WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrocarbon conversion process

  1. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  2. Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yongchun; Periana, Roy; Chen, Weiqun; van Duin, Adri; Nielsen, Robert; Shuler, Patrick; Ma, Qisheng; Blanco, Mario; Li, Zaiwei; Oxgaard, Jonas; Cheng, Jihong; Cheung, Sam; Pudar, Sanja

    2009-09-28

    This is the Final Report of the five-year project Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes (DE-FC36-04GO14276, July 1, 2004- June 30, 2009), in which we present our major accomplishments with detailed descriptions of our experimental and theoretical efforts. Upon the successful conduction of this project, we have followed our proposed breakdown work structure completing most of the technical tasks. Finally, we have developed and demonstrated several optimized homogenously catalytic methane conversion systems involving applications of novel ionic liquids, which present much more superior performance than the Catalytica system (the best-to-date system) in terms of three times higher reaction rates and longer catalysts lifetime and much stronger resistance to water deactivation. We have developed in-depth mechanistic understandings on the complicated chemistry involved in homogenously catalytic methane oxidation as well as developed the unique yet effective experimental protocols (reactors, analytical tools and screening methodologies) for achieving a highly efficient yet economically feasible and environmentally friendly catalytic methane conversion system. The most important findings have been published, patented as well as reported to DOE in this Final Report and our 20 Quarterly Reports.

  3. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Tan, E. C. D.; Biddy, M. J.; Beckham, G. T.; Scarlata, C.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.; Ross, J.; Lukas, J.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.

    2013-10-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of biological conversion of lingnocellulosic-dervied sugars. The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, using dilute-acid pretreatement, enzymatic saccharification, and bioconversion. Ancillary areas--feed handling, hydrolysate conditioning, product recovery and upgrading (hydrotreating) to a final blendstock material, wastewater treatment, lignin combusion, and utilities--are also included in the design.

  4. Process and apparatus for conversion of water vapor with coal or hydrocarbon into a product gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, W.; Barnert, H.; Oertel, M.; Schulten, R.

    1990-03-27

    A process and apparatus are provided for conversion of steam and hydrocarbon, or steam and coal, into a product gas which contains hydrogen. The conversion rate is augmented by effective extraction and removal of hydrogen as and when hydrogen is generated. Within a reaction vessel wherein the conversion takes place, a chamber for collection of hydrogen is formed by the provision of a hydrogen permeable membrane. The chamber is provided with a hydrogen extraction means and houses a support structure, for example, in the form of a mesh providing structural support to the membrane. The membrane may be of a pleated or corrugated construction, so as to provide an enlarged surface for the membrane to facilitate hydrogen extraction. Also, to further facilitate hydrogen extraction, a hydrogen partial pressure differential is maintained across the membrane, such as, for example, by the counter pressure of an inert gas. A preferred configuration for the apparatus of the invention is a tubular construction which houses generally tubular hydrogen extraction chambers. 5 figs.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scarlata, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, E. C. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ross, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Lukas, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Sexton, D. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic-derived hydrolysate. This model leverages expertise established over time in biomass deconstruction and process integration research at NREL, while adding in new technology areas for sugar purification and catalysis. The overarching process design converts biomass to die die diesel- and naphtha-range fuels using dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, purifications, and catalytic conversion focused on deoxygenating and oligomerizing biomass hydrolysates.

  6. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  7. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  8. First Principles Simulations of Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes in Functionalized Zeolitic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar, Mark Nickolaus

    With increasing demand for chemicals and fuels, and finite traditional crude oil resources, there is a growing need to invent, establish, or optimize chemical processes that convert gasifiable carbon-based feedstocks (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil sands, or biomass) into the needed final products. Catalysis is central to almost every industrial chemical process, including alkane metathesis (AM) and the methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) process, which represent final steps in a sequence of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. An in depth understanding of AM and MTH is essential to the selective production of the desired end products. In this dissertation, ab initio density functional theory simulations provide unique mechanistic and thermodynamic insight of specific elementary steps involved in AM and MTH as performed on zeolite supports. Zeolites have been employed throughout the petroleum industry because of their ability to perform acid-catalyzed reactions (e.g., cracking or MTH). The crystalline structure of zeolites imparts regular microporous networks and, in turn, the selective passage of molecules based on shape and functionality. Many different elements can be grafted onto or substituted into zeolites, resulting in a broad range of catalytic behavior. However, due to the variety of competing and secondary reactions that occur at experimental conditions, it is often difficult to extract quantitative information regarding individual elementary steps. ab initio calculations can be particularly useful for this purpose. Alkane metathesis (i.e., the molecular redistribution or chain length averaging of alkanes) is typically performed by transition metal hydrides on amorphous alumina or silica supports. In Chapter 3, the feasibility of AM in zeolites is assessed by using a grafted Ta-hydride complex to explore the full catalytic cycle in the self-metathesis of ethane. The decomposition of a Ta-metallacyclobutane reaction intermediate that forms during olefin metathesis

  9. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  10. Hydrocarbon processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Seddon, D.

    1989-06-28

    A process for the catalytic conversion of synthesis-gas into a product which comprises naphtha, kerosene and distillate is characterized in that the catalyst is a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst also containing a zeolite, the naphtha fraction contains 60% or less linear paraffins and the kerosene and distillated fractions contain more linear paraffins and olefins than found in the naphtha fraction. Reduction of the relative amount of straight chain material in the naphtha fraction increases the octane number and so enhances the quality of the gasoline product, while the high quality of the kerosene and distillate fractions is maintained.

  11. An apparatus for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-03-23

    The installation for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv) with the formation of a mixture of H2 and C02 is a catalyst chamber (KK) filled with longitudinally disposed thin pipes (with thin walls) or with pipe units made of dolomite, MgO or potassium aluminate. These pipes have a multilayered coating (Pk) on their internal and external surfaces (Pv), which contain catalytically active components. Such pipes or pipe units form a honeycombed structure with through longitudinal channels. The catalyst chamber itself is made of a ceramic material and has a heating winding outside for heating the catalyst. To save fuel and to increase the efficiency (KPD) of the heating device, the catalyst chamber is in turn enclosed by two additional shells filled with heat conducting packings which are easily penetrated by the gases being processed. The hydrocarbon vapors or gaseous fuel from the natural gas or methane and the steam are fed through the above cited heat exchange layers with packings into the facial part of the catalytic chamber, in which the conversion of the hydrocarbons occurs with the production of H2 and C02. From the catalyzer layer the mixture of gases and steam goes through a refrigerator into a trap for the steam excess and when it is necessary, into a C02 absorber and then, pure H2 is discharged from the latter. Such a catalytic installation is convenient to use for producing pure H2 from natural gas, methane, propane or kerosene.

  12. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons Using Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong

    2007-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H', CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The process of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was investigated. The experiment showed that the time and conditions of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation were different. Methane conversion rate increased with the increase in the current and decrease in the amount of methane. Furthermore, an examination of the reaction mechanisms revealed that free radicals played an important role in the chain reaction.

  13. Towards Carbon-Neutral CO2 Conversion to Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Jones, Matthew D; O'Byrne, Justin P; Griffiths, Owen G; Owen, Rhodri E; Sackville, Emma; McManus, Marcelle; Plucinski, Pawel

    2015-12-07

    With fossil fuels still predicted to contribute close to 80 % of the primary energy consumption by 2040, methods to limit further CO2 emissions in the atmosphere are urgently needed to avoid the catastrophic scenarios associated with global warming. In parallel with improvements in energy efficiency and CO2 storage, the conversion of CO2 has emerged as a complementary route with significant potential. In this work we present the direct thermo-catalytic conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons using a novel iron nanoparticle-carbon nanotube (Fe@CNT) catalyst. We adopted a holistic and systematic approach to CO2 conversion by integrating process optimization-identifying reaction conditions to maximize conversion and selectivity towards long chain hydrocarbons and/or short olefins-with catalyst optimization through the addition of promoters. The result is the production of valuable hydrocarbons in a manner that can approach carbon neutrality under realistic industrial process conditions.

  14. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ghorbanzadeh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  15. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  16. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  17. Natural gas conversion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

  18. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  19. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  20. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  1. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, E. C. D.; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, A.; Hensley, J.; Schaidle, J.; Biddy, M.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  2. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silks, Louis A.; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2016-10-18

    The present invention is directed to the one step selective conversion of starch, cellulose, or glucose to molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. The invention is also directed to the conversion of those intermediates to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  3. Biomass Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels Using the MixAlcoTM Process Conversion de la biomasse en combustibles hydrocarbonés au moyen du procédé MixAlcoTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taco-Vasquez S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The MixAlcoTM process converts biomass to hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline using the following generic steps: pretreatment, fermentation, descumming, dewatering, thermal ketonization, distillation, hydrogenation, oligomerization and saturation. This study describes the production of bio-gasoline from chicken manure and shredded office paper, both desirable feedstocks that do not require pretreatment. Using a mixed culture of microorganisms derived from marine soil, the biomass was fermented to produce a dilute aqueous solution of carboxylate salts, which were subsequently descummed and dried. The dry salts were thermally converted to raw ketones, which were distilled to remove impurities. Using Raney nickel catalyst, the distilled ketones were hydrogenated to mixed secondary alcohols ranging from C3 to C12. Using zeolite HZSM-5 catalyst, these alcohols were oligomerized to hydrocarbons in a plug -flow reactor. Finally, these unsaturated hydrocarbons were hydrogenated to produce a mixture of hydrocarbons that can be blended into commercial gasoline. Le procédé MixAlcoTM convertit la biomasse en hydrocarbures (par exemple, en essence selon les étapes génériques suivantes : prétraitement, fermentation, écumage, déshydratation, cétonisation thermique, distillation, hydrogénation, oligomérisation et saturation. Cette étude décrit la production de bioessence à partir de fumier de poulet et de papier en lambeaux, ces deux sources étant des matières premières convoitées ne nécessitant pas de prétraitement. À l’aide d’une culture mixte de microorganismes dérivés de sols marins, la biomasse a été soumise à une fermentation de manière à produire une solution aqueuse diluée de sels de carboxylates, ultérieurement écumés et séchés. Les sels séchés ont été thermiquement convertis en cétones brutes, ensuite distillées afin d’éliminer les impuretés. À l’aide du catalyseur à base de nickel de Raney, les c

  4. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  6. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, hydrolysates or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silks, Louis A; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2017-09-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to the conversion of a source material (e.g., a depolymerized oligosaccharide mixture, a monomeric sugar, a hydrolysate, or a mixture of monomeric sugars) to intermediate molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. These intermediates may also be converted to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  7. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  8. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  9. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a catalyst composition. It comprises: a modified Y zeolite having a unit cell size below about 24.45 {angstrom}, a degree of crystallinity which is at least retained at increasing SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios, a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio between about 8 to about 15, a water adsorption capacity at (25{degree}C and a p/p{sub {ital o}} value of 0.2) of between about 10--15% by weight of modified zeolite and a pore volume of at lest about 0.25 ml/g. Between about 10 to about 40% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least about 8 nm; an amorphous cracking component comprising a silica-alumina containing 50--95% by weight of silica; a binder comprising alumina; from about 0.05 to about 10 percent by weight of nickel and from about 2 to about 40 percent by weight of tungsten, calculated as metals per 100 parts by weight of total catalyst. The modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component comprises about 60--85% by weight of the total catalyst, the binder comprises about 15--40% by weight of the total catalyst and the amount of modified Y zeolite ranges between about 10--75% of the combined amount of modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component.

  10. Conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in thermal protection reactors of hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Mikhaylov, A. M.; Korabelnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal protection of heat-stressed surfaces of a high-speed vehicle flying in dense layers of atmosphere is one of the topical issues. Not of a less importance is also the problem of hydrocarbon fuel combustion in a supersonic air flow. In the concept under development, it is supposed that in the most high-stressed parts of airframe and engine, catalytic thermochemical reactors will be installed, wherein highly endothermic processes of steam conversion of hydrocarbon fuel take place. Simultaneously with heat absorption, hydrogen generation will occur in the reactors. This paper presents the results of a study of conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in a slit reactor.

  11. Cooperative internal conversion process

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, called cooperative internal conversion process, in which the coupling of bound-free electron and neutron transitions due to the dipole term of their Coulomb interaction permits cooperation of two nuclei leading to neutron exchange if it is allowed by energy conservation, is discussed theoretically. General expression of the cross section of the process is reported in one particle nuclear and spherical shell models as well in the case of free atoms (e.g. noble gases). A half-life characteristic of the process is also determined. The case of $Ne$ is investigated numerically. The process may have significance in fields of nuclear waste disposal and nuclear energy production.

  12. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 mL@min?1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is 76%, and the total selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons and C3 hydrocarbons is nearly 100%. The conversion of methane increases with the increase of voltage and decreases with the flow of methane increase; the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons decreases with the increase of voltage and increases with the flow of methane increase. The selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is improved with catalyst for conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons in plasma field. Methane molecule collision with radicals is mainly responsible for product formation.

  13. Conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons in a ZSM-5 coated monolithic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antia, J.E.; Govind, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Novel reactor configurations featuring catalysts supported on monolithic or honeycomb structures are being increasingly used for a number of applications. In this work, a zeolite-coated monolithic reactor is employed for the conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons. Experimental results show that the conversion and hydrocarbon product distribution compare favorably with data reported for fixed and fluid beds. Mathematical modeling shows that the conversion here is controlled by diffusion in the molecule-sized intracrystalline pores of the zeolite structure. This finding is of considerable important because it demonstrates that monolithic reactors are well-suited to zeolite-based catalytic processes.

  14. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  15. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  16. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  17. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  18. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Meyer, P.; Snowden-Swan, L.; Padmaperuma, A.; Tan, E.; Dutta, A.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  19. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 ml · min-1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons i

  20. Fractional Multistage Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass and Catalytic Conversion into Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy; Rozmiarek, Robert; Dally, Brice; Holland, Chris

    2017-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an improved multistage process for the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to serve as a new front-end, deconstruction process ideally suited to feed Virent’s well-proven catalytic technology, which is already being scaled up. This process produced water soluble, partially de-oxygenated intermediates that are ideally suited for catalytic finishing to fungible distillate hydrocarbons. Through this project, Virent, with its partners, demonstrated the conversion of pine wood chips to drop-in hydrocarbon distillate fuels using a multi-stage fractional conversion system that is integrated with Virent’s BioForming® process. The majority of work was in the liquefaction task and included temperature scoping, solvent optimization, and separations.

  1. Direct Conversion of Syngas-to-Hydrocarbons over Higher Alcohols Synthesis Catalysts Mixed with HZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.; Li, Jinjing; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-10

    The synthesis of hydrocarbon fuels directly from synthesis gas (i.e. one step process) was investigated with a catalytic system comprised of HZSM-5 physically mixed with either a methanol synthesis catalyst or a higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) catalyst. The metal sites of the methanol or HAS synthesis catalyst enable the conversion of syngas to alcohols, whereas HZSM-5 provides acid sites required for methanol dehydration, and dimethyl ether-to-hydrocarbons reactions. Catalytic performance for HZSM-5 when mixed with either a 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst or a HAS catalyst was evaluated at 300°C, 70 bars, GHSV=700 h-1 and H2/CO=1 using a HZSM-5: alcohols synthesis catalyst weight ratio of 3:1. The major difference observed between the methanol synthesis and HAS catalyst mixtures was found in the production of durene which is an undesirable byproduct. While durene formation is negligible with any of the HAS catalysts mixed with the HZSM-5 evaluated in this study, it represents almost 50% of the C5+ fraction for the methanol synthesis catalyst (5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 ) mixed with HZSM-5. This presents an advantage for using HAS catalysts over the methanol synthesis catalyst to minimize the durene by-product. The yield toward the desired C5+ hydrocarbons is thus twice higher with selected HAS catalysts as compared to when HZSM-5 is mixed with 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3. Among all the HAS catalysts evaluated in this study, a catalyst with 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst was found the most promising due to higher production of C5+ hydrocarbons and low durene formation. The efficiency of the one-step process was thus further evaluated using the HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst mixture under a number of process conditions to maximize liquid hydrocarbons product yield. At 300oC, 70 bars, GHSV = 700 h-1 and HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu = 3:1 (wt.), the C5+ fraction represents 48.5% of the hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to achieve higher selectivity

  2. Plasma conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas is widely abundant, is easily withdrawn from reservoirs, is commonly produced as an associated gas along with crude oil production, and is found in many geologic settings as a resource separate from oil. A much larger fraction of the natural gas may be produced from a gas reservoir, as compared with a crude oil reservoir. However, natural gas is normally transported by pipeline, and the energy throughput of such a pipeline is perhaps only 20% to 30% of the throughput of an oil pipeline of the same size and cost. Gas is difficult to transport in moderate quantities at low cost, as it must either have a special pipeline or must be liquified into LNG, shipped in cryogenic LNG tankers, and regasified chemical stability of methane has made it difficult to convert it directly into conventional hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, and has also impeded its use as a feedstock for petrochemical production. Experiments are described in which a methane plasma is created, and the resulting methyl and hydrogen ions have been accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 15 ev to greater than 100 ev, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces has caused the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 8} molecules. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The costs of production of the plasma conversion devices are projected to be quite low, and the technology appears to be commercially and economically feasible.

