for a quick and economical assessment of the potential long term success of bioremediation technologies. The initial relative rate of degradation and a biodegradation module were determined. Results showed that the heterogeneity of the contaminant composition and its spatial distribution in hydrocarbon contaminant domains significantly reduced the rate of biodegradation. 2 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  18. Optimization of environment compatible analysis methods for mineral hydrocarbons in the soil; Optimierung umweltvertraeglicher Analysenverfahren fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe im Boden

    Flachowsky, J.; Borsdorf, H. [eds.] [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Loehmannsroeben, H.G.; Roch, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Leopom, P. [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany); Reimers, C. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Matz, G.; Kuebler, J. [MOBILAB GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Christall, B. [SOFIA GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hahn, M.; Matschiner, H. [Elektrochemie Halle GmbH (Germany); Baermann, A. [Dr. Baermann und Partner Mikroanalytik, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes several analytical methods for the quantitative chemical analysis of mineral oil hydrocarbons in soils. The measuring methods are investigated on accuracy, errors, sample preparation methods, analysis of reference materials and real materials. (SR) [Deutsch] Mit dieser Schrift praesentiert die Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt der Oeffentlichkeit Ergebnisse zu alternativen umweltvertraeglichen Bestimmungsmethoden fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe in Boeden. Es war in erster Linie das Ziel aller beteiligten Forscher und Entwickler, die heute noch in der Anwendung befindliche Vorschrift nach DIN 38409 H18 zur Analytik von Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffen durch eine sowohl umweltfreundliche als auch insgesamt aussagekraeftige Methode zu substituieren. (orig.)

  19. Additivity methods for prediction of thermochemical properties. The Laidler method revisited. 2. Hydrocarbons including substituted cyclic compounds

    Santos, Rui C.; Leal, Joao P.; Martinho Simoes, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A revised parameterization of the extended Laidler method for predicting standard molar enthalpies of atomization and standard molar enthalpies of formation at T = 298.15 K for several families of hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, polyenes, poly-ynes, cycloalkanes, substituted cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, substituted cycloalkenes, benzene derivatives, and bi and polyphenyls) is presented. Data for a total of 265 gas-phase and 242 liquid-phase compounds were used for the calculation of the parameters. Comparison of the experimental values with those obtained using the additive scheme led to an average absolute difference of 0.73 kJ . mol -1 for the gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation and 0.79 kJ . mol -1 for the liquid-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation. The database used to establish the parameters was carefully reviewed by using, whenever possible, the original publications. A worksheet to simplify the calculation of standard molar enthalpies of formation and standard molar enthalpies of atomization at T = 298.15 K based on the extended Laidler parameters defined in this paper is provided as supplementary material.

  20. Determination of molecular structures of aromatic hydrocarbons of crystal fractions of Noriysk crude by a series of luminescent-spectral methods

    Ogloblina, A.I.; Alekseyeva, T.A.; Barabadze, Sh.Sh.; Melikadze, L.D.; Teplitskaya, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of crystalline aromatic hydrocarbons isolated from the high boiling fraction (540-560 degrees) of Noriysk crude was studied using methods of luminescent-spectral analysis. The individual composition of the crystalline aromatic hydrocarbons was analyzed by a combination of fine structure luminescent spectroscopy and spectrofluorimetric methods in frozen matrices using spectra of fluorescence, phosphorescence and excitation of luminescence. The composite method used at 77 K is very effective and allows detailed characteristics of the molar-group composition of complex mixtures of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons to the point of identification of individual components.

  1. Aromatic hydrocarbons

    Roder, M.

    1985-01-01

    Papers dealing with radiolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons of different composition (from benzene to terphenyls and hydrocarbons with condensed rings) as well as their mixtures (with alkanes, alkenes, other aromatic hydrocarbons) are reviewed. High radiation stability of aromatic hydrocarbons in condensed phases associated with peculiarities of molecular structure of compounds is underlined. Mechanisms of radiolytic processes, vaues of product yields are considered

  2. A Monte Carlo simulation method for assessing biotransformation effects on groundwater fuel hydrocarbon plume lengths

    McNab, W.W. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Biotransformation of dissolved groundwater hydrocarbon plumes emanating from leaking underground fuel tanks should, in principle, result in plume length stabilization over relatively short distances, thus diminishing the environmental risk. However, because the behavior of hydrocarbon plumes is usually poorly constrained at most leaking underground fuel tank sites in terms of release history, groundwater velocity, dispersion, as well as the biotransformation rate, demonstrating such a limitation in plume length is problematic. Biotransformation signatures in the aquifer geochemistry, most notably elevated bicarbonate, may offer a means of constraining the relationship between plume length and the mean biotransformation rate. In this study, modeled plume lengths and spatial bicarbonate differences among a population of synthetic hydrocarbon plumes, generated through Monte Carlo simulation of an analytical solute transport model, are compared to field observations from six underground storage tank (UST) sites at military bases in California. Simulation results indicate that the relationship between plume length and the distribution of bicarbonate is best explained by biotransformation rates that are consistent with ranges commonly reported in the literature. This finding suggests that bicarbonate can indeed provide an independent means for evaluating limitations in hydrocarbon plume length resulting from biotransformation. (Author)

  3. Determination of sulfate in thorium salts using gravimetric technique with previous thorium separation

    Silva, C.M. da; Pires, M.A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. A simple analytical method to analyze sulfates in thorium salt, is presented. The method is based on the thorium separation as hydroxide. The gravimetric technique is used to analyze the sulfate in the filtered as barium sulfate. Using this method, the sulfate separation from thorium has been reach 99,9% yield, and 0,1% precision. This method is applied to thorium salts specifically thorium sulfate, carbonate and nitrate. (author). 5 refs, 2 tabs

  4. Development of a screening method for the determination of total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in water and wastewater

    Riggin, R.; Strup, P.; Billets, S.

    1983-01-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent an important class of organic compounds from an environmental standpoint, due to known human carcinogenicity of some members. Consequently, there is a great need for monitoring the PAH concentration of a variety of media, including water and industrial wastewater. Recently, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) developed a sensitive analytical method, designated Test Method 610, for the determination of priority pollutant PAHs in aqueous industrial discharges. This method employs reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) and fluorescence detection to determine all sixteen priority pollutant PAHs in a single chromatographic separation

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of different methods for the remediation of contaminated groundwater by determining the petroleum hydrocarbon content

    Voyevoda, Maryna; Geyer, Wolfgang; Mothes, Sibylle [Department of Analytical Chemistry, UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Mosig, Peter [Centre for Environmental Biotechnology, UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Seeger, Eva M. [Department of Environmental Biotechnology, UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    The effectiveness of different remediation procedures for decreasing the amount of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons) in contaminated groundwater was evaluated at the site of a former refinery. The investigations were carried out on samples taken from several gravel based HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) constructed wetlands (CW) which differed in relation to their filter material additives (no additive, charcoal, and ferric oxides additives) and examined the potential effect of these additives on the overall treatment efficiency. Samples of the following gravel based HSSF CW were investigated. No filter additive (system A), 0.1% activated carbon (system B), 0.5% iron(III) hydroxide (system C), and the reference (system D). Systems A-C were planted with common reed (Phragmites australis), whereas system D remained unplanted. In addition, the influence of seasonal conditions on the reduction of these hydrocarbons and the correlation between the amounts of TPH and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers), on the one hand, and methyl tert-butyl ether, on the other, was investigated. The study was carried out by using a modified GC-FID approach and multivariate methods. The investigations carried out in the first year of operation demonstrated that the effectiveness of the petroleum hydrocarbon removal was highest and reached a level of 93 {+-} 3.5% when HSSF filters with activated carbon as a filter additive were used. This remediation method allowed the petroleum hydrocarbon content to be reduced independently of seasonal conditions. The correlation between the reduction of TPH and BTEX was found to be R = 0.8824. Using this correlation coefficient, the time-consuming determination of the BTEX content was no longer necessary. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2008-10-14

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  7. Interpretation of Gravimetric and Aeromagnetic Data of the Tecoripa Chart in Southeast Sonora, Mexico.

    Martínez-Retama, S.; Montaño-Del Cid, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Tecoripa chart H12-D64 is located southeast of the state of Sonora, México, south of Arizona. The geology is represented by sedimentary rocks of the Ordovician and Triassic, volcanic rocks of the Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary, intrusive rocks from the Upper Cretaceous- Tertiary and sedimentary rocks of the Cenozoic. In this paper a gravimetric study was conducted to determine the configuration and depth of the basement and to develop a structural model of the subsurface. For this purpose a consistent gravimetric survey in 3 profiles was conducted. To complement this study, gravimetric data obtained by INEGI (96 gravimetric stations spaced every 4000 m) that correspond to a regional survey was also used. The two sets of data were corrected and processed with the WinGLink software. The profiles were then modeled using the Talwani method. 4 Profiles corresponding to the gravimetric survey and 5 data profiles from INEGI were modeled. Aeromagnetic data from the total field of Tecoripa chart were also processed. The digital information was integrated and processed by generating a data grid. Processes applied to data consisted of reduction to the pole, regional-residual separation and upward continuations. In general, the obtained structural models show intrusive bodies associated with well-defined high gravimetric and magnetic and low gravimetric and magnetic are associated with basins and sedimentary rocks. The obtained geological models show the basement represented by volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation from the Upper Cretaceous which are in contact with sedimentary rocks from the Barranca Group from Upper Cretaceous and limestones from the Middle Ordovician. Both volcanic and sedimentary rocks are intruded by granodiorite- granite with ages of the Tertiary-Oligocene. Based on the superficial geology as well as in the configuration of the basement and the obtained structural model the existence of faults with NW-SE orientation that originate Horst and

  8. Prediction of ecotoxicity of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using physicochemical parameters

    Wong, D.C.L.; Chai, E.Y.; Chu, K.K.; Dorn, P.B.

    1999-11-01

    The physicochemical properties of eight hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were used to predict toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants. The toxicity of these preremediated soils was assessed using earthworm avoidance, survival, and reproduction and seed germination and root growth in four plant species. No-observed-effect and 25% inhibitory concentrations were determined from the earthworm and plant assays. Physical property measurements and metals analyses of the soils were conducted. Hydrocarbon contamination was characterized by total petroleum hydrocarbons, oil and grease, and GC boiling-point distribution. Univariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to examine relationships between physical and chemical properties and biological endpoints. Soil groupings based on physicochemical properties and toxicity from cluster and principal component analyses were generally similar. Correlation analysis identified a number of significant relationships between soil parameters and toxicity that were used in univariate model development. Total petroleum hydrocarbons by gas chromatography and polars were identified as predictors of earthworm avoidance and survival and seed germination, explaining 65 to 75% of the variation in the data. Asphaltenes also explained 83% of the variation in seed germination. Gravimetric total petroleum hydrocarbons explained 40% of the variation in earthworm reproduction, whereas 43% of the variation in plant root growth was explained by asphaltenes. Multivariate one-component partial least squares models, which identified predictors similar to those identified by the univariate models, were also developed for worm avoidance and survival and seed germination and had predictive powers of 42 and 29%, respectively.

  9. Novel gravimetric measurement technique for quantitative volume calibration in the sub-microliter range

    Liang, Dong; Zengerle, Roland; Steinert, Chris; Ernst, Andreas; Koltay, Peter; Bammesberger, Stefan; Tanguy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel measurement method based on the gravimetric principles adapted from the ASTM E542 and ISO 4787 standards for quantitative volume determination in the sub-microliter range. Such a method is particularly important for the calibration of non-contact micro dispensers as well as other microfluidic devices. The novel method is based on the linear regression analysis of continuously monitored gravimetric results and therefore is referred to as ‘gravimetric regression method (GRM)’. In this context, the regression analysis is necessary to compensate the mass loss due to evaporation that is significant for very small dispensing volumes. A full assessment of the measurement uncertainty of GRM is presented and results in a standard measurement uncertainty around 6 nl for dosage volumes in the range from 40 nl to 1 µl. The GRM has been experimentally benchmarked with a dual-dye ratiometric photometric method (Artel Inc., Westbrook, ME, USA), which can provide traceability of measurement to the International System of Units (SI) through reference standards maintained by NIST. Good precision (max. CV = 2.8%) and consistency (bias around 7 nl in the volume range from 40 to 400 nl) have been observed comparing the two methods. Based on the ASTM and ISO standards on the one hand and the benchmark with the photometric method on the other hand, two different approaches for establishing traceability for the GRM are discussed. (paper)

  10. Efficient method for calculating the resonance energy expression of benzenoid hydrocarbons based on the eunumeration of conjugated circuits

    Lin

    2000-05-01

    To reduce the calculating time for the summations over linearly independent and minimal conjugated circuits of benzenoid hydrocarbons (BHs), an approximate method is proposed that counts only the numbers of the first four classes of conjugated circuits R1, R2, R3, and R4, respectively. By representation of BHs as custom-made "ring-block chains" and use of the techniques of Database and visual computing, an application software is realized that is much faster and more powerful than the old one based on an enumeration technique.

  11. Efficiency Analysis of Technological Methods for Reduction of NOx Emissions while Burning Hydrocarbon Fuels in Heat and Power Plants

    S. M. Kabishov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a comparative efficiency analysis pertaining to application of existing technological methods for suppression of nitric oxide formation in heating boilers of heat generators. A special attention has been given to investigation of NOx  emission reduction while burning hydrocarbon fuel with the help of oxygen-enriched air. The calculations have demonstrated that while enriching oxidizer with the help of oxygen up to 50 % (by volume it is possible to reduce volume of NOx formation (while burning fuel unit by 21 %.

  12. Gravimetric determination of carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials

    Kavanaugh, H.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Lovell, A.P.

    1979-12-01

    A gravimetric method for determining carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials was developed to analyze six samples simultaneously. The samples are burned slowly in an oxygen atmosphere at approximately 900 0 C, and the gases generated are passed through Schuetze's oxidizing reagent (iodine pentoxide on silica gel) to assure quantitative oxidation of the CO to CO 2 . The CO 2 is collected on Ascarite and weighed. This method was tested using a tungsten carbide reference material (NBS-SRM-276) and a (U,Pu)C sample. For 42 analyses of the tungsten carbide, which has a certified carbon content of 6.09%, an average value of 6.09% was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.01 7 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.28%. For 17 analyses of the (U,Pu)C sample, an average carbon content of 4.97% was found with a standard deviation of 0.01 2 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.24%

  13. A principal-component and least-squares method for allocating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment to multiple sources

    Burns, W.A.; Mankiewicz, P.J.; Bence, A.E.; Page, D.S.; Parker, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method was developed to allocate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment samples to the PAH sources from which they came. The method uses principal-component analysis to identify possible sources and a least-squares model to find the source mix that gives the best fit of 36 PAH analytes in each sample. The method identified 18 possible PAH sources in a large set of field data collected in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, after the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, including diesel oil, diesel soot, spilled crude oil in various weathering states, natural background, creosote, and combustion products from human activities and forest fires. Spill oil was generally found to be a small increment of the natural background in subtidal sediments, whereas combustion products were often the predominant sources for subtidal PAHs near sites of past or present human activity. The method appears to be applicable to other situations, including other spills

  14. An approximate method for calculating composition of the non-equilibrium explosion products of hydrocarbons and oxygen

    Shargatov, V A; Gubin, S A; Okunev, D Yu

    2016-01-01

    We develop a method for calculating the changes in composition of the explosion products in the case where the complete chemical equilibrium is absent but the bimolecular reactions are in quasi-equilibrium with the exception bimolecular reactions with one of the components of the mixture. We investigate the possibility of using the method of 'quasiequilibrium' for mixtures of hydrocarbons and oxygen. The method is based on the assumption of the existence of the partial chemical equilibrium in the explosion products. Without significant loss of accuracy to the solution of stiff differential equations detailed kinetic mechanism can be replaced by one or two differential equation and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed mechanism and can be used separately or in conjunction with the solution of a stiff system for chemically non-equilibrium mixtures replacing it when bimolecular reactions are near to equilibrium. (paper)

  15. Resonant gravimetric immunosensing based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers

    Viržonis, Darius

    2014-04-08

    High-frequency (40 MHz) and low-frequency (7 MHz) capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) were fabricated and tested for use in gravimetric detection of biomolecules. The low-frequency CMUT sensors have a gold-coated surface, while the high-frequency sensors have a silicon nitride surface. Both surfaces were functionalized with bovine leukemia virus antigen gp51 acting as the antigen. On addition of an a specific antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the antigen/antibody complex is formed on the surface and quantified by HRP-catalyzed oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine. It has been found that a considerably smaller quantity of immuno complex is formed on the high frequency sensor surface. In parallel, the loading of the surface of the CMUT was determined via resonance frequency and electromechanical resistance readings. Following the formation of the immuno complexes, the resonance frequencies of the low-frequency and high-frequency sensors decrease by up to 420 and 440 kHz, respectively. Finite element analysis reveals that the loading of the (gold-coated) low frequency sensors is several times larger than that on high frequency sensors. The formation of the protein film with pronounced elasticity and stress on the gold surface case is discussed. We also discuss the adoption of this method for the detection of DNA using a hybridization assay following polymerase chain reaction.

  16. Gravimetric and conductometric studies of the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous dispersions of kaoline

    Bulavyin, L.A.; Khrapatij, S.V.; Koval'chuk, V.Yi.; Klepko, V.V.; Lebovka, M.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    Using gravimetric and conductometric methods, the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous suspensions of Alekseev kaoline has been studied for pH value range from 4 to 10. It has been found that pH increasing leads to the decreasing of mean radii of flocks linearly. We found that sedimentation kinetics for intermediate pH values can be described by scaling equations that crossover time defined transition from a gravitational mechanism of deposition to the diffusion one

  17. GRAVIMETRIC-DETERMINATION OF THE WATER CONCENTRATION IN WHOLE-BLOOD, PLASMA AND ERYTHROCYTES AND CORRELATIONS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL AND CLINICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    LIJNEMA, TH; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JAGER, J; MACKOR, AJ; GIPS, CH

    1993-01-01

    We have assessed gravimetric methods for determination of intravascular water, established whole blood-, plasma- and erythrocyte water reference values in a healthy volunteer group (n = 97, 48 females) and correlated these variables with 30 simultaneous hematological, clinicochemical and body

  18. Application, advantages and limitations of high-density gravimetric surveys compared with three-dimensional geological modelling in dolomite stability investigations

    Breytenbach, I J; Bosch, P J A

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the nature of the gravimetric survey as applied and used in dolomite stability investigations on areas underlain by the Chuniespoort Group in South Africa. A short discussion is given on the gravimetric survey procedure along with its uses and alternative methods. Finally, two case studies illustrate the application of the method on a high-density survey grid spacing in comparison with three-dimensional geological modelling based on the lithology and karst weathering hor...

  19. An In Silico Approach for Evaluating a Fraction-Based, Risk Assessment Method for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Nina Ching Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP and the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group (TPHCWG developed fraction-based approaches for assessing human health risks posed by total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH mixtures in the environment. Both organizations defined TPH fractions based on their expected environmental fate and by analytical chemical methods. They derived toxicity values for selected compounds within each fraction and used these as surrogates to assess hazard or risk of exposure to the whole fractions. Membership in a TPH fraction is generally defined by the number of carbon atoms in a compound and by a compound's equivalent carbon (EC number index, which can predict its environmental fate. Here, we systematically and objectively re-evaluate the assignment of TPH to specific fractions using comparative molecular field analysis and hierarchical clustering. The approach is transparent and reproducible, reducing inherent reliance on judgment when toxicity information is limited. Our evaluation of membership in these fractions is highly consistent (̃80% on average across various fractions with the empirical approach of MADEP and TPHCWG. Furthermore, the results support the general methodology of mixture risk assessment to assess both cancer and noncancer risk values after the application of fractionation.

  20. Spectrophotometric, potentiometric, and gravimetric determination of lanthanides with peri-dihydroxynaphthindenone

    Hassan, S.S.M.; Mahmoud, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Sensitive and reasonably selective methods are described for the spectrophotometric, potentiometric, and gravimetric determination of lanthanides using peri-dihydroxynaphthindenone as a novel chromogenic and precipitating reagent. The reagent forms a stable 1:2 (metal:reagent) type of complex with light lanthanides at pH 2-7 in 1:1 ethanol-water mixture. Low metal concentrations ( 4 L mol -1 cm -1 ) which obey Beer's law. Quantitative precipitation of the complexes from metal solutions of concentrations > 100 μg/mL permits both gravimetric quantitation by igniting the precipitates to the metal oxides and potentiometric titration of the excess reagent. Results with an average recovery of 98% (standard deviation 0.7%) are obtainable for 0.1 μg to 200 mg of all light lanthanides. Many foreign ions naturally occurring or frequently associated with lanthanides do not interfere or can be tolerated

  1. A detailed gravimetric geoid from North America to Eurasia

    Vincent, S. F.; Strange, W. E.; Marsh, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid of the United States, North Atlantic, and Eurasia, which was computed from a combination of satellite derived and surface gravity data, is presented. The precision of this detailed geoid is + or - 2 to + or - 3 m in the continents but may be in the range of 5 to 7 m in those areas where data is sparse. Comparisons of the detailed gravimetric geoid with results of Rapp, Fischer, and Rice for the United States, Bomford in Europe, and Heiskanen and Fischer in India are presented. Comparisons are also presented with geoid heights from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, and Europe.

  2. Combined Colorimetric and Gravimetric CMUT Sensor for Detection of Phenylacetone

    Mølgaard, Mathias Johannes Grøndahl; Laustsen, Milan; Thygesen, Ida Lysgaard

    2017-01-01

    The detection of phenylacetone is of interest as it is a common precursor for the synthesis of (meth)amphetamine. Resonant gravimetric sensors can be used to detect the mass and hereby the concentration of a gas while colorimetric arrays typically have an exceptional selectivity to the target...... analyte if the right colorimetric dyes are chosen. We present a sensor system consisting of a Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer (CMUT) and a colorimetric array for detection of phenylacetone. The CMUT is used as a resonant gravimetric gas sensor where the resonance frequency shift due to mass...

  3. Visual estimation versus gravimetric measurement of postpartum blood loss: a prospective cohort study.

    Al Kadri, Hanan M F; Al Anazi, Bedayah K; Tamim, Hani M

    2011-06-01

    One of the major problems in international literature is how to measure postpartum blood loss with accuracy. We aimed in this research to assess the accuracy of visual estimation of postpartum blood loss (by each of two main health-care providers) compared with the gravimetric calculation method. We carried out a prospective cohort study at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between 1 November 2009 and 31 December 2009. All women who were admitted to labor and delivery suite and delivered vaginally were included in the study. Postpartum blood loss was visually estimated by the attending physician and obstetrics nurse and then objectively calculated by a gravimetric machine. Comparison between the three methods of blood loss calculation was carried out. A total of 150 patients were included in this study. There was a significant difference between the gravimetric calculated blood loss and both health-care providers' estimation with a tendency to underestimate the loss by about 30%. The background and seniority of the assessing health-care provider did not affect the accuracy of the estimation. The corrected incidence of postpartum hemorrhage in Saudi Arabia was found to be 1.47%. Health-care providers tend to underestimate the volume of postpartum blood loss by about 30%. Training and continuous auditing of the diagnosis of postpartum hemorrhage is needed to avoid missing cases and thus preventing associated morbidity and mortality.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290... balance. (a) Application. Use a balance to weigh net PM on a sample medium for laboratory testing. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use a balance that meets the specifications in Table 1 of...

  5. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  6. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  7. Application of chemical tools to evaluate phytoremediation of weathered hydrocarbons

    Camp, H.; Kulakow, P.; Smart, D.R.; O'Reilly, K.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of using phytoremediation methods to treat soils contaminated with hydrocarbons was tested in a three-year study at a site in northern California at a treatment pond for refinery process water. The treatment pond was drained several years ago and is targeted for cleanup. The petroleum hydrocarbons from the refinery waste were already highly degraded from natural weathering processes by the time the study began. The soil consists of about 23 per cent sand, 38 per cent silt, and 39 per cent clay. The study followed the Environmental Protection Agency's standardized field protocol and analytical approach. During the study, chemical data for several hydrocarbon parameters was gathered. Soil samples were Soxhlet-extracted in organic solvent and measured for oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons using gravimetric techniques. One of the objectives was to develop an accurate quantitative way to identify sites and conditions where phytoremediation will be effective to supplement decision-tree-type approaches. The focus of the study is the application of chemical data in evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment process. Phytoremediation uses living plants for in situ remediation of polluted soils. The basic benefits of the techniques is that it is aesthetically pleasing, natural and passive. In addition, it is effective in cleaning up sites with low to moderate levels of pollution at shallow depths. A particular form of phytoremediation called rhizodegradation or enhanced rhizosphere biodegradation was the treatment used in this study. It is a treatment in which microorganisms digest organic substances and beak them down by biodegradation while being supported in the plant root structure. Test results indicate that the effects of phytoremediation treatments are subtle for highly weathered source material. It was noted that more statistical analysis will be performed with the data to determine compositional changes due to phytoremediation

  8. Analytical method validation of GC-FID for the simultaneous measurement of hydrocarbons (C2-C4 in their gas mixture

    Oman Zuas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector (GC-FID method was validated for the simultaneous analysis of light hydrocarbons (C2-C4 in their gas mixture. The validation parameters were evaluated based on the ISO/IEC 17025 definition including method selectivity, repeatability, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection (LOD, limit of quantitation (LOQ, and ruggedness. Under the optimum analytical conditions, the analysis of gas mixture revealed that each target component was well-separated with high selectivity property. The method was also found to be precise and accurate. The method linearity was found to be high with good correlation coefficient values (R2 ≥ 0.999 for all target components. It can be concluded that the GC-FID developed method is reliable and suitable for determination of light C2-C4 hydrocarbons (including ethylene, propane, propylene, isobutane, and n-butane in their gas mixture. The validated method has successfully been applied to the estimation of hydrocarbons light C2-C4 hydrocarbons in natural gas samples, showing high performance repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD less than 1.0% and good selectivity with no interference from other possible components could be observed.

  9. ELECTRO-GRAVIMETRIC RECOVERY OF SILVER FROM ...

    2 M glacial acetic acid (CH3COOH) ... were escaped in the form of unstable volatile oxides using fire assay method as mentioned earlier. ... voltage 1.5 V was observed optimum cell voltage for maximum % recovery of silver [9-10]. Figure 1.

  10. Method for quantifying the fate of petroleum in the environment

    Mills, M.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Bonner, J.S.; Simon, M.A.; Autenrieth, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum is a complex mixture of a wide range of hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon compounds of various physical and chemical properties. In recent years, the research on the fate of petroleum in the environment has required analytical methods that can provide more detailed information on the components of petroleum than traditional standard methods. The analytical method presented for aqueous, sediment, and soil samples provides several levels of information on petroleum in the environment. The Total Extractable Materials (TEM) analysis provides a gross measure of petroleum in the environment using methylene chloride extraction and gravimetric analysis. Gross composition analysis separates the methylene chloride extract into a saturate hydrocarbon, an aromatic hydrocarbon, and a polar fraction each measured gravimetrically. In contrast, the target compound analysis provides a detailed measure by GC-MS of 62 specific compounds. Normalization to the conservative compound, 17α, 21β-(H)Hopane, is incorporated into the method to reduce the effects of sample and site heterogeneity. Quality control and quality assurance procedures are integral parts of these analyses to assure the validity of the resulting data. (author)

  11. Quantitation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH4) in cocoa and chocolate samples by an HPLC-FD method.

    Raters, Marion; Matissek, Reinhard

    2014-11-05

    As a consequence of the PAH4 (sum of four different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, named benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene) maximum levels permitted in cocoa beans and derived products as of 2013, an high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection method (HPLC-FD) was developed and adapted to the complex cocoa butter matrix to enable a simultaneous determination of PAH4. The resulting analysis method was subsequently successfully validated. This method meets the requirements of Regulation (EU) No. 836/2011 regarding analysis methods criteria for determining PAH4 and is hence most suitable for monitoring the observance of the maximum levels applicable under Regulation (EU) No. 835/2011. Within the scope of this work, a total of 218 samples of raw cocoa, cocoa masses, and cocoa butter from several sample years (1999-2012), of various origins and treatments, as well as cocoa and chocolate products were analyzed for the occurrence of PAH4. In summary, it is noted that the current PAH contamination level of cocoa products can be deemed very slight overall.

  12. Detection and identification of radiation induced hydrocarbons in meets with the use of gas chromatography as one of methods for the detection of irradiated food

    Lehner, K.; Stachowicz, W.

    2000-01-01

    Results of the determination of the content of radiation induced hydrocarbons in meat samples (chicken, pork, beef) as well as proportion between the concentration of individual hydrocarbons in relation to the content of fatty acids in a given product are presented. The measurements have been done with the use of a Perkin Elmer model 8700 gas chromatograph equipped with a FID detector. The present study is a preliminary work on the implementation of a routine method for the detection of irradiation in foods that contain fats. (author)

  13. A dynamic gravimetric standard for trace water.

    Brewer, P J; Goody, B A; Woods, P T; Milton, M J T

    2011-10-01

    A system for generating traceable reference standards of water vapor at trace levels between 5 and 2000 nmol/mol has been developed. It can provide different amount fractions of trace water vapor by using continuous accurate measurements of mass loss from a permeation device coupled with a dilution system based on an array of critical flow orifices. An estimated relative expanded uncertainty of ±2% has been achieved for most amount fractions generated. The system has been used in an international comparison and demonstrates excellent comparability with National Metrology Institutes maintaining standards of water vapor in this range using other methods.

  14. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining Sorption Rate by a Continuous Gravimetric Method

    Hall, Monicia R; Procell, Lawrence R; Bartram, Philip W; Shuely, Wendel J

    2003-01-01

    ... were automatically recorded in an Excel file while CARC coupons were submerged in solvent. Initial sorption rates were determined for butyl acetate, butyl ether, cyclohexane and propylene carbonate...

  16. Adsorption characteristics of methane on Maxsorb III by gravimetric method

    Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Youngdeuk; Ismil, Azhar Bin; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption characteristics of CH4 on the carbonaceous porous material is evaluated for possible application in adsorbed natural gas (ANG) system. Adsorption uptakes at assorted temperatures (25-80 °C) and pressures ranging from ambient to relatively

  17. Vanadium contents in Kazakhstan fossils hydrocarbons by data of nuclear-physical analysis methods

    Nadirov, N.K.; Solodukhin, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation of nuclear physical methods possibilities of vanadium determination analysis in organic fossils and an application of these methods for solution of scientific and practical tasks are presented. Vanadium contents in high viscous petroleums and petroleum bituminous rock of different deposits of Western Kazakhstan and carbonaceous shales of Dzhangariya are studied. Presented data evidence that organic fossils of numerous deposits of Kazakhstan have industrial interest because of high vanadium concentration in its contents

  18. Method of pyrolytic decomposition and coking of a mixture of finely distributed solid or semisolid carbonaceous material and hydrocarbon oils

    1933-09-09

    A method of pyrolytic decomposition and coking of a mixture of finely distributed of solid or semi-solid carbonaceous material and hydrocarbon oils is disclosed whereby the mixture is exposed to a decomposition temperature and later is brought into the zone of decomposition where vapors are separated from the unvaporized residue and the vapors are exposed to fractional condensation for the purpose of obtaining a light product of distillation. The method is characterized by the mixture being exposed to heating by means of indirect exchange of heat in a heating zone or by means of a direct addition of a hot heat-conducting medium, or by means of both the mentioned indirect exchange of heat and direct heat under such conditions that the unvaporized residue obtained from the thus-heated mixture in the decomposition zone is transformed to solid coke in this zone by being heated to coking temperature in a comparatively thin layer on the surface of the decomposition zone that has been heated to a high temperature.

