WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrocarbon conversion reactions

  1. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Cold Plasma Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons via cold plasma reaction with catalysts has been studied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Methane can be converted into C2 hydrocarbons in different selectivity depending on the form of the reactor, power of plasma, flow rate of methane, ratio of N2/CH4 and nature of the catalysts. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can reach as high as 98.64%, and the conversion of methane as high as 60% and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons as high as 50% are obtained. Coking can be minimized under the conditions of: proper selection of the catalysts,appropriate high flow rate of inlet methane and suitable ratio of N2 to CH4. The catalyst surface provides active sites for radical recombination.

  2. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  3. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons Using Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong

    2007-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H', CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The process of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was investigated. The experiment showed that the time and conditions of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation were different. Methane conversion rate increased with the increase in the current and decrease in the amount of methane. Furthermore, an examination of the reaction mechanisms revealed that free radicals played an important role in the chain reaction.

  4. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  5. Towards Carbon-Neutral CO2 Conversion to Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Jones, Matthew D; O'Byrne, Justin P; Griffiths, Owen G; Owen, Rhodri E; Sackville, Emma; McManus, Marcelle; Plucinski, Pawel

    2015-12-07

    With fossil fuels still predicted to contribute close to 80 % of the primary energy consumption by 2040, methods to limit further CO2 emissions in the atmosphere are urgently needed to avoid the catastrophic scenarios associated with global warming. In parallel with improvements in energy efficiency and CO2 storage, the conversion of CO2 has emerged as a complementary route with significant potential. In this work we present the direct thermo-catalytic conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons using a novel iron nanoparticle-carbon nanotube (Fe@CNT) catalyst. We adopted a holistic and systematic approach to CO2 conversion by integrating process optimization-identifying reaction conditions to maximize conversion and selectivity towards long chain hydrocarbons and/or short olefins-with catalyst optimization through the addition of promoters. The result is the production of valuable hydrocarbons in a manner that can approach carbon neutrality under realistic industrial process conditions.

  6. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  7. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ghorbanzadeh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  8. An apparatus for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-03-23

    The installation for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv) with the formation of a mixture of H2 and C02 is a catalyst chamber (KK) filled with longitudinally disposed thin pipes (with thin walls) or with pipe units made of dolomite, MgO or potassium aluminate. These pipes have a multilayered coating (Pk) on their internal and external surfaces (Pv), which contain catalytically active components. Such pipes or pipe units form a honeycombed structure with through longitudinal channels. The catalyst chamber itself is made of a ceramic material and has a heating winding outside for heating the catalyst. To save fuel and to increase the efficiency (KPD) of the heating device, the catalyst chamber is in turn enclosed by two additional shells filled with heat conducting packings which are easily penetrated by the gases being processed. The hydrocarbon vapors or gaseous fuel from the natural gas or methane and the steam are fed through the above cited heat exchange layers with packings into the facial part of the catalytic chamber, in which the conversion of the hydrocarbons occurs with the production of H2 and C02. From the catalyzer layer the mixture of gases and steam goes through a refrigerator into a trap for the steam excess and when it is necessary, into a C02 absorber and then, pure H2 is discharged from the latter. Such a catalytic installation is convenient to use for producing pure H2 from natural gas, methane, propane or kerosene.

  9. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  10. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silks, Louis A.; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2016-10-18

    The present invention is directed to the one step selective conversion of starch, cellulose, or glucose to molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. The invention is also directed to the conversion of those intermediates to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  11. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, hydrolysates or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silks, Louis A; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2017-09-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to the conversion of a source material (e.g., a depolymerized oligosaccharide mixture, a monomeric sugar, a hydrolysate, or a mixture of monomeric sugars) to intermediate molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. These intermediates may also be converted to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  12. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  13. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  14. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 mL@min?1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is 76%, and the total selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons and C3 hydrocarbons is nearly 100%. The conversion of methane increases with the increase of voltage and decreases with the flow of methane increase; the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons decreases with the increase of voltage and increases with the flow of methane increase. The selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is improved with catalyst for conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons in plasma field. Methane molecule collision with radicals is mainly responsible for product formation.

  15. Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yongchun; Periana, Roy; Chen, Weiqun; van Duin, Adri; Nielsen, Robert; Shuler, Patrick; Ma, Qisheng; Blanco, Mario; Li, Zaiwei; Oxgaard, Jonas; Cheng, Jihong; Cheung, Sam; Pudar, Sanja

    2009-09-28

    This is the Final Report of the five-year project Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes (DE-FC36-04GO14276, July 1, 2004- June 30, 2009), in which we present our major accomplishments with detailed descriptions of our experimental and theoretical efforts. Upon the successful conduction of this project, we have followed our proposed breakdown work structure completing most of the technical tasks. Finally, we have developed and demonstrated several optimized homogenously catalytic methane conversion systems involving applications of novel ionic liquids, which present much more superior performance than the Catalytica system (the best-to-date system) in terms of three times higher reaction rates and longer catalysts lifetime and much stronger resistance to water deactivation. We have developed in-depth mechanistic understandings on the complicated chemistry involved in homogenously catalytic methane oxidation as well as developed the unique yet effective experimental protocols (reactors, analytical tools and screening methodologies) for achieving a highly efficient yet economically feasible and environmentally friendly catalytic methane conversion system. The most important findings have been published, patented as well as reported to DOE in this Final Report and our 20 Quarterly Reports.

  16. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  17. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  18. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  19. Density functional calculations on hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Selmi, Massimo

    1994-06-01

    Hartree—Fock, Hartree—Fock-plus-correlation and self-consistent Kohn—Sham calculations are performed on a set of hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions, i.e. reactions among hydrocarbons in which the number and type of carbon—carbon and carbon—hydrogen bonds is conserved. It is found that neither Hartree—Fock nor Kohn—Sham methods correctly predict standard enthalpies, Δ Hr(298 K), of these reactions, even though — for reactions involving molecules containing strained double bonds — the agreement between the theoretical estimates and the experimental values of Δ Hr seems to be improved by the self-consistent solution of the Kohn—Sham equations. The remaining discrepancies are attributed to intramolecular dispersion effects, that are not described by ordinary exchange—correlation functionals, and are eliminated by introducing corrections based on a simple semi-empirical model.

  20. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  1. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  2. 甲烷等离子体转化合成碳二烃反应过程和过渡态理论%Theoretical Study of Reaction Paths and Transition States on Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 杨恩翠; 许根慧; 郝金库

    2007-01-01

    The direct synthesis of C2 hydrocarbons (ethylene, acetylene and ethane) from methane is one of the most important task in C1 chemistry. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can be realized through plasma reaction. In order to explore the reaction process and mechanism, the possible reaction paths (1)-(4) were proposed on coupling reaction of methane through plasma and studied theoretically using semi-PM3 method [PM3 is parametcrization method of modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO)] including determining the transition state, calculating the activation energy and thermodynamic state functions and analyzing the bond order and intrinsic reaction coordinate. The reaction heat results indicate that the reactions (2) and (4) are exothermic,while reactions of (1) and (3) are endothermic. The activation energy results show that activation energy for reactions (1) and (2) was much lower than that of reaction paths (3) and (4). Therefore, paths (1) and (2) is the favorable reaction path energetically. More interestingly by comparing the intrinsic reaction coordinated (IRC) of the reaction paths (1) and (2), it is found that the variations of bond lengths in reaction path (1) has a crucial effect on the potential energy, while in reaction path (2), the adjustment of the system geometry also contributes to the whole potential energy of the system.

  3. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  4. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  5. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  6. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 ml · min-1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons i

  7. Catalysis Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons via Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Wei WANG; Gen Hui XU

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effect of catalyst and carrier in electric field enhanced plasma on methane conversion into C2 hydrocarbons was investigated. Methane coupling reaction was studied in the system of continuous flow reactor on Ni, MoO3, MnO2 catalysts and different ZSM-5 carriers. The per pass conversion of methane can be as high as 22%, the selectivity of ethylene can be as high as 23.8%, of acetylene 60.8%, of ethane 5.4% and of total C2 hydrocarbons was more than 90%. ZSM-5-25 was the better carrier and MnO2 was the better active component. The efficiency of energy was as high as 7.81%.

  8. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  9. Direct Conversion of Syngas-to-Hydrocarbons over Higher Alcohols Synthesis Catalysts Mixed with HZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.; Li, Jinjing; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-10

    The synthesis of hydrocarbon fuels directly from synthesis gas (i.e. one step process) was investigated with a catalytic system comprised of HZSM-5 physically mixed with either a methanol synthesis catalyst or a higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) catalyst. The metal sites of the methanol or HAS synthesis catalyst enable the conversion of syngas to alcohols, whereas HZSM-5 provides acid sites required for methanol dehydration, and dimethyl ether-to-hydrocarbons reactions. Catalytic performance for HZSM-5 when mixed with either a 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst or a HAS catalyst was evaluated at 300°C, 70 bars, GHSV=700 h-1 and H2/CO=1 using a HZSM-5: alcohols synthesis catalyst weight ratio of 3:1. The major difference observed between the methanol synthesis and HAS catalyst mixtures was found in the production of durene which is an undesirable byproduct. While durene formation is negligible with any of the HAS catalysts mixed with the HZSM-5 evaluated in this study, it represents almost 50% of the C5+ fraction for the methanol synthesis catalyst (5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 ) mixed with HZSM-5. This presents an advantage for using HAS catalysts over the methanol synthesis catalyst to minimize the durene by-product. The yield toward the desired C5+ hydrocarbons is thus twice higher with selected HAS catalysts as compared to when HZSM-5 is mixed with 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3. Among all the HAS catalysts evaluated in this study, a catalyst with 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst was found the most promising due to higher production of C5+ hydrocarbons and low durene formation. The efficiency of the one-step process was thus further evaluated using the HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst mixture under a number of process conditions to maximize liquid hydrocarbons product yield. At 300oC, 70 bars, GHSV = 700 h-1 and HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu = 3:1 (wt.), the C5+ fraction represents 48.5% of the hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to achieve higher selectivity

  10. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Wesley D. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry; Schaefer, III, Henry F. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry

    2015-11-14

    This is the final report of the theoretical studies of elementary hydrocarbon species and their reactions. Part A has a bibliography of publications supported by DOE from 2010 to 2016 and Part B goes into recent research highlights.

  11. Plasma conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas is widely abundant, is easily withdrawn from reservoirs, is commonly produced as an associated gas along with crude oil production, and is found in many geologic settings as a resource separate from oil. A much larger fraction of the natural gas may be produced from a gas reservoir, as compared with a crude oil reservoir. However, natural gas is normally transported by pipeline, and the energy throughput of such a pipeline is perhaps only 20% to 30% of the throughput of an oil pipeline of the same size and cost. Gas is difficult to transport in moderate quantities at low cost, as it must either have a special pipeline or must be liquified into LNG, shipped in cryogenic LNG tankers, and regasified chemical stability of methane has made it difficult to convert it directly into conventional hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, and has also impeded its use as a feedstock for petrochemical production. Experiments are described in which a methane plasma is created, and the resulting methyl and hydrogen ions have been accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 15 ev to greater than 100 ev, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces has caused the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 8} molecules. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The costs of production of the plasma conversion devices are projected to be quite low, and the technology appears to be commercially and economically feasible.

  12. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over ZSM-5 zeolite: an examination of the role of aromatic hydrocarbons using /sup 13/carbon and deuterium-labeled feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, T.; Bett, G.; Seddon, D.

    1983-12-01

    A mechanism is suggested for the acceleration by aromatic hydrocarbons of zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion. According to this mechanism, the aromatic hydrocarbon undergoes successive ring methylation, prototropic conversion to an exo-methylene-cyclohexadiene, side-chain methylation, and ring de-ethylation. The overall result is that two methanol molecules give an ethylene molecule. The mechanism is supported by various reactions observed over ZSM-5 catalyst at methanol conversion temperatures: (I) deuteration of p-xylene by D/sub 2/O in the ring and methyl positions; (II) de-alkylation of p-ethyltoluene and n-propylbenzene; and (III) incorporation of the aromatic carbon of benzenes and alkylbenzenes into ethylene product, as revealed by /sup 13/C-labeling studies. 3 tables.

  13. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  14. Two-step thermal conversion of oleaginous microalgae into renewable hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Asomaning, Justice; Mussone, Paolo; Bressler, David C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the conversion of microalgal biomass to renewable chemicals and fuels through a two-step reaction and separation process. High density Chlorella protothecoides culture with 40% lipid accumulation (dwb) was produced in 10 L bioreactors and hydrolyzed in batch stainless steel reactors under subcritical conditions. After hydrolysis, fatty acids free of sulfur and low in nitrogen and salts, were recovered by hexane extraction. The fatty acids were pyrolyzed at 410°C for 2h under N2 yielding n-alkanes, α-olefins and internal olefins and low molecular weight fatty acids. This study demonstrated the direct conversion of microalgal biomass into valuable platform chemicals and fuels compatible with the existing industrial hydrocarbon infrastructure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxygen-containing coke species in zeolite-catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-06

    Zeolites are the most commonly used catalysts for methanol-to-hydrocarbon (MTH) conversion. Here, we identified two oxygen-containing compounds as coke species in zeolite catalysts after MTH reactions. We investigated the possible influences of the oxygen-containing compounds on coke formation, catalyst deactivation, product selectivity, and the induction period of the MTH reaction through a series of controlled experiments in which one of the identified compounds (2,3-dimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) was co-fed with methanol over a zeolite H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Our results allow us to infer that once produced, the oxygen-containing compounds block the Brønsted acid sites by strong chemisorption and their rapid conversion to aromatics expedites the formation of coke and thus the deactivation of the catalyst. A minor effect of the production of such compounds during the MTH reaction is that the aromatic-based catalytic cycle can be slightly promoted to give higher selectivity to ethylene.

  16. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons using modified clinoptilolite catalysts. Investigation of catalyst lifetime and reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, G.J.; Themistocleous, T.; Copperthwaite, R.G.

    1988-10-17

    A study of the deactivation and reactivation of modified clinoptilolite catalysts for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is reported. Clinoptilolite catalysts, modified by either ammonium ion exchange or hydrochloric acid treatment, exhibit a short useful catalyst lifetime for this reaction (ca. 2-3 h) due to a high rate of coke deposition (3-5.10/sup -3/ g carbon/g catalyst/h). A comparative study of reactivation using oxygen, nitrous oxide and ozone/oxygen as oxidants indicated that nitrous oxide reactivation gives improved catalytic performance when compared to the activity and lifetime of the fresh catalyst. Both oxygen and ozone/oxygen were found to be ineffective for the reactivation of clinoptilolite. Initial studies of in situ on-line reactivation are also described. 3 figs., 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in thermal protection reactors of hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Mikhaylov, A. M.; Korabelnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal protection of heat-stressed surfaces of a high-speed vehicle flying in dense layers of atmosphere is one of the topical issues. Not of a less importance is also the problem of hydrocarbon fuel combustion in a supersonic air flow. In the concept under development, it is supposed that in the most high-stressed parts of airframe and engine, catalytic thermochemical reactors will be installed, wherein highly endothermic processes of steam conversion of hydrocarbon fuel take place. Simultaneously with heat absorption, hydrogen generation will occur in the reactors. This paper presents the results of a study of conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in a slit reactor.

  18. Process and apparatus for conversion of water vapor with coal or hydrocarbon into a product gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, W.; Barnert, H.; Oertel, M.; Schulten, R.

    1990-03-27

    A process and apparatus are provided for conversion of steam and hydrocarbon, or steam and coal, into a product gas which contains hydrogen. The conversion rate is augmented by effective extraction and removal of hydrogen as and when hydrogen is generated. Within a reaction vessel wherein the conversion takes place, a chamber for collection of hydrogen is formed by the provision of a hydrogen permeable membrane. The chamber is provided with a hydrogen extraction means and houses a support structure, for example, in the form of a mesh providing structural support to the membrane. The membrane may be of a pleated or corrugated construction, so as to provide an enlarged surface for the membrane to facilitate hydrogen extraction. Also, to further facilitate hydrogen extraction, a hydrogen partial pressure differential is maintained across the membrane, such as, for example, by the counter pressure of an inert gas. A preferred configuration for the apparatus of the invention is a tubular construction which houses generally tubular hydrogen extraction chambers. 5 figs.

  19. Metal-Exchanged β Zeolites as Catalysts for the Conversion of Acetone to Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various metal-β zeolites have been synthesized under similar ion-exchange conditions. During the exchange process, the nature and acid strength of the used cations modified the composition and textural properties as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the final materials. Zeolites exchanged with divalent cations showed a clear decrease of their surface Brönsted acidity and an increase of their Lewis acidity. All materials were active as catalysts for the transformation of acetone into hydrocarbons. Although the protonic zeolite was the most active in the acetone conversion (96.8% conversion, the metal-exchanged zeolites showed varied selectivities towards different products of the reaction. In particular, we found the Cu-β to have a considerable selectivity towards the production of isobutene from acetone (over 31% yield compared to 7.5% of the protonic zeolite. We propose different reactions mechanisms in order to explain the final product distributions.

  20. Conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons in a ZSM-5 coated monolithic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antia, J.E.; Govind, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Novel reactor configurations featuring catalysts supported on monolithic or honeycomb structures are being increasingly used for a number of applications. In this work, a zeolite-coated monolithic reactor is employed for the conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons. Experimental results show that the conversion and hydrocarbon product distribution compare favorably with data reported for fixed and fluid beds. Mathematical modeling shows that the conversion here is controlled by diffusion in the molecule-sized intracrystalline pores of the zeolite structure. This finding is of considerable important because it demonstrates that monolithic reactors are well-suited to zeolite-based catalytic processes.

  1. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  2. Ethylene Conversion to Higher Hydrocarbon over Copper Loaded BZSM-5 in the Presence of Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramli Mat; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Zainab Ramli; W.Azelee W.Abu Bakar

    2006-01-01

    The successful production of higher hydrocarbons from methane depends on the stability or the oxidation rate of the intermediate products. The performances of the BZSM-5 and the modified BZSM-5 catalysts were tested for ethylene conversion into higher hydrocarbons. The catalytic experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed micro reactor at atmospheric pressure. The catalysts were characterized using XRD, NH3-TPD, and IR for their structure and acidity. The result suggests that BZSM-5 is a weak acid. The introduction of copper into BZSM-5 improved the acidity of BZSM-5. The conversion of ethylene toward higher hydrocarbons is dependent on the acidity of the catalyst. Only weaker acid site is required to convert ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The loading of Cu on BZSM-5 improved the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons especially at low percentage. The reactivity of ethylene is dependent on the amount of acidity as well as the presence of metal on the catalyst surface. Cu1%BZSM-5 is capable of converting ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The balances between the metal and acid sites influence the performance of ethylene conversion and higher hydrocarbon selectivity. Higher loading of Cu leads to the formation of COx.

  3. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts(1-4). Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon source

  4. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  5. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  6. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  7. Green technology for conversion of renewable hydrocarbon based on plasma-catalytic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedirchyk, Igor; Nedybaliuk, Oleg; Chernyak, Valeriy; Demchina, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    The ability to convert renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals is one of the most important steps on our path to green technology and sustainable development. However, the complex composition of biomass poses a major problem for established conversion technologies. The high temperature of thermochemical biomass conversion often leads to the appearance of undesirable byproducts and waste. The catalytic conversion has reduced yield and feedstock range. Plasma-catalytic reforming technology opens a new path for biomass conversion by replacing feedstock-specific catalysts with free radicals generated in the plasma. We studied the plasma-catalytic conversion of several renewable hydrocarbons using the air plasma created by rotating gliding discharge. We found that plasma-catalytic hydrocarbon conversion can be conducted at significantly lower temperatures (500 K) than during the thermochemical ( 1000 K) and catalytic (800 K) conversion. By using gas chromatography, we determined conversion products and found that conversion efficiency of plasma-catalytic conversion reaches over 85%. We used obtained data to determine the energy yield of hydrogen in case of plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol and compared it with other plasma-based hydrogen-generating systems.

  8. (--SCLAREOL CONVERSION IN RITTER'S REACTION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kovalskaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main products of sclareol (1 Ritter’s reaction in mild conditions are (8R,13R-Labd-14(15-en-8,13-diacetamide (2 (8R,13S-Labd-14(15-en-8,13-diacetamide (3 stereoisomeric on C13 atom and having unrearranged native diol skeleton. We present in the current communication the results of sclareol converting (1 into nitrogen-containing labdanes in the Ritter’s reaction conditions.

  9. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, J; Sokoto, A M; Tambuwal, A D; Garba, N A

    2017-05-01

    Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration) at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm(3) resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%). The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16), high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg), kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm(2)/s), density (0.94 g/ml), saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g), and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g) respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  10. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm3 resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%. The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16, high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg, kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm2/s, density (0.94 g/ml, saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g, and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  11. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  12. Heterobimetallic Zeolite, InV-ZSM-5, Enables Efficient Conversion of Biomass Derived Ethanol to Renewable Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Li, Zhenglong; Casbeer, Erik M.; Geiger, Robert A.; Moses-Debusk, Melanie; Keller, Martin; Buchanan, Michelle V.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-01

    Direct catalytic conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon blend-stock can increase biofuels use in current vehicles beyond the ethanol blend-wall of 10-15%. Literature reports describe quantitative conversion of ethanol over zeolite catalysts but high C2 hydrocarbon formation renders this approach unsuitable for commercialization. Furthermore, the prior mechanistic studies suggested that ethanol conversion involves endothermic dehydration step. Here, we report the complete conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons over InV-ZSM-5 without added hydrogen and which produces lower C2 (products come from the hydrocarbon pool type mechanism and dehydration step is not necessary. Thus, our method of direct conversion of ethanol offers a pathway to produce suitable hydrocarbon blend-stock that may be blended at a refinery to produce fuels such as gasoline, diesel, JP-8, and jet fuel, or produce commodity chemicals such as BTX.

  13. A new comprehensive reaction mechanism for combustion of hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranzi, E.; Sogaro, A.; Gaffuri, P.; Pennati, G. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria Chimica; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-03

    A chemical kinetic model has been developed which describes pyrolysis, ignition and oxidation of many small hydrocarbon fuels over a wide range of experimental conditions. Fuels include carbon monoxide and hydrogen, methane and other alkane species up to n-butane, ethylene, propene, acetylene, and oxygenated species such as methanol, acetaldehyde and ethanol. Formation of some larger intermediate and product species including benzene, butadiene, large olefins, and cyclopentadiene has been treated in a semi-empirical manner. The reaction mechanism has been tested for conditions that do not involve transport and diffusional processes, including plug flow and stirred reactors, batch reactors and shock tubes. The present kinetic model and its validation differ from previous reaction mechanisms in two ways. First, in addition to conventional combustion data, experiments more commonly associated with chemical engineering problems such as oxidative coupling, oxidative pyrolysis and steam cracking are used to test the reaction mechanism, making it even more general than previous models. In addition, H atom abstraction and some other reaction rates, even for the smaller C{sub 2}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, are treated using approximations that facilitate future extensions to larger fuels in a convenient manner. Construction of the reaction mechanism and comparisons with experimental data illustrate the generality of the model.

  14. Understanding of Electrochemical Mechanisms for CO2 Capture and Conversion into Hydrocarbon Fuels in Transition-Metal Carbides (MXenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Xingzhu; Ong, Wee-Jun; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Zhao, Xiujian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sun, Chenghua

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal (groups IV, V, VI) carbides (MXenes) with formulas M3C2 have been investigated as CO2 conversion catalysts with well-resolved density functional theory calculations. While MXenes from the group IV to VI series have demonstrated an active behavior for the capture of CO2, the Cr3C2 and Mo3C2 MXenes exhibit the most promising CO2 to CH4 selective conversion capabilities. Our results predicted the formation of OCHO(•) and HOCO(•) radical species in the early hydrogenation steps through spontaneous reactions. This provides atomic level insights into the computer-aided screening for high-performance catalysts and the understanding of electrochemical mechanisms for CO2 reduction to energy-rich hydrocarbon fuels, which is of fundamental significance to elucidate the elementary steps for CO2 fixation.

  15. First Principles Simulations of Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes in Functionalized Zeolitic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar, Mark Nickolaus

    With increasing demand for chemicals and fuels, and finite traditional crude oil resources, there is a growing need to invent, establish, or optimize chemical processes that convert gasifiable carbon-based feedstocks (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil sands, or biomass) into the needed final products. Catalysis is central to almost every industrial chemical process, including alkane metathesis (AM) and the methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) process, which represent final steps in a sequence of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. An in depth understanding of AM and MTH is essential to the selective production of the desired end products. In this dissertation, ab initio density functional theory simulations provide unique mechanistic and thermodynamic insight of specific elementary steps involved in AM and MTH as performed on zeolite supports. Zeolites have been employed throughout the petroleum industry because of their ability to perform acid-catalyzed reactions (e.g., cracking or MTH). The crystalline structure of zeolites imparts regular microporous networks and, in turn, the selective passage of molecules based on shape and functionality. Many different elements can be grafted onto or substituted into zeolites, resulting in a broad range of catalytic behavior. However, due to the variety of competing and secondary reactions that occur at experimental conditions, it is often difficult to extract quantitative information regarding individual elementary steps. ab initio calculations can be particularly useful for this purpose. Alkane metathesis (i.e., the molecular redistribution or chain length averaging of alkanes) is typically performed by transition metal hydrides on amorphous alumina or silica supports. In Chapter 3, the feasibility of AM in zeolites is assessed by using a grafted Ta-hydride complex to explore the full catalytic cycle in the self-metathesis of ethane. The decomposition of a Ta-metallacyclobutane reaction intermediate that forms during olefin metathesis

  16. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  17. Mesoporous zeolite single crystals for catalytic hydrocarbon conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, C.H.; Hasselriis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport.......Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...

  18. Mesoporous zeolite single crystals for catalytic hydrocarbon conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, C.H.; Hasselriis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  19. Catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight hydrocarbons. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.B.

    1979-12-01

    The recent demands on the available energy have stimulated the search for alternatives to oil. Methanol, because of its abundance and the availability of technology to produce it from coal, is projected as an alternative source for producing low molecular weight olefins. Utilizing chabazite ion exchanged with ammonium and rare earth chlorides, methanol is converted to ethylene, propylene and propane with carbon yields of 70 to 90% at reaction temperatures of 633 to 723/sup 0/K and pressures from 1 to 18 atmospheres. X-ray diffraction studies, using Cu-K radiation, show no permanent structural changes after a long use. No permanent deactivation was observed even though the catalyst was overheated once, and have been deactivated and regenerated as many as 21 times. The ammonium exchange coupled with the water at high temperature suggest the formation of an ultrastable zeolite. Ethylene yields increase as the temperature increases from 633/sup 0/K to 723/sup 0/K.

  20. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  1. Fractional Multistage Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass and Catalytic Conversion into Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy; Rozmiarek, Robert; Dally, Brice; Holland, Chris

    2017-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an improved multistage process for the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to serve as a new front-end, deconstruction process ideally suited to feed Virent’s well-proven catalytic technology, which is already being scaled up. This process produced water soluble, partially de-oxygenated intermediates that are ideally suited for catalytic finishing to fungible distillate hydrocarbons. Through this project, Virent, with its partners, demonstrated the conversion of pine wood chips to drop-in hydrocarbon distillate fuels using a multi-stage fractional conversion system that is integrated with Virent’s BioForming® process. The majority of work was in the liquefaction task and included temperature scoping, solvent optimization, and separations.

  2. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  3. Utilization of biomass: Conversion of model compounds to hydrocarbons over zeolite H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Holm, Martin Spangsberg

    2011-01-01

    Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of small oxygenates present in bio-oil or selected as model compounds was performed under Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons (MTH) like reaction conditions using H-ZSM-5 as the catalyst. Co-feeding of the oxygenates with methanol generally decreases catalyst lifetime due to ...

  4. Catalytic conversion of palm oil over mesoporous aluminosilicate MCM-41 for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twaiq, Farouq A.; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, SPS, Pinang (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati M. [Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Sri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2003-11-15

    The catalytic cracking of palm oil to liquid hydrocarbon fuels was studied in a fixed bed micro-reactor operated at atmospheric pressure, reaction temperature of 723 K and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 2.5 h{sup -1} over the synthesized mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 materials. Mesoporous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratio of 50 was synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Different pore sizes were obtained by changing the type of template and organic directing agent (ODA) used. The synthesized materials were characterized using various analytical methods such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), BET surface area, inductive coupled plasma (ICP), MAS NMR, FTIR and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The materials exhibit a crystalline structure of MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves with surface area varying from 550 to 1200 m{sup 2}/g and an average pore size (APS) ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 nm. The synthesized MCM-41 catalysts show high activity for palm oil cracking. The conversion of palm kernel oil, lower-molecular-weight oil, was higher as compared to higher-molecular-weight, palm olein oil. MCM-41 materials were selective for the formation of linear hydrocarbons, particularly, C{sub 13} when palm kernel oil was used and C{sub 17} when palm olein oil was fed. The yield of liquid product decreased with the increase of surface area of the catalyst. The gasoline selectivity increased whereas diesel selectivity decreased with the conversion of palm oil.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Tan, E. C. D.; Biddy, M. J.; Beckham, G. T.; Scarlata, C.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.; Ross, J.; Lukas, J.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.

    2013-10-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of biological conversion of lingnocellulosic-dervied sugars. The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, using dilute-acid pretreatement, enzymatic saccharification, and bioconversion. Ancillary areas--feed handling, hydrolysate conditioning, product recovery and upgrading (hydrotreating) to a final blendstock material, wastewater treatment, lignin combusion, and utilities--are also included in the design.

  6. Methane conversion into higher hydrocarbons with dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei; Wang; Wenjuan; Yan; Wenjie; Ge; Xiaofei; Duan

    2013-01-01

    We reported a coaxial,micro-dielectric barrier discharge(micro-DBD)reactor and a conventional DBD reactor for the direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure.The effects of input power,residence time,discharge gap and external electrode length were investigated for methane conversion and product selectivity.We found the conversion of methane in a micro-DBD reactor was higher than that in a conventional DBD reactor.And at an input power of 25.0 W,the conversion of methane and the total C2+C3 selectivity reached 25.10% and 80.27%,respectively,with a micro-DBD reactor of 0.4 mm discharge gap.Finally,a nonlinear multiple regression model was used to study the correlations between both methane conversion and product selectivity and various system variables.The calculated data were obtained using SPSS 12.0 software.The regression analysis illustrated the correlations between system variables and both methane conversion and product selectivity.

  7. Distribution of Electrical Field Energy for Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Dissymmetrical Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu; Hongwei Sun

    2006-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane into C2 hydrocarbons through alternating current electric field enhanced plasma was studied under room temperature, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions.The distribution of electrical field intensity and distribution of energy were calculated with software that was developed by us according to the charge simulation method. The results indicated that the energy of tip of electrode was 0.36 J/mm3 and it was higher than the methane dissociation energy (0.0553 J/mm3).The methane located at this area can be activated easily. The higher-energy particles produced by dissociation collided with molecules around them and initiated consecutive reactions between free radicals and molecules. The method was proved to be valided and could be taken as a basis for the electrical field study concerned.

  8. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons by Abnormal Glow Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Wei; Yu Hui; Chen Qi; Yin Yongxiang; Dai Xiaoyan

    2005-01-01

    Methane conversion to C2 hydrocarbons has been investigated with the addition of hydrogen in a plasma reactor of abnormal glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The aim of this experiment is to minimize coke formation and improve discharge stability. The typical conditions in the experiment are 300 ml of total feed flux and 400 W of discharge power. The experimental results show that methane conversion is from 91.6% to 35.2% in mol, acetylene selectivity is from 90.2% to 57.6%, and ethylene selectivity is approximately from 7.8% to 3.6%,where the coke increases gradually along with the increase of CH4/H2 from 2: 8 to 9: 1. A stable discharge for a considerable running time can be obtained only at a lower ratio of CH4/H2= 2:8 or 3: 7. These phenomena indicate that the coke deposition during methane conversion is obviously reduced by adding a large amount of hydrogen during an abnormal glow discharge.A qualitative interpretation is presented, namely, with abundant hydrogen, the possibility that hydrogen molecules are activated to hydrogen radicals is increased with the help of the abnormal glow discharge. These hydrogen radicals react with carbon radicals to form C2 hydrocarbon products. Therefore, the deposition of coke is restrained.

  9. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  10. On the impact of olefins and aromatics in the methanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion over H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.; Mueller, S.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Methanol-to-hydrocarbons processes using HZSM-5 archetype acidic zeolites or zeotype SAPO-34 catalysts are regarded as a vital suite of conversion technologies to bypass petroleum-based routes for the production of specific fuels and petrochemical commodities. Special significance of the methanol chemistry originates from its versatility enabling selective transformations towards various products. Industry demonstrated successfully implementations of Methanol-To-Gasoline, Methanol-To-Olefin, and Methanol-To-Propylene processes, although the typical single-pass selectivity remained limited and recycling is necessary. Considerable fundamental research efforts both from experimental and computational sides contributed to unravel the underlying complex reaction mechanism. The indirect hydrocarbon pool mechanism, in which Broensted acid sites combined with adsorbed light olefins or lower methylbenzenes act as active centers, is generally accepted to explain the formation of light olefins. As olefin and aromatics populated catalytic sites show different reactivity in terms of activity and selectivity to ethylene or propylene, one could envision optimizing the product distribution by suitable co-feeding of specific hydrocarbons. The present work addresses three questions with an experimental study conducted under realistic MTP operation conditions: (1) How are ethylene and propylene formed at molecular level? (2) Which reaction pathway leads to the formation of undesired hydrogen transfer products? (3) Does olefin or aromatics co-feeding change the selectivity to ethylene or propylene? Xylenes and various olefins were co-fed with methanol to achieve a detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism over acidic HZSM-5 zeolites. Results suggest, that an olefin homologation/cracking route (olefin cycle) accounts for the autocatalytic (-like) nature and the majority of methanol consumption rather than the route involving aromatic intermediates (aromatics cycle). Co

  11. An experimental and theoretical study of reaction steps relevant to the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svelle, Stian

    2004-07-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to obtain new insight into the reaction mechanism of the zeolite catalyzed methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction. It was decided to use both experimental and computational techniques to reach this goal. An investigation of the n-butene + methanol system was therefore initiated. Over time, it became apparent that it was possible to determine the rate for the methylation of n-butene by methanol. The ethene and propene systems were therefore reexamined in order to collect kinetic information also for those cases. With the development of user-friendly quantum chemistry programs such as the Gaussian suite of programs, the possibility of applying quantum chemical methods to many types of problems has become readily available even for non-experts. When performing mechanistic studies, there is quite often a considerable synergy effect when combining experimental and computational approaches. The methylation reactions mentioned above turned out to be an issue well suited for quantum chemical investigations. The incentive for examining the halomethane reactivity was the clear analogy to the MTH reaction system. Alkene dimerization was also a reaction readily examined with quantum chemistry. As discussed in the introduction of this thesis, polymethylbenzenes, or their cationic counterparts, are suspected to be key intermediates in the MTH reaction. It was therefore decided to investigate the intrinsic reactivity of these species in the gas-phase by employing sophisticated mass spectrometric (MS) techniques in collaboration with the MS group at the Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo The data thus obtained will also be compared with results from an ongoing computational study on gas phase polymethylbenzenium reactivity. 6 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) A Theoretical Investigation of the Methylation of Alkenes with Methanol over Acidic Zeolites. 2) A Theoretical Investigation of the

  12. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scarlata, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, E. C. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ross, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Lukas, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Sexton, D. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic-derived hydrolysate. This model leverages expertise established over time in biomass deconstruction and process integration research at NREL, while adding in new technology areas for sugar purification and catalysis. The overarching process design converts biomass to die die diesel- and naphtha-range fuels using dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, purifications, and catalytic conversion focused on deoxygenating and oligomerizing biomass hydrolysates.

  13. Enhancement of NOx and hydrocarbon conversion in plasma-activated catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill; Adress, Wahmeed; Goguet, Alexandre; Yang, Hui; De Rosa, Fabio; Hardacre, Christopher; Stere, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure, non-thermal plasma-activated-catalysis is showing real promise in a number of applications. Here we report on how electrical, visible and FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy measurements in a kHz atmospheric pressure He plasma jet coupled with a Ag/Al2O3 catalyst allowed us produce and confirm a strong enhancement of both NOx and hydrocarbon conversion at a measured gas temperature of <= 250° C. How these and other measurements have provided an insight into the fundamental physical and chemical processes in the plasma environment that have helped us move to a more efficient system and other processes will be discussed.

  14. Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

  15. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all

  16. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.;

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  17. Investigating the Influence of Mesoporosity in Zeolite Beta on its Catalytic Performance for the Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-08-26

    Hierarchically porous zeolite Beta (Beta-MS) synthesized by a soft-templating method contains remarkable intra-crystalline mesoporosity, which reduces the diffusion length in zeolite channels down to several nanometers and alters the distribution of Al among distinct crystallographic sites. When used as a catalyst for the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) at 330 oC, Beta-MS exhibited a 2.7-fold larger conversion capacity, a 2.0-fold faster reaction rate, and a remarkably longer lifetime than conventional zeolite Beta (Beta-C). The superior catalytic performance of Beta-MS is attributed to its hierarchical structure, which offers full accessibility to all catalytic active sites. In contrast, Beta-C was easily deactivated because a layer of coke quickly deposited on the outer surfaces of the catalyst crystals, impeding access to interior active sites. This difference is clearly demonstrated by using electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy to probe the distribution of coke in the deactivated catalysts. At both low and high conversions, ranging from 20% to 100%, Beta-MS gave higher selectivity towards higher aliphatics (C4-C7) but lower ethene selectivity compared to Beta-C. Therefore, we conclude that a hierarchical structure decreases the residence time of methylbenzenes in zeolite micropores, disfavoring the propagation of the aromatic-based catalytic cycle. This conclusion is consistent with a recent report on ZSM-5 and is also strongly supported by our analysis of soluble coke species residing in the catalysts. Moreover, we identified an oxygen-containing compound, 4-methyl-benzaldehyde, in the coke, which has not been observed in the MTH reaction before.  