  3. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  4. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  5. Process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons or mixtures thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wielen, L.A.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for the continuous biological production of lipids, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon like material or mixtures thereof by conversion of a suitable substrate using micro-organisms, in which process the said substrate is continuously, anaerobically fermented to

  6. Natural gas conversion process. Sixth quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

  7. Enhancement of NOx and hydrocarbon conversion in plasma-activated catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill; Adress, Wahmeed; Goguet, Alexandre; Yang, Hui; De Rosa, Fabio; Hardacre, Christopher; Stere, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure, non-thermal plasma-activated-catalysis is showing real promise in a number of applications. Here we report on how electrical, visible and FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy measurements in a kHz atmospheric pressure He plasma jet coupled with a Ag/Al2O3 catalyst allowed us produce and confirm a strong enhancement of both NOx and hydrocarbon conversion at a measured gas temperature of <= 250° C. How these and other measurements have provided an insight into the fundamental physical and chemical processes in the plasma environment that have helped us move to a more efficient system and other processes will be discussed.

  8. Process for making unsaturated hydrocarbons using microchannel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Yuschak, Thomas; LaPlante, Timothy J.; Rankin, Scott; Perry, Steven T.; Fitzgerald, Sean Patrick; Simmons, Wayne W.; Mazanec, Terry Daymo, Eric

    2011-04-12

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for converting a feed composition comprising one or more hydrocarbons to a product comprising one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons, the process comprising: flowing the feed composition and steam in contact with each other in a microchannel reactor at a temperature in the range from about 200.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to convert the feed composition to the product, the process being characterized by the absence of catalyst for converting the one or more hydrocarbons to one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons. Hydrogen and/or oxygen may be combined with the feed composition and steam.

  9. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  10. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  11. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  12. Spatial Distribution of Zeolite ZSM-5 within Catalyst Bodies Affects Selectivity and Stability of Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño, P.; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Epelde, E.; Gayubo, A.G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Solid acids, such as zeolites, are used as catalyst materials in a wide variety of important crude oil refinery, bulk chemical synthesis, and green processes. Examples include fluid catalytic cracking (FCC),[1] methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion,[ 2] plastic waste valorization,[3] and biomass

  13. Two-step thermal conversion of oleaginous microalgae into renewable hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Asomaning, Justice; Mussone, Paolo; Bressler, David C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the conversion of microalgal biomass to renewable chemicals and fuels through a two-step reaction and separation process. High density Chlorella protothecoides culture with 40% lipid accumulation (dwb) was produced in 10 L bioreactors and hydrolyzed in batch stainless steel reactors under subcritical conditions. After hydrolysis, fatty acids free of sulfur and low in nitrogen and salts, were recovered by hexane extraction. The fatty acids were pyrolyzed at 410°C for 2h under N2 yielding n-alkanes, α-olefins and internal olefins and low molecular weight fatty acids. This study demonstrated the direct conversion of microalgal biomass into valuable platform chemicals and fuels compatible with the existing industrial hydrocarbon infrastructure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

  15. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

    2014-12-09

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  16. Thermal Adsorption Processing Of Hydrocarbon Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudad H. Al.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The raw materials of secondary catalytic processes must be pre-refined. Among these refining processes are the deasphalting and demetallization including their thermo adsorption or thermo-contact adsorption variety. In oil processing four main processes of thermo-adsorption refining of hydrocarbon residues are used ART Asphalt Residual Treating - residues deasphaltizing 3D Discriminatory Destructive Distillation developed in the US ACT Adsorption-Contact Treatment and ETCC Express Thermo-Contact Cracking developed in Russia. ART and ACT are processes with absorbers of lift type reactor while 3D and ETCC processes are with an adsorbing reactor having ultra-short contact time of the raw material with the adsorbent. In all these processes refining of hydrocarbon residues is achieved by partial Thermo-destructive transformations of hydrocarbons and hetero-atomic compounds with simultaneous adsorption of the formed on the surface of the adsorbents resins asphaltene and carboids as well as metal- sulphur - and nitro-organic compounds. Demetallized and deasphalted light and heavy gas oils or their mixtures are a quality raw material for secondary deepening refining processes catalytic and hydrogenation cracking etc. since they are characterized by low coking ability and low content of organometallic compounds that lead to irreversible deactivation of the catalysts of these deepening processes.

  17. Conversational Knowledge Process for Social Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Toyoaki

    The conversational knowledge process is a collective activity for knowledge creation, management, and application where conversational communications are used as a primary means of interaction among participating actors. In this article, I survey a suite of communication tools that augment the conversational knowledge process in order to accelerate social problem solving.

  18. Ethylene Conversion to Higher Hydrocarbon over Copper Loaded BZSM-5 in the Presence of Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramli Mat; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Zainab Ramli; W.Azelee W.Abu Bakar

    2006-01-01

    The successful production of higher hydrocarbons from methane depends on the stability or the oxidation rate of the intermediate products. The performances of the BZSM-5 and the modified BZSM-5 catalysts were tested for ethylene conversion into higher hydrocarbons. The catalytic experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed micro reactor at atmospheric pressure. The catalysts were characterized using XRD, NH3-TPD, and IR for their structure and acidity. The result suggests that BZSM-5 is a weak acid. The introduction of copper into BZSM-5 improved the acidity of BZSM-5. The conversion of ethylene toward higher hydrocarbons is dependent on the acidity of the catalyst. Only weaker acid site is required to convert ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The loading of Cu on BZSM-5 improved the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons especially at low percentage. The reactivity of ethylene is dependent on the amount of acidity as well as the presence of metal on the catalyst surface. Cu1%BZSM-5 is capable of converting ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The balances between the metal and acid sites influence the performance of ethylene conversion and higher hydrocarbon selectivity. Higher loading of Cu leads to the formation of COx.

  19. Microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Martin; Beckmaann, Sabrina; Siegert, Michael; Grundger, Friederike; Richnow, Hans [Geomicrobiology Group, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, oil production has increased enormously but almost half of the oil now remaining is heavy/biodegraded and cannot be put into production. There is therefore a need for new technology and for diversification of energy sources. This paper discusses the microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs. The objective of the study is to identify microbial and geochemical controls on methanogenesis in reservoirs. A graph shows the utilization of methane for various purposes in Germany from 1998 to 2007. A degradation process to convert coal to methane is shown using a flow chart. The process for converting oil to methane is also given. Controlling factors include elements such as Fe, nitrogen and sulfur. Atmospheric temperature and reservoir pressure and temperature also play an important role. From the study it can be concluded that isotopes of methane provide exploration tools for reservoir selection and alkanes and aromatic compounds provide enrichment cultures.

  20. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts(1-4). Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon source

  1. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Cold Plasma Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons via cold plasma reaction with catalysts has been studied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Methane can be converted into C2 hydrocarbons in different selectivity depending on the form of the reactor, power of plasma, flow rate of methane, ratio of N2/CH4 and nature of the catalysts. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can reach as high as 98.64%, and the conversion of methane as high as 60% and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons as high as 50% are obtained. Coking can be minimized under the conditions of: proper selection of the catalysts,appropriate high flow rate of inlet methane and suitable ratio of N2 to CH4. The catalyst surface provides active sites for radical recombination.

  2. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  3. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  4. Green technology for conversion of renewable hydrocarbon based on plasma-catalytic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedirchyk, Igor; Nedybaliuk, Oleg; Chernyak, Valeriy; Demchina, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    The ability to convert renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals is one of the most important steps on our path to green technology and sustainable development. However, the complex composition of biomass poses a major problem for established conversion technologies. The high temperature of thermochemical biomass conversion often leads to the appearance of undesirable byproducts and waste. The catalytic conversion has reduced yield and feedstock range. Plasma-catalytic reforming technology opens a new path for biomass conversion by replacing feedstock-specific catalysts with free radicals generated in the plasma. We studied the plasma-catalytic conversion of several renewable hydrocarbons using the air plasma created by rotating gliding discharge. We found that plasma-catalytic hydrocarbon conversion can be conducted at significantly lower temperatures (500 K) than during the thermochemical ( 1000 K) and catalytic (800 K) conversion. By using gas chromatography, we determined conversion products and found that conversion efficiency of plasma-catalytic conversion reaches over 85%. We used obtained data to determine the energy yield of hydrogen in case of plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol and compared it with other plasma-based hydrogen-generating systems.

  5. New Petrochemical Processes Based on Direct Conversion of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraguna F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Petrochemistry is a branch of chemistry and chemical engineering that studies reactions and processes of the transformation of petroleum derivatives and natural gas into useful petrochemicals. In its beginning, petrochemistry, or rather the organic chemical industry, was based on the acetylene and Reppe chemistry. The main raw materials of the petrochemical industry nowadays are olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons, with a pronounced tendency toward development of new processes and higher usage of syngas, methane and other alkanes. Here, the reactions and new processes of direct conversion of methane into more valuable petrochemicals are reviewed. Reactions of partial oxidation of methane, dehydroaromatization of methane, oxidative and non-oxidative coupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons are also described and discussed.

  6. Cooperative internal conversion process by proton exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of the recently discovered cooperative internal conversion process is investigated theoretically. In the cooperative internal conversion process by proton exchange investigated the coupling of bound-free electron and proton transitions due to the dipole term of their Coulomb interaction permits cooperation of two nuclei leading to proton exchange and an electron emission. General expression of the cross section of the process obtained in the one particle spherical nuclear shell model is presented. As a numerical example the cooperative internal conversion process by proton exchange in $Al$ is dealt with. As a further generalization, cooperative internal conversion process by heavy charged particle exchange and as an example of it the cooperative internal conversion process by triton exchange is discussed. The process is also connected to the field of nuclear waste disposal.

  7. Heterobimetallic Zeolite, InV-ZSM-5, Enables Efficient Conversion of Biomass Derived Ethanol to Renewable Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Li, Zhenglong; Casbeer, Erik M.; Geiger, Robert A.; Moses-Debusk, Melanie; Keller, Martin; Buchanan, Michelle V.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-01

    Direct catalytic conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon blend-stock can increase biofuels use in current vehicles beyond the ethanol blend-wall of 10-15%. Literature reports describe quantitative conversion of ethanol over zeolite catalysts but high C2 hydrocarbon formation renders this approach unsuitable for commercialization. Furthermore, the prior mechanistic studies suggested that ethanol conversion involves endothermic dehydration step. Here, we report the complete conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons over InV-ZSM-5 without added hydrogen and which produces lower C2 (products come from the hydrocarbon pool type mechanism and dehydration step is not necessary. Thus, our method of direct conversion of ethanol offers a pathway to produce suitable hydrocarbon blend-stock that may be blended at a refinery to produce fuels such as gasoline, diesel, JP-8, and jet fuel, or produce commodity chemicals such as BTX.

  8. Metal-Exchanged β Zeolites as Catalysts for the Conversion of Acetone to Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various metal-β zeolites have been synthesized under similar ion-exchange conditions. During the exchange process, the nature and acid strength of the used cations modified the composition and textural properties as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the final materials. Zeolites exchanged with divalent cations showed a clear decrease of their surface Brönsted acidity and an increase of their Lewis acidity. All materials were active as catalysts for the transformation of acetone into hydrocarbons. Although the protonic zeolite was the most active in the acetone conversion (96.8% conversion, the metal-exchanged zeolites showed varied selectivities towards different products of the reaction. In particular, we found the Cu-β to have a considerable selectivity towards the production of isobutene from acetone (over 31% yield compared to 7.5% of the protonic zeolite. We propose different reactions mechanisms in order to explain the final product distributions.

  9. Conversion of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons to valuable synthetic feed for steamcrackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesana, A.; Dalloro, L.; Rivetti, F.; Buzzoni, R.; Bignazzi, R. [ENI S.p.A., Novara (Italy). Refining and Marketing Div.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of the present study was upgrading a set of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures whose commercial value ranks close to fuel oil and should become even lower in the next future because of the introduction of more stringent regulations on fuels, through hydro-conversion to a synthetic feed for steam-cracking. The resulting process provides an opportunity to improve the economic return of a steamcracking plant, offering the chance of converting low-value mixtures produced by the plant itself, such as fuel oil of cracking (FOK), saving an equivalent amount of naphtha. The method can also be used for converting pyrolysis gasoline (pygas). Although pygas has at present a fair commercial value, it could suffer a significant penalization in the future due to further limitations on total aromatic content in gasoline. Pygas hydro-conversion to a synthetic steam-cracking feedstock has been recently reported. Fractions from refinery, such as heavy distillates (e.g. Heavy Vacuum Gas Oil, VGO), deasphalted resides (DAO), or some FCC streams (e.g. LCO) resulted suitable and very attractive mixtures to be treated as well. No more than deasphalting was required as pretreatment of the feed mixture and only when the asphalts were >2%. Hetero-elements are often present in such kind of feeds at quite high concentrations, but no problems were observed due to the presence of sulphur and nitrogen, respectively, up to 15000 and 5500 ppm. (orig.)

  10. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all

  11. System and process for upgrading hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Smith, Joseph D.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-08-25

    In one embodiment, a system for upgrading a hydrocarbon material may include a black wax upgrade subsystem and a molten salt gasification (MSG) subsystem. The black wax upgrade subsystem and the MSG subsystem may be located within a common pressure boundary, such as within a pressure vessel. Gaseous materials produced by the MSG subsystem may be used in the process carried out within the black wax upgrade subsystem. For example, hydrogen may pass through a gaseous transfer interface to interact with black wax feed material to hydrogenate such material during a cracking process. In one embodiment, the gaseous transfer interface may include one or more openings in a tube or conduit which is carrying the black wax material. A pressure differential may control the flow of hydrogen within the tube or conduit. Related methods are also disclosed.

  12. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Microwave plasma torch for processing hydrocarbon gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Zherlitsyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We designed and developed an ultrahigh-frequency (microwave plasma torch with a combined (nitrogen, methane plasma-forming environment, and microwave output of up to 2 kW, continuously. We demonstrate the possibility of using it in order to process natural and associated petroleum (APG gas into valuable products (hydrogen and carbon nanomaterial CNM with up to 70% efficiency. Based on the developed microwave plasma torch, we developed an apparatus capable of converting hydrocarbon feedstock at a capacity of 50 g/h yielding CNM and hydrogen of up to 70 vol. %. In its mobile small-tonnage version, this technology can be used on gas-condensate fields.

  14. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  15. Process and apparatus for conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into a product that may be further processes in a fermentation step. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the inventi

  16. Process and apparatus for conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into a product that may be further processes in a fermentation step. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the

  17. Catalysis Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons via Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Wei WANG; Gen Hui XU

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effect of catalyst and carrier in electric field enhanced plasma on methane conversion into C2 hydrocarbons was investigated. Methane coupling reaction was studied in the system of continuous flow reactor on Ni, MoO3, MnO2 catalysts and different ZSM-5 carriers. The per pass conversion of methane can be as high as 22%, the selectivity of ethylene can be as high as 23.8%, of acetylene 60.8%, of ethane 5.4% and of total C2 hydrocarbons was more than 90%. ZSM-5-25 was the better carrier and MnO2 was the better active component. The efficiency of energy was as high as 7.81%.