  19. Method and apparatus for determination of hydrocarbons in waters. Verfahren und Einrichtung zum Feststellen von Kohlenwasserstoffen in einem Gewaesser

    Caetano, A; Gergely, J S; Blanchard, A J

    1980-12-15

    Methods and equipment are described with which, in combination with the use of a controlled submersible vehicle, probes can be made on or in the vicinity of the sea or riverbed and the presence of hydrocarbons or other substances which absorb light or fluoresce determined. By this method a light source of a certain frequency or frequencies is carried in the diving vehicle to probe the seabed and the reflected light energy recorded and processed. This light energy, which results either from the wavelength of oil fluorescence in water or from back-scattering of the source frequency, is determined both for the seabed and also for an area in the water of given clearance above the seabed. Alternative designs of equipment are presented with which both oil fluorescence and differential absorption measurement of the back-scattered light from the source can be measured, the latter emanating from the surrounding water or other factors in the water such as living organisms or turbidity.

  20. Germination of Lepidium sativum as a method to evaluate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal from contaminated soil

    Maila, MP

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of Lepidium sativum germination to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated in soil(s) artificially and historically contaminated with mixtures of PAR The level of germination of L. sativum decreased with increasing...

  1. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise

  2. Analytical method validation of GC-FID for the simultaneous measurement of hydrocarbons (C2-C4) in their gas mixture

    Oman Zuas; Harry budiman; Muhammad Rizky Mulyana

    2016-01-01

    An accurate gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) method was validated for the simultaneous analysis of light hydrocarbons (C2-C4) in their gas mixture. The validation parameters were evaluated based on the ISO/IEC 17025 definition including method selectivity, repeatability, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), and ruggedness. Under the optimum analytical conditions, the analysis of gas mixture revealed that each target comp...

  3. Preparation of standard mixtures of gas hydrocarbons in air by the diffusion dilution method

    Garcia, M. R.; Perez, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    An original diffusion system able to produce continuously gaseous samples is described. This system can generate samples with concentrations of benzene in air from 0.1 to 1 ppm a reproducible way. The diffusion dilution method used Is also studied. The use of this diffusion system has been extended to the preparation of binary mixtures (benzene-toluene). Whit a secondary dilution device is possible preparing these mixtures over a wide range of concentrations (0.11 to 0.04 ppm for benzene and 0.06 to 0.02 for toluene). (Author) 7 refs

  4. Energetic Analysis of Conjugated Hydrocarbons Using the Interacting Quantum Atoms Method.

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2018-07-05

    A number of aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic organic molecules was analyzed in terms of the contributions to the electronic energy defined in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and the interacting quantum atoms method. Regularities were found in the exchange and electrostatic interatomic energies showing trends that are closely related to those of the delocalization indices defined in the theory. In particular, the CC interaction energies between bonded atoms allow to rationalize the energetic stabilization associated with the bond length alternation in conjugated polyenes. This approach also provides support to Clar's sextet rules devised for aromatic systems. In addition, the H⋯H bonding found in some of the aromatic molecules studied was of an attractive nature, according to the stabilizing exchange interaction between the bonded H atoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Purifying hydrocarbons

    Demoulins, H D; Garner, F H

    1923-02-07

    Hydrocarbon distillates, including natural gases and vapors produced by cracking hydrocarbon oils, are desulfurized etc. by treating the vapor with an aqueous alkaline solution of an oxidizing agent. The hydrocarbons may be previously purified by sulfuric acid. In examples aqueous solutions of sodium or calcium hydrochlorite containing 1.5 to 5.0 grams per liter of available chlorine and sufficient alkali to give an excess of 0.1 percent in the spent reagent are preheated to the temperature of the vapor, and either sprayed or atomized into the vapors near the outlet of the dephlegmator or fractionating tower, or passed in countercurrent to the vapors through one or a series of scrubbers.

  6. A screening method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in water by headspace SPME with GC-FID

    Zuazagoitia, D.; Millan, E.; Garcia, R. [Univ. of Pais Vasco, Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2007-11-15

    A simple method for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) was developed. In order to obtain the convenient experimental conditions for HS-SPME extraction an experimental design with two steps was accomplished. A 2{sup 6-2} fractional factorial design and central composite design (CCD) considering three significant factors were used. Naphthalene, anthracene and fluoranthene were chosen as representatives of two, three and four aromatic rings, and the global response of three PAHs was used for the results, evaluation. The chosen extraction conditions were: 85 {mu}m polyacrylate fibre; 50 C temperature; 60 min time; 20 mL-dissolution volume (in 40 mL glass vial); without salt addition; and 2 min desorption time. The procedure was extended to other seven PAHs (acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo(a)anthracene) and the analytical characteristics were checked. The limit of detection (LOD) was from 0.08 (anthracene) to 0.20 {mu}g L{sup -1} (naphthalene). The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD in %) using 50 {mu}g L{sup -1} of each analyte ranged from 6.8 to 17 %. The method was applied to the analysis of the surface waters and leaching waters of contaminated soils from Gipuzkoa (North Spain). The PAHs were not detected in surface water samples. Most of the PAHs were found in the leachates from contaminated soils showing a maximum global value of 75.5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. (orig.)

  7. Gravimetric determination of hafnium through its arsenate in carbide and boride of hafnium

    Rasulbekova, R.A.; Mamedov, I.A.

    1976-01-01

    A gravimetric method of determining hafnium through hydroarsenate has been recommended. The method differs from the known ones by its simplicity and by the recalculation coefficient which is more than by 50% smaller than that used in preparing a weight form of HfO 2 . Upon development of gravimetric determination of hafnium through hydro-and pyroarsenate, an investigation has been conducted with the aim to find some physico-chemical constants of hafnium hydroarsenate. The weighed amount of hafnium hydroarsenate is dissolved in sulphuric acid (2:5). The precipitate of hafnium hydroarsenate has been studied for recording infrared absorption spectra. Thermographic analysis of the precipitate has been performed. Thermogram reveals endothermal effect at 105 deg C and exothermal at 840 deg C. Water solubility of hafnium has been determined equal to 1.75x10 6 g mol/l. The corresponding solubility product of the precipitate has been calculated which is 2.1x10 -17 . It is shown that the method possesses certain selectivity, sufficient accuracy, and is rather fast. It has been established that determination can be performed in the presence of excess amounts of ions

  8. Mycotoxin metrology: Gravimetric production of zearalenone calibration solution

    Rego, E. C. P.; Simon, M. E.; Li, Xiuqin; Li, Xiaomin; Daireaux, A.; Choteau, T.; Westwood, S.; Josephs, R. D.; Wielgosz, R. I.; Cunha, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    Food safety is a major concern for countries developing metrology and quality assurance systems, including the contamination of food and feed by mycotoxins. To improve the mycotoxin analysis and ensure the metrological traceability, CRM of calibration solution should be used. The production of certified mycotoxin solutions is a major challenge due to the limited amount of standard for conducting a proper purity study and due to the cost of standards. The CBKT project was started at BIPM and Inmetro produced gravimetrically one batch of zearelenone in acetronitrile (14.708 ± 0.016 μg/g, k=2) and conducted homogeneity, stability and value assignment studies.

  9. Purifying hydrocarbons

    Dunstan, A E

    1918-06-03

    Ligroin, kerosene, and other distillates from petroleum and shale oil, are purified by treatment with a solution of a hypochlorite containing an excess of alkali. The hydrocarbon may be poured into brine, the mixture stirred, and an electric current passed through. Heat may be applied.

  10. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  11. Gravimetric determination of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) with substituted pyrazolones

    Arora, H.C.; Rao, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    4-Acylpyrazolones like 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP), 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-p-nitrobenzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMNP) and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-(3,5 dinitrobenzoyl)-5-pyrazolone (PMDP) have been synthesized and developed as gravimetric reagents for the determination of U(VI) and Th(IV). Uranium(VI) is almost quantitatively precipitated with PMBP, PMNP, and PMDP at pH 2.20, 1.85 and 1.70 respectively. The pH values for the complete precipitation of thorium(IV) with PMBP, PMNP and PMDP are 2.90, 2.75 and 2.50 respectively. PMBP has proved to be an efficient ligand for gravimetric determination of U(VI) by direct weighing method after drying at 100 +- 10 deg C. The percentage relative error varies from 0.4 to 1.6 in the determination of U(VI) by this method. The effect of a number of interfering ions on the precipitation of U(VI) by PMBP has been reported. (author)

  12. Contaminação de aqüífero por hidrocarbonetos: estudo de caso na Vila Tupi, Porto Velho - Rondônia Hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater: the case of Tupi Village, Porto Velho-RO

    Elcimar Juarez Forte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground storage tanks (UST are widely used in the Porto Velho area. A large number of these USTs are in bad condition due to corrosion processes causing groundwater contamination. A large number of these leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFT are in urban areas but due to the lack of water quality monitoring, they are only detected when there is a high contamination level. This study identified petroleum hydrocarbons, derived from a LUFT, by a silica gel/petroleum ether partitioning gravimetric method and by gas chromatographic analysis of samples collected in wells dug in a gas station and in houses in the aforementioned neighborhood.

  13. Determination of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in processed food and complex lipid matrices. A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method for detection of irradiated components in food

    Hartmann, M.; Ammon, J.; Berg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Detection of irradiated components in processed food with complex lipid matrices can be affected by two problems. First, the processed food may contain only a small amount of the irradiated component, and the radiation-induced hydrocarbons may be diluted throughout the lipid matrix of the whole food. Second, in complex lipid matrices, the detection of prior irradiation is often disturbed by fat-associated compounds. In these cases, common solid phase extraction (SPE) Florisil clean-up alone is inadequate in the detection of prior irradiation. Subsequent SPE argentation chromatography of the Florisil eluate allows the measurement of small amounts of irradiated lipid-containing ingredients in processed food as well as the detection of prior irradiation in complex lipid matrices such as paprika and chilli. SPE argetation chromatography is the first method available for the selective enrichment of radiation-specific hydrocarbons from even complex lipid matrices, thus enabling the detection of irradiation does as low as 0.025 kGy. Furthermore, by using radiation-induced hydrocarbons in the detection of prior irradiation of paprika and chilli powder, a second independent method, the first being measurement of thermoluminescence, is available for the analysis of these matrices. Such analysis could be achieved by using this highly sensitive, cheap and easy to perform combined SPE Florisil/argentation chromatography method, without the need for sophisticated techniques like SFE-GC/MS or LC-GC/MS, so that highly sensitive detection of prior irradiation colud be performed in almost every laboratory

  14. Method for the simultaneous determination of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial effluents using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Makoś, Patrycja; Fernandes, André; Boczkaj, Grzegorz

    2018-02-23

    We present a new method for simultaneous determination of 22 monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in postoxidative effluents from the production of petroleum bitumen using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The eight extraction parameters including the type and volume of extraction and disperser solvent, pH, salting out effect, extraction, and centrifugation time were optimized. The low detection limit ranging from 0.36 to 28 μg/L, limit of quantitation (1.1-84 μg/L), good reproducibility, and wide linear ranges, as well as the recoveries ranging from 71.74 to 114.67% revealed that the new method allows the determination of aromatic hydrocarbons at low concentration levels in industrial effluents having a very complex composition. The developed method was applied to the determination of content of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of raw postoxidative effluents in which 15 compounds were identified at concentrations ranging from 1.21 to 1017.0 μg/L as well as in effluents after chemical treatment. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Model studies for evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of complex hydrocarbon solvents. I. Validation of methods with ethanol

    McKee, R.H.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Hoogendijk, E.M.G.; Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Barsotti, D.A.; Owen, D.E.; Kulig, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    As a preliminary step to evaluating the acute neurobehavioral effects of hydrocarbon solvents and to establish a working model for extrapolating animal test data to humans, joint neurobehavioral/toxicokinetic studies were conducted which involved administering ethanol to rats and volunteers. The

  16. Magnetometric and gravimetric surveys in fault detection over Acambay System

    García-Serrano, A.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, J.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.

    2013-05-01

    In commemoration of the centennial of the Acambay intraplate earthquake of November 19th 1912, we carry out gravimetric and magnetometric surveys to define the structure of faults caused by this event. The study area is located approximately 11 km south of Acambay, in the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault system, where we performed two magnetometric surveys, the first consisting of 17 lines with a spacing of 35m between lines and 5m between stations, and the second with a total of 12 lines with the same spacing, both NW. In addition to these two lines we performed gravimetric profiles located in the central part of each magnetometric survey, with a spacing of 25m between stations, in order to correlate the results of both techniques, the lengths of such profiles were of 600m and 550m respectively. This work describes the data processing including directional derivatives, analytical signal and inversion, by means of which we obtain results of magnetic variations and anomaly traits highly correlated with those faults. It is of great importance to characterize these faults given the large population growth in the area and settlement houses on them, which involves a high risk in the security of the population, considering that these are active faults and cannot be discard earthquakes associated with them, so it is necessary for the authorities and people have relevant information to these problem.

  17. Crustal thickness of Antarctica estimated using data from gravimetric satellites

    Llubes, Muriel; Seoane, Lucia; Bruinsma, Sean; Rémy, Frédérique

    2018-04-01

    Computing a better crustal thickness model is still a necessary improvement in Antarctica. In this remote continent where almost all the bedrock is covered by the ice sheet, seismic investigations do not reach a sufficient spatial resolution for geological and geophysical purposes. Here, we present a global map of Antarctic crustal thickness computed from space gravity observations. The DIR5 gravity field model, built from GOCE and GRACE gravimetric data, is inverted with the Parker-Oldenburg iterative algorithm. The BEDMAP products are used to estimate the gravity effect of the ice and the rocky surface. Our result is compared to crustal thickness calculated from seismological studies and the CRUST1.0 and AN1 models. Although the CRUST1.0 model shows a very good agreement with ours, its spatial resolution is larger than the one we obtain with gravimetric data. Finally, we compute a model in which the crust-mantle density contrast is adjusted to fit the Moho depth from the CRUST1.0 model. In East Antarctica, the resulting density contrast clearly shows higher values than in West Antarctica.

  18. Crustal thickness of Antarctica estimated using data from gravimetric satellites

    M. Llubes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Computing a better crustal thickness model is still a necessary improvement in Antarctica. In this remote continent where almost all the bedrock is covered by the ice sheet, seismic investigations do not reach a sufficient spatial resolution for geological and geophysical purposes. Here, we present a global map of Antarctic crustal thickness computed from space gravity observations. The DIR5 gravity field model, built from GOCE and GRACE gravimetric data, is inverted with the Parker–Oldenburg iterative algorithm. The BEDMAP products are used to estimate the gravity effect of the ice and the rocky surface. Our result is compared to crustal thickness calculated from seismological studies and the CRUST1.0 and AN1 models. Although the CRUST1.0 model shows a very good agreement with ours, its spatial resolution is larger than the one we obtain with gravimetric data. Finally, we compute a model in which the crust–mantle density contrast is adjusted to fit the Moho depth from the CRUST1.0 model. In East Antarctica, the resulting density contrast clearly shows higher values than in West Antarctica.

  19. Computation of improved tidal parameters at the gravimetric station of Brasimone

    P. Baldi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1991 a GWR superconducting gravimeter has been working in a laboratory at the Brasimone ENEA Research Centre, near Bologna (Italy, in the frame of an experimental program to verify Newton's law over distances of the order of 10-100 m. Owing to the aim of the experiment, the gravimeter was moved to different laboratories in the same area, but from August 1995 to date it has been working continuously in the same laboratory in the frame of the preliminary program of the Global Geodynamics Project. The site, belonging to a building of a dismissed nuclear power plant, is free from noise due to human activities, and is thus highly suitable for recording Earth tides. Starting from a set of gravimetric and atmospheric pressure data of high quality relative to 22 months of observation, we performed the tidal analysis using Eterna 3.2 software in order to compute amplitudes, gravimetric factors and phases of the main waves of the Tamura 1987 catalogue. The accuracy of the method adopted for the calibration of the gravimeter, the values of the principal waves and the result of the computation of atmospheric pressure admittance are described.

  20. Use of sulfoxides for extraction-gravimetric determination of niobium and tantalum

    Nikolaev, A.I.; Babkin, A.G.; Tkachenko, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    An extraction-gravimetrical technique has been developed for determination of niobium and tantalum. The technique permits simultaneous extraction of tantalum and its concentrating in the aqueous phase; the range of Ta concentrations determined is essentially wider than in case of the routine gravimetric methods. The technique is based upon the fact, that tantalum is extracted by sulfoxides from fluorine-sulphate solutions at lower concentration of Hf and at lower ratios between the volumes of organic and aqueous phases than niobium. Two subsequent extractions by 1M sulfoxide solutions provide for practically complete transfer of tantalum into the organic phase, whereas extraction of niobium is only 3-20%. Sufficient recovery of Ta and Nb from organic phases is provided by re-extraction by NH 4 F solution. The technique is suitable for niobium and tantalum determination at the ratios of their pentoxides from 1:100 to 100:1. The disturbing influence of Fe(3) is suppressed by reductions to Fe(2)

  1. Zero drift and solid Earth tide extracted from relative gravimetric data with principal component analysis

    Hongjuan Yu; Jinyun Guo; Jiulong Li; Dapeng Mu; Qiaoli Kong

    2015-01-01

    Zero drift and solid Earth tide corrections to static relative gravimetric data cannot be ignored. In this paper, a new principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm is presented to extract the zero drift and the solid Earth tide, as signals, from static relative gravimetric data assuming that the components contained in the relative gravimetric data are uncorrelated. Static relative gravity observations from Aug. 15 to Aug. 23, 2014 are used as statistical variables to separate the signal and...

  2. Humidity and Gravimetric Equivalency Adjustments for Nephelometer-Based Particulate Matter Measurements of Emissions from Solid Biomass Fuel Use in Cookstoves

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Chen, Chen; Tielsch, James M.; Katz, Joanne; Zeger, Scott L.; Checkley, William; Curriero, Frank C.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2014-01-01

    Great uncertainty exists around indoor biomass burning exposure-disease relationships due to lack of detailed exposure data in large health outcome studies. Passive nephelometers can be used to estimate high particulate matter (PM) concentrations during cooking in low resource environments. Since passive nephelometers do not have a collection filter they are not subject to sampler overload. Nephelometric concentration readings can be biased due to particle growth in high humid environments and differences in compositional and size dependent aerosol characteristics. This paper explores relative humidity (RH) and gravimetric equivalency adjustment approaches to be used for the pDR-1000 used to assess indoor PM concentrations for a cookstove intervention trial in Nepal. Three approaches to humidity adjustment performed equivalently (similar root mean squared error). For gravimetric conversion, the new linear regression equation with log-transformed variables performed better than the traditional linear equation. In addition, gravimetric conversion equations utilizing a spline or quadratic term were examined. We propose a humidity adjustment equation encompassing the entire RH range instead of adjusting for RH above an arbitrary 60% threshold. Furthermore, we propose new integrated RH and gravimetric conversion methods because they have one response variable (gravimetric PM2.5 concentration), do not contain an RH threshold, and is straightforward. PMID:24950062

  3. Humidity and gravimetric equivalency adjustments for nephelometer-based particulate matter measurements of emissions from solid biomass fuel use in cookstoves.

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Chen, Chen; Tielsch, James M; Katz, Joanne; Zeger, Scott L; Checkley, William; Curriero, Frank C; Breysse, Patrick N

    2014-06-19

    Great uncertainty exists around indoor biomass burning exposure-disease relationships due to lack of detailed exposure data in large health outcome studies. Passive nephelometers can be used to estimate high particulate matter (PM) concentrations during cooking in low resource environments. Since passive nephelometers do not have a collection filter they are not subject to sampler overload. Nephelometric concentration readings can be biased due to particle growth in high humid environments and differences in compositional and size dependent aerosol characteristics. This paper explores relative humidity (RH) and gravimetric equivalency adjustment approaches to be used for the pDR-1000 used to assess indoor PM concentrations for a cookstove intervention trial in Nepal. Three approaches to humidity adjustment performed equivalently (similar root mean squared error). For gravimetric conversion, the new linear regression equation with log-transformed variables performed better than the traditional linear equation. In addition, gravimetric conversion equations utilizing a spline or quadratic term were examined. We propose a humidity adjustment equation encompassing the entire RH range instead of adjusting for RH above an arbitrary 60% threshold. Furthermore, we propose new integrated RH and gravimetric conversion methods because they have one response variable (gravimetric PM2.5 concentration), do not contain an RH threshold, and is straightforward.

  4. Gravimetric model of the Gastre trough, province of Chubut, Argentina; Modelo gravimetrico en la fosa de Gastre, provincia de Chubut, Argentina

    Lince Klinger, F.; Nacif, S.; Martinez, M. P.; Gimenez, M. E.; Ruiz, F.; Alvarez, O.

    2011-07-01

    A gravimetric study of the Gastre trough in the Province of Chubut, to the southwest of the Canadon Asfalto basin, has allowed us to determine the geometry of its crystalline basement. Using filtering techniques we were able to map residual Bouguer anomalies, which show the heterogeneities situated within the upper crust, some of which are linked to recognised geological structures. The gravimetric minima in the residual Bouguer anomaly map are associated with graben-type basins, flanked by positive gravity values associated with alignments identified on the surface and with the overall topographic relief of the Gastre trough. After suitable treatment of the density values of the outcrops and seismic data we were able to construct a 2D density model, perpendicular to the trough, which indicated a depth of 3600 m. The importance of this study lies in the fact that it has been possible to arrive at a gravimetric characterization of the Gastre trough in the Canadon Asfalto basin sector, a potentially hydrocarbon-bearing area hitherto lacking in reliable data concerning its subsoil. (Author)

  5. Phase II Interim Report - Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana; SEMIANNUAL

    Monson, Lawrence M.

    2002-01-01

    The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis

  6. Phase II Interim Report -- Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana

    Monson, Lawrence M.

    2002-04-24

    The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis.

  7. Modificações do método gravimétrico não enzimático para determinar fibra alimentar solúvel e insolúvel em frutos Modifications in the gravimetric non enzymatic method for determination of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber in fruits

    Nonete Barbosa Guerra

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Modificações do tratamento da amostra e da seqüência operacional do método gravimétrico não enzimático foram realizadas, com vistas a simplificá-lo e permitir a quantificação das frações solúvel e insolúvel da fibra alimentar total. MÉTODOS: A influência da liofilização foi inicialmente avaliada em amostras de goiaba e, posteriormente, em acerola, manga, pinha, sapoti e uva. As modificações inerentes à seqüência metodológica foram testadas nos referidos frutos e em abacaxi, caju, maracujá e morango. RESULTADOS: As médias de fibra alimentar total obtidas para goiaba liofilizada e não liofilizada: 10,47%±1,15 e 10,53 %±0,88, respectivamente, demonstram: boa reprodutibilidade do método e inexistência de diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos aplicados à goiaba e demais frutos. Diferentemente do constatado na determinação da Fibra Alimentar Insolúvel, cujo percentual variou de 99,6% para o caju a 54,0% para a acerola, os dados gerados para a fibra alimentar solúvel foram desconsiderados, dada a dispersibilidade apresentada. CONCLUSÃO: Estes resultados evidenciam que as amostras prescindem da liofilização e que a quantificação da Fibra Alimentar Solúvel requer ajustes na etapa de precipitação.OBJETIVES: Modifications in the treatment of samples and operational sequence of the gravimetric non enzymatic method were carried out in order to simplify it and allow the quantification of soluble and insoluble quantities of the total dietary fiber. METHODS: Lyophilization influence was first evaluated in guava samples and afterward in samples of acerola, mango, sugar apples, sapodilla and grapes. The mentioned fruits and also pineapple, cashew, passion fruit and strawberry were tested for the modifications intrinsic in the methodological sequence. RESULTS: The average total dietary fiber for guava, both lyophilized and non-lyophilized, were: 10.50% ±0.97 and 10.53% ±0.88, respectively

  8. Measurement of Gd content in (U,Gd)O2 using thermal gravimetric analysis

    Kim, Keon Sik; Yang, Jae Ho; Kang, Ki Won; Song, Kun Woo; Kim, Gil Moo

    2004-01-01

    We propose a simple and precise method for measuring the Gd content in the (U,Gd)O 2 pellet by only measuring the weight variation of the pellet during thermal heat treatment in air. The (U,Gd)O 2 fuel pellets were oxidized at 475 deg. C, subsequently heat treated at 1300 deg. C, and then cooled to room temperature in air. The accompanying weight variations were measured using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The measured weight variations were mathematically analyzed with reference to the successive phase reactions during the heat treatment. This method provides an advantage in that the rare-earth element content including Gd can be measured using relatively simple equipment such as an electric furnace and a balance

  9. Cracking hydrocarbons

    Forwood, G F; Lane, M; Taplay, J G

    1921-10-07

    In cracking and hydrogenating hydrocarbon oils by passing their vapors together with steam over heated carbon derived from shale, wood, peat or other vegetable or animal matter, the gases from the condenser are freed from sulfuretted hydrogen, and preferably also from carbon dioxide, and passed together with oil vapors and steam through the retort. Carbon dioxide may be removed by passage through slaked lime, and sulfuretted hydrogen by means of hydrated oxide of iron. Vapors from high-boiling oils and those from low-boiling oils are passed alternately through the retort, so that carbon deposited from the high-boiling oils is used up during treatment of low-boiling oils.

  10. Distilling hydrocarbons

    Bataafsche, N V; de Brey, J H.C.

    1918-10-30

    Hydrocarbons containing a very volatile constituent and less volatile constituents, such as casing-head gases, still gases from the distillation of crude petroleum and bituminous shale are separated into their constituents by rectification under pressure; a pressure of 20 atmospheres and limiting temperatures of 150/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C are mentioned as suitable. The mixture may be subjected to a preliminary treatment consisting in heating to a temperature below the maximum rectification temperature at a pressure greater than that proposed to be used in the rectification.

  11. Comparison of Glaciological and Gravimetric Glacier Mass Balance Measurements of Taku and Lemon Creek Glaciers, Southeast Alaska

    Vogler, K.; McNeil, C.; Bond, M.; Getraer, B.; Huxley-Reicher, B.; McNamara, G.; Reinhardt-Ertman, T.; Silverwood, J.; Kienholz, C.; Beedle, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Glacier-wide annual mass balances (Ba) have been calculated for Taku (726 km2) and Lemon Creek glaciers (10.2 km2) since 1946 and 1953 respectively. These are the longest mass balance records in North America, and the only Ba time-series available for Southeast Alaska, making them particularly valuable for the global glacier mass balance monitoring network. We compared Ba time-series from Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers to Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mascon solutions (1352 and 1353) during the 2004-2015 period to assess how well these gravimetric solutions reflect individual glaciological records. Lemon Creek Glacier is a challenging candidate for this comparison because it is small compared to the 12,100 km2 GRACE mascon solutions. Taku Glacier is equally challenging because its mass balance is stable compared to the negative balances dominating its neighboring glaciers. Challenges notwithstanding, a high correlation between the glaciological and gravimetrically-derived Ba for Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers encourage future use of GRACE to measure glacier mass balance. Additionally, we employed high frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) to measure the variability of accumulation around glaciological sites to assess uncertainty in our glaciological measurements, and the resulting impact to Ba. Finally, we synthesize this comparison of glaciological and gravimetric mass balance solutions with a discussion of potential sources of error in both methods and their combined utility for measuring regional glacier change during the 21st century.

  12. Investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channel based on wavelet entropy method

    Zan, Hao; Li, Haowei; Jiang, Yuguang; Wu, Meng; Zhou, Weixing; Bao, Wen

    2018-06-01

    As part of our efforts to find ways and means to further improve the regenerative cooling technology in scramjet, the experiments of thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing have been conducted in horizontal circular tubes at different conditions. The experimental results indicate that there is a developing process from thermo-acoustic stability to instability. In order to have a deep understanding on the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability, the method of Multi-scale Shannon Wavelet Entropy (MSWE) based on Wavelet Transform Correlation Filter (WTCF) and Multi-Scale Shannon Entropy (MSE) is adopted in this paper. The results demonstrate that the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability from noise and weak signals is well detected by MSWE method and the differences among the stability, the developing process and the instability can be identified. These properties render the method particularly powerful for warning thermo-acoustic instability of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channels. The mass flow rate and the inlet pressure will make an influence on the developing process of the thermo-acoustic instability. The investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics at supercritical pressure based on wavelet entropy method offers guidance on the control of scramjet fuel supply, which can secure stable fuel flowing in regenerative cooling system.

  13. The geothermal gradient map of Central Tunisia: Comparison with structural, gravimetric and petroleum data

    Dhia, Hamed Ben

    1987-10-01

    Five hundred and fifty temperature values, initially measured as either bottom-hole temperatures (BHT) or drill-stem tests (DST), from 98 selected petroleum exploration wells form the basis of a geothermal gradient map of central Tunisia. A "global-statistical" method was employed to correct the BHT measurements, using the DST as references. The geothermal gradient ranges from 23° to 49°C/km. Comparison of the geothermal gradient with structural, gravimetric and petroleum data indicates that: (1) the general trend of the geothermal gradient curves reflects the main structural directions of the region, (2) zones of low and high geothermal gradient are correlated with zones of negative and positive Bouguer anomalies and (3) the five most important oil fields of central Tunisia are located near the geothermal gradient curve of 40° C/km. Such associations could have practical importance in petroleum exploration, but their significance must first be established through further investigation and additional data.

  14. Analysis of rocks involving the x-ray diffraction, infrared and thermal gravimetric techniques

    Ikram, M.; Rauf, M.A.; Munir, N.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical analysis of rocks and minerals are usually obtained by a number of analytical techniques. The purpose of present work is to investigate the chemical composition of the rock samples and also to find that how far the results obtained by different instrumental methods are closely related. Chemical tests wee performed before using the instrumental techniques in order to determined the nature of these rocks. The chemical analysis indicated mainly the presence of carbonate and hence the carbonate nature of these rocks. The x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis techniques were used for the determination of chemical composition of these samples. The results obtained by using these techniques have shown a great deal of similarities. (author)

  15. Zeolitic imidazolate framework membranes and methods of making and using same for separation of c2- and c3+ hydrocarbons and separation of propylene and propane mixtures

    Lai, Zhiping

    2012-12-06

    Certain embodiments are directed to processes for fabrication of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) membranes. These ZIF membranes can be used in separating C2-hydrocarbons from C3+ hydrocarbons and propylene/propane mixtures.

  16. Zeolitic imidazolate framework membranes and methods of making and using same for separation of c2- and c3+ hydrocarbons and separation of propylene and propane mixtures

    Lai, Zhiping; Pan, Yichang

    2012-01-01

    Certain embodiments are directed to processes for fabrication of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) membranes. These ZIF membranes can be used in separating C2-hydrocarbons from C3+ hydrocarbons and propylene/propane mixtures.