  18. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional transition-metal/silica-alumina catalysts for the chloromethane conversion to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.F. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, L.O.A.; Nascimento, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: leopoldo@ctgas.com.br; Ruiz, J.A.C. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil); Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-10-15

    In this work bifunctional (metal-acid) catalysts of Fe, Ni, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO over amorphous silica alumina support were characterized (acidity) and evaluated for the conversion of chloromethane in a fixed bed reactor. Temperature program tests TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) and TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) were performed to characterize the chemisorption sites for the impregnated and unimpregnated support. New adsorption sites were created on the metal supported catalysts. The conversion yield of chloromethane was evaluated for the five materials. The highest conversion conversion (85%) was observed for the unmodified support (SiAl) after 6 of reaction at 860 K and a WHSV (Weight Hourly Space Velocity) of 4,5 h{sup -1}. The best selectivity toward desirable hydrocarbons (C{sup 3}, C{sup 4}) was found for the Fe-SiAl catalyst. C{sup 3} was also found in the products stream when Ni/SiAl and NiO/SiAl catalysts were tested. Ni catalysts were the most favorable to methane production. The catalytic tests showed coke formation in all materials. For the SiAl support the desorption energy of chloromethane, determined by TPD runs, was 101,9 KJ/mol. The metals presented lower desorption energies (75,2 KJ/mol for Ni and 133,4 KJ/mol for Fe) than the oxides (190,1 KJ/mol for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 322,4 KJ/mol for NiO). (author)

  19. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product is unprecedented, asymmetrically distributed towards heavier alkanes. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  1. Hydration of saccharides: estimation of reaction properties and equilibrium conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanova, O.; Mueller, K.; Mokrushina, L.; Arlt, W. [Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Separation Science and Technology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Biomass holds great promise as a renewable source of hydrogen and thus as a zero-emission, carbon-neutral, and nearly inexhaustible energy resource. Thermodynamic analysis of biomass hydration is carried out to study the reaction properties considering a series of saccharides as a model. Equilibrium constants and composition are estimated in dependence on the saccharide chain length and temperature. The latter is also studied as a function of the reactant ratios and in the presence of nonreacting additives. Being highly endothermic, the reaction is thermodynamically favorable due to a high entropic contribution. Increase in the saccharide chain length affects the conversion only slightly, so the results for low-molecular-weight saccharides can be transferred to long-chain ones. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Conversion of Dimethyl Ether to Branched Hydrocarbons Over Cu/BEA: the Roles of Lewis Acidic and Metallic Sites in H2 Incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Jesse E.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Cheah, Singfoong; Habas, Susan E.; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Guanghui; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2017-04-26

    Conversion of biomass to fuels remains as one of the most promising approach to support our energy needs. It has been previously shown that the gasification of non-edible cellulosic biomass can be used to derive fuels like methanol and dimethyl ether (DME). However, the use of methanol and DME is limited due to the fact that they have low energy densities, poor lubricity and lower viscosity when compared to long-chain hydrocarbons. Increasing the blending percentage can also lead to undesired amounts of oxygenated molecules in the transportation fuel infrastructure, which restrict their applicability as jet or diesel fuels. Consequently, the petroleum-derived hydrocarbons remain as the main constituent of the middle-distillate based fuels. One way to increase the share of biofuels in middle-distillates is to use methanol/DME as building blocks for producing renewable, energy-dense hydrocarbons. One way to achieve this is by catalytically converting the DME and methanol to light olefins, followed by oligomerization to higher molecular weight premium alkanes, which can directly be used as kerosene/diesel fuels. Here, we report the catalytic dimerization of biomass-derived deoxygenated olefins into transportation fuel-range hydrocarbons under liquid-phase stirred-batch conditions. Specifically, the effect of operating conditions, such as reaction temperature, solvent-type, reaction duration and olefin-structure, on the conversion, selectivity and kinetics of dimerization of triptene (2,3,3-trimethyl-1-butene) were investigated. Triptene, as previously reported, is one of the major products of DME-homologation reaction over a BEA zeolite4. We show that triptene can be converted to high quality middle-distillates using a commercially available ion-exchange acid resin, Amberlyst-35 (dry) by the process of catalytic dimerization.

  3. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

  4. Microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Martin; Beckmaann, Sabrina; Siegert, Michael; Grundger, Friederike; Richnow, Hans [Geomicrobiology Group, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, oil production has increased enormously but almost half of the oil now remaining is heavy/biodegraded and cannot be put into production. There is therefore a need for new technology and for diversification of energy sources. This paper discusses the microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs. The objective of the study is to identify microbial and geochemical controls on methanogenesis in reservoirs. A graph shows the utilization of methane for various purposes in Germany from 1998 to 2007. A degradation process to convert coal to methane is shown using a flow chart. The process for converting oil to methane is also given. Controlling factors include elements such as Fe, nitrogen and sulfur. Atmospheric temperature and reservoir pressure and temperature also play an important role. From the study it can be concluded that isotopes of methane provide exploration tools for reservoir selection and alkanes and aromatic compounds provide enrichment cultures.

  5. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons in Solid State Oxide Electrolyte Membrane Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHAO Ling; ZHU Zhong-nan; XI Dan-li

    2005-01-01

    Provskite-type catalysts, Ln0.6 Sr0.4 FexCo1-x O3 (Ln = Nd,Pr, Gd, Sm, La, 0<x<1) and Ln0.8Na0.2CoO3(Ln= La,Gd, Sm) were synthesized, their catalytic properties in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) were examined in a fixed-bed reactor. The former group presented higher activity in the OCM, but the main product was carbon dioxide. While the later group showed lower activity but much higher selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons compared with the former. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a solid oxide membrane reactor with La0.8 Na0.2CoO3 as catalyst. The results showed that methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide and ethane by two parallel reactions. Ethane was oxidized to ethene and carbon dioxide. A fraction of ethene was oxidized deeply to carbon dioxide. The total selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons exceeded 70%. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model was suggested to describe the reaction results.

  6. Gaseous hydrocarbon production by the reaction of coal char with hydrogen plasma at relatively lower microwave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, S.; Nishikubo, K.; Imamura, T. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Tosu (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Experimental conditions such as reaction temperature, microwave power and reaction pressure were changed in the reaction of carbon with hydrogen plasma. Methane was major product and other hydrocarbons such as acetylene and C2-C4 hydrocarbons were also produced. Methane production shows its maximum at 700-900 K and at 30W of microwave power. 2 figs.

  7. Spatial Distribution of Zeolite ZSM-5 within Catalyst Bodies Affects Selectivity and Stability of Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño, P.; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Epelde, E.; Gayubo, A.G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Solid acids, such as zeolites, are used as catalyst materials in a wide variety of important crude oil refinery, bulk chemical synthesis, and green processes. Examples include fluid catalytic cracking (FCC),[1] methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion,[ 2] plastic waste valorization,[3] and biomass

  8. Conversion of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons to valuable synthetic feed for steamcrackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesana, A.; Dalloro, L.; Rivetti, F.; Buzzoni, R.; Bignazzi, R. [ENI S.p.A., Novara (Italy). Refining and Marketing Div.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of the present study was upgrading a set of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures whose commercial value ranks close to fuel oil and should become even lower in the next future because of the introduction of more stringent regulations on fuels, through hydro-conversion to a synthetic feed for steam-cracking. The resulting process provides an opportunity to improve the economic return of a steamcracking plant, offering the chance of converting low-value mixtures produced by the plant itself, such as fuel oil of cracking (FOK), saving an equivalent amount of naphtha. The method can also be used for converting pyrolysis gasoline (pygas). Although pygas has at present a fair commercial value, it could suffer a significant penalization in the future due to further limitations on total aromatic content in gasoline. Pygas hydro-conversion to a synthetic steam-cracking feedstock has been recently reported. Fractions from refinery, such as heavy distillates (e.g. Heavy Vacuum Gas Oil, VGO), deasphalted resides (DAO), or some FCC streams (e.g. LCO) resulted suitable and very attractive mixtures to be treated as well. No more than deasphalting was required as pretreatment of the feed mixture and only when the asphalts were >2%. Hetero-elements are often present in such kind of feeds at quite high concentrations, but no problems were observed due to the presence of sulphur and nitrogen, respectively, up to 15000 and 5500 ppm. (orig.)

  9. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis of Methanol Conversion to Hydrocarbons Using Cantera Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duminda A. Gunawardena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactions associated with removal of oxygen from oxygenates (deoxygenation are an important aspect of hydrocarbon fuels production process from biorenewable substrates. Here we report the equilibrium composition of methanol-to-hydrocarbon system by minimizing the total Gibbs energy of the system using Cantera methodology. The system was treated as a mixture of 14 components which had CH3OH, C6H6, C7H8, C8H10 (ethyl benzene, C8H10 (xylenes, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, CH4, H2O, C, CO2, CO, H2. The carbon in the equilibrium mixture was used as a measure of coke formation which causes deactivation of catalysts that are used in aromatization reaction(s. Equilibrium compositions of each species were analyzed for temperatures ranging from 300 to 1380 K and pressure at 0–15 atm gauge. It was observed that when the temperature increases the mole fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene pass through a maximum around 1020 K. At 300 K the most abundant species in the system were CH4, CO2, and H2O with mole fractions 50%, 16.67%, and 33.33%, respectively. Similarly at high temperature (1380 K, the most abundant species in the system were H2 and CO with mole fractions 64.5% and 32.6% respectively. The pressure in the system shows a significant impact on the composition of species.

  10. An Experimental and Kinetic Calculation of the Promotion Effect of Hydrocarbons on the NO-NO2 Conversion in a Flow Reacto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M; Marinov, N; Matsunaga, N; Pitz, W; Westbrook, C

    1998-01-06

    The main route to nitrogen dioxide (NOz) formation in combustion systems is through the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO). This process was originally invcstigafed in order to explain the high proportion of NOz found in NOx emissions from the exhaust of gas turbine engines [l]. Moreover, the understanding of the NO-NO2 conversion mechanism is relevant to a number of issues including NOz emission from unflued space heaters, development of NOx control technologies, behavior of NO/N02 in the atmosphere, formation and reduction chemistry of NOx, and the probe sampling techniques for NOx concentration measurements. Originally, the NO-NO2 conversion was thought to proceed through the rapid oxidation of NO by oxidative radicals without much attention to the effect of fuels on the conversion [2-41. Although, in later studies, it was revealed that the conversion was greatly promoted by small quantities of fuels such as hydrocarbons, Hz, CO, and methanol [S-9]. In our former experiment and model calculation of the NO-NO2 conversion in the mixing of hot combustion gas with cold air and nine different fuels [6], the results indicated that NO-NO2 conversion appeared only in the low temperature range, and showed a strong dependence on fuel type. Thus, the interaction between the NO-NO2 reactions and the oxidation reactions of the fuel in the low temperature range must be .understood in order to explain the effect of fuel type on the NO-NO2 conversion and consequently to predict the NO/NO2 emission levels from combustion systems.

  11. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, E. C. D.; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, A.; Hensley, J.; Schaidle, J.; Biddy, M.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  12. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions involving hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Intrinsic barriers (formally the barrier in the absence of driving force) for H-atom transfer reactions are key parameters in Evans-Polyanyi and Marcus equations for estimating exothermic reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few of these barriers have been measured due to experimental difficulties in measuring rates for identity reactions. Thus, the authors have used semiempirical Molecular Orbital theoretical methods (MNDO/PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom transfer identity reactions involving alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl radicals and donors. Briefly stated, they find that barriers decrease with the degree of alkyl substitution at the radical site whereas barriers increase with the degree of conjugation with the radical site. Details of the methodology and analyses of how these barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  13. Designing overall stoichiometric conversions and intervening metabolic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-04

    Existing computational tools for de novo metabolic pathway assembly, either based on mixed integer linear programming techniques or graph-search applications, generally only find linear pathways connecting the source to the target metabolite. The overall stoichiometry of conversion along with alternate co-reactant (or co-product) combinations is not part of the pathway design. Therefore, global carbon and energy efficiency is in essence fixed with no opportunities to identify more efficient routes for recycling carbon flux closer to the thermodynamic limit. Here, we introduce a two-stage computational procedure that both identifies the optimum overall stoichiometry (i.e., optStoic) and selects for (non-)native reactions (i.e., minRxn/minFlux) that maximize carbon, energy or price efficiency while satisfying thermodynamic feasibility requirements. Implementation for recent pathway design studies identified non-intuitive designs with improved efficiencies. Specifically, multiple alternatives for non-oxidative glycolysis are generated and non-intuitive ways of co-utilizing carbon dioxide with methanol are revealed for the production of C2+ metabolites with higher carbon efficiency.

  14. Electric Field-Enhanced Catalytic Conversion of Methane: AN Experimental Study on the Effects of Corona Discharge on Methane Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafee, Abdulathim M. J.

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is currently being actively studied for the production of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas. The present study concentrates on the oxidative conversion of methane in a high-pressure (one atmosphere), nonthermal plasma formed by corona discharge. Here, methyl radicals are formed by the reaction of methane with negatively-charged oxygen species created in the corona discharge. The results of methane conversion in the presence of both AC and DC corona discharges revealed that ethane and ethylene product selectivity is affected by electrode polarity, frequency, and oxygen partial pressure in the feed. Higher C_2 yields were obtained with the AC corona. All of the AC corona discharges specified here were initiated at room temperature (i.e., no oven or other heat source used), with temperature increases from 300 to 500^circC due to the exothermic gas discharge and exothermic reaction. A reaction mechanism is presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results suggest that AC and/or DC gas discharge techniques should be further studied for improved economics of methane conversion. The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane in DC corona discharges was investigated. The atomic oxygen radicals initiated by corona discharges are thought to be active for the OXD of ethane. The selectivity to ethylene is affected by the reaction temperature, the DC applied voltage, voltage polarity, and the C_2H _6/O_2 ratio. The results of this study suggest the corona discharge process to be very efficient and selective in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane. The effects of DC corona discharge were examined in the presence of a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La _2O_3. Experimental investigations have correspondingly been conducted, in which all reactive gases passed through a catalyst bed situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. The methane conversion and C_2 yield increased (with O_2 partial pressure) during the corona-enhanced catalytic

  15. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  16. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  17. Conversion and reaction kinetics of coke oven gas over a commercial Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈一新; 徐贺明; 赵见峰; 王志彦; 王亚涛

    2016-01-01

    Producing methanol from coke oven gas (COG) is one of the important applications of COG. Removal of sulfur from COG is a key step of this process. Conversion and reaction kinetics over a commercial Fe−Mo/Al2O3 catalyst (T-202) were studied in a continuous flow fixed bed reactor under pressures of 1.6−2.8 MPa, space time of 1.32−3.55 s and temperatures of 240−360 °C. Though the COG contains about 0.6 mol/mol H2, hydrogenation of CO and CO2 is not significant on this catalyst. The conversions of unsaturated hydrocarbons depend on their molecular structures. Diolefins and alkynes can be completely hydrogenated even at relatively low temperature and pressure. Olefins, in contrast, can only be progressively hydrogenated with increasing temperature and pressure. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of CS2 on this catalyst is easy. Complete conversion of CS2 was observed in the whole range of the conditions used in this work. The original COS in the COG can also be easily converted to a low level. However, its complete HDS is difficult due to the relatively high concentration of CO in the COG and due to the limitation of thermodynamics. H2S can react with unsaturated hydrocarbons to form ethyl mercaptan and thiophene, which are then progressively hydrodesulfurized with increasing temperature and pressure. Based on the experimental observations, reaction kinetic models for the conversion of ethylene and sulfur-containing compounds were proposed; the values of the parameters in the models were obtained by regression of the experimental data.

  18. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  19. Reaction Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Hydrocarbons in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.

    2014-03-24

    This grant supported research in theoretical and computational Chemical Physics that resulted in numerous publications on fitting ab initio potential energy surfaces and dipole moment surfaces of polyatomic molecules and cations. This work made use of novel fitting methods that ensures that these surfaces are invariant with respect to all permutations of like atoms. The surfaces were used in various dynamics calculations, ranging from quantum vibrational dynamics to(quasi)classical trajectory calculations of reaction dynamics. A number of these studies were done in collaboration with experimental groups where the theoretical analyses turned out to be essential to give a proper understanding of the experimental results.

  20. Catalytic reaction energetics by single crystal adsorption calorimetry: hydrocarbons on Pt(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytken, Ole; Lew, Wanda; Campbell, Charles T

    2008-10-01

    Single crystal adsorption calorimetry provides essential information about the energetics of surface reactions on well-defined surfaces where the adsorbed reaction products can be clearly identified. In this tutorial review, we cover the essentials of that technique, with emphasis on our lab's recent advances in sensitivity and temperature range, and demonstrate what can be achieved through a review of selected example studies concerning adsorption and dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons on Pt(111). A fairly complete reaction enthalpy diagram is presented for the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene on Pt(111).

  1. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  2. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  3. ZnCl2 Induced Catalytic Conversion of Softwood Lignin to Aromatics and Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang; Zhang, Libing; Deng, Tiansheng; Ruan, Hao; Hou, Xianglin; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-19

    Selective cleavage of C-O-C bonds in lignin without disrupting C-C linkages can result in releasing aromatic monomers and dimers that can be subsequently converted into chemicals and fuels. Results showed that both biomass-derived lignin and lignin model compounds were depolymerized in a highly concentrated ZnCl2 solution. Zn2+ ions in highly concentrated ZnCl2 solutions appeared to selectively coordinate with C-O-C bonds to cause key linkages of lignin much easier to cleave. In 63 wt.% ZnCl2 solution at 200 °C for 6 h, nearly half of the softwood technical lignin was converted to liquid products, of which the majority was alkylphenols. Results indicated that most β-O-4 and Cmethyl-OAr bonds of model compounds were cleaved undersame conditions, providing a foundation towards understanding lignin depolymerization in a concentrated ZnCl2 solution. The phenolic products were further converted into cyclic hydrocarbons via hydrodeoxygenation and coupling reactions by co-catalyst Ru/C.

  4. Gas-phase Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions with Molecules of Interstellar Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-02-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C6H- 5), naphthalenide (C10H- 7), and anthracenide (C14H- 9) with atomic H, H2, and D2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O2, CO2, N2O, C2H2, CH3OH, CH3CN, (CH3)2CO, CH3CHO, CH3Cl, and (CH3CH2)2O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  5. Comparison of techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is not an easy task due to the heterogeneity of the reaction medium and the tendency of particles to agglomerate rapidly when stirring is stopped. Usually, bulk polymerization in ampoules is employed to study the kinetics of suspension polymerization reactions. In this work, a comparison of different techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is presented. Results showed a good agreement between the conversion obtained by gravimetry during styrene suspension polymerization and on-line conversion monitoring data using fiber-optic based Raman Spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the polymerization rate of styrene bulk polymerization carried out in ampoules was higher than the real reaction rate of styrene suspension polymerization due to slightly higher reaction temperatures. Simulation results using the experimental temperature data in a mathematical model confirmed these results.

  6. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  7. Dual gas-solid reactions with converse vector in ferrous metallurgy and its character

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; LI Wenzhong; JIANG Maofa; MA Xingya; ZHENG Hongxia

    2004-01-01

    A concept of dual gas-solid reactions with the converse vector that simultaneously take place inside the pellet and between the gas and pellet has been put forward. Two parameters used for describing the character of dual gas-solid reactions are found out and verified by the reduction experiment of the pellet containing carbon in CO2 atmosphere. Of the parameters, critical rate of dual gas-solid reactions with converse vector is used to express minimum rate of gas-solid reaction inside the pellet, which is able to make reaction between gas and pellet halt. This rate can be measured and calculated. Diffusion coefficient of dual gas-solid reaction with converse vector disturbed by the gas expelled from inside the pellet can also be calculated by the critical rate and reaction rate of gas-solid inside the pellet.

  8. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  9. Characterization and Activity of Cr,Cu and Ga Modified ZSM-5 for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane using a metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite prepared via acidic ion exchange was investigated to elucidate the roles of metal and acidity in the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. ZSM-5 (SiO2/Al2O3=30) was loaded with different metals (Cr, Cu and Ga) according to the acidic ion-exchange method to produce metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. XRD, NMR, FT-IR and N2 adsorption analyses indicated that Cr and Ga species managed to occupy the aluminum positions in the ZSM-5 framework. In addition, Cr species were deposited in the pores of the structure. However, Cu oxides were deposited on the surface and in the mesopores of the ZSM-5 zeolite. An acidity study using TPD-NH3, FT-IR, and IR-pyridine analyses revealed that the total number of acid sites and the strengths of the Bronsted and Lewis acid sites were significantly different after the acidic ion exchange treatment.Cu loaded HZSM-5 is a potential catalyst for direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. The successful production of gasoline via the direct conversion of methane depends on the amount of aluminum in the zeolite framework and the strength of the Bronsted acid sites.

  10. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  11. Resonance Conversion as a Catalyser of Nuclear Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Karpeshin, Feodor; Zhang, Weining

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that resonance interal conversion offers a feasible tool for mastering nuclear processes with laser or synchrotron radiation. Physics of the process is discussed in detail in historical aspect. Possible way of experimental applicaytion is shown in the case of the $M1$ 70.6-keV transition in nuclei of $^{169}$Yb. Nuclear transition rate in hydrogenlike ions of this nuclide can be enhanced by up to four orders of magnitude.

  12. Resonance Conversion as a Catalyzer of Nuclear Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KARPESHIN Feodor; ZHANG Jing-Bo; ZHANG Wei-Ning

    2006-01-01

    @@ It is shown that resonance internal conversion offers a feasible tool for mastering nuclear processes with laser or synchrotron radiation. The physics of the process is discussed in detail in a historical aspect. Possible experimental application is shown in the case of the M1 70.6-keV transition in nuclei of 169 Yb. The nuclear transition rate in hydrogen-like ions of this nuclide can be enhanced by up to four orders of magnitude.

  13. Esterification of bio-oil from mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves with a solid acid catalyst: Conversion of the cyclic ether and terpenoids into hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xun; Gunawan, Richard; Mourant, Daniel; Wang, Yi; Lievens, Caroline; Chaiwat, Weerawut; Wu, Liping; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Bio-oil from pyrolysis of mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves differs from that obtained with wood by its content of cyclic ethers, terpenoids and N-containing organic compounds. Upgrading of the leaf bio-oil in methanol with a solid acid catalyst was investigated and it was found that the N-containing organics in the bio-oil lead to deactivation of the catalyst in the initial stage of exposure and have to be removed via employing high catalyst loading to allow the occurrence of other acid-catalysed reactions. Eucalyptol, the main cyclic ether in the bio-oil, could be converted into the aromatic hydrocarbon, p-cymene, through a series of intermediates including α-terpineol, terpinolene, and α-terpinene. Various steps such as ring-opening, dehydration, isomerisation, and aromatization were involved in the conversion of eucalyptol. The terpenoids in bio-oil could also be converted into aromatic hydrocarbons that can serve as starting materials for the synthesis of fine chemicals, via the similar processes.

  14. A DFT-based investigation of hydrogen abstraction reactions from methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel

    2008-11-10

    The growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is in many areas of combustion and pyrolysis of hydrocarbons an inconvenient side effect that warrants an extensive investigation of the underlying reaction mechanism, which is known to be a cascade of radical reactions. Herein, the focus lies on one of the key reaction classes within the coke formation process: hydrogen abstraction reactions induced by a methyl radical from methylated benzenoid species. It has been shown previously that hydrogen abstractions determine the global PAH formation rate. In particular, the influence of the polyaromatic environment on the thermodynamic and kinetic properties is the subject of a thorough exploration. Reaction enthalpies at 298 K, reaction barriers at 0 K, rate constants, and kinetic parameters (within the temperature interval 700-1100 K) are calculated by using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) geometries and BMK/6-311+G(3df,2p) single-point energies. This level of theory has been validated with available experimental data for the abstraction at toluene. The enhanced stability of the product benzylic radicals and its influence on the reaction enthalpies is highlighted. Corrections for tunneling effects and hindered (or free) rotations of the methyl group are taken into account. The largest spreading in thermochemical and kinetic data is observed in the series of linear acenes, and a normal reactivity-enthalpy relationship is obtained. The abstraction of a methyl hydrogen atom at one of the center rings of large methylated acenes is largely preferred. Geometrical and electronic aspects lie at the basis of this striking feature. Comparison with hydrogen abstractions leading to arylic radicals is also made.

  15. Experimental Study on Hydrocarbon Formation Due to Reactions Between Carbonates and Water or Water—Bearing Minerals in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁克难; 汪本善; 等

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the depth of the Earth,experimental research on reactions between carbonates and water or waterbearing minerals was carried out at the pressure of about 1GPa and the temperature range of 800-1500℃.The reactions took place in an open and nonequilibrium state.Chromatographic analyses of the gas products indicate that in the experiments there were generated CH4-dominated hydrocarbons,along with some CO2 and CO.Accordingly,we think there is no essential distinction between free-state water and hydroxy in the minerals in the process of hydrocarbon formation.This study indicates that reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals should be an important factor leading to the formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the Earth's depth.

  16. Time- and space-resolved study of the methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction - influence of zeolite topology on axial deactivation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Gama, Daniel; Etemadi, Samaneh; Kirby, Eliot; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Beato, Pablo; Svelle, Stian; Olsbye, Unni

    2017-02-10

    Zeolites representing seven different topologies were subjected to life-time assessment studies as methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) catalysts at 400 °C, P(MeOH) = 13 kPa and P(tot) = 100 kPa. The following topologies were studied: ZSM-22 (TON), ZSM-23 (MTT), IM-5 (IMF), ITQ-13 (ITH), ZSM-5 (MFI), mordenite (MOR) and beta (BEA). Two experimental approaches were used. In the first approach, each catalyst was tested at three different contact times, all giving 100% initial conversion. The life-time before conversion decreased to 50% at each contact time was measured and used to calculate critical contact times (i.e. the contact time needed to launch the autocatalytic MTH reaction) and deactivation rates. It was found that the critical contact time is strongly correlated with pore size: the smaller the pore size, the longer the critical contact time. The second experimental approach consisted of testing the catalysts in a double tube reactor with 100% initial conversion, and quenching the reaction after 4 consecutive times on stream, representing full, partial, and zero conversion. After quenching, the catalyst bed was divided into four segments, which were individually characterised for coke content (temperature-programmed oxidation) and specific surface area (N2 adsorption). The axial deactivation pattern was found to depend on pore size. With increasing pore size, the main source of coke formation changed from methanol conversion (1D 10-ring structures), to partly methanol, partly product conversion (3D 10-ring structures) and finally mainly product conversion (3D 12-ring structure). As a result, the methanol conversion capacity changed little with contact time for ZSM-5, while it increased with increasing contact time for the catalysts with smaller pore sizes, and decreased with increasing contact time for pore sizes larger than ZSM-5.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-21

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations.

  18. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions.

  19. Energetics, transition states, and intrinsic reaction coordinates for reactions associated with O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tianying; Hase, William L.; Doubleday, Charles

    2004-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations based on multiconfiguration wave functions are used to investigate a set of archetypal reactions relevant to O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon molecules and surfaces. These include O(3P) reactions with methane and ethane to give OH plus methyl or ethyl radicals, O(3P)+ethane to give CH3O+CH3, and secondary reactions of the OH product radical with ethane and the ethyl radical. Geometry optimization is carried out with CASSCF/cc-pVTZ for all reactions, and with CASPT2/cc-pVTZ for O(3P)+methane/ethane. Single-point energy corrections are applied with CASPT2, CASPT3, and MRCI+Q with the cc-pVTZ and cc-pVQZ basis sets, and the energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit (CBL). Where comparison of computed barriers and energies of reaction with experiment is possible, the agreement is good to excellent. The best agreement (within experimental error) is found for MRCI+Q/CBL applied to O(3P)+methane. For the other reactions, CASPT2/CBL and MRCI+Q/CBL predictions differ from experiment by 1-5 kcal/mol for 0 K enthalpies of reaction, and are within 1 kcal/mol of the best-estimate experimental range of 0 K barriers for O(3P)+ethane and OH+ethane. The accuracy of MRCI+Q/CBL is limited mainly by the quality of the active space. CASPT2/CBL barriers are consistently lower than MRCI+Q/CBL barriers with identical reference spaces.

  20. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit

  1. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Scott; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Turco, Richard P.; Drdla, Katja; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1994-02-01

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO2 and N2O5, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HOx radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HOx removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases.

  2. Brown coal conversion by microwave plasma reactions under successive supply of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, O.; Onoe, K.; Marushima, W.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    1998-10-01

    To develop an innovative method for directly converting brown coal to relatively important fuels and synthesis gases in a single step, while simultaneously upgrading the carbon content of the residue, microwave plasma technology was applied to the direct conversion of brown coal (Yallourn). Methane under reduced pressure was supplied through a quartz reactor into the irradiation zone and reacted with the coal bed placed downstream. Both the coal conversion and the carbon content of the residue were increased with an increase of irradiation time. The yield of oily products showed a maximum value (18 wt.%) at 2 min irradiation, and the fuels were composed mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the range from C{sub 13} to C{sub 34}. Furthermore, carbon monoxide and hydrogen accompanied by a molar fraction of {lt} 16% of acetylene were mainly produced when the irradiation time was varied from 1 to 10 min. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effect of external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite on product distribution in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhui Li; Yanan Wang; Wenzhi Jia; Zhiwen Xi; Huanhui Chen; Zhirong Zhu∗; Zhonghua Hu

    2014-01-01

    The external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite was passivated by liquid siliceous deposition and by acidic sites poisoning with lepidine, respectively. Then methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction was investigated over the above as-prepared catalysts and the dissoluble coke on these used catalysts was analyzed by GC-MS, to study the role of the external surface of HZSM-5 in the catalytic reaction. Comparison with the experi-mental results based on parent ZSM-5 showed that the product distribution of MTH reaction was obviously influenced by the external surface. Evidences were listed as follows:(1) the final product on parent HZSM-5 showed higher aromatic selectivity, lower olefin selectivity, lower ra-tio of C2/C3+aliphatics and higher ratio of C3/C4+aliphatics than the reaction mixture produced by the sole catalysis of acidic sites in HZSM-5 channel;(2) a little of pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene in the product on parent HZSM-5, was produced via multi-methylation of methylbenzene on the external surface. The above conclusion may also be suitable for MTH reaction over other zeolites with 10-ring channel.

  4. An installation for vapor conversion of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, I.; Tabata, K.

    1983-01-28

    An installation is proposed for converting a mixture of hydrocarbon gases with steam in the presence of nickel, platinum, lead and cobalt catalysts (Kt) on a carrier of Si0/sub 2/, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, Ti0/sub 2/ and so on. The reaction tower (RK1) for conversion is made of an inorganic, heat resistant ceramic material (for instance, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/ ceramic), heaters are located inside the walls of the reaction tower, while on the outside the reaction conversion tower is equipped with an external tubular housing made of heat resistant materials or of inorganic heat resistant ceramic material. Here, there is a space between the external walls of the reaction conversion tower and the walls of the housing along the entire circumference of the reaction conversion tower which serves for preheating of the hydrocarbon gas and the steam before their input into the reaction conversion tower. The installation is designed for conversion of natural gas, C/sub 3/H/sub 8/ and other hydrocarbon gases and of liquid hydrocarbons (Uv) into synthesis gas. The design provides for even heating of the catalyst during reforming. The use of ceramic materials for the reaction conversion tower prevents sedimentation of coke on the walls of the reaction tower.

  5. Catalytic Routes for the Conversion of Biomass Derivatives to Hydrocarbons and/or Platform Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silks, III, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Unprotected carbohydrates were reacted in amine-catalyzed cascade reactions with various methyl ketones to give a direct access to C-glycosides by an operationally simple protocol. As the reaction mechanism,an aldol condensation followed by an intramolecular conjugate addition is assumed.

  6. Partial conversion of hydrocarbons to syngas and hydrogen in volumetric radiation burners as a prospective way to enhance the performance characteristics of power engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, V. S.; Shmelev, V. M.; Shapovalova, O. V.; Rakhmetov, A. N.; Strekova, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    New type of syngas generator based on the partial conversion of natural gas (methane) or heavier hydrocarbons in volumetric permeable matrix burners in the conditions of locked infrared (IR) radiation is suggested as a high-productive, adaptable, and rather simple way of syngas and hydrogen production for various low-scale applications including enhancing the performance characteristics of power engines.

  7. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  8. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O(3 P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Mhairi; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Reed, Stewart K.; Westacott, Robin E.; Costen, Matthew L.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2007-09-01

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O(3P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  9. Secondary reactions of tar during thermochemical biomass conversion[Dissertation 14341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morf, P.O.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich presents and discusses the results obtained during the examination of the processes involved in the formation and conversion of tar in biomass gasification plant. Details are given on the laboratory reactor system used to provide separated tar production and conversion for the purposes of the experiments carried out. The results of analyses made of the tar and the gaseous products obtained after its conversion at various temperatures are presented. The development of kinetic models using the results of the experiments that were carried out is described. The results of the experiments and modelling are compared with the corresponding results obtained using a full-scale down-draft, fixed-bed gasifier. The author is of the opinion that the reaction conditions found in full-scale gasifiers can be well simulated using heterogeneous tar conversion experiments using the lab reactor system.

  10. Ring-closing metathesis reactions: interpretation of conversion-time data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vasco; Wannowius, Klaus-Jürgen; Wolff, Christiane; Thiele, Christina M; Plenio, Herbert

    2013-11-25

    Conversion-time data were recorded for various ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions that lead to five- or six-membered cyclic olefins by using different precatalysts of the Hoveyda type. Slowly activated precatalysts were found to produce more RCM product than rapidly activated complexes, but this comes at the price of slower product formation. A kinetic model for the analysis of the conversion-time data was derived, which is based on the conversion of the precatalyst (Pcat) into the active species (Acat), with the rate constant k(act), followed by two parallel reactions: 1) the catalytic reaction, which utilizes Acat to convert reactants into products, with the rate k(cat), and 2) the conversion of Acat into the inactive species (Dcat), with the rate k(dec). The calculations employ two experimental parameters: the concentration of the substrate (c(S)) at a given time and the rate of substrate conversion (-dc(S)/dt). This provides a direct measure of the concentration of Acat and enables the calculation of the pseudo-first-order rate constants k(act), k(cat), and k(dec) and of k(S) (for the RCM conversion of the respective substrate by Acat). Most of the RCM reactions studied with different precatalysts are characterized by fast k(cat) rates and by the k(dec) value being greater than the k(act) value, which leads to quasistationarity for Acat. The active species formed during the activation step was shown to be the same, regardless of the nature of different Pcats. The decomposition of Acat occurs along two parallel pathways, a unimolecular (or pseudo-first-order) reaction and a bimolecular reaction involving two ruthenium complexes. Electron-deficient precatalysts display higher rates of catalyst deactivation than their electron-rich relatives. Slowly initiating Pcats act as a reservoir, by generating small stationary concentrations of Acat. Based on this, it can be understood why the use of different precatalysts results in different substrate conversions in

  11. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  12. Influence of the Reaction Temperature on the Nature of the Active and Deactivating Species During Methanol-to-Olefins Conversion over H-SAPO-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The selectivity toward lower olefins during the methanol-to-olefins conversion over H-SAPO-34 at reaction temperatures between 573 and 773 K has been studied with a combination of operando UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and online gas chromatography. It was found that the selectivity toward propylene increases in the temperature range of 573–623 K, while it decreases in the temperature range of 623–773 K. The high degree of incorporation of olefins, mainly propylene, into the hydrocarbon pool affects the product selectivity at lower reaction temperatures. The nature and dynamics of the active and deactivating hydrocarbon species with increasing reaction temperature were revealed by a non-negative matrix factorization of the time-resolved operando UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The active hydrocarbon pool species consist of mainly highly methylated benzene carbocations at temperatures between 573 and 598 K, of both highly methylated benzene carbocations and methylated naphthalene carbocations at 623 K, and of only methylated naphthalene carbocations at temperatures between 673 and 773 K. The operando spectroscopy results suggest that the nature of the active species also influences the olefin selectivity. In fact, monoenylic and highly methylated benzene carbocations are more selective to the formation of propylene, whereas the formation of the group of low methylated benzene carbocations and methylated naphthalene carbocations at higher reaction temperatures (i.e., 673 and 773 K) favors the formation of ethylene. At reaction temperatures between 573 and 623 K, catalyst deactivation is caused by the gradual filling of the micropores with methylated naphthalene carbocations, while between 623 and 773 K the formation of neutral poly aromatics and phenanthrene/anthracene carbocations are mainly responsible for catalyst deactivation, their respective contribution increasing with increasing reaction temperature. Methanol pulse experiments at

  13. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

    1988-05-20

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

  14. Dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of O(3P) atoms with hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Hailey; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Henderson, David A.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2003-11-01

    We describe an experimental approach to the determination of the nascent internal state distribution of gas-phase products of a gas-liquid interfacial reaction. The system chosen for study is O(3P) atoms with the surface of liquid deuterated squalane, a partially branched long-chain saturated hydrocarbon, C30D62. The nascent OD products are detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Both OD (v'=0) and (v'=1) were observed in significant yield. The rotational distributions in both vibrational levels are essentially the same, and are characteristic of a Boltzmann distribution at a temperature close to that of the liquid surface. This contrasts with the distributions in the corresponding homogeneous gas-phase reactions. We propose a preliminary interpretation in terms of a dominant trapping-desorption mechanism, in which the OD molecules are retained at the surface sufficiently long to cause rotational equilibration but not complete vibrational relaxation. The significant yield of vibrationally excited OD also suggests that the surface is not composed entirely of -CD3 endgroups, but that secondary and/or tertiary units along the backbone are exposed.

  15. Comparison of automatically generated reaction mechanism for oxidation of simple hydrocarbons in IC engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mansha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a detailed kinetic reaction mechanism, consisting of 208 reactions and 79 species, has been developed todescribe the oxidation of simple hydrocarbon fuel (natural gas in IC engine. The performance of the proposed mechanismis tested using simulation, tool CHEMKIN 4.1.1, and experimental measurements. The simulation results of the proposedreaction scheme were compared with those of reference mechanisms (GRI v3.0 and Konnov 0.5 version as well as experimentaldata. Based upon simulation results, it can be concluded that the proposed mechanism shows good concordanceswith GR I3.0 mechanism especially in the prediction of temperature, pressure, and major product species (H2O, CO2 profilesat stoichiometric conditions (= 1.0. Although, there are some discrepancies among each predicted profile, the proposeddetailed mechanism is good to describe the oxidation of natural gas in IC engine. The experimental data also showed favorableresults for prediction of major product species (CO2, H2O & CO at various engine operating speeds in idle mode.

  16. Pattern of explosive reaction between uranium hexafluoride and hydrocarbon oils. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, K.E.

    1986-03-21

    Examination of uranium hexafluoride release incidents occurring over the past three decades of ORGDP experience has identified only four which apparently involved an explosion of a container resulting from reaction between uranium hexafluoride and an impurity. These four incidents exhibit a certain degree of commonality. Each has involved: (1) condensed phase uranium hexafluoride, (2) a moderately elevated temperature, (3) a sufficient quantity of uranium hexafluoride for a significant partial pressure to be maintained independently above that which can be consumed by chemical reaction, and (4) an organic liquid (probably hydrocarbon oil) accidentally present in the container as a contaminant. The purpose of this investigative search was to establish some conditional pattern for these four incidents to which their violent consequences could be attributed. Fortunately, the number of such incidents is relatively small, which emphasizes even more pointedly the unfortunate fact that documentation ranges from thorough to very limited. Documented sources of information are given in the bibliography. Copies of those which are not readily available are contained in six appendices. 8 refs.

  17. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  18. The Internal Conversion Electron and Gamma Spectroscopy in the 14N + 197Au Reaction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    KrXf3l, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Perkowski, J.; Sobczak, K.; Kisielinski, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Kownacki, J.; Korman, A.

    2008-02-01

    The first ``in-beam'' spectra of the internal conversion electrons were collected in the 197Au(14N,5n)206Rn fusion evaporation reaction by new constructed electron spectrometer. The measurements were carried out in electron-gamma and gamma-gamma coincidence mode with use of electron spectrometer coupled to OSIRIS II gamma array at Heavy Ion Laboratory (HIL) of the Warsaw University. The analysis of the data for gamma -gamma coincidence measurement disclosed new transitions in 206Rn excited nucleus. Experimentally obtained internal conversion coefficient allowed to determine multipolarity of the new observed transition in 206Rn nucleus.