  18. Low temperature conversion of plastic waste into light hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sajid Hussain; Khan, Zahid Mahmood; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Mahmood, Qaisar; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Khan, Jamil; Farooq, Ather; Rashid, Naim [Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060 (Pakistan); Wu, Donglei, E-mail: wudl@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Advance recycling through pyrolytic technology has the potential of being applied to the management of plastic waste (PW). For this purpose 1 l volume, energy efficient batch reactor was manufactured locally and tested for pyrolysis of waste plastic. The feedstock for reactor was 50 g waste polyethylene. The average yield of the pyrolytic oil, wax, pyrogas and char from pyrolysis of PW were 48.6, 40.7, 10.1 and 0.6%, respectively, at 275 deg. C with non-catalytic process. Using catalyst the average yields of pyrolytic oil, pyrogas, wax and residue (char) of 50 g of PW was 47.98, 35.43, 16.09 and 0.50%, respectively, at operating temperature of 250 deg. C. The designed reactor could work at low temperature in the absence of a catalyst to obtain similar products as for a catalytic process.

  19. Process and apparatus for conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of cellulosic biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into fermentable sugars. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the invention biomass is converted into ferm

  20. Process and apparatus for conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of cellulosic biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into fermentable sugars. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the invention biomass is converted into

  1. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  2. An eco-friendly process for natural gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, S.; Nakayama, A.; Suzuki, E. [Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth, Kyoto (Japan). Catalysis Science Laboratory

    2001-07-01

    An eco-friendly process has been developed to convert methane, the major component of natural gas, to acetylene and hydrogen using a high frequency pulsed plasma. Acetylene is an important raw material in industry that is manufactured mainly by the reaction of calcium carbide with water. Acetylene is also manufactured by thermal cracking of hydrocarbons, or by partial oxidation of methane. These conventional processes require severe reaction conditions (a very high reaction temperature) and emit large amounts of greenhouse gas. The new process can convert methane to acetylene and hydrogen with a conversion efficiency of 52.8%, an acetylene selectivity of 91.8%, and a hydrogen ratio of 4.15 moles per mole acetylene at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. No environmental pollutant is emitted. 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Methane conversion into higher hydrocarbons with dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei; Wang; Wenjuan; Yan; Wenjie; Ge; Xiaofei; Duan

    2013-01-01

    We reported a coaxial,micro-dielectric barrier discharge(micro-DBD)reactor and a conventional DBD reactor for the direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure.The effects of input power,residence time,discharge gap and external electrode length were investigated for methane conversion and product selectivity.We found the conversion of methane in a micro-DBD reactor was higher than that in a conventional DBD reactor.And at an input power of 25.0 W,the conversion of methane and the total C2+C3 selectivity reached 25.10% and 80.27%,respectively,with a micro-DBD reactor of 0.4 mm discharge gap.Finally,a nonlinear multiple regression model was used to study the correlations between both methane conversion and product selectivity and various system variables.The calculated data were obtained using SPSS 12.0 software.The regression analysis illustrated the correlations between system variables and both methane conversion and product selectivity.

  4. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons by Abnormal Glow Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Wei; Yu Hui; Chen Qi; Yin Yongxiang; Dai Xiaoyan

    2005-01-01

    Methane conversion to C2 hydrocarbons has been investigated with the addition of hydrogen in a plasma reactor of abnormal glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The aim of this experiment is to minimize coke formation and improve discharge stability. The typical conditions in the experiment are 300 ml of total feed flux and 400 W of discharge power. The experimental results show that methane conversion is from 91.6% to 35.2% in mol, acetylene selectivity is from 90.2% to 57.6%, and ethylene selectivity is approximately from 7.8% to 3.6%,where the coke increases gradually along with the increase of CH4/H2 from 2: 8 to 9: 1. A stable discharge for a considerable running time can be obtained only at a lower ratio of CH4/H2= 2:8 or 3: 7. These phenomena indicate that the coke deposition during methane conversion is obviously reduced by adding a large amount of hydrogen during an abnormal glow discharge.A qualitative interpretation is presented, namely, with abundant hydrogen, the possibility that hydrogen molecules are activated to hydrogen radicals is increased with the help of the abnormal glow discharge. These hydrogen radicals react with carbon radicals to form C2 hydrocarbon products. Therefore, the deposition of coke is restrained.

  5. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  6. Normal hydrocarbons as a source of resin formation in the process of obtaining isoprene from isopentane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Sire, Y.M.; Vasil' yeva, V.P.; Gitis, K.M.; Rozengart, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on a catalyst of dehydrogenation of olefins of the conversion of isoamylenes and other C/sub 5/ hydrocarbons (isoprene, n-pentenes, piperylene), formed during dehydrogenation of isoamylenes to isoprene. It was found that the yield of heavy products increases on transition from hydrocarbons of iso-structure to normal hydrocarbons, which is due to the greater ease of polycondensation of cyclopentadiene formed from n-pentenes and particularly from piperylene under conditions of dehydrogenation. A study was made by chromato-mass-spectrometry of the composition of heavy products of conversion of piperylene and isoprene. In contrast with the catalysate of isoprene, the catalysate of piperylene contains a significant proportion of hydrocarbons containing a five-membered ring in the molecule (dicyclopentadiene, indane, indene, methylindenes, azilene), this being due to the participation of cyclopentadiene in the formation of heavy products. In the two-stage process of dehydrogenation of isopentane to isoprene 95% normal hydrocarbons are formed on dehydrogenation of isopentane to isoamylenes. (JMT)

  7. Catalytic processes for space station waste conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, M. W.; Madsen, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic techniques for processing waste products onboard space vehicles were evaluated. The goal of the study was the conversion of waste to carbon, wash water, oxygen and nitrogen. However, the ultimate goal is conversion to plant nutrients and other materials useful in closure of an ecological life support system for extended planetary missions. The resulting process studied involves hydrolysis at 250 C and 600 psia to break down and compact cellulose material, distillation at 100 C to remove water, coking at 450 C and atmospheric pressure, and catalytic oxidation at 450 to 600 C and atmospheric pressure. Tests were conducted with a model waste to characterize the hydrolysis and coking processes. An oxidizer reactor was sized based on automotive catalytic conversion experience. Products obtained from the hydrolysis and coking steps included a solid residue, gases, water condensate streams, and a volatile coker oil. Based on the data obtained, sufficient component sizing was performed to make a preliminary comparison of the catalytic technique with oxidation for processing waste for a six-man spacecraft. Wet oxidation seems to be the preferred technique from the standpoint of both component simplicity and power consumption.

  8. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over ZSM-5 zeolite: an examination of the role of aromatic hydrocarbons using /sup 13/carbon and deuterium-labeled feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, T.; Bett, G.; Seddon, D.

    1983-12-01

    A mechanism is suggested for the acceleration by aromatic hydrocarbons of zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion. According to this mechanism, the aromatic hydrocarbon undergoes successive ring methylation, prototropic conversion to an exo-methylene-cyclohexadiene, side-chain methylation, and ring de-ethylation. The overall result is that two methanol molecules give an ethylene molecule. The mechanism is supported by various reactions observed over ZSM-5 catalyst at methanol conversion temperatures: (I) deuteration of p-xylene by D/sub 2/O in the ring and methyl positions; (II) de-alkylation of p-ethyltoluene and n-propylbenzene; and (III) incorporation of the aromatic carbon of benzenes and alkylbenzenes into ethylene product, as revealed by /sup 13/C-labeling studies. 3 tables.

  9. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons using modified clinoptilolite catalysts. Investigation of catalyst lifetime and reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, G.J.; Themistocleous, T.; Copperthwaite, R.G.

    1988-10-17

    A study of the deactivation and reactivation of modified clinoptilolite catalysts for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is reported. Clinoptilolite catalysts, modified by either ammonium ion exchange or hydrochloric acid treatment, exhibit a short useful catalyst lifetime for this reaction (ca. 2-3 h) due to a high rate of coke deposition (3-5.10/sup -3/ g carbon/g catalyst/h). A comparative study of reactivation using oxygen, nitrous oxide and ozone/oxygen as oxidants indicated that nitrous oxide reactivation gives improved catalytic performance when compared to the activity and lifetime of the fresh catalyst. Both oxygen and ozone/oxygen were found to be ineffective for the reactivation of clinoptilolite. Initial studies of in situ on-line reactivation are also described. 3 figs., 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Two-step processing of oil shale to linear hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Ryzhov, A.N.; Latypova, D.Zh.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry; Avakyan, T.A. [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01

    Thermal and catalytic steam reforming of oil shale mined from Leningrad and Kashpir deposits was studied. Experiments were performed in fixed bed reactor by varying temperature and steam flow rate. Data obtained were approximated by empirical formulas containing some parameters calculated by least-squares method. Thus predicting amount of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane in producer gas is possible for given particular kind of oil shale, temperature and steam flow rate. Adding Ni catalyst enriches hydrogen and depletes CO content in effluent gas at low gasification temperatures. Modeling gas simulating steam reforming gases (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} mixture) was tested in hydrocarbon synthesis over Co-containing supported catalyst. Selectivity of CO conversion into C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches 84% while selectivity to methane is 7%. Molecular weight distribution of synthesized alkanes obeys Anderson-Schulz-Flory equation and chain growth probability 0.84. (orig.)

  11. Hybrid staging of geothermal energy conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steidel, R.F.

    1978-09-01

    A hybrid system consists of two or more energy conversion processes. This study examines the use of three energy conversion machines in hybrid systems: the conventional single-phase turbine, and the two-phase expanders known as the Lysholm engine and the radial outflow reaction turbine. Two hybrid systems are presented. The first is a two-stage, single-flash system with the Lysholm engine as the first stage, and a separator and conventional turbine as the second stage. The second system adds a radial outflow reaction turbine to recover a part of the energy rejected in the second stage. A theoretical specific power of 41.3 kW.s/lb is predicted for the two-stage, single-flash hybrid system. The addition of the radial outflow rotary turbine increases performance to 44.8 kW.s/lb. Both are superior to the double-flash system, with a specific power of 37.8 kW.s/lb. In addition, the hybrid system offers operating flexibility.

  12. Electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2017-01-31

    An electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion includes combining a Catalytically Active Element and Helper Catalyst in the presence of carbon dioxide, allowing a reaction to proceed to produce a reaction product, and applying electrical energy to said reaction to achieve electrochemical conversion of said reactant to said reaction product. The Catalytically Active Element can be a metal in the form of supported or unsupported particles or flakes with an average size between 0.6 nm and 100 nm. the reaction products comprise at least one of CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and CF.sub.3COOH.

  13. On the impact of olefins and aromatics in the methanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion over H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.; Mueller, S.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Methanol-to-hydrocarbons processes using HZSM-5 archetype acidic zeolites or zeotype SAPO-34 catalysts are regarded as a vital suite of conversion technologies to bypass petroleum-based routes for the production of specific fuels and petrochemical commodities. Special significance of the methanol chemistry originates from its versatility enabling selective transformations towards various products. Industry demonstrated successfully implementations of Methanol-To-Gasoline, Methanol-To-Olefin, and Methanol-To-Propylene processes, although the typical single-pass selectivity remained limited and recycling is necessary. Considerable fundamental research efforts both from experimental and computational sides contributed to unravel the underlying complex reaction mechanism. The indirect hydrocarbon pool mechanism, in which Broensted acid sites combined with adsorbed light olefins or lower methylbenzenes act as active centers, is generally accepted to explain the formation of light olefins. As olefin and aromatics populated catalytic sites show different reactivity in terms of activity and selectivity to ethylene or propylene, one could envision optimizing the product distribution by suitable co-feeding of specific hydrocarbons. The present work addresses three questions with an experimental study conducted under realistic MTP operation conditions: (1) How are ethylene and propylene formed at molecular level? (2) Which reaction pathway leads to the formation of undesired hydrogen transfer products? (3) Does olefin or aromatics co-feeding change the selectivity to ethylene or propylene? Xylenes and various olefins were co-fed with methanol to achieve a detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism over acidic HZSM-5 zeolites. Results suggest, that an olefin homologation/cracking route (olefin cycle) accounts for the autocatalytic (-like) nature and the majority of methanol consumption rather than the route involving aromatic intermediates (aromatics cycle). Co

  14. Oxygen-containing coke species in zeolite-catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-06

    Zeolites are the most commonly used catalysts for methanol-to-hydrocarbon (MTH) conversion. Here, we identified two oxygen-containing compounds as coke species in zeolite catalysts after MTH reactions. We investigated the possible influences of the oxygen-containing compounds on coke formation, catalyst deactivation, product selectivity, and the induction period of the MTH reaction through a series of controlled experiments in which one of the identified compounds (2,3-dimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) was co-fed with methanol over a zeolite H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Our results allow us to infer that once produced, the oxygen-containing compounds block the Brønsted acid sites by strong chemisorption and their rapid conversion to aromatics expedites the formation of coke and thus the deactivation of the catalyst. A minor effect of the production of such compounds during the MTH reaction is that the aromatic-based catalytic cycle can be slightly promoted to give higher selectivity to ethylene.

  15. Photoelectrochemical materials and energy conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkire, Richard C. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Kolb, Dieter M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Electrochemistry; Lipkowski, Jacek [Guelph Univ., Guelph, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Ross, Philip N. (eds.) [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Dept.

    2010-07-01

    This book focuses on the electrochemical science aspects associated with photonic phenomena, photovoltaic materials and systems, as well as the engineering fundamentals surrounding their fabrication processes and functional capabilities. It contains five main topics: 1. Applications of electrochemistry in the fabrication and characterization of thin film solar cells (P. Dale et al.); 2. Interfaces for the photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy (H-J. Lewerenz); 3. Printable materials and technologies for dye-sensitized photovoltaic cells with flexible substrates (T. Miyasaka); 4. Electrodepostied porous ZnO sensitized by organic dyes - promising materials for dye-sensitized solar cells with potential application in large-scale photovoltaics (D. Schlettwein et al.); 5. Thin-film semiconductors deposited in nanometric scales by electrochemical and wet chemical methods for photovoltaic solar cell applications (O. Savadogo).

  16. Power conversion process in magnetoelectric gyrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X.; Leung, C. M.; Li, J.; Viehland, D.

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the power conversion and loss processes in magnetoelectric gyrators. Two types of loss mechanisms were identified by using a transformer-gyrator structure, which transfers power between magnetic and magnetomechanical forms. A missing portion of the power in a gyrator was then identified to be a returned power from the load resistor under low drive conditions. Under high drive conditions, decreases in both the magnetostriction and mechanical quality factor resulted in additional inefficiencies. Power transfer efficiencies of greater than 70% and 50% were achieved for magnetoelectric (ME) gyrators based on Metglas/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 laminated composites under low power drive and high power density drive (60 W/in.3) conditions, respectively.

  17. Do sealless pumps belong in hydrocarbon processing services?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Shawn L. [Sundyne Corporation, Arvada, CO (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Sealless pump technology seems unimaginable in the hot, dirty and high-pressure world of hydrocarbon processing. Furthermore the high flow rates typical of the industry seem incompatible with sealless pumps. Seals and their environmental controls used in conventional technologies are not immune from these factors making sealless worth another look. In October 2000 the Sealless Centrifugal Pump Specification API 685 was published. This specification lends sealless pumps credibility and emphasizes the proper application of the technology. In many process units seal leaks can be extremely dangerous and costly. The heavy hydrocarbons can auto-ignite and light hydrocarbons will tend to find a source of ignition. The ever-increasing requirements for clean fuels are driving many of the current refinery upgrades. Best Also available control technology requirements and additional focus on Environmental Health and Safety increase the attractiveness of sealless technology to mitigate the hazards associated with seal leaks. Sealless has a place in hydrocarbon processing to eliminate seals, provide mechanical simplification, and ensure personnel/environmental protection. The proper application involves evaluating canned motor/magnetic drive technology, API 685 Guidelines, and vapor pressure versus pump circuit pressure analysis. There are four (4) specific processes where sealless pumps should be targeted: Alkylation, Sulfur Recovery/Hydrotreating, Naphtha Reforming Production, and Neutralization. (author)

  18. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  19. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

  20. Module filter for separating hydrocarbons and catalytic conversion of CO into CO sub 2. Modulfilter zur Abscheidung von Kohlenwasserstoffen und katalytischen Umwandlung von CO in CO sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Igelbuescher, H.; Gresch, H.; Dewert, H.