  17. Evaporation and Hydrocarbon Chain Conformation of Surface Lipid Films

    Sledge, Samiyyah M.; Khimji, Hussain; Borchman, Douglas; Oliver, Alexandria; Michael, Heidi; Dennis, Emily K.; Gerlach, Dylan; Bhola, Rahul; Stephen, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The inhibition of the rate of evaporation (Revap) by surface lipids is relevant to reservoirs and dry eye. Our aim was to test the idea that lipid surface films inhibit Revap. Methods Revap were determined gravimetrically. Hydrocarbon chain conformation and structure were measured using a Raman microscope. Six 1-hydroxyl hydrocarbons (11–24 carbons in length) and human meibum were studied. Reflex tears were obtained from a 62-year-old male. Results The Raman scattering intensity of the lipid film deviated by about 7 % for hydroxyl lipids and varied by 21 % for meibum films across the entire film at a resolution of 5 µm2. All of the surface lipids were ordered. Revap of the shorter chain hydroxyl lipids were slightly (7%) but significantly lower compared with the longer chain hydroxyl lipids. Revap of both groups was essentially similar to that of buffer. A hydroxyl lipid film did not influence Revap over an estimated average thickness range of 0.69 to >6.9 µm. Revap of human tears and buffer with and without human meibum (34.4 µm thick) was not significantly different. Revap of human tears was not significantly different from buffer. Conclusions Human meibum and hydroxyl lipids, regardless of their fluidity, chain length, or thickness did not inhibit Revap of buffer or tears even though they completely covered the surface. It is unlikely that hydroxyl lipids can be used to inhibit Revap of reservoirs. Our data do not support the widely accepted (yet unconfirmed) idea that the tear film lipid layer inhibits Revap of tears. PMID:27395776

  18. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction of hydrocarbons in marine sediments: comparison with the Soxhlet extraction method.

    Vázquez Blanco, E; López Mahía, P; Muniategui Lorenzo, S; Prada Rodríguez, D; Fernández Fernández, E

    2000-02-01

    Microwave energy was applied to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and linear aliphatic hydrocarbons (LAHs) from marine sediments. The influence of experimental conditions, such as different extracting solvents and mixtures, microwave power, irradiation time and number of samples extracted per run has been tested using real marine sediment samples; volume of the solvent, sample quantity and matrix effects were also evaluated. The yield of extracted compounds obtained by microwave irradiation was compared with that obtained using the traditional Soxhlet extraction. The best results were achieved with a mixture of acetone and hexane (1:1), and recoveries ranged from 92 to 106%. The extraction time is dependent on the irradiation power and the number of samples extracted per run, so when the irradiation power was set to 500 W, the extraction times varied from 6 min for 1 sample to 18 min for 8 samples. Analytical determinations were carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an ultraviolet-visible photodiode-array detector for PAHs and gas chromatography (GC) using a FID detector for LAHs. To test the accuracy of the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique, optimized methodology was applied to the analysis of standard reference material (SRM 1941), obtaining acceptable results.

  19. A combined approach of physicochemical and biological methods for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Masakorala, Kanaji; Yao, Jun; Chandankere, Radhika; Liu, Haijun; Liu, Wenjuan; Cai, Minmin; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-01-01

    Main physicochemical and microbiological parameters of collected petroleum-contaminated soils with different degrees of contamination from DaGang oil field (southeast of Tianjin, northeast China) were comparatively analyzed in order to assess the influence of petroleum contaminants on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soil. An integration of microcalorimetric technique with urease enzyme analysis was used with the aim to assess a general status of soil metabolism and the potential availability of nitrogen nutrient in soils stressed by petroleum-derived contaminants. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of contaminated soils varied from 752.3 to 29,114 mg kg(−1). Although the studied physicochemical and biological parameters showed variations dependent on TPH content, the correlation matrix showed also highly significant correlation coefficients among parameters, suggesting their utility in describing a complex matrix such as soil even in the presence of a high level of contaminants. The microcalorimetric measures gave evidence of microbial adaptation under highest TPH concentration; this would help in assessing the potential of a polluted soil to promote self-degradation of oil-derived hydrocarbon under natural or assisted remediation. The results highlighted the importance of the application of combined approach in the study of those parameters driving the soil amelioration and bioremediation.

  20. Hydrocarbon oils

    Foorwood, G F; Taplay, J G

    1916-12-12

    Hydrocarbon oils are hydrogenated, cracked, or treated for the removal of sulfur by bringing their vapors mixed with steam at temperatures between 450 and 600/sup 0/C into contact with a form of carbon that is capable of decomposing steam with the production of nascent hydrogen at those temperatures. The forms of carbon used include lamp-black, soot, charcoals derived from wood, cellulose, and lignite, and carbons obtained by carbonizing oil residues and other organic bodies at temperatures below 600/sup 0/C. The process is applied to the treatment of coal oil, shale oil, petroleum, and lignite oil. In examples, kerosene is cracked at 570/sup 0/C, cracked spirit is hydrogenated at 500/sup 0/C, and shale spirit is desulfurized at 530/sup 0/C. The products are led to a condenser and thence to a scrubber, where they are washed with creosote oil. After desulfurization, the products are washed with dilute caustic soda to remove sulfurretted hydrogen.

  1. Hydrocarbon exploration

    Lerche, I. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    This special issue of the journal examines various aspects of the on-going search for hydrocarbons, ranging from frontier basins where little data are available, to more mature areas where considerable data are available. The incentives underlying the search for oil are roughly: the social, economic and industrial needs of a nation; the incentive of a corporation to be profitable; and the personal incentives of individuals in the oil industry and governments, which range from financial wealth to power and which are as diverse as the individuals who are involved. From a geopolitical perspective, the needs, requirements, goals, strategies, and philosophies of nations, and groups of nations, also impact on the oil exploration game. Strategies that have been employed have ranged from boycott to austerity and rationing, to physical intervention, to global ''flooding'' with oil by over-production. (author)

  2. Development, optimization, validation and application of faster gas chromatography - flame ionization detector method for the analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    Zubair, Abdulrazaq; Pappoe, Michael; James, Lesley A; Hawboldt, Kelly

    2015-12-18

    This paper presents an important new approach to improving the timeliness of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) analysis in the soil by Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) using the CCME Canada-Wide Standard reference method. The Canada-Wide Standard (CWS) method is used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon compounds across Canada. However, inter-laboratory application of this method for the analysis of TPH in the soil has often shown considerable variability in the results. This could be due, in part, to the different gas chromatography (GC) conditions, other steps involved in the method, as well as the soil properties. In addition, there are differences in the interpretation of the GC results, which impacts the determination of the effectiveness of remediation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. In this work, multivariate experimental design approach was used to develop and validate the analytical method for a faster quantitative analysis of TPH in (contaminated) soil. A fractional factorial design (fFD) was used to screen six factors to identify the most significant factors impacting the analysis. These factors included: injection volume (μL), injection temperature (°C), oven program (°C/min), detector temperature (°C), carrier gas flow rate (mL/min) and solvent ratio (v/v hexane/dichloromethane). The most important factors (carrier gas flow rate and oven program) were then optimized using a central composite response surface design. Robustness testing and validation of model compares favourably with the experimental results with percentage difference of 2.78% for the analysis time. This research successfully reduced the method's standard analytical time from 20 to 8min with all the carbon fractions eluting. The method was successfully applied for fast TPH analysis of Bunker C oil contaminated soil. A reduced analytical time would offer many benefits including an improved laboratory reporting times, and overall improved clean up

  3. Laser metrology for a next generation gravimetric mission

    Mottini, Sergio; Biondetti, Giorgio; Cesare, Stefano; Castorina, Giuseppe; Musso, Fabio; Pisani, Marco; Leone, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    Within the ESA technology research project "Laser Interferometer High Precision tracking for LEO", Thales Alenia Space Italia is developing a laser metrology system for a Next Generation Gravimetric Mission (NGGM) based on satellite-to-satellite tracking. This technique is based on the precise measurement of the displacement between two satellites flying in formation at low altitude for monitoring the variations of Earth's gravity field at high resolution over a long time period. The laser metrology system that has been defined for this mission consists of the following elements: • an heterodyne Michelson interferometer for measuring the distance variation between retroreflectors positioned on the two satellites; • an angle metrology for measuring the orientation of the laser beam in the reference frames of the two satellites; • a lateral displacement metrology for measuring the deviations of the laser beam axis from the target retro-reflector. The laser interferometer makes use of a chopped measurement beam to avoid spurious signals and nonlinearity caused by the unbalance between the strong local beam and the weak return beam. The main results of the design, development and test activities performed on the breadboard of the metrology system are summarized in this paper.

  4. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Resonant-Gravimetric Detection of Trace-Level Xylene Molecules.

    Xu, Tao; Xu, Pengcheng; Zheng, Dan; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-12-20

    As one of typical VOCs, xylene is seriously harmful to human health. Nowadays, however, there is really lack of portable sensing method to directly detect environmental xylene that has chemical inertness. Especially when the concentration of xylene is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb, people are indeed hard to be aware of and avoid this harmful vapor. Herein the metal-organic framework (MOF) of HKUST-1 is first explored for sensing to the nonpolar molecule of p-xylene. And the sensing mechanism is identified that is via host-guest interaction of MOF with xylene molecule. By loading MOFs on mass-gravimetric resonant-cantilevers, sensing experiments for four MOFs of MOF-5, HKUST-1, ZIF-8, and MOF-177 approve that HKUST-1 has the highest sensitivity to p-xylene. The resonant-gravimetric sensing experiments with our HKUST-1 based sensors have demonstrated that trace-level p-xylene of 400 ppb can be detected that is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb. We analyze that the specificity of HKUST-1 to xylene comes from Cu 2+ -induced moderate Lewis acidity and the "like dissolves like" interaction of the benzene ring. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to elucidate the adsorbing/sensing mechanism of HKUST-1 to p-xylene, where p-xylene adsorbing induced blue-shift phenomenon is observed that confirms the sensing mechanism. Our study also indicates that the sensor shows good selectivity to various kinds of common interfering gases. And the long-term repeatability and stability of the sensing material are also approved for the usage/storage period of two months. This research approves that the MOF materials exhibit potential usages for high performance chemical sensors applications.

  5. Polyhalogenated hydrocarbon refrigerants and refrigerant oils colored with fluorescent dyes and method for their use as leak detectors

    Parekh, M.

    1988-07-19

    A leak detectable refrigeration composition is described comprising: (A) a refrigeration liquid selection from the group consisting of: (1) a polyhalogenated hydrocarbon refrigerant; (2) a refrigeration oil selected from the group consisting of naphthenic oils, paraffinic oils, alkylated benzenes, silicones, polyglycols, diesters or triesters of dicarboxylic or tricarboxylic acids, and polyalkyl silicate oils, and (3) a mixture of A(1) and A(2), and (B) a fluorescent dye compound or composition comprising the dye selected from the group consisting of: (1) a fluorescent dye selected from the group consisting of perylene, naphthoxanthene, monocyclic aromatic compounds having an organometallic compound, (2) a solution of fluorescent dye in a solvent, and (3) a mixture of B(1) and B(2). The fluorescent dye compound or composition is soluble in the refrigeration liquid. The concentration of the dye being at least 0.001 grams per 100 grams of the refrigeration liquid.

  6. Application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for developing construction codes in zones of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction: case study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    J. Pacheco-Martínez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR has become a valuable tool for surface deformation monitoring, including land subsidence associated with groundwater extraction. Another useful tools for studying Earth's surface processes are geophysical methods such as Gravimetry. In this work we present the application of InSAR analysis and gravimetric surveying to generate valuable information for risk management related to land subsidence and surface faulting. Subsidence of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico is presented as study case. Aguascalientes local governments have addressed land subsidence issues by including new requirements for new constructions projects in the State Urban Construction Code. Nevertheless, the resulting zoning proposed in the code is still subjective and not clearly defined. Our work based on gravimetric and InSAR surveys is aimed for improving the subsidence hazard zoning proposed in the State Urban Code in a more comprehensive way. The study includes a 2007–2011 ALOS InSAR time-series analysis of the Aguascalientes valley, an interpretation of the compete Bouguer gravimetric anomaly of the Aguascalientes urban area, and the application of time series and gravimetric anomaly maps for improve the subsidence hazard zoning of Aguascalientes City.

  7. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of

  8. Molecular characterization of autochthonous hydrocarbon utilizing ...

    Prof. Ogunji

    Materials and Methods ... culturable hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (HUB) were enumerated by vapour phase ... hydrocarbon utilizing bacterial isolates by boiling method according to ... obtained in this investigation are consistent with past field studies (Kostka et ... Microbial and other related changes in a Niger sediment.

  9. A detailed gravimetric geoid of North America, the North Atlantic, Eurasia, and Australia

    Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the calculation of a goid based upon a combination of satellite and surface gravity data. A detailed gravimetric geoid of North America, the North Atlantic, Eurasia, and Australia was derived by using this program.

  10. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio; Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  11. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  12. Analytical methods used at model facility

    Wing, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    A description of analytical methods used at the model LEU Fuel Fabrication Facility is presented. The methods include gravimetric uranium analysis, isotopic analysis, fluorimetric analysis, and emission spectroscopy

  13. Implementation of new technology is a reliable method of extracting reserves remaining in hydro-carbon deposits

    А. А. Молчанов

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The prospects for further increase in oil production determined the introduction of new advanced technologies at all stages of the geological exploration process, drilling of wells, extraction and processing of hydrocarbons. On exploited deposits located at the late and final stages of development, in areas with developed infrastructure, the task of increasing oil recovery is particularly relevant. The increase in the total oil extraction in the fields by only a few percent allows us to obtain additionally millions of tons of oil and gas condensate. The oil reservoir is a multifactorial dynamic dissipative system and possesses all the properties of nonlinear self-organizing systems. To order the physicochemical processes in the formation in the parametric resonance mode, it is sufficient to periodically apply pressure to the formation by wide-band pulses from an independent nonlinear source. Such an independent well source is a plasma-pulse generator with an energy of about one kilojoule and a frequency spectrum from a few hertz to several kilohertz with a period of elastic vibrations 1-2 times per minute. The authors of the proposed technology suggest using an underwater electric explosion of conductors, in which the process of formation of a conducting channel is a successive chain of phase transformations of a metal under the influence of a pulsed current and then a breakdown of the hydromedia along the products of the explosion. A typical process of initiating a discharge is the breakdown of the interelectrode gap in a liquid under the influence of an electrical voltage that appears on the electrodes when a charged capacitor is connected to them through a conductor initiating an explosion. The application of the plasma-pulse effect equipment on the productive reservoir ensures an increase of oil and gas production rate and injectivity of injection wells by a factor of 2-6 and an improvement in the oil-water ratio of the produced fluid.

  14. Predicting the cross-reactivities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ELISA by regression analysis and CoMFA methods

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; Dai, Shu-Gui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Key Laboratory for Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria of Ministry of Education, Tianjin (China); Ma, Yi [College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Institute of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Tianjin (China); Gao, Zhi-Xian [Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin (China)

    2010-07-15

    Immunoassays have been regarded as a possible alternative or supplement for measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Since there are too many potential cross-reactants for PAH immunoassays, it is difficult to determine all the cross-reactivities (CRs) by experimental tests. The relationship between CR and the physical-chemical properties of PAHs and related compounds was investigated using the CR data from a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit test. Two quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) techniques, regression analysis and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), were applied for predicting the CR of PAHs in this ELISA kit. Parabolic regression indicates that the CRs are significantly correlated with the logarithm of the partition coefficient for the octanol-water system (log K{sub ow}) (r{sup 2}=0.643, n=23, P<0.0001), suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in the antigen-antibody binding and the cross-reactions in this ELISA test. The CoMFA model obtained shows that the CRs of the PAHs are correlated with the 3D structure of the molecules (r{sub cv}{sup 2}=0.663, r{sup 2}=0.873, F{sub 4,32}=55.086). The contributions of the steric and electrostatic fields to CR were 40.4 and 59.6%, respectively. Both of the QSAR models satisfactorily predict the CR in this PAH immunoassay kit, and help in understanding the mechanisms of antigen-antibody interaction. (orig.)

  15. Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Crustal Model for Antarctica

    Baranov, Alexey; Tenzer, Robert; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    -28 km), while in West Antarctica the Moho depth minima are along the West Antarctic Rift System under the Bentley depression (20-22 km) and Ross Sea Ice Shelf (16-24 km). The gravimetric result confirmed a maximum extension of the Antarctic continental margins under the Ross Sea Embayment and the Weddell Sea Embayment with an extremely thin continental crust (10-20 km).

  16. Gravimetric quantitative determination of packaging residues in feed from former food.

    Amato, Giuseppina; Desiato, Rosanna; Giovannini, Tiziana; Pinotti, Luciano; Tretola, Marco; Gili, Marilena; Marchis, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Valorisation of former foodstuff products (FFP) in feed is part of a long-term strategy for sustainability. An approach to valorise FFP outside the waste value chain is their use as an alternative source of feed materials, with a subsequent optimisation of the environmental impact of products. In the current practice of food production, food packaging is provided to ensure the maintenance of food quality and safety during transport and storage. One of the problems of reusing FFP is how to deal with packaging materials or remains that can become residues in the feed. The aim of this study is to propose a fast and sensitive gravimetric method, fit for routine official controls, for the determination of packaging residues in feed. The developed method can briefly be summarised as: (1) visual selection of the undesired ingredients which can be identified as remnants of packaging materials; (2) weighing of the selected materials; (3) defatting; (4) dehydration; (5) final weighing; and (6) reporting of weight and percentage. Moreover, the method has been validated through the determination of some of the parameters listed in Council Regulation 2004/882/EC (i.e., specificity, limit of quantification (LOQ), recovery, repeatability, within-laboratory reproducibility and measurement uncertainty).

  17. Density Imaging of Puy de Dôme Volcano by Joint Inversion of Muographic and Gravimetric Data

    Barnoud, A.; Niess, V.; Le Ménédeu, E.; Cayol, V.; Carloganu, C.

    2016-12-01

    We aim at jointly inverting high density muographic and gravimetric data to robustly infer the density structure of volcanoes. We use the puy de Dôme volcano in France as a proof of principle since high quality data sets are available for both muography and gravimetry. Gravimetric inversion and muography are independent methods that provide an estimation of density distributions. On the one hand, gravimetry allows to reconstruct 3D density variations by inversion. This process is well known to be ill-posed and intrinsically non unique, thus it requires additional constraints (eg. a priori density model). On the other hand, muography provides a direct measurement of 2D mean densities (radiographic images) from the detection of high energy atmospheric muons crossing the volcanic edifice. 3D density distributions can be computed from several radiographic images, but the number of images is generally limited by field constraints and by the limited number of available telescopes. Thus, muon tomography is also ill-posed in practice.In the case of the puy de Dôme volcano, the density structures inferred from gravimetric data (Portal et al. 2016) and from muographic data (Le Ménédeu et al. 2016) show a qualitative agreement but cannot be compared quantitatively. Because each method has different intrinsic resolutions due to the physics (Jourde et al., 2015), the joint inversion is expected to improve the robustness of the inversion. Such joint inversion has already been applied in a volcanic context (Nishiyama et al., 2013).Volcano muography requires state-of-art, high-resolution and large-scale muon detectors (Ambrosino et al., 2015). Instrumental uncertainties and systematic errors may constitute an important limitation for muography and should not be overlooked. For instance, low-energy muons are detected together with ballistic high-energy muons, decreasing the measured value of the mean density closed to the topography.Here, we jointly invert the gravimetric and

  18. First Release of Gravimetric Geoid Model over Saudi Arabia Based on Terrestrial Gravity and GOCE Satellite Data: KSAG01

    Alothman, Abdulaziz; Elsaka, Basem

    2016-04-01

    A new gravimetric quasi-geoid, known as KSAG0, has been developed recently by Remove-Compute-Restore techniques (RCR), provided by the GRAVSOFT software, using gravimetric free air anomalies. The terrestrial gravity data used in this computations are: 1145 gravity field anomalies observed by ARAMCO (Saudi Arabian Oil Company) and 2470 Gravity measurements from BGI (Bureau Gravimétrique International). The computations were carried out implementing the least squares collocation method through the RCR techniques. The KSAG01 is based on merging in addition to the terrestrial gravity observations, GOCE satellite model (Eigen-6C4) and global gravity model (EGM2008) have been utilized in the computations. The long, medium and short wavelength spectrum of the height anomalies were compensated from Eigen-6C4 and EGM2008 geoid models truncated up to Degree and order (d/o) up to 2190. KSAG01 geoid covers 100 per cent of the kingdom, with geoid heights range from - 37.513 m in the southeast to 23.183 m in the northwest of the country. The accuracy of the geoid is governed by the accuracy, distribution, and spacing of the observations. The standard deviation of the predicted geoid heights is 0.115 m, with maximum errors of about 0.612 m. The RMS of geoid noise ranges from 0.019 m to 0.04 m. Comparison of the predicted gravimetric geoid with EGM, GOCE, and GPS/Levelling geoids, reveals a considerable improvements of the quasi-geoid heights over Saudi Arabia.

  19. Converting high boiling hydrocarbons

    Terrisse, H; DuFour, L

    1929-02-12

    A process is given for converting high boiling hydrocarbons into low boiling hydrocarbons, characterized in that the high boiling hydrocarbons are heated to 200 to 500/sup 0/C in the presence of ferrous chloride and of such gases as hydrogen, water gas, and the like gases under a pressure of from 5 to 40 kilograms per square centimeter. The desulfurization of the hydrocarbons occurs simultaneously.

  20. Synergistic improvement of gas sensing performance by micro-gravimetrically extracted kinetic/thermodynamic parameters

    Guo, Shuanbao; Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Cheng, Zhenxing; Li, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sensing material can be comprehensively optimized by using gravimetric cantilever. • Kinetic-thermodynamic model parameters are quantitatively extracted by experiment • Sensing-material performance is synergistically optimized by extracted parameters. - Abstract: A novel method is explored for comprehensive design/optimization of organophosphorus sensing material, which is loaded on mass-type microcantilever sensor. Conventionally, by directly observing the gas sensing response, it is difficult to build quantitative relationship with the intrinsic structure of the material. To break through this difficulty, resonant cantilever is employed as gravimetric tool to implement molecule adsorption experiment. Based on the sensing data, key kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of the material to the molecule, including adsorption heat −ΔH°, adsorption/desorption rate constants K a and K d , active-site number per unit mass N′ and surface coverage θ, can be quantitatively extracted according to physical–chemistry theories. With gaseous DMMP (simulant of organophosphorus agents) as sensing target, the optimization route for three sensing materials is successfully demonstrated. Firstly, a hyper-branched polymer is evaluated. Though suffering low sensitivity due to insufficient N′, the bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane (BHPF) sensing-group exhibits satisfactory reproducibility due to appropriate −ΔH°. To achieve more sensing-sites, KIT-5 mesoporous-silica with higher surface-area is assessed, resulting in good sensitivity but too high −ΔH° that brings poor repeatability. After comprehensive consideration, the confirmed BHPF sensing-group is grafted on the KIT-5 carrier to form an optimized DMMP sensing nanomaterial. Experimental results indicate that, featuring appropriate kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of −ΔH°, K a , K d , N′ and θ, the BHPF-functionalized KIT-5 mesoporous silica exhibits synergistic improvement among

  1. Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ambient Aerosols by Using One-Dimensional and Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometric Method: A Comparative Study

    Yun Gyong Ahn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced separation technology paired with mass spectrometry is an ideal method for the analysis of atmospheric samples having complex chemical compositions. Due to the huge variety of both natural and anthropogenic sources of organic compounds, simultaneous quantification and identification of organic compounds in aerosol samples represents a demanding analytical challenge. In this regard, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS has become an effective analytical method. However, verification and validation approaches to quantify these analytes have not been critically evaluated. We compared the performance of gas chromatography with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS and GC×GC-TOFMS for quantitative analysis of eighteen target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The quantitative obtained results such as limits of detection (LODs, limits of quantification (LOQs, and recoveries of target PAHs were approximately equivalent based on both analytical methods. Furthermore, a larger number of analytes were consistently identified from the aerosol samples by GC×GC-TOFMS compared to GC-qMS. Our findings suggest that GC×GC-TOFMS would be widely applicable to the atmospheric and related sciences with simultaneous target and nontarget analysis in a single run.

  2. Development of a method for the in situ measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. Final report

    Jaeger, E.; Weissbach, A.; Koenig, F.; Paul, T.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in water on the basis of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The detection of the sum of PAH in ground- and surfacewater is possible with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence of other substances like chlorophyll or dissolved organic matter is suppressed by a special choice of spectral and temporal windows. The method works without any sample preparation and gives the results in a very short time. On the basis of this method a first device was built with a sensitivity of 0,1 μg/1 PAH in water. The measuring time was less than one minute. The on site use of this prototype is possible because of the use of a battery driven nitrogen laser together with a notebook computer for system control The application of fiberoptic cables up to 30 meter length makes it possible to use the system for screening and monitoring of polluted areas both in existing wells and without any well by using geological probe techniques. (orig.) [de

  3. Single-laboratory validation of a saponification method for the determination of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oils by HPLC-fluorescence detection.

    Akdoğan, Abdullah; Buttinger, Gerhard; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method is reported for the determination of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), benz[a]anthracene (BaA), benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF) and chrysene (CHR)) in edible oils (sesame, maize, sunflower and olive oil) by high-performance liquid chromatography. Sample preparation is based on three steps including saponification, liquid-liquid partitioning and, finally, clean-up by solid phase extraction on 2 g of silica. Guidance on single-laboratory validation of the proposed analysis method was taken from the second edition of the Eurachem guide on method validation. The lower level of the working range of the method was determined by the limits of quantification of the individual analytes, and the upper level was equal to 5.0 µg kg(-1). The limits of detection and quantification of the four PAHs ranged from 0.06 to 0.12 µg kg(-1) and from 0.13 to 0.24 µg kg(-1). Recoveries of more than 84.8% were achieved for all four PAHs at two concentration levels (2.5 and 5.0 µg kg(-1)), and expanded relative measurement uncertainties were below 20%. The performance of the validated method was in all aspects compliant with provisions set in European Union legislation for the performance of analytical methods employed in the official control of food. The applicability of the method to routine samples was evaluated based on a limited number of commercial edible oil samples.

  4. [Heavy metals and hydrocarbons content in soils of settlements of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous region].

    Alekseev, I I; Abakumov, E V; Shamilishvili, G A; Lodygin, E D

    In August 2015 there were executed investigations on the study of the soils diversity of the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug. One of the directions of this work got be the study of urban soils of settlements of the Yamal-Nenents Autonomous Okrug. The sectors for the observation were settlement of Harsaim, village Aksarka, city of Salekhard, settlement Harp and city of Labytnangi. About 20 soil samples were collected during the field work. Samples were collected from a depth of 0-5 cm and 5-20 cm. Heavy metals (HM) were detected with the use of X-ray fluorescent analyzer “Spectroscan-MAX”. The HM content values were compared with the corresponding Approxible Permissible Concentrations and Maximum Allowable Concentrations (MAC) adopted in Russia. Hydrocarbons content was determined by gravimetric method. Values of the hydrocarbons content in studied soils were compared with the existing regulations of the Russian Federation. The levels of soil contamination by hydrocarbons were determined. The study of soil samples from different settlements allowed to reveal characteristic features of soil contamination of separate settlements by HM and hydrocarbons and to compare them against each other. The vast majority of samples are characterized by arsenic exceedance of MAC, which should indicate to a high regional background of this element. For a more adequate assessment of the Zc meaning as the value of the total pollution index of soils there were used not only arithmetical average values of the coefficients of the chemical composition concentration (Kc), but also their average geometric values. According to levels of total soil contamination most of soil samples are characterized as non-hazardous (Zc<16). Calculation of soil pollution index showed that the most of soil samples have values less than 1. It characterizes soils as unpolluted. Statistical processing of obtained data in the media of the analytical software interface STATISTICA 10 showed a statistically

  5. Determination of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    Lodge, Jr, J P

    1963-01-01

    At the present time, the method of choice for the determination of polynuclear hydrocarbons appears to be the following, (a) extraction of the benzene-soluble fraction from the gross collected particulate matter, (b) one pass through a chromatographic column of partially deactivated alumina, (c) spectral examination of the fractions and (d) the application of appropriate chemical tests as indicated by the previous step. Using this method, the presence of pyrene, fluoranthene, one of the benzofluorenes, chrysens, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, anthanthrene, and coronene was demonstrated in the air of numerous American cities, and benzo(a)pyrene was measured at some 130 sites. Invaluable as such accurate determinations may be for research purposes, they are still too costly and time-consuming for routine survey purposes. While studies on the subject are by no means complete, they indicate the validity of piperonal chloride test as a general index of polycyclic hydrocarbons. This procedure is described in this paper. 7 references.

  6. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  7. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). gas chromatographic method; Determinazione degli idrocarburi policiclici aromatici (IPA). Metodo gascaromatografico

    Menichini, E; Viviano, G [Istituto Superiore di Sanita` , Rome (Italy). Lab. di Igiene Ambientale

    1997-12-01

    The method enables the determination of 4- to 6- ring PAHs and particularly of carcinogenic PAHs regulated in Italy. This revision is based on the results of a national collaborative study. Sample extract, obtained by a method described in a previous report (Rapporto ISTISAN: 90/33) is cleaned up by thin layer chromatography and analysed by gas chromatography; identification is confirmed by mass spectrometry. An intralaboratory quality control program is described.

  8. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by high efficiency liquid chromatography in PM10 and PM2,5 particles

    Herrera Murillo, Jorge; Chaves Villalobos, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method was validated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM10 and PM2,5 particles collected from air by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was validated. The PAHs analyzed in the methodology include: Naphthalene, Acenaphthylene, Fluorene, Acenaphthene, Phenanthrene, Anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, Benzo (a)anthracene, Chrysene, Benzo (b)fluoranthene, Benzo (k)fluoranthene, Benzo (a)pyrene, Dibenzo (a, h)anthracene, Benzo (g, h, i)perylene and Indeno (1,2,3-CD)pyrene. For these compounds, the detection limit and quantification limit have been between 0,02 and 0,1 mg/l. An equipment DIONEX, ICS 3000 model is used, that has two in series detectors: one ultraviolet model VWD-1, and fluorescence detector, model RF-2000, separating the different absorption and emission signals for proper identification of individual compounds. For all the compounds analyzed, the recovery factor has found not significantly different from each other and the repeatability and reproducibility has been to be suitable for an analytical method, especially for the lighter PAHs. (author) [es

  9. Optimization and validation of a method using UHPLC-fluorescence for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cold-pressed vegetable oils.

    Silva, Simone Alves da; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva

    2017-04-15

    Among the different food categories, the oils and fats are important sources of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of organic chemical contaminants. The use of a validated method is essential to obtain reliable analytical results since the legislation establishes maximum limits in different foods. The objective of this study was to optimize and validate a method for the quantification of four PAHs [benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene] in vegetable oils. The samples were submitted to liquid-liquid extraction, followed by solid-phase extraction, and analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography. Under the optimized conditions, the validation parameters were evaluated according to the INMETRO Guidelines: linearity (r2 >0.99), selectivity (no matrix interference), limits of detection (0.08-0.30μgkg -1 ) and quantification (0.25-1.00μgkg -1 ), recovery (80.13-100.04%), repeatability and intermediate precision (analysis of PAHs in the vegetable oils evaluated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Development of a magnetic solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography method for the analysis of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Ma, Yan; Xie, Jiawen; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Zhijian; Zhou, Qing; Li, Aimin; Liang, Ying

    2015-07-01

    A novel magnetic solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography method was established to analyze polyaromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples. The extraction conditions, including the amount of extraction agent, extraction time, pH and the surface structure of the magnetic extraction agent, were optimized. The results showed that the amount of extraction agent and extraction time significantly influenced the extraction performance. The increase in the specific surface area, the enlargement of pore size, and the reduction of particle size could enhance the extraction performance of the magnetic microsphere. The optimized magnetic extraction agent possessed a high surface area of 1311 m(2) /g, a large pore size of 6-9 nm, and a small particle size of 6-9 μm. The limit of detection for phenanthrene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene in the developed analysis method was 3.2 and 10.5 ng/L, respectively. When applied to river water samples, the spiked recovery of phenanthrene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene ranged from 89.5-98.6% and 82.9-89.1%, respectively. Phenanthrene was detected over a concentration range of 89-117 ng/L in three water samples withdrawn from the midstream of the Huai River, and benzo[g,h,i]perylene was below the detection limit. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Development of an analytical method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coffee beverages and dark beer using novel high-sensitivity technique of supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nagatomi, Yasushi; Harayama, Koichi; Bamba, Takeshi

    2018-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are carcinogenic substances that are mainly generated during heating in food; therefore, the European Union (EU) has regulated the amount of benzo[a]pyrene and PAH4 in various types of food. In addition, the Scientific Committee on Food of the EU and the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives have recommended that 16 PAHs should be monitored. Since coffee beverages and dark beer are roasted during manufacture, monitoring these 16 PAHs is of great importance. On the other hand, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a separation method that has garnered attention in recent years as a complement for liquid and gas chromatography. Therefore, we developed a rapid high-sensitivity analytical method for the above-mentioned 16 PAHs in coffee beverages and dark beer involving supercritical fluid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (SFC/APCI-MS) and simple sample preparation. In this study, we developed a novel analytical technique that increased the sensitivity of MS detection by varying the back-pressure in SFC depending on the elution of PAHs. In addition, analysis of commercially available coffee and dark beer samples in Japan showed that the risk of containing the 16 PAHs may be low. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preliminary study of gravimetric anomalies in the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, South America

    Juan Manuel Alcacer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to recognize several geological structures associated with the shear zones of the MFFS (Magallanes – Fagnano fault system by the analysis and interpretation of gravimetric anomalies. Besides, to compare the gravimetrical response of the cortical blocks that integrate the region under study, which is related to the different morphotectonic domains recognized in the region. This research was developed employing data obtained from World Gravity 1.0, which includes earth and satellite gravity data derived from the EGM2008 model. The study and interpretation of the MFFS from the analysis and processing of the gravimetric data, allowed appreciation of a noticeable correlation with the most superficial cortical structure.