  19. Sequence-Fenton Reaction for Decreasing Phenol Formation during Benzene Chemical Conversion in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SB Mortazavi, A Sabzali, A Rezaee

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced oxidation processes such as Fenton reagent generates highly reactive hydroxyl free radicals to oxidize various compounds in the water and wastewater. The efficiency of different Fenton-related oxidative processes such as Fenton, solar-Fenton, UV-Fenton and Fenton reactions in different batch reactors was examined using benzene as pollutant in aqueous solutions. A batch study was conducted to optimize parameters like pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, reaction time and ferrous ion concentration governing the Fenton process. The concentrations of produced phenol were measured at the end of the reactions. The role of sequence reaction was tested for decreasing phenol formation during benzene conversion. At optimum conditions, different Fenton-related processes were compared for the degradation of benzene. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in photo-Fenton processes as compared to conventional Fenton process. The formation of phenol in Fenton reaction depended on reaction time, sequence in reaction, purity of hydrogen peroxide and other compounds such as alcohols that contributed into the reaction. In the Fenton process, carboxylic acids like acetic acid and oxalic acid were formed as the end products during the complete degradation of benzene. With the increase in mono-valence, two-valence ions and hardness, Fenton's efficiency decreased, respectively. Sequence Fenton reaction produced less phenol and its end products had smaller COD as compared to conventional Fenton process.

  20. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels with the largest chemical species being pyrene (C 16H 10), this new mechanism is generated by adding PAH sub-mechanisms to account for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C 24H 12). The density functional theory (DFT) and the transition state theory (TST) have been adopted to evaluate the rate constants for several PAH reactions. The mechanism is validated in the premixed laminar flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, benzene and ethylene. The characteristics of PAH formation in the counterflow diffusion flames of iso-octane/toluene and n-heptane/toluene mixtures have also been tested for both the soot formation and soot formation/oxidation flame conditions. The predictions of the concentrations of large PAHs in the premixed flames having available experimental data are significantly improved with the new mechanism as compared to the base mechanism. The major pathways for the formation of large PAHs are identified. The test of the counterflow diffusion flames successfully predicts the PAH behavior exhibiting a synergistic effect observed experimentally for the mixture fuels, irrespective of the type of flame (soot formation flame or soot formation/oxidation flame). The reactions that lead to this synergistic effect in PAH formation are identified through the rate-of-production analysis. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  1. Greenhouse Gas Conversion by Homogeneous Salen Catalyst Systems under Very Mild Reaction Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyungsock; Song, Sanghoon; Ahn, Sunghyun; Kim, Taesoon; Kim, Beomsik; Chang, Taesun [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Homogeneous salen catalyt systems were investigated for the conversion of greenhouse gas into cyclic carbonate under room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Salen complexes were more active than salophen complexes. Neither electron withdrawing nor donating group showed lower conversion efficiency. Co-catalysts such as moisture or ammonium salt increased the conversion efficiency dramatically. These results have potential to decrease carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel combustions under mild condition. One of the main scientific challenges in the 21st century is the global warming due to the increasing level of carbon dioxide. The consumption of fossil fuels is continue to increase with emitting substantial amount of green house gas. The solution currently considered is capturing and storing of carbon dioxide which compressing carbon dioxide and then storing it into oil wells or under the ocean. The other solution include converting the carbon dioxide into useful chemicals with significant commercial demand, but low chemical reactivity of carbon dioxide restricts the chemical reactions.

  2. SiC Conversion Coating Prepared from Silica-Graphite Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Back-Sub Sung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The β-SiC conversion coatings were successfully synthesized by the SiO(v-graphite(s reaction between silica powder and graphite specimen. This paper is to describe the effects on the characteristics of the SiC conversion coatings, fabricated according to two different reaction conditions. FE-SEM, FE-TEM microstructural morphologies, XRD patterns, pore size distribution, and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite were investigated. In the XRD pattern and SAD pattern, the coating layers showed cubic SiC peak as well as hexagonal SiC peak. The SiC coatings showed somewhat different characteristics with the reaction conditions according to the position arrangement of the graphite samples. The SiC coating on graphite, prepared in reaction zone (2, shows higher intensity of beta-SiC main peak (111 in XRD pattern as well as rather lower porosity and smaller main pore size peak under 1 μm.

  3. Conversion Reaction Mechanisms in Lithium Ion Batteries: Study of the Binary Metal Fluoride Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Robert, Rosa; Chernova, Natasha A.; Pereira, Nathalie; Omenya, Fredrick; Badway, Fadwa; Hua, Xiao; Ruotolo, Michael; Zhang, Ruigang; Wu, Lijun; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Su, Dong; Key, Baris; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Grey, Clare P.; Amatucci, Glenn G.; Zhu, Yimei; Graetz, Jason (Binghamton); (Rutgers); (BNL); (Cambridge); (SBU)

    2015-10-15

    Materials that undergo a conversion reaction with lithium (e.g., metal fluorides MF{sub 2}: M = Fe, Cu, ...) often accommodate more than one Li atom per transition-metal cation, and are promising candidates for high-capacity cathodes for lithium ion batteries. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the conversion process, the origins of the large polarization during electrochemical cycling, and why some materials are reversible (e.g., FeF{sub 2}) while others are not (e.g., CuF{sub 2}). In this study, we investigated the conversion reaction of binary metal fluorides, FeF{sub 2} and CuF{sub 2}, using a series of local and bulk probes to better understand the mechanisms underlying their contrasting electrochemical behavior. X-ray pair-distribution-function and magnetization measurements were used to determine changes in short-range ordering, particle size and microstructure, while high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to measure the atomic-level structure of individual particles and map the phase distribution in the initial and fully lithiated electrodes. Both FeF{sub 2} and CuF{sub 2} react with lithium via a direct conversion process with no intercalation step, but there are differences in the conversion process and final phase distribution. During the reaction of Li{sup +} with FeF{sub 2}, small metallic iron nanoparticles (<5 nm in diameter) nucleate in close proximity to the converted LiF phase, as a result of the low diffusivity of iron. The iron nanoparticles are interconnected and form a bicontinuous network, which provides a pathway for local electron transport through the insulating LiF phase. In addition, the massive interface formed between nanoscale solid phases provides a pathway for ionic transport during the conversion process. These results offer the first experimental evidence explaining the origins of the high lithium reversibility in FeF{sub 2}. In contrast

  4. Modeling of the interplay between single-file diffusion and conversion reaction in mesoporous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. A strict single-file (no passing) constraint occurs in the diffusion within such narrow pores. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice–gas model for this reaction–diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction–diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction–diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion (SFD) in this multispecies system. Noting the shortcomings of mf-RDE and h-RDE, we then develop a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) formulation of appropriate gh-RDE which incorporates an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The gh-RDE elucidate the non-exponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth. Then an extended model of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material is developed to assess the effect of varying the reaction product – pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. The analysis is performed utilizing the generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport for both irreversible and reversible reactions.

  5. Dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of O(1D) with a liquid hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Carla; King, Kerry L; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2011-06-30

    The dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of the first electronically excited state of the oxygen atom, O((1)D), with the surface of a liquid hydrocarbon, squalane (C(30)H(62); 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) has been studied experimentally. Translationally hot O((1)D) atoms were generated by 193 nm photolysis of a low pressure (nominally 1 mTorr) of N(2)O a short distance (mean = 6 mm) above a continually refreshed liquid squalane surface. Nascent OH (X(2)Π, v' = 0) reaction products were detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on the OH A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π (1,0) band at the same distance above the surface. The speed distribution of the recoiling OH was characterized by measuring the appearance profiles as a function of photolysis-probe delay for selected rotational levels, N'. The rotational (and, partially, fine-structure) state distributions were also measured by recording LIF excitation spectra at selected photolysis-probe delays. The OH v' = 0 rotational distribution is bimodal and can be empirically decomposed into near thermal (~300 K) and much hotter (~6000 K) Boltzmann-temperature components. There is a strong positive correlation between rotational excitation and translation energy. However, the colder rotational component still represents a significant fraction (~30%) of the fastest products, which have substantially superthermal speeds. We estimate an approximate upper limit of 3% for the quantum yield of OH per O((1)D) atom that collides with the surface. By comparison with established mechanisms for the corresponding reactions in the gas phase, we conclude that the rotationally and translationally hot products are formed via a nonstatistical insertion mechanism. The rotationally cold but translationally hot component is most likely produced by direct abstraction. Secondary collisions at the liquid surface of products of either of the previous two mechanisms are most likely responsible for the rotationally and translationally cold

  6. Mechanistic and kinetic investigations on the role of methanol and dimethyl ether in the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Espín, Juan Salvador Martínez

    2017-01-01

    The main scope of this PhD thesis was to gain knowledge on the mechanistic and kinetic behavior of methanol and DME in the industrially relevant Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction with the use of zeolitic materials as catalysts. Industrial MTH processes use methanol, DME or combined methanol/DME feeds over zeolitic catalysts. Methanol and its dehydration product, DME, are conventionally attributed an analogous behavior in MTH; however, a thorough investigation on the theme is still missi...

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  8. The bacterial catabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Characterization of three hydratase-aldolase-catalyzed reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake A. LeVieux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are highly toxic, pervasive environmental pollutants with mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic properties. There is interest in exploiting the nutritional capabilities of microbes to remove PAHs from various environments including those impacted by improper disposal or spills. Although there is a considerable body of literature on PAH degradation, the substrates and products for many of the enzymes have never been identified and many proposed activities have never been confirmed. This is particularly true for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. As a result, pathways for the degradation of these compounds are proposed to follow one elucidated for naphthalene with limited experimental verification. In this pathway, ring fission produces a species that can undergo a non-enzymatic cyclization reaction. An isomerase opens the ring and catalyzes a cis to trans double bond isomerization. The resulting product is the substrate for a hydratase-aldolase, which catalyzes the addition of water to the double bond of an α,β-unsaturated ketone, followed by a retro-aldol cleavage. Initial kinetic and mechanistic studies of the hydratase-aldolase in the naphthalene pathway (designated NahE and two hydratase-aldolases in the phenanthrene pathway (PhdG and PhdJ have been completed. Crystallographic work on two of the enzymes (NahE and PhdJ provides a rudimentary picture of the mechanism and a platform for future work to identify the structural basis for catalysis and the individual specificities of these hydratase-aldolases.

  9. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by heterogeneous reactions with N 2O 5 on atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, Richard M.; Guo, Jiazhen; Guo, Zhishi; McDow, Stephen R.

    The degradation of particulate polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on atmospheric soot particles in the presence of gas phase dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2O 5) was explored. Dilute diesel and wood soot particles containing PAH were reacted with˜10ppm of N 2O 5 in a 200 ℓ continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). To provide a stable source of particles for reaction in the CSTR, diesel or wood soot particles were injected at night into a 25 m 3 Teflon outdoor chamber. The large chamber served as a reservoir for the feed aerosol, and the aerosol could then be introduced at a constant flow rate into the CSTR. PAH-N 2O 5 heterogeneous rate constants for wood soot at 15°C ranged from2 × 10 -18to5 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. For diesel soot the rate constants at 16°C were higher and ranged from5 × 10 -18to30 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. Comparisons with other studies suggest that sunlight is the most important factor which influences PAH decay. This is followed by ozone, NO 2, N 2O 5 and nitric acid. The rate constants of nitro-PAH formation from a parent PAH and N 2O 5 were of the order of1 × 10 -19-1 × 10 -18 molecules -1s -1. The uncertainty associated with all of these rate constants is± a factor of 3. Given, however, the small magnitude of the rate constants and the low levels of N 2O 5 present in the atmosphere, we concluded that PAH heterogeneous reactions with gas phase N 2O 5 degrade particle-bound PAH or to form nitro-PAH from PAH are not very important. (Direct application of the specific rate constants derived in this study to ambient atmospheres should not be undertaken unless the ambient particle size distributions and chemical composition of the particles are similar to the ones reported in this study.)

  10. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  11. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which

  12. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

  13. Module filter for separating hydrocarbons and catalytic conversion of CO into CO sub 2. Modulfilter zur Abscheidung von Kohlenwasserstoffen und katalytischen Umwandlung von CO in CO sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Igelbuescher, H.; Gresch, H.; Dewert, H.

    1988-02-11

    A process is known for separating the hydrocarbons contained in the outside air via chemical absorption filters and for converting the CO into harmless CO{sub 2} by means of a catalyst. However, it proves to be a disadvantage that the catalyst in the CO conversion is saturated by humidity and becomes ineffective. In order to overcome this disadvantage, it is proposed, according to the invention, that a chemical absorption filter layer to separate acid harmful gases and/or those containing hydrocarbons on the clean gas side is provided with a cassette-shaped, easily replaceable catalyst layer which can be placed on it, which consists of a drying layer, preferably silica gel, and a subsequent hopkalite layer, where the cassettes are inserted in reusable transport containers which must be closed airtight. The transport containers can consist of plastic envelopes, which are provided with a damp-proof means of closing. (orig.).

  14. Reactions of ethynyl radicals as a source of C 4 and C 5 hydrocarbons in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, F.; Schleyer, P. v. R.; Schaefer, H. F., III; Kaiser, R. I.

    2002-06-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments augmented by electronic structure computations of neutral-neutral reactions of the ethynyl radical (C 2H, X 2Σ+) with the unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C 2H 2), methylacetylene (CH 3CCH), and allene (H 2CCCH 2) are reviewed briefly. All reactions are characterized by a C 2H versus H atom exchange and in the case of the C 2H/C 2H 2 system by an additional molecular hydrogen (H 2) elimination pathway. The attack of the ethynyl radical onto the π-electron density of the unsaturated hydrocarbons has no entrance barrier and initializes each reaction. Consecutive hydrogen atom migrations may precede the exit channels. Diacetylene (HCCCCH), the butadiynyl radical (HCCCC), methyldiacetylene (CH 3CCCCH), ethynylallene (H 2CCH(C 2H)), and penta-4-diyne (HCC(CH 2)C 2H) were identified as products of which only diacetylene has yet been observed in Titan's atmosphere. Our results, however, strongly suggest the presence of all these species on Titan, and the Cassini-Huygens mission is likely to detect these upon arrival in the Saturnian system in 2004.

  15. CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH ELECTRIC FIELD ENHANCED LOW TEMPERATURE PLASMA CATALYSIS%电场增强低温等离子催化合成C2烃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas is not only playing an increasing important role in energy and chemicals supplies in 21st century but is also the second most important component of the greenhouse gases. Clean and direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons (ethane, ethene and acetylene) through AC and DC plasma catalysis enhanced by electric field was studied at low temperature ranging from 50?℃ to 100?℃, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions. The influence of form of the electrode, distance between the electrodes, voltage, diameter of reactor, flow of inlet methane, N2/CH4(mole) and 20 catalysts were tested under low temperature plasma. The results indicated that best form of the electrode was plate; the better distance between the electrode was 5mm; the appropriate voltage was 38V(AC);the apparent diameter of reactor was 17mm, the likely flow range flux of inlet methane was 60—80?ml*min-1, the suitable ratio of N2/CH4 (mole) was 0.5—1.0.The yield of C2 hydrocarbons was the highest on V2O5,ZnO(5%)/ZSM-5-38 catalyst, the yield of ethene was the highest on La0.8Sr0.2CrO3,ZnO catalyst. The results are better than those obtained through conventional reaction of oxidation coupling of methane.

  16. Characterization of the major reactions during conversion of lignin to carbon fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Mainka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight design is an essential part of the overall Volkswagen strategy for reducing the CO2 emissions. The use of carbon fiber offers an enormous lightweight potential. In comparison to steel enabling a mass reduction of up to 70% in automotive parts without a degradation of the functionalities is possible. Today, the use of carbon fiber is limited in mass series applications of the automotive industry by the cost of the conventional C-fiber precursor polyacrylonitrile (PAN. 50% of the cost of a conventional carbon fiber already belongs to the cost of the PAN precursor. Lignin as a precursor for carbon fiber production can realize enormous savings in cost. For qualifying lignin-based carbon fiber for automotive mass production a detailed characterization of this new material is necessary. Therefore, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used. Using the results of these experiments, the major reactions during conversion of lignin to carbon fiber are proposed.

  17. Features of non-oxidative conversion of methane into aromatic hydrocarbons over Mo-containing zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. A.; Korobitsyna, L. L.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of study of methane conversion under non-oxidative conditions over molybdenum containing zeolite catalysts prepared by solid-phase synthesis using nanosized molybdenum powder are presented. The kinetic mechanisms of the process behavior under different conditions of methane dehydroaromatization are determined. It is shown that nonoxidative conversion of methane can occur both in the external diffusion and kinetic regions, depending on the methane flow rate. It is found out, that the optimum temperature of the methane conversion is 750 °C. It is shown that increased methane conversion is observed at the feed space velocity of methane decreasing from 1500 to 500 h-1.

  18. Ab initio study of the influence of resonance stabilization on intramolecular ring closure reactions of hydrocarbon radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2016-03-28

    The intramolecular ring closure reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbon radicals potentially play an important role for the formation of molecular weight growth species, especially during the pyrolysis and oxidation of alkenes under low to intermediate temperatures. In this work we investigated a series of intramolecular cycloaddition reactions of both allylic- and alkyl-type dienyl radicals. In the first set of reactions, a resonant linear radical is converted into a non-resonant cyclic radical. In the second set, a non-resonant linear alkenyl radical isomerizes to either a resonant cyclic radical or a cyclic carbinyl radical. In both cases, three different reaction schemes are examined based on the location of the partially-formed resonance structure in the cyclic transition state. For each reaction scheme, both the endo- and exo-pathways were investigated. High pressure rate parameters are obtained from the results of CBS-QB3 electronic structure calculations combined with canonical transition state theory calculations. The results are discussed in the context of a Benson-type model to examine the impact of the partially-formed resonance stabilization on both the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The results are compared to previously reported rate parameters for cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals. The differences in the activation energies are primarily due to the bimolecular component of the activation energy. However, in some cases, the presence of the partial resonance structure significantly increases the strain energy for the ring that is formed in the transition state. The pre-exponential factors are also impacted by the formation of a partial resonance structure in the transition state. Lastly, the C6H9 potential energy surface is examined to show how the trends that are outlined here can be used to estimate rate parameters, which are needed to analyze pressure-dependent reaction systems.

  19. Quantum chemical investigation of the reaction of O(32) with certain hydrocarbon radicals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashutosh Gupta; R P Singh; V B Singh; Brijesh Kumar Mishra; N Sathyamurthy

    2007-09-01

    The reaction of ground-state atomic oxygen [O(32)] with methyl, ethyl, -propyl and isopropyl radicals has been studied using the density functional method and the complete basis set model. The energies of the reactants, products, reaction intermediates and various transition states as well as the reaction enthalpies have been computed. The possible product channels and the reaction pathways are identified in each case. In the case of methyl radical the minimum energy reaction pathway leads to the products CO + H2 + H. In the case of ethyl radical the most facile pathway leads to the products, methanal + CH3 radical. For propyl radical (- and iso-), the minimum energy reaction pathway would lead to the channel containing ethanal + methyl radical.

  20. Methanol to olefin Conversion on HSAPO-34 zeolite from periodic density functional theory calculations: a complete cycle of side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.M.; Wang, Y.D.; Xie, Z.K.; Liu, Z.P. [SINOPEC, Shanghai (China)

    2009-03-15

    For its unique position in the coal chemical industry, the methanol to olefin (MTO) reaction has been a hot topic in zeolite catalysis. Due to the complexities of catalyst structure and reaction networks, many questions such as how the olefin chain is built from methanol remain elusive. On the basis of periodic density functional theory calculations, this work establishes the first complete catalytic cycle for MTO reaction via hexamethylbenzene (HMB) trapped in HSAPO-34 zeolite based on the so-called side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism. The cycle starts from the methylation of HMB that leads to heptamethylbenzenium ion (heptaMB{sup +}) intermediate. This is then followed by the growth of side chain via repeated deprotonation of benzenium ions and methylation of the exocyclic double bond. Ethene and propene can finally be released from the side ethyl and isopropyl groups of benzenium ions by deprotonation and subsequent protonation steps. We demonstrate that (i) HMB/HSAPO-34 only yields propene as the primary product based on the side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism and (ii) an indirect proton-shift step mediated by water that is always available in the system is energetically more favorable than the traditionally regarded internal hydrogen-shift step. Finally, the implications of our results toward understanding the effect of acidity of zeolite on MTO activity are also discussed.

  1. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  2. Atomistic Conversion Reaction Mechanism of WO 3 in Secondary Ion Batteries of Li, Na, and Ca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15261 USA; Gu, Meng [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Xiao, Haiyan [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 China; Luo, Langli [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Shao, Yuyan [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Gao, Fei [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA; Du, Yingge [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Mao, Scott X. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15261 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-04-13

    Reversible insertion and extraction of ionic species into a host lattice governs the basic operating principle for both rechargeable battery (such as lithium batteries) and electrochromic devices (such as ANA Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner electrochromic window). Intercalation and/or conversion are two fundamental chemical processes for some materials in response to the ion insertion. The interplay between these two chemical processes has never been established. It is speculated that the conversion reaction is initiated by ion intercalation. However, experimental evidence of intercalation and subsequent conversion remains unexplored. Here, using in situ HRTEM and spectroscopy, we captured the atomistic conversion reaction processes during lithium, sodium and calcium ion insertion into tungsten trioxide (WO3) single crystal model electrodes. An intercalation step right prior to conversion is explicitly revealed at atomic scale for the first time for these three ion species. Combining nanoscale diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, it is found that, beyond intercalation, the inserted ion-oxygen bonding formation destabilized the transition-metal framework which gradually shrunk, distorted and finally collapsed to a pseudo-amorphous structure. This study provides a full atomistic picture on the transition from intercalation to conversion, which is of essential for material applications in both secondary ion batteries and electrochromic devices.

  3. Unlocking the potential of SnS2: Transition metal catalyzed utilization of reversible conversion and alloying reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi Xiang; Wang, Ye; Liu, Bo; Kong, Dezhi; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Tupei; Yang, Hui Ying

    2017-01-01

    The alloying-dealloying reactions of SnS2 proceeds with the initial conversion reaction of SnS2 with lithium that produces Li2S. Unfortunately, due to the electrochemical inactivity of Li2S, the conversion reaction of SnS2 is irreversible, which significantly limit its potential applications in lithium-ion batteries. Herein, a systematic understanding of transition metal molybdenum (Mo) as a catalyst in SnS2 anode is presented. It is found that Mo catalyst is able to efficiently promote the reversible conversion of Sn to SnS2. This leads to the utilization of both conversion and alloying reactions in SnS2 that greatly increases lithium storage capability of SnS2. Mo catalyst is introduced in the form of MoS2 grown directly onto self-assembled vertical SnS2 nanosheets that anchors on three-dimensional graphene (3DG) creating a hierarchal nanostructured named as SnS2/MoS2/3DG. The catalytic effect results in a significantly enhanced electrochemical properties of SnS2/MoS2/3DG; a high initial Coulombic efficiency (81.5%) and high discharge capacities of 960.5 and 495.6 mA h g-1 at current densities of 50 and 1000 mA g-1, respectively. Post cycling investigations using ex situ TEM and XPS analysis verifies the successful conversion reaction of SnS2 mediated by Mo. The successful integration of catalyst on alloying type metal sulfide anode creates a new avenue towards high energy density lithium anodes.

  4. Role of glyoxal in SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: gas-phase reaction trumps reactive uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the significance of glyoxal acting as an intermediate species leading to SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under humid conditions. Rapid SOA formation from glyoxal uptake onto aqueous (NH42SO4 seed particles is observed; however, glyoxal did not partition to SOA or SOA coated aqueous seed during all aromatic hydrocarbon experiments (RH up to 80%. Glyoxal is found to only influence SOA formation by raising hydroxyl (OH radical concentrations. Four experimental approaches supporting this conclusion are presented in this paper: (1 increased SOA formation and decreased SOA volatility in the toluene + NOx photooxidation system with additional glyoxal was reproduced by matching OH radical concentrations through H2O2 addition; (2 glyoxal addition to SOA seed formed from toluene + NOx photooxidation did not increase observed SOA volume; (3 SOA formation from toluene + NOx photooxidation with and without deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed resulted in similar SOA growth, consistent with a coating of SOA preventing glyoxal uptake onto deliquesced (NH42SO4 seed; and (4 the fraction of a C4H9+ fragment (observed by Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS from SOA formed by 2-tert-butylphenol (BP oxidation was unchanged in the presence of additional glyoxal despite enhanced SOA formation. This study suggests that glyoxal uptake onto aerosol is minor when the surface (and near-surface of aerosols are primarily composed of secondary organic compounds.

  5. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O({sup 3} P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Mhairi [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bagot, Paul A J [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Koehler, Sven P K [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Reed, Stewart K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Westacott, Robin E [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Costen, Matthew L [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); McKendrick, Kenneth G [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O({sup 3}P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  6. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elçin Külah; Laurent Marot; Roland Steiner; Andriy Romanyuk; Thomas A Jung; Aneliia Wäckerlin; Ernst Meyer

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide...

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  8. A mechanistic basis for the effect of aluminum content on ethene selectivity in methanol-to-hydrocarbons conversion on HZSM-5

    KAUST Repository

    Khare, Rachit

    2017-03-20

    Increasing crystallize size or aluminum content in MFI-type zeolites independently enhances the propagation of the aromatics-based methylation/dealkylation cycle relative to that of the olefins-based methylation/cracking cycle in methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion and consequentially results in higher ethene selectivity. Ethene selectivity increases monotonically with increasing aluminum content for HZSM-5 samples with nearly identical crystallite size consequent to an increase in the intracrystalline contact time analogous to our recent report detailing the effects of crystallite size (Khare et al., 2015) on MTH selectivity. The confected effects of crystallite size and site density on MTH selectivity can therefore, be correlated using a descriptor that represents the average number of acid sites that an olefin-precursor will interact with before elution.

  9. Biomass Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels Using the MixAlcoTM Process Conversion de la biomasse en combustibles hydrocarbonés au moyen du procédé MixAlcoTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taco-Vasquez S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The MixAlcoTM process converts biomass to hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline using the following generic steps: pretreatment, fermentation, descumming, dewatering, thermal ketonization, distillation, hydrogenation, oligomerization and saturation. This study describes the production of bio-gasoline from chicken manure and shredded office paper, both desirable feedstocks that do not require pretreatment. Using a mixed culture of microorganisms derived from marine soil, the biomass was fermented to produce a dilute aqueous solution of carboxylate salts, which were subsequently descummed and dried. The dry salts were thermally converted to raw ketones, which were distilled to remove impurities. Using Raney nickel catalyst, the distilled ketones were hydrogenated to mixed secondary alcohols ranging from C3 to C12. Using zeolite HZSM-5 catalyst, these alcohols were oligomerized to hydrocarbons in a plug -flow reactor. Finally, these unsaturated hydrocarbons were hydrogenated to produce a mixture of hydrocarbons that can be blended into commercial gasoline. Le procédé MixAlcoTM convertit la biomasse en hydrocarbures (par exemple, en essence selon les étapes génériques suivantes : prétraitement, fermentation, écumage, déshydratation, cétonisation thermique, distillation, hydrogénation, oligomérisation et saturation. Cette étude décrit la production de bioessence à partir de fumier de poulet et de papier en lambeaux, ces deux sources étant des matières premières convoitées ne nécessitant pas de prétraitement. À l’aide d’une culture mixte de microorganismes dérivés de sols marins, la biomasse a été soumise à une fermentation de manière à produire une solution aqueuse diluée de sels de carboxylates, ultérieurement écumés et séchés. Les sels séchés ont été thermiquement convertis en cétones brutes, ensuite distillées afin d’éliminer les impuretés. À l’aide du catalyseur à base de nickel de Raney, les c

  10. Effect of NiW Modified HZSM-5 and HY Zeolites on Hydrocracking Conversion of Crude Palm Oil to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Subsadsana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic conversion of crude palm oil over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites modified with NiW as catalysts in the hydrocracking process was investigated. These zeolites supported by NiW catalysts were prepared employing the impregnation technique. NiW was added to the zeolites in order to induce bi-functional properties (both acid and metal sites in the catalysts. Subsequently, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD andnitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis. The catalytic activity of prepared catalysts was evaluated through the conversion of crude palm oil to biofuels. These results indicate that the incorporation of NiW over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites improves the conversion efficiency and enhances the yield of biofuel (gasoline, kerosene, and diesel, possibly due to NiW promote of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reaction.

  11. Influence of the Reaction Temperature on the Nature of the Active and Deactivating Species during Methanol to Olefins Conversion over H-SSZ-13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borodina, E.; Meirer, F.; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Mokhtar, M.; Asiri, A. M.; Al-Thabaiti, S. A.; Basahel, S. N.; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbon species during the methanol to olefins (MTO) reaction over zeolite H-SSZ-13 has been systematically studied at reaction temperatures between 573 and 723 K with a combination of operando UV-vis spectroscopy and online gas chromatography. It was found that the applied reac

  12. X-Ray Imaging of SAPO-34 Molecular Sieves at the Nanoscale : Influence of Steaming on the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Sommer, Linn; Arstad, Bjornar; Buitrago-Sierra, Robison; Sepulveda-Escribano, Antonio; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Olsbye, Unni; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a severe steaming treatment on the physicochemical properties and catalytic performance of H-SAPO-34 molecular sieves during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction has been investigated with a combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), catalytic testing, and bul

  13. A linear energy relationship between activation energy and absolute hardness: a case study with the O(3P) atom-addition reactions to polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, Juan F; Truong, Thanh N; Mondragón, Fanor

    2008-09-11

    A new linear relationship between absolute hardness and global activation energy of O-addition reaction to a series of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) is presented. A total of seventeen O((3)P)-addition reactions were evaluated. Thermal rate constants were calculated for each elementary reaction and used to estimate the total rate constants. This information was employed to obtain the global activation energy. A new linear relationship is shown and is estimated that it can be used within the RC-TST framework to predict relative rate constants for any reaction within an O-addition to PAH class from just absolute hardness values.

  14. Reactions of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with chlorine and chlorine dioxide in coal tar lined pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, T.; Maier, M.; Sacher, F.; Maier, D. [University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler Bunte Institut

    1997-12-31

    In the presence of disinfectants, PAH are remobilised from the coal tar lining of water distribution mains. Reactions of the PAH with chlorine and chlorine dioxide can lead to chlorinated PAH that might show higher mutagenic effects that the parent PAH. Detection limits in the lower nanogram-per-litre level for the determination of PAH and chlorinated PAH were achieved by using solid phase micro extraction and a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric device. Thus, the reactions of four PAH (anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene) with chlorine and chlorine dioxide under conditions and at concentrations of common practice in the drinking water distribution system could be investigated. In batch experiments with demineralised and drinking water at pH 7, the concentrations of fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene remained constant, whereas anthracene reacted quantitatively with both disinfectants. The reaction of anthracene followed by pseudo-first order kinetics. In these reactions no chlorinated products could be detected, only monohydroxyanthracene and anthraquinone were identified. The toxic effect of a set of chlorinated and oxidised PAH was also examined.

  15. Synthesis of ordered conjugated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polymers through polymerization reaction on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongping; Zhao, Huiling; Lu, Yan;

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional pi-conjugated polymer chains with variable lengths have been synthesized successfully via thermal polymerization reaction on the Au(111) surface. Such polymer chains form parallel arrays along specific directions according to the initial assembly orientations of the close-packed Br...

  16. Enhanced reactivity of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to birnessite in soil: reaction kinetics and nonextractable residue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Woong; Lee, Seunghwan; Ryu, Hyerim; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kang, Ki-Hoon

    2008-05-01

    Phenanthrene and pyrene were not transformed by birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the presence of phenol. The phenoxy radicals generated from phenol by birnessite did not act as a mediator for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical reaction under the studied conditions. In contrast, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene and 1-hydroxypyrene were remarkably sensitive to birnessite. The disappearance patterns of the test compounds both in the aqueous phase and soil followed first-order kinetics, with a linear relationship found between the rate constants and the surface area of birnessite. Moreover, the data indicated that the reaction was faster in the presence of soil than in the aqueous phase probably because of the presence of hydroxyl groups in soil organic matter. Sequential solvent extraction was not successful in the recovery of 9-hydroxyphenanthrene from the birnessite-treated soil samples, and capillary electrophoresis data suggest the formation of nonextractable residues of the compound in soil. In addition, the acute toxicity determined by Microtox declined approximately 8.3 times in the soil samples treated with birnessite compared to untreated samples, demonstrating that the toxic compound was no longer present as its parent form.

  17. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  18. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  19. Reaction of niobium and tantalum neutral clusters with low pressure, unsaturated hydrocarbons in a pickup cell: From dehydrogenation to Met-Car formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S.-G.; Xie, Y.; Dong, F.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2006-10-01

    Neutral niobium and tantalum clusters (Nbn and Tan) are generated by laser ablation and supersonic expansion into a vacuum and are reacted in a pickup cell with various low pressure (˜1mTorr) unsaturated hydrocarbons (acetylene, ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene) under nearly single collision conditions. The bare metal clusters and their reaction products are ionized by a 193nm laser and detected by a time of flight mass spectrometer. Partially and fully dehydrogenated products are observed for small (n⩽m) and large (n⩾m) neutral metal clusters, respectively, with m ranging from 2 to 5 depending on the particular hydrocarbon. In addition to primary, single collision products, sequential addition products that are usually fully dehydrogenated are also observed. With toluene used as the reactant gas, carbon loss products are observed, among which Nb8C12 and Ta8C12 are particularly abundant, indicating that the Met-Car molecule M8C12 can be formed from the neutral metal cluster upon two collisions with toluene molecules. The dehydrogenation results for low pressure reactions are compared with those available from previous studies employing flow tube (high pressure) reactors. Low pressure and high pressure cluster ion reactions are also compared with the present neutral metal cluster reactions. Reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and metal surfaces are discussed in terms of the present neutral cluster results.

  20. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  1. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The Sr

  2. Conversion of dimethyl ether on zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, A.V.; Kulumbegov, R.V.; Khadzhiev, S.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis

    2006-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrocarbons was investigated using zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 type. 2% MexOy - 60% HZVM(analogue of ZSM-5)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Me = Zn, Ga, Fe, Co, V, Ni) catalyst samples have been obtained. The reaction was carried out in a fixed bed reaction set-up at 350-400 C, pressure 3 MPa, gas mix (% vol.): 24 DME, 76 N{sub 2}, WHSV=1300 l/l-{sub kat.}h. Most effective catalysts of DME conversion are pentasil based catalysts with promoter metals zinc, iron and cobalt by totality DME-conversion, gas and liquid hydrocarbon selectivity, ethylene and propylene content in gas. The best work temperatures are 350 and 375 C, thereupon increasing of temperature to 400 C leads to considerable growth of methane in hydrocarbon gas. Liquid hydrocarbons have high content of aromatics and iso-paraffins. Liquid hydrocarbon product is characterized by high octane number (RON) 90-98. (orig.)

  3. Equipment for gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    Equipment is proposed for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv), possibly in a mixture with air, in order to produce an inorganic gas, which chiefly consists of H2 and COx. It consists of a reaction pipe made of an inorganic refractory ceramic and equipped along the wall circumference with heaters. The reaction pipe is filled with a combined, multilayer catalyst (Kt) carrier, made of gamma-A1203 which in the transverse cross section has a multipore reticular or fibrous structure. Replacement of the traditional steel (St) materials for the walls of the reaction pipe with ceramic materials reduces the output of the hydrocarbon which contaminates the surface (Pv) of the catalyst; the use of a multilayer carrier for the catalyst made of gamma-A1203 with a porous reticular or fibrous structure reduces the pressure losses in the reactor and facilitates the replacement of the spent catalyst. The equipment is designed for vapor conversion of natural gas, C3H8, and vapors of kerosene, naphtha and so on.

  4. Modification of the performance of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts by metal addition in hydrocarbon reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Gerardo Carlos; Manuale, Debora Laura; Benitez, Viviana Monica; Vera, Carlos Roman; Yori, Juan Carlos, E-mail: jyori@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientifica y Tecnicas, Santiago del Estero Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    A study of the different hydrocarbon reactions over Ni doped WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts was performed. Ni was found as NiO at low Ni concentration while at high Ni concentrations a small fraction was present as a metal. For both cases, Ni strongly modified total acidity and concentration of strong acid sites. In the cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction, Ni addition promotes both benzene and methyl cyclopentane production. The hydroconversion activity (n-butane and n-octane) increases with the augment of total acidity produced by Ni. The selectivity to reaction products is modified according to the acid strength distribution changes produced by Ni addition. (author)

  5. Thermochemical benchmarking of hydrocarbon bond separation reaction energies: Jacob's ladder is not reversed!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Helge; Grimme, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    We reinvestigate the performance of Kohn-Sham density functional (DF) methods for a thermochemical test set of bond separation reactions of alkanes (BSR36) published recently by Steinmann et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2950 (2009)]. According to our results, the tested approximations perform for this rather special benchmark as usual. We show that the choice of reference enthalpies plays a crucial role in the assessment. Due to the large stoichiometric factors involved, errors of various origin are strongly amplified. Inconsistent reference data are avoided by computing reference energies at the CCSD(T)/CBS level. These are compared to results for a variety of standard DFs. Two different versions of London dispersion corrections (DFT-D2 and DFT-D3) are applied and found to be very significant. The most accurate results are obtained with B2GPPLYP-D2 (MAD = 0.4 kcal mol-1) B2PLYP-D2 (MAD = 0.5 kcal mol-1) and B97-D2 (MAD = 0.9 kcal mol-1 methods. Dispersion corrections not only improve the computed BSR energies but also diminish the accuracy differences between the DFs. The previous DFT-D2 version performs better due to error compensation of medium-range correlation effects between the semi-classical and the density-based description. We strongly recommend not to overinterpret results regarding DF accuracy when based on a single set of chemical reactions and to use high-level theoretical data for benchmarking purposes.

  6. Effects of P content in a P/HZSM-5 catalyst on the conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyin Lu; Yancong Liu

    2011-01-01

    A series of P/HZSM-5 catalysts prepared by impregnation method were used for ethanol conversion to lower olefins.The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),NH3-temperature-programmed desorption(NH3-TPD)and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements.It was found that the P/HZSM-5 catalysts showed high activity and selectivity toward light olefins.The selectivities of propylene and butylene can be improved with the introduction of phosphorus(P).When the content of P reached 3.0 wt%,more than 18.9% propylene in the gaseous products was obtained over the P/HZSM-5 catalyst at 450 ℃.The introduction of P modified the strong Br()nsted acid sites of the original HZSM-5 catalysts and P/HZSM-5 catalysts could resist coke formation and showed good stability.

  7. Pyrolysis reaction models of waste tires: Application of Master-Plots method for energy conversion via devolatilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmak Aslan, Dilan; Parthasarathy, Prakash; Goldfarb, Jillian L; Ceylan, Selim

    2017-10-01

    Land applied disposal of waste tires has far-reaching environmental, economic, and human health consequences. Pyrolysis represents a potential waste management solution, whereby the solid carbonaceous residue is heated in the absence of oxygen to produce liquid and gaseous fuels, and a solid char. The design of an efficient conversion unit requires information on the reaction kinetics of pyrolysis. This work is the first to probe the appropriate reaction model of waste tire pyrolysis. The average activation energy of pyrolysis was determined via iso-conversional methods over a mass fraction conversion range between 0.20 and 0.80 to be 162.8±23.2kJmol(-1). Using the Master Plots method, a reaction order of three was found to be the most suitable model to describe the pyrolytic decomposition. This suggests that the chemical reactions themselves (cracking, depolymerization, etc.), not diffusion or boundary layer interactions common with carbonaceous biomasses, are the rate-limiting steps in the pyrolytic decomposition of waste tires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelias, Christos T. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2009-11-01

    Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

  9. Chemical Conversion Pathways and Kinetic Modeling for the OH-Initiated Reaction of Triclosan in Gas-Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD. Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of kadd/ktotal and kabs/ktotal at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  10. Abstracts of the first ORNL workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: characterization and measurement with a view toward personnel protection. [PAH from coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B. (comp.)