    1988-02-11

    A process is known for separating the hydrocarbons contained in the outside air via chemical absorption filters and for converting the CO into harmless CO{sub 2} by means of a catalyst. However, it proves to be a disadvantage that the catalyst in the CO conversion is saturated by humidity and becomes ineffective. In order to overcome this disadvantage, it is proposed, according to the invention, that a chemical absorption filter layer to separate acid harmful gases and/or those containing hydrocarbons on the clean gas side is provided with a cassette-shaped, easily replaceable catalyst layer which can be placed on it, which consists of a drying layer, preferably silica gel, and a subsequent hopkalite layer, where the cassettes are inserted in reusable transport containers which must be closed airtight. The transport containers can consist of plastic envelopes, which are provided with a damp-proof means of closing. (orig.).

  1. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  2. Automatic Intention Recognition in Conversation Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental assumption of many theories of conversation is that comprehension of a speaker's utterance involves recognition of the speaker's intention in producing that remark. However, the nature of intention recognition is not clear. One approach is to conceptualize a speaker's intention in terms of speech acts [Searle, J. (1969). "Speech…

  3. Automatic Intention Recognition in Conversation Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental assumption of many theories of conversation is that comprehension of a speaker's utterance involves recognition of the speaker's intention in producing that remark. However, the nature of intention recognition is not clear. One approach is to conceptualize a speaker's intention in terms of speech acts [Searle, J. (1969). "Speech…

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  5. Conversion of Dimethyl Ether to Branched Hydrocarbons Over Cu/BEA: the Roles of Lewis Acidic and Metallic Sites in H2 Incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Jesse E.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Cheah, Singfoong; Habas, Susan E.; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Guanghui; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2017-04-26

    Conversion of biomass to fuels remains as one of the most promising approach to support our energy needs. It has been previously shown that the gasification of non-edible cellulosic biomass can be used to derive fuels like methanol and dimethyl ether (DME). However, the use of methanol and DME is limited due to the fact that they have low energy densities, poor lubricity and lower viscosity when compared to long-chain hydrocarbons. Increasing the blending percentage can also lead to undesired amounts of oxygenated molecules in the transportation fuel infrastructure, which restrict their applicability as jet or diesel fuels. Consequently, the petroleum-derived hydrocarbons remain as the main constituent of the middle-distillate based fuels. One way to increase the share of biofuels in middle-distillates is to use methanol/DME as building blocks for producing renewable, energy-dense hydrocarbons. One way to achieve this is by catalytically converting the DME and methanol to light olefins, followed by oligomerization to higher molecular weight premium alkanes, which can directly be used as kerosene/diesel fuels. Here, we report the catalytic dimerization of biomass-derived deoxygenated olefins into transportation fuel-range hydrocarbons under liquid-phase stirred-batch conditions. Specifically, the effect of operating conditions, such as reaction temperature, solvent-type, reaction duration and olefin-structure, on the conversion, selectivity and kinetics of dimerization of triptene (2,3,3-trimethyl-1-butene) were investigated. Triptene, as previously reported, is one of the major products of DME-homologation reaction over a BEA zeolite4. We show that triptene can be converted to high quality middle-distillates using a commercially available ion-exchange acid resin, Amberlyst-35 (dry) by the process of catalytic dimerization.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' formation and occurrence in processed food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lochan; Varshney, Jay G; Agarwal, Tripti

    2016-05-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emerged as an important contaminant group in a gamut of processed food groups like dairy, nuts, herbs, beverages, meat products etc. Different cooking processes and processing techniques like roasting, barbecuing, grilling, smoking, heating, drying, baking, ohmic-infrared cooking etc. contribute towards its formation. The level of PAHs depends on factors like distance from heat source, fuel used, level of processing, cooking durations and methods, whereas processes like reuse, conching, concentration, crushing and storage enhance the amount of PAHs in some food items. This review paper provides insight into the impact of dietary intake of PAHs, its levels and formation mechanism in processed food items and possible interventions for prevention and reduction of the PAHs contamination. The gaps and future prospects have also been assessed.

  7. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis of Methanol Conversion to Hydrocarbons Using Cantera Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duminda A. Gunawardena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactions associated with removal of oxygen from oxygenates (deoxygenation are an important aspect of hydrocarbon fuels production process from biorenewable substrates. Here we report the equilibrium composition of methanol-to-hydrocarbon system by minimizing the total Gibbs energy of the system using Cantera methodology. The system was treated as a mixture of 14 components which had CH3OH, C6H6, C7H8, C8H10 (ethyl benzene, C8H10 (xylenes, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, CH4, H2O, C, CO2, CO, H2. The carbon in the equilibrium mixture was used as a measure of coke formation which causes deactivation of catalysts that are used in aromatization reaction(s. Equilibrium compositions of each species were analyzed for temperatures ranging from 300 to 1380 K and pressure at 0–15 atm gauge. It was observed that when the temperature increases the mole fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene pass through a maximum around 1020 K. At 300 K the most abundant species in the system were CH4, CO2, and H2O with mole fractions 50%, 16.67%, and 33.33%, respectively. Similarly at high temperature (1380 K, the most abundant species in the system were H2 and CO with mole fractions 64.5% and 32.6% respectively. The pressure in the system shows a significant impact on the composition of species.

  8. Hydrocarbonization process evaluation report. Volume II. Evaluation of process feasibility. [49 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.M.; Dyslin, D.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Joy, D.S.; Peterson, G.R.

    1977-07-01

    Volume II of a two-volume study concerning the preliminary design and economic evaluation of a Hydrocarbonization Facility includes: (1) a review of the current status of the major processing units, (2) an assessment of operating problems, (3) considerations of possible process alternatives, (4) an evaluation of the overall process feasibility, and (5) recommendations for future process development. Results of the study emphasize the need for testing the evaluated process, which is based on the Clean Coke Process, in a continuous pilot plant using a wide variety of highly caking bituminous coals as feed material. A program suggested for the pilot plant would encompass: (1) development of improved methods for the prevention of agglomeration of highly caking coals during hydrocarbonization, (2) optimization of the yields of coal liquids, (3) investigation of a single-stage high-temperature hydrocarbonizer optimized for char production, and (4) optimization of beneficiation ratios employed during coal preparation.

  9. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, J; Sokoto, A M; Tambuwal, A D; Garba, N A

    2017-05-01

    Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration) at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm(3) resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%). The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16), high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg), kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm(2)/s), density (0.94 g/ml), saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g), and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g) respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  10. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm3 resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%. The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16, high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg, kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm2/s, density (0.94 g/ml, saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g, and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  11. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  12. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  13. An Experimental and Kinetic Calculation of the Promotion Effect of Hydrocarbons on the NO-NO2 Conversion in a Flow Reacto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M; Marinov, N; Matsunaga, N; Pitz, W; Westbrook, C

    1998-01-06

    The main route to nitrogen dioxide (NOz) formation in combustion systems is through the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO). This process was originally invcstigafed in order to explain the high proportion of NOz found in NOx emissions from the exhaust of gas turbine engines [l]. Moreover, the understanding of the NO-NO2 conversion mechanism is relevant to a number of issues including NOz emission from unflued space heaters, development of NOx control technologies, behavior of NO/N02 in the atmosphere, formation and reduction chemistry of NOx, and the probe sampling techniques for NOx concentration measurements. Originally, the NO-NO2 conversion was thought to proceed through the rapid oxidation of NO by oxidative radicals without much attention to the effect of fuels on the conversion [2-41. Although, in later studies, it was revealed that the conversion was greatly promoted by small quantities of fuels such as hydrocarbons, Hz, CO, and methanol [S-9]. In our former experiment and model calculation of the NO-NO2 conversion in the mixing of hot combustion gas with cold air and nine different fuels [6], the results indicated that NO-NO2 conversion appeared only in the low temperature range, and showed a strong dependence on fuel type. Thus, the interaction between the NO-NO2 reactions and the oxidation reactions of the fuel in the low temperature range must be .understood in order to explain the effect of fuel type on the NO-NO2 conversion and consequently to predict the NO/NO2 emission levels from combustion systems.

  14. Characterization and Activity of Cr,Cu and Ga Modified ZSM-5 for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane using a metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite prepared via acidic ion exchange was investigated to elucidate the roles of metal and acidity in the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. ZSM-5 (SiO2/Al2O3=30) was loaded with different metals (Cr, Cu and Ga) according to the acidic ion-exchange method to produce metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. XRD, NMR, FT-IR and N2 adsorption analyses indicated that Cr and Ga species managed to occupy the aluminum positions in the ZSM-5 framework. In addition, Cr species were deposited in the pores of the structure. However, Cu oxides were deposited on the surface and in the mesopores of the ZSM-5 zeolite. An acidity study using TPD-NH3, FT-IR, and IR-pyridine analyses revealed that the total number of acid sites and the strengths of the Bronsted and Lewis acid sites were significantly different after the acidic ion exchange treatment.Cu loaded HZSM-5 is a potential catalyst for direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. The successful production of gasoline via the direct conversion of methane depends on the amount of aluminum in the zeolite framework and the strength of the Bronsted acid sites.

  15. Thermodynamic and Thermo-graphic Research of the Interaction Process of the Lisakovsky Gravitymagnetic Concentrate with Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Мuhtar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of this work consists in treatment of complex brown iron ores. Large volumes of off-balance ores are an additional source of production raw materials, however, there is still a problem of their treatment by effective complex methods.This work shows a possibility of using liquid hydrocarbons as the reducers during thermochemical preparation of brown iron concentrates of the Lisakovsky field to metallurgical conversion and studies the features and main regularities of a roasting process of Lisakovsky gravitymagnetic concentrate in the presence of liquid hydrocarbons.The initial concentrate was treated by solution of a liquid hydrocarbon reducer (oil: phenyl hydride: water, which was subjected to heat treatment with the subsequent magnetic dressing.Research by the X-ray phase analysis of reducing products has shown that the main phases of magnetic fraction of a roasted product are presented by magnetite in a small amount hematite and quartz. Generally, only relative intensity of peaks is changed.The thermodynamic analysis of interaction between the hydrocarbons, which are a part of oil, and iron oxides was carried out. This analysis allowed us to suppose a reducing mechanism for the brown iron ores by liquid reducers.The data obtained by the thermodynamic analysis are confirmed by experimental results. It is proved that with increasing hydrogen-to-carbon ratio the probability of proceeding reactions of interaction between oxide of iron (III and liquid hydrocarbon increases.The differential and thermal analysis allowed us to study a heat treatment process of the Lisakovsky gravity-magnetic concentrate, which is pre-treated by oil solutions, as well as to show a possibility for proceeding the process of interaction between liquid hydrocarbon and ferriferous products of Lisakovsky gravity-magnetic concentrate.It is found that with increasing temperature in the treated samples of LGMK the hydrogoethite dehydration product interacts with

  16. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  17. New Petrochemical Processes Based on Direct Conversion of Methane

    OpenAIRE

    Faraguna F.; Jukić A.

    2015-01-01

    Petrochemistry is a branch of chemistry and chemical engineering that studies reactions and processes of the transformation of petroleum derivatives and natural gas into useful petrochemicals. In its beginning, petrochemistry, or rather the organic chemical industry, was based on the acetylene and Reppe chemistry. The main raw materials of the petrochemical industry nowadays are olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons, with a pronounced tendency toward development of new processes and higher usage ...

  18. Sustainable Process Networks for CO2 Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Kongpanna, P.; Pavarajam, V.

    carbonate and ethylene carbonate are just some of the possible products that can be formed. Each of these involves CO2 and a co-reactant, such as hydrogen, which may also be captured from process purge streams. The process network evolves as some of the reactions involve products from other reactions...

  19. CONVERSE REASONING FOR FULL DEPRESSION-FEATURE MODEL AND PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new approach, namely, "defining protrusion-feature with depression-parameter" is advanced, which focuses on the shortcomings of protrusion-feature alteration method; The full depression-feature model is built up, and a basic converse reasoning iterative algorithm for machining process is given.The detailed examination has been implemented on the feature-based modeling system for light industry product (QJFMS) and the converse reasoning on fixture-based machining process is achieved.

  20. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to High Octane Gasoline: Thermochemical Research Pathway with Indirect Gasification and Methanol Intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hensley, Jesse [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schaidle, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes research for enabling cost-competitive liquid fuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research is geared to advance the state of technology (SOT) of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of their involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction (IDL). The steps involve the conversion of biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas cleanup and catalytic syngas conversion to a methanol intermediate; methanol is then further catalytically converted to high octane hydrocarbons. The conversion process model leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via tar and hydrocarbons reforming was one of the key technology advancements as part of that research. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area with downstream utilization of clean biomass-syngas for the production of high octane hydrocarbon products through a methanol intermediate, i.e., dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME) which subsequently undergoes homologation to high octane hydrocarbon products.

  1. Understanding of Electrochemical Mechanisms for CO2 Capture and Conversion into Hydrocarbon Fuels in Transition-Metal Carbides (MXenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Xingzhu; Ong, Wee-Jun; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Zhao, Xiujian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sun, Chenghua

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal (groups IV, V, VI) carbides (MXenes) with formulas M3C2 have been investigated as CO2 conversion catalysts with well-resolved density functional theory calculations. While MXenes from the group IV to VI series have demonstrated an active behavior for the capture of CO2, the Cr3C2 and Mo3C2 MXenes exhibit the most promising CO2 to CH4 selective conversion capabilities. Our results predicted the formation of OCHO(•) and HOCO(•) radical species in the early hydrogenation steps through spontaneous reactions. This provides atomic level insights into the computer-aided screening for high-performance catalysts and the understanding of electrochemical mechanisms for CO2 reduction to energy-rich hydrocarbon fuels, which is of fundamental significance to elucidate the elementary steps for CO2 fixation.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics of Photonics for Optical Signal Processing - Optical Frequency Conversion and Optical DSB-to-SSB Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    processing - optical frequency conversion and optical DSB -to-SSB conversion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-0006 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 134113...nonlinear dynamics of semiconductor lasers for certain optical signal processing functionalities, including optical DSB -to-SSB conversion, photonic...conversion and optical DSB -to-SSB conversion Performance Period May 30, 2014 ~ May 29, 2015 Principal Investigator Name: Sheng-Kwang Hwang Position

  3. Features of non-oxidative conversion of methane into aromatic hydrocarbons over Mo-containing zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. A.; Korobitsyna, L. L.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of study of methane conversion under non-oxidative conditions over molybdenum containing zeolite catalysts prepared by solid-phase synthesis using nanosized molybdenum powder are presented. The kinetic mechanisms of the process behavior under different conditions of methane dehydroaromatization are determined. It is shown that nonoxidative conversion of methane can occur both in the external diffusion and kinetic regions, depending on the methane flow rate. It is found out, that the optimum temperature of the methane conversion is 750 °C. It is shown that increased methane conversion is observed at the feed space velocity of methane decreasing from 1500 to 500 h-1.

  4. Process development for scum to biodiesel conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chong-hao; Min, Min; Nie, Yong; Xie, Qing-long; Lu, Qian; Deng, Xiang-yuan; Anderson, Erik; Li, Dong; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-06-01

    A novel process was developed for converting scum, a waste material from wastewater treatment facilities, to biodiesel. Scum is an oily waste that was skimmed from the surface of primary and secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment plants. Currently scum is treated either by anaerobic digestion or landfilling which raised several environmental issues. The newly developed process used a six-step method to convert scum to biodiesel, a higher value product. A combination of acid washing and acid catalyzed esterification was developed to remove soap and impurities while converting free fatty acids to methyl esters. A glycerol washing was used to facilitate the separation of biodiesel and glycerin after base catalyzed transesterification. As a result, 70% of dried and filtered scum was converted to biodiesel which is equivalent to about 134,000 gallon biodiesel per year for the Saint Paul waste water treatment plant in Minnesota.