  13. Correction for dispersion and Coulombic interactions in molecular clusters with density functional derived methods: Application to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters

    Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand; Talbi, Dahbia; Mineva, Tzonka; Goursot, Annick; Heine, Thomas; Seifert, Gotthard

    2009-06-01

    The density functional based tight binding (DFTB) is a semiempirical method derived from the density functional theory (DFT). It inherits therefore its problems in treating van der Waals clusters. A major error comes from dispersion forces, which are poorly described by commonly used DFT functionals, but which can be accounted for by an a posteriori treatment DFT-D. This correction is used for DFTB. The self-consistent charge (SCC) DFTB is built on Mulliken charges which are known to give a poor representation of Coulombic intermolecular potential. We propose to calculate this potential using the class IV/charge model 3 definition of atomic charges. The self-consistent calculation of these charges is introduced in the SCC procedure and corresponding nuclear forces are derived. Benzene dimer is then studied as a benchmark system with this corrected DFTB (c-DFTB-D) method, but also, for comparison, with the DFT-D. Both methods give similar results and are in agreement with references calculations (CCSD(T) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory) calculations. As a first application, pyrene dimer is studied with the c-DFTB-D and DFT-D methods. For coronene clusters, only the c-DFTB-D approach is used, which finds the sandwich configurations to be more stable than the T-shaped ones.

  14. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    Prof. Ogunji

    isolated fungi could be useful in the bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites. Keywords: ... Technologies such as mechanical force, burying, evaporation, dispersant application, and ..... The effects of drilling fluids on marine bacteria from a.

  15. Gravimetric study on the western edge of the Rio de La Plata craton

    Rame, G; Miro, R

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the gravimetric study on the western edge of the Rio de la Plata craton which belongs to the Gondwana fragment in the south of Brazil, Uruguay and central eastern of Argentina. The work consisted of a survey of 332 gravimetric and topographic stations extended from the western edge of the Sierra Chica de Cordoba up to 200 km east on the pampas. The gravity values observed (gobs) were obtained using a LaCoste §Rom berg gravimeter G-961 and 200T Sodin both with 0.01 mGal, referred to IGSN71 (International Gravity Standardization Net 1971) network

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    Boutheina Gargouri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  18. Providing long-term trend and gravimetric factor at Chandler period from superconducting gravimeter records by using Singular Spectrum Analysis along with its multivariate extension

    Gruszczynska, M.; Rosat, S.; Klos, A.; Bogusz, J.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) along with its multivariate extension MSSA (Multichannel SSA) were used to estimate long-term trend and gravimetric factor at the Chandler wobble frequency from superconducting gravimeter (SG) records. We have used data from seven stations located worldwide and contributing to the International Geodynamics and Earth Tides Service (IGETS). The timespan ranged from 15 to 19 years. Before applying SSA and MSSA, we had removed local tides, atmospheric (ECMWF data), hydrological (MERRA2 products) loadings and non-tidal ocean loading (ECCO2 products) effects. In the first part of analysis, we used the SSA approach in order to estimate the long-term trends from SG observations. We use the technique based on the classical Karhunen-Loève spectral decomposition of time series into long-term trend, oscillations and noise. In the second part, we present the determination of common time-varying pole tide (annual and Chandler wobble) to estimate gravimetric factor from SG time series using the MSSA approach. The presented method takes advantage over traditional methods like Least Squares Estimation by determining common modes of variability which reflect common geophysical field. We adopted a 6-year lag-window as the optimal length to extract common seasonal signals and the Chandler components of the Earth polar motion. The signals characterized by annual and Chandler wobble account for approximately 62% of the total variance of residual SG data. Then, we estimated the amplitude factors and phase lags of Chandler wobble with respect to the IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service) polar motion observations. The resulting gravimetric factors at the Chandler Wobble period are finally compared with previously estimates. A robust estimate of the gravimetric Earth response to the Chandlerian component of the polar motion is required to better constrain the mantle anelasticity at this frequency and hence the

  19. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  20. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  1. Method of preparing a catalyst suitable for steam reformation of hydrocarbons and for methane production. [German patent

    Golebiowski, A; Romotowski, T; Hennel, W; Wroblewska-Wroblewska, T; Polanski, A; Janecki, Z; Paluch-Paluch, S

    1977-05-26

    A method of producing a nickel catalyst suitable for steam reformation and methane production is described which forms a permanent bond with the inner surface of an externally heated metal tube, e.g. a heat exchanger tube. To begin with, a metal sponge with good adhesion to the metal tube is produced on the basis of a metallic powder of the metal group which is treated by a conventional calcination process. The metal sponge is then covered with a metal oxide which is not reduced under reformation conditions, e.g. aluminium oxide, by wetting the metal sponge with aluminium nitrate and repeated calcination. Wetting and calcination are repeated twice, and the calcination temperature is lower each time in the range between 400 and 1200/sup 0/C. The activated nickel is there deposited by wetting with a nickel salt solution and subsequent calcination.

  2. Hydrocarbons and air pollution

    Herz, O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper shows the influence of hydrocarbons vapors, emitted by transports or by volatile solvents using, on air pollution. Hydrocarbons are the principal precursors of photochemical pollution. After a brief introduction on atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions, the author describes the french prevention program against hydrocarbons emissions. In the last chapter, informations on international or european community programs for photochemical pollution study are given. 5 figs., 10 tabs

  3. Production of hydrocarbons

    Day, D T; Day, R E

    1920-04-27

    A process is disclosed of converting hydro-carbon oils having high boiling points to hydro-carbon oils having low boiling points, which process comprises adding the oil to be treated to a mass of hydro-carbon oil bearing shale, passing the shale with the oil through a conveyor retort and subjecting the material while in the retort to a heat treatment involving a temperature of at least 500/sup 0/F.

  4. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  5. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  6. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  7. Optimization of two different dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) analysis in water.

    Tseng, Wan-Chi; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-01

    Novel sample preparation methods termed "up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME)" and "water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (WLSEME)" coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been developed for the analysis of 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. For UDSA-DLLME, an up-and-down shaker-assisted emulsification was employed. Extraction was complete in 3min. Only 14 μL of 1-heptanol was required, without a dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were in the range 0.022-0.060 µg L(-1). The enrichment factors (EFs) ranged from 392 to 766. Relative recoveries were between 84% and 113% for river, lake, and field water. In WLSEME, 9 μL of 1-nonanol as extraction solvent and 240 μL of 1 mg L(-1) Triton X-100 as surfactant were mixed in a microsyringe to form a cloudy emulsified solution, which was then injected into the samples. Compared with other surfactant-assisted emulsion methods, WLSEME uses much less surfactant. The linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were 0.022-0.13 µg L(-1). The EFs ranged from 388 to 649. The relative recoveries were 86-114% for all three water specimens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimization and validation of a new method of analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sewage sludge by liquid chromatography after microwave assisted extraction

    Villar, P.; Callejon, M.; Alonso, E.; Jimenez, J.C.; Guiraum, A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of sludge from waste water treatment plants which are destined to be spread on agricultural lands, is a priority need. Inorganic pollutants are regularly controlled but organic pollutants have received little attention up to now. In this paper, we have developed an analytical procedure using microwave-assisted extraction prior to liquid chromatography coupled with diode array (LC-DAD) or fluorescence (LC-FL) detectors for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency (microwave power, irradiation time and extractant volume) were optimized. Clean-up of sewage sludge extracts was not found to be necessary. For adequate fluorescence detection of PAHs a temporal program of excitation and emission wavelengths was used. The optimized method was applied to the extraction of PAHs from various sludges from a waste water treatment plant (Jerez de la Frontera, Cadiz, Spain). The limits of detection were between 4 ng g -1 sewage sludge for benzo[b]fluoranthene and 12 ng g -1 sewage sludge for pyrene using LC-FL. When LC-DAD is used the limits of detection were between 13 ng g -1 for indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and 62 ng g -1 for naphthalene. The relative standard deviations were found to be <10%. The validation of the proposed method was carried out by application to analysis for PAHs in a certified reference material (CRM) 088 dried sewage sludge of the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR). The recoveries were between 69% for benzo[k]fluoranthene and 110% for pyrene using LC-FL and between 52% for indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and 104% for benzo[a]pyrene using LC-DAD of the certified values. These results are in a very good agreement with those given in the literature

  9. Gravimetric Analysis of Bismuth in Bismuth Subsalicylate Tablets: A Versatile Quantitative Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratories

    Davis, Eric; Cheung, Ken; Pauls, Steve; Dick, Jonathan; Roth, Elijah; Zalewski, Nicole; Veldhuizen, Christopher; Coeler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, lower- and upper-division students dissolved bismuth subsalicylate tablets in acid and precipitated the resultant Bi[superscript 3+] in solution with sodium phosphate for a gravimetric determination of bismuth subsalicylate in the tablets. With a labeled concentration of 262 mg/tablet, the combined data from three…

  10. Geopotential coefficient determination and the gravimetric boundary value problem: A new approach

    Sjoeberg, Lars E.

    1989-01-01

    New integral formulas to determine geopotential coefficients from terrestrial gravity and satellite altimetry data are given. The formulas are based on the integration of data over the non-spherical surface of the Earth. The effect of the topography to low degrees and orders of coefficients is estimated numerically. Formulas for the solution of the gravimetric boundary value problem are derived.

  11. Control and Prediction of the Course of Brewery Fermentations by Gravimetric Analysis

    Košín, P.; Šavel, J.; Brož, A.; Sigler, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2008), s. 451-456 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : brewery fermentation * gravimetric analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  12. Sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Gerner, Nadine V; Cailleaud, Kevin; Bassères, Anne; Liess, Matthias; Beketov, Mikhail A

    2017-11-01

    Hydrocarbons have an utmost economical importance but may also cause substantial ecological impacts due to accidents or inadequate transportation and use. Currently, freshwater biomonitoring methods lack an indicator that can unequivocally reflect the impacts caused by hydrocarbons while being independent from effects of other stressors. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants, which can be used in hydrocarbon-specific bioindicators. We employed the Relative Sensitivity method and developed the sensitivity ranking S hydrocarbons based on literature ecotoxicological data supplemented with rapid and mesocosm test results. A first validation of the sensitivity ranking based on an earlier field study has been conducted and revealed the S hydrocarbons ranking to be promising for application in sensitivity based indicators. Thus, the first results indicate that the ranking can serve as the core component of future hydrocarbon-specific and sensitivity trait based bioindicators.

  13. A binder-free NiCo2O4 nanosheet/3D elastic N-doped hollow carbon nanotube sponge electrode with high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    Tong, Hao; Yue, Shihong; Lu, Liang; Jin, Fengqiao; Han, Qiwei; Zhang, Xiaogang; Liu, Jie

    2017-11-09

    To increase the volumetric and gravimetric capacitances of supercapacitors, a new class of electrode materials with high electrochemical activity and favorable structures is extremely desired. In this work, a hollow novel nitrogen-doped 3D elastic single-walled carbon nanotube sponge (NSCS) which is ultra lightweight with the lowest density of 0.8 mg cm -3 , and has a high open surface structure for electrolyte accessibility and excellent compressible properties as the electrode scaffold has been successfully fabricated by the pyrolysis method which could produce the carbon nanotube sponge easily on a large scale without high-cost and time-consuming processes. Moreover, a NiCo 2 O 4 nanosheet supported on the NSCS has been successfully fabricated. The highest volumetric and gravimetric capacitance of this electrode is 790 F cm -3 at 1.43 g cm -3 and 1618 F g -1 at 0.54 g cm -3 with excellent cycling stability. The density of NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS electrode was adjusted by mechanical compression and the most favorable density of the film for both high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances obtained was 1.21 g cm -3 . The thick NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS film of 72 μm has been fabricated at this favorable density, presenting both high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances of 597 F cm -3 and 1074 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 , respectively, indicating that the structure of the NSCS is extremely feasible for obtaining a thick film electrode with excellent volumetric and gravimetric capacitances. Furthermore, an asymmetric supercapacitor of NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS//NGN/CNTs was fabricated, exhibiting a high gravimetric energy density of 47.65 W h kg -1 at 536 W kg -1 and a volumetric energy density of 33.44 W h L -1 at 376.16 W L -1 .

  14. Post-factum detection of radiation treatment in processed food by analysis of radiation-induced hydrocarbons. Pt. 1. Applying the method L 06.00-37 defined in Para. 35 LMBG (German Act on Food Irradiation) to processed food

    Hartmann, M.; Ammon, J.; Berg, H.

    1995-01-01

    The German official method L 06.00-37 (Para. 35 German Act on Food Irradiation) is used for the identification of irradiated fat-containing food by GC-analysis of radiation-induced hydrocarbons. Simple modifications in sample preparation allow a distinctive improvement in detection possibilities and detection limits as well. The applicability of the modified method for the detection of irradiated ingredients in model-like processed food is shown. An identification of only 3% (irradiated fat to total fat ratio) irradiated ingredient (1,5 kGy) in processed food was possible. Additionally, the kind of irradiated ingredient could be identified by the pattern of radiation induced hydrocarbons. Their concentrations are corresponding with the fatty acid composition of the irradiated compound. (orig.) [de

  15. Primary standards for measuring flow rates from 100 nl/min to 1 ml/min - gravimetric principle.

    Bissig, Hugo; Petter, Harm Tido; Lucas, Peter; Batista, Elsa; Filipe, Eduarda; Almeida, Nelson; Ribeiro, Luis Filipe; Gala, João; Martins, Rui; Savanier, Benoit; Ogheard, Florestan; Niemann, Anders Koustrup; Lötters, Joost; Sparreboom, Wouter

    2015-08-01

    Microflow and nanoflow rate calibrations are important in several applications such as liquid chromatography, (scaled-down) process technology, and special health-care applications. However, traceability in the microflow and nanoflow range does not go below 16 μl/min in Europe. Furthermore, the European metrology organization EURAMET did not yet validate this traceability by means of an intercomparison between different National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The NMIs METAS, Centre Technique des Industries Aérauliques et Thermiques, IPQ, Danish Technological Institute, and VSL have therefore developed and validated primary standards to cover the flow rate range from 0.1 μl/min to at least 1 ml/min. In this article, we describe the different designs and methods of the primary standards of the gravimetric principle and the results obtained at the intercomparison for the upper flow rate range for the various NMIs and Bronkhorst High-Tech, the manufacturer of the transfer standards used.

  16. Integrating gravimetric and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for enhancing reservoir history matching of carbonate gas and volatile oil reservoirs

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2016-08-25

    Reservoir history matching is assuming a critical role in understanding reservoir characteristics, tracking water fronts, and forecasting production. While production data have been incorporated for matching reservoir production levels and estimating critical reservoir parameters, the sparse spatial nature of this dataset limits the efficiency of the history matching process. Recently, gravimetry techniques have significantly advanced to the point of providing measurement accuracy in the microgal range and consequently can be used for the tracking of gas displacement caused by water influx. While gravity measurements provide information on subsurface density changes, i.e., the composition of the reservoir, these data do only yield marginal information about temporal displacements of oil and inflowing water. We propose to complement gravimetric data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar surface deformation data to exploit the strong pressure deformation relationship for enhancing fluid flow direction forecasts. We have developed an ensemble Kalman-filter-based history matching framework for gas, gas condensate, and volatile oil reservoirs, which synergizes time-lapse gravity and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for improved reservoir management and reservoir forecasts. Based on a dual state-parameter estimation algorithm separating the estimation of static reservoir parameters from the dynamic reservoir parameters, our numerical experiments demonstrate that history matching gravity measurements allow monitoring the density changes caused by oil-gas phase transition and water influx to determine the saturation levels, whereas the interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements help to improve the forecasts of hydrocarbon production and water displacement directions. The reservoir estimates resulting from the dual filtering scheme are on average 20%-40% better than those from the joint estimation scheme, but require about a 30% increase in

  17. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  18. CORONA-INDUCED PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS AND HYDROCARBONS OVER TIO2 IN THE ABSENCE OF A UV LIGHT SOURCE - A NOVEL AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY METHOD FOR OXIDATION

    Corona-induced photooxidation is a novel oxidation methodology for the efficient oxidation of alcohols and hydrocarbons utilizing the advantage of both the high oxidizing power of ozone formed in the reactor as well as the photooxidation capability of the UV light generated durin...

  19. Comparison of gravimetric and mantle flow solutions for sub-lithopsheric stress modeling and their combination

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Steinberger, Bernhard; Tenzer, Robert; Tassara, Andrés

    2018-05-01

    Based on Hager and O'Connell's solution to mantle flow equations, the stresses induced by mantle convection are determined using the density and viscosity structure in addition to topographic data and a plate velocity model. The solution to mantle flow equations requires the knowledge of mantle properties that are typically retrieved from seismic information. Large parts of the world are, however, not yet covered sufficiently by seismic surveys. An alternative method of modeling the stress field was introduced by Runcorn. He formulated a direct relation between the stress field and gravity data, while adopting several assumptions, particularly disregarding the toroidal mantle flow component and mantle viscosity variations. A possible way to overcome theoretical deficiencies of Runcorn's theory as well as some practical limitations of applying Hager and O'Connell's theory (in the absence of seismic data) is to combine these two methods. In this study, we apply a least-squares analysis to combine these two methods based on the gravity data inversion constraint on mantle flow equations. In particular, we use vertical gravity gradients from the Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer that are corrected for the gravitational contribution of crustal density heterogeneities prior to applying a localized gravity-gradient inversion. This gravitational contribution is estimated based on combining the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and flexural isostatic theories. Moreover, we treat the non-isostatic effect implicitly by applying a band-limited kernel of the integral equation during the inversion. In numerical studies of modeling, the stress field within the South American continental lithosphere we compare the results obtained after applying Runcorn and Hager and O'Connell's methods as well as their combination. The results show that, according to Hager and O'Connell's (mantle flow) solution, the maximum stress intensity is inferred under the northern Andes

  20. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  1. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  2. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  3. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  4. Uncertainty associated with the gravimetric measurement of particulate matter concentration in ambient air.

    Lacey, Ronald E; Faulkner, William Brock

    2015-07-01

    This work applied a propagation of uncertainty method to typical total suspended particulate (TSP) sampling apparatus in order to estimate the overall measurement uncertainty. The objectives of this study were to estimate the uncertainty for three TSP samplers, develop an uncertainty budget, and determine the sensitivity of the total uncertainty to environmental parameters. The samplers evaluated were the TAMU High Volume TSP Sampler at a nominal volumetric flow rate of 1.42 m3 min(-1) (50 CFM), the TAMU Low Volume TSP Sampler at a nominal volumetric flow rate of 17 L min(-1) (0.6 CFM) and the EPA TSP Sampler at the nominal volumetric flow rates of 1.1 and 1.7 m3 min(-1) (39 and 60 CFM). Under nominal operating conditions the overall measurement uncertainty was found to vary from 6.1x10(-6) g m(-3) to 18.0x10(-6) g m(-3), which represented an uncertainty of 1.7% to 5.2% of the measurement. Analysis of the uncertainty budget determined that three of the instrument parameters contributed significantly to the overall uncertainty: the uncertainty in the pressure drop measurement across the orifice meter during both calibration and testing and the uncertainty of the airflow standard used during calibration of the orifice meter. Five environmental parameters occurring during field measurements were considered for their effect on overall uncertainty: ambient TSP concentration, volumetric airflow rate, ambient temperature, ambient pressure, and ambient relative humidity. Of these, only ambient TSP concentration and volumetric airflow rate were found to have a strong effect on the overall uncertainty. The technique described in this paper can be applied to other measurement systems and is especially useful where there are no methods available to generate these values empirically. This work addresses measurement uncertainty of TSP samplers used in ambient conditions. Estimation of uncertainty in gravimetric measurements is of particular interest, since as ambient particulate

  5. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  6. Estimation of the internal structure of Trans-Mexican volcanic belt by gravimetric data

    Flores R, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The regional gravimetric data of Trans-Mexican volcanic belt and surroundings, has been analyzed in order to estimate the depth of its internal structure. The short profiles with N-S orientation give a model of four shells with an average depth in the rank 24, 34, 56 and 83 kilometers. Only the profiles included between 97 West degrees to 102 West degrees give a depth of crust larger than the rest of the profiles with the same orientation. This profiles are associated with that of the Valleys of Toluca, D.F. and Puebla where the maximum crust thickness was estimated. The 3 long profiles with S-W orientation, give a model of 3 shells. The tendency of the first shell has a cortical thickness of 38 kilometers in the latitude of 18 North degrees. This tendency to increase the depth in the crust is associated with the minimum gravimetric in the map of Bouguer anomaly. (Author)

  7. Separation and gravimetric determination of rare earths with N-(3-nitrobenzoyl), N-(3-tolyl) hydroxylamine

    Agrawal, Y.K.; Kapoor, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The N-(3-nitrobenzoyl), N-(3-tolyl) hydroxylamine is used as a reagent for the separation and gravimetric determination of Ce 3+ , La 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Sm 3+ and Gd 3+ . The optimum conditions of precipitation of these rare earths indicate that, by control of pH and judicious use of masking agents, these ions can be separated from, and determined gravimetrically among several other ions. Further, the stochiometric nature of the N-(3-nitrobenzoyl), N-(3-tolyl) hydroxylamine acid is advantageous for the direct determination by weighting of (C 14 H 11 N 2 O 4 ) 3 M complex without ignition to obtain oxides. These complexes are characterized by infrared spectra

  8. Strategy for thermo-gravimetric analysis of K East fuel samples

    Lawrence, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy was developed for the Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) testing of K East fuel samples for oxidation rate determinations. Tests will first establish if there are any differences for dry air oxidation between the K West and K East fuel. These tests will be followed by moist inert gas oxidation rate measurements. The final series of tests will consider pure water vapor i.e., steam

  9. Precise and efficient evaluation of gravimetric quantities at arbitrarily scattered points in space

    Ivanov, Kamen G.; Pavlis, Nikolaos K.; Petrushev, Pencho

    2017-12-01

    Gravimetric quantities are commonly represented in terms of high degree surface or solid spherical harmonics. After EGM2008, such expansions routinely extend to spherical harmonic degree 2190, which makes the computation of gravimetric quantities at a large number of arbitrarily scattered points in space using harmonic synthesis, a very computationally demanding process. We present here the development of an algorithm and its associated software for the efficient and precise evaluation of gravimetric quantities, represented in high degree solid spherical harmonics, at arbitrarily scattered points in the space exterior to the surface of the Earth. The new algorithm is based on representation of the quantities of interest in solid ellipsoidal harmonics and application of the tensor product trigonometric needlets. A FORTRAN implementation of this algorithm has been developed and extensively tested. The capabilities of the code are demonstrated using as examples the disturbing potential T, height anomaly ζ , gravity anomaly Δ g , gravity disturbance δ g , north-south deflection of the vertical ξ , east-west deflection of the vertical η , and the second radial derivative T_{rr} of the disturbing potential. After a pre-computational step that takes between 1 and 2 h per quantity, the current version of the software is capable of computing on a standard PC each of these quantities in the range from the surface of the Earth up to 544 km above that surface at speeds between 20,000 and 40,000 point evaluations per second, depending on the gravimetric quantity being evaluated, while the relative error does not exceed 10^{-6} and the memory (RAM) use is 9.3 GB.

  10. Crumpled Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Supercapacitors with High Gravimetric and Volumetric Performances.

    Wang, Jie; Ding, Bing; Xu, Yunling; Shen, Laifa; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2015-10-14

    Graphene is considered a promising electrochemical capacitors electrode material due to its high surface area and high electrical conductivity. However, restacking interactions between graphene nanosheets significantly decrease the ion-accessible surface area and impede electronic and ionic transfer. This would, in turn, severely hinder the realization of high energy density. Herein, we report a strategy for preparation of few-layer graphene material with abundant crumples and high-level nitrogen doping. The two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (CNG) feature high ion-available surface area, excellent electronic and ion transfer properties, and high packing density, permitting the CNG electrode to exhibit excellent electrochemical performance. In ionic liquid electrolyte, the CNG electrode exhibits gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 128 F g(-1) and 98 F cm(-3), respectively, achieving gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 56 Wh kg(-1) and 43 Wh L(-1). The preparation strategy described here provides a new approach for developing a graphene-based supercapacitor with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities.

  11. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    isolation tubes with crude oil. Three isolates tested showed positive hydrophobicity of cell walls as judged by the Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. Addition of Bombay High crude oil to nutrient broth slightly enhanced growth of the protists...

  12. Predicting Alkylate Yield and its Hydrocarbon Composition for Sulfuric Acid Catalyzed Isobutane Alkylation with Olefins Using the Method of Mathematical Modeling

    Nurmakanova, А. Е.; Ivashkina, Elena Nikolaevna; Ivanchina, Emilia Dmitrievna; Dolganov, I. A.; Boychenko, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The article provides the results of applied mathematical model of isobutane alkylation with olefins catalyzed by sulfuric acid to predict yield and hydrocarbon composition of alkylate caused by the changes in the feedstock composition and process parameters. It is shown that the alkylate produced from feedstock with less mass fraction of isobutane has lower octane value. Wherein the difference in composition of the feedstock contributes to antiknock index by the amount of 1.0-2.0 points.

  13. Purifying hydrocarbon oils

    Rostin, H

    1938-08-11

    A process is described for continuously purifying hydrocarbon oils consisting in conducting the vapors of the same at a temperature of 300 to 400/sup 0/C over the oelitic ore minette together with reducing gases in presence of steam the proportion of the reducing gases and steam being such that the sulfur of the hydrocarbons escapes from the reaction chamber in the form of sulfuretted hydrogen without permanent sulfide of iron being formed.

  14. Process for refining hydrocarbons

    Risenfeld, E H

    1924-11-26

    A process is disclosed for the refining of hydrocarbons or other mixtures through treatment in vapor form with metal catalysts, characterized by such metals being used as catalysts, which are obtained by reduction of the oxide of minerals containing the iron group, and by the vapors of the hydrocarbons, in the presence of the water vapor, being led over these catalysts at temperatures from 200 to 300/sup 0/C.

  15. Determination of descriptors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related compounds by chromatographic methods and liquid-liquid partition in totally organic biphasic systems.