    1976-11-01

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at a workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as those produced by coal conversion technologies. Their often carcinogenic nature imposes the obligation of providing adequate protection and measurement devices for workers and for the general public. The primary questions are as follows: What should be measured. Where and how should it be measured. What are the maximum permissible concentrations. This workshop and future workshops are intended to bring these problems into better focus and to help establish a consensus on what needs to be done in order to provide a dosimetry effort that will ensure the adequate protection of personnel. There were 32 attendees of this one-day meeting. The papers and discussions included current industrial hygiene practices, the development of government agency guidelines for worker protection, and a wide range of analytical techniques for PAH detection, some of which are still in the research stage and are unproven. The workshop was held at ORNL on February 26, 1976.

  11. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  12. One-pot conversion reactions of glycosyl boranophosphates into glycosyl phosphate derivatives via acyl phosphite intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuki; Wada, Takeshi

    2016-11-29

    A one-pot synthesis of glycosyl phosphates and their P-modified analogs from glycosyl boranophosphates under mild basic conditions has been conducted. (31)P NMR monitoring of the reaction mixture revealed that the key intermediates of these reactions were acyl phosphites, which could not be formed from the corresponding H-phosphonate diesters.

  13. Conversion characteristics and mechanism analysis of gaseous dichloromethane degraded by a VUV light in different reaction media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianming Yu; Wenji Cai; Jianmeng Chen; Li Feng; Yifeng Jiang; Zhuowei Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The photodegradation of gaseous dichloromethane (DCM) by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in a spiral reactor was investigated with different reaction media and initial concentrations.Through the combination of direct photolysis,O3 oxidation and HO oxidation,DCM was ultimately mineralized into inorganic compounds (such as HCl,CO2,H2O,etc.) in the air with relative humidity (RH) of 75%-85%.During the photodegradation process,some small organic acids (including formic acid,acetic acid) were also detected and the intermediates were more soluble than DCM,providing a possibility for its combination with subsequent biodegradation.Based on the detected intermediates and the confirmed radicals,a photodegradation pathway of DCM by VUV was proposed.With RH 75%-80% air as the reaction medium,the DCM removal followed the second-order kinetic model at inlet concentration of 100-1000 mg/m3.Kinetic analysis showed that the reaction media affected the kinetic constants of DCM conversion by a large extent,and RH 80% air could cause a much lower half-life for its conversion.Such results supported the possibility that VUV photodegradation could be used not only for the mineralization of DCM but also as a pretreatment before biodegradation.

  14. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  15. A Reduced Reaction Scheme for Volatile Nitrogen Conversion in Coal Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Saaby; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    In pulverised coal flames, the most important volatile nitrogen component forming NOx is HCN. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames it is necessary to have an adequate model for HCN oxidation. The present work was concerned with developing a model for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based...... that the CO/H-2 chemistry was described adequately, the reduced HCN/NH3/NO model compared very well with the detailed model over a wide range of stoichiometries. Decoupling of the HCN chemistry from the CO/H-2 chemistry resulted in over-prediction of the HCN oxidation rate under fuel rich conditions, but had...... negligible effect on the CO/H-2 chemistry. Comparison with simplified HCN models from the literature revealed significant differences, indicating that these models should be used cautiously in modelling volatile nitrogen conversion....

  16. Asymmetric pathways in the electrochemical conversion reaction of NiO as battery electrode with high storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesenberg, Ulrike; Marcus, Matthew A.; Shukla, Alpesh K.; Yi, Tanghong; McDermott, Eamon; Teh, Pei Fen; Srinivasan, Madhavi; Moewes, Alexander; Cabana, Jordi

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemical conversion reactions of transition metal compounds create opportunities for large energy storage capabilities exceeding modern Li-ion batteries. However, for practical electrodes to be envisaged, a detailed understanding of their mechanisms is needed, especially vis-à-vis the voltage hysteresis observed between reduction and oxidation. Here, we present such insight at scales from local atomic arrangements to whole electrodes. NiO was chosen as a simple model system. The most important finding is that the voltage hysteresis has its origin in the differing chemical pathways during reduction and oxidation. This asymmetry is enabled by the presence of small metallic clusters and, thus, is likely to apply to other transition metal oxide systems. The presence of nanoparticles also influences the electrochemical activity of the electrolyte and its degradation products and can create differences in transport properties within an electrode, resulting in localized reactions around converted domains that lead to compositional inhomogeneities at the microscale.

  17. Asymmetric pathways in the electrochemical conversion reaction of NiO as battery electrode with high storage capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesenberg, Ulrike; Marcus, Matthew A; Shukla, Alpesh K; Yi, Tanghong; McDermott, Eamon; Teh, Pei Fen; Srinivasan, Madhavi; Moewes, Alexander; Cabana, Jordi

    2014-11-20

    Electrochemical conversion reactions of transition metal compounds create opportunities for large energy storage capabilities exceeding modern Li-ion batteries. However, for practical electrodes to be envisaged, a detailed understanding of their mechanisms is needed, especially vis-à-vis the voltage hysteresis observed between reduction and oxidation. Here, we present such insight at scales from local atomic arrangements to whole electrodes. NiO was chosen as a simple model system. The most important finding is that the voltage hysteresis has its origin in the differing chemical pathways during reduction and oxidation. This asymmetry is enabled by the presence of small metallic clusters and, thus, is likely to apply to other transition metal oxide systems. The presence of nanoparticles also influences the electrochemical activity of the electrolyte and its degradation products and can create differences in transport properties within an electrode, resulting in localized reactions around converted domains that lead to compositional inhomogeneities at the microscale.

  18. Direct conversion from Jerusalem artichoke to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) using the Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Han, Jong-In

    2014-05-15

    A simple method for hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) production from non-crop biomass of the Jerusalem artichoke was developed using the Fenton reaction, in a mixture of 2-butanol and water. Four parameters (temperature, reaction time, Fe(2+) concentration, and H2O2 concentration) were identified as experimental factors, and HMF yield was selected as the response parameter. The experimental factors were optimised by employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The maximum HMF yield, of 46%, was obtained with a reaction time of 90 min, Fe(2+) concentration of 1.3 mM, and 0.47 M of H2O2 at 180 °C. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Thermochemical properties, rotation barriers, and group additivity for unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbons and radicals resulting from reaction of vinyl and phenyl radical systems with O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbarand, Nadia; Bockhorn, Henning; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2005-03-17

    Oxidation of unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric and combustion processes results in formation of linear and cyclic unsaturated, oxygenated-hydrocarbon intermediates. The thermochemical parameters delatafH degrees 298, S degrees 298, and C(p)(f298)(T) for these intermediates are needed to understand their stability and reaction paths in further oxidation. These properties are not available for a majority of these unsaturated oxy-hydrocarbons and their corresponding radicals, even via group additivity methods. Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity of a series of 40 oxygenated and non-oxygenated molecules, or radicals corresponding to hydrogen atom loss from the parent stable molecules are determined in this study. Enthalpy (delatafH degrees 298 in kcal mol(-1)) is derived from the density function calculations at the B3LYP/6-311g(d,p) calculated enthalpy of reaction (delatafH degrees rxn,298) and by use of isodesmic (work) reactions. Estimation of error in enthalpy delatafH degrees 298, from use of computational chemistry coupled with work reactions analysis, is presented using comparisons between the calculated and literature enthalpies of reaction. Entropies (S degrees 298) and heat capacities (C(p)(f298)(T)) were calculated using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) determined frequencies and geometries. Potential barriers for internal rotors in each molecule were determined and used (in place of torsion frequencies) to calculate contributions to S and C(p)(T) from the hindered rotors. Twenty-six groups for use in group additivity (GA) are also developed.

  20. Supercritical water oxidation of Quinazoline: Effects of conversion parameters and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan

    2016-09-01

    The supercritical water oxidation reaction of quinazoline and a set of related reaction products were investigated in batch reactors by varying the temperature (T, 400-600 °C), time (t, 0-400 s), water density (ρ, 70.79-166.28  kg m(-3)) and oxidation coefficient (OC, 0-4.0). The TOC removal efficiency (CRE) increased significantly as the OC increased, whereas this effect was very limited at high OC (>2.0). Lack of oxygen resulted in low CRE and TN removal efficiency (NRE), also cause coke-formation, and giving high yield of NH3 and nitrogenous organic intermediates. Prolonging reaction time did not provide an appreciable improvement on CRE but remarkably increased NRE at temperature higher than 500 °C. Pyrimidines and pyridines as the nitrogenous intermediates were largely found in GC-MS spectrum. Polymerization among benzene, phenyl radical and benzyl radical played important roles in the formation of PAHs, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, phenanthrene. These collective results showed how the yield of intermediate products responded to changes in the process variables, which permitted the development of a potential reaction network for supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline.

  1. 碳五烃催化裂解制取低碳烯烃反应性能及机理%Reaction Performance and Mechanism for Production of Propylene and Ethylene from C5 Hydrocarbon by Catalytic Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊涛; 滕加伟

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic cracking process for production of propylene and ethylene from C5 hydrocarbon with a catalyst of the ZSM-5 molecular sieve was investigated, especially the influence of reaction temperature and dilution ratio on product distribution was researched. The results showed that conversion of both C5 alkane and C5 olefins increased constantly with reaction temperature increasing, while the conversion of C5 olefins was much higher than that of C5 alkane. The yield of propylene and ethylene increased continuously from 8.84 % and 2.38 % at 450℃ to 19.67% and 13.86 % at 620℃ under reaction conditions of weight hourly space velocity of 3.06 h-1 and reaction partial pressure of 23.24 kPa. On the other hand, the conversion of C5 olefins, yield of ethylene, propylene and butene all decreased with dilution ratio increasing, while the yield of C6 hydrocarbon increased continuously. The mechanism of C5 hydrocarbon catalytic cracking was discussed. It was assumed that direct cracking of C5 olefins into ethylene and propylene and dimerisation of C5 olefins to C10 intermediate proceeded simultaneously. Then the cracking was carried out from the C10 intermediate. The above-mentioned mechanism can be used to explain experimental data satisfactorily.%以 ZSM-5分子筛为催化剂,碳五烃混合物为裂解原料,考察温度及稀释比对碳五烃催化裂解制丙烯/乙烯反应性能的影响。结果表明:随温度升高碳五烷烃及烯烃的转化率均不断升高,但碳五烯烃的转化率远高于碳五烷烃的转化率。同时乙烯及丙烯的收率也随温度的升高而升高,空速3.06 h-1,分压23.24 kPa时,分别由450℃的2.38%,8.84%升高到620℃时的13.86%和19.67%。另外,随稀释比的增加,碳五烯烃转化率,乙烯、丙烯及丁烯的收率不断下降,但 C6烃的收率随稀释比的增加而升高。碳五烯烃催化裂解机理分析指出:碳五烯烃催化裂解过程中碳五烯烃在直接裂解

  2. Feasibility of Traveling Wave Direct Energy Conversion of Fission Reaction Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; George, J. A.; Miley, G. H.; Scott, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fission fragment direct energy conversion has been considered in the past for the purpose of increasing nuclear power plant efficiency and for advanced space propulsion. Since the fragments carry electric charge (typically in the order of 20 e) and have 100 MeV-range kinetic energy, techniques utilizing very high-voltage DC electrodes have been considered. This study is focused on a different approach: the kinetic energy of the charged fission fragments is converted into alternating current by means of a traveling wave coupling scheme (Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter, TWDEC), thereby not requiring the utilization of high voltage technology. A preliminary feasibility analysis of the concept is introduced based on a conceptual level study and on a particle simulation model of the beam dynamics.

  3. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  4. Effect Of Solid Acids In The Conversion Of Glycerol Over Ru/Bentonite Catalyst In Glycerol Hydrogenolysis Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraini Hamzah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol known as by-product of transesterification of vegetables oil become an important materials after some chemical modification. In this study, hydrogenolysis reaction of glycerol to 1,2-propanediol was conducted using various supported ruthenium based catalyst. The support materials used in this study are bentonite ,TiO2, Al2O3 and SiO2. All experiments were carried out at reaction condition of 150°C, hydrogen pressure 20-30 bar for 7 hours and the 20%(wt glycerol content in distilled water. The result shows that activity of the catalyts increased following this order: Ru/SiO2< Ru/TiO2 ≈ Ru/Al2O3 < Ru/bentonite. High selectivity to 1,2-propanediol was obtained in hydrogenolysis glycerol over Ru/TiO2 (83.7% and Ru/bentonite (80.1% catalysts. Since Ru/bentonite catalyst performed better than other tested catalyst, we choose this catalyst system to investigate the effect of various solid acids (zeolite, ZrO2, Nb2O5 and amberlyst on conversion of glycerol in hydrogenolysis reaction. Addition of solid acid in hydrogenolysis glycerol had promote the activity of Ru/bentonite catalyst drastically. The result shows that the presence of zeolite make the conversion of glycerol increased to maximum from 62.8% to 81.6% compared the other solid acids. Interestingly, selectivity to 1,2-propanediol still was achieved over 80.0%. These catalysts system were characterized by XRD, XPS, BET, and TEM for obtaining some physicochemical properties of the catalysts.

  5. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-07-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} \\min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1}, 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  6. Crossed beam investigation of elementary reactions relevant to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-like molecules in extraterrestrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Asvany, O.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-04-01

    The reactions of ground state carbon atoms, C( 3P j), with benzene, C 6H 6, and phenyl radicals, C 6H 5, with methylacetylene, CH 3CCH, were investigated in crossed beam experiments at collision energies of 21.8 and 140 kJ mol -1 to investigate elementary reactions relevant to the formation and chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in extraterrestrial environments. The C( 3P j) reaction proceeds via complex formation and gives a cyclic, seven-membered C 7H 5 doublet radical plus atomic hydrogen. This pathway has neither an entrance nor exit barrier, and is exothermic. Together with the experimental verification of the carbon versus hydrogen exchange under single collision conditions, the findings have an important impact on the chemistry of aromatic molecules in interstellar clouds and outflow of carbon stars. Even in the coldest molecular clouds ( T=10 K), the benzene molecule can be destroyed upon reaction with carbon atoms, whereas they are resistant toward an attack of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Since the aromatic benzene unit is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial, PAH-like material, our results suggest that PAHs might react with carbon atoms as well. On the other side, the reaction of C 6H 5 radicals with methylacetylene to form phenylmethylacetylene is direct. Since an entrance barrier inhibits the reaction in cold molecular clouds and in the atmospheres of hydrocarbon rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn and satellites such as Titan, this reaction is expected to play a role in PAH synthesis only in high temperature interstellar environments, such as circumstellar outflows of carbon stars.

  7. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a catalyst composition. It comprises: a modified Y zeolite having a unit cell size below about 24.45 {angstrom}, a degree of crystallinity which is at least retained at increasing SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios, a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio between about 8 to about 15, a water adsorption capacity at (25{degree}C and a p/p{sub {ital o}} value of 0.2) of between about 10--15% by weight of modified zeolite and a pore volume of at lest about 0.25 ml/g. Between about 10 to about 40% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least about 8 nm; an amorphous cracking component comprising a silica-alumina containing 50--95% by weight of silica; a binder comprising alumina; from about 0.05 to about 10 percent by weight of nickel and from about 2 to about 40 percent by weight of tungsten, calculated as metals per 100 parts by weight of total catalyst. The modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component comprises about 60--85% by weight of the total catalyst, the binder comprises about 15--40% by weight of the total catalyst and the amount of modified Y zeolite ranges between about 10--75% of the combined amount of modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component.

  8. Reaction mechanisms in the geopolymeric conversion of inorganic waste to useful products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, J S J; Provis, J L; Duxson, P; Lukey, G C

    2007-01-31

    High-performance materials for construction, waste immobilisation and an ever-growing range of niche applications are produced by the reaction sequence known as 'geopolymerisation'. In this process, an alkaline activating solution reacts with a solid aluminosilicate source, with solidification possible within minutes and very rapid early strength development. Geopolymers have been observed to display remarkable chemical and thermal stability, but due to their largely X-ray amorphous nature have only recently been accurately characterised. It has previously been shown that both fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag are highly effective as solid constituents of geopolymer reaction slurries, providing readily soluble alumina and silica that undergo a dissolution-reorientation-solidification process to form a geopolymeric material. Here a conceptual model for geopolymerisation is presented, allowing elucidation of the individual mechanistic steps involved in this complex and rapid process. The model is based on the reactions known to occur in the weathering of aluminosilicate minerals under alkaline conditions, which occur in a highly accelerated manner under the conditions required for geopolymerisation. Transformation of the waste materials to the mixture of gel and nanocrystalline/semicrystalline phases comprising the geopolymeric product is described. Presence of calcium in the solid waste materials affects the process of geopolymerisation by providing extra nucleation sites for precipitation of dissolved species, which may be used to tailor setting times and material properties if desired. Application of geopolymer technology in remediation of toxic or radioactive contaminants will depend on the ability to analyse and predict long-term durability and stability based on initial mix formulation. The model presented here provides a framework by which this will be made possible.

  9. Interplay between nanoscale reactivity and bulk performance of H-ZSM-5 catalysts during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Teketel, Shewangizaw; Svelle, Stian; Bare, Simon R.; Arstad, Bjornar; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Olsbye, Unni; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    H-ZSM-5 catalyst powders before and after a steaming post-treatment have been investigated during the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) process at 350 degrees C. Bulk and surface characterization techniques have been combined with in situ Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the aluminum an

  10. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  11. Utilizing carbon dioxide as a reaction medium to mitigate production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the thermal decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-10-02

    The CO(2) cofeed impact on the pyrolysis of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The direct comparison of the chemical species evolved from the thermal degradation of SBR in N(2) and CO(2) led to a preliminary mechanistic understanding of the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C(1-4)), aromatic derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), clarifying the role of CO(2) in the thermal degradation of SBR. The identification and quantification of over 50 major and minor chemical species from hydrogen and benzo[ghi]perylene were carried out experimentally in the temperature regime between 300 and 500 °C in N(2) and CO(2). The significant amounts of benzene derivatives from the direct bond dissociation of the backbone of SBR, induced by thermal degradation, provided favorable conditions for PAHs by the gas-phase addition reaction at a relatively low temperature compared to that with conventional fuels such as coal and petroleum-derived fuels. However, the formation of PAHs in a CO(2) atmosphere was decreased considerably (i.e., ∼50%) by the enhanced thermal cracking behavior, and the ultimate fates of these species were determined by different pathways in CO(2) and N(2) atmospheres. Consequently, this work has provided a new approach to mitigate PAHs by utilizing CO(2) as a reaction medium in thermochemical processes.

  12. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  13. Time resolved studies of the addition reactions of silylenes and unsaturated hydrocarbons in the gas phase (an investigation of the strain energies of silirane and silirene rings)

    CERN Document Server

    Dormer, G

    1999-01-01

    This thesis reports the measurement of absolute rate constants for number of silylene addition reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons. The reactions of SiH sub 2 , SiD sub 2 and Me sub 2 Si with alkene and alkynes were studied. The silylenes were formed, in situ, by the photolysis of an organosilicon precursor, and the rate constants obtained by the direct observation of the absorption decay of the silylene reactant. The reactions were studied in the gas phase and their temperature and pressure dependence investigated. The reaction of SiH sub 2 and 1,3-butadiene was investigated and found to be pressure dependent. The following Arrhenius equation was yielded at infinite pressure; log(k supinfinity/cm sup 3 molecule sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1) = (-9.57 +- 0.05) + (3.22 +- 0.35) kJmol sup - sup 1 /RT ln 10. The reaction was found to proceed via a two-channel pathway, leading to the products vinylsilirane and silacyclopentane. RRKM modelling of the system was carried out and led to the calculation of the strain ...

  14. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. V. Chemical dynamics of n-C4H3 formation from reaction of C(3Pj) with allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Chang, A. H. H.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1999-06-01

    The crossed molecular beams technique was employed to investigate the reaction between ground state carbon atoms, C(3Pj), and allene, H2CCCH2(X 1A1), at two averaged collision energies of 19.6 and 38.8 kJ mol-1. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C4H3 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields weakly polarized center-of-mass angular flux distributions isotropic at lower, but forward scattered with respect to the carbon beam at a higher collision energy. The maximum translational energy release and the angular distributions combined with ab initio and RRKM calculations are consistent with the formation of the n-C4H3 radical in its electronic ground state. The channel to the i-C4H3 isomer contributes less than 1.5%. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental data indicate that the carbon atom attacks the π-orbitals of the allenic carbon-carbon double bond barrierless via a loose, reactant-like transition state located at the centrifugal barrier. The initially formed cyclopropylidene derivative rotates in a plane almost perpendicular to the total angular momentum vector around its C-axis and undergoes ring opening to triplet butatriene. At higher collision energy, the butatriene complex decomposes within 0.6 ps via hydrogen emission to form the n-C4H3 isomer and atomic hydrogen through an exit transition state located 9.2 kJ mol-1 above the products. The explicit identification of the n-C4H3 radical under single collision represents a further example of a carbon-hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This channel opens a barrierless route to synthesize extremely reactive hydrocarbon radicals in combustion processes, interstellar chemistry, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, as well as Triton.

  15. Unexpected Scholl Reaction of 6,7,13,14-Tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene: Selective Formation of Five-Membered Rings in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzhi; Narita, Akimitsu; Osella, Silvio; Zhang, Wen; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Beljonne, David; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-03-02

    Cyclodehydrogenation is a versatile reaction that has enabled the syntheses of numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We now describe a unique Scholl reaction of 6,7,13,14-tetraarylbenzo[k]tetraphene, which "unexpectedly" forms five-membered rings accompanying highly selective 1,2-shift of aryl groups. The geometric and optoelectronic nature of the resulting bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is comprehensively investigated by single-crystal X-ray, NMR, UV-vis absorption, and cyclic voltammetry analyses. Furthermore, a possible mechanism is proposed to account for the selective five-membered-ring formation with the rearrangement of the aryl groups, which can be rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The theoretical results suggest that the formation of the bistetracene analogue with five-membered rings is kinetically controlled while an "expected" product with six-membered rings is thermodynamically more favored. These experimental and theoretical results provide further insights into the still controversial mechanism of the Scholl reaction as well as open up an unprecedented entry to extend the variety of PAHs by programing otherwise unpredictable rearrangements during the Scholl reaction.

  16. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  17. Cherenkov radiation conversion and collection considerations for a gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostic for the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W; Mack, Joseph M; Young, Carlton S; Malone, Robert M; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Horsfield, Colin J

    2008-10-01

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF system design requirements. A comprehensive, validated numerical study of candidate systems is providing essential information needed to make a down selection based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF logistics. This paper presents basic design considerations arising from the two-step conversion process from gamma rays to relativistic electrons to UV/visible Cherenkov radiation.

  18. Escherichia coli as a potential hydrocarbon conversion microorganism. Oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds by recombinant E. coli in two-liquid phase (aqueous-organic) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favre-Bulle, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    The increased interest in the study of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms in recent years has been stimulated by the possibility of using their monooxygenases in the selective oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. As an example, long chain (>C16) n-alkanes are converted to dicarboxylic

  19. Experimental Study on Reaction Energy Release Characteristics of Hydrocarbon and Chlorine Trifluoride%三氟化氯与碳氢燃料反应放能试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪泉; 卢芳云; 王少龙; 罗永锋; 闫华; 刘志勇

    2011-01-01

    Using a designed experimental device,explosion experiments of hydrocarbon with chlorine trifluoride in confined space were carried out,based on the analysis of the hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride reaction mechanism. The energy released from the reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride without oxygen was calculated based on experimental results. Results show that (1) The reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride accompanies an intense release of great deal of energy,so that part of the hydrocarbon is vaporized and dispersed,a violent deflagrating would be ignited once the vaporized hydrocarbon be mixed with the air. (2) The TNT equivalence of the explosion reaction of hydrocarbon and chlorine trifluoride without oxygen is about 1.8.%在对三氟化氯与碳氢燃料反应机理进行分析的基础上,进行了密闭环境下三氟化氯与碳氢燃料的反应放能试验研究.结果表明:三氟化氯与碳氢燃料可以发生剧烈反应,释放大量的能量,将碳氢燃料部分雾化并喷出密闭空间,激活的碳氢燃料一旦接触空气,便诱发碳氢燃料的剧烈爆燃;在无氧条件下,三氟化氯与碳氢燃料爆炸反应所释放的能量相当于1.8倍TNT当量.

  20. Beyond intercalation-based Li-ion batteries: the state of the art and challenges of electrode materials reacting through conversion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Jordi; Monconduit, Laure; Larcher, Dominique; Palacín, M Rosa

    2010-09-15

    Despite the imminent commercial introduction of Li-ion batteries in electric drive vehicles and their proposed use as enablers of smart grids based on renewable energy technologies, an intensive quest for new electrode materials that bring about improvements in energy density, cycle life, cost, and safety is still underway. This Progress Report highlights the recent developments and the future prospects of the use of phases that react through conversion reactions as both positive and negative electrode materials in Li-ion batteries. By moving beyond classical intercalation reactions, a variety of low cost compounds with gravimetric specific capacities that are two-to-five times larger than those attained with currently used materials, such as graphite and LiCoO(2), can be achieved. Nonetheless, several factors currently handicap the applicability of electrode materials entailing conversion reactions. These factors, together with the scientific breakthroughs that are necessary to fully assess the practicality of this concept, are reviewed in this report.

  1. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI: Major differences in deactivation behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Højholt, Karen Thrane; Holm, Martin Spangsberg;

    2012-01-01

    Methanol has been converted to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI. The gallium based zeotypes are analogous to H-ZSM-5, but the Brønsted acidity is introduced by framework incorporation of gallium rather than aluminum, which leads to lower intrinsic acid strength. ...... (hydrolysis) of the Ga&sbnd;O bonds in the zeolite structure rather than coke deposition....

  2. Influence of Gas Feed Composition and Pressure on the Catalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbons Using a Traditional Cobalt-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-25

    availability. Fuel independence would alleviate uncertainties in the world market supply of oil along with commercial fluctuations in price. In addition...this supply by supporting the development of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel from the vast natural resources, such as coal, shale, gas hydrates, and CO2...product a day by steam-reforming coal to generate syngas for the FT process.5 A water-gas shift is needed to obtain a 2:1 ratio of hydrogen/carbon

  3. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  4. Role of cobalt catalyst porosity in the reaction of hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Tsapkina, V.; Davydov, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; United Research and Development Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-30

    Effect of surface properties on catalyst performance is challenging problem for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We have studied a number of cobalt-alumina and cobalt-silica-alumina catalysts prepared by wet impregnation technique. Average pore diameter of supports varied from 6 to 100 nm. All the catalysts were activated uniformly in hydrogen and tested in FT synthesis. Non-linear dependence of cobalt crystallite size on average pore diameter of support have been found. For large pore aluminas with pore diameter 40 nm and more, cobalt crystallite size in activated Co-alumina catalysts reaches 14 nm and almost independent on pore diameter. Catalytic tests demonstrate that large-pore, low surface area supports are preferable in terms of activity. Calculated turnover rates reach 2.6-3.7 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} at 190 C for these catalysts. On the contrary, catalysts based on narrow-pore silica-aluminas display smaller turnover rate of about 0.4-0.8 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. Thus, specific activity of small cobalt crystallites, 6 nm or less, was found to be lower than that of large particles. Molar selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches maximal values of 88-90% for supports with 7-12 nm average pore diameter. These samples provide lowest CH{sub 4} selectivity, 5-7 mol.%. (orig.)

  5. RRKM and master equation kinetic analysis of parallel addition reactions of isomeric radical intermediates in hydrocarbon flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Pierre M.; Rheaume, Michael; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    2017-08-01

    We have calculated the temperature-dependent rate coefficients of the addition reactions of butadien-2-yl (C4H5) and acroylyl (C3H3O) radicals with ethene (C2H4), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (H2CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and ketene (H2CCO), in order to explore the balance between kinetic and thermodynamic control in these combustion-related reactions. For the C4H5 radical, the 1,3-diene form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,2-diene, but the 1,2-diene form of the radical intermediate is stabilized by an allylic delocalization, which may influence the relative activation energies. For the reactions combining C3H3O with C2H4, CO, and HCN, the opposite is true: the 1,2-enone form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,3-enone, whereas the 1,3-enone is the slightly more stable radical species. Optimized geometries and vibrational modes were computed with the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level and basis, followed by single-point CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12 energy calculations. Our findings indicate that the kinetics in all cases favor reaction along the 1,3 pathway for both the C4H5 and C3H3O systems. The Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) microcanonical rate coefficients and subsequent solution of the chemical master equation were used to predict the time-evolution of our system under conditions from 500 K to 2000 K and from 10-5 bar to 10 bars. Despite the 1,3 reaction pathway being more favorable for the C4H5 system, our results predict branching ratios of the 1,2 to 1,3 product as high as 0.48 at 1 bar. Similar results hold for the acroylyl system under these combustion conditions, suggesting that under kinetic control the branching of these reactions may be much more significant than the thermodynamics would suggest. This effect may be partly attributed to the low energy difference between 1,2 and 1,3 forms of the radical intermediate. No substantial pressure-dependence is found for the overall forward reaction rates until pressures

  6. Control of hydrocarbon content of a reforming gas by using a hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kenichiro; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    To control of hydrocarbon content in waste pyrolysis-gasification and reforming processes, the use of a hydrogenation catalyst was examined in a test system with a model gas. To reduce the concentration of benzene in the reforming gas, benzene was hydrogenated with a nickel catalyst. The catalyst is usually used to convert gas-phase unsaturated hydrocarbons to saturated hydrocarbons, and the benzene was converted to cyclohexane at a temperature range of about 130 to 180 degrees C in the presence of steam. However, the conversion to methane occurred at about 250 to 300 degrees C. Methane seems to be a useful conversion compound because it does not cohere as a light tar. Sometimes the reforming gas needs to be cooled for use as generator fuel. In this case, it is possible to avoid the tar cohesion if the benzene in the gas is converted to methane at about 300 degrees C after the reforming. Reduction of the efficiency of conversion to methane was not observed over a 60h reaction period. The lower hydrocarbons (ethylene, ethane, and propylene) were also converted to methane at about 300 degrees C. Conversion of benzene was also possible when other hydrocarbons were present at high concentrations.

  7. Employing CO2 as reaction medium for in-situ suppression of the formation of benzene derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during pyrolysis of simulated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jechan; Choi, Dongho; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-05-01

    This study proposes a strategic principle to enhance the thermal efficiency of pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW). An environmentally sound energy recovery platform was established by suppressing the formation of harmful organic compounds evolved from pyrolysis of MSW. Using CO2 as reaction medium/feedstock, CO generation was enhanced through the following: 1) expediting the thermal cracking of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) evolved from the thermal degradation of the MSWs and 2) directly reacting VOCs with CO2. This particular influence of CO2 on pyrolysis of the MSWs also led to the in-situ mitigation of harmful organic compounds (e.g., benzene derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) considering that CO2 acted as a carbon scavenger to block reaction pathways toward benzenes and PAHs in pyrolysis. To understand the fundamental influence of CO2, simulated MSWs (i.e., various ratios of biomass to polymer) were used to avoid any complexities arising from the heterogeneous matrix of MSW. All experimental findings in this study suggested the foreseeable environmental application of CO2 to energy recovery from MSW together with disposal of MSW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microplasma reforming of hydrocarbons for fuel cell power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, R. S.; Lindner, P. J.

    The implementation of a microplasma approach for small scale reforming processes is explored as an alternative to more standard catalyst-based processes. Plasmas are a known approach to activating a chemical reaction in place of catalysts, and microplasmas are particularly attractive owing to their extremely high electron and power densities. Their inherent compactness gives them appeal for portable applications, but their modularity leads to scalability for higher capacity. We describe the realization of experimental microplasma reactors based on the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) structure by silicon micromachining for device fabrication. Experiments were carried out with model hydrocarbons methane and butane in the reactors within a microfluidic flow and analytical setup. We observe several key phenomena, including the ability to liberate hydrogen from the hydrocarbons at temperatures near ambient and sub-Watt input power levels, the tendency toward hydrocarbon decomposition rather than oxidation even in the presence of oxygen, and the need for a neutral carrier to obtain conversion. Mass and energy balances on these experiments revealed conversions up to nearly 50%, but the conversion of electrical power input to chemical reaction enthalpy was only on the order of 1%. These initial, exploratory results were recorded with devices and at process settings without optimization, and are hence promising for an emerging, catalyst-free reforming approach.

  9. A combined experimental and theoretical study of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and oxygenated hydrocarbons relevant to astrochemical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R J; Caravan, R L; Blitz, M A; Heard, D E

    2014-02-28

    The kinetics of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with acetone and dimethyl ether (DME) have been studied between 63-148 K and at a range of pressures using laser-flash photolysis coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection of OH in a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. For acetone, a large negative temperature dependence was observed, with the rate coefficient increasing from k1 = (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 148 K to (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 79 K, and also increasing with pressure. For DME, a similar behaviour was found, with the rate coefficient increasing from k2 = (3.1 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 138 K to (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 63 K, and also increasing with pressure. The temperature and pressure dependence of the experimental rate coefficients are rationalised for both reactions by the formation and subsequent stabilisation of a hydrogen bonded complex, with a non-zero rate coefficient extrapolated to zero pressure supportive of quantum mechanical tunnelling on the timescale of the experiments leading to products. In the case of DME, experiments performed in the presence of O2 provide additional evidence that the yield of the CH3OCH2 abstraction product, which can recycle OH in the presence of O2, is ≥50%. The experimental data are modelled using the MESMER (Master Equation Solver for Multi Energy Well Reactions) code which includes a treatment of quantum mechanical tunnelling, and uses energies and structures of transition states and complexes calculated by ab initio methods. Good agreement is seen between experiment and theory, with MESMER being able to reproduce for both reactions the temperature behaviour between ~70-800 K and the pressure dependence observed at ~80 K. At the limit of zero pressure, the model predicts a rate coefficient of ~10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of OH with acetone at 20 K, providing evidence that the

  10. Co-conversion of Ethane and Methanol into Higher Hydrocarbons over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Rovik, Anne; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    Ethane and methanol are converted simultaneously over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5 to produce light olefins and aromatics. The presence of methanol in the reactant stream is intended to facilitate activation of ethane following literature reports on co-conversion of methane and methanol....... However, the conversion of ethane actually decreases significantly when methanol is present. To gain insight into mechanistic details, C-13-labeled methanol is co-converted with unlabeled ethane. These isotopic labeling studies show that carbon atoms from ethane and methanol are mixed in the products...

  11. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbons over a two-component (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO and ZSM-5 zeolite) catalyst: kinetic modelling and catalyst deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erena, J.; Arandes, J.M.; Bilbao, J.; Gayubo, A.G. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingeneria Quimica; De Lasa, H.I. [University of Western Ontario, London, ONT (Canada). Chemical Reactor Engineering Centre

    2000-05-01

    The present study describes the kinetics of syngas transformation into liquid hydrocarbons (boiling point in the gasoline range) using as catalyst a mixture of a metallic component, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO, and of an acidic component, ZSM-5 zeolite. Experimental results were obtained in an isothermal fixed-bed integral reactor. The validity of several kinetic models, available for methanol synthesis, is analysed and modifications are proposed. These changes involve a rate equation with a CO{sub 2} concentration-dependent term. Catalyst deactivation is also evaluated and the effect of the operating conditions on coke deposition is established. Moreover, the rate of CO conversion and the change of catalytic activity with time-on-stream were described using a kinetic model showing a weak influence of temperature. (Author)

  12. Optimization of supercritical phase and combined supercritical/subcritical conversion of lignocellulose for hexose production by using a flow reaction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wu, Hua-Yong; Liu, Jin-Wen; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2012-12-01

    A flow reaction system was utilized to investigate lignocellulose conversion using combined supercritical/subcritical conditions for hexose production. Initially, investigation of cellulose hydrolysis in supercritical water and optimization of reaction parameters were done. Oligosaccharide yields reached over 30% at cellulose concentrations of 3-5 gL(-1) and reaction times of 6-10s at 375 °C, and 2.5-4 gL(-1) and 8-10s at 380 °C. Temperatures above 380 °C were not appropriate for the supercritical phase in the combined process. Subsequently, conversion of lignocellulosic materials under combined supercritical/subcritical conditions was studied. Around 30% hexose was produced from corn stalks under the optimal parameters for supercritical (380 °C, 23-24 MPa, 9-10s) and subcritical (240 °C, 8-9 MPa, 45-50s) phases. Flow systems utilizing the combined supercritical/subcritical technology present a promising method for lignocellulosic conversion. The results of this study provide an important guide for the operational optimization and practical application of the proposed system.

  13. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  14. Crossed beam reaction of cyano radicals with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of cyanoacetylene (HCCCN; X 1Σ+) formation from reaction of CN(X 2Σ+) with acetylene, C2H2(X 1Σg+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L. C. L.; Asvany, O.; Chang, A. H. H.; Balucani, N.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.; Osamura, Y.

    2000-11-01

    The chemical reaction dynamics to form cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X 1Σ+), via the radical-neutral reaction of cyano radicals, CN(X 2Σ+;ν=0), with acetylene, C2H2(X 1Σg+), are unraveled in crossed molecular beam experiments at two collision energies of 21.1 and 27.0 kJ mol-1. Laboratory angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of the HCCCN product are recorded at m/e=51 and 50. Experiments were supplemented by electronic structure calculations on the doublet C3H2N potential energy surface and RRKM investigations. Forward-convolution fitting of the crossed beam data combined with our theoretical investigations shows that the reaction has no entrance barrier and is initiated by an attack of the CN radical to the π electron density of the acetylene molecule to form a doublet cis/trans HCCHCN collision complex on the 2A' surface via indirect reactive scattering dynamics. Here 85% of the collision complexes undergo C-H bond rupture through a tight transition state located 22 kJ mol-1 above the cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X 1Σ+) and H(2S1/2) products (microchannel 1). To a minor amount (15%) trans HCCHCN shows a 1,2-H shift via a 177 kJ mol-1 barrier to form a doublet H2CCCN radical, which is 46 kJ mol-1 more stable than the initial reaction intermediate (microchannel 2). The H2CCCN complex decomposes via a rather loose exit transition state situated only 7 kJ mol-1 above the reaction products HCCCN (X 1Σ+) and H(2S1/2). In both cases the geometry of the exit transition states is reflected in the observed center-of-mass angular distributions showing a mild forward/sideways peaking. The explicit identification of the cyanoacetylene as the only reaction product represents a solid background for the title reaction to be included in reaction networks modeling the chemistry in dark, molecular clouds, outflow of dying carbon stars, hot molecular cores, as well as the atmosphere of hydrocarbon rich planets and satellites such as the Saturnian moon Titan.

  15. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  16. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

    2007-09-25

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

  17. Non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林胜; 徐奕德; 陶龙骧

    1997-01-01

    The non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons such as aroma tics and C2 hydrocarbons in a low temperature range of 773-973 K with Mo/HZSM-5,Mo-Zr/HZSM-5 and Mo-W/HZSM-5 catalysts is studied.The means for enhancing the activity and stability of the Mo-containing catalysts under the reaction conditions is reported.Quite a stable methane conversion rate of over 10% with a high selectivity to the higher hydrocarbons has been obtained at a temperature of 973 K.Pure methane conversions of about 5.2% and 2.0% have been obtained at 923 and 873 K,respectively.In addition,accompanied by the C2-C3 mixture,tht- methane reaction can be initiated even at a lower temperature and the conversion rate of methane is enhanced by the presence of tne initiator of C2-C3 hydrocarbons.Compared with methane oxidative coupling to ethylene,the novel way for methane transformation is significant and reasonable for its lower reaction temperatures and high selectivity to the desired prod

  18. An intensified π-hole in beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes: its determinant role in CO2 conversion into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2016-02-28

    DFT investigations on beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes or sheets (BNs) predict the existence of a very reactive kind of novel material capable of spontaneously reducing the first hydrogenation step in the CO2 conversion mechanism. This impressive behaviour appears as a result of the very deep π-hole generated by the beryllium moieties, and also determines its selectivity towards the production of CH4.