  5. Enhanced substrate conversion efficiency of fermentation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, J.P.M.; Weusthuis, R.A.; Mooibroek, H.

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of fermentation technology. In particular the invention relates to fermentation processes for the production of a first and a second fermentation product by a single production organism wherein the first product is in a more reduced state than the substrate and the second fermentation product is in a more oxidised state than the substrate yet in less oxidised state than the final oxidation product CO2, such that the concurrent synthesis of the first ...

  6. Catalytic conversion of palm oil over mesoporous aluminosilicate MCM-41 for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twaiq, Farouq A.; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, SPS, Pinang (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati M. [Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Sri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2003-11-15

    The catalytic cracking of palm oil to liquid hydrocarbon fuels was studied in a fixed bed micro-reactor operated at atmospheric pressure, reaction temperature of 723 K and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 2.5 h{sup -1} over the synthesized mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 materials. Mesoporous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratio of 50 was synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Different pore sizes were obtained by changing the type of template and organic directing agent (ODA) used. The synthesized materials were characterized using various analytical methods such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), BET surface area, inductive coupled plasma (ICP), MAS NMR, FTIR and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The materials exhibit a crystalline structure of MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves with surface area varying from 550 to 1200 m{sup 2}/g and an average pore size (APS) ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 nm. The synthesized MCM-41 catalysts show high activity for palm oil cracking. The conversion of palm kernel oil, lower-molecular-weight oil, was higher as compared to higher-molecular-weight, palm olein oil. MCM-41 materials were selective for the formation of linear hydrocarbons, particularly, C{sub 13} when palm kernel oil was used and C{sub 17} when palm olein oil was fed. The yield of liquid product decreased with the increase of surface area of the catalyst. The gasoline selectivity increased whereas diesel selectivity decreased with the conversion of palm oil.

  7. Utilization of biomass: Conversion of model compounds to hydrocarbons over zeolite H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Holm, Martin Spangsberg

    2011-01-01

    Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of small oxygenates present in bio-oil or selected as model compounds was performed under Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons (MTH) like reaction conditions using H-ZSM-5 as the catalyst. Co-feeding of the oxygenates with methanol generally decreases catalyst lifetime due to ...

  8. Organizational Knowledge Conversion and Creation Processes in a Chaotic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ștefan NESTIAN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This is an explorative and conceptual paper, based on the analysis and comparison of relevant literature. the purpose of the article is to clarify the differences between knowledge creating processes and knowledge conversion processes, by analysing them when confronted with a chaotic environment. the way the knowledge conversion and creation processes are presented by Ikujiro Nonaka and his co-workers suggests the necessary existence of a Ba in order to generate the spiral of knowledge creation. this implies the acceptance of a relationship between the environment and the knowledge conversion process, in which the environment influences the knowledge creation. the article is based on the hypothesis that a chaotic environment, characterized by unpredictability, non-linearity and crisis, will lead to specific ways of functioning of the knowledge creation and conversion process that highlight the relations between the two different types of processes. Starting from the general concept of resilience, herein one proposes and explains the concept of resilience of the knowledge conversion system. the role of the attractors from the chaotic environment in the creation of new knowledge is identified and explained

  9. Process and apparatus for the conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of cellulosic biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into fermentable sugars. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the invention biomass is converted into ferm

  10. Process and apparatus for the conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.; Groenestijn, van J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the conversion of cellulosic biomass, in particular lignocellulose-containing biomass into fermentable sugars. The invention is further directed to apparatus suitable for carrying out such processes. According to the invention biomass is converted into

  11. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  12. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  13. Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

    1982-06-29

    The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

  14. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  15. Qualitative vs. quantitative software process simulation modelling: conversion and comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, He; Kitchenham, Barbara; Jeffery, Ross

    2009-01-01

    peer-reviewed Software Process Simulation Modeling (SPSM) research has increased in the past two decades. However, most of these models are quantitative, which require detailed understanding and accurate measurement. As the continuous work to our previous studies in qualitative modeling of software process, this paper aims to investigate the structure equivalence and model conversion between quantitative and qualitative process modeling, and to compare the characteristics and performance o...

  16. Esterification of bio-oil from mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves with a solid acid catalyst: Conversion of the cyclic ether and terpenoids into hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xun; Gunawan, Richard; Mourant, Daniel; Wang, Yi; Lievens, Caroline; Chaiwat, Weerawut; Wu, Liping; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Bio-oil from pyrolysis of mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves differs from that obtained with wood by its content of cyclic ethers, terpenoids and N-containing organic compounds. Upgrading of the leaf bio-oil in methanol with a solid acid catalyst was investigated and it was found that the N-containing organics in the bio-oil lead to deactivation of the catalyst in the initial stage of exposure and have to be removed via employing high catalyst loading to allow the occurrence of other acid-catalysed reactions. Eucalyptol, the main cyclic ether in the bio-oil, could be converted into the aromatic hydrocarbon, p-cymene, through a series of intermediates including α-terpineol, terpinolene, and α-terpinene. Various steps such as ring-opening, dehydration, isomerisation, and aromatization were involved in the conversion of eucalyptol. The terpenoids in bio-oil could also be converted into aromatic hydrocarbons that can serve as starting materials for the synthesis of fine chemicals, via the similar processes.

  17. Distribution of Electrical Field Energy for Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Dissymmetrical Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu; Hongwei Sun

    2006-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane into C2 hydrocarbons through alternating current electric field enhanced plasma was studied under room temperature, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions.The distribution of electrical field intensity and distribution of energy were calculated with software that was developed by us according to the charge simulation method. The results indicated that the energy of tip of electrode was 0.36 J/mm3 and it was higher than the methane dissociation energy (0.0553 J/mm3).The methane located at this area can be activated easily. The higher-energy particles produced by dissociation collided with molecules around them and initiated consecutive reactions between free radicals and molecules. The method was proved to be valided and could be taken as a basis for the electrical field study concerned.

  18. Energy conversion processes for the use of geothermal heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minder, R. [Minder Energy Consulting, Oberlunkhofen (Switzerland); Koedel, J.; Schaedle, K.-H.; Ramsel, K. [Gruneko AG, Basel (Switzerland); Girardin, L.; Marechal, F. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratory for industrial energy systems (LENI), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study made on energy conversion processes that can be used when geothermal heat is to be used. The study deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of the conversion of geothermal heat to electricity. The report is divided into several parts and covers general study, practical experience, planning and operation of geothermal power plants as well as methodology for the optimal integration of energy conversion systems in geothermal power plants. In the first part, the specific properties and characteristics of geothermal resources are discussed. Also, a general survey of conversion processes is presented with special emphasis on thermo-electric conversion. The second part deals with practical aspects related to planning, construction and operation of geothermal power plant. Technical basics, such as relevant site-specific conditions, drilling techniques, thermal water or brine quality and materials requirements. Further, planning procedures are discussed. Also, operation and maintenance aspects are examined and some basic information on costs is presented. The third part of the report presents the methodology and results for the optimal valorisation of the thermodynamic potential of deep geothermal systems.

  19. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons in Solid State Oxide Electrolyte Membrane Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHAO Ling; ZHU Zhong-nan; XI Dan-li

    2005-01-01

    Provskite-type catalysts, Ln0.6 Sr0.4 FexCo1-x O3 (Ln = Nd,Pr, Gd, Sm, La, 0<x<1) and Ln0.8Na0.2CoO3(Ln= La,Gd, Sm) were synthesized, their catalytic properties in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) were examined in a fixed-bed reactor. The former group presented higher activity in the OCM, but the main product was carbon dioxide. While the later group showed lower activity but much higher selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons compared with the former. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a solid oxide membrane reactor with La0.8 Na0.2CoO3 as catalyst. The results showed that methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide and ethane by two parallel reactions. Ethane was oxidized to ethene and carbon dioxide. A fraction of ethene was oxidized deeply to carbon dioxide. The total selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons exceeded 70%. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model was suggested to describe the reaction results.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional transition-metal/silica-alumina catalysts for the chloromethane conversion to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.F. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, L.O.A.; Nascimento, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: leopoldo@ctgas.com.br; Ruiz, J.A.C. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil); Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-10-15

    In this work bifunctional (metal-acid) catalysts of Fe, Ni, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO over amorphous silica alumina support were characterized (acidity) and evaluated for the conversion of chloromethane in a fixed bed reactor. Temperature program tests TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) and TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) were performed to characterize the chemisorption sites for the impregnated and unimpregnated support. New adsorption sites were created on the metal supported catalysts. The conversion yield of chloromethane was evaluated for the five materials. The highest conversion conversion (85%) was observed for the unmodified support (SiAl) after 6 of reaction at 860 K and a WHSV (Weight Hourly Space Velocity) of 4,5 h{sup -1}. The best selectivity toward desirable hydrocarbons (C{sup 3}, C{sup 4}) was found for the Fe-SiAl catalyst. C{sup 3} was also found in the products stream when Ni/SiAl and NiO/SiAl catalysts were tested. Ni catalysts were the most favorable to methane production. The catalytic tests showed coke formation in all materials. For the SiAl support the desorption energy of chloromethane, determined by TPD runs, was 101,9 KJ/mol. The metals presented lower desorption energies (75,2 KJ/mol for Ni and 133,4 KJ/mol for Fe) than the oxides (190,1 KJ/mol for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 322,4 KJ/mol for NiO). (author)

  1. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  2. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  3. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product is unprecedented, asymmetrically distributed towards heavier alkanes. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Programming-Free Form Conversion, Design, and Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Ting-Jun; Machlin, Rona S.; Wang, Christopher P.; Chang, Ifay F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we present the requirements and design considerations for programming-free form conversion, design, and processing. A set of object-oriented software tools are also presented to help users convert a paper form into an electronic form, design an electronic form, and fill in an electronic form directly on screen.

  5. Utilization of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.R.; Hamilton, R.W.

    The laws of thermodynamics state that no process of energy transformation can take place with perfect efficiency--some waste heat is always produced. The generation of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes are discussed. First-law and second-law efficiencies are defined. After listing the amounts of waste heat produced, some technological options for reducing waste heat or using it for other purposes, such as district heating, are described.

  6. Partial conversion of hydrocarbons to syngas and hydrogen in volumetric radiation burners as a prospective way to enhance the performance characteristics of power engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, V. S.; Shmelev, V. M.; Shapovalova, O. V.; Rakhmetov, A. N.; Strekova, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    New type of syngas generator based on the partial conversion of natural gas (methane) or heavier hydrocarbons in volumetric permeable matrix burners in the conditions of locked infrared (IR) radiation is suggested as a high-productive, adaptable, and rather simple way of syngas and hydrogen production for various low-scale applications including enhancing the performance characteristics of power engines.

  7. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  8. Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2013-09-10

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  9. Investigating the Influence of Mesoporosity in Zeolite Beta on its Catalytic Performance for the Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-08-26

    Hierarchically porous zeolite Beta (Beta-MS) synthesized by a soft-templating method contains remarkable intra-crystalline mesoporosity, which reduces the diffusion length in zeolite channels down to several nanometers and alters the distribution of Al among distinct crystallographic sites. When used as a catalyst for the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) at 330 oC, Beta-MS exhibited a 2.7-fold larger conversion capacity, a 2.0-fold faster reaction rate, and a remarkably longer lifetime than conventional zeolite Beta (Beta-C). The superior catalytic performance of Beta-MS is attributed to its hierarchical structure, which offers full accessibility to all catalytic active sites. In contrast, Beta-C was easily deactivated because a layer of coke quickly deposited on the outer surfaces of the catalyst crystals, impeding access to interior active sites. This difference is clearly demonstrated by using electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy to probe the distribution of coke in the deactivated catalysts. At both low and high conversions, ranging from 20% to 100%, Beta-MS gave higher selectivity towards higher aliphatics (C4-C7) but lower ethene selectivity compared to Beta-C. Therefore, we conclude that a hierarchical structure decreases the residence time of methylbenzenes in zeolite micropores, disfavoring the propagation of the aromatic-based catalytic cycle. This conclusion is consistent with a recent report on ZSM-5 and is also strongly supported by our analysis of soluble coke species residing in the catalysts. Moreover, we identified an oxygen-containing compound, 4-methyl-benzaldehyde, in the coke, which has not been observed in the MTH reaction before.  

  10. Final Report, "Molecular Design of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Catalytic Processes"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Francisco Zaera

    2007-08-09

    production of small amounts of ethylene and water, most likely via the concerted decomposition or disproportionation of the adsorbed molecular species. The bulk of the 2-iodoethanol decomposes at about 150 K via an initial carbon-iodine scission to form –O(H)CH2CH2– (~80%) and 2-hydroxyethyl (~20%) intermediates. Two competing reactions are involved with the subsequent conversion of the 2-hydroxyethyl species around 160 K, a reductive elimination with surface hydrogen to yield ethanol, and a β-H elimination to surface vinyl alcohol. The –O(H)CH2CH2–, on the other hand, dehydrogenates to a –OCH2CH2– oxametallacycle species about the same temperature. Both 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle species tautomerize to acetaldehyde, around 210 K and above 250 K, respectively, and some of that acetaldehyde desorbs while the rest decomposes to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. We contend that a better understanding of the surface chemistry of oxygen-containing surfaces can lead to better selectivities in catalysis. This is arguably the most important issue in the field of catalysis in the near future, and one that impacts several technologies of interest to DOE such as the manufacturing of speciality chemicals and the control and removal of pollutants. Additional work was performed on the characterization of the chemistry of methyl and methylene adsorbed species on oxygen-treated nickel surfaces. Complex chemistry was observed involving not only hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, but also C-C couplings and methylene insertions to produce heavier hydrocarbons, and oxygen insertion reactions that yield oxygenates. Finally, a dual titration technique employing xenon and a chemically sensitive probe was developed to identify minority catalytic sites on oxide surfaces. In the case of oxygen-treated Ni(110) single crystals, it was found that both hydrogen transfer with adsorbed water or ammonia and certain hydrocarbon hydrogenation reactions take place at the end of the

  11. An Integrated Biomass Production and Conversion Process for Sustainable Bioenergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is not enough land for the current bioenergy production process because of its low annual yield per unit land. In the present paper, an integrated biomass production and conversion process for sustainable bioenergy is proposed and analyzed. The wastes from the biomass conversion process, including waste water, gas and solid are treated or utilized by the biomass production process in the integrated process. Analysis of the integrated process including the production of water hyacinth and digestion for methane in a tropical area demonstrates several major advantages of the integrated process. (1 The net annual yield of methane per unit land can reach 29.0 and 55.6 km3/h for the present and future (2040 respectively, which are mainly due to the high yield of water hyacinth, high biomethane yield and low energy input. The land demand for the proposed process accounts for about 1% of the world’s land to meet the current global automobile fuels or electricity consumption; (2 A closed cycle of nutrients provides the fertilizer for biomass production and waste treatment, and thus reduces the energy input; (3 The proposed process can be applied in agriculturally marginal land, which will not compete with food production. Therefore, it may be a good alternative energy technology for the future.

  12. ZnCl2 Induced Catalytic Conversion of Softwood Lignin to Aromatics and Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang; Zhang, Libing; Deng, Tiansheng; Ruan, Hao; Hou, Xianglin; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-19

    Selective cleavage of C-O-C bonds in lignin without disrupting C-C linkages can result in releasing aromatic monomers and dimers that can be subsequently converted into chemicals and fuels. Results showed that both biomass-derived lignin and lignin model compounds were depolymerized in a highly concentrated ZnCl2 solution. Zn2+ ions in highly concentrated ZnCl2 solutions appeared to selectively coordinate with C-O-C bonds to cause key linkages of lignin much easier to cleave. In 63 wt.% ZnCl2 solution at 200 °C for 6 h, nearly half of the softwood technical lignin was converted to liquid products, of which the majority was alkylphenols. Results indicated that most β-O-4 and Cmethyl-OAr bonds of model compounds were cleaved undersame conditions, providing a foundation towards understanding lignin depolymerization in a concentrated ZnCl2 solution. The phenolic products were further converted into cyclic hydrocarbons via hydrodeoxygenation and coupling reactions by co-catalyst Ru/C.