    Ariyasena, Thiloka C; Poole, Colin F

    2014-09-26

    Retention factors on several columns and at various temperatures using gas chromatography and from reversed-phase liquid chromatography on a SunFire C18 column with various mobile phase compositions containing acetonitrile, methanol and tetrahydrofuran as strength adjusting solvents are combined with liquid-liquid partition coefficients in totally organic biphasic systems to calculate descriptors for 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eighteen related compounds of environmental interest. The use of a consistent protocol for the above measurements provides descriptors that are more self consistent for the estimation of physicochemical properties (octanol-water, air-octanol, air-water, aqueous solubility, and subcooled liquid vapor pressure). The descriptor in this report tend to have smaller values for the L and E descriptors and random differences in the B and S descriptors compared with literature sources. A simple atom fragment constant model is proposed for the estimation of descriptors from structure for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The new descriptors show no bias in the prediction of the air-water partition coefficient for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons unlike the literature values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of asphaltenes in heavy oils using an on-column method

    Rogel, E.; Ovalles, C.; Moir, M. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Schabron, J.F. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2009-07-01

    An improved analytical method for determining the asphaltene content in crude oil and petroleum samples was presented. The method used an on-column precipitation technique coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). The column has an inert packing material where the asphaltene was precipitated and re-dissolved using a solvent. Heavy crude oils with asphaltene contents ranging from 5 to 25 per cent w/w were tested. A blend of 90:10 dichloromethane and methanol was used to decrease the influence of hydrocarbon adsorption mechanisms from the polymeric liquid chromatographic phases. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to compare results obtained using the method with results obtained using traditional gravimetric methods. Regression analysis was used to determine the calibration constants. The study showed that the method can be used as replacement for conventional gravimetric methods when faster results are needed or when sample sizes are small. It was concluded that the method was able to accurately quantify asphaltene contents as low as 120 ppm. 8 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  17. Corrosion of experimental magnesium alloys in blood and PBS: A gravimetric and microscopic evaluation

    Schille, Ch., E-mail: Christine.Schille@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Braun, M.; Wendel, H.P. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Div. Congenital and Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, University Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany, Calwerstr. 7/1, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Scheideler, L. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Hort, N. [GKSS Research Centre, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Reichel, H.-P. [Weissensee Company, Buergermeister-Ebert-Str. 30-32, D-36124 Eichenzell (Germany); Schweizer, E.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Center for Dentistry, Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section Medical Materials and Technology, Osianderstr. 2-8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion of eight Mg-based Biomaterials was tested in saline and human blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion behaviour in physiological saline and in blood was entirely different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al and Zn had the highest influence on corrosion behaviour in both electrolytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1 showed least corrosion in human whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tests in buffered corrosion media are not sufficient to predict corrosion in vivo. - Abstract: Corrosion tests for medical materials are often performed in simulated body fluids (SBF). When SBF are used for corrosion measurement, the open question is, how well they match the conditions in the human body. The aim of the study was to compare the corrosion behaviour of different experimental magnesium alloys in human whole blood and PBS{sup minus} (phosphate buffered saline w/o Ca and Mg) as a simulated body fluid by gravimetric weight measurements and microscopic evaluation. Eight different experimental magnesium alloys, containing neither Mn nor other additives, were manufactured. With these alloys, a static immersion test in PBS{sup minus} and a dynamic test using the Chandler-loop model with human whole blood over 6 h were performed. During the static immersion test, the samples were weighed every hour. During the dynamic test, the specimens were weighed before and after the 6 h incubation period in the Chandler-loop. From both tests, the total mass change was calculated for each alloy and the values were compared. Additionally, microscopic pictures from the samples were taken at the end of the test period. All alloys showed different corrosion behaviour in both tests, especially the alloys with high aluminium content, MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1. Generally, alloys in PBS showed a weight gain due to generation of a microscopically visible corrosion layer, while in the blood test system a more or less distinct weight

  18. Corrosion of experimental magnesium alloys in blood and PBS: A gravimetric and microscopic evaluation

    Schille, Ch.; Braun, M.; Wendel, H.P.; Scheideler, L.; Hort, N.; Reichel, H.-P.; Schweizer, E.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of eight Mg–based Biomaterials was tested in saline and human blood. ► Corrosion behaviour in physiological saline and in blood was entirely different. ► Al and Zn had the highest influence on corrosion behaviour in both electrolytes. ► MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1 showed least corrosion in human whole blood. ► Tests in buffered corrosion media are not sufficient to predict corrosion in vivo. - Abstract: Corrosion tests for medical materials are often performed in simulated body fluids (SBF). When SBF are used for corrosion measurement, the open question is, how well they match the conditions in the human body. The aim of the study was to compare the corrosion behaviour of different experimental magnesium alloys in human whole blood and PBS minus (phosphate buffered saline w/o Ca and Mg) as a simulated body fluid by gravimetric weight measurements and microscopic evaluation. Eight different experimental magnesium alloys, containing neither Mn nor other additives, were manufactured. With these alloys, a static immersion test in PBS minus and a dynamic test using the Chandler-loop model with human whole blood over 6 h were performed. During the static immersion test, the samples were weighed every hour. During the dynamic test, the specimens were weighed before and after the 6 h incubation period in the Chandler-loop. From both tests, the total mass change was calculated for each alloy and the values were compared. Additionally, microscopic pictures from the samples were taken at the end of the test period. All alloys showed different corrosion behaviour in both tests, especially the alloys with high aluminium content, MgAl9 and MgAl9Zn1. Generally, alloys in PBS showed a weight gain due to generation of a microscopically visible corrosion layer, while in the blood test system a more or less distinct weight loss was observed. When alloys are ranked according to corrosion susceptibility, the results differ also between the test systems. The

  19. Electrostatically atomised hydrocarbon sprays

    Yule, A.J.; Shrimpton, J.S.; Watkins, A.P.; Balachandran, W.; Hu, D. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom). Thermofluids Division, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    A burner using an electrostatic method to produce and control a fuel spray is investigated for non-burning sprays. The burner has a charge injection nozzle and the liquid flow rate and charge injection rate are varied using hydrocarbon liquids of differing viscosities, surface tensions and electrical conductivities (kerosene, white spirit and diesel oil). Droplet size distributions are measured and it is shown how the dropsize, spray pattern, breakup mechanism and breakup length depend on the above variables, and in particular on the specific charge achieved in the spray. The data are valuable for validating two computer models under development. One predicts the electric field and flow field inside the nozzle as a function of emitter potential, geometry and flow rate. The other predicts the effect of charge on spray dispersion, with a view to optimizing spray combustion. It is shown that electrostatic disruptive forces can be used to atomize oils at flow rates commensurate with practical combustion systems and that the charge injection technique is particularly suitable for highly resistive liquids. Possible limitations requiring further research include the need to control the wide spray angle, which may provide fuel-air mixtures too lean near the nozzle, and the need to design for maximum charge injection rate, which is thought to be limited by corona breakdown in the gas near the nozzle orifice. 30 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of soot particles and gas species in light hydrocarbon flames using mass spectrometry

    Li, Qingxun; Liu, Fang; Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Tiefeng

    2014-01-01

    Besides gas species concentrations, soot volume fractions are also important data in the study of flames. This work describes the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of soot and gas species in light hydrocarbon flames by in situ sampling and mass spectrometry (MS).The reaction medium was frozen by sampling into a very low-pressure tube, and the soot selectivity (proportion of carbon atoms in the reactant converted to soot) was determined from the C and H mass balances using the measured concentrations of the gas species and the mass of soot present per unit gas volume. The H/C ratio of the soot was measured by a thermogravimetry–mass spectrometry combination. The soot volume fraction was calculated from the soot selectivity and density of the soot. The soot selectivity measured by this reduced pressure sampling mass spectrometry (RPSMS) method was verified by measurements using the gravimetric sampling technique where the mass of soot collected in a volume of gas was weighed by a high precision balance. For most of the measurements, the uncertainty in the soot volume fraction was ±5%, but this would be larger when the soot volume fractions are less than 1 ppm. For demonstration, the RPSMS method was used to study a methane fuel-rich flame where the soot volume fractions were 1–5 ppm. The simultaneous measurement of concentrations of soot and gas species is useful for the quantitative study of flames. (paper)

  1. Evaluation of real-time data obtained from gravimetric preparation of antineoplastic agents shows medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact: Results of a large-scale, multicentre, multinational, retrospective study.

    Terkola, R; Czejka, M; Bérubé, J

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality especially with antineoplastic drugs, owing to their narrow therapeutic index. Gravimetric workflow software systems have the potential to reduce volumetric errors during intravenous antineoplastic drug preparation which may occur when verification is reliant on visual inspection. Our aim was to detect medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact as determined by the rate of prevented medication errors in chemotherapy compounding after implementation of gravimetric measurement. A large-scale, retrospective analysis of data was carried out, related to medication errors identified during preparation of antineoplastic drugs in 10 pharmacy services ("centres") in five European countries following the introduction of an intravenous workflow software gravimetric system. Errors were defined as errors in dose volumes outside tolerance levels, identified during weighing stages of preparation of chemotherapy solutions which would not otherwise have been detected by conventional visual inspection. The gravimetric system detected that 7.89% of the 759 060 doses of antineoplastic drugs prepared at participating centres between July 2011 and October 2015 had error levels outside the accepted tolerance range set by individual centres, and prevented these doses from reaching patients. The proportion of antineoplastic preparations with deviations >10% ranged from 0.49% to 5.04% across sites, with a mean of 2.25%. The proportion of preparations with deviations >20% ranged from 0.21% to 1.27% across sites, with a mean of 0.71%. There was considerable variation in error levels for different antineoplastic agents. Introduction of a gravimetric preparation system for antineoplastic agents detected and prevented dosing errors which would not have been recognized with traditional methods and could have resulted in toxicity or suboptimal therapeutic outcomes for patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  2. Emissions of hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    Olsson, Mona; Persson, Eva Marie.

    1991-10-01

    Evaluations and measurements of emissions of hydrocarbons from power plants with a capacity exceeding 1 MW using biofuels (wood fuels and peat) have been studied in order to identify and quantify the emissions of incompletely combusted hydrocarbons. The influence of the type of fuel and the combustion technology applied were also studied, using literature references. The report summarizes monitoring results from a number of plants using biofuels. The reported emissions from the different plants can not be compared as they are relatively few and the test results have been obtained under various conditions using different methods of testing and analysis. The methods used are often poorly documented in the studied reports. Few investigations of emissions of hydrocarbons from plants in the range of 1 to 10 MW have been carried out. The plant and the technology used are important factors determining the amount and type of emissions of hydrocarbons. Larger temporary emissions can occur during start up, operational disturbances or when using fuel of inhomogeneous quality. In order to minimize the emissions the combustion process must be efficiently controlled, and a fuel of a hohogeneous quality must be used. The report also summarizes sampling and analysis methods used for monitoring emissions of hydrocarbons. (29 refs., 17 figs.)

  3. Process for desulfurizing hydrocarbons

    1937-04-12

    A process is described for the desulfurization of a mixture of hydrocarbons, and in particular hydrocarbons containing less than 7 atoms of carbon and sulfur compounds of the type of sulfur carbonyl, characterized by the fact that the mixture, preferably in the liquid phase, is brought in contact with a solution of caustic alkali, essentially anhydrous or preferably with a solution of alkali hydroxide in an organic hydroxy nonacid solvent, for example, an alcohol, or with an alkaline alcoholate, under conditions suitable to the formation of hydrogen sulfide which produces a hydrocarbon mixture free from sulfur compounds of the sulfur carbonyl type but containing hydrogen sulfide, and that it is treated, following mixing, having beem submitted to the first treatment, by means of aqueous alkaline hydroxide to eliminate the hydrogen sulfide.

  4. Three years of high precision gravity measurements at the gravimetric station of Brasimone - Italy

    G. Casula

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available From August 1995 up to now, at the Enea Research Center of Brasimone, in the Italian Apennines between Bologna and Florence (Italy: 44º07'N, 11º.07'E, 890 m height, the superconducting gravimeter GWR model TT70 number T015 has been continuously recording the variation of the local gravity field, in the frame of the Global Geodynamics Project. The gravimetric laboratory, being a room of the disused nuclear power plant of Brasimone, is a very stable site, free from noise due to human activities. Data blocks of several months of continuous gravity records have been collected over a time span of three years, together with the meteorological data. The gravimeter has been calibrated at relative accuracy better than 0.3% with the aid of a mobile mass system, by imposed perturbations of the local gravity field and recording the gravimeter response. The results of this calibration technique were checked by two comparison experiments with absolute gravimeters performed during this period: the first, in May 1994 with the aid of the symmetrical rise and fall gravimeter of the Institute of Metrology Colonnetti of Turin, and the second in October 1997 involving an FG5 absolute gravimeter of the Institute de Physique du Globe of Strasbourg. The gravimeter signal was analysed to compute a high precision tidal model for Brasimone site. Starting from a set of gravimetric and atmospheric pressure data of high quality, relative to 46 months of observation, we performed the tidal analysis using Eterna 3.2 software to compute amplitudes, gravimetric factors and phases of the main waves of the Tamura catalogue. Finally a comparison experiment between two of the STS-1/VBB broadband seismometers of the MedNet project network and the gravity records relative to the Balleny Islands earthquake (March 25, 1998 were analysed to look for evidence of normal modes due to the free oscillations of the Earth.

  5. Tectonic evolution of the Paranoá basin: New evidence from gravimetric and stratigraphic data

    Martins-Ferreira, Marco Antonio Caçador; Campos, José Eloi Guimarães; Von Huelsen, Monica Giannoccaro

    2018-06-01

    Field gravimetric and stratigraphic surveys were conducted with the aim to constraint the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of the Stenian-Tonian Paranoá basin, central Brazil, a subject not yet studied in detail. The Paranoá Group crops out in the external zone of the Brasília Belt, a Neoproterozoic orogen in the western margin of the São Francisco Craton. Detailed geological mapping confirmed the existence of a regional scale fault that controlled sedimentation of the Paranoá Group during the deposition of its basal formations, revealing important details about basin initiation and early evolution. Gravimetric modeling indicates the existence of paleorift structures beneath the Paranoá sequence in the study area. Results from both stratigraphic and gravimetric surveys show strong evidence of mechanical subsidence by faulting during basin initiation. Unsorted, angular, clasts cut by quartz veins and brecciated boulders present in the basal conglomerate, support this hypothesis. Basin initiation faults coincide with deeper paleorift faults and are thus interpreted as reactivations of the older Statherian Araí Rift. The reactivations favored an initial regime of mechanical subsidence, dominated by the development of epirogenic arches subsiding at different rates. Apart from faulting activity, the post-basal sequence presents no evidence of rift environment in the strict sense. Besides, the great lateral continuity and relatively constant thickness of facies, indicate that an initial mechanic subsidence rapidly gave way to flexural subsidence during subsequent stages of basin evolution. The Paranoá Group do not present reliable characteristics that would allow its strict classification as a passive margin. Its main stratigraphic characteristics, tectonic location and basement architecture, indicate that the Paranoá Group was deposited in a cratonic margin basin, and may have been either connected to a passive margin basin at times of sea level rise

  6. Recovery of hydrocarbon oils

    1941-02-10

    A process is disclosed for recovery of hydrocarbon oils, especially lubricating oils or diesel oils, through pressure hydrogenation of distillation, extraction of hydrogenation products from coal or coaly materials or from oils such as mineral oils or tars in liquid phase by use in a reaction vessel of fixed-bed catalysts, characterized in that as starting material is employed material which has been freed of asphaltic and resinous material by hydrogenation refining, vacuum-steam distillation, treatment with hydrogen-rich hydrocarbons (hydroforming), or sulfuric acid.

  7. Thermo Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis of Clay of Western Rajasthan (india)

    Shekhawat, M. S.

    The paper presents the study of thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis of blended clay. Western part of Rajasthan (India) is rich resource of Ball clays and it is mainly used by porcelain, sanitary ware, and tile industry. The quality and grade of clay available in the region vary from one deposit to other. To upgrade the fired colour and strength properties, different variety of clays may be blended together. The paper compares the results of thermal analysis one of blended clay B2 with reference clay of Ukraine which is imported by industries owners. The result revealed that the blended clay is having mineral kaolinite while the Ukrainian clay is Halloysite.

  8. Modeling and Inversion of three-dimensional crustal structures beneath the Pyrenees and their foreland basins based upon geological, gravimetric and seismological data

    Spangenberg, Hannah; Chevrot, Sébastien; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Our goal is to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) model of mass density and seismic velocities beneath the Pyrenees and their foreland basins (Aquitaine and Ebro basins), which accounts for all the geological and geophysical information available for that region. This model covers the whole mountain range going from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea, and from the Iberian range to the Massif Central. The model is described by different units: the lower, middle, and upper crusts, the accretionary prism, and the consolidated and unconsolidated sediment layers. Furthermore, a sub-continental, serpentinized European mantle is introduced to describe the exhumed mantle bodies which are responsible for the positive Bouguer gravity anomalies in the western Pyrenees. We build a first 3D model using all the geological information: drill-hole surveys, seismic sections, and the geological map. We use the potential field method implemented in Geomodeler to interpolate these geological data. However, these data are too sparse to build a model that explains seismic travel times or gravimetric data, especially the Labourd and the St. Gaudens Bouguer gravity anomalies. In addition, inconsistencies between the different data sets exist. We thus add by trial and error additional data points, comparing modeled and observed Bouguer gravimetric anomalies. The result of this procedure is a 3D geological model that respects the geological data and explains the measured Bouguer gravimetric anomalies. In a second step, we use this model to determine the average density and seismic velocities inside each geological unit assuming uniform layers. To constrain the seismic velocities we use travel time picks extracted from the bulletin of the Pyrenean seismicity released by the Observatoire Midi Pyrenées. In a third step, we use this 3D a priori model in a Monte Carlo inversion to invert jointly gravimetric data and seismic travel times from the bulletin. This probabilistic approach

  9. The effect of copper, MDA, and accelerated aging on jet fuel thermal stability as measured by the gravimetric JFTOT

    Pande, S.G. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Ft. Washington, MD (United States); Hardy, D.R. [Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Thermally unstable jet fuels pose operational problems. In order to adequately identify such fuels, factors that realistically impact on thermal stability were examined. Evaluation was based on a quantitative method of measuring thermal stability, viz., NRL`s recently developed gravimetric JFTOT. This method gives a quantitative measurement of both the strip deposit and filterables formed. The pertinent factors examined, included the individual and interactive effects of: soluble copper, MDA (metal deactivator), and aging. The latter was accelerated to simulate field conditions of approximately six months aging at ambient temperature and pressure. The results indicate that the individual and interactive effects of copper, MDA, and accelerated aging appear to be fuel dependent. Based on the results, the three test fuels examined (one JP-8 and two JP-5s) were categorized as exhibiting very good, typical, and poor thermal stabilities, respectively. For both the very good and poor thermal stability fuels, the effect of copper in conjunction with accelerated aging did not significantly increase the total thermal deposits of the neat fuels. In contrast, for the typical thermal stability fuel, the combined effects of copper and accelerated aging, did. Furthermore, the addition of MDA prior to aging of the copper-doped, typical stability fuel significantly counteracted the adverse effect of copper and aging. A similar beneficial effect of MDA was not observed for the poor stability fuel. These results focus on the compositional differences among fuels and the need to elucidate these differences (physical and chemical) for a better understanding and prediction of their performance.

  10. Understanding of thermo-gravimetric analysis to calculate number of addends in multifunctional hemi-ortho ester derivatives of fullerenol

    Singh, Rachana; Goswami, Thakohari

    2011-01-01

    Test results for the applicability of existing thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) technique to ascertain average number of exohedral chemical attachment in a new class of fullerene dyads consisting of multiple hemi-ortho esters onto fullerenol is presented. Although the method is nicely applicable for higher fullerenol, but homogeneous phase products calculate lower number of addends, whereas, the hetero phase products indicate higher value. Lower value is attributed to either overlapping of thermal events or substituents effects and higher value is the contribution of tetra butyl ammonium hydroxide (TBAH) impurity used as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) in heterogeneous phase reactions. Presence of TBAH impurity is recognized through thermo-gravimetry mass spectrometry (TG-MS) measurement. Appropriate modification of test method to arrive at accurate and precise values of x (total mass contribution due to addends only) and y (total mass contribution due to fullerene plus char yield) are also reported. Successful use of two more different techniques, viz., electron-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), supplement above results. Influences of fullerene and different substituents on thermal behavior of dyads are assessed.

  11. Feasibility of Using an Electrolysis Cell for Quantification of the Electrolytic Products of Water from Gravimetric Measurement.

    Melaku, Samuel; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Dabke, Rajeev B

    2018-01-01

    A gravimetric method for the quantitative assessment of the products of electrolysis of water is presented. In this approach, the electrolysis cell was directly powered by 9 V batteries. Prior to electrolysis, a known amount of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) was added to the cathode compartment, and an excess amount of KHCO 3 was added to the anode compartment electrolyte. During electrolysis, cathode and anode compartments produced OH - (aq) and H + (aq) ions, respectively. Electrolytically produced OH - (aq) neutralized the KHP, and the completion of this neutralization was detected by a visual indicator color change. Electrolytically produced H + (aq) reacted with HCO 3 - (aq) liberating CO 2 (g) from the anode compartment. Concurrent liberation of H 2 (g) and O 2 (g) at the cathode and anode, respectively, resulted in a decrease in the mass of the cell. Mass of the electrolysis cell was monitored. Liberation of CO 2 (g) resulted in a pronounced effect of a decrease in mass. Experimentally determined decrease in mass (53.7 g/Faraday) agreed with that predicted from Faraday's laws of electrolysis (53.0 g/Faraday). The efficacy of the cell was tested to quantify the acid content in household vinegar samples. Accurate results were obtained for vinegar analysis with a precision better than 5% in most cases. The cell offers the advantages of coulometric method and additionally simplifies the circuitry by eliminating the use of a constant current power source or a coulometer.

  12. Assessing human error during collecting a hydrocarbon sample of ...

    This paper reports the assessment method of the hydrocarbon sample collection standard operation procedure (SOP) using THERP. The Performance Shaping Factors (PSF) from THERP analyzed and assessed the human errors during collecting a hydrocarbon sample of a petrochemical refinery plant. Twenty-two ...

  13. Dynamic–gravimetric preparation of metrologically traceable primary calibration standards for halogenated greenhouse gases

    M. Guillevic

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the comparability of measurements obtained with various instruments within a global-scale air quality monitoring network has been ensured by anchoring all results to a unique suite of reference gas mixtures, also called a primary calibration scale. Such suites of reference gas mixtures are usually prepared and then stored over decades in pressurised cylinders by a designated laboratory. For the halogenated gases which have been measured over the last 40 years, this anchoring method is highly relevant as measurement reproducibility is currently much better ( <  1 %, k  =  2 or 95 % confidence interval than the expanded uncertainty of a reference gas mixture (usually  >  2 %. Meanwhile, newly emitted halogenated gases are already measured in the atmosphere at pmol mol−1 levels, while still lacking an established reference standard. For compounds prone to adsorption on material surfaces, it is difficult to evaluate mixture stability and thus variations in the molar fractions over time in cylinders at pmol mol−1 levels.To support atmospheric monitoring of halogenated gases, we create new primary calibration scales for SF6 (sulfur hexafluoride, HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, HFO-1234yf (or HFC-1234yf, 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroprop-1-ene, HCFC-132b (1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane and CFC-13 (chlorotrifluoromethane. The preparation method, newly applied to halocarbons, is dynamic and gravimetric: it is based on the permeation principle followed by dynamic dilution and cryo-filling of the mixture in cylinders. The obtained METAS-2017 primary calibration scales are made of 11 cylinders containing these five substances at near-ambient and slightly varying molar fractions. Each prepared molar fraction is traceable to the realisation of SI units (International System of Units and is assigned an uncertainty estimate following international guidelines (JCGM, 2008, ranging from 0.6 % for SF6 to 1.3 % (k

  14. Study of alumosilicate porcelains: Sol-gel preparation, characterization and erosion evaluated by gravimetric method

    Bogdanoviciene, Irma; Jankeviciute, Audrone; Pinkas, Jiri; Beganskiene, Aldona; Kareiva, Aivaras

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the sol-gel synthesis and characteristic properties of kalsilite-type alumosilicates (KAlSiO 4 and K 0.5 Na 0.5 AlSiO 4 ) are reported. The polycrystalline powders were characterized by thermal analysis (TG/DTA), powder X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-phase kalsilite oxides have been obtained after annealing precursor gels for 5 h in the temperature range of 750-850 deg. C. It was demonstrated that crystallinity of the samples slightly depends on the temperature of annealing. From the results obtained, it could be concluded that the KAlSiO 4 solids are composed of the volumetric plate-like grains with no regular size (from 5 μm to 30 μm at 750 deg. C and around 5-50 μm at 850 deg. C). Larger crystallites for mixed potassium-sodium kalsilite have formed (from 10 μm to 80 μm at 750 deg. C and >100 μm at 850 deg. C) in comparison with potassium kalsilite samples). The erosion of obtained dental porcelain samples stored in saliva, beer and Coca-Cola was compared

  15. A method for the gravimetric determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate concentrate solution

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Plutonium nitrate solution is treated with sulphuric acid before being heated and finally ignited. The stoichiometric plutonium dioxide so formed is weighed and hence the plutonium content is calculated. (author)

  16. Aerosols concentration in the Candiota area applying different gravimetric methods of sampling and numeric modelling.

    Braga, C F; Alves, R C M; Teixeira, E C; Pire, M

    2002-12-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to study the concentration of atmospheric particles in the Candiota region, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, where the Presidente Médici coal power plant is located. Aerosol samples were collected at the studied locations between December 2000 and December 2001 during 24 h periods at 15 day intervals using HV PM10 and dichotomous samplers. Then, the values obtained with the ISCST (Industrial Source Complex Term) model, with the HV PM10 sampler at all studied stations, and with the dichotomous sampler at the 8 de Agosto station were compared with each other. The results show that the values for the model had been underestimated in relation to the HV PM10 data for the studied stations, but agreed with the values obtained with the dichotomous sampler.

  17. Engineering gravimetric monitoring methods to cope with excessively high dust levels-2.

    Belle, BK

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available -test and F-test), the mean dust concentration measured by pairs of cyclones is not significantly affected at 95 percent level of confidence. In other words, there is no difference between the measured mean dust concentration levels between various sampler... List of Figures . . . . . . . 8 List of Tables . . . .. . . 11 Glossary of Abbreviations and Symbols . . . . . 12 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . 13 1 Introduction . . . . . . . 14 2 Background . . . . . . . 14 3 Test Samplers . . . . . . . 16...

  18. Anestesi Infus Gravimetrik Ketamin dan Propofol pada Anjing (THE GRAVIMETRIC INFUSION ANAESTHESIA WITH KETAMINE AND PROPOFOL IN DOGS

    I Gusti Ngurah Sudisma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aim was to evaluate quality of anaesthesia by using gravimetric infusion anaesthesia withketamine and propofol in dogs. The quality of anaesthesia, duration of actions, and the physiological responsseof anaesthesia were evaluated in twenty domestic dogs. Anaesthesia was induced intramuscularly withatropine (0.03 mg/kg-xylazine (2 mg/kg (AX, intravenously ketamine-propofol (KP (4 mg/kg, andmaintained with continuous intravenous infusion with pre-mixed propofol (P and normal saline containing2 mg/ml of propofol and 2 mg/ml of ketamine (K. Domestic stray dogs were randomly divided into fivegroups. Groups AXKP-K2P2, AXKP-K4P4, and AXKP-K6P6 were treated with ketamine-propofol the dose0.2 mg/kg/minute, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg/minute respectively, while group AXKP-P4 was given propofol 0.4 mg/kg/minute and group AXKP-I was given isoflurane 1-2%. Heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR,electrocardiogram (ECG, blood oxygen saturation (SpO2, end tidal CO2 (ET CO2, and capillary refill time(CRT were measured. No significant difference (P>0.05 found between the groups in anaesthetion times.All groups showed rapid and smooth inductions, prolonged surgical stage, and rapid recovery. Groups AXKPK2P2and AXKP-K4P4 showed minimal physiological effect on the dogs. The HR, RR, ET CO2, SpO2, CRT,and ECG wave were stabl. Combination of AXKP-K6P6 induced SpO2 depression, increased and instabilityof HR, RR and ET CO2. Groups AXKP-P4 showed decreased of HR and respiratory depression. All anaestheticcombinations showed no significant influence (P>0.05 on the electricity of the dog’s heart. The combinationof ketamine-propofol at dose 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg/minute were found to be better as an application formaintaining anaesthesia by gravimetric continuous intravenous infusion. The method is a suitablealternative for inhalation anaesthesia in dogs.

  19. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic parameters determination of biomass fuel powders by differential thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG)

    El-Sayed, Saad A.; Mostafa, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The sugarcane bagasse powder has better energy value compared to the cotton stalks. • Bagasse moisture is entrained in its cell walls and its evaporation needs more energy. • The cotton stalks is more reactive and readily combustible than the bagasse powders. • A lower E and A 0 has been found for bagasse compared with cotton stalks powders. • Calculated E of bagasse and cotton stalks by direct and integral methods are different. - Abstract: The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of the two biomass materials (sugarcane bagasse and cotton stalks powders) were evaluated using a differential thermo-gravimetric analyzer under a non-isothermal condition. Two distinct reaction zones were observed for the two biomasses. The direct Arrhenius plot method and the integral method were applied for determination of kinetic parameters: activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and order of reaction. The weight loss curve showed that pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse and cotton stalks took place mainly in the range of 200–500 °C. The activation energy of the sugarcane bagasse powder obtained by the direct Arrhenius plot method ranged between 43 and 53.5 kJ/mol. On the other side, the integral method shows larger values of activation energy (77–87.7 kJ/mol). The activation energy of the cotton stalks powder obtained by the direct Arrhenius plot method was ranged between 98.5 and 100.2 kJ/mol, but the integral method shows larger values of activation energy (72.5–127.8 kJ/mol)

  20. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1988-09-13

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

  1. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  2. A cost-effective technique for integrating personal radiation dose assessment with personal gravimetric sampling

    Strydom, R.; Rolle, R.; Van der Linde, A.

    1992-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing awareness internationally of radiation levels in the mining and milling of radioactive ores, including those from non-uranium mines. A major aspect of radiation control is concerned with the measurement of radiation levels and the assessment of radiation doses incurred by individual workers. Current techniques available internationally for personnel monitoring of radiation exposures are expensive and there is a particular need to reduce the cost of personal radiation monitoring in South African gold mines because of the large labour force employed. In this regard the obvious benefits of integrating personal radiation monitoring with existing personal monitoring systems already in place in South African gold mines should be exploited. A system which can be utilized for this purpose is personal gravimetric sampling. A new cost-effective technique for personal radiation monitoring, which can be fully integrated with the personal gravimetric sampling strategy being implemented on mines, has been developed in South Africa. The basic principles of this technique and its potential in South African mines are described. 9 refs., 7 figs

  3. Analysis of the thermal profiles and the charcoal gravimetric yield in three variations of rectangular brick

    Oliveira, Rogerio Lima Mota de; Alves Junior, Edson; Mulina, Bruno Henrique Oliveira; Borges, Valerio Luiz; Carvalho, Solidonio Rodrigues de [Federal University of Uberlandia - UFU, MG (Brazil). School of Mechanical Engineering - FEMEC], e-mails: rogerio@mecanica.ufu.br, edson@mec.ufu.br, vlborges@mecanica.ufu.br, srcarvalho@mecanica.ufu.br

    2010-07-01

    Charcoal assumes a major role in Brazilian economic scenario. The procedure for obtaining charcoal consists in carbonization of wood at certain specific temperatures in kilns. This ancient process has a few joined technologies and the kilns for such practice do not have any control instruments, in their great majority, becoming dependent on the ability of its operators. However, in recent decades several studies have been developed to improve the practice as well as the equipment that involve and control the stages of charcoal production. In this sense, this work proposes the analysis of the thermal profiles and the gravimetric yield in three variations of a rectangular brick kiln called RAC220: traditional (without any type of instrumentation), instrumented with thermal sensors (RTD PT100) and adapted with gasifier. The goal is to correlate temperature, gravimetric yield and quality of the produced charcoal. Immediate analyses were performed to determine the amount of fixed carbon, volatile gases and ashes contents in charcoal. Through such measurement procedures, together with statistical analysis, the aim is to identify an important tool to reduce the time of charcoal production and also contributes to minimize losses and to increase the thermal efficiency of the production process. (author)

  4. Highly Selective Polypyrrole MIP-Based Gravimetric and Electrochemical Sensors for Picomolar Detection of Glyphosate

    Zouhour Mazouz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a global debate and concern about the use of glyphosate (Gly as an herbicide. New toxicological studies will determine its use in the future under new strict conditions or its replacement by alternative synthetic or natural herbicides. In this context, we designed biomimetic polymer sensing layers for the selective molecular recognition of Gly. Towards this end, complementary surface acoustic wave (SAW and electrochemical sensors were functionalized with polypyrrole (PPy-imprinted polymer for the selective detection of Gly. Their corresponding limits of detection were on the order of 1 pM, which are among the lowest values ever reported in literature. The relevant dissociation constants between PPy and Gly were estimated at [Kd1 = (0.7 ± 0.3 pM and Kd2 = (1.6 ± 1.4 µM] and [Kd1 = (2.4 ± 0.9 pM and Kd2 = (0.3 ± 0.1 µM] for electrochemical and gravimetric measurements, respectively. Quantum chemical calculations permitted to estimate the interaction energy between Gly and PPy film: ΔE = −145 kJ/mol. Selectivity and competitivity tests were investigated with the most common pesticides. This work conclusively shows that gravimetric and electrochemical results indicate that both MIP-based sensors are perfectly able to detect and distinguish glyphosate without any ambiguity.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Seismological and Gravimetric Crustal Thicknesses below the Andean Region with Flat Subduction of the Nazca Plate

    Mario E. Gimenez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A gravimetric study was carried out in a region of the Central Andean Range between 28∘ and 32∘ south latitudes and from 72∘ and 66∘ west longitudes. The seismological and gravimetrical Moho models were compared in a sector which coincides with the seismological stations of the CHARGE project. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the gravity Moho depths and those obtained from seismological investigations (CHARGE project, the latter giving deeper values than those resulting from the gravimetric inversion. These discrepancies are attenuated when the positive gravimetric effect of the Nazca plate is considered. Nonetheless, a small residuum of about 5 km remains beneath the Cuyania terrane region, to the east of the main Andean chain. This residuum could be gravimetrically justified if the existence of a high density or eclogitized portion of the lower crust is considered. This result differed from the interpretations from Project “CHARGE” which revealed that the entire inferior crust extending from the Precordillera to the occidental “Sierras Pampeanas” could be “eclogitized”. In this same sector, we calculated the effective elastic thickness (Te of the crust. These results indicated an anomalous value of Te = 30 km below the Cuyania terrane. This is further conclusive evidence of the fact that the Cuyania terrane is allochthonous, for which also geological evidences exist.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic and gravimetric study of some Hofmann-CBA-Type Host and host-guest compounds

    Aytekin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, similar to Hofmann type M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 (M=Ni or Co) host and M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 .nG (M=Ni or Co; G=benzene, 1,2-, 1,3-dichlorobenzene; n=the number of guest) hostguest compounds were obtained chemically. The infrared spectra of these compounds were recorded with FT-IR spectrometer in the spectroscopic region of 4000cm-1-400cm-1. From these spectra the vibrational wave numbers of ligand molecule, Ni(CN) 4 2 - ion and guest molecules were determined. The absorption and the liberation processes of the guest molecules in the host compounds were examined at room temperature by gravimetric method. Otherwise, it was seen that the molecular structure was supported by making instrumental analysis of host and some host-guest compounds. By analysing the structures of host and host-guest compounds were found to be similar to those of Hofmann type compounds, ligand molecule cyclobutylamine were coordinated to M metal atom from cyclobutylamine's nitrogen atom, the guest molecules were imprisoned in the structural cavities between the sheets

  7. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments

    Rowell, M.J.; Ashworth, J.; Qureshi, A.A.