  19. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  20. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Meyer, P.; Snowden-Swan, L.; Padmaperuma, A.; Tan, E.; Dutta, A.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  1. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  2. Method and apparatus for conversion of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Kenneth W.; Namazian, Mehdi; Kelly, John T.

    2015-12-01

    Embodiments of the invention relates to conversion of hydrocarbon material including but not limited to coal and biomass to a synthetic liquid transportation fuel. The invention includes the integration of a non-catalytic first reaction scheme, which converts carbonaceous materials into a solid product that includes char and ash and a gaseous product; a non-catalytic second reaction scheme, which converts a portion of the gaseous product from the first reaction scheme to light olefins and liquid byproducts; a traditional gas-cleanup operations; and the third reaction scheme to combine the olefins from the second reaction scheme to produce a targeted fuel like liquid transportation fuels.

  3. Pathological reactions and recovery of hepatopancreatic digestive cells from the marine snail Littorina littorea following exposure to a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, D M; Moore, M N; Readman, J W

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular pathological responses of hepatopancreatic digestive cells from the periwinkle Littorina littorea exposed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene and to ascertain whether any injurious effects were reversible within the experimental time scale. A secondary objective was to establish the relationship of the various reactions to animal health status, using lysosomal stability as an index of well-being. Exposure of snails to a concentration of 335 microgl(-1) (1.7 microM) fluoranthene (seawater renewed and spiked daily with fluoranthene) for 5 days resulted in a reduction in lysosomal stability (neutral red retention) and endocytosis; and an increase in smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and 7-ethoxycoumarin-o-deethylase (ECOD; measured as cyano-ECOD) activity measured in isolated live digestive cells. Exposed snails treated with clean seawater for a further 8 days resulted in a return to control levels of lysosomal stability, ECOD and ER; endocytosis showed only a partial recovery. Multi-variate and uni-variate analysis showed that there were strong correlations between the various cellular biomarker responses. These findings are interpretable within the current framework of molluscan biomarker responses to PAHs. Principal component analysis was used to derive the first principal component for endocytosis, ER and ECOD reactions and these were plotted against lysosomal stability as a measure of cellular well-being. The resulting significant regression represents the mapping of the individual biomarkers within health status space for a gradient of fluoranthene toxicity. From this analysis, we concluded that endocytosis is an indicator of healthy snails while proliferation of ER and to a lesser extent induced ECOD are indicative of dysfunction and reduced health. Finally, the results indicate that stress induced by chronic exposure to a PAH is reversible.

  4. Efficient Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to 1-Butanol via the Guerbet Reaction over Copper- and Nickel-Doped Porous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhuohua; Vasconcelos, Anais Couto; Bottari, Giovanni; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Bonura, Giuseppe; Cannilla, Catia; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin

    The direct conversion of ethanol to higher value 1-butanol is a catalytic transformation of great interest in light of the expected wide availability of bioethanol originating from the fermentation of renewable resources. In this contribution we describe several novel compositions of porous metal

  5. Efficient Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to 1-Butanol via the Guerbet Reaction over Copper- and Nickel-Doped Porous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhuohua; Vasconcelos, Anais Couto; Bottari, Giovanni; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Bonura, Giuseppe; Cannilla, Catia; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of ethanol to higher value 1-butanol is a catalytic transformation of great interest in light of the expected wide availability of bioethanol originating from the fermentation of renewable resources. In this contribution we describe several novel compositions of porous metal ox

  6. New Petrochemical Processes Based on Direct Conversion of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraguna F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Petrochemistry is a branch of chemistry and chemical engineering that studies reactions and processes of the transformation of petroleum derivatives and natural gas into useful petrochemicals. In its beginning, petrochemistry, or rather the organic chemical industry, was based on the acetylene and Reppe chemistry. The main raw materials of the petrochemical industry nowadays are olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons, with a pronounced tendency toward development of new processes and higher usage of syngas, methane and other alkanes. Here, the reactions and new processes of direct conversion of methane into more valuable petrochemicals are reviewed. Reactions of partial oxidation of methane, dehydroaromatization of methane, oxidative and non-oxidative coupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons are also described and discussed.

  7. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot in fuel-rich oxidation of methane in a laminar flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Østberg, M.

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and soot was investigated under fuel-rich conditions in a laminar flow reactor. The effects of stoichiometry, dilution, and water vapor addition were studied at temperatures between 1073 and 1823 K. A chemical...... decrease with increasing addition of water vapor. The effect is described qualitatively by the reaction mechanism. The enhanced oxidation of acetylene is attributed to higher levels of hydroxyl radicals, formed from the reaction between the water vapor and hydrogen atoms....

  8. Beyond intercalation-based Li-ion batteries: the state of the art and challenges of electrode materials reacting through conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabana, Jordi [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Monconduit, Laure [Institut Charles Gerhardt-CNRS Universite Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); ALISTORE-ERI European Research Institute, Amiens (France); Larcher, Dominique [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, CNRS UMR6007, Amiens (France); ALISTORE-ERI European Research Institute, Amiens (France); Palacin, M.R. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain); ALISTORE-ERI European Research Institute, Amiens (France)

    2010-09-15

    Despite the imminent commercial introduction of Li-ion batteries in electric drive vehicles and their proposed use as enablers of smart grids based on renewable energy technologies, an intensive quest for new electrode materials that bring about improvements in energy density, cycle life, cost, and safety is still underway. This Progress Report highlights the recent developments and the future prospects of the use of phases that react through conversion reactions as both positive and negative electrode materials in Li-ion batteries. By moving beyond classical intercalation reactions, a variety of low cost compounds with gravimetric specific capacities that are two-to-five times larger than those attained with currently used materials, such as graphite and LiCoO{sub 2}, can be achieved. Nonetheless, several factors currently handicap the applicability of electrode materials entailing conversion reactions. These factors, together with the scientific breakthroughs that are necessary to fully assess the practicality of this concept, are reviewed in this report. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  10. Dielectric barrier discharges used for the conversion of greenhouse gases: modeling the plasma chemistry by fluid simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bie, Christophe; Martens, Tom; Bogaerts, Annemie [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Dijk, Jan [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Paulussen, Sabine; Verheyde, Bert [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Corthals, Steven, E-mail: annemie.bogaerts@ua.ac.b [Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, K. U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-04-15

    The conversion of methane to value-added chemicals and fuels is considered to be one of the challenges of the 21st century. In this paper we study, by means of fluid modeling, the conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons or oxygenates by partial oxidation with CO{sub 2} or O{sub 2} in a dielectric barrier discharge. Sixty-nine different plasma species (electrons, ions, molecules, radicals) are included in the model, as well as a comprehensive set of chemical reactions. The calculation results presented in this paper include the conversion of the reactants and the yields of the reaction products as a function of residence time in the reactor, for different gas mixing ratios. Syngas (i.e. H{sub 2} + CO) and higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}H{sub x}) are typically found to be important reaction products.

  11. Characterization of the InN conversion layer in InP surface by ammonia gas: Nuclear reaction analysis, X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuki, Y. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Onoue, A. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kuriyama, K. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan)]. E-mail: kuri@ionbeam.hosei.ac.jp; Hasegawa, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Sakamoto, I. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    The surface layer of InP(1 0 0) wafer is converted into {alpha}-InN phase (wurtzite) by annealing it at around 510 {sup o}C for 5 h under NH{sub 3} gas flow. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the conversion layer is a (1 1 -2 0) oriented InN. This result is also supported by E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(LO) phonon modes observed by a Raman scattering method, originated from the (1 1 -2 0) face of {alpha}-InN. The converted layer evaluated by nuclear reaction analysis using a {sup 14}N(d, p){sup 15}N reaction includes a N concentration of {approx}6 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}.

  12. COMPETITION BETWEEN THE REACTION MEDIUM AND NANOSTRUCTURED ZnO IN THE PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF ANTHRACENE. TOWARD AN OPTIMAL PROCESS FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca L. Martínez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is considered an important health issue due to the toxicity of these compounds. Photocatalytic degradation of anthracene, a representative molecule of PAHs, using the high quantum yield semiconductor ZnO, has been reported. The solubility of anthracene in water makes necessary to use mixtures with organic solvents in fundamental degradation studies. It is well known that some organic solvents participate in the photochemical transformation of this molecule. In the PAHs photocatalysis, the competition between a semiconductor and solvents has not reported. Therefore, in this work, we decided to study the photocatalytic degradation of anthracene with two common reaction media and nanostructured ZnO. The semiconductor was obtained by a one pot method which consists in an alkaline hydrolysis of Zn(CH3COO2·2H2O in ethanol. Nanoparticles size in colloidal dispersion was calculated using UV-Vis spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microcopy (HR-TEM. ZnO powder was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction to be used in photocatalytic experiments. Surface area determination and photocurrent spectroscopic experiments were also carried out. Linear sweep voltammetries under darkness and UV-Vis irradiation indicate a charge separation due to photoexcitation. Photocatalytic experiments in ethanol:water pH 12 (1:1 and acetone:water pH 12 (1:1, with and without ZnO was explored. The results demonstrated that ethanol:water and acetone:water promotes the photo-transformation of anthracene to 9,10-anthraquinone. Meanwhile, ZnO transformed anthracene to benzoic acid and to 9,10-anthraquinone in ethanol:water and acetone:water, respectively. A faster photochemical kinetic is observed when acetone was used as solvent in the presence and in the absence of ZnO.

  13. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano [Madison, WI; West, Ryan M [Madison, WI

    2012-04-03

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

  14. Direct conversion of natural gas into COx-free hydrogen and MWCNTs over commercial Ni–Mo/Al2O3 catalyst: Effect of reaction parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A commercial hydrotreating nickel molybdate/alumina catalyst was used for the direct conversion of natural gas (NG into COx-free hydrogen and a co-valuable product of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The catalytic runs were carried out atmospherically in a fixed-bed flow reactor. The effect of reaction temperature between 600 and 800 °C, and dilution of the NG feed with nitrogen as well as pretreatment of the catalyst with hydrogen were investigated. At a reaction temperature of 700 °C and dilution ratio of NG/N2 = 20/30, the optimum yield of H2 (∼80% was obtained with higher longevity. However, using the feed ratio of NG/N2 = 30/20, the optimum yield of MWCNTs was obtained (669%. X-ray diffraction pattern for the catalyst after the reaction showed that the MWCNTs were grown on the catalyst at all reaction temperatures under study. TEM pictures revealed that the as-grown MWCNTs at 600, 650 and 800 °C are short and long with a low graphitization degree. At 700 °C a forest of condensed CNTs is formed, whereas both carbon nanofibers and CNTs were formed at 750 °C.

  15. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of syngas (CO + H2 to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent. Methanol was synthesized from syngas over Cu-ZnO; subsequently, was converted to hydrocarbons through the formation of dimethyl ether (DME over the metal-loaded ZSM-5. When 0.5 wt% Pd/ZSM-5 and 5 wt% Cu/ZSM-5 among the metal-loaded ZSM-5 catalysts with Pd, Co, Fe or Cu were employed as a portion of the hybrid catalyst, the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons were selectively produced (the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons in all hydrocarbons: 59% for the hybrid catalyst with Pd/ZSM-5 and 64% for that with Cu/ZSM-5 with a similar CO conversion during the reaction. An increase in the Cu loading on ZSM-5 resulted in increasing the yield of the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons, and in decreasing the yield of DME. Furthermore, the hybrid catalyst with Cu/ZSM-5 exhibited no deactivation for 30 h of the reaction. It was revealed that a hybrid catalyst containing Cu/ZSM-5 was efficient in the selective synthesis of gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons from syngas via methanol in the near-critical n-hexane fluid.

  16. Electrochemical conversion of CO₂ to fuels: tuning of the reaction zone using suitable functional groups in a solid polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeshala, Leela Manohar; Uppaluri, Ramagopal; Verma, Anil

    2014-09-07

    The electrochemical reduction of gaseous CO2 is studied for the first time using sterically hindered bulky quaternary ammonium ions in a solid polymer matrix at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a developed electrochemical reactor. Some new insights are found, leading to an effective reaction process. It is found that the reaction zone can be tuned to a great extent with the help of fixed functional groups attached to the solid polymer. To illustrate the concept, solid polymer electrolytes with the same backbone and different fixed functional groups are synthesized. It is found that only a change to the functional group in the membrane is needed to dramatically change the efficiency and selectivity of the reaction products. Suitable groups may increase the mass transfer of CO2 at the reaction interface and help as a co-catalyst. This work may open a new approach for the development of next generation processes for gaseous CO2 electroreduction to fuels, which is a present need.

  17. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  18. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II DECHEMA; GREEN SOLVENTS FOR CATALYSIS - ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN REACTION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green catalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in alternative solvent systems generated by PARIS IIThomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez, Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Mar...

  19. Thermal conversion of biomass to valuable fuels, chemical feedstocks and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, William A.; Howard, Jack B.; Modestino, Anthony J.; Vogel, Fredreric; Steffin, Carsten R.

    2009-02-24

    A continuous process for the conversion of biomass to form a chemical feedstock is described. The biomass and an exogenous metal oxide, preferably calcium oxide, or metal oxide precursor are continuously fed into a reaction chamber that is operated at a temperature of at least 1400.degree. C. to form reaction products including metal carbide. The metal oxide or metal oxide precursor is capable of forming a hydrolizable metal carbide. The reaction products are quenched to a temperature of 800.degree. C. or less. The resulting metal carbide is separated from the reaction products or, alternatively, when quenched with water, hydolyzed to provide a recoverable hydrocarbon gas feedstock.

  20. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  1. New insight into the hydrocarbon-pool chemistry of the methanol-to-olefins conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 from GC-MS, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Chu, Yueying; Zheng, Anmin; Xu, Jun; Wang, Qiang; Gao, Pan; Qi, Guodong; Gong, Yanjun; Deng, Feng

    2014-09-22

    Over zeolite H-ZSM-5, the aromatics-based hydrocarbon-pool mechanism of methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction was studied by GC-MS, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. Isotopic-labeling experimental results demonstrated that polymethylbenzenes (MBs) are intimately correlated with the formation of olefin products in the initial stage. More importantly, three types of cyclopentenyl cations (1,3-dimethylcyclopentenyl, 1,2,3-trimethylcyclopentenyl, and 1,3,4-trimethylcyclopentenyl cations) and a pentamethylbenzenium ion were for the first time identified by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations under both co-feeding ([(13) C6 ]benzene and methanol) conditions and typical MTO working (feeding [(13) C]methanol alone) conditions. The comparable reactivity of the MBs (from xylene to tetramethylbenzene) and the carbocations (trimethylcyclopentenyl and pentamethylbenzium ions) in the MTO reaction was revealed by (13) C-labeling experiments, evidencing that they work together through a paring mechanism to produce propene. The paring route in a full aromatics-based catalytic cycle was also supported by theoretical DFT calculations.

  2. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisu; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-06-01

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of -41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and -53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV-visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7-99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  3. Conversion of methane through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei WANG; Xiaolei CAO; Kuanhui YANG; Genhui XU

    2008-01-01

    Methane coupling to produce C2 hydrocar-bons through a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reaction was studied in four DBD reactors. The effects of high voltage electrode position, different discharge gap, types of inner electrode, volume ratio of hydrogen to methane and air cooling method on the conversion of methane and distribution of products were investigated. Conversion of methane is obviously lower when a high voltage electrode acts as an outer electrode than when it acts as an inner electrode. The lifting of reaction temper-ature becomes slow due to cooling of outer electrode and the temperature can be controlled in the expected range of 60℃-150℃ for ensuring better methane conversion and safe operation. The parameters of reactors have obvious effects on methane conversion, but it only slightly affects distribution of the products. The main products are ethyl-ene, ethane and propane. The selectivity of C2 hydrocar-bons can reach 74.50% when volume ratio of hydrogen to methane is 1.50.

  4. Free radical hydrogen atom abstraction from saturated hydrocarbons: A crossed-molecular-beams study of the reaction Cl + C{sub 3}H{sub 8} {yields} HCl + C{sub 3}H{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.; Hemmi, N.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The abstraction of hydrogen atoms from saturated hydrocarbons are reactions of fundamental importance in combustion as well as often being the rate limiting step in free radical substitution reactions. The authors have begun studying these reactions under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique on beamline 9.0.2.1, utilizing VUV undulator radiation to selectively ionize the scattered hydrocarbon free radical products (C{sub x}H{sub 2x+1}). The crossed molecular beam technique involves two reactant molecular beams fixed at 90{degrees}. The molecular beam sources are rotatable in the plane defined by the two beams. The scattered neutral products travel 12.0 cm where they are photoionized using the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. In the authors initial investigations they are using halogen atoms as protypical free radicals to abstract hydrogen atoms from small alkanes. Their first study has been looking at the reaction of Cl + propane {r_arrow} HCl + propyl radical. In their preliminary efforts the authors have measured the laboratory scattering angular distribution and time of flight spectra for the propyl radical products at collision energies of 9.6 kcal/mol and 14.9 kcal/mol.

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  6. 对称电场催化增强甲烷转化合成Q研究%STUDY ON THE CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH SYMMETRIC ELECTRICAL FIELD ENHANCING CATALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    利用电场作用通过交流和直流等离子体在低温、常压和低功率下催化反应将甲烷直接转化为碳二烃(乙烷、乙烯、乙炔)。考察了在对称电场作用下催化剂的催化性能。实验结果表明,在交流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别不大;甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:MnO2/Al2O3>Ni/Al2O3>MoO—Al2O3>Ni/NaY>Pd/ZSM-5>Ni/H4Mg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>无催化剂:在直流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别也不大(除Ni/NaY外),甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:Ni/Al2O3>Ni/HaMg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>MnO2/Al2O3>MoO3/Al2O3>Ni/NaY>无催化剂>Pd/ZSM-5。%Low-power catalytic conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons(ethane, ethCene and acetylene) through AC or DC plasma catalysis reactionsin symmetric electrical field was studied under low temperature andatmospheric pressure. The function of catalyst was tested. The appropriate condition was: voltage 90 V~1l0 V (power 15 W~20 W DC); voltage 20 V~40 V (AC). The appropriate inlet flow of methane was 45 mL/min~80mL/min under AC and DC field. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons was above 95%.

  7. The effect of acid strength on the MTO reaction : Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over H-SAPO-34 and high silica Chabazite (H-SSZ-13)

    OpenAIRE

    Bleken, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    The Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process for the production of polymer-grade olefins is a possible step in the upgrading of natural gas. The preferred MTO catalyst is the microporous silicoaluminophosphate H-SAPO-34 (CHA topology). In the present work, H-SAPO-34 is compared with H-SSZ-13 which has the same topology and density of acid sites, but is slightly more acidic due to the framework composition. This is a one-parameter study where the effect of acidity on the MTO-process is ...

  8. Studies on Anion Promoted Titania.1: Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity toward Alcohol and Cumene Conversion Reactions of Phosphated Titania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida; Acharya; Samantaray; Mishra

    1999-09-15

    Phosphate impregnated titania samples with varying amount of phosphate have been prepared by solid-solid kneading as well as aqueous impregnation method. All the samples are characterized by XRD, TG-DTA, and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherm. Surface area is found to increase with the increase in phosphate content up to 7.5 wt% loading and thereafter decreases. The average pore diameter and crystallite size of titania decreases with the addition of phosphate. However, total acidity (determined by base adsorption method) and the catalytic activity increases with the increase in phosphate content up to 10 wt%. Phosphated samples prepared using phosphoric acid as the source of phosphate exhibit higher acidity compared to the samples prepared using (NH(4))(3)PO(4). However, the sample prepared from (NH(4))(3)PO(4) shows the presence of both acid and basic sites. Though from the cumene conversion study it is understood that phosphated samples contain both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites, the latter predominates over the former. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Primary light-energy conversion in tetrameric chlorophyll structure of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers: I. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatypov, Ravil A; Khmelnitskiy, Anton Yu; Leonova, Maria M; Vasilieva, Lyudmila G; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the review is to show that the tetrameric (bacterio)chlorophyll ((B)Chl) structures in reaction centers of photosystem II (PSII) of green plants and in bacterial reaction centers (BRCs) are similar and play a key role in the primary charge separation. The Stark effect measurements on PSII reaction centers have revealed an increased dipole moment for the transition at approximately 730 nm (Frese et al., Biochemistry 42:9205-9213, 2003). It was found (Heber and Shuvalov, Photosynth Res 84:84-91, 2005) that two fluorescent bands at 685 and 720 nm are observed in different organisms. These two forms are registered in the action spectrum of Q(A) photoreduction. Similar results were obtained in core complexes of PSII at low temperature (Hughes et al., Biochim Biophys Acta 1757: 841-851, 2006). In all cases the far-red absorption and emission can be interpreted as indication of the state with charge transfer character in which the chlorophyll monomer plays a role of an electron donor. The role of bacteriochlorophyll monomers (B(A) and B(B)) in BRCs can be revealed by different mutations of axial ligand for Mg central atoms. RCs with substitution of histidine L153 by tyrosine or leucine and of histidine M182 by leucine (double mutant) are not stable in isolated state. They were studied in antennaless membrane by different kinds of spectroscopy including one with femtosecond time resolution. It was found that the single mutation (L153HY) was accompanied by disappearance of B(A) molecule absorption near 802 nm and by 14-fold decrease of photochemical activity measured with ms time resolution. The lifetime of P(870)* increased up to approximately 200 ps in agreement with very low rate of the electron transfer to A-branch. In the double mutant L153HY + M182HL, the B(A) appears to be lost and B(B) is replaced by bacteriopheophytin Phi(B) with the absence of any absorption near 800 nm. Femtosecond measurements have revealed the electron transfer to B-branch with a

  10. Epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed enantioselective conversion of trans-stilbene oxide: Insights into the reaction mechanism from steady-state and pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archelas, Alain; Zhao, Wei; Faure, Bruno; Iacazio, Gilles; Kotik, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A detailed kinetic study based on steady-state and pre-steady-state measurements is described for the highly enantioselective epoxide hydrolase Kau2. The enzyme, which is a member of the α/β-hydrolase fold family, preferentially reacts with the (S,S)-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) with an E value of ∼200. The enzyme follows a classical two-step catalytic mechanism with formation of an alkyl-enzyme intermediate in the first step and hydrolysis of this intermediate in a rate-limiting second step. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching during TSO conversion appears to correlate with alkylation of the enzyme. The steady-state data are consistent with (S,S) and (R,R)-TSO being two competing substrates with marked differences in k(cat) and K(M) values. The high enantiopreference of the epoxide hydrolase is best explained by pronounced differences in the second-order alkylation rate constant (k2/K(S)) and the alkyl-enzyme hydrolysis rate k3 between the (S,S) and (R,R)-enantiomers of TSO. Our data suggest that during conversion of (S,S)-TSO the two active site tyrosines, Tyr(157) and Tyr(259), serve mainly as electrophilic catalysts in the alkylation half-reaction, polarizing the oxirane oxygen of the bound epoxide through hydrogen bond formation, however, without fully donating their hydrogens to the forming alkyl-enzyme intermediate.

  11. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  12. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  13. Catalytic cracking of non-edible sunflower oil over ZSM-5 for hydrocarbon bio-jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianhui; Wei, Lin; Julson, James; Qiao, Qiquan; Dubey, Ashish; Anderson, Gary

    2015-03-25

    Non-edible sunflower oils that were extracted from sunflower residual wastes were catalytically cracked over a ZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed reactor at three different reaction temperatures: 450°C, 500°C and 550°C. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, FT-IR, BET and SEM. Characterizations of the upgraded sunflower oils, hydrocarbon fuels, distillation residues and non-condensable gases were carried out. The effect of the reaction temperature on the yield and quality of liquid products was discussed. The results showed that the reaction temperature affected the hydrocarbon fuel yield but had a minor influence on its properties. The highest conversion efficiency from sunflower oils to hydrocarbon fuels was 30.1%, which was obtained at 550°C. The reaction temperature affected the component content of the non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gases generated at 550°C contained the highest content of light hydrocarbons (C1-C5), CO, CO2 and H2. Compared to raw sunflower oils, the properties of hydrocarbon fuels including the dynamic viscosity, pH, moisture content, density, oxygen content and heating value were improved.

  14. Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Alcohol-to-Olefins over SAPO-34 at Different Reaction Stages : Crystal Accessibility and Hydrocarbons Reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, Qingyun; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Mokhtar, Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A.; Basahel, Suliman N.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    Insitu synchrotron-based IR and UV/Vis micro-spectroscopy combined with isotopically labeled reactants have been used to identify the different hydrocarbon species formed as well as to assess the activity and accessibility of individual 50m-sized SAPO-34 crystals. For the methanol-to-olefins

  15. Methanol to hydrocarbons reaction over HZSM-22 and SAPO-11:Effect of catalyst acid strength on reaction and deactivation mechanism%HZSM-22和SAPO-11催化甲醇转化制烯烃(MTH)反应:酸强度对反应和失活机理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金棒; 张雯娜; 武新强; 郭新闻; 刘中民; 李金哲; 徐舒涛; 郅玉春; 魏迎旭; 何艳丽; 陈景润; 张默之; 王全义

    2015-01-01

    -ring channels, but have different acidic strengths. Comparison studies and 12C/13C isotopic switching experiments were conducted to eval-uate the influence of the acidic strength of the catalyst on the conversion of methanol, as well as its deactivation mechanism. Although the conversion of methanol proceeded via an alkene methyla-tion-cracking pathway over both catalysts, the acidity of the catalysts had a significant impact on the conversion and product distribution of these reactions. The stability of the catalysts varied with temperature. The catalysts were deactivated at high temperature by the deposition of graphitic coke on their outer surface. Deactivation also occurred at low temperatures a result that the pores of the catalyst were blocked by polyaromatic compounds. The co-reaction of 13C-methanol and 12C-1-butene confirmed the importance of the acidity of the catalyst on the distribution of the hy-drocarbon products.

  16. Study on Reaction Mechanism for Cracking FCC Gasoline on Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Youhao; Wang Xieqing

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on the experimental data on reaction of FCC naphtha in the presence of acid catalysts. The data published in the literature were reprocessed and compared with experimental data and the relationship of hydrogen and methane contained in the dry gas with the conversion rate was identified.The similarity between the route for cracking of olefin enriched FCC gasoline and the route for reaction of individual hydrocarbons was deduced, while the route for formation of ethylene in dry gas was also proposed to identify the relationship between the reaction path for formation of ethylene and the conversion rate.

  17. Advanced reactors and novel reactions for the conversion of triglyceride based oils into high quality renewable transportation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnen, Michael James

    Sustainable energy continues to grow more important to all societies, leading to the research and development of a variety of alternative and renewable energy technologies. Of these, renewable liquid transportation fuels may be the most visible to consumers, and this visibility is further magnified by the long-term trend of increasingly expensive petroleum fuels that the public consumes. While first-generation biofuels such as biodiesel and fuel ethanol have been integrated into the existing fuel infrastructures of several countries, the chemical differences between them and their petroleum counterparts reduce their effectiveness. This gives rise to the development and commercialization of second generation biofuels, many of which are intended to have equivalent properties to those of their petroleum counterparts. In this dissertation, the primary reactions for a second-generation biofuel process, known herein as the University of North Dakota noncatalytic cracking process (NCP), have been studied at the fundamental level and improved. The NCP is capable of producing renewable fuels and chemicals that are virtually the same as their petroleum counterparts in performance and quality (i.e., petroleum-equivalent). In addition, a novel analytical method, FIMSDIST was developed which, within certain limitations, can increase the elution capabilities of GC analysis and decrease sample processing times compared to other high resolution methods. These advances are particularly useful for studies of highly heterogeneous fuel and/or organic chemical intermediates, such as those studied for the NCP. However the data from FIMSDIST must be supplemented with data from other methods such as for certain carboxylic acid, to provide accurate, comprehensive results, From a series of TAG cracking experiments that were performed, it was found that coke formation during cracking is most likely the result of excessive temperature and/or residence time in a cracking reactor. Based on this

  18. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  19. Effect of La2O3/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst on the Activation of CH4 and CO2 to C2 Hydrocarbons under Non-equilibrium Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the reaction of methane and carbon dioxide to C2 hydrocarbons under non-equilibrium plasma, methane conversion was decreased, but selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons was increased when using La2O3/γ-Al2O3 as catalyst. So the yield of C2 hydrocarbons was higher than using plasma alone. The synergism of La2O3/γ-Al2O3 and plasma gave methane conversion of 24.9% and C2 yield of 18.1%. The distribution of C2 hydrocarbons changed when Pd- La2O3/γ-Al2O3 was used as catalyst, the major C2 product was ethylene.

  20. Activation energies of pericyclic reactions: performance of DFT, MP2, and CBS-QB3 methods for the prediction of activation barriers and reaction energetics of 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, and revised activation enthalpies for a standard set of hydrocarbon pericyclic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ess, Daniel H; Houk, K N

    2005-10-27

    Activation barriers and reaction energetics for the three main classes of 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, including nine different reactions, were evaluated with the MPW1K and B3LYP density functional methods, MP2, and the multicomponent CBS-QB3 method. The CBS-QB3 values were used as standards for 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition activation barriers and reaction energetics, and the density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 methods were benchmarked against these values. The MPW1K/6-31G* method and basis set performs best for activation barriers, with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) value of 1.1 kcal/mol. The B3LYP/6-31G* method and basis set performs best for reaction enthalpies, with a MAD value of 2.4 kcal/mol, while the MPW1K method shows large errors for reaction energetics. The MP2 method gives the expected systematic underestimation of barriers. Concerted and nearly synchronous transition structures are predicted by all DFT and MP2 methods. Also reported are revised estimated 0 K experimental activation enthalpies for a standard set of hydrocarbon pericyclic reactions and updated comparisons to experiment for DFT, ab initio, and multicomponent methods. B3LYP and MPW1K methods with MAD values of 1.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, fortuitously outperform the multicomponent CBS-QB3 method, which has a MAD value of 2.3. The MAD value of the O3LYP functional improves to 2.4 kcal/mol from the previously reported 3.0 kcal/mol.

  1. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  2. Study on Olefins Yield from Methanol Conversion over Different Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Munib Shahda; Yan Dengchao; Wang Zhihe; Wen Huixin

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of Methanol to Olefins (MTO) under different reaction conditions was experimentally investigated over different catalysts, and comparison was made between the SAPO-34 and GOR-MLC catalysts. Optimization of reaction conditions has been explored. Conversion of methanol to olefins over these catalysts under different reaction temperatures was experimentally studied. In a fixed bed micro-reactor, the influence of temperature was found to be one of the major factors. For both catalysts the olefins yield was increased significantly when water was added to the methanol feed. A temperature range of 460-480 ℃ appeared to be the optimum range suitable for methanol conversion with appropriate catalyst activity and C2-C3 olefins yield. Some other hydrocarbons appeared during the MTO reaction in the presence of the SAPO-34 catalyst, while a lot of dimethylether was formed when the GOR-MLC catalyst was used. In the course of the MTO reaction, the GOR-MLC catalyst was found to have a faster catalyst deactivation rate compared to the SAPO-34 catalyst.

  3. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  4. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of wat

  5. H{sub 2} thermal desorption and hydride conversion reactions in Li cells of TiH{sub 2}/C amorphous nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitucci, F.M., E-mail: francesco.vitucci@roma1.infn.it [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Paolone, A. [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Brutti, S. [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze, Univ. Basilicata, V.le Ateneo Lucano, 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Munaò, D.; Silvestri, L.; Panero, S. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Univ. Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Reale, P. [ENEA – Centro Ricerche Casaccia,via Anguillarese 301, 00100 Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Galvanostatic measurements on amorphous TiH{sub 2} is reported. • Variation of ball milling pre-treatment vary the first discharge capacity. • Relation between thermal H{sub 2} desorption and electrochemical properties is proposed. - Abstract: Here we investigate the properties of amorphous TiH{sub 2}/carbon nanocomposites as possible active material in lithium cells. Several TiH{sub 2}/C mixtures are prepared by a mechanochemical route, by varying the carbon/hydride ratio. Materials are tested in electrochemical cells versus lithium metal in EC:DMC LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte by galvanostatic cycling (GC) and are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. Thermal dehydrogenation processes are altered by the mechanochemical treatment of the sample: milling decreases the hydrogen content of the hydride. On the other hand, the mechanochemical grinding increases the specific capacity delivered during the first GC discharge. We suggest that the electrochemical process is the result of a delicate balance between the absolute quantity of hydrogen and its availability for the hydride conversion reaction.

  6. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  8. Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV; Haynes, Daniel [Morgantown, WV; Smith, Mark [Morgantown, WV; Spivey, James J [Baton Rouge, LA

    2012-03-13

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  9. An eco-friendly process for natural gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, S.; Nakayama, A.; Suzuki, E. [Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth, Kyoto (Japan). Catalysis Science Laboratory

    2001-07-01

    An eco-friendly process has been developed to convert methane, the major component of natural gas, to acetylene and hydrogen using a high frequency pulsed plasma. Acetylene is an important raw material in industry that is manufactured mainly by the reaction of calcium carbide with water. Acetylene is also manufactured by thermal cracking of hydrocarbons, or by partial oxidation of methane. These conventional processes require severe reaction conditions (a very high reaction temperature) and emit large amounts of greenhouse gas. The new process can convert methane to acetylene and hydrogen with a conversion efficiency of 52.8%, an acetylene selectivity of 91.8%, and a hydrogen ratio of 4.15 moles per mole acetylene at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. No environmental pollutant is emitted. 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  11. In vitro cultivation of Hammondia heydorni: Generation of tachyzoites, stage conversion into bradyzoites, and evaluation of serologic cross-reaction with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, L F P; Meyer, J; Peters, M; Rezende-Gondim, M M; Vrhovec, M G; Pantchev, N; Bauer, C; Conraths, F J; Schares, G

    2015-06-15

    Hammondia heydorni was in vitro isolated from oocysts shed by three dogs using a finite cell line from embryonal bovine heart (KH-R). The oocysts were purified and suspended in 2% potassium dichromate or 2% sulphuric acid for sporulation for 2-5 days at room temperature. The parasites were confirmed as H. heydorni by PCR using specific primers (JS4/JS5) and by negative reaction for Neospora caninum employing the primers Np6+/Np21+. H. heydorni sporulated oocysts (1 × 10(6)) from each dog were initially treated with sodium hypochlorite. For excystation of sporozoites, oocysts from one dog were lysed by ultrasound followed by incubation with 0.75% taurocholate. Excystation of sporozoites from the other two dogs was achieved by oocyst fragmentation with glass beads with no further chemical treatment. Tachyzoites were clearly seen in the cultures at three days post inoculation (dpi). Bradyzoite conversion and cyst formation were evaluated at different time points by using a polyclonal rabbit serum against a bradyzoite-specific antigen (anti-BAG1), and a rat monoclonal antibody (mAbCC2) against a cyst wall protein. Bradyzoites were firstly detected at 7 dpi. Between 18 and 21 dpi most of cultured parasites consisted of encysted bradyzoites. The H. heydorni cysts increased in size during cultivation and reached a length of up to 135 μm. The parasite was maintained in the bovine heart cells up to 4.5months. Sera from mice and sheep experimentally infected with H. heydorni oocysts reacted with H. heydorni by IFAT, but did not cross-react with N. caninum antigens using IFAT or immunoblot. These findings suggest that serological cross-reactivity between H. heydorni and N. caninum seems to be of minor importance.

  12. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  13. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electro......The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future...... is electrolysis followed by conversion into synthetic hydrocarbons, alcohols or ethers. Several types of electrolysers exist. The various types are listed together with a short description of principle and status. It is argued that electrolysis will at least become part of large sustainable energy systems...

  14. Conversational Dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  15. 基于转化反应机制的锂离子电池电极材料研究进展%Progress of Electrode Materials Entailing Conversion Reaction for Li-ion Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴超; 崔永丽; 庄全超; 徐守冬; 沈明芳; 史月丽; 孙智

    2011-01-01

    基于转化反应机制实现储锂功能的电极材料的研究和开发是提高锂离子电池性能,尤其是其可逆循环容量的重要方法,对于锂离子电池未来的发展有着非常重要的意义。本文综述近年来基于转化反应机制实现储锂功能的锂离子电池电极材料的研究进展,介绍了转化反应机制等新概念,重点讨论了基于转化反应机制实现储锂功能的简单过渡金属化合物电极材料的电化学性能、电极界面特性及其电化学性能改进的方法,最后展望了基于转化反应机制实现储锂功能的锂离子电池电极材料的未来发展。%The development of electrode materials entailing conversion reactions were very important methods for improving the performance of Li-ion batteries,especially for improving its reversible capacity upon cycling.In this paper,the progresses of the use of transition metal compounds that react with Li through conversion reactions as both positive and negative electrode materials in Li-ion batteries were reviewed,the mechanisms of the conversion reactions were introduced,and several factors currently handicapping the applicability of electrode materials entailing conversion reactions were also discussed.Emphasis was put on the electrochemical behavior,the properties of electrode/electrolyte interfaces and the methods for improving the performance of these transition metal compounds entailing conversion reactions.At last,the directions of future research of electrode materials through conversion reactions were put forward.

  16. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  17. Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons over Tungsten-ZSM-5 and Tungsten Loaded Cu/ZSM-5 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Didi Dwi Anggoro; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2006-01-01

    Metal containing ZSM-5 can produce higher hydrocarbons in methane oxidation. Many researchers have studied the applicability of HZSM-5 and modify ZSM-5 for methane conversion to liquid hydrocarbons, but their research results still lead to low conversion, low selectivity and low heat resistance.The modified HZSM-5, by loading with tungsten (W), could enhance its heat resistant performance, and the high reaction temperature (800 ℃) did not lead to a loss of the W component by sublimation. The loading of HZSM-5 with tungsten and copper (Cu) resulted in an increment in the methane conversion as well as CO2 and C5+ selectivities. In contrast, CO, C2-3 and H2O selectivities were reduced. The process of converting methane to liquid hydrocarbons (C5+) was dependent on the metal surface area and the acidity of the zeolite. High methane conversion and C5+ selectivity, and low H2O selectivity are obtained over W/3.0Cu/HZSM.

  18. La conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes : au carrefour du thermique et du catalytique Conversion of Residues and Heavy Oils At the Crossroads of Thermal Cracking and Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Page J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article passe en revue les diverses familles de procédés de conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes. Tous les résultats semblent converger pour accréditer l'idée que dans tous ces procédés, y compris les procédés dits catalytiques, l'essentiel de la conversion des espèces de poids moléculaire élevé, résines et asphaltènes, procède par mécanisme radicalaire : la clef de la conversion profonde, c'est paradoxalement la maîtrise de la condensation radicalaire de ces espèces. Hydrogène seul, hydrogène en présence de solvant donneur, d'additifs ou encore mieux de catalyseurs, sont les armes dont dispose tout raffineur pour affirmer cette maîtrise, dans la mesure où il ne tient pas à fabriquer du coke. Tous ces procédés de conversion des résidus donnent par ailleurs naissance à des produits craqués dont la nature et la distribution rappellent celles des produits de première distillation du pétrole brut dont est issu le résidu soumis au craquage. This article reviews the different families of conversion processes for residues and heavy oils. All the results seem to converge to support the idea that in all these processes, including so-called catalytic processes, most of the conversion of high-molecular-weight species (resins and asphaltenes operates by a radical mechanism. The key to in-depth conversion is, paradoxically, the mastery of the radical condensation of these species. Hydrogen alone, hydrogen in the presence of a donor solvent, of additives or, better yet, of catalysts, are the arms at the disposal of all refiners to assert this mastery, to the extent that they do not want to manufacture coke. All such conversion processes for residues also give rise to cracked products whose nature and distribution recall those of first-distillation products of crude oil, from which the residue comes that is subjected to cracking.