  13. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  14. Coal conversion processes and their materials requirements. Physical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, J.B.; Voorde, M. van de; Betteridge, W.

    1984-01-01

    The coal conversion processes combustion, gasification and liquefaction are discussed with respect to current industrial developments and material problems in industrial plants due to fouling, corrosion and erosion. The available materials are discussed by means of high temperature corrosion, erosion, ductibility, creep, fatigue and physical properties. Ceramics and refractories which are particularly used as thermal insulation are also discussed by means of corrosion and erosion and mechanical properties.

  15. Integrated process for high conversion and high yield protein PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decades, PEGylation has become a powerful technique to increase the in vivo circulation half-life of therapeutic proteins while maintaining their activity. The development of new therapeutic proteins is likely to require further improvement of the PEGylation methods to reach even better selectivity and yield for reduced costs. The intensification of the PEGylation process was investigated through the integration of a chromatographic step in order to increase yield and conversion for the production of mono-PEGylated protein. Lysozyme was used as a model protein to demonstrate the feasibility of such approach. In the integrated reaction/separation process, chromatography was used as fractionation technique in order to isolate and recycle the unreacted protein from the PEGylated products. This allows operating the reactor with short reaction times so as to minimize the production of multi-PEGylated proteins (i.e., conjugated to more than one polymer). That is, the reaction is stopped before the desired product (i.e., the mono-PEGylated protein) can further react, thus leading to limited conversion but high yield. The recycling of the unreacted protein was then considered to drive the protein overall conversion to completion. This approach has great potential to improve processes whose yield is limited by the further reaction of the product leading to undesirable by-products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1711-1718. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Quantum Matter-Photonics Framework: Analyses of Chemical Conversion Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia, O

    2014-01-01

    A quantum Matter-Photonics framework is adapted to help scrutinize chemical reaction mechanisms and used to explore a process mapped from chemical tree topological model. The chemical concept of bond knitting/breaking is reformulated via partitioned base sets leading to an abstract and general quantum presentation. Pivotal roles are assigned to entanglement, coherence,de-coherence and Feshbach resonance quantum states that permit apprehend gating states in conversion processes. A view from above in the state energy eigenvalue ladder, belonging to full system spectra complement the standard view from ground state. A full quantum physical view supporting chemical change obtains.

  17. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

  18. Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Mo, Weijian; Muylle, Michel Serge Marie; Mandema, Remco Hugo; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-01

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

  19. Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A Two-Step Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    with an immersion cooler (SP Scientific) in a water bath, and the product gas stream was first dried over a bed of 3 Å molecular sieves prior to GC...Commonwealth realm Crown government in the course of their duties. Article Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A Two-Step Process...AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A

  20. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (USA)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. Success in this program will be a major step in improving in predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized first principles'' treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data. The progress during the fifteenth quarterly of the program is presented. 56 refs., 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Coagulation-flocculation process applied to wastewaters generated in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil washing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, L. g.; Belloc, C.; Iturbe, R.; Bandala, E.

    2009-07-01

    A wastewater produced in the contaminated soil washing was treated by means of coagulation-flocculation (CF) process. the wastewater treatment in this work continued petroleum hydrocarbons, a surfactant, i. e., sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as well as salts, humic acids and other constituents that were lixiviated rom the soil during the washing process. The aim of this work was to develop a process for treating the wastewaters generated when washing hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in such a way that it could be recycled to the washing process, and at the end of the cleaning up, the waters could be disposed properly. (Author)

  2. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Progress report, January-February 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The following materials were processed thru gasification: sugarcane bagasse, smooth sumac, coralberry, wild bergamot, pokeweed, cornstarch, Portugese oak cork and hog fuel. A data summary is given. The high H/sub 2//CO ratio at low temperature for pokeweed is of significance (>T, >H/sub 2/). Also the high olefin content of Portugese oak cork (commercial cork) is of major interest. The most promising feedstock to date with regard to synthesis gas composition has been guayule cork. A comparison of data for the two cork materials is given. A detailed breakdown for corn starch is given revealing an exceptionally high methane content (35.50 mole %). (MHR)

  3. Process for converting hydrocarbon oils and catalyst for use in such a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, T.; Schaper, H.; Hoek, A.

    1990-05-08

    This invention is directed at increasing the utilization of residual oil found in currently available crude oil feedstocks. The process of the invention is particularly suitable for hydrocracking, and comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil in the presence of hydrogen with a hydrocracking catalyst. Suitable feedstocks include tar oils, vacuum gas oil, deasphalted oils, long and short residues, catalytically cracked cycle oils, thermally cracked gas oils, and synthetic crudes, or combinations of various such oils. Suitable process conditions comprise temperatures from 200 to 500{degree}C, hydrogen pressures up to 300 bar, space velocities of 0.1-10 kg feed per liter of catalyst per hour, and gas/feed ratios of 100-5000 Nl/kg feed. The catalyst used in the process comprises zeolite Y particles, with an average size in the range of 0.8 to 5.0 mm, and a unit cell size preferably from 24.19 to 24.35 {angstrom}. Preference is given to zeolite Y having a silica/alumina molar ratio of 8-15. The zeolite is combined with a hydrogenation component of a Group VI and/or VIII metal, preferably nickel and tungsten. Alumina is the preferred binder. The catalyst contains 60-85% zeolite and 15-40% binder, based on the total amount of zeolite and binder. The products of the process include gaseous material (in general C1-4 hydrocarbons), naphtha, and a middle distillate fraction. Experiments are described to illustrate the preparation of catalysts and the process of the invention. 1 tab.

  4. Conversion of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons to valuable synthetic feed for steamcrackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesana, A.; Dalloro, L.; Rivetti, F.; Buzzoni, R. [Eni S.p.A., Centro Ricerche per le Energie non Convenzionali, Novara (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    Low value aromatic fractions, i.e. heavy pygas and pyrolysis fuel oil from naphtha steamcrackers or heavy distillates and ends from refinery, can be conveniently upgraded as high quality steamcracker feeds by severe hydrocracking treatment at 450 -530 C, 6 MPa H{sub 2} employing Ni-Mo or Zn-Mo on H-USY zeolite as catalysts. The process mainly leads to linear C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} alkanes with a low yield to CH{sub 4}. The robust catalytic system allows upgrading fractions with a high content of sulfur and nitrogen. Catalyst like and industrial feasibility have been assessed by long life runs using genuine industrial feedstocks. (orig.)

  5. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z.

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  6. Self-Exciting Point Process Modeling of Conversation Event Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo

    Self-exciting processes of Hawkes type have been used to model various phenomena including earthquakes, neural activities, and views of online videos. Studies of temporal networks have revealed that sequences of social interevent times for individuals are highly bursty. We examine some basic properties of event sequences generated by the Hawkes self-exciting process to show that it generates bursty interevent times for a wide parameter range. Then, we fit the model to the data of conversation sequences recorded in company offices in Japan. In this way, we can estimate relative magnitudes of the self excitement, its temporal decay, and the base event rate independent of the self excitation. These variables highly depend on individuals. We also point out that the Hawkes model has an important limitation that the correlation in the interevent times and the burstiness cannot be independently modulated.

  7. Self-exciting point process modeling of conversation event sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Naoki; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Self-exciting processes of Hawkes type have been used to model various phenomena including earthquakes, neural activities, and views of online videos. Studies of temporal networks have revealed that sequences of social interevent intervals for individuals are highly bursty. We examine some basic properties of event sequences generated by the Hawkes self-exciting process to show that it generates bursty interevent intervals for a wide parameter range. Then, we fit the model to the data of conversation sequences recorded in company offices in Japan. In this way, we can estimate relative magnitudes of the self excitement, its temporal decay, and the base event rate independent of the self excitation. These variables highly depend on individuals. We also point out that the Hawkes model has an important limitation that the correlation in the interevent intervals and the burstiness cannot be independently modulated.

  8. Capabilities For Modelling Of Conversion Processes In Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Zarrin, Bahram; Tonini, Davide

    Life cycle assessment was traditionally used for modelling of product design and optimization. This is also seen in the conventional LCA software which is optimized for the modelling of single materials streams of a homogeneous nature that is assembled into a final product. There has therefore been...... little focus on the chemical composition of the functional flows, as flows in the models have mainly been tracked on a mass basis, as emphasis was the function of the product and not the chemical composition of said product. Conversely, in modelling of environmental technologies, such as wastewater...... considering how the biochemical parameters change through a process chain. A good example of this is bio-refinery processes where different residual biomass products are converted through different steps into the final energy product. Here it is necessary to know the stoichiometry of the different products...

  9. Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

  10. A novel zeolite process for clean end use of hydrocarbon products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskinen, K.M. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland). Technology Centre

    1996-12-31

    In recent years zeolites such as ZSM-5 have attracted considerable interest for the catalysis of a wide range of hydrocarbon transformations. A novel process developed by Neste converts light olefins to higher molecular weight hydrocarbon products. A wide range of high quality diesel, solvents and lube oils can be produced by the new NESKO process. Hydrotreated products have excellent properties; negligible sulphur or nitrogen compounds, very low aromatic content and pour point lower than -50 deg C. Proprietary technology is used in this olefin oligomerization process. (author) (7 refs.)

  11. Biotechnological processes for conversion of corn into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothast, R.J.; Schlicher, M.A. [National Corn-To-Ethanol Research Center, Southern Illinois Univ. Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Ethanol has been utilized as a fuel source in the United States since the turn of the century. However, it has repeatedly faced significant commercial viability obstacles relative to petroleum. Renewed interest exists in ethanol as a fuel source today owing to its positive impact on rural America, the environment and United States energy security. Today, most fuel ethanol is produced by either the dry grind or the wet mill process. Current technologies allow for 2.5 gallons (wet mill process) to 2.8 gallons (dry grind process) of ethanol (1 gallon = 3.7851) per bushel of corn. Valuable co-products, distillers dried grains with solubles (dry grind) and corn gluten meal and feed (wet mill), are also generated in the production of ethanol. While current supplies are generated from both processes, the majority of the growth in the industry is from dry grind plant construction in rural communities across the corn belt. While fuel ethanol production is an energy-efficient process today, additional research is occurring to improve its long-term economic viability. Three of the most significant areas of research are in the production of hybrids with a higher starch content or a higher extractable starch content, in the conversion of the corn kernel fiber fraction to ethanol, and in the identification and development of new and higher-value co-products. (orig.)

  12. Ortho-para-H$_2$ conversion processes in astrophysical media

    CERN Document Server

    Lique, François; Faure, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We report in this review recent fully-quantum time-independent calculations of cross sections and rate constants for the gas phase ortho-to-para conversion of H$_2$ by H and H$^+$. Such processes are of crucial interest and importance in various astrophysical environments. The investigated temperature ranges was 10$-$1500 K for H+H$_2$ and 10$-$100 K for H$^+$+H$_2$. Calculations were based on highly accurate H$_3$ and H$_3^+$ global potential energy surfaces. Comparisons with previous calculations and with available measurements are presented and discussed. It is shown that the existence of a long-lived intermediate complex H$_3^+$ in the (barrierless) H$^+$+H$_2$ reaction give rise to a pronounced resonance structure and a statistical behaviour, in contrast to H+H$_2$ which proceeds through a barrier of $\\sim 5000$ K. In the cold interstellar medium ($T\\leq 100$ K), the ortho-to-para conversion is thus driven by proton exchange while above $\\sim$300 K, the contribution of hydrogen atoms become significant o...

  13. Conversion of microalgae to jet fuel: process design and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Bluck, David; Van Wie, Bernard J

    2014-09-01

    Microalgae's aquatic, non-edible, highly genetically modifiable nature and fast growth rate are considered ideal for biomass conversion to liquid fuels providing promise for future shortages in fossil fuels and for reducing greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions from combustion. We demonstrate adaptability of PRO/II software by simulating a microalgae photo-bio-reactor and thermolysis with fixed conversion isothermal reactors adding a heat exchanger for thermolysis. We model a cooling tower and gas floatation with zero-duty flash drums adding solids removal for floatation. Properties data are from PRO/II's thermodynamic data manager. Hydrotreating is analyzed within PRO/II's case study option, made subject to Jet B fuel constraints, and we determine an optimal 6.8% bioleum bypass ratio, 230°C hydrotreater temperature, and 20:1 bottoms to overhead distillation ratio. Process economic feasibility occurs if cheap CO2, H2O and nutrient resources are available, along with solar energy and energy from byproduct combustion, and hydrotreater H2 from product reforming.

  14. EFFICIENCY OF THE LIQUID HYDROCARBONS USAGE IN THE ENRICHMENT PROCESS OF IRON ORE

    OpenAIRE

    SHKURENOK V.; PANOVA A.; AKYLBEK B.; OSTANINA N.

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes the liquid hydrocarbon reductant (LHR) usage in the process of iron ore opening-up to a metallurgic range. Calcination process optimization of Lisakovsk gravity-magnetic concentrate (LGMC) was performed by the planning of experiments using Seidel – Gauss method. Iron content in the concentrate increases from 47,6 % to 54,17 % in optimal conditions.

  15. EFFICIENCY OF THE LIQUID HYDROCARBONS USAGE IN THE ENRICHMENT PROCESS OF IRON ORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHKURENOK V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes the liquid hydrocarbon reductant (LHR usage in the process of iron ore opening-up to a metallurgic range. Calcination process optimization of Lisakovsk gravity-magnetic concentrate (LGMC was performed by the planning of experiments using Seidel – Gauss method. Iron content in the concentrate increases from 47,6 % to 54,17 % in optimal conditions.

  16. Impact of oxidation process on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content in bitumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliet, Christophe; Juery, Catherine; Thiebaut, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the oxidation process on the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in blown bitumen and identified some key contributing parameters. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's PAH list was used for this study. PAHs are considered a good toxicological marker, and measurement of PAHs in bitumen can be performed easily. The results of PAH content in blown bitumen and the corresponding feedstock was determined from the limit of detection up to 120 mg/kg for 24 samples. Compared to PAH levels in coal tar pitch, PAH levels in bitumen are very low. Measurements were performed by three laboratories using different methods to allow robust conclusions. The results highlight the difficulties in measuring PAHs in bitumen with accuracy for values below 30 mg/kg; therefore the discussion is based on summary statistics by adding concentrations of PAHs with common ring sizes. Incorporation of flux oil in the feed of the blowing bitumen unit tends to increase PAH content in feed stock and in blown bitumen, particularly the 4- to 6-ring PAHs, which are the most carcinogenic as identified by an animal skin painting test. The amount of PAH content from blown bitumen with flux oil can be at least three times higher than the amount in blown bitumen without flux oil, depending on the quality and quantity of the flux oil used. This study shows that the blowing process does not produce PAHs in bitumen. Conversely, it appears to reduce them in the final product. Close to 10 to 30% of PAHs are probably stripped from the liquid phase of bitumen during the blowing operation.