    1992-12-01

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments was reviewed via a literature survey and discussions with workers in relevant disciplines. The impacts of hydrocarbons on soil are discussed along with a range of methods available to assist in their decomposition by soil microorganisms. The range of petroleum-based materials considered includes conventional and synthetic crude oils, refined oils, sludges, asphalts and bitumens, drilling mud residues, creosote tars, and some pesticides. The degradability of hydrocarbons largely depends upon their aqueous solubility and their adsorption on soil surfaces and, therefore, is related to their molecular structures. The ease of decomposition decreases with increasing complexity of structure, in the order aliphatics > aromatics > heterocyclics and asphaltenes (most recalcitrant). Most soils contain an adequate population of microorganisms and hence bioaugmentation may only be needed in special circumstances. Decomposition is fastest in soils where the hydrocarbon loading rate, aeration, nutrition, moisture, and pH are all optimized. At spill sites there is little control over the application rate, although containment measures can assist in either limiting contamination or distributing it more evenly. The enhancement of bioremediation is discussed in light of all these factors. Other techniques such as enhanced aeration, hydrocarbon decomposition by anaerobic processes, surfactants, and burning are also discussed. 211 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments

    Rowell, M J; Ashworth, J; Qureshi, A A

    1992-12-01

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments was reviewed via a literature survey and discussions with workers in relevant disciplines. The impacts of hydrocarbons on soil are discussed along with a range of methods available to assist in their decomposition by soil microorganisms. The range of petroleum-based materials considered includes conventional and synthetic crude oils, refined oils, sludges, asphalts and bitumens, drilling mud residues, creosote tars, and some pesticides. The degradability of hydrocarbons largely depends upon their aqueous solubility and their adsorption on soil surfaces and, therefore, is related to their molecular structures. The ease of decomposition decreases with increasing complexity of structure, in the order aliphatics > aromatics > heterocyclics and asphaltenes (most recalcitrant). Most soils contain an adequate population of microorganisms and hence bioaugmentation may only be needed in special circumstances. Decomposition is fastest in soils where the hydrocarbon loading rate, aeration, nutrition, moisture, and pH are all optimized. At spill sites there is little control over the application rate, although containment measures can assist in either limiting contamination or distributing it more evenly. The enhancement of bioremediation is discussed in light of all these factors. Other techniques such as enhanced aeration, hydrocarbon decomposition by anaerobic processes, surfactants, and burning are also discussed. 211 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. 3D inversion and modeling of magnetic and gravimetric data characterizing the geophysical anomaly source in Pratinha I in the southeast of Brazil

    Louro, Vinicius Hector Abud; Mantovani, Marta Silvia Maria

    2012-05-01

    The Alto do Paranaíba Igneous Province (APIP) is known for its great mineral exploratory interest in phosphates, niobium, titanium, and diamonds, among others. In the years of 2005 and 2006, the Economic Development Company of Minas Gerais (CODEMIG — http://www.comig.com.br/) performed an airborne magnetic survey over the portion of this igneous province which belongs to Minas Gerais state, denominated Area 7. This survey revealed at the coordinates (19°45'S, 46°10'W) a tripolar anomaly here referred as Pratinha I. This anomaly does not present evidences of outcropping or topographic remodeling. So, boreholes or studies over its sources make the geophysical methods the best and less expensive solution for studying the body in its subsurface. Besides, two gravimetric ground surveys were performed in 2009 and 2010, confirming the existence of a density contrast over the region of the magnetic anomaly. Therefore, through the magnetometry and gravimetry processing, 3D modeling and inversions, it was possible to estimate the geometry, density and magnetic susceptibility, which when analyzed with the regional geology, enabled the proposition of an igneous intrusion of probable alkaline or kamafugitic composition to justify the gravimetric and magnetic response in the region.

  10. Direct electroreduction of CO2 into hydrocarbon

    Winea, Gauthier; Ledoux, Marc-Jacques; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Gangeri, Miriam; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    A lot of methods exist to directly reduce carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons: the photoelectrochemical process is certainly the most interesting, essentially due to the similarities with photosynthesis. As the human activities produce a great quantity of CO 2 , this one can then be considered as an infinite source of carbon. The products of this reaction are identical to those obtained during a Fischer-Tropsch reaction, that is to say hydrocarbons, alcohols and carboxylic acids. These works deal with the electrochemical reduction of CO 2 in standard conditions of temperature and pressure. The photochemical part has been replaced by a current generator as electrons source and a KHCO 3 aqueous solution as protons source. The first catalytic results clearly show that it is possible to reduce CO 2 into light hydrocarbons, typically from C1 to C9. (O.M.)

  11. Microbial hydrocarbon degradation - bioremediation of oil spills

    Atlas, R M [Louisville Univ., KY (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1991-01-01

    Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of oil-polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradative activities. Bioremediation of petroleum pollutants overcomes the factors limiting rates of microbial hydrocarbon biodegradation. Often this involves using the enzymatic capabilities of the indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations and modifying environmental factors, particularly concentrations of molecular oxygen, fixed forms of nitrogen and phosphate to achieve enhanced rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation. Biodegradation of oily sludges and bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites has been achieved by oxygen addition-e.g. by tilling soils in landfarming and by adding hydrogen peroxide or pumping oxygen into oiled aquifers along with addition of nitrogen- and phosphorous-containing fertilizers. The success of seeding oil spills with microbial preparations is ambiguous. Successful bioremediation of a major marine oil spill has been achieved based upon addition of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. (author).

  12. Source identification of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and sediments from Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil using the CHEMSIC method (CHEMometric analysis of Selected Ion Chromatograms).

    Gallotta, Fabiana D C; Christensen, Jan H

    2012-04-27

    A chemometric method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of pre-processed and combined sections of selected ion chromatograms (SICs) is used to characterise the hydrocarbon profiles in soil and sediment from Araucária, Guajuvira, General Lúcio and Balsa Nova Municipalities (Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil) and to indicate the main sources of hydrocarbon pollution. The study includes 38 SICs of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and four of petroleum biomarkers in two separate analyses. The most contaminated samples are inside the Presidente Getúlio Vargas Refinery area. These samples represent a petrogenic pattern and different weathering degrees. Samples from outside the refinery area are either less or not contaminated, or contain mixtures of diagenetic, pyrogenic and petrogenic inputs where different proportions predominate. The locations farthest away from industrial activity (Balsa Nova) contains the lowest levels of PAC contamination. There are no evidences to conclude positive matches between the samples from outside the refinery area and the Cusiana spilled oil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Producing light hydrocarbons by destructive hydrogenation

    Fohlen, J H

    1928-06-20

    A method of obtaining light hydrocarbons from fuels and natural or industrial carbonaceous materials by cracking under pressure from 5 to 200 atmospheres and within a temperature range of 200 to 1,000/sup 0/C, the cracking operation being assisted by the presence of catalysts such as metallic halides, simultaneously, with hydrogenation by means of nascent hydrogen in the reaction chamber.

  14. A highly accurate absolute gravimetric network for Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard; Butta, Hubert; Qirko, Kristaq; Pavicevic, Bozidar; Murat, Meha

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a basic gravity network in Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro to enable further investigations in geodetic and geophysical issues. Therefore the first time in history absolute gravity measurements were performed in these countries. The Norwegian mapping authority Kartverket is assisting the national mapping authorities in Kosovo (KCA) (Kosovo Cadastral Agency - Agjencia Kadastrale e Kosovës), Albania (ASIG) (Autoriteti Shtetëror i Informacionit Gjeohapësinor) and in Montenegro (REA) (Real Estate Administration of Montenegro - Uprava za nekretnine Crne Gore) in improving the geodetic frameworks. The gravity measurements are funded by Kartverket. The absolute gravimetric measurements were performed from BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) with the absolute gravimeter FG5-242. As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Laser and clock of the absolute gravimeter were calibrated before and after the measurements. The absolute gravimetric survey was carried out from September to October 2015. Finally all 8 scheduled stations were successfully measured: there are three stations located in Montenegro, two stations in Kosovo and three stations in Albania. The stations are distributed over the countries to establish a gravity network for each country. The vertical gradients were measured at all 8 stations with the relative gravimeter Scintrex CG5. The high class quality of some absolute gravity stations can be used for gravity monitoring activities in future. The measurement uncertainties of the absolute gravity measurements range around 2.5 micro Gal at all stations (1 microgal = 10-8 m/s2). In Montenegro the large gravity difference of 200 MilliGal between station Zabljak and Podgorica can be even used for calibration of relative gravimeters

  15. Distilling hydrocarbons, etc

    Turner, C

    1917-11-23

    In the fractional or destructive distillation of hydrocarbon oils or other liquids, the pressure in the still is raised and lowered alternately. The still is closed to raise the pressure, and is opened to lower the pressure rapidly solely by expansion of the vapors. The operation is effected without intermittent cooling, except such as may occur during the lowering of the pressure. In distilling hydrocarbon oil, pressure steam is blown into the oil until the pressure reaches 5 lb/in./sup 2/. The vapor outlet is then opened until the pressure falls to 2 lb/in./sup 2/, whereupon the vapor outlet is closed and steam is again admitted. The operation is continued until the steam, which is of 20 lb pressure, no longer effects distillation; after this stage, superheated steam is used.

  16. Distilling hydrocarbon oils

    Tausz, J

    1924-07-16

    Hydrocarbon oils such as petroleum, shale oils, lignite or coal tar oils are purified by distilling them and collecting the distillate in fractions within narrow limits so that all the impurities are contained in one or more of the narrow fractions. In distilling ligroin obtained by destructive distillation of brown coal, it is found that the coloring and resin-forming constituents are contained in the fractions distilling over at 62 to 86/sup 0/C and 108/sup 0/C. The ligroin is purified, therefore, by distillating in an apparatus provided with an efficient dephlegmotor and removing these two fractions. The distillation may be carried out wholly or in part under reduced pressure, and fractions separated under ordinary pressure may be subsequently distilled under reduced pressure. The hydrocarbons may be first separated into fractions over wider limits and the separate fractions be subjected to a further fractional distillation.

  17. Decontamination of hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Smith, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes the method of treating hydrocarbon contaminated soil. It comprises forming the soil into a flowing particulate stream, forming an aqueous liquid mixture of water and treating substance that reacts with hydrocarbon to form CO 2 and water, dispersing the liquid mixture into the particulate soil stream to wet the particulate, allowing the substance to react with the wetted soil particulate to thereby form CO 2 and water, thereby the resultant soil is beneficially treated, the stream being freely projected to dwell at a level and then fall, and the dispersing includes spraying the liquid mixture into the projected stream at the dwell, the substance consisting of natural bacteria, and at a concentration level in the mixture of between 100 to 3,000 PPM of bacteria to water, the soil forming step including impacting the soil to reduce it to particles less than about 1 inches in cross dimension, and including forming the wetting particulate into a first layer on a surface to allow the substance to react

  18. Production of hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    Lohmueller, R

    1984-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are the preferred starting materials for the industrial production of hydrogen. Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming of light hydrocarbons. Partial oxidation of heavy oil and residue is used for the production of H/sub 2/ and synthesis gas in large plants. In both cases gas purification was improved. Hydrogen-rich gases like coke oven gas, refinery-offgas, and offgases from the chemical and petrochemical industry have high potential for becoming a major source of hydrogen. Processes for recovering H/sub 2/ (and by-products) are condensation and rectification at low temperatures and, most attractive and versatile for the production of very pure H/sub 2/, adsorption (PSA). The environmental impact of H/sub 2/ production lies mainly in the emission of CO/sub 2/ and heat. Other forms of pollution can be considerably reduced by conventional methods. The economy of H/sub 2/ production depends essentially on price and availability of the raw materials.

  19. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    Ravishankar, K. [Harding Lawson Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  20. Nuclear explosives and hydrocarbons

    Cohen, P

    1971-10-01

    A nuclear explosive 12 in. in diam and producing very little tritium is feasible in France. Such a device would be well adapted for contained nuclear explosions set off for the purpose of hydrocarbon storage or stimulation. The different aspects of setting off the explosive are reviewed. In the particular case of gas storage in a nuclear cavity in granite, it is demonstrated that the dose of irradiation received is extremely small. (18 refs.)

  1. Treatment of hydrocarbon oils

    1936-02-22

    A process is described for refining a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons containing harmful substances, this process permitting the operation, which consists in treating the liquid mixture at a temperature higher than 200/sup 0/C with a solid catalyst of phosphoric acid, consisting of phosphoric acid deposited on a solid support of the type of metallurgical coke, for a time sufficient to convert the harmful components to inoffensive substances.

  2. Cracking hydrocarbon oils

    Seigle, A A.F.M.

    1922-12-20

    Hydrocarbon oils such as petroleum, peat, shale, or lignite oils, heavy tars, resin oils, naphthalene oils, etc., are vaporized by being fed from a tank through a preheater to the lower part of a vertical annular retort heated by a flame projected down the central cavity from a burner. The oil vapors rise through annular passages formed by disks, on which are placed chips of copper, iron, aluminum, etc., to act as catalysts.

  3. High boiling point hydrocarbons

    Pier, M

    1929-04-29

    A process is given for the production of hydrocarbons of high boiling point, such as lubricating oils, from bituminous substances, such as varieties of coal, shale, or other solid distillable carbonaceous materials. The process consists of treating the initial materials with organic solvents and then subjecting the products extracted from the initial materials, preferably directly, to a reducing treatment in respect to temperature, pressure, and time. The reduction treatment is performed by means of hydrogen under pressure.

  4. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  5. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  6. Gravimetric and volumetric approaches adapted for hydrogen sorption measurements with in situ conditioning on small sorbent samples

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Tessier, A.; Bose, T.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present high sensitivity (0 to 1 bar, 295 K) gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen sorption measurement systems adapted for in situ sample conditioning at high temperature and high vacuum. These systems are designed especially for experiments on sorbents available in small masses (mg) and requiring thorough degassing prior to sorption measurements. Uncertainty analysis from instrumental specifications and hydrogen absorption measurements on palladium are presented. The gravimetric and volumetric systems yield cross-checkable results within about 0.05 wt % on samples weighing from (3 to 25) mg. Hydrogen storage capacities of single-walled carbon nanotubes measured at 1 bar and 295 K with both systems are presented

  7. Hydrocarbons thermal maturation: Leopatin method applied to the Parana basin; Maturacao termica de hidrocarbonetos: aplicacao do metodo de Lopatin a Bacia do Parana

    Eston, Sergio Medici de; Jardim, Niza S

    1987-12-31

    One of the requirements for the existent of economic deposits of hydrocarbons is that the organic matter has undergone adequate thermal maturation. Several techniques have been proposed in order to quantity the catagenetic state of kerogen, and the Lopatin-Waples methodology permits quantification at any past time and does not require laboratory tests on samples of the material. For this reason it is an useful techniques for predicting mature zones using as basic information the thermal and subsidence histories of each stratum. Lopatin`s technique was applied to the Parana basin, with McKenzie`s crustal stretching model fitted to the data of 18 wells, and the areas predicted as mature for oil and/or gas were in good agreement with the field results. The technique predicted oil phone areas at the east border of the basin for the Ponta Grossa and Irati formation, and also that most of the thermal maturation occurred after the basalt flows of the Cretaceous period. (author) 41 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Hydrocarbons thermal maturation: Leopatin method applied to the Parana basin; Maturacao termica de hidrocarbonetos: aplicacao do metodo de Lopatin a Bacia do Parana

    Eston, Sergio Medici de; Jardim, Niza S.

    1986-12-31

    One of the requirements for the existent of economic deposits of hydrocarbons is that the organic matter has undergone adequate thermal maturation. Several techniques have been proposed in order to quantity the catagenetic state of kerogen, and the Lopatin-Waples methodology permits quantification at any past time and does not require laboratory tests on samples of the material. For this reason it is an useful techniques for predicting mature zones using as basic information the thermal and subsidence histories of each stratum. Lopatin`s technique was applied to the Parana basin, with McKenzie`s crustal stretching model fitted to the data of 18 wells, and the areas predicted as mature for oil and/or gas were in good agreement with the field results. The technique predicted oil phone areas at the east border of the basin for the Ponta Grossa and Irati formation, and also that most of the thermal maturation occurred after the basalt flows of the Cretaceous period. (author) 41 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Influence of the method of production of eggs on the daily intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine contaminants: an independent study in the Canary Islands (Spain).

    Luzardo, Octavio P; Rodríguez-Hernández, Angel; Quesada-Tacoronte, Yohana; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Almeida-González, Maira; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D

    2013-10-01

    Analysis of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 20 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were performed on eggs from three different production types (conventional, free-run and organic) collected from the markets of the Canary Islands (Spain). Unlike other studies we did not found differences in the content of PCBs or OCPs of eggs in relation to its production type. Median ∑OCPs content was 3.87 ng g⁻¹ fat, being dieldrin, dicofol, hexachlorobenzene, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT the most frequently detected. Median ∑PCBs value was 3.93 ng g⁻¹ fat, with 79.9% of this amount coming from the marker PCBs. Two samples, one free-run and one organic, greatly exceeded the current European Commission (EC) limit of 2.5 pg TEQ(PCDD/F) g⁻¹ lipid, but the rest were well below of this limit. The concentrations of PAHs in conventionally produced eggs were almost 4 times higher than in free-run or organic eggs. Mean dietary intake estimates of the organochlorine contaminants based on consumption of eggs, regardless of the type chosen, is negligible for the Canary Islands' population. However, the median dietary intake estimates of PAHs greatly depend on the type of eggs chosen, being much lower when free-run and organic eggs are consumed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Alpine streams during annual snowmelt: investigating effects of sampling method, site characteristics, and meteorology.

    Shahpoury, Pourya; Hageman, Kimberly J; Matthaei, Christoph D; Alumbaugh, Robert E; Cook, Michelle E

    2014-10-07

    Silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates were used to measure time-integrated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in alpine streams during annual snowmelt. The three sampling sites were located near a main highway in Arthur's Pass National Park in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. A similar set of PAH congeners, composed of 2-4 rings, were found in silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates. The background PAH concentrations were similar at all sites, implying that proximity to the highway did not affect concentrations. In passive samplers, an increase of PAH concentrations by up to seven times was observed during snowmelt. In macroinvertebrates, the concentration changes were moderate; however, macroinvertebrate sampling did not occur during the main pulse observed in the passive samplers. The extent of vegetation in the catchment appeared to affect the concentration patterns seen at the different stream sites. A strong correlation was found between PAH concentrations in passive samplers and the amount of rainfall in the study area, indicating that the washout of contaminants from snowpack by rainfall was an important process.

  11. Thermal analysis of thermo-gravimetric measurements of spent nuclear fuel oxidation rates

    Cramer, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed thermal analysis was completed of the sample temperatures in the Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) system used to measure irradiated N Reactor fuel oxidation rates. Sample temperatures during the oxidation process did not show the increase which was postulated as a result of the exothermic reactions. The analysis shows the axial conduction of heat in the sample holder effectively removes the added heat and only a very small, i.e., <10 C, increase in temperature is calculated. A room temperature evaporation test with water showed the sample thermocouple sensitivity to be more than adequate to account for a temperature change of approximately 5 C. Therefore, measured temperatures in the TGA are within approximately 10 C of the actual sample temperatures and no adjustments to reported data to account for the heat input from the oxidation process are necessary

  12. Global detailed gravimetric geoid. [based on gravity model derived from satellite tracking and surface gravity data

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 deg-by-1 deg mean free air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is + or - 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  13. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  14. Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. The device is capable of determining hydrocarbon gases in water to the concentration of less than 5 x 10{sup -4} ml/l of water. According to the results of microbiological studies, the plate count technique can be a useful supplementary method for hydrocarbon exploration. This is based on the facts that the average survival rate to hydrocarbons (pentane, hexane) for heterotrophs is higher in the area known as containing considerable hydrocarbon gases than other areas in the Pohang region. However, it is still necessary to develop techniques to treat the bacteria with gaseous hydrocarbons. (author). 2 figs., 41 tabs.

  15. The use of gravimetric data from GRACE mission in the understanding of polar motion variations

    Seoane, L.; Nastula, J.; Bizouard, C.; Gambis, D.

    2009-08-01

    Tesseral coefficients C21 and S21 derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations allow to compute the mass term of the polar-motion excitation function. This independent estimation can improve the geophysical models and, in addition, determine the unmodelled phenomena. In this paper, we intend to validate the polar motion excitation derived from GRACE's last release (GRACE Release 4) computed by different institutes: GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Postdam, Germany; Center for Space Research (CSR), Austin, USA; Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, USA, and the Groupe de Recherche en Géodésie Spatiale (GRGS), Toulouse, France. For this purpose, we compare these excitations functions first to the mass term obtained from observed Earth's rotation variations free of the motion term and, second, to the mass term estimated from geophysical fluids models. We confirm the large improvement of the CSR solution, and we show that the GRGS estimate is also well correlated with the geodetic observations. Significant discrepancies exist between the solutions of each centre. The source of these differences is probably related to the data processing strategy. We also consider residuals computed after removing the geophysical models or the gravimetric solutions from the geodetic mass term. We show that the residual excitation based on models is smoother than the gravimetric data, which are still noisy. Still, they are comparable for the χ2 component. It appears that χ2 residual signals using GFZ and JPL data have less variability. Finally, for assessing the impact of the geophysical fluids models choice on our results, we checked two different oceanic excitation series. We show the significant differences in the residuals correlations, especially for the χ1 more sensitive to the oceanic signals.

  16. In-situ hydrocarbon delineation using laser-induced fluorescence

    Taer, A.D.; Hastings, R.W.; Brown, A.Y.; Frend, R.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of hydrocarbons in soils was conducted at an active Shell Oil Company petroleum products terminal, located in Carson, California. An investigation approach involving Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) technologies was implemented to provide real-time, in-situ characterization of site stratigraphy, hydrocarbon distribution and importantly, hydrocarbon product differentiation. The area of investigation is located along a property boundary, where a plume of separate phase hydrocarbons has been actively recovered for several years. CPT/LIF technology was selected for the investigation since previous delineation efforts using hydrocarbon fingerprinting methods proved inconclusive. Additionally, the CPT/LIF technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution to accomplish project objectives. Based on the information obtained during this investigation, it was determined that the plume of separate phase hydrocarbons along the northern property boundary is from a source distinctly different than any identified hydrocarbons known to be from on-site sources. In addition, the plume was determined to not be connected with any other known on-site hydrocarbon plumes. The results of this CPT/LIF investigation were consistent with the known hydrogeologic conditions. This evaluation determined that CPT/LIF technology was very effective in addressing project objectives and resulted in a significant cost savings

  17. Source identification of hydrocarbons following environmental releases

    Birkholz, D.A. [ALS Environmental, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Methods of identifying the sources of hydrocarbon contaminations were discussed in this PowerPoint presentation. Laboratories analyze for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) by obtaining chromatograms of observed products. However, many petroleum products provide similar chromatograms. Several independent lines of evidence are needed for the purposes of accurate determination in legal applications. A case study of a lube oil plant spill was used to demonstrate the inconclusiveness of chromatograms and the need to determine petroleum biomarkers. Terpane, sterane, triaromatic sterane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane analyses were conducted to differentiate between the hydrocarbon samples. The analysis methods are being used with various soil, water, and crab species samples from the BP oil spill. Oil found at the different sites must be directly related to the spill. However, there are 3858 oil and gas platforms currently operating in the Gulf of Mexico. Ratios of biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are being developed to generate weight of evidence. A critical difference analysis was also presented. tabs., figs.

  18. Evaluation of environmental samples containing heavy hydrocarbon components in environmental forensic investigations

    Raia, J.C.; Blakley, C.R.; Fuex, A.N.; Villalanti, D.C.; Fahrenthold, P.D. [Triton Anal Corp, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-03-01

    This article presents a procedure to evaluate and characterize environmental samples containing mixtures of hydrocarbons over a wide boiling range of materials that include fuels and other products used in commerce. The range of the method extends to the higher boiling and heavier molecular weight hydrocarbon products in the range of motor oil, bunker fuel, and heavier residue materials. The procedure uses the analytical laboratory technique of high-temperature simulated distillation along with mathematical regression of the analytical data to estimate the relative contribution of individual products in mixtures of hydrocarbons present in environmental samples. An analytical technique to determine hydrocarbon-type distributions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with nitric oxide ionization spectrometry evaluation is also presented. This type of analysis allows complex hydrocarbon mixtures to be classified by their chemical composition, or types of hydrocarbons that include paraffins, cycloparaffins, monoaromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Characteristic hydrocarbon patterns for example, in the relative distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are valuable for determining the potential origin of materials present in environmental samples. These methods provide quantitative data for hydrocarbon components in mixtures as a function of boiling range and 'hydrocarbon fingerprints' of the types of materials present. This information is valuable in assessing environmental impacts of hydrocarbons at contaminated sites and establishing the liabilities and cost allocations for responsible parties.

  19. Measuring Trace Hydrocarbons in Silanes

    Lesser, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Technique rapid and uses standard analytical equipment. Silane gas containing traces of hydrocarbons injected into carrier gas of moist nitrogen having about 0.2 percent water vapor. Carrier, water and silane pass through short column packed with powdered sodium hydroxide which combines moisture and silane to form nonvolatile sodium silicate. Carrier gas free of silane but containing nonreactive hydrocarbons, pass to silica-gel column where chromatographic separation takes place. Hydrocarbons measured by FID.

  20. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91method were both good and detection limits ranged from 1.2 to 6.4 ng for the investigated compounds.

  1. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments

    Chiappini, L.; Perraudin, E.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Doussin, J.F. [Universites Paris, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, UMR CNRS 7583, Creteil (France)

    2006-11-15

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91 < R < 0.98) of the method were both good and detection limits ranged from 1.2 to 6.4 ng for the investigated compounds. (orig.)

  2. Tröger’s Base Ladder Polymer for Membrane-Based Hydrocarbon Separation

    Alhazmi, Abdulrahman

    2017-05-01

    The use of polymeric membranes for natural gas separation has rapidly increased during the past three decades, particularly for carbon dioxide separation from natural gas. Another valuable application is the separation of heavy hydrocarbons from methane (fuel gas conditioning), more importantly for remote area and off-shore applications. A new potential polymeric membrane that might be utilized for natural gas separations is a Tröger’s base ladder polymer (PIM-Trip-TB-2). This glassy polymeric membrane was synthesized by the polymerization reaction of 9, 10-dimethyl-2,6 (7) diaminotriptycene with dimethoxymethane. In this research, the polymer was selected due to its high surface area and highly interconnected microporous structure. Sorption isotherms of nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O¬2), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), ethane (C2H6), propane (C3H8), and n-butane (n-C4H10) were measured at 35 °C over a range of pressures using a Hiden Intelligent Gravimetric Analyzer, IGA. The more condensable gases (C2H6, CO2, C3H8, and n-C4H10) showed high solubility due to their high affinity to the polymer matrix. The permeation coefficients were determined for various gases at 35 °C and pressure difference of 5 bar via the constant-pressure/variable-volume method. The PIM-Trip-TB-2 film exhibited high performance for several high-impact applications, such as O2/N2, H2/N2 and H2/CH4. Also, physical aging for several gases was examined by measuring the permeability coefficients at different periods of time. Moreover, a series of mixed-gas permeation tests was performed using 2 vol.% n-C4H10/98 vol.% CH4 and the results showed similar transport characteristics to other microporous polymers with pores of less than 2 nm. The work performed in this research suggested that PIM-Trip-TB-2 is suitable for the separation of: (i) higher hydrocarbons from methane and (ii) small, non-condensable gases such as O2/N2 and H2/CH4.

  3. Fractional separation of hydrocarbon vapours

    1937-07-10

    A process is described for converting higher boiling hydrocarbons to lower boiling hydrocarbons by subjecting them at elevated temperatures to a conversion operation, then separating the higher and lower boiling fractions. The separation takes place while the reaction products are maintained in the vapor phase by contact with a mass of solid porous material which has little or no catalytic activity but does have a preferential absorption property for higher boiling hydrocarbons so that the lower boiling part of the reaction products pass through the separation zone while the heavier hydrocarbons are retained. The separation is accomplished without substantial loss of heat of these reaction products.

  4. Process for preparing hydrocarbons

    Krauch, C; Anther, E; Pier, M

    1926-04-07

    A process is described for the conversion of coal of all kinds, wood, oil, shale, as well as other carbonaceous materials into liquid hydrocarbons in two steps, characterized by treatment of the coal and so forth with a stream of hydrogen or hydrogen-containing gases at raised temperatures and raised pressures and producing a tarry product which, after separation of the ashlike residue, is converted by a further treatment, in the presence of catalysts, with hydrogen or hydrogen-containing gases at raised temperature and pressure, largely into low-boiling products.

  5. Recovering valuable liquid hydrocarbons

    Pier, M

    1931-06-11

    A process for recovering valuable liquid hydrocarbons from coking coal, mineral coal, or oil shale through treatment with hydrogen under pressure at elevated temperature is described. Catalysts and grinding oil may be used in the process if necessary. The process provides for deashing the coal prior to hydrogenation and for preventing the coking and swelling of the deashed material. During the treatment with hydrogen, the coal is either mixed with coal low in bituminous material, such as lean coal or active coal, as a diluent or the bituminous constituents which cause the coking and swelling are removed by extraction with solvents. (BLM)

  6. Hydrogen production from hydrocarbons

    Docekal, J

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen is an important feed stock for chemical and petroleum industries, in addition to being considered as the energy carrier of the future. At the present time the feed stock hydrogen is mainly manufactured from hydrocarbons using steam reforming. In steam reforming two processes are employed, the conventional process and PSA (pressure swing adsorption) process. These two processes are described and compared. The results show that the total costs and the maintenance costs are lower for the PSA process, the capital outlay is lower for the conventional process, and the operating costs are similar for the two processes.

  7. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  8. Magneto-thermo-gravimetric technique to investigate the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-B-Nb-Y Bulk Metallic Glass

    Lee, Sangmin; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa [Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Masood, Ansar; Tamaki, Takahiko; Valter, Strom; Rao, K V, E-mail: smlee@imr.tohoku.ac.j [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockhom (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Magneto-thermo-gravimetric (MTG) technique is highly informative about the changes in the magnetic state, as well as structural changes in a system, which cannot be often noticed in calorimetric measurements. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique in determining the magnetic transition temperature, and the subsequent crystallization process in a (Fe{sub 0.72}B{sub 0.24}Nb{sub 0.04}){sub 95.5}Y{sub 4.5} Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG). MTG and DSC analyses were carried out at the heating rate of 0.67 K/s from RT {approx}1170 K. As a result of the repeated MTG measurements, a magnetic 2nd amorphous phase was observed in the BMG sample, which could be the first measurement for the Magnetic Short Range Ordering (MSRO). Consequently, the MTG measurement is proved as the most convenient method for determining the various structural and magnetic transitions in a glassy material.

  9. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environment through bioremediation: a review.