  19. Hydrogen radical additions to unsaturated hydrocarbons and the reverse beta-scission reactions: modeling of activation energies and pre-exponential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Waroquier, Michel; Marin, Guy B

    2010-01-18

    The group additivity method for Arrhenius parameters is applied to hydrogen addition to alkenes and alkynes and the reverse beta-scission reactions, an important family of reactions in thermal processes based on radical chemistry. A consistent set of group additive values for 33 groups is derived to calculate the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for a broad range of hydrogen addition reactions. The group additive values are determined from CBS-QB3 ab-initio-calculated rate coefficients. A mean factor of deviation of only two between CBS-QB3 and experimental rate coefficients for seven reactions in the range 300-1000 K is found. Tunneling coefficients for these reactions were found to be significant below 400 K and a correlation accounting for tunneling is presented. Application of the obtained group additive values to predict the kinetics for a set of 11 additions and beta-scissions yields rate coefficients within a factor of 3.5 of the CBS-QB3 results except for two beta-scissions with severe steric effects. The mean factor of deviation with respect to experimental rate coefficients of 2.0 shows that the group additive method with tunneling corrections can accurately predict the kinetics and is at least as accurate as the most commonly used density functional methods. The constructed group additive model can hence be applied to predict the kinetics of hydrogen radical additions for a broad range of unsaturated compounds.

  20. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  1. Time- and space-resolved high energy operando X-ray diffraction for monitoring the methanol to hydrocarbons reaction over H-ZSM-22 zeolite catalyst in different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Pablo; Slawinski, Wojciech Andrzej; Henry, Reynald; Erichsen, Marius Westgård; Svelle, Stian; Beato, Pablo; Wragg, David; Olsbye, Unni

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) over H-ZSM-22 was studied by operando time- and space-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) at 370-385 °C and WHSV = 2 g/g h at the Swiss-Norwegian Beamline at ESRF. The performance of a commercial H-ZSM-22 sample was compared before and after acid-base treatment, and with and without propanol co-feed, respectively. N2 adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy and propyl amine desorption experiments showed that acid-base treatment led to enhanced accessibility of acid sites, mainly due to the formation of mesopores between agglomerated H-ZSM-22 crystals. The catalytic set-up allowed us to simultaneously observe the catalyst activity and unit cell volume variations by time- and space-resolved HXRD in operando conditions. The expansion of the unit cell and final flattening at different positions in the catalytic bed matched very nicely with the catalytic activity gradients. Different scenarios provided different behaviors and gave insights in the effect of morphology and co-feed process on the activity in the MTH process. This technique is the only one which has so far been able to provide direct evidence of the behavior of the species inside the catalytic reactor.

  2. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000954.htm Conversion disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person ...

  3. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  4. Effect of Cooling Methods on Methane Conversion via Dielectric-Barrier Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Baowei; YANG Kuanhui; XU Genhui

    2008-01-01

    Effects of cooling methods on stability and methane conversion rate using dielectricbarrier discharges (DBD) were systematically investigated in this article.The results showed that the methane conversion rate was as high as 44.43% in a pure methane system at a flow rate of 100 mL.min-1 and an input power of 234.2 W with air cooling.A dark greenish and soft film-like carbon was deposited on the outer surface of quartz tube when the outer electrode was watercooled,which decreased the methane conversion.With air cooling of inner electrode the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons was higher than that with other cooling methods,while the C3 hydrocarbons had higher selectivity with flowing water cooling.Cooling the inner electrode could restrain the carbon deposition,but would decrease the methane conversion rate.The stability of both reaction and plasma operation can be improved through cooling the reactor.From thermodynamic analysis,it was found that the effective collisions frequency among the reactant molecules and free electrons (e-) increased with temperature,which in turn led to a higher methane conversion rate and a change in the distribution of products.

  5. Hydrocarbon processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Seddon, D.

    1989-06-28

    A process for the catalytic conversion of synthesis-gas into a product which comprises naphtha, kerosene and distillate is characterized in that the catalyst is a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst also containing a zeolite, the naphtha fraction contains 60% or less linear paraffins and the kerosene and distillated fractions contain more linear paraffins and olefins than found in the naphtha fraction. Reduction of the relative amount of straight chain material in the naphtha fraction increases the octane number and so enhances the quality of the gasoline product, while the high quality of the kerosene and distillate fractions is maintained.

  6. Monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A case of Fe³⁺ to Fe²⁺ conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Suhua; Meng, Juan; Tang, Xianghu; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the process of organic chemical reactions to study the kinetics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is currently of immense interest. However, monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction is still an extremely difficulty for researchers. This study exactly focused on the monitor of inorganic chemical reaction. Capillary coated with silver nanoparticles was introduced, which was an efficient platform for monitoring reactions with SERS due to the advantages of sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. The photoreduction of [Fe(phen)3](3+) to [Fe(phen)3](2+) was used as model reaction to demonstrated the feasibility of SERS monitoring inorganic chemical reaction by involving in metal-organic complexes. Moreover, the preliminary implementation demonstrated that the kinetics of photoreduction can be real-time monitored by in situ using the SERS technique on a single constructed capillary, which may be useful for the practical application of SERS technique.

  7. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  8. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  9. 电晕放电二氧化碳冷等离子体转化特性研究%STUDY ON CORONA DISCHARGE FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CONVERSION USING COLD PLASMA REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明伟; 许根慧; 刘昌俊; 姜涛

    2001-01-01

    在常压、室温条件下利用电晕放电使二氧化碳通过冷等离子体反应分解为一氧化碳和氧气,由四极质谱在线定量分析产物组成。考察反应条件(电晕类型、能量密度、气体流量等)对反应转化率的影响,分析了该反应的能量效率。当放电功率为40?W、CO2流量为30 mL*min-1时,正电晕等离子体CO2分解反应的转化率为15.2%;CO2转化率随体系能量密度的增加而上升,随反应时间的增加而增大。当CO2流量为90 mL*min-1、正电晕放电功率为37.6?W时,反应体系的能量效率为5.89%;实验发现,正电晕放电时CO2的转化率高于负电晕的转化率。%The decomposition of CO2 through corona discharge of cold plasma reaction at ambient temperature and atmosphere was carried out. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was employed for online quantity analysis of the products of CO2 plasma decomposition reaction. The effects of reaction parameters on conversion and energy efficiency, such as different corona discharges (include positive corona discharge, negative corona discharge), energy density, flow rate of feed, etc. were investigated. For the flow rate of CO2 at 30?mL*min-1, discharge power at 40?W, the CO2 conversion was 15.2% in positive corona plasma reaction. The conversion increased with increasing energy density and decreased with increasing CO2 flow rate. For CO2 flow rate at 90?mL*min-1, power at 37.6?W, the energy efficiency was 5.89% in positive corona plasma reaction. The conversion of CO2 in positive corona discharge is higher than that in negative corona discharge.

  10. Environmental Hydrocarbon Harvesting for Micro-Scale Power Sources using Thermopower Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-06

    Environmental Hydrocarbon Harvesting 1 Environmental Hydrocarbon Harvesting for Micro-scale Power Sources using Thermopower Waves Final...prevents continuous operation of thermopower power sources because the fuels are not easily refueled and are completely consumed in the reaction. Hence

  11. An installation for steam conversion of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    An installation is proposed for steam conversion of a hydrocarbon gas in order to produce an inorganic gas which chiefly consists of H2 and CO in which the line for feeding the hydrocarbon gas has a steam generator which has a microcapillary structure made of sponge metal, inorganic heat resistant fibers of glass, Si02, Al203 or carbon, inorganic heat resistant fibers twisted into a fiber or a cord of multipore ceramic material; the installation is equipped with a heater which regulates the water temperature, in which the steam generator is submerged. The installation is designed for converting natural gas, C3H8, other hydrocarbon gases and vapors of liquid hydrocarbons (Uv) into H2 and CO. The design and disposition of the steam generator simplify the design of the device, eliminating the pump for feeding the steam and the device for premixing of the steam and hydrocarbon gas.

  12. Synthesis of Hydrocarbons from H2-Deficient Syngas in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Co-Based Catalyst Coupled with Fe-Based Catalyst as Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of metal species in an Fe-based catalyst on structural properties were investigated through the synthesis of Fe-based catalysts containing various metal species such, as Mn, Zr, and Ce. The addition of the metal species to the Fe-based catalyst resulted in high dispersions of the Fe species and high surface areas due to the formation of mesoporous voids about 2–4 nm surrounded by the catalyst particles. The metal-added Fe-based catalysts were employed together with Co-loaded beta zeolite for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from syngas with a lower H2/CO ratio of 1 than the stoichiometric H2/CO ratio of 2 for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS. Among the catalysts, the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst exhibited a high activity for the water-gas shift (WGS reaction with a comparative durability, leading to the enhancement of the CO hydrogenation in the FTS in comparison with Co-loaded beta zeolite alone. Furthermore, the loading of Pd on the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst enhanced the catalytic durability due to the hydrogenation of carbonaceous species by the hydrogen activated over Pd.

  13. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  14. Methanization of biogenic synthetic gases with respect to direct reaction of higher hydrocarbons; Methanisierung biogener Synthesegase mit Hinblick auf die direkte Umsetzung von hoeheren Kohlenwasserstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    The present work deals with a process for the methanation of the synthesis-gas from allothermal fluidized bed gasification. In the proposed process, the tar and sulfur contaminated syngas is used in a fixed-bed methanation reactor without further gas treatment. Commercial nickel catalysts are applied, which offer the opportunity to bring the gas to stoichiometry, in order to remove sulfur compounds by adsorption and to reform the synthesis-gas tar-content directly in the methanation reactor. An increased catalyst consumption turns out to be disadvantageous for the process. For process development in the course of this work, a biomass-fueled allothermic fluidized bed gasifier (Q{sub BR}=5kW) as well as a polytropic temperature-controlled methanation-reactor was constructed, built up and put into operation. It is possible to operate the system fully remote-controlled, which enables long-term tests without staff on site. Within the step of modelling with the software package ASPEN Plus in advance of experiments, parametric studies of both, the gasifier as well as of the process of methanation, were performed. As a major result, it can be shown that due to the use of nickel as methanation-catalyst-material, the educt gas-conversion is independent of the synthesis-gas's H{sub 2}/CO-ratio. Gasification tests were made to investigate the allothermic fluidized bed gasifier, in order to find an optimum point of operation for the downstream methane-synthesis. In the found point of operation, due to a sufficient water-content in the synthesis gas, from the thermodynamic perspective, carbon deposits on the methanation-catalyst can be avoided. The synthesis gas has a gravimetric tar-load of 10,4 g/Nm{sup 3}, furthermore hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) with a concentration of around 8 ppm{sub v} was measured as the representative sulfur component. It this gas is led to the methanation-reactor, in contrast to attempts with a clean synthesis-gas, the equilibrium

  15. Methane Conversion Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge: Comparison with Thermal Process and Catalyst Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2006-01-01

    The direct conversion of methane using a dielectric barrier discharge has been experimentally studied. Experiments with different values of flow rates and discharge voltages have been performed to investigate the effects on the conversion and reaction products both qualitatively and quantitatively.Experimental results indicate that the maximum conversion of methane has been 80% at an input flow rate of 5 ml/min and a discharge voltage of 4 kV. Experimental results also show that the optimum condition has occurred at a high discharge voltage and higher input flow rate. In terms of product distribution, a higher flow rate or shorter residence time can increase the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons. No hydrocarbon product was detected using the thermal method, except hydrogen and carbon. Increasing selectivity for ethane was found when Pt and Ru catalysts presented in the plasma reaction. Hydrogenation of acetylene in the catalyst surface could have been the reason for this phenomenon as the selectivity for acetylene in the products was decreasing.

  16. Conversational Narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelisti, Anita L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines narcissistic communication and the ways it is exhibited in everyday conversation. Identifies the following behavioral referents: boasting, refocusing the topic of conversation on the self, exaggerating hand and body movements, using a loud tone of voice, and "glazing over" when others speak. Suggests that conversational…

  17. Contentious Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  18. Thermodynamic and Thermo-graphic Research of the Interaction Process of the Lisakovsky Gravitymagnetic Concentrate with Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Мuhtar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of this work consists in treatment of complex brown iron ores. Large volumes of off-balance ores are an additional source of production raw materials, however, there is still a problem of their treatment by effective complex methods.This work shows a possibility of using liquid hydrocarbons as the reducers during thermochemical preparation of brown iron concentrates of the Lisakovsky field to metallurgical conversion and studies the features and main regularities of a roasting process of Lisakovsky gravitymagnetic concentrate in the presence of liquid hydrocarbons.The initial concentrate was treated by solution of a liquid hydrocarbon reducer (oil: phenyl hydride: water, which was subjected to heat treatment with the subsequent magnetic dressing.Research by the X-ray phase analysis of reducing products has shown that the main phases of magnetic fraction of a roasted product are presented by magnetite in a small amount hematite and quartz. Generally, only relative intensity of peaks is changed.The thermodynamic analysis of interaction between the hydrocarbons, which are a part of oil, and iron oxides was carried out. This analysis allowed us to suppose a reducing mechanism for the brown iron ores by liquid reducers.The data obtained by the thermodynamic analysis are confirmed by experimental results. It is proved that with increasing hydrogen-to-carbon ratio the probability of proceeding reactions of interaction between oxide of iron (III and liquid hydrocarbon increases.The differential and thermal analysis allowed us to study a heat treatment process of the Lisakovsky gravity-magnetic concentrate, which is pre-treated by oil solutions, as well as to show a possibility for proceeding the process of interaction between liquid hydrocarbon and ferriferous products of Lisakovsky gravity-magnetic concentrate.It is found that with increasing temperature in the treated samples of LGMK the hydrogoethite dehydration product interacts with

  19. Federal Air Pollutant Emission Regulations and Preliminary Estimates of Potential-to-Emit from Biorefineries. Pathway #1: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass-to-Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars-to-Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bhatt, Arpit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomas, Mae [Eastern Research Group, Lexington, MA (United States); Renzaglia, Jason [Eastern Research Group, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Biorefineries are subject to environmental laws, including complex air quality regulations that aim to protect and improve the quality of the air. These regulations govern the amount of certain types of air pollutants that can be emitted from different types of emission sources. To determine which federal air emission regulations potentially apply to the sugars-to-hydrocarbon (HC) biorefinery, we first identified the types of regulated air pollutants emitted to the ambient environment by the biorefinery or from specific equipment. Once the regulated air pollutants are identified, we review the applicability criteria of each federal air regulation to determine whether the sugars-to-HC biorefinery or specific equipment is subject to it. We then estimate the potential-to-emit of pollutants likely to be emitted from the sugars-to-HC biorefinery to understand the air permitting requirements.

  20. Progress in studies of natural gas conversion in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Changchun; Shen Shikong

    2008-01-01

    Progress in natural gas conversion in China is presented in this paper, including processes of natural gas to synthesis gas (syngas), syngas to liquid hydrocarbons, oxygenates synthesis, methanol to olefins (MTO), methane to aromatics and oxidative coupling of methane (OCM).

  1. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  2. Renewable energy based catalytic CH4 conversion to fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jansen, I.; Schuttlefield, J.D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas is envisioned as a primary source of hydrocarbons in the foreseeable future. With the abundance of shale gas, the main concerns have shifted from the limited hydrocarbon availability to the sustainable methods of CH4 conversion to fuels. This is necessitated by high costs of natural gas

  3. Sources of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); Kildebestemmelse af polyaromatiske kulbrinter (PAH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egsgaard, H. [Forskningscenetr Risoe, Ald. for Plantebiologi og Biokemi (DK); Larsen, E. [Forskningscenter Risoe, Ald. for Optic og Fluid Dynamik (Denmark)

    2000-03-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons including PAH compounds are thermally and chemically very stable compounds and are formed by gasification/pyrolysis of biomass. With reference to the tar compounds present in the produced gas from updraft gasifiers the sources responsible for the formation of naphthalene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons have been investigated. The focus has been on thermal and oxidative conversions of compounds related to the lignin building blocks. Thus, phenols, 2-methoxy-phenols and 4-substituted-2-methoxy-phenols were investigated by introducing water solutions of the compounds into a continuos flow system operating in the temperature range 600-850 deg. C. The pyrolysis products were identified by GC/MS. The tar compounds reveal a well-defined and characteristic thermal transformation. Phenol is a strong source to naphthalene and indenes while 2-methoxyphenols are sources to aromatic oxo-compounds such as cinnamaldehyde. More complex systems are sources to higer PAH compounds. Thus, oligomers of phenol and 2-methoxyphenol give dibenzofuran and oligomers of isoeugenol are important sources to acenaphthylene. It is characteristic that the simple tar compounds investigated undergo loss of CO and hereby loss of the aromatic structure. The intermediary compounds are very reactive cyclo-pentadienes entering Diels-Alder reactions. The later products are transformed to aromatic compounds. The results may facilitate the determination of optimum conditions for updraft gasifiers and hence a reduction of PAH formation. (au)

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Bio-Oil to Oxygen-Containing Fuels by Acid-Catalyzed Reaction with Olefins and Alcohols over Silica Sulfuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Crude bio-oil from pine chip fast pyrolysis was upgraded with olefins (1-octene, cyclohexene, 1,7-octadiene, and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene plus 1-butanol (iso-butanol, t-butanol and ethanol at 120 °C using a silica sulfuric acid (SSA catalyst that possesses a good catalytic activity and stability. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR analysis showed that upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, phenols, polyhydric alcohols and carboxylic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rose from 2.5 to >3.5, removed the unpleasant odor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content dramatically decreased from 37.2% to about 7.0% and the heating value increased from 12.6 MJ·kg−1 to about 31.9 MJ·kg−1. This work has proved that bio-oil upgrading with a primary olefin plus 1-butanol is a feasible route where all the original heating value of the bio-oil plus the added olefin and alcohol are present in the resulting fuel.

  5. Natural gas conversion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

  6. Experimental Probing on Formation Mechanism of Hydrocarbon in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weng Kenan; Xiao Wansheng; Zhang Huizi; Wang Benshan

    1997-01-01

    @@ In order to study the formation mechanism of hydrocarbon in the earth's interior, preliminary experiments on chemical reactions of wax, graphite, siderite with supercritical water have been carried out respectively under the conditions of temperature about 800~1500℃ and pressure approximately above 1 GPa. These reactions can produce a large amount of methane, together with some CO2 and a little other hydrocarbons, indicating that the reactions of carbon-bearing materials with supercritical water is possibly a new formation mechanism of hydrocarbon under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure in deep earth.

  7. Non-oxidative dehydroaromatization of methane:an effective reaction regeneration cyclic operation for catalyst life extension

    OpenAIRE

    Portilla Ovejero, Mª Teresa; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO JAVIER; Martínez, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane aromatization is an attractive direct route for producing higher hydrocarbons. It is highly selective to benzene despite the low conversion due to thermodynamic limitations, and Mo/H-ZSM-5, the first catalyst proposed for this reaction, is still considered as one of the most adequate. The major problem of this process is the severe catalyst deactivation due to the rapid build-up of carbonaceous deposits on the catalysts. Here we present an effective regeneration procedur...

  8. The Conversion of L-Phenylalanine to ("S")-2-Hydroxy-3-Phenylpropanoic Acid: A Simple, Visual Example of a Stereospecific S[subscript N]2 Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Draanen, Nanine A.; Hengst, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple, inexpensive, visual, and environmentally friendly S[subscript N]2 reaction appropriate for the second-year organic chemistry laboratory that illustrates stereospecificity, dependence of water solubility on the state of ionization, optical activity, and effect of diastereotopic protons in [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy. The…

  9. Conversion Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recent significant stress or emotional trauma Being female — women are much more likely to develop conversion disorder Having a mental health condition, such as mood or anxiety disorders, dissociative disorder or certain personality disorders Having ...

  10. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  11. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  12. Review of Systems for Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbon Fuels%光催化CO2转化为碳氢燃料体系的综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝奔月; 史海峰

    2014-01-01

    Increasing global warming and energy shortage caused by traditional fossil energy combustion to carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a significant global issue in view of humansʹcontinuing development. The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 produced from hydrocarbon fuels using solar light and semiconductor photocatalytic materials could not only decrease the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and thus reduce the greenhouse warming effect, but also provide hydrocarbon fuels to partial y al eviate the energy shortage crisis. Hence, the photocatalysis technique has attracted considerable attention in industry and academic areas. In this paper, the fundamental principles of heterogeneous photocatalysis and the recent progress in the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbon fuels are introduced and reviewed. Based on previous reports in the field of photocatalysis research, the main types of semiconductors capable of photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide can be summarized as fol ows: pure TiO2 photocatalysts, ABO3 perovskite-structured photocatalysts, spinel-structured photocatalysts, doped oxide photocatalysts, composite semiconductor photocatalysts, V-, W-, Ge-, Ga-based photocatalysts, and graphene-based photocatalysts. In addition, the characteristics of various photocatalytic materials and some factors affecting photocatalytic activities are reviewed and analyzed. Final y, the prospects and chal enges for developing new photocatalysts for CO2 reduction are presented.%传统化石能源燃烧产生CO2引起的地球变暖和能源短缺已经成为一个严重的全球性问题。利用太阳光和光催化材料将CO2还原为碳氢燃料,不仅可以减少空气中CO2浓度,降低温室效应的影响,还可以提供碳氢燃料,缓解能源短缺问题,因此日益受到各国科学家的高度关注。本文综述了光催化还原CO2为碳氢燃料的研究进展,介绍了光催化还原CO2的反应机理,并对

  13. Strategic conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Asher

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of conversation that rely on a strong notion of cooperation don’t apply to strategic conversation — that is, to conversation where the agents’ motives don’t align, such as courtroom cross examination and political debate. We provide a game-theoretic framework that provides an analysis of both cooperative and strategic conversation. Our analysis features a new notion of safety that applies to implicatures: an implicature is safe when it can be reliably treated as a matter of public record. We explore the safety of implicatures within cooperative and non cooperative settings. We then provide a symbolic model enabling us (i to prove a correspondence result between a characterisation of conversation in terms of an alignment of players’ preferences and one where Gricean principles of cooperative conversation like Sincerity hold, and (ii to show when an implicature is safe and when it is not. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.6.2 BibTeX info

  14. Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, P.T.; Spehlmann, B.C.; Gajda, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    The initial objective of this program was to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutylene via the isosynthesis process. Preliminary work directed at identifying potential catalysts for this reaction did not have promising results. Therefore, the objectives of this program were revised to the development of a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol. Two approaches have been investigated in this area: the direct conversion of synthesis gas to higher alcohols and indirect conversion via methanol produced using conventional methanol synthesis technology. The isosynthesis reaction for the conversion of synthesis gas to branched hydrocarbons was pioneered by German workers during World War II The primary products of this reaction are either isobutane or isobutylene depending on the catalyst system used. Thoria-based catalysts were found to give the highest yields, but virtually all of the products were alkanes. More recently, there have been several reports of olefin production using ZrO{sub 2}-based. The preliminary work in this program focussed on the evaluation of ZrO{sub 2} and modified ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for the direct conversion of CO/H{sub 2} to isobutylene via the isosynthesis reaction. All of the catalysts and conditions evaluated in this work gave isobutylene yields of less than 4% which is far below that required for an economically viable process. A summary of the key results from this portion of the project is given in Section 3.6. In view of the poor performance of these catalysts and the lack any encouraging results from other research groups working in the isosynthesis area, this approach was abandoned in favor of approaches related to higher alcohols synthesis.

  15. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  16. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Larry B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Hladik, Michelle L. [U.S. Geological Survey, 6000 J Street Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819 (United States); Vajda, Alan M. [University of Colorado, Department of Integrative Biology, CB 171, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Fitzgerald, Kevin C. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); AECOM, 500 West Jefferson St., Ste. 1600, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Douville, Chris [City of Boulder, 4049 75th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m{sup 3} d{sup −1} design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L{sup −1}; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L{sup −1}), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L{sup −1}) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had

  17. Direct determination of atom and radical concentrations in thermal reactions of hydrocarbons and other gases. Progress report, June 1, 1976--December 31, 1976. [Design and construction of shock tube for measuring reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, G. B.; Lifshitz, A.

    1977-01-01

    A shock tube has been designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring atom and radical concentrations in thermal reactions of gases. Design features which lead to extremely low levels of contamination include a turbomolecular vacuum pump, metal O-rings in the test section, stainless steel bellows-seal valves, and provision for baking all components to 150 to 200/sup 0/C. The optical system consists of a microwave discharge lamp through which various gas mixtures may flow at low pressures, MgF/sub 2/ windows on the shock tube, and a photodetector. For initial measurements of H and O atoms, a solar blind photomultiplier sensitive at 110 to 140 nm is being used. During the balance of the contract year (January 1--May 31) testing of the shock tube will be completed, the light source will be characterized, and measurements of H atom concentrations in shock-heated mixtures of CH/sub 4/--Ar and H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/--Ar will be started.

  18. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  19. 异丙醇探针反应表征Ce-Mo-O催化剂的酸性与氧化还原性%Characterization of Acidic and Oxidative Properties of Ce-Mo-O Catalysts Using the Probe Reaction of Isopropanol Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓东; 陈慧; 沈俭一

    2003-01-01

    Acidic and redox properties are two important aspects of metal oxide catalysts for selective oxidation reactions. Various methods have been used to characterize these properties, of which the isopropanol conversion is a useful probe reaction that can give qualitative information. It is well known that acidicsites catalyze the dehydration of isopropanol to propylene and basic sites catalyze the dehydrogenation of isopropanol to acetone.

  20. Glycerol and bioglycerol conversion in supercritical water for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wu, Q M; Weiss-Hortala, E; Barna, R; Boucard, H; Bulza, S

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic transesterification of vegetable oils leads to biodiesel and an alkaline feed (bioglycerol and organic residues, such as esters, alcohols. . .). The conversion ofbioglycerol into valuable organic molecules represents a sustainable industrial process leading to the valorization of a renewable organic resource. The physicochemical properties in the supercritical domain (T > 374 degrees C, P > 22.1 MPa) transform water into a solvent for organics and a reactant favouring radical reactions. In this context, the conversion ofbioglycerol in supercritical water (SCW) into platform molecules and/or high energetic gases (hydrogen, hydrocarbons) could represent an interesting valorization process. The reported research results concern the conversion of bioglycerol compared to pure glycerol. The experiments have been done in batch autoclaves (5 ml and 500 ml stirred). Solutions of pure (5 or 10 wt%) and crude (3.5 wt%) glycerol have been processed with or without catalyst (K2CO3 1.5 wt%) in the range of 450-600 degrees C. The molecular formula of bioglycerol was determined as C4.3H9.7O1.8Na0.1Si0.08. Glycerol was partially decomposed in the batch systems during the heating (42% before reaching 420 degrees C) and some intermediates (propanediol, ethylene glycol . . .) were quantified, leading to a proposition of a reaction pathway. Acrolein, a valuable platform molecule, was mainly produced in the absence of catalyst. No solid phase was recovered after SCW conversion of pure and bioglycerol in batch reactors. The optimal parameters for gasification were 600 degrees C, 25 MPa for bioglycerol and 525 degrees C, 25 MPa, for pure glycerol. In these operating conditions, 1 kg of pure or bioglycerol leads to 15 and, respectively, 10 mol of hydrogen. Supercritical water gasification of crude glycerol favoured the generation of light hydrocarbons, while pure glycerol promoted H2 production. SCW conversion of glycerol (pure and crude) allows to obtain simultaneously energetic

  1. Direct Conversion of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R

    1964-01-01

    Topics include: direct versus dynamic energy conversion; laws governing energy conversion; thermoelectricity; thermionic conversion; magnetohydrodynamic conversion; chemical batteries; the fuel cell; solar cells; nuclear batteries; and advanced concepts including ferroelectric conversion and thermomagnetic conversion.

  2. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  3. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B; Hladik, Michelle L; Vajda, Alan M; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Douville, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m(3) d(-1) design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration=2.7 μg L(-1); n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration=4.5 μg L(-1)), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration=1.4 μg L(-1)) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative proportions of

  4. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m3 d−1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L−1; n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L−1), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L−1) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  5. MECHANISMS OF MEMBRANE TOXICITY OF HYDROCARBONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, Jan; Poolman, Bert; de Bont, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Microbial transformations of cyclic hydrocarbons have received much attention during the past three decades. Interest in the degradation of environmental pollutants as well as in applications of microorganisms in the catalysis of chemical reactions has stimulated research in this nl ea. The metaboli

  6. Review on the Biodegradation and Conversion Mechanisms of Typical Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons%典型多环芳烃生物降解及转化机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岩; 杨颖; 张贤明

    2014-01-01

    多环芳烃(PAHs)作为重要的难降解环境污染物,因其突出的危害性,对其进行生物降解已受到越来越多的关注。针对不同相对分子质量的典型PAHs ,概述了细菌、真菌、藻类等PAHs生物降解菌种的研究进展;以萘、蒽、菲和苯并[a]芘4种常见环境污染物为模型化合物,论述了 PAHs的生物转化机制;从PAHs的生物可利用性、微生物的活性,以及环境因子方面,分析了PAHs生物降解过程中的关键影响因素。鉴于环境中 PAHs具有组分多样性的特点,指出构建高效菌群,进行多菌种联合降解将成为开展 PA H s生物降解的重要方法,既具有很强的针对性又可提高现有资源的利用率,可以有效地避免当前以菌种开发为主要研究方向的偶然性和随机性。%Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) ,a class of crucially persistent pollutants with two or more fused benzene rings , have attracted growing concern due to their carcinogenic , teratogenic and mutagenic effects . The biodegradation progress of typical PAHs with different molecular masses by microorganisms including bacteria , fungi and algae isolated from contaminated soil or sediments is reviewed . The biotransformation mechanisms , key enzymes and metabolic pathways of four representative pollutants of naphthalene ,anthracene ,phenanthrene and benzo[a] pyrene were discussed . Still , the crucial impacting factors , such as bioavailability of PAHs , microbial activity and environmental factors , to increase biodegradation rate are introduced . Finally ,it is advanced that studies on a high‐effective microbial consortium and synergetic degradation will be considered as the important means aiming at the diversity of PAHs in the environment , w hich can effectively avoid the contingency and randomness in the development of PA H‐degrading microbes as main direction , and is niche targeting and effective to improve the utilization of

  7. Conversational Telugu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop elementary conversational skills in Telugu. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The first, and most predominant, is the unit microwave cycle. These cycles divide the learning process into two basic phases, the first of which involves mimicry, memorization, and…

  8. Conversion Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fisher, Robert S; Stonnington, Cynthia M; Barry, John J

    2006-01-01

    ... to proceed after establishing a diagnosis of conversion disorder. Case Presentation "Ms. A," a 53-year-old left-handed woman, was admitted to our epilepsy monitoring unit for evaluation of a 4-month history of tremors, head bobbing, and episodic loss of awareness. The onset of these symptoms was 1 week after she had visited an emergency department...

  9. Crossed beam reaction of cyano radicals with hydrocarbon molecules. I. Chemical dynamics of cyanobenzene (C6H5CN; X 1A1) and perdeutero cyanobenzene (C6D5CN; X 1A1) formation from reaction of CN(X 2Σ+) with benzene C6H6(X 1A1g), and d6-benzene C6D6(X 1A1g)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Chang, A. H. H.; Lin, S. H.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.; Bettinger, H. F.; Schleyer, P. v. R.; Schaefer, H. F.

    1999-10-01

    The chemical reaction dynamics to form cyanobenzene C6H5CN(X 1A1), and perdeutero cyanobenzene C6D5CN(X 1A1) via the neutral-neutral reaction of the cyano radical CN(X 2Σ+), with benzene C6H6(X 1A1g) and perdeutero benzene C6D6(X 1A1g), were investigated in crossed molecular beam experiments at collision energies between 19.5 and 34.4 kJ mol-1. The laboratory angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of the products were recorded at mass to charge ratios m/e=103-98 and 108-98, respectively. Forward-convolution fitting of our experimental data together with electronic structure calculations (B3LYP/6-311+G**) indicate that the reaction is without entrance barrier and governed by an initial attack of the CN radical on the carbon side to the aromatic π electron density of the benzene molecule to form a Cs symmetric C6H6CN(C6D6CN) complex. At all collision energies, the center-of-mass angular distributions are forward-backward symmetric and peak at π/2. This shape documents that the decomposing intermediate has a lifetime longer than its rotational period. The H/D atom is emitted almost perpendicular to the C6H5CN plane, giving preferentially sideways scattering. This experimental finding can be rationalized in light of the electronic structure calculations depicting a H-C-C angle of 101.2° in the exit transition state. The latter is found to be tight and located about 32.8 kJ mol-1 above the products. Our experimentally determined reaction exothermicity of 80-95 kJ mol-1 is in good agreement with the theoretically calculated one of 94.6 kJ mol-1. Neither the C6H6CN adduct nor the stable iso cyanobenzene isomer C6H5NC were found to contribute to the scattering signal. The experimental identification of cyanobenzene gives a strong background for the title reaction to be included with more confidence in reaction networks modeling the chemistry in dark, molecular clouds, outflow of dying carbon stars, hot molecular cores, as well as the atmosphere of hydrocarbon

  10. Nickel and potassium co-modified β-Mo2C catalyst for CO conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglin Xiang; Juan Zou; Debao Li; Wenhuai Li; Yuhan Sun; Xichun She

    2009-01-01

    Nickel and potassium co-medified β-Mo2C catalysts were prepared and used for CO hydrogenation reaction. The major products over β-Mo2C were C1-C4 hydrocarbons, only few alcohols were obtained. Addition of potassium resulted in remarkable selectivity shift from hydrocarbons to alcohols at the expense of CO conversion over β-Mo2C. Moreover, it was found that potassium enhanced the ability of chain propagation with a higher C2+OH production. Modified by nickel, β-Mo-2C showed a relatively high CO conversion, however, the products were similar to those of pure β-Mo2C. When co-modified by nickel and potassium,β-Mo2C exhibited high activity and selectivity towards mixed alcohols synthesis, and also the whole chain propagation to produce alcohols especially for the stage of C1OH to C2OH was remarkably enhanced. It was concluded that the Ni and K had, to some extent, synergistic effect on CO conversion.

  11. 光催化还原CO2的研究现状和发展前景%Research Progress in Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴聪萍; 周勇; 邹志刚

    2011-01-01

    CO2 photoreduction as typical advanced technology has been becoming one of the most promising solutions to mitigate CO2 emissions. Firstly, emission reduction and utilization of CO2 was introduced. Then the present research status of photocatalytic conversion of CO2 was reviewed, with particular attention to our recent progress on this field. The artificial photosynthesis technology helps one partially reduce atmospheric CO2 levels and fulfill the recycle utilization of CO2. Finally, challenges and prospects for further development of this field are presented.%综述了光催化还原CO2的研究进展,并重点介绍了本课题组在光催化还原CO2为碳氢燃料方面的研究工作,通过该途径可降低CO2在大气中的排放浓度,还可将CO2转化为烷烃、醇或其它有机物质,从而实现碳材料的再循环使用.最后展望了该研究领域的前景.

  12. De novo biosynthesis of linoleic acid and its conversion to the hydrocarbon (Z,Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene in the astigmatid mite, Carpoglyphus lactis: incorporation experiments with 13C-labeled glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuhiro; Naito, Michiya; Mori, Naoki; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2014-02-01

    De novo biosynthesis of linoleic acid (LA) and its conversion to (Z,Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene were examined in Carpoglyphus lactis (Acarina, Carpoglyphidae). Experiments involving (13)C-administration using [1-(13)C]-d-glucose revealed that (13)C atoms were incorporated into LA of total lipid extracted from the mite, resulting in labeling of all even-numbered carbons. This result demonstrated that LA was produced from (13)C-labeled acetyl-CoA, which is indicative of direct de novo biosynthesis. In these feeding experiments involving [1-(13)C]-D-glucose, (13)C atoms were also incorporated into (Z,Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene, which is one of the major secretory components in the mite. The labeling pattern of (Z,Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene at odd-numbered carbons agreed well with that of LA after loss of the carboxyl carbon. It was concluded that the mites could stably convert LA into (Z,Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene without the dietary requirement of this essential fatty acid.

  13. Effects of hydrocarbon contamination on ozone generation with dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose L.; Vezzu, Guido; Freilich, Alfred; Paolini, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    The increasing usage of the feed gases of lower grade liquid oxygen (LOX) containing higher levels of trace hydrocarbon impurities in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for ozone generation requires a better understanding of the kinetics of the by-product formation resulting from reactions involving these hydrocarbon impurities. As a case study of hydrocarbon impurities, the kinetics of CH4 conversion in DBDs and the subsequent HNO3 formation were investigated by means of gas-phase plasma diagnostics, supported by detailed process modeling, and extensive in-situ and ex-situ by-product analysis. The by-products formation in the plasma with the presence of CH4, were found to differ significantly in oxygen-fed generators as compared to generators fed with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The amount of HNO3 formed depends on the concentration of NOx formed in the plasma and the amount of CH4 that is converted, but not on the O3 concentration. In the present work we have investigated CH4 concentrations of up to 1.95 wt% of the feed gas. The rate of deterioration of the overall ozone generator performance was found to be affected by the concentration of nitrogen in the oxygen/nitrogen mixture.

  14. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  15. Conversion Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacov Rofé

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder remains a mystery that has only become more complicated with the decline of the scientific status of psychoanalysis (e.g., Piper, Lillevik, & Kritzer, 2008; Rofé, 2008 and recent neurological findings suggest that this behavior is controlled by biological mechanisms (van Beilen, Vogt, & Leenders, 2010. Moreover, existing theories have difficulty explaining the efficacy of various interventions, such as psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, drug therapy and religious therapy. This article reviews research and clinical evidence pertaining to both the development and treatment of conversion disorder and shows that this seemingly incompatible evidence can be integrated within a new theory, the Rational-Choice Theory of Neurosis (RCTN; Rofé, 2010. Despite the striking differences, RCTN continues Freud's framework of thinking as it employs a new concept of repression and replaces the unconscious with self-deception. Moreover, it incorporates Freud's idea, implicitly expressed in his theory, that neurotic disorders are, in fact, rational behaviors.