  17. Greenhouse gas impacts of declining hydrocarbon resource quality: Depletion, dynamics, and process emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam Robert

    This dissertation explores the environmental and economic impacts of the transition to hydrocarbon substitutes for conventional petroleum (SCPs). First, mathematical models of oil depletion are reviewed, including the Hubbert model, curve-fitting methods, simulation models, and economic models. The benefits and drawbacks of each method are outlined. I discuss the predictive value of the models and our ability to determine if one model type works best. I argue that forecasting oil depletion without also including substitution with SCPs results in unrealistic projections of future energy supply. I next use information theoretic techniques to test the Hubbert model of oil depletion against five other asymmetric and symmetric curve-fitting models using data from 139 oil producing regions. I also test the assumptions that production curves are symmetric and that production is more bell-shaped in larger regions. Results show that if symmetry is enforced, Gaussian production curves perform best, while if asymmetry is allowed, asymmetric exponential models prove most useful. I also find strong evidence for asymmetry: production declines are consistently less steep than inclines. In order to understand the impacts of oil depletion on GHG emissions, I developed the Regional Optimization Model for Emissions from Oil Substitutes (ROMEO). ROMEO is an economic optimization model of investment and production of fuels. Results indicate that incremental emissions (with demand held constant) from SCPs could be 5-20 GtC over the next 50 years. These results are sensitive to the endowment of conventional oil and not sensitive to a carbon tax. If demand can vary, total emissions could decline under a transition because the higher cost of SCPs lessens overall fuel consumption. Lastly, I study the energetic and environmental characteristics of the in situ conversion process, which utilizes electricity to generate liquid hydrocarbons from oil shale. I model the energy inputs and outputs

  18. MATLAB tools for lidar data conversion, visualization, and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Kaijing; Yang, Jie; Lu, Yilong

    2011-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) [1] is an optical remote sensing technology that has gained increasing acceptance for topographic mapping. LIDAR technology has higher accuracy than RADAR and has wide applications. The relevant commercial market for LIDAR has developed greatly in the last few years. LAS format is approved to be the standard data format for interchanging LIDAR data among different software developers, manufacturers and end users. LAS data format reduces the data size compared to ASCII data format. However, LAS data file can only be visualized by some expensive commercial software. There are some free tools available, but they are not user-friendly and have less or poor visualization functionality. This makes it difficult for researchers to investigate and use LIDAR data. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient and low cost LIDAR data toolbox. For this purpose we have developed a free and efficient Matlab tool for LIDAR data conversion, visualization and processing.

  19. Self-supported electrocatalysts for advanced energy conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yi Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The biggest challenge in developing new energy conversion technologies such as rechargeable metal-air batteries, regenerated fuel cells and water splitting devices is to find suitable catalysts that can efficiently and stably catalyze the key electrochemical processes involved. This paper reviews the new development of self-supported electrocatalysts in three categories: electrocatalysts growing on rigid substrates, electrocatalysts growing on soft substrates, and free-standing catalyst films. They are distinct and superior to the conventional powdery electrocatalysts, showing advantages in controllable nanostructure and chemical component, flexible electrode configuration, and outstanding catalytic performance. The self-supported electrocatalysts with various architectures like nanowire/plate/pillar arrays and porous films, composed of metals, metal oxides/selenides/phosphides, organic polymers, carbons and their corresponding hybrids, are presented and discussed. These catalysts exhibit high activity, durability and selectivity toward oxygen reduction, oxygen evolution, and/or hydrogen evolution reactions. The perspectives on the relevant areas are also proposed.

  20. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on hydrocarbon processing mixing and scale-up problems. [Fuels processing for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, J. D. [ed.

    1978-01-01

    A workshop was convened by the Division of Fossil Fuel Utilization of the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the Particulate and Multiphase Process Program of the National Science Foundation to identify needs for fundamental engineering support for the design of chemical reactors for processing heavy hydrocarbon liquids. The problems associated with dispersing liquid hydrocarbons in a reacting gas and mixing within the gas phase are of primary concern. The transactions of the workshop begin with an introduction to the immediate goals of the Department of Energy. Fuel cell systems and current research and development are reviewed. Modeling of combustion and the problems of soot formation and deposits in hydrocarbon fuels are next considered. The fluid mechanics of turbulent mixing and its effect on chemical reactions are then presented. Current experimental work and process development provide an update on the present state-of-the-art.

  2. Rapid process for the conversion of xylose to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, G.B.; Levy-Rick, S.; Mahmourides, G.; Labelle, J.; Schneider, H.

    1990-02-27

    This invention concerns a method for producing ethanol from a substrate containing D-xylose. The process has two stages. In the first, cells of selected yeast species are cultured for several generations aerobically with D-xylose substantially the sole source of sugar, in order to condition the cells to D-xylose as a major carbon source. The cells are harvested when they are in a physiological state wherein ethanol productivity is maximal. Yeast species that function particularly well in this process include Candida fennica, C. insectorum, C. ishiwadae, C. silvanorum, C. steatolytica, Debaryomyces polymorphus (cantarelli), Pichia stipitis, and Schwanniomyces occidentalis. The cells are then concentrated and used in the second stage to inoculate a D-xylose-containing medium. The medium is fermented under conditions deficient in oxygen such that cells yield ethanol. The cells resulting from the second stage can be obtained from the first stage or recycled through the second stage many times, and when the efficiency of ethanol conversion of such cells falls, they can be recycled through the first stage. This process has been shown to provide high yields and high rates of production; yields equivalent to theoretical (0.5114 g ethanol/g xylose) have been obtained from 10% D-xylose in 17 hours. 4 figs.

  3. Lithological architecture, geological processes and energy-field environments are major factors for the formation of hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wenzhi; WANG Zecheng; LI Xiaoqing; WANG Hongjun; WANG Zhaoyun

    2005-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbon reservoirs is controlled by three major factors: lithological architecture, geological processes and energy-field environments. Among the three major factors, lithological architecture provides the storing medium for hydrocarbon; geological processes include hydrocarbon generation, migration, accumulation, preservation and modification; and energy-field environments refer to the various geothermal and geodynamic forces that affect the lithological architecture and drive the geological processes.In this study, we take Kela-2 and Sulige gas reservoirs as two examples to study relationships among the three major factors, and explain how these factors influence the scale and quality of hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  4. Diversity of optical signal processing led by optical signal form conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: konishi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.j [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    This paper reviews opportunities of optical signal form conversion as typified by time-space conversion in optical signal processing. Several examples of typical ultra-fast optical signal processing using optical signal form conversion are described and their applications are introduced in respect to photonic networks, ultra-fast measurement, and so on.

  5. Using information technology to support knowledge conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main roles of Information Technology in Knowledge Management programs is to accelerate the speed of knowledge transfer and creation. The Knowledge Management tools intend to help the processes of collecting and organizing the knowledge of groups of individuals in order to make this knowledge available in a shared base. Due to the largeness of the concept of knowledge, the software market for Knowledge Management seems to be quite confusing. Technology vendors are developing different implementations of the Knowledge Management concepts in their software products. Because of the variety and quantity of Knowledge Management tools available on the market, a typology may be a valuable aid to organizations that are looking for answers to specific needs. The objective of this article is to present guidelines that help to design such a typology. Knowledge Management solutions such as intranet systems, Electronic Document Management (EDM, groupware, workflow, artificial intelligence-based systems, Business Intelligence (BI, knowledge map systems, innovation support, competitive intelligence tools and knowledge portals are discussed in terms of their potential contributions to the processes of creating, registering and sharing knowledge. A number of Knowledge Management tools (Lotus Notes, Microsoft Exchange, Business Objects, Aris Toolset, File Net, Gingo, Vigipro, Sopheon have been checked. The potential of each category of solutions to support the transfer of tacit and/or explicit knowledge and to facilitate the knowledge conversion spiral in the sense of Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995 is discussed.

  6. Process for simultaneously processing of used metal and/or metal scrap and scrap containing halogenated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapper, G.; Kirchner, W.; Sloterdijk, W.; Verbraak, C.A.

    1982-03-02

    A process is presened for reducing environmental pollution resulting from disposal of waste containing halogenated hydrocarbons by simultaneous treatment with used metal and/or metal scrap at elevated temperatures. The halogenated hydrocarbons are pyrolyzed and the resulting hydrogen halide containing gas is brought into contact with the used metal and/or metal scrap at elevated temperatures so as to form metal halogenides that are volatile under the conditions applied. The volatile metal halogenides are largely separated from the gaseous mixture formed, and at least part of the remaining gaseous mixture and/or hydrocarbon residue is used as fuel to maintain the required temperature. The waste feed compositions and process conditions can be chosen to effect separation between various metals by selective halogenation and condensation, and substantially all of the hydrogen halide can be tied up and recovered as metal halogenides.

  7. Investigation of non-volatile additives on the process of distillation of hydrocarbon mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.Б. Степанов

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available  The given results of researches of influence of nonvolatile additives on processes of distillation of individual hydrocarbons and their mixes, including petroleum and mineral oil. With the help of the developed computer system of the continuous control of distillation it is shown, that at the presence of small amounts of the additive decrease of temperature of the beginning of boiling of hydrocarbons is observed, their speeds of banish and exits of light fuel mineral oil grow during initial oil refining

  8. Recovery Process for Lighter Hydrocarbon of Natural Gas in Liaohe Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Fulu

    1995-01-01

    @@ Liaohe Oilfield, the third largest oilfield in China is richer in natural gas. Up to the end of 1993,the accumulative production of natural gas reached 31. 15 billion m3,among which associated gas occupied 19.83 billion m3. In the recent ten years ,more than ten of lighter hydrocarbon recovery units with different scales have been constructed. The following is describing the main process features about recovery units of 200 × 104m3/d,120× 104 m3/d and other small recovery units for lighter hydrocarbon of natural gas.

  9. Development of Nitrogen-Hydrocarbon Atmospheric Carburizing and Process Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zurecki, Zbigniew; Sisson, Richard D.

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure carburizing and neutral carbon potential annealing in nitrogen containing small additions of hydrocarbon gases can offer cost and steel surface quality alternatives to the comparable, endothermic atmosphere, or vacuum operations. An experimental program was conducted for refining real-time process control methods in carburizing of AISI 8620 steel under N2-CH4, N2-C3H8 blends containing <5 vol.% of hydrocarbon gas at 900 and 930 °C. Multiple types of gas analyzers were used to monitor residual concentrations of H2, CO, CO2, H2O, O2, CH4, C3H8, and other hydrocarbons inside furnace. A modified shim stock technique was additionally evaluated for correlation with gas analysis and diffusional modeling using measured carbon mass flux values (g/cm2/s). Results of this evaluation work are presented.

  10. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1994-05-06

    Previous work on isosynthesis (conversion of synthesis gas to isobutane and isobutylene) was performed at very low conversions or extreme process conditions. The objectives of this research were (1) determine the optimum process conditions for isosynthesis; (2) determine the optimum catalyst preparation method and catalyst composition/properties for isosynthesis; (3) determine the kinetics for the best catalyst; (4) develop reactor models for trickle bed, slurry, and fixed bed reactors; and (5) simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for isosynthesis. More improvement in catalyst activity and selectivity is needed before isosynthesis can become a commercially feasible (stand-alone) process. Catalysts prepared by the precipitation method show the most promise for future development as compared with those prepared hydrothermally, by calcining zirconyl nitrate, or by a modified sol-gel method. For current catalysts the high temperatures (>673 K) required for activity also cause the production of methane (because of thermodynamics). A catalyst with higher activity at lower temperatures would magnify the unique selectivity of zirconia for isobutylene. Perhaps with a more active catalyst and acidification, oxygenate production could be limited at lower temperatures. Pressures above 50 atm cause an undesirable shift in product distribution toward heavier hydrocarbons. A model was developed that can predict carbon monoxide conversion an product distribution. The rate equation for carbon monoxide conversion contains only a rate constant and an adsorption equilibrium constant. The product distribution was predicted using a simple ratio of the rate of CO conversion. This report is divided into Introduction, Experimental, and Results and Discussion sections.

  11. Method for estimating processability of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock for hydroprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2014-01-14

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitates asphaltenes. Determined parameters and processabilities for a plurality of feedstocks can be used to generate a mathematical relationship between parameter and processability; this relationship can be used to estimate the processability for hydroprocessing for a feedstock of unknown processability.

  12. LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelias, Christos T. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2009-11-01

    Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

  13. Energy analysis of biochemical conversion processes of biomass to bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakari, M.; Ngadi, M.; Bergthorson, T. [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Bioethanol is among the most promising of biofuels that can be produced from different biomass such as agricultural products, waste and byproducts. This paper reported on a study that examined the energy conversion of different groups of biomass to bioethanol, including lignocelluloses, starches and sugar. Biochemical conversion generally involves the breakdown of biomass to simple sugars using different pretreatment methods. The energy needed for the conversion steps was calculated in order to obtain mass and energy efficiencies for the conversions. Mass conversion ratios of corn, molasses and rice straw were calculated as 0.3396, 0.2300 and 0.2296 kg of bioethanol per kg of biomass, respectively. The energy efficiency of biochemical conversion of corn, molasses and rice straw was calculated as 28.57, 28.21 and 31.33 per cent, respectively. The results demonstrated that lignocelluloses can be efficiently converted with specific microorganisms such as Mucor indicus, Rhizopus oryzae using the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) methods.

  14. Process systems engineering issues and applications towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions through conversion technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews issues and applications for design of sustainable carbon dioxide conversion processes, specifically through chemical conversion, and the integration of the conversion processes with other systems from a process systems engineering (PSE) view-point. Systematic and computer......-aided methods and tools for reaction network generation, processing route generation, process design/optimization, and sustainability analysis are reviewed with respect to carbon dioxide conversion. Also, the relevant gaps and opportunities are highlighted. In addition, the integration of carbon dioxide...... conversion processes with other systems including coexisting infrastructure and carbon dioxide sources is described.Then, the importance of PSE based studies for such application is discussed. Finally, some perspectives on the status and future directions of carbon dioxide conversion technology...

  15. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics'era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment's complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment's reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying "omics" approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition, we

  16. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana eCravo-Laureau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature, nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying ‘omics’ approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon

  17. High conversion efficiency in resonant four-wave mixing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Yuan; Wu, Bo-Han; Wang, Gang; Chen, Yong-Fang; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Yu, Ite A

    2016-01-25

    We propose a new scheme of the resonant four-wave mixing (FWM) for the frequency up or down conversion, which is more efficient than the commonly-used scheme of the non-resonant FWM. In this new scheme, two control fields are spatially varied such that a probe field at the input can be converted to a signal field at the output. The efficiency of probe-to-signal energy conversion can be 90% at medium's optical depth of about 100. Our proposed scheme works for both the continuous-wave and pulse cases, and is flexible in choosing the control field intensity. This work provides a very useful tool in the nonlinear frequency conversion.

  18. Simultaneous constraint and phase conversion processing of oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Thompson, Elliott D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Hellstrom, Eric E.; Larbalestier, David C.; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Parrell, Jeffrey A.; Reeves, Jodi L.

    2003-04-29

    A method of making an oxide superconductor article includes subjecting an oxide superconductor precursor to a texturing operation to orient grains of the oxide superconductor precursor to obtain a highly textured precursor; and converting the textured oxide superconducting precursor into an oxide superconductor, while simultaneously applying a force to the precursor which at least matches the expansion force experienced by the precursor during phase conversion to the oxide superconductor. The density and the degree of texture of the oxide superconductor precursor are retained during phase conversion. The constraining force may be applied isostatically.

  19. Modeling the kinetics of methane conversion in steam reforming process of coke-oven gas based on experimental data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jia-yuan; ZHOU Jie-min

    2007-01-01

    Steam-reforming is an effective approach for upgrading methane and hydrocarbon of coke-oven gas into CO and H2, but the kinetic behavior needs more study. We investigated the conversion of methane in coke-oven gas by steam reforming process in an electric tubular flow at 14 kPa with temperature varying from 500℃ to 950℃, and developed a kenetic model for , ignoring the effects of adsorption and diffusion. The optimal dynamic conditions for methane conversion 14 kPa are as follows: the ratio of the amount of water to the amount of methane is from 1.1 to 1.3; the reaction temperature is from 1 223 K to 1 273 K. The methane conversion rate is larger than 95% when the ratio of the amount of water to the amount of methane is 1.2 at a temperature above 1 223 K with the residence time up to 0.75 s.

  20. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  1. Methane Conversion Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge: Comparison with Thermal Process and Catalyst Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2006-01-01

    The direct conversion of methane using a dielectric barrier discharge has been experimentally studied. Experiments with different values of flow rates and discharge voltages have been performed to investigate the effects on the conversion and reaction products both qualitatively and quantitatively.Experimental results indicate that the maximum conversion of methane has been 80% at an input flow rate of 5 ml/min and a discharge voltage of 4 kV. Experimental results also show that the optimum condition has occurred at a high discharge voltage and higher input flow rate. In terms of product distribution, a higher flow rate or shorter residence time can increase the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons. No hydrocarbon product was detected using the thermal method, except hydrogen and carbon. Increasing selectivity for ethane was found when Pt and Ru catalysts presented in the plasma reaction. Hydrogenation of acetylene in the catalyst surface could have been the reason for this phenomenon as the selectivity for acetylene in the products was decreasing.