    Singh, Kriti; Chandra, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation play key role in the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Exposure of petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment occurs either due to human activities or accidentally and cause environmental pollution. Petroleum hydrocarbon cause many toxic compounds which are potent immunotoxicants and carcinogenic to human being. Remedial methods for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment include various physiochemical and biological methods. Due to the negative consequences caused by the physiochemical methods, the bioremediation technology is widely adapted and considered as one of the best technology for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment. Bioremediation utilizes the natural ability of microorganism to degrade the hazardous compound into simpler and non hazardous form. This paper provides a review on the role of bioremediation in the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment, discuss various hazardous effects of petroleum hydrocarbon, various factors influencing biodegradation, role of various enzymes in biodegradation and genetic engineering in bioremediation.

  10. Validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence detection method for the simultaneous quantification of fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Olsen, I L; Holst, E

    1991-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence method using multiple wavelength shift for simultaneous quantification of different PAH compounds was developed. The new method was superior to the methods of DONG and GREENBERG [J. Liquid Chromatogr. 11, 1887-1905 (1988)] and WISE et al...... that no systematic errors, and only small unsystematic errors, could be demonstrated. Furthermore, the method had a good reproducibility and a high sensitivity....

  11. Hydrocarbons: source of energy

    Imarisio, G.; Frias, M.; Bemtgen, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are at present the single most important source of energy, since they are the most versatile and widely used. It is expected that their importance will extend well into the next century and therefore it is essential to provide for all those improvements which will extend their availability and usefulness. The sub-programme ''Optimization of the production and utilization of hydrocarbons'' (within the Non-Nuclear Energy R and D Programme of the European Communities) is pursuing a number of R and D topics aimed at the above-mentioned results. It is implemented by means of shared-cost R and D contracts. At this first Seminar held in Lyon (France) from 21-23 September, 1988, all contractors of the sub-programme presented the state of progress of their R and D projects. These proceedings comprise all the papers presented at the Seminar. The section on oilfield exploration includes a report of work on the interpretation of nuclear logs by means of mathematical models. (author)

  12. Gravimetric and volumetric determination of the purity of electrolytically refined silver and the produced silver nitrate

    Ačanski Marijana M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver is, along with gold and the platinum-group metals, one of the so called precious metals. Because of its comparative scarcity, brilliant white color, malleability and resistance to atmospheric oxidation, silver has been used in the manufacture of coins and jewelry for a long time. Silver has the highest known electrical and thermal conductivity of all metals and is used in fabricating printed electrical circuits, and also as a coating for electronic conductors. It is also alloyed with other elements such as nickel or palladium for use in electrical contacts. The most useful silver salt is silver nitrate, a caustic chemical reagent, significant as an antiseptic and as a reagent in analytical chemistry. Pure silver nitrate is an intermediate in the industrial preparation of other silver salts, including the colloidal silver compounds used in medicine and the silver halides incorporated into photographic emulsions. Silver halides become increasingly insoluble in the series: AgCl, AgBr, AgI. All silver salts are sensitive to light and are used in photographic coatings on film and paper. The ZORKA-PHARMA company (Sabac, Serbia specializes in the production of pharmaceutical remedies and lab chemicals. One of its products is chemical silver nitrate (argentum-nitricum (l. Silver nitrate is generally produced by dissolving pure electrolytically refined silver in hot 48% nitric acid. Since the purity of silver nitrate, produced in 2002, was not in compliance with the p.a. level of purity, there was doubt that the electrolytically refined silver was pure. The aim of this research was the gravimetric and volumetric determination of the purity of electrolytically refined silver and silver nitrate, produced industrially and in a laboratory. The purity determination was carried out gravimetrically, by the sedimentation of silver(I ions in the form of insoluble silver salts: AgCl, AgBr and Agi, and volumetrically, according to Mohr and Volhardt. The

  13. Steam hydrocarbon cracking and reforming

    Golombok, M.

    2004-01-01

    Many industrial chemical processes are taught as distinct contrasting reactions when in fact the unifying comparisons are greater than the contrasts. We examine steam hydrocarbon reforming and steam hydrocarbon cracking as an example of two processes that operate under different chemical reactivity

  14. To what extent can aerosol water explain the discrepancy between model calculated and gravimetric PM10 and PM2.5?

    S. G. Tsyro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-comparisons of European air quality models show that regional transport models, including the EMEP (Co-operative Programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmission of air pollutants in Europe aerosol model, tend to underestimate the observed concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5. Obviously, an accurate representation of the individual aerosol constituents is a prerequisite for adequate calculation of PM concentrations. On the other hand, available measurements on the chemical characterization of ambient particles reveal that full chemical PM mass closure is rarely achieved. The fraction unaccounted for by chemical analysis can comprise as much as 30-40% of gravimetric PM10 or PM2.5 mass. The unaccounted PM mass can partly be due to non-C atoms in organic aerosols and/or due to sampling and measurement artefacts. Moreover, a part of the unaccounted PM mass is likely to consist of water associated with particles. Thus, the gravimetrically measured particle mass does not necessarily represent dry PM10 and PM2.5 mass. This is thought to be one of the reasons for models under-prediction of observed PM, if calculated dry PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations are compared with measurements. The EMEP aerosol model has been used to study to what extent particle-bound water can explain the chemically unidentified PM mass in filter-based particle samples. Water content of PM2.5 and PM10 has been estimated with the model for temperature 20°C and relative humidity 50%, which are conditions required for equilibration of dust-loaded filters according to the Reference method recommended by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN. Model calculations for Europe show that, depending on particle composition, particle-bound water constitutes 20-35% of the annual mean PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations, which is consistent with existing experimental estimates. At two Austrian sites, in Vienna and Streithofen, where daily measurements of PM2.5 mass

  15. Risk analysis associated with petroleum hydrocarbons: is everything running smoothly?

    Morin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum products represent one of the main sources of environmental contamination, and these products are complex, composed of several hundred individual hydrocarbons. The evaluation of the risks associated with petroleum products is often limited by certain specific parameters such as benzene. The petroleum hydrocarbons running from C(10) to C(50) are not often integrated in an analysis of the toxological risks since the toxological characterization of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons is difficult to carry out. There exist in the United States two approaches that were developed recently that allow the integration of various hydrocarbons comprising a mixture. In this presentation, two of these approaches are described and compared. An overview of these approaches related to Canadian regulatory bodies is included, and a case study completes the account. The two approaches that are most well known in this area are: 1) that of the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection, and 2) that of the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group. The integration of petroleum hydrocarbons in a quantitative evaluation of their toxological risk is possible by present methods. This integration allows a reduction in the uncertainty associated with the use of an integrating parameter in the case of these petroleum hydrocarbons in the C(10) to the C(50) range

  16. Tannins gravimetric yield condensed in Anadenanthera peregrina bark in different diameter classes

    Caroline Junqueira Sartori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to determine the gravimetric yield of condensed tannins in the Anadenanthera peregrina bark in different diameter classes. Fifty-nine trees samples were collected of Anadenanthera peregrina, at 1.30m of the ground (diameter at breast height - DBH, distributed in seven diameter classes. The barks were dried and crushed in mill of hammer. Composite sample was made to prepare the extract. The extraction was done using water in the ratio 15:1 (v/w, added 3% sodium sulfite (w/w in water-bath at 70°C for 4 hours. The material was filtered using fine cloth strainer and concentrated on a heating plate at approximately 150 g. It was determined the extract mass and removed 10 g for obtaining solids content and 20g for the Stiasny's index. The average values of total solids content, Stiasny's index, condensed tannin content and the compound content non-tannin were 11.34%; 75.79%; 12.76% and 4.07%, respectively. The content of solids, Stiasny's index, compound content non-tannin show significant differences between diameter classes. For the condensed tannins production, the diameter class parameter there was no influence.

  17. The first Australian gravimetric quasigeoid model with location-specific uncertainty estimates

    Featherstone, W. E.; McCubbine, J. C.; Brown, N. J.; Claessens, S. J.; Filmer, M. S.; Kirby, J. F.

    2018-02-01

    We describe the computation of the first Australian quasigeoid model to include error estimates as a function of location that have been propagated from uncertainties in the EGM2008 global model, land and altimeter-derived gravity anomalies and terrain corrections. The model has been extended to include Australia's offshore territories and maritime boundaries using newer datasets comprising an additional {˜ }280,000 land gravity observations, a newer altimeter-derived marine gravity anomaly grid, and terrain corrections at 1^' ' }× 1^' ' } resolution. The error propagation uses a remove-restore approach, where the EGM2008 quasigeoid and gravity anomaly error grids are augmented by errors propagated through a modified Stokes integral from the errors in the altimeter gravity anomalies, land gravity observations and terrain corrections. The gravimetric quasigeoid errors (one sigma) are 50-60 mm across most of the Australian landmass, increasing to {˜ }100 mm in regions of steep horizontal gravity gradients or the mountains, and are commensurate with external estimates.

  18. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  19. Investigating the Trimethylaluminium/Water ALD Process on Mesoporous Silica by In Situ Gravimetric Monitoring

    Verena E. Strempel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A low amount of AlOx was successfully deposited on an unordered, mesoporous SiO2 powder using 1–3 ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition cycles of trimethylaluminium and water. The process was realized in a self-built ALD setup featuring a microbalanceand a fixed particle bed. The reactor temperature was varied between 75, 120, and 200 °C. The self-limiting nature of the deposition was verified by in situ gravimetric monitoring for all temperatures. The coated material was further analyzed by nitrogen sorption, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The obtained mass gains correspond to average growth between 0.81–1.10 Å/cycle depending on substrate temperature. In addition, the different mass gains during the half-cycles in combination with the analyzed aluminum content after one, two, and three cycles indicate a change in the preferred surface reaction of the trimethylaluminium molecule from a predominately two-ligand exchange with hydroxyl groups to more single-ligand exchange with increasing cycle number. Nitrogen sorption isotherms demonstrate (1 homogeneously coated mesopores, (2 a decrease in surface area, and (3 a reduction of the pore size. The experiment is successfully repeated in a scale-up using a ten times higher substrate batch size.

  20. Gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetric studies on glycerin-induced skin hydration.

    Lee, Ae-Ri Cho; Moon, Hee Kyung

    2007-11-01

    A thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were carried out to characterize the water property and an alteration of lipid phase transition of stratum corneum (SC) by glycerin. In addition, the relationship between steady state skin permeation rate and skin hydration in various concentrations of glycerin was investigated. Water vapor absorption-desorption was studied in the hairless mouse stratum corneum. Dry SC samples were exposed to different conc. of glycerin (0-50%) followed by exposure to dry air and the change in weight property was monitored over time by use of TGA. In DSC study, significant decrease in DeltaH of the lipid transition in 10% glycerin and water treated sample: the heat of lipid transition of normal, water, 10% glycerin treated SC were 6.058, 4.412 and 4.316 mJ/mg, respectively. In 10% glycerin treated SCs, the Tc of water shifts around 129 degrees C, corresponding to the weakly bound secondary water. In 40% glycerin treated SC, the Tc of water shifts to 144 degrees C corresponding to strongly bound primary water. There was a good correlation between the hydration property of the skin and the steady state skin flux with the correlation coefficient (r2=0.94). As the hydration increased, the steady state flux increased. As glycerin concentration increased, hydration property decreased. High diffusivity induced by the hydration effect of glycerin and water could be the major contributing factor for the enhanced skin permeation of nicotinic acid (NA).

  1. Gravimetric Viral Diagnostics: QCM Based Biosensors for Early Detection of Viruses

    Adeel Afzal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are pathogenic microorganisms that can inhabit and replicate in human bodies causing a number of widespread infectious diseases such as influenza, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, meningitis, pneumonia, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS etc. A majority of these viral diseases are contagious and can spread from infected to healthy human beings. The most important step in the treatment of these contagious diseases and to prevent their unwanted spread is to timely detect the disease-causing viruses. Gravimetric viral diagnostics based on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM transducers and natural or synthetic receptors are miniaturized sensing platforms that can selectively recognize and quantify harmful virus species. Herein, a review of the label-free QCM virus sensors for clinical diagnostics and point of care (POC applications is presented with major emphasis on the nature and performance of different receptors ranging from the natural or synthetic antibodies to selective macromolecular materials such as DNA and aptamers. A performance comparison of different receptors is provided and their limitations are discussed.

  2. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electro...... in the future. In spite of this, it is important to research and develop as many viable sustainable energy technologies as economical possible. © 2012 ECS - The Electrochemical Society  ...

  3. A magnetic-based dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction method using the metal-organic framework HKUST-1 and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for determining polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters and fruit tea infusions.

    Rocío-Bautista, Priscilla; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Pasán, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Afonso, Ana M

    2016-03-04

    A hybrid material composed by the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been synthetized in a quite simple manner, characterized, and used in a magnetic-assisted dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (M-d-μSPE) method in combination with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and fluorescence detection (FD). The application was devoted to the determination of 8 heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different aqueous samples, specifically tap water, wastewaters, and fruit tea infusion samples. The overall M-d-μSPE-UHPLC-FD method was optimized and validated. The method is characterized by: its simplicity in both the preparation of the hybrid material (simple mixing) and the magnetic-assisted approach (∼10min extraction time), the use of low sorbent amounts (20mg of HKUST-1 and 5mg of Fe3O4 MNPs), and the low organic solvent consumption in the overall M-d-μSPE-UHPLC-FD method (1.5mL of acetonitrile in the M-d-μSPE method and 2.8mL of acetonitrile in the UHPLC-FD run). The resulting method has high sensitivity, with LODs down to 0.8ngL(-1); adequate intermediate precision, with relative standard deviation values (RSD) always lower than 6.3% (being the range 5.9-9.0% in tap water for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1), 6.1-14% in wastewaters for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1), and 7.2-17% in fruit tea infusion samples for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1)); and adequate relative recoveries, with average values of 82% in tap water, and 94% and 75% in wastewater and fruit tea infusion samples, respectively, if using the proper matrix-matched calibration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Canada's hydrocarbon processing evolution

    Wise, T.H.; Horton, R.

    2000-01-01

    The development of petroleum refining, petrochemicals and natural gas industries in Canada are discussed together with future issues and prospects. Figures give data on (a) refined products trade 1998; (b) refining capacity; (c) product demand 1980-1999; (d) refinery crude runs and capacity; (e) refining and marketing, historical returns 1993-1999; (f) processing power index for Canada and USA; (g) ethylene capacity; (eye) Montreal petrochemical capacities; (j) Sarnia petrochemical capacities in 2000; (k) Alberta petrochemicals capacities 2001; (l) ethylene net equivalent trade; (m) ethylene costs 1999 for W. Canada and other countries. It was concluded that the hydrocarbon processing business continues to expand in Canada and natural gas processing is likely to increase. Petrochemicals may expand in W. Canada, possibly using feed stock from the Far North. Offshore developments may stimulate new processing on the E. Coast

  5. Hydrogenating gaseous hydrocarbons

    Nicolardot, P L.F.

    1930-08-06

    Gaseous hydrocarbons obtained by the destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials are simultaneously desulfurized and hydrogenated by passing them at 350 to 500/sup 0/C, mixed with carbon monoxide and water vapor over lime mixed with metallic oxides present in sufficient amount to absorb the carbon dioxide as it is formed. Oxides of iron, copper, silver, cobalt, and metals of the rare earths may be used and are mixed with the lime to form a filling material of small pieces filling the reaction vessel which may have walls metallized with copper and zinc dust. The products are condensed and fixed with absorbents, e.g. oils, activated carbon, silica gels. The metallic masses may be regenerated by a hot air stream and by heating in inert gases.

  6. Treating hydrocarbon oils

    Scott, R; MacIvor, W

    1869-09-01

    The treatment of hydrocarbon oils, such as coal or shale oils, paraffin oils, and petroleum, either in the crude or more or less refined state has the object of reducing the specific gravity and otherwise improving the qualities of such oils. The oil to be treated is put into any ordinary still and distilled. The vapor escaping during the distillation is passed through one or more heating vessels or chambers and exposed to the heat necessary to produce the change. The heating vessels or chambers may be made of metal, clay, or any other material adapted to endure heat, and they may be made of any desired form, or they may be constituted of a coil of metal pipes or a series of tubes such as are used for heating air for blast furnaces.

  7. Fate and effects of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine coastal ecosystems

    Vanderhorst, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from field and laboratory studies on the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on marine organisms of Northwest Pacific coastal ecosystems. Chemical methods for the characterization of test solutions for specific hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, xylene, and heptodecane) were developed concurrently with population and community studies of the effects of short-term and chronic exposures. Results are reported from studies on algae (Ulva), clams (protothaca staminea), crustaceans (Anomyx and Neomysis) and burrowing worms

  8. A novel headspace solid-phase microextraction method using in situ derivatization and a diethoxydiphenylsilane fibre for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of urinary hydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Bianchi, F

    2009-07-24

    An innovative and simple headspace solid-phase microextraction method using a novel diethoxydiphenylsilane fibre based on in situ derivatization with acetic anhydride was optimized and validated for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of some monohydroxy metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, namely 1-hydroxynaphthalene, 2-hydroxynaphtalene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 2-hydroxyfluorene and 1-hydroxypyrene at trace levels in human urine. Enzymatic hydrolysis was applied before derivatization, whereas extraction conditions, i.e. the effects of time and temperature of extraction and salt addition were investigated by experimental design. Regression models and desirability functions were applied to find the experimental conditions providing the highest global extraction response. These conditions were found in correspondence of an extraction temperature of 90 degrees C, an extraction time of 90 min and 25% NaCl added to urine samples. The capabilities of the developed method were proved obtaining limit of quantitations in the 0.1-2 microg/l range, thus allowing the bio-monitoring of these compounds in human urine. A good precision was observed both in terms of intra-batch and inter-batch repeatability with RSD always lower than 14%. Recoveries ranging from 98(+/-3) to 121(+/-1)% and extraction yields higher than 72% were also obtained. Finally, the analysis of urine specimens of coke-oven workers revealed analytes' concentrations in the 2.2-164 microg/l range, proving the exposure to PAHs of the involved workers.

  9. Polycyclic hydrocarbons - occurrence and determination

    Drzewicz, P.

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a special group of atmospheric contaminants included in the persistent toxic substances (PTS) and also in the volatile organic compounds (VOC) groups. PAHs are present in the atmosphere and their origin can be due to anthropogenic activities. The main source of emission of PAH is the combustion of fossil fuels. Their specific characteristics, high volatility, mutagenic and carcinogenic power, easily transportable for long distances with the wind, make them important contaminants despite of the fact that they are present at very low concentrations. The report provides a review of main analytical methods applied in the determination of PAH in air. Special attention was devoted to heterocyclic PAH which contain one or more heteroatom (sulphur, oxygen, nitrogen) in the multiple-fused ring. The presence of heterocyclic PAH requires very complex, laborious and long lasting sample separation methods before analysis. In some cases, application of different temperature programs in gas chromatography allows to determine PAH and heterocyclic PAH in gaseous samples without sample pretreatment. Gas chromatography methods for the determination of PAH and heterocyclic PAH in the gas from combustion of light heating oil has been optimized. (author) [pl

  10. Petroleum Hydrocarbon Pollution in Soil and Surface Water by Public Oil Fields in Wonocolo Sub-district, Indonesia

    Gina Lova Sari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Public crude oil fields in Wonocolo sub-district were active from 1942 until now and have inadequately operated. The aims of this research were to measure the level of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH pollution and their distribution in soil and surface water at the Wonocolo public crude oil fields. Twelve composite soil samples were collected from uncontaminated and contaminated sites of old well (OW, transportation line (T, and refinery area (R at the depths of 0–30 cm, 30–60 cm, and 60–90 cm. The composite surface water sample was obtained from two points with different distances from the river side. TPH from soil and surface water samples were extracted using soxhlet and gravimetric method. Quantification of TPH was performed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR Spectrometer. From the results of this study, it was concluded that soils and surface water are contaminated by TPH of 119.80–107,190 µg/g and 211,025.73 µg/L, respectively. TPH is clearly located in the upper of 0–30 cm depth at OW, T, and R sites (52,328.14–107,189.63 µg/g. These concentrations exceeded the soil quality standard of TPH and classified as category A for human hazard risk. The findings from this study show that there are considerable health risks which are potentially poisonous to humans in the local area. We recommend that remediation could be conducted using biological methods to reduce TPH pollution level.

  11. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  12. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2018-04-17

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  13. Study of the processes of ion pairs formation by the method of ion-ion coincidence: I2 and chlorine-containing hydrocarbons

    Golovin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    A method of ion-ion coincidences was suggested to study the process of ion pairs formation during molecule photoionization. The principle of action of ion-ion coincidence method is based on recording of only the negative and positive ions that formed as a result of a molecule decomposition. The flowsheet of the facility of ion-ion coincidences was presented. The processes of ion pairs formation in iodine, chloroform, propyl-, n-propenyl-, tert.butyl- and benzyl-chlorides were studied. A simple model permitting to evaluate the dependence of quantum yield of ion pair formation on excitation energy was suggested

  14. Optimization of a hydrocarbon bioremediation system at laboratory scale; Optimizacion de un sistema de biorremediacion de hidrocarburos a escala de laboratorio

    Acuna, A. J.; Tonin, N. L.; Diaz, V.; Pucci, G. N.; Pucci, O. H. [Centro de Estudios e Investigacion en Microbiologia Aplicada (CEIMA), Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco (Argentina); ar, ntonin@unpata. edu.; com, victordj_2003@hotmail.; ar, granapu@unpata. edu.; ar, ceima@unpata. edu.

    2012-01-15

    The aim of this study was to optimize the parameters of moisture, temperature and ratio of nutrients to estimate the possibility of applying the technique of bioremediation in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. For this, an initial characterization of contaminated soil was made according to their physical and chemical characteristics and the number of heterotrophic and hydrocarbon degraders bacteria. Also the contaminant concentration by gravimetric method and by gas chromatography was studied. To optimize moisture and temperature, microcosms with moisture of 3%, 10%, 15% and 20% and temperatures of 5, 15, 28 and 37 degrees Celsius were used. The monitoring of the mineralization of hydrocarbons was performed by measuring the CO{sub 2} produced. To optimize the ratio of nutrients, different microcosms were designed and were monitored by oxygen consumption and by determination of hydrocarbons by gas chromatography. The C:N:P relationships studied were 100:20:2, 100:10:1, 100:5:0,5 and 100:1:0,1. The results indicate that the mineralization of hydrocarbons was optimal for moisture of 10% to 20% and temperatures of 25 degrees Celsius to 37 degrees Celsius with CO{sub 2} production values of 3000-4500 mg CO{sub 2} kg-1. The optimal C:N:P ratio was 100:1:0,1 in which the highest oxygen consumption was and the elimination of 83% of total hydrocarbons determined by gas chromatography with 78% and 89% of n-alkanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons elimination, respectively. [Spanish] El objeto de este trabajo fue optimizar los parametros de humedad, temperatura y relacion de nutrientes para estimar la posibilidad de aplicar la tecnica de biorremediacion en un suelo contaminado con hidrocarburos. Para esto se realizo una caracterizacion inicial del suelo contaminado en funcion de sus caracteristicas fisicas y quimicas, su cantidad de microorganismos heterotrofos y degradadores de hidrocarburos. Tambien se estudio la concentracion del contaminante por metodo gravimetrico y

  15. High Pressure Preignition Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Cernansky, N.P

    1998-01-01

    .... The research program entailed mechanistic studies examining the oxidation chemistry of single-component hydrocarbons and ignition studies examining the overall ignition of pure single component fuels and fuel blends...

  16. Accuracy of Several Wave Function and Density Functional Theory Methods for Description of Noncovalent Interaction of Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Dimers

    Granatier, Jaroslav; Pitoňák, M.; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2012), s. 2282-2292 ISSN 1549-9618 Grant - others:APVV(SK) APVV-0059-10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : intermolecular interaction energies * Plesset perturbation-theory * molecular-orbital methods * protein rubredoxin Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.389, year: 2012

  17. Analysis of monoterpene hydrocarbons in rural atmospheres

    Holdren, M.W.; Westberg, H.H.; Zimmerman, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis of monoterpenes from a rural forested site in the northwestern United States is described. Use of a glass capillary column provided excellent resolution of the hydrocarbons. Increased sensitivity and specificity of the mass spectrometer detector over the flame ionization detector were demonstrated for trace (parts per trillion) atmospheric hydrocarbons. As little as 10 ppt of compound was detectable in 100-cc air samples. Two analytical methods (cryogenic and solid adsorbent--Tenax-GC) were used in the collection of ambient air. Analytical results from the two techniques compared very well. Rural concentrations of the monoterpenes varied considerably depending upon location within the forest canopy. The concentration of individual species never exceeded 1 ppb of compound during a 10-month sampling period. The monoterpene total for all samples fell in the range of 0.5- to 16-ppb compound for C 10 terpene

  18. Desorption and bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    Gray, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted in which the extent and pattern of contaminant biodegradation during bioremediation of four industrially-contaminated soils were examined to determine which factors control the ultimate extent of biodegradation and which limit the success of biological treatment. It was noted that although bioremediation is inexpensive and has low environmental impact, it often fails to completely remove the hydrocarbons in soils because of the complex interactions between contaminants, the soil environment, and the active microorganisms. In this study, the competency of the microorganisms in the soil to degrade the contaminants was examined. The equilibrium partitioning of the contaminants between the soil and the aqueous phase was also examined along with the transport of contaminants out of soil particles. The role of diffusion of compounds in the soil and the importance of direct contact between microorganisms and the hydrocarbons was determined. Methods for selecting suitable sites for biological treatment were also described

  19. The role of mass spectrometry in hydrocarbon analysis

    Kerenyi, E.

    1980-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometry has an outstandin.o role in solving problems concerning the composition and structure of hydrocarbon mixtures and their derivatives, petroleum and petrochemical products. Its efficiency in hydrocarbon analysis has been increased not only by high resolving power and computerized spectrum processing but also by the metastable ion spectrum technique promoting structural examinations, by mild ionization facilitating composition analysis, and by selective ion-detecting technique. The author presents the advantages of the metastable ion spectra, the field ionization, field desorption and other mild ionization methods, and finally, those of fragmentation analysis in connection with the examination of hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives. Examples taken from the literature and from the research work carried out in the Institute are also given. (author)

  20. Design and realization of the high-precision weighing systems as the gravimetric references in PTB's national water flow standard

    Engel, Rainer; Beyer, Karlheinz; Baade, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    PTB's ‘Hydrodynamic Test Field’, which represents a high-accuracy water flow calibration facility, serves as the national primary standard for liquid flow measurands. As the core reference device of this flow facility, a gravimetric standard has been incorporated, which comprises three special-design weighing systems: 300 kg, 3 tons and 30 tons. These gravimetric references were realized as a combination of a strain-gauge-based and an electromagnetic-force-compensation load-cell-based balance, each. Special emphasis had to be placed upon the dynamics design of the whole weighing system, due to the high measurement resolution and the dynamic behavior of the weighing systems, which are dynamically affected by mechanical vibrations caused by environmental impacts, flow machinery operation, flow noise in the pipework and induced wave motions in the weigh tanks. Taking into account all the above boundary conditions, the design work for the gravimetric reference resulted in a concrete foundation ‘rock’ of some 300 tons that rests on a number of vibration isolators. In addition to these passively operating vibration isolators, the vibration damping effect is enhanced by applying an electronic level regulation device. (paper)

  1. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Segarra, José A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior.En este artículo se ha investigado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión en medios acuosos salinos de chapas soldadas de aleación AZ31 mediante técnicas gravimétricas y ensayo en cámara de niebla salina. Las muestras estudiadas han sido soldadas mediante soldadura TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas y con diferentes materiales de aporte. En el estudio se ha empleado microscopía óptica para analizar la microestructura. Los ensayos de gravimetría y los ensayos de niebla salina indican que el empleo de materiales de aporte más nobles para soldar las muestras evitando la disminución del contenido en aluminio en los cordones, no implica un mejor comportamiento frente a la corrosión.

  2. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L John

    2006-01-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters

  3. The Marine Magnetotelluric Method (MMT) applied of hydrocarbons exploration in Brazilian waters; Aplicacao do Metodo Magnetotelurico Marinho (MMT) na exploracao de hidrocarbonetos em aguas brasileiras

    Pinto, Vinicius R.; Flexor, Jean M.; La Terra, Emanuele F.; Fontes, Sergio L. [Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lugao, Patricia P. [Schlumberger, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Western-Geco

    2008-07-01

    Magnetotellurics (MT) is a natural-source, electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging structures below the earth's surface. It is used to map the subsurface Earth's resistivity by measuring the naturally occurring electric and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. These natural EM fields are generated in the Earth's atmosphere mainly by lightning strokes and by interactions between the solar wind and the ionosphere. Natural variations in the earth's magnetic field induce electric currents (or telluric currents) under the earth's surface. Concurrent measurements of orthogonal components of the electric and magnetic fields allow for the calculation of the impedance tensor, which is complex and frequency-dependent and from which it is possible to gain insight into the resistivity structure of the surrounding material. The marine magnetotelluric method (MMT) is the application of MT method to investigate the sea-floor resistivity's distribution. A MMT sounding with 96 stations was realized in the region of Santos Basin on a subsalt section to assist the interpretation of seismic data in order to estimate the depth of base of the salt (subsalt) since this imaging in general is problematic. The high contrast of the electrical resistivity between the salt and the surrounding sediments is an excellent objective and it constitutes a great opportunity to test the applicability of the MMT method in oil exploration studies. The geological interpretation of the seismic profile of the studied area shows the existence of several bodies of salt with depths of the base that could vary more from 7000 m to more than 9000 m. The top of the body of more important salt of the profile begins to the 3500 m and your base is not solved by the seismic sign that it reaches a maximum depth of 9000 m. The MMT data of the central profile were submitted an inversion procedure - 2D by using the non linear conjugate gradients that produces smooth models for

  4. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  5. Process for treating hydrocarbons, etc

    1933-09-15

    A process is described for treating simultaneously bituminous substances and hydrocarbon oils for the production of low-boiling hydrocarbons and volatilization of the bituminous substances, characterized by the fact that it consists of heating a current of charge constituted by a mixture of the bituminous substances and hydrocarbon oils, to a high temperature, passing the heated current into a zone of extended reaction where the vapors are separated from the liquid or solid residue to favor transformation of the liquid hydrocarbons and volatilization of the bituminous substances, owing to the utilization of a heating agent carried to a high temperature being brought in contact with the heated charge in order to communicate its heat to the charge, while this later presents itself as relatively fine pellet or in the condition of distinct particles, particularly separated from one another.

  6. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    Poppendieck, D.; Loehr, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  7. Application of magnetotelluric method to hydrocarbon exploration in the Yurihara oil and gas field, northeast Japan; Akitaken Yurihara gasu den ni okeru MT ho jikken chosa. 2

    Mitsuhata, Y [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Matsuo, K; Minegishi, M [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Experiment and investigation are conducted in the Yurihara District, Akita Prefecture, to verify that the magnetotelluric (MT) method can be effectively applied to oil and gas fields. In the Yurihara district there exist a number of pits dug for exploration or production, and records on seismic surveys conducted, and therefore the geological structure of this district can be explained fairly well. The oil and gas reservoirs belong in the Nishikurosawa stratum overlain by the Onagawa stratum and Funakawa stratum. The Nishikurosawa rocks, basaltic rocks for example, present a resistivity of approximately 5 ohm/m which is higher than that of the other two that is more or less 1 ohm/m. Under the circumstances, experiment and investigation are conducted so as to detect the Nishikurosawa basaltic rocks as a high-resistivity stratum located under low-resistivity strata by use of the MT method. As the result, a high-resistivity stratum corresponding to the Nishikurosawa basaltic stratum is detected under low-resistivity strata, and the three-dimensional structure of the basaltic stratum is disclosed. In this stratum, the resistivity value gradually increases from south toward north with occasional abrupt rises, and it is found that such abrupt rises result from oil and gas producing strata where exploitation is under way. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical processes involved, and the use of constructed treatment wetlands in the removal of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons from produced and/or processed water. Wastewaters from the oil industry contain aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and x...