  16. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  17. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  18. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  19. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  20. Interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous-phase fuel conversion on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-02-01

    The interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous fuel oxidation reactions on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane (ITM) are examined using a comprehensive model, which couples the dependency of the oxygen permeation rate on the membrane surface conditions and detailed chemistry and transport in the vicinity of the membrane. We assume that the membrane surface is not catalytic to hydrocarbon or syngas oxidation. Results show that increasing the sweep gas inlet temperature and fuel concentration enhances oxygen permeation substantially. This is accomplished through promoting oxidation reactions (oxygen consumption) and the transport of the products and reaction heat towards the membrane, which lowers the oxygen concentration and increases the gas temperature near the membrane. Faster reactions at higher fuel concentration and higher inlet gas temperature support substantial fuel conversion and lead to a higher oxygen permeation flux without the contribution of surface catalytic activity. Beyond a certain maximum in the fuel concentration, extensive heat loss to the membrane (and feed side) reduces the oxidation kinetic rates and limits oxygen permeation as the reaction front reaches the membrane. The sweep gas flow rate and channel height have moderate impacts on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion due to the residence time requirements for the chemical reactions and the location of the reaction zone relative to the membrane surface. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  2. Electrochemical removal of NOx and hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Anja Zarah

    on the electrodes during polarisation, probably because of strong adsorption of the hydrocarbon relative to NO. On LSF/CGO electrode the impregnation of ionic conducting material increased the oxidation of NO to NO2 which is an important step before nitrogen formation. The propene inhibited this reaction because....... This could only be done if the electrode was impregnated with BaO. The nitrate formation did not seem to be inhibited by the presence of the hydrocarbon. However, the oxidation of propene was inhibited by the BaO because the active sites for oxidations were partially covered by the BaO nanoparticles...

  3. Thermal simulation experiment on the hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuiLi; JIN ZhiJun; HE ZhiLiang; QIN JianZhong; SHAO ZhiBing

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock was simulated with thermal experiments in a laboratory. The results reveal that hydrocarbon regeneration does not simply continue the primary hydrocarbon generation process, and that, for marine carbonate source rock, discontinuous hydrocarbon generation differs greatly from the continuous generation. Several different features of hydrocarbon regeneration were observed in the experiments. First, the liquid hydrocarbon generation peak was always observed no matter what the initial maturity of the sample was. Moreover, the maturity and the liquid hydrocarbon yield corresponding to the peak varied with the sample's initial maturity. Second, the hydrocarbon regeneration started earlier than the continuous one. In the experiments, the hydrocarbon could be re-generated when the sample maturity did not rise to any great extent. Third, the accumulative hydrocarbon-generating quantity during discontinuous generation was always more than that during continuous generation. And the hydrocarbon-generating quantity varied with the discontinuous generation history. Chemical kinetic analysis suggests that discontinuous hydrocarbon generation should not only be explained by the parallel reaction mechanism but also by the consecutive reaction mechanism which has been ignored in the traditional chemical kinetic model for continuous hydrocarbon generation.

  4. The NO to NO{sub 2} conversion by ethylene oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Steele, R.C.; Malte, P.C. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hori, M. [Takushoku Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Department of Mechanical System Engineering

    1994-05-13

    A well-stirred reactor experiment and chemical kinetic modeling effort were performed in order to study the effect of ethylene oxidation on the conversion of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). Parameters examined in this study were temperature (1003--1260K) and input hydrocarbon concentration (220--3270 ppmv wet). The stirred reactor residence time was maintained at {approximately}2 milliseconds. Kinetic calculations indicated the NO to NO{sub 2} conversion proceeded through the ``HO{sub 2} mechanism``, NO + HO{sub 2} {yields} NO{sub 2} + OH, and the majority of the conversion occurred within the well-stirred reactor. The chemical kinetic mechanism used to model the percent conversion of the NO to NO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}, CO and CO{sub 2} concentrations showed excellent agreement with the experimental data, thereby validating the ethylene oxidation mechanism. Reaction pathway analysis and logarithmic sensitivity analysis were combined to analyze the ethylene oxidation structure and HO{sub 2} production process. The analysis revealed the primary ethylene oxidation pathway has the potential to form two HO{sub 2} radicals per ethylene consumed, thus making the ethylene a significant agent in promoting conversion of NO to NO{sub 2}. The secondary ethylene oxidation pathway is a potent chain branching process which furthers ethylene consumption and HO{sub 2} production.

  5. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  6. Process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons or mixtures thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wielen, L.A.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon like material or mixtures thereof by conversion of a suitable substrate using micro-organisms, in which process the said substrate is continuously, anaerobically fermented to

  7. Tailoring ZSM-5 Zeolites for the Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Thomas C.; Gardner, David W.; Thilakaratne, Rajeeva

    2016-01-01

    The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose by zeolite-catalyzed fast pyrolysis involves a complex reaction network sensitive to the zeolite structure, crystallinity, elemental composition, porosity, and acidity. The interplay of these parameters under the reaction conditions represent...

  8. Studies of Catalytic Properties of Inorganic Rock Matrices in Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay M. Dobrynkin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic catalytic properties of mineral matrices of various kinds (basalts, clays, sandstones were studied, which are of interest for in-situ heavy oil upgrading (i.e., underground to create advanced technologies for enhanced oil recovery. The elemental, surface and phase composition and matrix particle morphology, surface and acidic properties were studied using elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and ammonia. The data on the catalytic activity of inorganic matrices in ammonium nitrate decomposition (reaction with a large gassing, oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, and hydrocracking of asphaltenes into maltenes (the conversion of heavy hydrocarbons into more valuable light hydrocarbons were discussed. In order to check their applicability for the asphaltenes hydrocracking catalytic systems development, basalt and clay matrices were used as supports for iron/basalt, nickel/basalt and iron/clay catalysts. The catalytic activity of the matrices in the reactions of the decomposition of ammonium nitrate, oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, and hydrocracking of asphaltens was observed for the first time.

  9. Catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate using reduced copper-cerium oxide catalysts as low as 353 K and 1.3 MPa and the reaction mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiki eWada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC from CO2 and methanol under milder reaction conditions was performed using reduced cerium oxide catalysts and reduced copper-promoted Ce oxide catalysts. Although the conversion of methanol was low (0.005–0.11% for 2 h of reaction, DMC was synthesized as low as 353 K and at total pressure of as low as 1.3 MPa using reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.5 wt% of Cu. The apparent activation energy was 120 kJ mol–1 and the DMC synthesis rates were proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. An optimum amount of Cu addition to CeO2 was 0.1 wt% for DMC synthesis under the conditions at 393 K and total pressure of 1.3 MPa for 2 h (conversion of methanol: 0.15% due to the compromise of two effects of Cu: the activation of H2 during reduction prior to the kinetic tests and the block (cover of the surface active site. The reduction effects in H2 were monitored through the reduction of Ce4+ sites to Ce3+ based on the shoulder peak intensity at 5727 eV in the Ce L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES. The Ce3+ content was 10% for reduced CeO2 catalyst whereas it increased to 15% for reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.5wt% of Cu. Moreover, the content of reduced Ce3+ sites (10% associated with the surface O vacancy (defect sites decreased to 5% under CO2 at 290 K for reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.1wt% of Cu. The adsorption step of CO2 on the defect sites might be the key step in DMC synthesis and thus the DMC synthesis rate dependence on the partial pressure of CO2 was proportional. Subsequent H atom subtraction steps from methanol at the neighboring surface Lewis base sites should combine two methoxy species to the adsorbed CO2 to form DMC, water, and restore the surface O vacancy.

  10. Kinetic modeling of ethane pyrolysis at high conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed Sultan; Wang, Chenguang; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Dean, Anthony M

    2011-09-29

    The primary objective of this study is to develop an improved first-principle-based mechanism that describes the molecular weight growth kinetics observed during ethane pyrolysis. A proper characterization of the kinetics of ethane pyrolysis is a prerequisite for any analysis of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation. Flow reactor experiments were performed with ~50/50 ethane/nitrogen mixtures with temperatures ranging from 550 to 850 °C at an absolute pressure of ~0.8 atm and a residence time of ~5 s. These conditions result in ethane conversions ranging from virtually no reaction to ~90%. Comparisons of predictions using our original mechanism to these data yielded very satisfactory results in terms of the temperature dependence of ethane conversion and prediction of the major products ethylene and hydrogen. However, there were discrepancies in some of the minor species concentrations that are involved in the molecular weight growth kinetics. We performed a series of CBS-QB3 analyses for the C(3)H(7), C(4)H(7), and C(4)H(9) potential energy surfaces to better characterize the radical addition reactions that lead to molecular weight growth. We also extended a published C(6)H(9) PES to include addition of vinyl to butadiene. The results were then used to calculate pressure-dependent rate constants for the multiple reaction pathways of these addition reactions. Inclusion of the unadjusted rate constants resulting from these analyses in the mechanism significantly improved the description of several of the species involved in molecular weight growth kinetics. We compare the predictions of this improved model to those obtained with a consensus model recently published as well as to ethane steam cracking data. We find that a particularly important reaction is that of vinyl addition to butadiene. Another important observation is that several radical addition reactions are partially equilibrated. Not only does this mean that reliable thermodynamic parameters are essential

  11. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  12. Solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz I

    2012-01-01

    Finally filling a gap in the literature for a text that also adopts the chemist?s view of this hot topic, Prof Likhtenshtein, an experienced author and internationally renowned scientist, considers different physical and engineering aspects in solar energy conversion. From theory to real-life systems, he shows exactly which chemical reactions take place when converting light energy, providing an overview of the chemical perspective from fundamentals to molecular harvesting systems and solar cells. This essential guide will thus help researchers in academia and industry better understa

  13. Conversion chimique du gaz naturel Chemical Conversion of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaumette P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article sont passés en revue les travaux de recherche et développement et les procédés existants dans le domaine de la conversion chimique du gaz naturel. Les deux voies possibles, conversion directe du méthane et conversion indirecte, via le gaz de synthèse, sont présentées. Tant la préparation d'hydrocarbures utilisables comme carburants, que celle des composés de bases pour la pétrochimie ou la chimie sont évoquées. L'accent est mis sur l'étape clé du développement de chaque procédé qui, selon le produit visé, consiste en la mise au point d'un nouveau système catalytique, en un changement de la technologie du réacteur, ou en la mise au point d'une section fractionnement moins complexe. This article reviews the research and development work and the existing processes in the area of chemical conversion of natural gas. The two possible methods, direct conversion of methane and indirect conversion via synthesis gas, are discussed. The preparation of hydrocarbons that can be used as fuels and the production of building blocks for the petrochemical and chemical industries are both dealt with. The accent is placed on the key step in developing each process. Depending on the target product, this key step consists in working out a new catalytic system, changing reactor technology or engineering a less complex fractionation section.

  14. Conversion enhancement of tubular fixed-bed reactor for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using static mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phavanee Narataruksa; Sabaithip Tungkamani; Karn Pana-Suppamassadu; Phongsak Keeratiwintakorn; Siriluck Nivitchanyong; Piyapong Hunpinyo; Hussanai Sukkathanyawat; Prayut Jiamrittiwong; Visarut Nopparat

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has become an interesting technology because of its potential role in producing biofuels via Biomassto-Liquids (BTL) processes.In Fischer-Tropsch (FT) section,biomass-derived syngas,mainly composed of a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO)and hydrogen (H2),is converted into various forms of hydrocarbon products over a catalyst at specified temperature and pressure.Fixed-bed reactors are typically used for these processes as conventional FT reactors.The fixed-bed or packed-bed type reactor has its drawbacks,which are heat transfer limitation,i.e.a hot spot problem involved highly exothermic characteristics of FT reaction,and mass transfer limitation due to the condensation of liquid hydrocarbon products occurred on catalyst surface.This work is initiated to develop a new chemical reactor design in which a better distribution of gaseous reactants and hydrocarbon products could be achieved,and led to higher throughput and conversion.The main goal of the research is the enhancement of a fixed-bed reactor,focusing on the application of KenicsTM static mixer insertion in the tubular packed-bed reactor.Two FTS experiments were carried out using two reactors i.e.,with and without static mixer insertion within catalytic beds.The modeled syngas used was a mixed gas composed of H2/CO in 2 ∶ 1 molar ratio that was fed at the rate of 30 mL(STP)·min-1 (GHSV ≈ 136 mL·g-1cat·h-1) into the fixed Ru supported aluminum catalyst bed of weight 13.3 g.The reaction was carried out at 180 ℃ and atmospheric pressure continuously for 36 h for both experiments.Both transient and steady-state conversions (in terms of time on stream) were reported.The results revealed that the steady-state CO conversion for the case using the static mixer was approximately 3.5 times higher than that of the case without static mixer.In both cases,the values of chain growth probability of hydrocarbon products (α) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were 0.92 and 0.89 for

  15. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  16. Low temperature conversion of plastic waste into light hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sajid Hussain; Khan, Zahid Mahmood; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Mahmood, Qaisar; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Khan, Jamil; Farooq, Ather; Rashid, Naim [Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060 (Pakistan); Wu, Donglei, E-mail: wudl@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Advance recycling through pyrolytic technology has the potential of being applied to the management of plastic waste (PW). For this purpose 1 l volume, energy efficient batch reactor was manufactured locally and tested for pyrolysis of waste plastic. The feedstock for reactor was 50 g waste polyethylene. The average yield of the pyrolytic oil, wax, pyrogas and char from pyrolysis of PW were 48.6, 40.7, 10.1 and 0.6%, respectively, at 275 deg. C with non-catalytic process. Using catalyst the average yields of pyrolytic oil, pyrogas, wax and residue (char) of 50 g of PW was 47.98, 35.43, 16.09 and 0.50%, respectively, at operating temperature of 250 deg. C. The designed reactor could work at low temperature in the absence of a catalyst to obtain similar products as for a catalytic process.

  17. The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Reaction Studies of Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles in Mesoporous Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst design program was implemented in which Pt nanoparticles, either of monodisperse size and/or shape were synthesized, characterized and studied in a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The novel preparation of these materials enables exquisite control over their physical and chemical properties that could be controlled (and therefore rationally tuned) during synthesis. The ability to synthesize rather than prepare catalysts followed by thorough characterization enable accurate structure-function relationships to be elucidated. This thesis emphasizes all three aspects of catalyst design: synthesis, characterization and reactivity studies. The precise control of metal nanoparticle size, surface structure and composition may enable the development of highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts.

  18. Transition metal chemistry under high carbon monoxide pressure: an infrared spectroscopic study of catalysis in the Fischer--Tropsch reaction. [7 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Iqbal, M.Z.; Frazier, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    This project involves the design and construction of equipment to investigate the infrared spectra of metal carbonyl derivatives in the 1600 to 2200 cm./sup -1/ nu(CO) region at pressures up to 500 atmospheres and temperatures up to 250/sup 0/ followed by the use of this equipment to study the infrared spectra of a variety of transition metal derivatives at elevated pressures of carbon monoxide. The ultimate objective of this work is the discovery of new chemistry leading to the development of new systems which are catalytically active for the conversion of mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to hydrocarbons in connection with the conversion of coal to hydrocarbon fuels. During the initial period covered by this first progress report a high pressure infrared cell has been designed, constructed, and used for the preliminary investigations of reactions of about 15 transition metal derivatives under elevated pressure of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

  19. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

  20. Hydrogen Abstraction from Hydrocarbons by NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Kamal; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Gore, Jeff; Westmoreland, Phillip R; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2017-03-23

    This contribution investigates thermokinetic parameters of bimolecular gas-phase reactions involving the amine (NH2) radical and a large number of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. These reactions play an important role in combustion and pyrolysis of nitrogen-rich fuels, most notably biomass. Computations performed at the CBS-QB3 level and based on the conventional transition-state theory yield potential-energy surfaces and reaction rate constants, accounting for tunnelling effects and the presence of hindered rotors. In an analogy to other H abstraction systems, we demonstrate only a small influence of variational effects on the rate constants for selected reaction. The studied reactions cover the abstraction of hydrogen atoms by the NH2 radical from the C-H bonds in C1-C4 species, and four C5 hydrocarbons of 2-methylbutane, 2-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-2-butene, and 3-methyl-1-butyne. For the abstraction of H from methane, in the temperature windows 300-500 and 1600-2000 K, the calculated reaction rate constants concur with the available experimental measurements, i.e., kcalculated/kexperimetal = 0.3-2.5 and 1.1-1.4, and the previous theoretical estimates. Abstraction of H atom from ethane attains the ratio of kcalculated/kexperimetal equal to 0.10-1.2 and 1.3-1.5 over the temperature windows of available experimental measurements, i.e., 300-900 K and 1500-2000 K, respectively. For the remaining alkanes (propane and n-butane), the average kexperimental/kcalculated ratio remains 2.6 and 1.3 over the temperature range of experimental data. Also, comparing the calculated standard enthalpy of reaction (ΔrH°298) with the available experimental measurements for alkanes, we found the mean unsigned error of computations as 3.7 kJ mol(-1). This agreement provides an accuracy benchmark of our methodology, affording the estimation of the unreported kinetic parameters for H abstractions from alkenes and alkynes. On the basis of the Evans

  1. Mechanistic studies on the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of selected aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehr, Sascha

    2012-07-01

    Benzene, toluene, the xylenes, and the trimethylbenzenes are among the most abundant aromatic trace constituents of the atmosphere mainly originating from anthropogenic sources. The OH-initiated atmospheric photo-oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons is the predominant removal process resulting in the formation of O{sub 3} and secondary organic aerosol. Therefore, aromatics are important trace constituents regarding air pollution in urban environments. Our understanding of aromatic photo-oxidation processes is far from being complete. This work presents novel approaches for the investigation of OH-initiated atmospheric degradation mechanisms of aromatic hydrocarbons. Firstly, pulsed kinetic studies were performed to investigate the prompt HO{sub 2} formation from OH+ aromatic hydrocarbon reactions under ambient conditions. For these studies, the existing OH reactivity instrument, based on the flash photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (FP/LIF) technique, was extended to the detection of HO{sub 2} radicals. The experimental design allows for the determination of HO{sub 2} formation yields and kinetics. Results of the pulsed kinetic experiments complement previous product studies and help to reduce uncertainties regarding the primary oxidation steps. Secondly, experiments with aromatic hydrocarbons were performed under atmospheric conditions in the outdoor atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction chamber) located at Forschungszentrum Juelich. The experiments were aimed at the evaluation of up-to-date aromatic degradation schemes of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.2). The unique combination of analytical instruments operated at SAPHIR allows for a detailed investigation of HO{sub x} and NO{sub x} budgets and for the determination of primary phenolic oxidation product yields. MCMv3.2 deficiencies were identified and most likely originate from shortcomings in the mechanistic representation of ring

  2. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  3. Miscellaneous hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat; DeWitt, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The solvents discussed in this article are common solvents not categorized as halogenated, aromatic, or botanical. The solvents discussed are categorized into two groups: hydrocarbon mixtures and single agents. The hydrocarbon mixtures discussed are Stoddard solvent, naphtha, and kerosene. The remaining solvents described are n-hexane, methyl n-butyl ketone, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and butyl mercaptans. Effects common to this group of agents and their unique effects are characterized. Treatment of exposures and toxic effects of these solvents is described, and physiochemical properties and occupational exposure levels are listed.

  4. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  5. Detailed surface reaction mechanism in a three-way catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, D; Deutschmann, O; Warnatz, J

    2001-01-01

    Monolithic three-way catalysts are applied to reduce the emission of combustion engines. The design of such a catalytic converter is a complex process involving the optimization of different physical and chemical parameters (in the simplest case, e.g., length, cell densities or metal coverage of the catalyst). Numerical simulation can be used as an effective tool for the investigation of the catalytic properties of a catalytic converter and for the prediction of the performance of the catalyst. To attain this goal, a two-dimensional flow-field description is coupled with a detailed surface reaction model (gas-phase reactions can be neglected in three-way catalysts). This surface reaction mechanism (with C3H6 taken as representative of unburnt hydrocarbons) was developed using sub-mechanisms recently developed for hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane oxidation, literature values for C3H6 oxidation, and estimates for the remaining unknown reactions. Results of the simulation of a monolithic single channel are used to validate the surface reaction mechanism. The performance of the catalyst was simulated under lean, nearly stoichiometric and rich conditions. For these characteristic conditions, the oxidation of propene and carbon monoxide and the reduction of NO on a typical Pt/Rh coated three-way catalyst were simulated as a function of temperature. The numerically predicted conversion data are compared with experimentally measured data. The simulation further reveals the coupling between chemical reactions and transport processes within the monolithic channel.

  6. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordvang, Emily C.; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ

  7. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordvang, Emily C.; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ sing

  8. C-H ACTIVATION REACTIONS BY YTTRIUM AND LUTETIUM HYDRIDE COMPLEXES - H/D EXCHANGE VS METALATION OF HYDROCARBONS - IMPORTANCE OF THE HYBRIDIZATION STATE AT THE ALPHA-CARBON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEELMAN, BJ; TEUBEN, JH; MACGREGOR, SA; EISENSTEN, O

    1995-01-01

    Extended Huckel (EHT) calculations have been used to discuss the two alternative sigma-bond C-H metathesis reactions which occur with organo-lanthanide (Ln = Y, Lu) compounds. The two reactions lead either to H/H (H/D) exchange or to metalation and have been modelled by studying the interaction of a

  9. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  10. Conversion “V” Profiles in Torticollis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahanshahi

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The assumption that spasmodic torticollis represents a conversion reaction was examined by evaluating profiles of 61 patients on the hypochondriasis, depression, and hysteria scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Thirty-six per cent of the sample had normal profiles. A conversion “V” profile with scores above 70 was found in a minority (9% of the patients. The profile of the majority of the group was characterized by the presence of mild depression. It was concluded that a personality profile suggestive of conversion reaction is not typical of patients with spasmodic torticollis.

  11. Fenton's reagent as a remediation process in water treatment: application to the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters and sewage sludges; La reaction de fenton comme procede de rehabilitation dans le traitement des eaux: application a la degradation des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques dans les eaux et les boues residuaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotron, V.

    2004-05-15

    This study is related to the application of Fenton's reagent to remedy matrices contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In aqueous solution, the choice of the reagent implementation is important, in order to generate enough radicals to oxidize pollutants. Degradation of the organic compounds is possible, but a large difference in reactivity is observed between 'alternant' and 'non-alternant' PAHs (with a five carbon atoms cycle). Besides, if a few specific precautions are omitted, the PAHs can sorb onto the flask inside surface, and therefore not undergo oxidation. The results on sewage sludges show that under certain conditions (high reagent concentrations), the pollutants can be oxidised although they are adsorbed. Moreover, it appears that the matrix itself plays an important role, as the iron oxides seem to be able to decompose hydrogen peroxide, and thus initiate Fenton reaction. Its application to contaminated soils and sediments is also possible. (author)

  12. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  13. Oxidation Reactions of Ethane over Ba-Ce-O Based Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James E.; Sault, Allen G.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-08-18

    Ethane oxidation reactions were studied over pure and Ca-, Mg-, Sr-, La-, Nd-, and Y-substituted BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites under oxygen limited conditions. Several of the materials, notably the Ca- and Y-substituted materials, show activity for complete oxidation of the hydrocarbon to CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 650 C. At higher temperatures, the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) to ethylene becomes significant. Conversions and ethylene yields are enhanced by the perovskites above the thermal reaction in our system in some cases. The perovskite structure is not retained in the high temperature reaction environment. Rather, a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed. Loss of the perovskite structure correlates with a loss of activity and selectivity to ethylene.

  14. Effect of hydrocarbons on plasma treatment of NOx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Lean burn gasoline engine exhausts contain a significant amount of hydrocarbons in the form of propene. Diesel engine exhausts contain little gaseous hydrocarbon; however, they contain a significant amount of liquid-phase hydrocarbons (known as the volatile organic fraction) in the particulates. The objective of this paper is to examine the fate of NO{sub x} when an exhaust gas mixture that contains hydrocarbons is subjected to a plasma. The authors will show that the hydrocarbons promote the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}, but not the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} is strongly coupled with the hydrocarbon oxidation chemistry. This result suggests that gas-phase reactions in the plasma alone cannot lead to the chemical reduction of NO{sub x}. Any reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} can only be accomplished through heterogeneous reactions of NO{sub 2} with surfaces or particulates.

  15. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvang, Emily C; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during catalytic testing with the single crystal in situ results. PMID:26463581

  16. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbons Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier;

    2015-01-01

    single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics...... at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during......The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ...

  17. Conversations About Responsible Nanoresearch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjølberg, Kamilla Lein; Strand, Roger

    2011-04-01

    There is currently a strong focus on responsible research in relation to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This study presents a series of conversations with nanoresearchers, with the 'European Commission recommendation on a code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research' (EC-CoC) as its point of departure. Six types of reactions to the document are developed, illustrating the diversity existing within the scientific community in responses towards this kind of new approaches to governance. Three broad notions of responsible nanoresearch are presented. The article concludes by arguing that while the suggestion put forward in the EC-CoC brings the concept of responsible nanoresearch a long way, one crucial element is to be wanted, namely responsible nanoresearch as increased awareness of moral choices.

  18. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Langworthy, T. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  19. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  20. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-metabolic conversion of toluene in anaerobic n-alkane-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Ralf; Jarling, René; Lahme, Sven; Kühner, Simon; Heider, Johann; Widdel, Friedrich; Wilkes, Heinz

    2011-09-01

    Diverse microorganisms have been described to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons anaerobically. Strains able to utilize n-alkanes do not grow with aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas strains able to utilize aromatic hydrocarbons do not grow with n-alkanes. To investigate this specificity in more detail, three anaerobic n-alkane degraders (two denitrifying, one sulfate-reducing) and eight anaerobic alkylbenzene degraders (five denitrifying, three sulfate-reducing) were incubated with mixtures of n-alkanes and toluene. Whereas the toluene degradationers formed only the characteristic toluene-derived benzylsuccinate and benzoate, but no n-alkane-derived metabolites, the n-alkane degraders formed toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, 4-phenylbutanoate, phenylacetate and benzoate besides the regular n-alkane-derived (1-methylalkyl)succinates and methyl-branched alkanoates. The co-metabolic conversion of toluene by anaerobic n-alkane degraders to the level of benzoate obviously follows the anaerobic n-alkane degradation pathway with C-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation rather than the β-oxidation pathway of anaerobic toluene metabolism. Hence, petroleum-derived aromatic metabolites detectable in anoxic environments may not be exclusively formed by genuine alkylbenzene degraders. In addition, the hitherto largely unexplored fate of fumarate hydrogen during the activation reactions was examined with (2,3-(2) H(2) )fumarate as co-substrate. Deuterium was completely exchanged with hydrogen at the substituted carbon atom (C-2) of the succinate adducts of n-alkanes, whereas it is retained in toluene-derived benzylsuccinate, regardless of the type of enzyme catalysing the fumarate addition reaction.

  2. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  3. Fundamental mechanisms for conversion of volatiles in biomass and waste combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Hindiyarti, L.; Marshall, P.; Livbjerg, H.; Dagaut, P.; Jensen, Anker; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-03-15

    This project deals with the volatile oxidation chemistry in biomass and waste fired systems, emphasizing reactions important for pollutants emissions (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, HCl, aerosols). The project aims to extend existing models and databases with a number of chemical subsystems that are presently not well understood, but are particularly important in connection with combustion of biomass and waste. The project is divided into 3 tasks. Task 1: Conversion of chlorine, sulfur and alkali gas phase components in combustion of biomass. Task 2: Formation mechanisms for NO{sub x} in the freeboard of grate combustion of biomass. Task 3: Oxidation mechanisms for oxygenated hydrocarbons in the volatiles from pyrolysis of biomass. (au)

  4. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  5. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  6. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic - DBD plasma reactor was designed and developed for co-generation of synthesis gas and C2+ hydrocarbons from methane. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network - Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA was developed to model, simulate and optimize the reactor. Effects of CH4/CO2 feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge voltage and reactor wall temperature on the performance of catalytic DBD plasma reactor was explored. The Pareto optimal solutions and corresponding optimal operating parameters ranges based on multi-objectives can be suggested for catalytic DBD plasma reactor owing to two cases, i.e. simultaneous maximization of CH4 conversion and C2+ selectivity, and H2 selectivity and H2/CO ratio. It can be concluded that the hybrid catalytic DBD plasma reactor is potential for co-generation of synthesis gas and higher hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide and showed better than the conventional fixed bed reactor with respect to CH4 conversion, C2+ yield and H2 selectivity for CO2 OCM process. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: I. Istadi, N.A.S. Amin. (2007. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 37-44.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/8][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  7. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  8. Thermal simulation experiments of saturated hydrocarbons with calcium sulfate and element sulfur: Implications on origin of H2S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Temperature-programmed simulation experiments of saturated hydrocarbons with calcium sulfate and element sulfur were compared in this study. Based on the variation analysis of the yields and evolvement features of gaseous hydrocarbon (C1-C5) and inorganic gaseous CO2, H2 and H2S, the reaction mechanisms were analyzed and discussed. In the calcium sulfate-saturated hydrocarbon system, H2S was produced by a small quantity, which indicates this reaction belongs to the low-degreed thermal sulfate reduction (TSR) and is featured of self-pyrolysis. In the sulfur-saturated hydrocarbon system, the heated sulfur becomes sulfur radical, which has strong catalysis capability and can fasten the cracking of C―H bond in the alkyl group in the saturated hydrocarbons. As a result, the cracking of C―H bond leads to the yields enhancement of CO2 and H2, and at the same time, H2S was produced since the cracked hydrogen can be instantly combined with sulfur radical. Therefore, this reaction in the sulfur-hydrocarbon system belongs to the catalysis of sulfur radical. Furthermore, the promoted pyrolysis effects of C6+ hydrocarbons by sulfur radical in the low-temperature stage in the sul- fur-hydrocarbon system, together with the consumption effects of gaseous hydrocarbon in the high-temperature stage in the calcium-hydrocarbon system, result in the crossed phenomenon of the gaseous hydrocarbon yields curves.

  9. Precipitation of the rare earth double sodium and rare earths from the sulfuric liquor and the conversion into rare earth hydroxides through meta ethic reaction; Precipitacao do sulfato duplo de terras raras e sodio a partir de licor sulfurico e sua conversao em hidroxido de terras raras mediante reacao metatetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Renata D.; Oliveira, Ester F.; Brito, Walter de; Morais, Carlos A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: rda@cdtn.br; esterfo@cdtn.br; britow@cdtn.br; cmorais@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the purification study of the rare earths through precipitation of rare earth and sodium (Na TR (SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. x H{sub 2}O)) double sulfate and his conversion to rare earths hydroxide TR(OH){sub 3} by meta ethic reaction through the addition of sodium hydroxide solution to the solid double sulfate. The study used the sulfuric liquor as rare earth sample, generated in the chemical processing of the monazite with sulfuric acid by the Industrias Nucleares do Brasil - INB, Brazil, after the thorium and uranium extraction. The work investigated the influence of the main variables involved in the precipitation of Na TR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O and in the conversion for the TR(OH){sub 3}, as follows: type and excess of the precipitation agent, temperature and time reaction. The obtained solid composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and chemical analysis. The double sulfate diffractogram indicated the Na TR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} mono-hydrated. The characterization of the metatese products has shown that, for obtaining the complete conversion of NaTR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O into TR(OH){sub 3}, the reaction must be hot processed ({approx}70 deg C) and with small excess of Na OH ({<=} 5 percent). (author)

  10. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  11. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  12. Microbial production of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Progress report, February 1, 1979-September 30, 1979. [Optimization for commercial oily hydrocarbon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T G

    1979-09-01

    The neutral lipids of nine species of methanogenic bacteria, two thermoacidophiles, two alkalinophiles and 20 algal samples were analyzed. The major components were C/sub 30/, C/sub 25/, and/or C/sub 20/ acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons with a continuous range of hydroisoprenoid homologues. The range or acyclic isoprenoids detected were from C/sub 14/ to C/sub 30/. The neutral lipid composition from these bacteria resembles the isoprenoid distribution isolated from ancient sediments and petroleum. Therefore, these findings may have major implications to biological and biogeochemical evolution. In this connection, samples and cores from ancient sediments and future fossil fuel source beds are being analyzed for these neutral lipids as well as the more polar isopranyl glycerol-ether lipids. The derivation of fossil fuels and the biomass accumulations are the focal points of this phase of the study. Ancient and recent sediments, future source beds, and local esturaries are being enriched for microorganisms to establish a range and capability profile for hydrocarbon production. Only a relatively small percent of the microorganisms isolated demonstrated the ability to synthesize hydrocarbons; however, one particular algal isolate demonstrated that it can synthesize hydrocarbons while in a green physiological stage. Greater production is expected in the brown phase of growth. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis studies were conducted in an attempt to better understand the conditions required to maximize hydrocarbon production. The program involved physical and chemical parameters as well as assays of specifically labelled precusors with a cell free enzyme system to measure their conversions to hydrocarbons. The results have indicated a complex one enzyme system is involved in condensation and reduction of two fatty acids into hydrocarbons.

  13. Pyrolytic conversion of lipid feeds for bio-chemical and bio-fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.D.; Kirkwood, K.M.; Bressler, D.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The production of renewable fuels and chemicals through pyrolysis of lipid feedstock was investigated with particular focus on the effect of unsaturation on thermal cracking behaviour and product distribution. The feasibility of producing deoxygenated liquid hydrocarbons for renewable fuel and chemical applications was studied using oleic acid and linoleic acid as unsaturated model free fatty acids. These were pyrolyzed in 15 mL batch micro-reactors under a nitrogen atmosphere. The analyzed products were compared to previous work investigating pyrolysis of a fully saturated free fatty acid, stearic acids, as well as fatty acids hydrolyzed from animal fats and vegetable oils. The primary reaction in oleic acid pyrolysis was decarboxylation to heptadecene and carbon dioxide, which is consistent with stearic acid pyrolysis. Some hydrogen addition was indicated by the presence of n-heptacecane. Cracking at the double bond was found to be a dominant reaction because only the C9 and lower alkane/alkenes were present in notable concentrations. In addition, the C10-C20 alkanes/alkenes were not easily distinguishable from other compounds that were found to be alkane isomers. The product mixture was highly influenced by reaction temperatures (350-500 degrees C) and time (0.5-8 hours). Lower temperatures and shorter reaction times resulted in low acid conversion. Although higher temperatures and longer reaction times increased conversion, they eventually caused degeneration into aromatic compounds. Pyrolysis of fatty acids from hydrolyzed beef tallow, poultry tallow and canola oil yielded a similar series of alkanes and alkenes where the product distribution was consistent with an additive effect of the constituent saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

  14. A Hierarchically Micro-Meso-Macroporous Zeolite CaA for Methanol Conversion to Dimethyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical zeolite CaA with microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structure was hydrothermally synthesized by a ”Bond-Blocking” method using organo-functionalized mesoporous silica (MS as a silica source. The characterization by XRD, SEM/TEM and N2 adsorption/desorption techniques showed that the prepared material had well-crystalline zeolite Linde Type A (LTA topological structure, microspherical particle morphologies, and hierarchically intracrystalline micro-meso-macropores structure. With the Bond-Blocking principle, the external surface area and macro-mesoporosity of the hierarchical zeolite CaA can be adjusted by varying the organo-functionalized degree of the mesoporous silica surface. Similarly, the distribution of the micro-meso-macroporous structure in the zeolite CaA can be controlled purposely. Compared with the conventional microporous zeolite CaA, the hierarchical zeolite CaA as a catalyst in the conversion of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME, exhibited complete DME selectivity and stable catalytic activity with high methanol conversion. The catalytic performances of the hierarchical zeolite CaA results clearly from the micro-meso-macroporous structure, improving diffusion properties, favoring the access to the active surface and avoiding secondary reactions (no hydrocarbon products were detected after 3 h of reaction.

  15. Methane Decomposition and C2 Hydrocarbon Formation under the Condition of DC Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxun He; Miao Hu; Zhiguo Lu

    2004-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H, CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The processes of methane decomposition and formation of C2 hydrocarbons were studied. The experiment shows that methane decomposition can be divided into three periods as the reaction proceeds.In the first period, a large number of free radicals were formed. While in the last period, the formation of C2 hydrocarbons and the decrease of free radicals were observed. The time and conditions of methane decomposition and formation of C2 hydrocarbons are different.

  16. Investigation on Methane Decomposition and the Formation of C2 Hydrocarbons in DC Discharge Plasma byEmission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺建勋; 韩媛媛; 高爱华; 周引穗; 陆治国

    2004-01-01

    The IR emission spectra of methane were measured under DC glow discharge conditions. The distinct difference in time between methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was specially pointed out. C2 hydrocarbons formed at the end of methane decomposition. The optimum condition for C2 hydrocarbon formation was studied and the optimum combination between electric current density and methane input quantity was suggested. The appropriate reaction conditions for methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation are different, so high yield of C2 hydrocarbons will be probably obtained when different conditions are taken.

  17. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  18. Endothermic Heat-Sink of Hydrocarbon Fuels for Scramjet Cooling AIAA 2002-3871

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, H

    2002-01-01

    Storable liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as JP-7, JP-8+ 100, and JP-10, that can undergo endothermic reactions may provide sufficient heat sink to enable hypersonic flight without having to resort to cryogenic fuels...

  19. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed ...

  20. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed ...

  1. Hydrocarbons and energy from plants: Final report, 1984-1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.; Otvos, J.; Taylor, S.E.; Nemethy, E.K.; Skrukrud, C.L.; Hawkins, D.R.; Lago, R.

    1988-08-01

    Plant hydrocarbon (isoprenoid) production was investigated as an alternative source to fossil fuels. Because of their high triterpenoid (hydrocarbon) content of 4--8%, Euphorbia lathyris plants were used as a model system for this study. The structure of the E. lathyris triterpenoids was determined, and triterpenoid biosynthesis studied to better understand the metabolic regulation of isoprenoid production. Triterpenoid biosynthesis occurs in two distinct tissue types in E. lathyris plants: in the latex of the laticifer cells; and in the mesophyll cells of the leaf and stem. The latex has been fractionated by centrifugation, and it has been determined that the later steps of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the conversion of mevalonic acid to the triterpenes, are compartmentized within a vacuole. Also identified was the conversion of hydroxymethyl glutaryl-CoA to mevalonic acid, catalyzed by the enzyme Hydroxymethyl glutaryl-CoA Reductase, as a key rate limiting step in isoprenoid biosynthesis. At least two isozymes of this enzyme, one in the latex and another in the leaf plastids, have been identified. Environmental stress has been applied to plants to study changes in carbon allocation. Salinity stress caused a large decrease in growth, smaller decreases in photosynthesis, resulting in a larger allocation of carbon to both hydrocarbon and sugar production. An increase in Hydroxymethyl glutaryl-CoA Reductase activity was also observed when isoprenoid production increased. Other species where also screened for the production of hydrogen rich products such as isoprenoids and glycerides, and their hydrocarbon composition was determined.

  2. Study of Methanol Conversion over Fe-Zn-Zr Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoming Ni; Yisheng Tan; Yizhuo Han

    2007-01-01

    The methanol conversion over Fe-Zn-Zr catalyst was studied at 0.1 MPa and 280-360℃.The experimental results indicate that the main products of methanol conversion are methane and butane,and that other hydrocarbons are scarcely produced.All results show that propylene is most probably the olefin formed first in methanol conversion rather than ethene over Fe-Zn-Zr catalyst.Methane is formed from methoxy group,and C4 is possibly yielded on the surface from propylene through binding with a methoxy group.

  3. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  4. Chemical – thermodynamics description of oxidization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Л. Матвєєва

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  In theory it is grounded, that in the process of exploitation because of intensification of oxidizing processes worsening takes place of power properties of fuels, in particular warmth of combustion, due to reduction of thermal effects of reactions of combustion of the oxidized hydrocarbons.

  5. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  6. Biofiltration of gasoline and diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halecky, Martin; Rousova, Jana; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii; Seames, Wayne; Jones, Kim

    2015-02-01

    The ability of a biofilm to switch between the mixtures of mostly aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons was investigated to assess biofiltration efficiency and potential substrate interactions. A switch from gasoline, which consisted of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, to a mixture of volatile diesel n-alkanes resulted in a significant increase in biofiltration efficiency, despite the lack of readily biodegradable aromatic hydrocarbons in the diesel mixture. This improved biofilter performance was shown to be the result of the presence of larger size (C₉-C(12)) linear alkanes in diesel, which turned out to be more degradable than their shorter-chain (C₆-C₈) homologues in gasoline. The evidence obtained from both biofiltration-based and independent microbiological tests indicated that the rate was limited by biochemical reactions, with the inhibition of shorter chain alkane biodegradation by their larger size homologues as corroborated by a significant substrate specialization along the biofilter bed. These observations were explained by the lack of specific enzymes designed for the oxidation of short-chain alkanes as opposed to their longer carbon chain homologues.

  7. Performance comparison of autothermal reforming for liquid hydrocarbons, gasoline and diesel for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inyong; Bae, Joongmyeon; Bae, Gyujong

    This paper discusses the reforming of liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen for fuel cell applications, focusing on gasoline and diesel due to their high hydrogen density and well-established infrastructures. Gasoline and diesel are composed of numerous hydrocarbon species including paraffins, olefins, cycloparaffins, and aromatics. We have investigated the reforming characteristics of several representative liquid hydrocarbons. In the case of paraffin reforming, H 2 yield and reforming efficiency were close to thermodynamic equilibrium status (TES), although heavier hydrocarbons required slightly higher temperatures than lighter hydrocarbons. However, the conversion efficiency was much lower for aromatics than paraffins with similar carbon number. We have also investigated the reforming performance of simulated commercial diesel and gasoline using simple synthetic diesel and gasoline compositions. Reforming performances of our formulations were in good agreement with those of commercial fuels. In addition, the reforming of gas to liquid (GTL) resulted in high H 2 yield and reforming efficiency showing promise for possible fuel cell applications.

  8. Abiogenic formation of alkanes in the Earth's crust as a minor source for global hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Westgate, T. D.; Ward, J. A.; Slater, G. F.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.

    2002-04-01

    Natural hydrocarbons are largely formed by the thermal decomposition of organic matter (thermogenesis) or by microbial processes (bacteriogenesis). But the discovery of methane at an East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent and in other crustal fluids supports the occurrence of an abiogenic source of hydrocarbons. These abiogenic hydrocarbons are generally formed by the reduction of carbon dioxide, a process which is thought to occur during magma cooling and-more commonly-in hydrothermal systems during water-rock interactions, for example involving Fischer-Tropsch reactions and the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. Suggestions that abiogenic hydrocarbons make a significant contribution to economic hydrocarbon reservoirs have been difficult to resolve, in part owing to uncertainty in the carbon isotopic signatures for abiogenic versus thermogenic hydrocarbons. Here, using carbon and hydrogen isotope analyses of abiogenic methane and higher hydrocarbons in crystalline rocks of the Canadian shield, we show a clear distinction between abiogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbons. The progressive isotopic trends for the series of C1-C4 alkanes indicate that hydrocarbon formation occurs by way of polymerization of methane precursors. Given that these trends are not observed in the isotopic signatures of economic gas reservoirs, we can now rule out the presence of a globally significant abiogenic source of hydrocarbons.

  9. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  10. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities.

  11. Alteration and Reformation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and Prediction of Remaining Potential Resources in Superimposed Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Hong; PANG Xiongqi; YANG Haijun; LIN Changsong; MENG Qingyang; WANG Huaijie

    2010-01-01

    Complex hydrocarbon reservoirs developed widely in the superimposed basins of China formed from multiple structural alterations,reformation and destruction of hydrocarbon reservoirs formed at early stages.They are characterized currently by trap adjustment,component variation,phase conversion,and scale reformation.This is significant for guiding current hydrocarbon exploration by revealing evolution mechanisms after hydrocarbon reservoir formation and for predicting remaining potential resources.Based on the analysis of a number of complex hydrocarbon reservoirs,there are four geologic features controlling the degree of destruction of hydrocarbon reservoirs formed at early stages:tectonic event intensity,frequency,time and caprock sealing for oil and gas during tectonic evolution.Research shows that the larger the tectonic event intensity,the more frequent the tectonic event,the later the last tectonic event,the weaker the caprock sealing for oil and gas,and the greater the volume of destroyed hydrocarbons in the early stages.Based on research on the main controlling factors of hydrocarbon reservoir destruction mechanisms,a geological model of tectonic superimposition and a mathematical model evaluating potential remaining complex hydrocarbon reservoirs have been established.The predication method and technical procedures were applied in the Tazhong area of Tarim Basin,where four stages of hydrocarbon accumulation and three stages of hydrocarbon alteration occurred.Geohistorical hydrocarbon accumulation reached 3.184billion tons,of which 1.271 billion tons were destroyed.The total volume of remaining resources available for exploration is~1.9 billion tons.

  12. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  13. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  14. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

  15. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  16. Kinetics of coal conversion in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anatoli A. Vostrikov; Sergey A. Psarov; Dmitri Yu. Dubov; Oxana N. Fedyaeva; Mikhail Ya. Sokol [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermophysics

    2007-09-15

    Conversion of the coal particle pack in supercritical water (SCW) was studied in the semibatch reactor under the pressure of P = 30 MPa, in the temperature range of T = 500-750{sup o}C, and in the reaction time of t = 60-720 s. The experimental results were analyzed within the framework of homogeneous, nonreacted core, and random pore models. The quantitative composition of conversion products was determined. Dependences of the conversion rate on the degree of coal conversion, reaction time, and temperature were described in an assumption of the first-order reaction and Arrhenius dependence. It was found that activation energy of conversion is E = 103 kJ/mol and the pre-exponential factor is A{sub 0} = 1.3 x 10{sup 3.1} s{sup -1}. It was revealed that coal gasification in SCW without oxidants is the weakly endothermic process. The addition of CO{sub 2} into SCW decreases the conversion rate and increases the CO yield. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Temperature Dependence of C2(X1Σ+g) in Reactions with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons%C2(X1Σg)自由基与不饱和碳氢化合物反应的温度效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡仁志; 谢品华; 张群; 司福祺; 陈旸

    2013-01-01

      运用脉冲激光光解-激光诱导荧光(PLP-LIF)的方法在293-573 K的温度范围内测量了C2(X1Σ+g)自由基与不饱和碳氢化合物(C2H4和C2H2)气相反应的双分子反应速率常数.获得的速率常数可以用Arrhenius公式表达如下(单位:cm3·molecule-1·s-1):k(C2H4)=(1.16±0.10)×10-10exp[(290.68±9.72)/T], k(C2H2)=(1.36±0.02)×10-10exp[(263.85±7.60)/T],误差为2σ.由获得的双分子反应速率常数及其所呈现的负温度效应,我们认为在293-573 K温度范围内C2(X1Σ+g)自由基和不饱和碳氢化合物的反应遵循加成机理.%Bimolecular rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of C2(X1Σ+g) with unsaturated hydrocarbons C2H4 and C2H2 were measured over the temperature range 293-573 K by pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF). The rate constants, in the unit of cm3·molecule-1·s-1, can be fitted by the normal Arrhenius expressions:k(C2H4)=(1.16±0.10)×10-10exp[(290.68±9.72)/T], and k(C2H2)=(1.36±0.02)× 10-10exp[(263.85 ± 7.60)/T], where al error estimates are ± 2σ and represent the precision of the fit. The observed bimolecular rate constants along with the negative temperature dependences of k(T) al ow us to conclude that the reactions of C2(X1Σ+g) with these unsaturated hydrocarbons in the temperature range 293-573 K proceed via an addition mechanism.

  18. REACTION CHEMISTRY RELATED TO FCC GASOLINE QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    About 80% of the gasoline pool as a whole in China for supplying the domestic market at current stage directly originates from FCC units. Obviously, FCC gasoline quality is critical for refiners to meet the nations more and more stringent gasoline specifications. FCC process is expected to produce gasoline with reduced contents of olefins, aromatics, benzene, sulfur, and, contradictorily, still with high octane number.   Catalytic cracking process involves a series of acid catalyzed reactions. Bronsted acid sites dominate the surface of the catalyst used for FCC process. All the reactions of hydrocarbons in FCC process are based on carbonium ions of penta-coordinated, or carbenium ions of tri-coordinated. The monomolecular beta scission mechanism for alkane cracking explains that the cracking of carbon-carbon bonding occurs at the beta position to the carbon atom bearing positive charge, and hence forms two small hydrocarbon molecules: one alkane molecule and one olefin molecule. The molar ratio of alkane to olefin for the primary cracking product will be 1 and it will be less than 1 if the cracking reaction proceeds.   However, it is proved that bimolecular reaction pathways exist between surface carbenium ions and the feed molecules. The products of this bimolecular disproportionation reaction could be an alkane molecule and a newly formed carbenium ion. The better understanding of the reaction chemistry of FCC process based on monomolecular pathways and bimolecular pathways should be the basis for searching approaches to the improvement of FCC gasoline quality. In the complicated reaction scheme of the FCC process, the isomerization reaction leading to the formation of iso-alkanes is obviously a target reaction, which favors both olefin reduction and octane enhancement.   The cracking of small paraffin molecules, due to its limited number of reaction pathways and products, has been used to investigate cracking mechanism. In the present work the

  19. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  20. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  1. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  2. Chinese Conversation Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the features of Chinese conversation structure. Specifically speaking, the structure will be analyzed from the following four aspects:openings and pre-sequence, adjacency pairs, pre-closing and closing. Generally speak-ing, Chinese conversation structure is similar to English conversation structure. But still a lot of differences are found due to cul-tural factors.

  3. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  4. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  5. Final Technical Report: Tandem and Bimetallic Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Light Hydrocarbon with Renewable Feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-01-06

    An estimated 490 million metric tons of lignocellulosic biomass is available annually from U.S. agriculture and forestry. With continuing concerns over greenhouse gas emission, the development of efficient catalytic processes for conversion of biomass derived compounds is an important area of research. Since carbohydrates and polyols are rich in oxygen, approximately one oxygen atom per carbon, removal of hydroxyl groups via deoxygenation is needed. The necessary hydrogen required for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) would either come from reforming biomass itself or from steam reforming of natural gas. Both processes contribute to global CO2 emission. The hope is that eventually renewable sources such as wind and solar for hydrogen production will become more viable and economic in the future. In the meantime, unconventional natural gas production in North America has boomed. As a result, light hydrocarbons present an opportunity when coupled with biomass derived oxygenates to generate valuable products from both streams without co-production of carbon dioxide. This concept is the focus of our current funding period. The objective of the project requires coupling two different types of catalysis, HDO and dehydrogenation. Our hypothesis was formulated around our success in establishing oxorhenium catalysts for polyol HDO reactions and known literature precedence for the use of iridium hydrides in alkane dehydrogenation. To examine our hypothesis we set out to investigate the reaction chemistry of binuclear complexes of oxorhenium and iridium hydride.

  6. Investigation of thermochemistry associated with the carbon-carbon coupling reactions of furan and furfural using ab initio methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Assary, Rajeev S; Curtiss, Larry A

    2014-06-26

    Upgrading furan and small oxygenates obtained from the decomposition of cellulosic materials via formation of carbon-carbon bonds is critical to effective conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels. Simulation-driven molecular level understanding of carbon-carbon bond formation is required to design efficient catalysts and processes. Accurate quantum chemical methods are utilized here to predict the reaction energetics for conversion of furan (C4H4O) to C5-C8 ethers and the transformation of furfural (C5H6O2) to C13-C26 alkanes. Furan can be coupled with various C1 to C4 low molecular weight carbohydrates obtained from the pyrolysis via Diels-Alder type reactions in the gas phase to produce C5-C8 cyclic ethers. The computed reaction barriers for these reactions (∼25 kcal/mol) are lower than the cellulose activation or decomposition reactions (∼50 kcal/mol). Cycloaddition of C5-C8 cyclo ethers with furans can also occur in the gas phase, and the computed activation energy is similar to that of the first Diels-Alder reaction. Furfural, obtained from biomass, can be coupled with aldehydes or ketones with α-hydrogen atoms to form longer chain aldol products, and these aldol products can undergo vapor phase hydrocycloaddition (activation barrier of ∼20 kcal/mol) to form the precursors of C26 cyclic hydrocarbons. These thermochemical studies provide the basis for further vapor phase catalytic studies required for upgrading of furans/furfurals to longer chain hydrocarbons.

  7. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  8. Elements of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Elements of Energy Conversion brings together scattered information on the subject of energy conversion and presents it in terms of the fundamental thermodynamics that apply to energy conversion by any process. Emphasis is given to the development of the theory of heat engines because these are and will remain most important power sources. Descriptive material is then presented to provide elementary information on all important energy conversion devices. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of forms of energy, energy sources and storage, and energy conversion. This is foll

  9. NGL data conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Nobuyasu

    2005-06-01

    We are developing a NGL data conversion system for EPL, for LEEPL, and for EBDW, which is based on our established photomask data conversion system, PATACON PC-cluster. For EPL data conversion, it has SF division, Complementary division, Stitching, Proximity effect correction, Alignment mark insertion, EB stepper control data creation, and Mask inspection data creation. For LEEPL data conversion, it has Pattern checking, Complementary division, Stitching, Stress distortion correction, Alignment mark insertion, and Mask inspection data creation. For EB direct-writing data conversion, it has Proximity effect correction and Extraction of aperture pattern for cell projection exposure.

  10. Heterogeneous OH oxidation of motor oil particles causes selective depletion of branched and less cyclic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacman, Gabriel; Chan, Arthur W H; Nah, Theodora; Worton, David R; Ruehl, Chris R; Wilson, Kevin R; Goldstein, Allen H

    2012-10-02

    Motor oil serves as a useful model system for atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures typical of anthropogenic atmospheric particulate matter, but its complexity often prevents comprehensive chemical speciation. In this work we fully characterize this formerly "unresolved complex mixture" at the molecular level using recently developed soft ionization gas chromatography techniques. Nucleated motor oil particles are oxidized in a flow tube reactor to investigate the relative reaction rates of observed hydrocarbon classes: alkanes, cycloalkanes, bicycloalkanes, tricycloalkanes, and steranes. Oxidation of hydrocarbons in a complex aerosol is found to be efficient, with approximately three-quarters (0.72 ± 0.06) of OH collisions yielding a reaction. Reaction rates of individual hydrocarbons are structurally dependent: compared to normal alkanes, reaction rates increased by 20-50% with branching, while rates decreased ∼20% per nonaromatic ring present. These differences in rates are expected to alter particle composition as a function of oxidation, with depletion of branched and enrichment of cyclic hydrocarbons. Due to this expected shift toward ring-opening reactions heterogeneous oxidation of the unreacted hydrocarbon mixture is less likely to proceed through fragmentation pathways in more oxidized particles. Based on the observed oxidation-induced changes in composition, isomer-resolved analysis has potential utility for determining the photochemical age of atmospheric particulate matter with respect to heterogeneous oxidation.

  11. Effects of operating conditions on compositional characteristics and reaction kinetics of liquid derived by delayed coking of nigerian petroleum residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Bello

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal upgrading of Nigerian petroleum residue was studied at relatively low pressure in a delayed coking reactor system. In this work, the intent was to investigate the effects of process variables such as reaction temperature (200(0C to 600(0C, reaction time (0 to 120min, additive concentration loading and additive-to-residue ratio on the amounts and quality of organic liquid product (OLP. The liquid products derived from the delayed coking process were characterized by means of instrumental analysis of gas-liquid chromatography. Results obtained from the analyses of the OLP revealed an upward trend of the conversion process and the selectivity of the aromatic compounds with additive-to-residue ratio (ARR and increase in temperature. This led to maximum yield of 37.2% achieved with ARR of 5 compared to 31% achieved with ordinary thermal conversion. The selectivity for aromatic hydrocarbons was maximum at 83.1wt% the selectivity towards aromatics and aliphatic hydrocarbons were highest for methanol-potassium hydroxide and methanol respectively. In all additive system cases, maximum OLP was produced at an optimum reaction temperature of 370(0C in the delayed coking reactor and at higher residence time. The gaseous product consisted of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide and C1 - C6 hydrocarbons, which amounted to about 20 to 30 wt% of liquid distillate. The information obtained in this study show that the organic liquid products are amenable to characterization procedure and provided the basis for the identification of processes for upgrading Nigerian petroleum residue and such other starting materials such as bitumen or fossil fuel coal liquids.

  12. Unraveling the reaction mechanisms governing methanol-to-olefins catalysis by theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; De Wispelaere, Kristof; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2013-06-03

    The conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO) over a heterogeneous nanoporous catalyst material is a highly complex process involving a cascade of elementary reactions. The elucidation of the reaction mechanisms leading to either the desired production of ethene and/or propene or undesired deactivation has challenged researchers for many decades. Clearly, catalyst choice, in particular topology and acidity, as well as the specific process conditions determine the overall MTO activity and selectivity; however, the subtle balances between these factors remain not fully understood. In this review, an overview of proposed reaction mechanisms for the MTO process is given, focusing on the archetypal MTO catalysts, H-ZSM-5 and H-SAPO-34. The presence of organic species, that is, the so-called hydrocarbon pool, in the inorganic framework forms the starting point for the majority of the mechanistic routes. The combination of theory and experiment enables a detailed description of reaction mechanisms and corresponding reaction intermediates. The identification of such intermediates occurs by different spectroscopic techniques, for which theory and experiment also complement each other. Depending on the catalyst topology, reaction mechanisms proposed thus far involve aromatic or aliphatic intermediates. Ab initio simulations taking into account the zeolitic environment can nowadays be used to obtain reliable reaction barriers and chemical kinetics of individual reactions. As a result, computational chemistry and by extension computational spectroscopy have matured to the level at which reliable theoretical data can be obtained, supplying information that is very hard to acquire experimentally. Special emphasis is given to theoretical developments that open new perspectives and possibilities that aid to unravel a process as complex as methanol conversion over an acidic porous material.

  13. Identification of some novel tetracyclic diterpene hydrocarbons in petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, A.A.; Pehk, T.Y.; Vorobieva, N.S.; Zemskova, Z.K. (Institute of Geology and Exploitation of Combustible Minerals, Moscow (USSR))

    1988-01-01

    A new group of tetracyclic diterpene hydrocarbons of molecular formula C{sub 19}H{sub 32} has been found in the Jurassic oils and condensates of the Central Kara-Kum (Turkmenia, U.S.S.R.). The structure of the hydrocarbons has been determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. Of the compounds identified 4,8-dimethyl-13-isopropyltetracyclo(6.6.0.0{sup 1,11}O{sup 3,7})- and 5,14-dimethyl-10-isopropyltetracyclo = (6.4.1.1.{sup 1,9}O{sup 4,13})tetradecanes are present in the highest concentrations. Some ideas are put forward about the source and the reactions involved in the formation of the hydrocarbons under natural conditions by the enzymic C{sub 5} cyclization of aliphatic isoprenoids.

  14. Conversion of wood residues to diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The general conversion scheme is shown. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, paraffinic fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A flow diagram of the continuous laboratory unit is shown. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. Capacity is about 10 lbs/h of feedstock. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. If a high octane gasoline is desired, the paraffinic fuel is passed through a conventional catalytic reformer. The normal propanol could be used as a fuel extender if blended with the hydrocarbon fuel products. Off gases from the downstream reactors are of high quality due to the accumulation of low molecular weight paraffins.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H2 FORMATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrower, John; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Friis, Emil Enderup;

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H2 formation...

  16. Characterization of cyanobacterial hydrocarbon composition and distribution of biosynthetic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cameron Coates

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to naturally produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids. Hydrocarbon compositions of thirty-two strains of cyanobacteria were characterized to reveal novel structural features and insights into hydrocarbon biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. This investigation revealed new double bond (2- and 3-heptadecene and methyl group positions (3-, 4- and 5-methylheptadecane for a variety of strains. Additionally, results from this study and literature reports indicate that hydrocarbon production is a universal phenomenon in cyanobacteria. All cyanobacteria possess the capacity to produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids yet not all accomplish this through the same metabolic pathway. One pathway comprises a two-step conversion of fatty acids first to fatty aldehydes and then alkanes that involves a fatty acyl ACP reductase (FAAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. The second involves a polyketide synthase (PKS pathway that first elongates the acyl chain followed by decarboxylation to produce a terminal alkene (olefin synthase, OLS. Sixty-one strains possessing the FAAR/ADO pathway and twelve strains possessing the OLS pathway were newly identified through bioinformatic analyses. Strains possessing the OLS pathway formed a cohesive phylogenetic clade with the exception of three Moorea strains and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 which may have acquired the OLS pathway via horizontal gene transfer. Hydrocarbon pathways were identified in one-hundred-forty-two strains of cyanobacteria over a broad phylogenetic range and there were no instances where both the FAAR/ADO and the OLS pathways were found together in the same genome, suggesting an unknown selective pressure maintains one or the other pathway, but not both.

  17. A Case Study on the Nature of Informal Conversation in an Organization Utilizing Microblogging Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine the nature of conversations that occur within an organizational microblog and compare them to traditional informal conversations. Since informal conversations are closely associated with reaction to change, this study explored how organizational microblog conversations may be understood to affect…

  18. A Case Study on the Nature of Informal Conversation in an Organization Utilizing Microblogging Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine the nature of conversations that occur within an organizational microblog and compare them to traditional informal conversations. Since informal conversations are closely associated with reaction to change, this study explored how organizational microblog conversations may be understood to affect…

  19. One-step catalytic conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates to liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ayusman; Yang, Weiran

    2014-03-18

    The invention relates to a method for manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels and oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels such as alkyl substituted tetrahydrofurans such as 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, 5-methylfurfural and mixtures thereof. The method generally entails forming a mixture of reactants that includes carbonaceous material, water, a metal catalyst and an acid reacting that mixture in the presence of hydrogen. The reaction is performed at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a furan type hydrocarbon fuel. The process may be adapted to provide continuous manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels such as a furan type fuel.

  20. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.

    1993-01-01

    Some fundamentals of the ion chemistry of flames are summarized. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames have been studied using a VG PlasmaQuad, the ICP-system being substituted by a simple quartz burner. Simple hydrocarbon flames as well as sulfur-containing flames have been investigated....... The simple hydrocarbon flames are dominated by a series of hydrocarbonic ions and, to a minor extent, protonated oxo-compounds. The introduction of sulfur to the flames leads to significant changes in the ion composition, as sulfur-containing species become dominant. The ability of the technique to study...

  1. Uranium conversion; Conversion de l`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the activities of the Comurhex company, created in 1971 and which became a 100% Cogema`s daughter company in 1992. The Comurhex company is in charge of the conversion of natural uranium into gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The two steps of the conversion operation are performed in the Malvesi and Pierrelatte (France) industrial sites and represent 31% (14000 t/year) of the uranium conversion capacity of western countries. The refining and UF{sub 4} production (Malvesi) and the UF{sub 6} fabrication (Pierrelatte) processes are described. Comurhex is also one of the few companies in the world which produces UF{sub 6} from the uranium of spent fuels. (J.S.)

  2. A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

  3. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  4. Modeling the kinetics of methane conversion in steam reforming process of coke-oven gas based on experimental data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jia-yuan; ZHOU Jie-min

    2007-01-01

    Steam-reforming is an effective approach for upgrading methane and hydrocarbon of coke-oven gas into CO and H2, but the kinetic behavior needs more study. We investigated the conversion of methane in coke-oven gas by steam reforming process in an electric tubular flow at 14 kPa with temperature varying from 500℃ to 950℃, and developed a kenetic model for , ignoring the effects of adsorption and diffusion. The optimal dynamic conditions for methane conversion 14 kPa are as follows: the ratio of the amount of water to the amount of methane is from 1.1 to 1.3; the reaction temperature is from 1 223 K to 1 273 K. The methane conversion rate is larger than 95% when the ratio of the amount of water to the amount of methane is 1.2 at a temperature above 1 223 K with the residence time up to 0.75 s.

  5. Thermal simulation experiments of saturated hydro-carbons with calcium sulfate and element sulfur: Implications on origin of H_2S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN TengShui; HE Qin; LU Hong; PENG PingAn; LIU JinZhong

    2009-01-01

    Temperature-programmed simulation experiments of saturated hydrocarbons with calcium sulfate and element sulfur were compared in this study. Based on the variation analysis of the yields and evolve-ment features of gaseous hydrocarbon (C_1-C_5) and inorganic gaseous CO_2, H_2 and H_2S, the reaction mechanisms were analyzed and discussed. In the calcium sulfate-saturated hydrocarbon system, H2S was produced by a small quantity, which indicates this reaction belongs to the low-degreed thermal sulfate reduction (TSR) and is featured of self-pyrolysis. In the sulfur-saturated hydrocarbon system, the heated sulfur becomes sulfur radical, which has strong catalysis capability and can fasten the cracking of C-H bond in the alkyl group in the saturated hydrocarbons. As a result, the cracking of C-H bond leads to the yields enhancement of CO_2 and H_2, and at the same time, H2S was produced since the cracked hydrogen can be instantly combined with sulfur radical. Therefore, this reaction in the sulfur-hydrocarbon system belongs to the catalysis of sulfur radical. Furthermore, the promoted pyro-lysis effects of C_(6+). hydrocarbons by sulfur radical in the low-temperature stage in the sul-fur-hydrocarbon system, together with the consumption effects of gaseous hydrocarbon in the high-temperature stage in the calcium-hydrocarbon system, result in the crossed phenomenon of the gaseous hydrocarbon yields curves.

  6. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  7. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  8. Computers and conversation

    CERN Document Server

    Luff, Paul; Gilbert, Nigel G

    1986-01-01

    In the past few years a branch of sociology, conversation analysis, has begun to have a significant impact on the design of human*b1computer interaction (HCI). The investigation of human*b1human dialogue has emerged as a fruitful foundation for interactive system design.****This book includes eleven original chapters by leading researchers who are applying conversation analysis to HCI. The fundamentals of conversation analysis are outlined, a number of systems are described, and a critical view of their value for HCI is offered.****Computers and Conversation will be of interest to all concerne

  9. Biological conversion of synthesis gas culture development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Research continues on the conversion of synthesis by shift reactions involving bacteria. Topics discussed here include: biological water gas shift, sulfur gas utilization, experimental screening procedures, water gas shift studies, H{sub 2}S removal studies, COS degradation by selected CO-utilizing bacteria, and indirect COS utilization by Chlorobia. (VC)

  10. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  11. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  12. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  13. Conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, olefins and fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh; Lee, Suh-Jane

    2016-12-13

    Embodiments of an integrated method for step-wise conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, and optionally to hydrocarbons, are disclosed. The method includes providing an acidic catalyst, exposing a composition comprising aqueous 2,3-butanediol to the acidic catalyst to produce an intermediate composition comprising methyl ethyl ketone, providing a hydrogenation catalyst that is spatially separated from the acidic catalyst, and subsequently exposing the intermediate composition to the hydrogenation catalyst to produce a composition comprising 2-butanol. The method may further include subsequently exposing the composition comprising 2-butanol to a deoxygenation catalyst, and deoxygenating the 2-butanol to form hydrocarbons. In some embodiments, the hydrocarbons comprise olefins, such as butenes, and the method may further include subsequently exposing the hydrocarbons to a hydrogenation catalyst to form saturated hydrocarbons.

  14. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  15. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  16. Tuning functionality of photocatalytic materials: an infrared study on hydrocarbon oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrollahi Buky, Rezvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the research described in this thesis was on the engineering and design of effective photocatalysts able to catalyze the oxidative conversion of hydrocarbons. The prepared catalysts were synthesized by using different procedures involving sol gel precursors, and impregnation or photo-de

  17. Selective homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether to triptane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Nilay; Iglesia, Enrique; Labinger, Jay A; Simonetti, Dante A

    2012-04-17

    The demand for specific fuels and chemical feed-stocks fluctuates, and as a result, logistical mismatches can occur in the supply of their precursor raw materials such as coal, biomass, crude oil, and methane. To overcome these challenges, industry requires a versatile and robust suite of conversion technologies, many of which are mediated by synthesis gas (CO + H(2)) or methanol/dimethyl ether (DME) intermediates. One such transformation, the conversion of methanol/DME to triptane (2,2,3-trimethylbutane) has spurred particular research interest. Practically, triptane is a high-octane, high-value fuel component, but this transformation also raises fundamental questions: how can such a complex molecule be generated from such a simple precursor with high selectivity? In this Account, we present studies of this reaction carried out in two modes: homogeneously with soluble metal halide catalysts and heterogeneously over solid microporous acid catalysts. Despite their very different compositions, reaction conditions, provenance, and historical scientific context, both processes lead to remarkably similar products and mechanistic interpretations. In both cases, hydrocarbon chains grow by successive methylation in a carbocation-based mechanism. The relative rates of competitive processes-chain growth by methylation, chain termination by hydrogen transfer, isomerization, and cracking-systematically depend upon the structure of the various hydrocarbons produced, strongly favoring the formation of the maximally branched C(7) alkane, triptane. The two catalysts also show parallels in their dependence on acid strength. Stronger acids exhibit higher methanol/DME conversion but also tend to favor chain termination, isomerization, and cracking relative to chain growth, decreasing the preference for triptane. Hence, in both modes, there will be an optimal range: if the acid strength is too low, activity will be poor, but if it is too high, selectivity will be poor. A related

  18. Mathematical Simulation of High-Conversion Binary Copolymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangWei; QinJiguang

    2005-01-01

    A new model for mathematical simulation of high-conversion binary copolymerization was established by combination of the concept of the three stage polymerization model (TSPM) proposed by Qin et al. for bulk free radical homopolymerization with the North equation to describe high-conversion copolymerization reaction exhibiting a strong gel effect, and the mathematical expressions of this new model were derived. Like TSPM, the new model also assmnes that the whole course of binary copolymerization can be divided into three different stages: low conversion, gel effect and glass effect stages. In addition, the reaction rate constants and the initiator efficiency at each copolymerization stage do not vary with conversion. Based on the expressions derived, a plot method for determining the overall rate constants and critical conversions was proposed. The literature data on conversion history for styrene (St)-methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA)-MMA copolymerizations were treated to examine the model, which shows that the model is satisfactory.

  19. Deep conversion of black oils with Eni Slurry technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panariti, Nicoletta; Rispoli, Giacomo

    2010-09-15

    Eni Slurry Technology represents a significant technological innovation in residue conversion and unconventional oils upgrading. EST allows the almost total conversion of heavy feedstocks into useful products, mainly transportation fuels, with a great major impact on the economic and environmental valorization of hydrocarbon resources. The peculiar characteristics of EST in terms of yields, products quality, absence of undesired by-products and feedstock flexibility constitute its superior economic and environmental attractiveness. The first full scale industrial plant based on this new technology will be realized in Eni's Sannazzaro refinery (23,000 bpd). Oil in is scheduled by 4th quarter 2012.

  20. Metagenomics of hydrocarbon resource environments indicates aerobic taxa and genes to be unexpectedly common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dongshan; Caffrey, Sean M; Soh, Jung; Agrawal, Akhil; Brown, Damon; Budwill, Karen; Dong, Xiaoli; Dunfield, Peter F; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M; Hallam, Steven J; Hanson, Niels W; He, Zhiguo; Jack, Thomas R; Klassen, Jonathan; Konwar, Kishori M; Kuatsjah, Eugene; Li, Carmen; Larter, Steve; Leopatra, Verlyn; Nesbø, Camilla L; Oldenburg, Thomas; Pagé, Antoine P; Ramos-Padron, Esther; Rochman, Fauziah F; Saidi-Mehrabad, Alireeza; Sensen, Christoph W; Sipahimalani, Payal; Song, Young C; Wilson, Sandra; Wolbring, Gregor; Wong, Man-Ling; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-09-17

    Oil in subsurface reservoirs is biodegraded by resident microbial communities. Water-mediated, anaerobic conversion of hydrocarbons to methane and CO2, catalyzed by syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea, is thought to be one of the dominant processes. We compared 160 microbial community compositions in ten hydrocarbon resource environments (HREs) and sequenced twelve metagenomes to characterize their metabolic potential. Although anaerobic communities were common, cores from oil sands and coal beds had unexpectedly high proportions of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Likewise, most metagenomes had high proportions of genes for enzymes involved in aerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. Hence, although HREs may have been strictly anaerobic and typically methanogenic for much of their history, this may not hold today for coal beds and for the Alberta oil sands, one of the largest remaining oil reservoirs in the world. This finding may influence strategies to recover energy or chemicals from these HREs by in situ microbial processes.

  1. The Conversation Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  2. Content for Conversation Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  3. Canning Canned Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Michael P.; Daigaku, Sanyo

    Ways to improve the role-playing conversations found in most second language textbooks are outlined. It is argued that the conversations are often restrictive, dull, and repetitive, and students respond to them in kind. The teacher can make the target language used more interesting by creating new characters, situations, settings, or objectives.…

  4. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  5. Two-step processing of oil shale to linear hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Ryzhov, A.N.; Latypova, D.Zh.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry; Avakyan, T.A. [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01

    Thermal and catalytic steam reforming of oil shale mined from Leningrad and Kashpir deposits was studied. Experiments were performed in fixed bed reactor by varying temperature and steam flow rate. Data obtained were approximated by empirical formulas containing some parameters calculated by least-squares method. Thus predicting amount of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane in producer gas is possible for given particular kind of oil shale, temperature and steam flow rate. Adding Ni catalyst enriches hydrogen and depletes CO content in effluent gas at low gasification temperatures. Modeling gas simulating steam reforming gases (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} mixture) was tested in hydrocarbon synthesis over Co-containing supported catalyst. Selectivity of CO conversion into C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches 84% while selectivity to methane is 7%. Molecular weight distribution of synthesized alkanes obeys Anderson-Schulz-Flory equation and chain growth probability 0.84. (orig.)

  6. Predictability of conversation partners

    CERN Document Server

    Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, Song et al. (2010) found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one's conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one's next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between close sensor nodes. We find t...

  7. Political conversations on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    2016-01-01

    Political conversations are according to theories on deliberative democracy essential to well-functioning democracies. Traditionally these conversations have taken place in face-to-face settings, in e.g. party meetings and town meetings. However, social media such as Facebook and Twitter offers new...... possibilities for online political conversations between citizens and politicians. This paper examines the presence on Facebook and Twitter of Members of the Danish national Parliament, the Folketing, and focusses on a quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities taking place in the threads...... following Facebook posts from Danish Members of Parliament (MPs). The paper shows that, in comparison with previous findings from other countries, Danish MPs have a relatively high degree of engagement in political conversations with citizens on Facebook – and that a large number of citizens follow MPs...

  8. Reaction pathways involved in CH4 conversion on Pd/Al2O3 catalysts : TAP as a powerful tool for the elucidation of the effective role of the metal/support interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor offers an alternative to draw direct structure/activity relationships checked on Natural Gas-fuelled Vehicle (NGV) catalysts Determination of accurate kinetic constants for methane adsorption from single pulse experiments and subsequent investigation of sequential surface reactions from alternative CH4/O2 pulse experiments provides a straightforward visualization of the involvement of the metal/support interface on freshly-prepared catalysts and the loss of this effect on aged single palladium based catalysts.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  10. Monomolecular conversion of light alkanes over H-ZSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narbeshuber, T.; Narbeshuber, Thomas F.; Vinek, Hannelore; Lercher, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The monomolecular conversion of light n-alkanes (propane to n-hexane) over H-ZSM-5 was investigated between 723 and 823 K. The rates and energies of activation of the individual reactions were determined and a kinetic model for the conversion is presented. The results suggest that carbonium ions are

  11. Enhancement of in situ Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.

    2006-07-01

    Approximately 750 000 sites of contaminated land exist across Europe. The harmful chemicals found in Finnish soils include heavy metals, oil products, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorophenols, and pesticides. Petroleum and petroleum products enter soil from ruptured oil pipelines, land disposal of refinery products, leaking storage tanks and through accidents. PAH contamination is caused by the spills of coal tar and creosote from coal gasification and wood treatment sites in addition to oil spills. Cleanup of soil by bioremediation is cheaper than by chemical and physical processes. However, the cleaning capacity of natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation is limited. The purpose of this thesis was to find feasible options to enhance in situ remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The aims were to increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and microbial activity at the subsurface in order to achieve higher contaminant removal efficiency than by intrinsic biodegradation alone. Enhancement of microbial activity and decrease of soil toxicity during remediation were estimated by using several biological assays. The performance of these assays was compared in order to find suitable indicators to follow the progress of remediation. Phytoremediation and chemical oxidation are promising in situ techniques to increase the degradation of hydrocarbons in soil. Phytoremediation is plant-enhanced decontamination of soil and water. Degradation of hydrocarbons is enhanced in the root zone by increased microbial activity and through the detoxifying enzymes of plants themselves. Chemical oxidation of contaminants by Fenton's reaction can produce degradation products which are more biodegradable than the parent compounds. Fenton's reaction and its modifications apply solutions of hydrogen peroxide and iron for the oxidation of organic chemicals. The cost of oxidation can be reduced by aiming at partial instead of full

  12. OPERATION OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES WITH PRACTICAL HYDROCARBON FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott A. Barnett; Jiang Liu; Yuanbo Lin

    2004-07-30

    This work was carried out to achieve a better understanding of how SOFC anodes work with real fuels. The motivation was to improve the fuel flexibility of SOFC anodes, thereby allowing simplification and cost reduction of SOFC power plants. The work was based on prior results indicating that Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs can be operated directly on methane and natural gas, while SOFCs with novel anode compositions can work with higher hydrocarbons. While these results were promising, more work was clearly needed to establish the feasibility of these direct-hydrocarbon SOFCs. Basic information on hydrocarbon-anode reactions should be broadly useful because reformate fuel gas can contain residual hydrocarbons, especially methane. In the Phase I project, we have studied the reaction mechanisms of various hydrocarbons--including methane, natural gas, and higher hydrocarbons--on two kinds of Ni-containing anodes: conventional Ni-YSZ anodes and a novel ceramic-based anode composition that avoid problems with coking. The effect of sulfur impurities was also studied. The program was aimed both at achieving an understanding of the interactions between real fuels and SOFC anodes, and providing enough information to establish the feasibility of operating SOFC stacks directly on hydrocarbon fuels. A combination of techniques was used to provide insight into the hydrocarbon reactions at these anodes during SOFC operation. Differentially-pumped mass spectrometry was be used for product-gas analysis both with and without cell operation. Impedance spectroscopy was used in order to understand electrochemical rate-limiting steps. Open-circuit voltages measurements under a range of conditions was used to help determine anode electrochemical reactions. Life tests over a wide range of conditions were used to establish the conditions for stable operation of anode-supported SOFC stacks directly on methane. Redox cycling was carried out on ceramic-based anodes. Tests on sulfur tolerance of

  13. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, Matthew A.; Baehr, Arthur L.

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 gyr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 gm-2yr-1 (1.45×10-3 and 1.51×10-3 gal.ft.-2yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  14. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  15. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  16. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  17. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  18. Reaction pathways involved in CH4 conversion on Pd/Al2O3 catalysts : TAP as a powerful tool for the elucidation of the effective role of the metal/support interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eGRANGER

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP reactor offers an alternative to draw direct structure/activity relationships checked on Natural Gas-fuelled Vehicle (NGV catalysts Determination of accurate kinetic constants for methane adsorption from single pulse experiments and subsequent investigation of sequential surface reactions from alternative CH4/O2 pulse experiments provides a straightforward visualization of the involvement of the metal/support interface on freshly-prepared catalysts and the loss of this effect on aged single palladium based catalysts.

  19. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  20. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.