  9. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  11. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  12. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the open-quotes Eleana Formationclose quotes are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock

  13. Hydrocarbons in sediments adjacent to a gas and condensate development and production platform in northwestern Australia

    Fischer, S.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    In northwestern Australia during the period of 1983 to 1991, 23 wells were drilled from a gas/condensate production platform to the producing formation approximately 3000 m below the sea bed. Low toxicity water-based drilling muds formulated with hydrogenated kerosenes were used, with the resultant formation cuttings being legally discharged into the ocean. To study the fate of hydrocarbons associated with the cuttings, sea-floor samples were collected along two perpendicular transects from the platform. The first extended 10 km in the prevailing direction of the current and the other to 1.2 km. Subsequently, samples have been collected from one of these sites on two occasions, first one year and secondly two years after the initial collection. Samples collected from directly under the platform cuttings chute contained the highest hydrocarbon concentrations, determined gravimetrically, of 75000 mg/kg, decreasing to approximately 40 mg/kg within 800 m in the direction of the prevailing current. Concentrations in the more remote samples were determined by GC and decreased gradually to be barely discernible above background at less than 0.01 mg/kg at 10 km from the platform. This suite of samples provided an excellent opportunity to study the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation as it occurs in the marine environment. Analysis by GC-FID, GC-MS and GC-FTIR revealed a number of features. For example, the extent of biodegradation and weathering with increasing distance from the platform, and the half life for biodegradation of total hydrocarbons appears to be approximately one year. The hydrocarbon components of the sediments are mainly from the drilling mud with minor contributions from the formation fluids

  14. BioTiger{sup TM} : a natural microbial product for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands

    Brigmon, R.L.; Berry, C.J.; Milliken, C.E.; Jones, W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation discussed the feasibility of using BioTiger{sup TM} technology to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery processes was initially developed and used by the United States Department of Energy for bioremediation of soils contaminated with oil, but it may also be used to optimize bitumen separation. BioTiger was described as being a unique microbial consortia that has resulted from nearly a decade of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from an old waste lagoon. The technology offers rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and produces new surfactants. It is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and has good activity at high temperatures at extreme pH levels. A flotation test protocol with oil sands from Fort McMurray, Alberta was used for the BioTiger evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/flotation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger showed a 50 per cent improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis. BioTiger is well suited for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands because it performs well at high temperatures. 8 figs.

  15. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  16. Catalytic pyrolysis of wheat bran for hydrocarbons production in the presence of zeolites and noble-metals by using TGA-FTIR method.

    Lazdovica, K; Liepina, L; Kampars, V

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of wheat bran with or without catalysts was investigated using TGA-FTIR method in order to determine the influence of zeolite and noble metal catalysts on the evolution profile and relative yield of the volatile compounds. The addition of all catalysts decreased the volatile matter of wheat bran from 76.3% to 75.9%, 73.9%, 73.5%, 69.7% and increased the solid residue from 18.0% to 18.4%, 20.4%, 20.8%, 24.6% under the catalyst of ZSM-5, 5% Pd/C, MCM-41, and 5% Pt/C. Noble-metal catalysts had higher activity for deoxygenation of compounds containing carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups than zeolites. Degradation of nitrogen containing compounds atom proceeded better in presence of zeolites. Noble-metal catalysts promoted formation of aromatics and changed the profiles of evolved compounds whereas zeolites advanced formation of aliphatics and olefins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  18. Enumeration of petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria

    Mukherjee, S.; Barot, M.; Levine, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    In-situ biological treatment is one among a number of emerging technologies that may be applied to the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. In 1985, a surface spill of 1,500 gallons of dielectric transformer oil at the Sandia National Laboratories (HERMES II facility) resulted in contamination of soil up to depths of 160 feet. The extent of contamination and site characteristics favored the application of in-situ bioremediation as a potential remedial technology. The purpose of this research was to enumerate indigenous microbial populations capable of degrading petroleum hydrocarbons. Microbial enumeration and characterization methods suitably adapted for hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria were used as an indicator of the presence of viable microbial consortia in excavated oil samples with hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. Microbial activity was quantified by direct and streak plating soil samples on silica gel media. Effects of toxicity and temperature were studied using batch cultures of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (selectively isolated in an enrichment medium), at temperatures of 20 and 35 C. It was concluded from this study that it is possible to isolate native microorganisms from contaminated soils from depths of 60 to 160 feet, and with oil concentration ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. About 62% of the microorganisms isolated form the contaminated soil were capable of using contaminant oil as a substrate for growth and metabolism under aerobic conditions. Growth rates were observed to be 50% higher for the highest contaminant concentration at 20 C. Resistance to toxicity to contaminant oil was also observed to be greater at 20 C than at 35 C

  19. Development of a solid-phase microextraction-based method for sampling of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in an urbanized coastal environment.

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tsukada, David; Diehl, Dario W

    2004-11-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been used as an in situ sampling technique for a wide range of volatile organic chemicals, but SPME field sampling of nonvolatile organic pollutants has not been reported. This paper describes the development of an SPME-based sampling method employing a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated (100-microm thickness) fiber as the sorbent phase. The laboratory-calibrated PDMS-coated fibers were used to construct SPME samplers, and field tests were conducted at three coastal locations off southern California to determine the equilibrium sampling time and compare the efficacy of the SPME samplers with that of an Infiltrex 100 water pumping system (Axys Environmental Systems Ltd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada). p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE were the components consistently detected in the SPME samples among 42 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and 17 chlorinated pesticidestargeted. SPME samplers deployed attwo locations with moderate and high levels of contamination for 18 and 30 d, respectively, attained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE. In addition, SPME samplers deployed for 23 and 43 d, respectively, at a location of low contamination also contained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE. These results indicate that equilibrium could be reached within 18 to 23 d. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDE, or p,p'-DDD obtained with the SPME samplers and the Infiltrex 100 system were virtually identical. In particular, two water column concentration profiles of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE acquired by the SPME samplers at a highly contaminated site on the Palos Verdes Shelf overlapped with the profiles obtained by the Infiltrex 100 system in 1997. The field tests not only reveal the advantages of the SPME samplers compared to the Infiltrex 100 system and other integrative passive devices but also indicate the need to improve the sensitivity of the SPME-based sampling technique.

  20. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  1. Use of derivatives to assess preservation of hydrocarbon deposits

    Koshkin, K. A.; Melkishev, O. A.

    2018-05-01

    The paper considers the calculation of derivatives along the surface of a modern and paleostructure map of a Tl2-b formation top used to forecast the preservation of oil and gas deposits in traps according to 3D seismic survey via statistical methods. It also suggests a method to evaluate morphological changes of the formation top by calculating the difference between derivatives. The proposed method allows analyzing structural changes of the formation top in time towards primary migration of hydrocarbons. The comprehensive use of calculated indicators allowed ranking the prepared structures in terms of preservation of hydrocarbon deposits.

  2. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Mortensen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    for biodegradation was highly variable, which from autoregressive state-space modeling was partly explained by changes in soil air-filled porosity and gravimetric water content. The results suggest considering biological heterogeneity when evaluating the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.......Quantifying the spatial variability of factors affecting natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone is important to (i) performing a reliable risk assessment and (ii) evaluating the possibility for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites. Most studies to date have focused...... on the shallow unsaturated zone. Based on a data set comprising analysis of about 100 soil samples taken in a 16-m-deep unsaturated zone polluted with volatile petroleum compounds, we statistically and geostatistically analyzed values of essential soil properties. The subsurface of the site was highly layered...

  3. Intercalibration of analytical methods on marine environmental samples. Results of MEDPOL-II exercise for the intercalibration of chlorinated hydrocarbon measurements on mussel homogenate (MA-M-2/OC)

    1986-10-01

    Mussels have been considered as good indicators of chlorinated hydrocarbon pollution of the marine environment and this led to the development of mussel watch programmes in many countries in the late seventies. These intercalibration exercises were arranged in order to increase the quality of analytical capabilities of environmental laboratories. The samples MA-M-2/0C of Mediterranean mussels with chlorinated hydrocarbon content were checked by 27 laboratories. It was judged highly suitable for these laboratories to have at their disposal a reference material made of mussel tissue with robust estimations of the true values with respect to several chlorinated hydrocarbons. Such a material would allow chemists to check the validity of new analytical procedures

  4. Syntrophic biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Gieg, Lisa M; Fowler, S Jane; Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic environments are crucial to global carbon cycling wherein the microbial metabolism of organic matter occurs under a variety of redox conditions. In many anaerobic ecosystems, syntrophy plays a key role wherein microbial species must cooperate, essentially as a single catalytic unit, to metabolize substrates in a mutually beneficial manner. Hydrocarbon-contaminated environments such as groundwater aquifers are typically anaerobic, and often methanogenic. Syntrophic processes are needed to biodegrade hydrocarbons to methane, and recent studies suggest that syntrophic hydrocarbon metabolism can also occur in the presence of electron acceptors. The elucidation of key features of syntrophic processes in defined co-cultures has benefited greatly from advances in 'omics' based tools. Such tools, along with approaches like stable isotope probing, are now being used to monitor carbon flow within an increasing number of hydrocarbon-degrading consortia to pinpoint the key microbial players involved in the degradative pathways. The metagenomic sequencing of hydrocarbon-utilizing consortia should help to further identify key syntrophic features and define microbial interactions in these complex communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of light hydrocarbons, etc. [from heavy hydrocarbons

    1937-10-07

    A process is given for the production of light hydrocarbons of the gasoline type and, if desired, of the middle-oil type, from liquid or fusible heavy or medium heavy hydrocarbon materials. The process comprises subjecting the said initial materials in the first stage to catalytic hydrofining, separating the lower boiling constituents and the hydrogenating gas from the resulting products and then subjecting the higher boiling constituents in a second stage to a splitting destructive hydrogenation and then recycling substantially the entire reaction mixture obtained in the second stage to the frst stage.

  6. Measurement error potential and control when quantifying volatile hydrocarbon concentrations in soils

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Due to their widespread use throughout commerce and industry, volatile hydrocarbons such as toluene, trichloroethene, and 1, 1,1-trichloroethane routinely appears as principal pollutants in contamination of soil system hydrocarbons is necessary to confirm the presence of contamination and its nature and extent; to assess site risks and the need for cleanup; to evaluate remedial technologies; and to verify the performance of a selected alternative. Decisions regarding these issues have far-reaching impacts and, ideally, should be based on accurate measurements of soil hydrocarbon concentrations. Unfortunately, quantification of volatile hydrocarbons in soils is extremely difficult and there is normally little understanding of the accuracy and precision of these measurements. Rather, the assumptions often implicitly made that the hydrocarbon data are sufficiently accurate for the intended purpose. This appear presents a discussion of measurement error potential when quantifying volatile hydrocarbons in soils, and outlines some methods for understanding the managing these errors

  7. Comparison of Respirable Mass Concentrations Measured by a Personal Dust Monitor and a Personal DataRAM to Gravimetric Measurements.

    Halterman, Andrew; Sousan, Sinan; Peters, Thomas M

    2017-12-15

    In 2016, the Mine Safety and Health Administration required the use of continuous monitors to measure respirable dust in mines and better protect miner health. The Personal Dust Monitor, PDM3700, has met stringent performance criteria for this purpose. In a laboratory study, respirable mass concentrations measured with the PDM3700 and a photometer (personal DataRam, pDR-1500) were compared to those measured gravimetrically for five aerosols of varying refractive index and density (diesel exhaust fume, welding fume, coal dust, Arizona road dust (ARD), and salt [NaCl] aerosol) at target concentrations of 0.38, 0.75, and 1.5 mg m-3. For all aerosols except coal dust, strong, near-one-to-one, linear relationships were observed between mass concentrations measured with the PDM3700 and gravimetrically (diesel fume, slope = 0.99, R2 = 0.99; ARD, slope = 0.98, R2 = 0.99; and NaCl, slope = 0.95, R2 = 0.99). The slope deviated substantially from unity for coal dust (slope = 0.55; R2 = 0.99). Linear relationships were also observed between mass concentrations measured with the pDR-1500 and gravimetrically, but one-to-one behavior was not exhibited (diesel fume, slope = 0.23, R2 = 0.76; coal dust, slope = 0.54, R2 = 0.99; ARD, slope = 0.61, R2 = 0.99; NaCl, slope = 1.14, R2 = 0.98). Unlike the pDR-1500, mass concentrations measured with the PDM3700 appear independent of refractive index and density, suggesting that it could have applications in a variety of occupational settings. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  8. Uncertainty Quantification and Global Sensitivity Analysis of Subsurface Flow Parameters to Gravimetric Variations During Pumping Tests in Unconfined Aquifers

    Maina, Fadji Zaouna; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    We study the contribution of typically uncertain subsurface flow parameters to gravity changes that can be recorded during pumping tests in unconfined aquifers. We do so in the framework of a Global Sensitivity Analysis and quantify the effects of uncertainty of such parameters on the first four statistical moments of the probability distribution of gravimetric variations induced by the operation of the well. System parameters are grouped into two main categories, respectively, governing groundwater flow in the unsaturated and saturated portions of the domain. We ground our work on the three-dimensional analytical model proposed by Mishra and Neuman (2011), which fully takes into account the richness of the physical process taking place across the unsaturated and saturated zones and storage effects in a finite radius pumping well. The relative influence of model parameter uncertainties on drawdown, moisture content, and gravity changes are quantified through (a) the Sobol' indices, derived from a classical decomposition of variance and (b) recently developed indices quantifying the relative contribution of each uncertain model parameter to the (ensemble) mean, skewness, and kurtosis of the model output. Our results document (i) the importance of the effects of the parameters governing the unsaturated flow dynamics on the mean and variance of local drawdown and gravity changes; (ii) the marked sensitivity (as expressed in terms of the statistical moments analyzed) of gravity changes to the employed water retention curve model parameter, specific yield, and storage, and (iii) the influential role of hydraulic conductivity of the unsaturated and saturated zones to the skewness and kurtosis of gravimetric variation distributions. The observed temporal dynamics of the strength of the relative contribution of system parameters to gravimetric variations suggest that gravity data have a clear potential to provide useful information for estimating the key hydraulic

  9. Prediction of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils and Sediments

    Cuypers, M.P.; Clemens, R.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, several laboratory methods have been developed for the prediction of contaminant bioavailability. So far, none of these methods has been extensively tested for petroleum hydrocarbons. In the present study we investigated solid-phase extraction and persulfate oxidation for the prediction of

  10. Production of hydrocarbons, especially ethylene

    1952-01-17

    The invention has for its object a process for the production of gaseous nonsaturated hydrocarbons, particularly ethylene and aromatic hydrocarbons, by starting with hydrocarbon oils entirely of paraffinic nature or their fractions, which consists in putting the separated products in contact with solid inert material especially with porous nonmetallic inert material or of heavy metals or their alloys, maybe in a finely divided state or in the form, of pieces or chips, at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C, or better between 600 and 700/sup 0/C at a velocity per hour of 0.6 to 3.0, and preferably 0.75 to 1.5 parts per volume of products per each part of space volume of catalyst.

  11. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Yang,; Dali, [Los Alamos, NM; Devlin, David [Santa Fe, NM; Barbero, Robert S [Santa Cruz, NM; Carrera, Martin E [Naperville, IL; Colling, Craig W [Warrenville, IL

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  12. Production of hydrocarbons of value

    1931-06-16

    A process is described for the production of hydrocarbons of great value by treating with heat and pressure carbonaceous materials such as coals, tars, mineral oils, and products of distillation and transformation of these materials, also for the refining with heat and pressure of mixed liquid hydrocarbons by means of hydrogen gas, preferably in the presence of catalysts, consisting in using as the hydrogenating gas that obtained by gasification of combustible solids after partial or complete cleaning at atmospheric or elevated pressures, by means of solid adsorbents, chemical agents or catalysts, or mixtures of these agents, the hydrocarbons being characterized by strong unsaturation, and the presence of oxygen, sulfur compounds, and oxides of nitrogen.

  13. Process of distilling heavy hydrocarbons

    1929-12-03

    This invention has for its object the distillation of heavy liquid hydrocarbons for the purpose of obtaining lighter hydrocarbons stable and immediately salable for fuels in combustion motors. The process is distinguished by the fact that the heavy hydrocarbon is distilled by means of heating to a temperature in keeping with the nature of the material to be treated up to 350/sup 0/C under pressure or without pressure the distillation being carried out on catalysts containing successively nickel, copper, and iron (3 parts of nickel, 1 part of copper, and 1 part of iron), the vapors produced by this distillation being exposed in turn to the action of catalysts of the same nature and in the same proportion.

  14. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  15. Estimating fair-market value for hydrocarbon producing properties

    Garb, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The generally accepted appraisal methods used to evaluate hydrocarbon properties and prospects were described. Fair-market-value (FMV) estimates have been used in the petroleum industry in attempts to protect a purchaser against an unwise acquisition, or conversely, to establish a just price to compensate a seller. Four methods were identified for determining FMV for hydrocarbon producing properties. They are: (1) comparative sales, (2) rule of thumb, (3) income forecast, and (4) replacement cost. The differences between oil and gas FMV and real estate FMV were explained

  16. Quantification of petroleum-type hydrocarbons in avian tissue

    Gay, M.L.; Belisle, A.A.; Patton, J.F.

    1980-01-04

    Methods were developed for the analysis of 16 hydrocarbons in avian tissue. Mechanical extraction with pentane was followed by clean-up on Florisil and Silicar. Residues were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and gas-liquid, chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was applied to the analysis of liver, kidney, fat, and brain tissue of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed a mixture of hydrocarbons. Measurable concentrations of all compounds analyzed were present in all tissues except brain. Highest concentrations were in fat.

  17. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  18. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Volkering, F.; Breure, A.M.; Andel, J.G. van

    1992-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are hazardous compounds originating from oil, tar, creosote, or from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Application of biotechnological techniques for remediation of polluted soils from PAH demonstrated that the high molecular compounds are degraded very slowly, and that the residual concentration of PAH often is too high to permit application of the treated soil. Investigations were started to establish process parameters for optimal biodegradation of PAH. The aim is to achieve a relation between the physical properties of PAH and the biodegradation kinetics in different matrices, in order to identify applicability of biotechnological cleanup methods for waste streams and polluted soil. (orig.) [de

  19. Preparing valuable hydrocarbons by hydrogenation

    Pier, M

    1930-08-22

    A process is described for the preparation of valuable hydrocarbons by treatment of carbonaceous materials, like coal, tars, minerals oils, and their distillation and conversion products, and for refining of liquid hydrocarbon mixture obtained at raised temperature and under pressure, preferably in the presence of catalysts, by the use of hydrogen-containing gases, purified and obtained by distilling solid combustibles, characterized by the purification of the hydrogen-containing gases being accomplished for the purpose of practically complete removal of the oxygen by heating at ordinary or higher pressure in the presence of a catalyst containing silver and oxides of metals of group VI of the periodic system.

  20. Purifying and regenerating hydrocarbon oils

    1931-11-19

    Hydrocarbons are freed from sulfur-containing compounds, colloidal asphaltic bodies and unstable unsaturated substances by treatment with a small amount of dilute sulfuric acid and a salt of a trivalent cation, such as ferric chloride or sulfate. Hydrocarbons specified are petroleum, crude benzol, low temperature tars, shale oil or vapor-phase cracked spirit. Motor spirit or lubricating oil distillates are refined and finally distilled. The acid reagent may be regenerated by filtering through sand or asbestos. Used lubricating oils may be treated similarly and after removal of refining agent, the oil is heated with an adsorbent and decolorizing material and then filtered.

  1. Hydrocarbons cocktails of the future

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This publication of the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, provides information on the energy in many domains. This issue deals with the CO 2 pollution exchange, the carbon sinks to compensate the CO 2 , the green coal as an innovative solution, an outsize dam in China, the solar energy progresses in France and the french medicine academy in favor of Nuclear. A special chapter is devoted to the hydrocarbons of the future, artificial chemical combination created from constituents of hydrocarbons and derived from various sources. (A.L.B.)

  2. Hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes: methods and results

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Tessier, A.; Cossement, D.; Lafi, L.; Bose, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    We present high sensitivity gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen sorption measurement systems adapted for in situ conditioning under high temperature and high vacuum. These systems, which allow for precise measurements on small samples and thorough degassing, are used for sorption measurements on carbon nanostructures. We developed one volumetric system for the pressure range 0-1 bar, and two gravimetric systems for 0-1 bar and 0-100 bars. The use of both gravimetric and volumetric methods allows for the cross-checking of the results. The accuracy of the systems has been determined from hydrogen absorption measurements on palladium. The accuracies of the 0-1 bar volumetric and gravimetric systems are about 10 μg and 20 μg respectively. The accuracy of the 0-100 bars gravimetric system is about 20 μg. Hydrogen sorption measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal-incorporated- SWNTs are presented. (author)

  3. BIOREMEDIATION OF A PETROLEUM-HYDROCARBON

    ES OBE

    under field conditions in the bioremediation of a petroleum- hydrocarbon polluted ... an accelerated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a polluted agricultural soil ..... 12) Jackson, M.L. Soil chemical analysis. ... biological assay. 3 rd.

  4. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  5. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    2016-07-31

    distribution unlimited Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis Matthew...vital importance for hydrocarbon -fueled propulsion systems: fuel thermal performance as indicated by physical and chemical effects of cooling passage... analysis . The selection and acquisition of a set of chemically diverse fuels is pivotal for a successful outcome since test method validation and

  6. Hydrologically induced orientation variations of a tri-axial Earth's principal axes based on satellite-gravimetric and hydrological models

    Shen Wenbin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Earth is a tri-axial body, with unequal principal inertia moments, A, B and C. The corresponding principal axes a, b and c are determined by the mass distribution of the Earth, and their orientations vary with the mass redistribution. In this study, the hydrologically induced variations are estimated on the basis of satellite gravimetric data, including those from satellite laser ranging (SLR and gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE, and hydrological models from global land data assimilation system (GLDAS. The longitude variations of a and b are mainly related to the variations of the spherical harmonic coefficients C¯22 and S¯22, which have been estimated to be consisting annual variations of about 1. 6 arc seconds and 1. 8 arc seconds, respectively, from gravity data. This result is confirmed by land surface water storage provided by the GLDAS model. If the atmospheric and oceanic signals are removed from the spherical harmonic coefficients C¯21 and S¯21, the agreement of the orientation series for c becomes poor, possibly due to the inaccurate background models used in pre-processing of the satellite gravimetric data. Determination of the orientation variations may provide a better understanding of various phenomena in the study of the rotation of a tri-axial Earth.

  7. Characterization and Gravimetric Analysis of the Dissolved Quartz in the Conversion of Coal Fly Ash to Sodalite

    Mohd Hilmi Mohamed; Zainab Ramli

    2012-01-01

    Coal fly ash (CFA) is a waste product produced from the electrical power plant and hazardous towards the environment. However, the high composition of silica and alumina in the CFA makes it useful as raw materials in the zeolite synthesis. However, the presence of silica in the form of quartz in the CFA does not facilitate the transformation of CFA to zeolite at 100 degree Celsius and autogeneous pressure. In this study, CFA was converted to zeolites in various NaOH concentrations by microwave heating at various heating time. All synthesized product were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and gravimetric analysis. XRD has shown that quite pure sodalite in nano size has been formed as early as 15 minutes and increase with time. Prolong heating up to 45 minutes has reduced the content of quartz to ca 20 %. Gravimetric analysis performed on the liquor of the reaction showed that the dissolved silica decrease with increase of heating time indicating that most of the dissolved quartz is used up to form sodalite framework. Hence, quartz of CFA did help in enhancing the crystallinity of the formed sodalite after prolong heating. (author)

  8. Structural features of the southern Tulum Fault System, western central Argentina, through gravimetric data and geomorphologic analyses

    Rodríguez, Aixa I.; Christiansen, Rodolfo O.; Suvires, Graciela M.; Lince Klinger, Federico; Martinez, M. Patricia

    2016-12-01

    A gravimetric analysis over the Tulum Valley was made. This data was used to reveal the structural setting of the Tulum Fault System situated in the southeastern part of San Juan province in the arid western part of Argentina. This system is the boundary between two geological provinces, the eastern Precordillera Oriental and the Sierras Pampeanas Occidentales. Gravity data was processed using upward continuation and vertical derivative filters and all the results were compared with the geomorphological and the drainage systems maps of the area. Our assessment confirms the presence of two structures in the Pampeano basement with positive anomalies similar to those found in Valdivia and Barboza hills, two important depocenters with low gravimetric gradients separated by a zone with higher gravity anomalies than the depocenters to the east and west. In view of this, a structural map is proposed for the area. This system is important not only because it is the boundary between two geological provinces and has significance regarding regional tectonic issues but also because it controls the surface drainage, soils distribution and groundwater flow of the Tulum basin conditioning the land use distribution.

  9. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  10. Determination of the parameters of binding between lipopolysaccharide and chitosan and its N-acetylated derivative using a gravimetric piezoquartz biosensor.

    Naberezhnykh, G A; Gorbach, V I; Kalmykova, E N; Solov'eva, T F

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide - LPS) with low molecular weight chitosan (5.5 kDa), its N-acylated derivative and chitoliposomes was studied using a gravimetric piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance biosensor. The optimal conditions for the formation of a biolayer based on immobilized LPS on the resonator surface and its regeneration were elaborated. The association and dissociation rate constants for LPS binding to chitosans were determined and the affinity constants (Kaf) were calculated based on the data on changes in the oscillation frequency of the quartz crystal resonator. The Kaf values correlated with the ones obtained using other methods. The affinity of N-acylated chitosan binding to LPS was higher than that of the parent chitosan binding to LPS. Based on the results obtained, we suggest that water-soluble N-acylated derivatives of chitosan with low degree of substitution of amino groups could be useful compounds for endotoxin binding and neutralization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments of Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    Kiceniuk, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the potential for contamination of recent sediments with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons due to tanker and refinery activity in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland, an area without large local anthropogenic sources of aromatics. Sediment samples were taken from the vicinity of the Come By Chance refinery, Woody Island, Wild Cove, and Port Royal Arm, all in the north end of the bay. The samples were extracted by two methods, dichloromethane extraction of dried sediment for determination of total aromatic hydrocarbon content and hexane extraction of wet sediment for estimation of the bioavailability of hydrocarbons and determination of more volatile compounds. Class analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons was conducted on a NH 2 column with detection at 255 nm. Total concentrations of di-tricyclic aromatics were highest at the Woody Island site (0.6 μg/g). The sediments from the Come By Chance site, Wild Cove, and Port Royal Arm sediments contained 0.3, 0.1, and 0.2 μg/g respectively. The hexane extracts from Come By Chance were lowest in di-tricyclic aromatics (0.007 μg/g), with the other sites being equal in concentration (0.01 μg/g). It is evident from the study that aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in Placentia Bay are elevated in some parts of the bay in the absence of local combustion sources, and that the most likely source is petroleum. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Sand amendment enhances bioelectrochemical remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Zhang, Yueyong; Li, Nan; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical system is an emerging technology for the remediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, performance of such systems can be limited by the inefficient mass transport in soil. Here we report a new method of sand amendment, which significantly increases both oxygen and proton transports, resulting to increased soil porosity (from 44.5% to 51.3%), decreased Ohmic resistance (by 46%), and increased charge output (from 2.5 to 3.5Cg(-1)soil). The degradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons increased by up to 268% in 135d. The degradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight was accelerated, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that the microbial community close to the air-cathode was substantially stimulated by the induced current, especially the hydrocarbon degrading bacteria Alcanivorax. The bioelectrochemical stimulation imposed a selective pressure on the microbial community of anodes, including that far from the cathode. These results suggested that sand amendment can be an effective approach for soil conditioning that will enhances the bioelectrochemical removal of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Soil bioremediation approaches for petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments

    Eman Koshlaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialisation, continued population growth and heavy demand and reliance on petrochemical products have led to unprecedented economic growth and development. However, inevitably this dependence on fossil fuels has resulted in serious environmental issues over recent decades. The eco-toxicity and the potential health implications that petroleum hydrocarbons pose for both environmental and human health have led to increased interest in developing environmental biotechnology-based methodologies to detoxify environments impacted by petrogenic compounds. Different approaches have been applied for remediating polluted sites with petroleum derivatives. Bioremediation represents an environmentally sustainable and economical emerging technology for maximizing the metabolism of organic pollutants and minimizing the ecological effects of oil spills. Bioremediation relies on microbial metabolic activities in the presence of optimal ecological factors and necessary nutrients to transform organic pollutants such as petrogenic hydrocarbons. Although, biodegradation often takes longer than traditional remediation methods, the complete degradation of the contaminant is often accomplished. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in soil is determined by a number of environmental and biological factors varying from site to site such as the pH of the soil, temperature, oxygen availability and nutrient content, the growth and survival of hydrocarbon-degrading microbes and bioavailability of pollutants to microbial attack. In this review we have attempted to broaden the perspectives of scientists working in bioremediation. We focus on the most common bioremediation technologies currently used for soil remediation and the mechanisms underlying the degradation of petrogenic hydrocarbons by microorganisms.

  14. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  15. Process for separating liquid hydrocarbons from waxes

    Sowa, F J

    1948-03-08

    A process is described for the separation of liquid hydrocarbons from waxes comprising adding to a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons and waxes a sufficient quantity of an organo-silicon compound to cause the separation of the hydrocarbon and wax. The organo-silicon compounds are selected from the class of organic silicanes and their hydrolysis products and polymers. The silicanes have the formula R/sub y/SiX/sub z/, in which R is a saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon radical, X is a halogen or another hydrocarbon radical or an -OR group, y has a value 1, 2, or 3 and z has a value 1, 2, or 3.

  16. AGRONOMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    Phytoremediation is a low-cost method of using plants to degrade, volatilize or sequester organic and metal pollutants that has been used in efforts to remediate sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) refinery wastes. Non-native plant species aggressivel...

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in Danish barbecued meat

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Aaslyng, Margit Dall; Meinert, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Barbecuing is known to result in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A validated method that employed pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) on Silica and analytical determination by GC-MS was applied...

  18. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) levels from two industrial zones ...

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) levels from two industrial zones (Sihwa and Banwal) located in An-san city ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... method (HVAS-Sibata) was employed to collect airborne PAHs in both the particulate and gas phases. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in occupational vs. urban environmental air

    Branisteanu, R.; Aiking, H.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the balance between occupational and environmental exposure to suspended particulate matter (SPM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), comparison measurements were performed in a coal-fired power plant and the urban atmosphere from the town nearby. Methods: The

  20. Tolerance of Antarctic soil fungi to hydrocarbons

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Bridge, Paul; Clark, Melody S. [British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of hydrocarbons and fuel oil on Antarctic filamentous fungi in the terrestrial Antarctic environment. Growth of fungi and bacteria from soils around Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula) was assessed in the presence of ten separate aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons [marine gas oil (MGO), dodecane, hexadecane, benzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, toluene, phenol, biphenyl, naphthalene and m- and p-xylenes with ethylbenzene]. Aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited soil microbial growth more than aliphatic hydrocarbons. Soil microorganisms from a moss patch, where little previous impact or hydrocarbon contamination had occurred, were less tolerant of hydrocarbons than those from high impact sites. Fungal growth rates of Mollisia sp., Penicillium commune, Mortierella sp., Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma sp. and Phoma herbarum were assessed in the presence of hydrocarbons. Generally, aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited or stopped hyphal extension, though growth rates increased with some aliphatic hydrocarbons. Hyphal dry weight measurements suggested that Mortierella sp. may be able to use dodecane as sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading Antarctic fungi may have use in future hydrocarbon spill bioremediation. (author)