  2. Progress in studies of natural gas conversion in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Changchun; Shen Shikong

    2008-01-01

    Progress in natural gas conversion in China is presented in this paper, including processes of natural gas to synthesis gas (syngas), syngas to liquid hydrocarbons, oxygenates synthesis, methanol to olefins (MTO), methane to aromatics and oxidative coupling of methane (OCM).

  3. Influence of Gas Feed Composition and Pressure on the Catalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbons Using a Traditional Cobalt-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-25

    availability. Fuel independence would alleviate uncertainties in the world market supply of oil along with commercial fluctuations in price. In addition...this supply by supporting the development of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel from the vast natural resources, such as coal, shale, gas hydrates, and CO2...product a day by steam-reforming coal to generate syngas for the FT process.5 A water-gas shift is needed to obtain a 2:1 ratio of hydrogen/carbon

  4. Problems in Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons and Detailed Simulation of Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yuxuan

    This dissertation research consists of two parts, with Part I on the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons and Part II on aspects on the detailed simulation of combustion processes. In Part I, the catalytic oxidation of C1--C3 hydrocarbons, namely methane, ethane, propane and ethylene, was investigated for lean hydrocarbon-air mixtures over an unsupported Pd-based catalyst, from 600 to 800 K and under atmospheric pressure. In Chapter 2, the experimental facility of wire microcalorimetry and simulation configuration were described in details. In Chapter 3 and 4, the oxidation rate of C1--C 3 hydrocarbons is demonstrated to be determined by the dissociative adsorption of hydrocarbons. A detailed surface kinetics model is proposed with deriving the rate coefficient of hydrocarbon dissociative adsorption from the wire microcalorimetry data. In Part II, four fundamental studies were conducted through detailed combustion simulations. In Chapter 5, self-accelerating hydrogen-air flames are studied via two-dimensional detailed numerical simulation (DNS). The increase in the global flame velocity is shown to be caused by the increase of flame surface area, and the fractal structure of the flame front is demonstrated by the box-counting method. In Chapter 6, skeletal reaction models for butane combustion are derived by using directed relation graph (DRG) and DRG-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA), and uncertainty minimization by polynomial chaos expansion (MUM-PCE) mothodes. The dependence of model uncertainty is subjected to the completeness of the model. In Chapter 7, a systematic strategy is proposed to reduce the cost of the multicomponent diffusion model by accurately accounting for the species whose diffusivity is important to the global responses of the combustion systems, and approximating those of less importance by the mixture-averaged model. The reduced model is validated in an n-heptane mechanism with 88 species. In Chapter 8, the influence of Soret

  5. An integrated bioremediation process for petroleum hydrocarbons removal and odor mitigation from contaminated marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lo, Irene M C; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2015-10-15

    This study developed a novel integrated bioremediation process for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and the mitigation of odor induced by reduced sulfur from contaminated marine sediment. The bioremediation process consisted of two phases. In Phase I, acetate was dosed into the sediment as co-substrate to facilitate the sulfate reduction process. Meanwhile, akaganeite (β-FeOOH) was dosed in the surface layer of the sediment to prevent S(2-) release into the overlying seawater. In Phase II, NO3(-) was injected into the sediment as an electron acceptor to facilitate the denitrification process. After 20 weeks of treatment, the sequential integration of the sulfate reduction and denitrification processes led to effective biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), in which about 72% of TPH was removed. In Phase I, the release of S(2-) was effectively controlled by the addition of akaganeite. The oxidation of S(2-) by Fe(3+) and the precipitation of S(2-) by Fe(2+) were the main mechanisms for S(2-) removal. In Phase II, the injection of NO3(-) completely inhibited the sulfate reduction process. Most of residual AVS and S(0) were removed within 4 weeks after NO3(-) injection. The 16S rRNA clone library-based analysis revealed a distinct shift of bacterial community structure in the sediment over different treatment phases. The clones affiliated with Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales were the most abundant in Phase I, while the clones related to Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus, Thiohalomonas nitratireducens and Sulfurimonas denitrificans predominated in Phase II.

  6. A mechanistic basis for the effect of aluminum content on ethene selectivity in methanol-to-hydrocarbons conversion on HZSM-5

    KAUST Repository

    Khare, Rachit

    2017-03-20

    Increasing crystallize size or aluminum content in MFI-type zeolites independently enhances the propagation of the aromatics-based methylation/dealkylation cycle relative to that of the olefins-based methylation/cracking cycle in methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion and consequentially results in higher ethene selectivity. Ethene selectivity increases monotonically with increasing aluminum content for HZSM-5 samples with nearly identical crystallite size consequent to an increase in the intracrystalline contact time analogous to our recent report detailing the effects of crystallite size (Khare et al., 2015) on MTH selectivity. The confected effects of crystallite size and site density on MTH selectivity can therefore, be correlated using a descriptor that represents the average number of acid sites that an olefin-precursor will interact with before elution.

  7. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  8. Debugging the Conversion Process: Lessons from an Administrative Information System Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbler, Fritz; Mitchell, Linda

    1995-01-01

    The process of reengineering the administrative information system at the University of Idaho required careful planning, development of a set of philosophies, and several strategies for ensuring success. The latter included a humorous symbol (a jitter bug) to express concern, improved institutional communications, and a focus on logistical issues.…

  9. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

    1988-05-20

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

  10. Influence of mid-point temperature of heavy hydrocarbons separator to the liquefaction process for small LNG plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, H. A.; Indarto, A.

    2016-11-01

    In liquefied natural gas (LNG) process production, one of the important units is heavy hydrocarbon removal unit to prevent freezing during liquefaction. For small scale of LNG plant, this unit is usually integrated with main heat exchanger. Feed is obtained from main heat exchanger then flows to separator to separate liquid from gas. The separator operating condition is called as Midpoint condition. Selecting Midpoint conditions have impact to light hydrocarbon losses, Specific Brake Horse Power (SBHP) process, and heating value of LNG. Hence understanding of selecting this condition and its effect to light hydrocarbon losses, SBHP process, and HHV of LNG will help to design more efficient LNG plant. According to study, the lower of Mid-Point temperature will result in lower SBHP, lower of light hydrocarbon losses, and increase LNG of HHV value. Meanwhile, the higher Mid-Point pressure will result in lower SBHP, higher light hydrocarbon losses, and lower LNG of HHV value. The change of Mid-Point pressures have more impact to light hydrocarbon losses than SBHP process.

  11. Phone Conversation while Processing Information: Chronometric Analysis of Load Effects in Everyday-media Multitasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, Michael B; Huestegge, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    This is a pilot study that examined the effect of cell-phone conversation on cognition using a continuous multitasking paradigm. Current theorizing argues that phone conversation affects behavior (e.g., driving) by interfering at a level of cognitive processes (not peripheral activity) and by implying an attentional-failure account. Within the framework of an intermittent spare-utilized capacity threading model, we examined the effect of aspects of (secondary-task) phone conversation on (primary-task) continuous arithmetic performance, asking whether phone use makes components of automatic and controlled information-processing (i.e., easy vs. hard mental arithmetic) run more slowly, or alternatively, makes processing run less reliably albeit with the same processing speed. The results can be summarized as follows: While neither expecting a text message nor expecting an impending phone call had any detrimental effects on performance, active phone conversation was clearly detrimental to primary-task performance. Crucially, the decrement imposed by secondary-task (conversation) was not due to a constant slowdown but is better be characterized by an occasional breakdown of information processing, which differentially affected automatic and controlled components of primary-task processing. In conclusion, these findings support the notion that phone conversation makes individuals not constantly slower but more vulnerable to commit attention failure, and in this way, hampers stability of (primary-task) information processing.

  12. Food oral processing: conversion of food structure to textural perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, H; Vinyard, C J; Essick, G K; Foegeding, E A

    2013-01-01

    Food oral processing includes all muscle activities, jaw movements, and tongue movements that contribute to preparing food for swallowing. Simultaneously, during the transformation of food structure to a bolus, a cognitive representation of food texture is formed. These physiological signals detected during oral processing are highly complex and dynamic in nature because food structure changes continuously due to mechanical and biochemical breakdown coupled with the lubricating action of saliva. Multiple and different sensations are perceived at different stages of the process. Although much work has focused on factors that determine mechanical (e.g., rheological and fracture) and sensory properties of foods, far less attention has been paid to linking food transformations that occur during oral processing with sensory perception of texture. Understanding how food structure influences specific patterns of oral processing and how these patterns relate to specific textural properties and their cognitive representations facilitates the design of foods that are nutritious, healthy, and enjoyable.

  13. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  14. A Preliminary Study of the Potential to Kinetic Energy Conversion Process in the Stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert M.; Nolan, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to kinetic energy conversion process in the lower stratosphere associated with the vertical exchange of warm and cold air is evaluated using adiabatically derived vertical velocities for the North American region for a five-day period. Preliminary results suggest the possibility that on the average the kinetic energy of stratospheric motions may not result from a conversion of potential energy within the stratosphere by this process. The further implication is that stratospheric...

  15. Materials measurement and accounting in an operating plutonium conversion and purification process. Phase I. Process modeling and simulation. [PUCSF code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.

    1981-04-01

    A model of an operating conversion and purification process for the production of reactor-grade plutonium dioxide was developed as the first component in the design and evaluation of a nuclear materials measurement and accountability system. The model accurately simulates process operation and can be used to identify process problems and to predict the effect of process modifications.

  16. Torrefaction as a process for biomass conversion into biocoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnogaća Bojan R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical treatment of biomass carried out within a temperature range from 250ºC to 300ºC, in an inert atmosphere. The process can be described as a mild form of pyrolysis. During the torrefaction process, biomass undergoes a slight breakdown and physical water (moisture contained in biomass as well as superfluous volatiles are released while the biopolymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin partly decompose giving off various types of volatiles. In the course of the process, the properties of biomass change and result in much better quality of fuel combustion and gassification. The final product is the remaining solid, dry, brittle, blackened material that is referred to as torrefied biomass (bio-coal and which is more resistant to biological degradation, self-ignition and physical decomposition. This paper presents a comprehensive review of torrefaction including both advantages and disadvantages of the torrefaction process.

  17. Effect of external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite on product distribution in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhui Li; Yanan Wang; Wenzhi Jia; Zhiwen Xi; Huanhui Chen; Zhirong Zhu∗; Zhonghua Hu

    2014-01-01

    The external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite was passivated by liquid siliceous deposition and by acidic sites poisoning with lepidine, respectively. Then methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction was investigated over the above as-prepared catalysts and the dissoluble coke on these used catalysts was analyzed by GC-MS, to study the role of the external surface of HZSM-5 in the catalytic reaction. Comparison with the experi-mental results based on parent ZSM-5 showed that the product distribution of MTH reaction was obviously influenced by the external surface. Evidences were listed as follows:(1) the final product on parent HZSM-5 showed higher aromatic selectivity, lower olefin selectivity, lower ra-tio of C2/C3+aliphatics and higher ratio of C3/C4+aliphatics than the reaction mixture produced by the sole catalysis of acidic sites in HZSM-5 channel;(2) a little of pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene in the product on parent HZSM-5, was produced via multi-methylation of methylbenzene on the external surface. The above conclusion may also be suitable for MTH reaction over other zeolites with 10-ring channel.

  18. Converting oil shale to liquid fuels: energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the Shell in situ conversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam R

    2008-10-01

    Oil shale is a sedimentary rock that contains kerogen, a fossil organic material. Kerogen can be heated to produce oil and gas (retorted). This has traditionally been a CO2-intensive process. In this paper, the Shell in situ conversion process (ICP), which is a novel method of retorting oil shale in place, is analyzed. The ICP utilizes electricity to heat the underground shale over a period of 2 years. Hydrocarbons are produced using conventional oil production techniques, leaving shale oil coke within the formation. The energy inputs and outputs from the ICP, as applied to oil shales of the Green River formation, are modeled. Using these energy inputs, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the ICP are calculated and are compared to emissions from conventional petroleum. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) are 1.2-1.6 times greater than the total primary energy inputs to the process. In the absence of capturing CO2 generated from electricity produced to fuel the process, well-to-pump GHG emissions are in the range of 30.6-37.1 grams of carbon equivalent per megajoule of liquid fuel produced. These full-fuel-cycle emissions are 21%-47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels.

  19. The multi-factor recombination and processes superimposition model for hydrocarbon accumulation: application to the Silurian in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qingyang; Pang Xiongqi; Gao Jianbo

    2008-01-01

    The multi-factor recombination and processes superimposition model for hydrocarbon accumulation is put forward in view of the hydrocarbon geological characteristics of multiple episodes of structural evolution, multiple sets of source-reservoir-seal assemblage, multiple cycles of hydrocarbon accumulation and multiple episodes of readjustment and reconstruction in the complex superimposed basins in China. It is a system including theories and methods that can help to predict favorable exploration regions. According to this model, the basic discipline for hydrocarbon generation, evolution and distribution in the superimposed basins can be summarized in multi-factor recombination, processes superimposition, multiple stages of oil filling and latest stage preservation. With the Silurian of the Tarim basin as an example, based on the reconstruction of the evolution history of the four factors (paleo-anticline,source rock, regional cap rock and kinematic equilibrium belt) controlling hydrocarbon accumulation,this model was adopted to predict favorable hydrocarbon accumulation areas and favorable exploration regions following structural destruction in three stages of oil filling, to provide guidance for further exploration of oil and gas in the Silurian of the Tarim basin.

  20. Microchemical Systems for Fuel Processing and Conversion to Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-15

    6.8 Vacuum Packaging ........................................................................................................................................43...production may take place. Vacuum packaging and reflective shields, required to maximize the thermal isolation of the reaction zone, have been tested...microfabrication strategies. Substantial effort has been expended on the chip level vacuum packaging process, which is critical to the performance of the

  1. Energy and environmental analysis of a rapeseed biorefinery conversion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Balzan, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    positive effects on the greenhouse gases (GHG) footprint of the biorefinery system, with improvements in the range of 9 % to 29 %, depending on the considered alternative. The mass and energy balances showed the potential for improvement of straw treatment processes (hydrothermal pre-treatment and dark...

  2. Effects of P content in a P/HZSM-5 catalyst on the conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyin Lu; Yancong Liu

    2011-01-01

    A series of P/HZSM-5 catalysts prepared by impregnation method were used for ethanol conversion to lower olefins.The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),NH3-temperature-programmed desorption(NH3-TPD)and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements.It was found that the P/HZSM-5 catalysts showed high activity and selectivity toward light olefins.The selectivities of propylene and butylene can be improved with the introduction of phosphorus(P).When the content of P reached 3.0 wt%,more than 18.9% propylene in the gaseous products was obtained over the P/HZSM-5 catalyst at 450 ℃.The introduction of P modified the strong Br()nsted acid sites of the original HZSM-5 catalysts and P/HZSM-5 catalysts could resist coke formation and showed good stability.

  3. CONVERSION PRODUCT STRUCTURE AS TOOL TO INCREASE YIELD PROCESSING ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khorev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors' analysis of the performance of organizations, processing raw materials of agricultural origin, in particular, dealing with meat processing, identified the need to develop tools to increase their profitability. Unlike common approaches to assessing the profitability of the processing organizations, taking into account only the interests of the organization's leadership and buyers of products, the authors proposed and implemented a concept based on the interests of participants in the triune balance business activities: owners of capital, management organizations and consumers. As one of the tools for improving the yield of processing organizations are invited to transform their product mix of economic evaluations of profitability of each product line positions. Russian researchers income from product sales are traditionally measured by indicators such as net income, income from sales, profit margins and profitability level - in terms of return on sales. The disadvantage of using these indicators, according to the authors, is their lack of objectivity in the evaluation of the effectiveness of investment business owners. In this work was used unconventional and non-proliferation in the Russian practice, the rate of economic value added (EVA, a built - in system of profitability assortment positions. As indicators, the production of a particular product line units proposed and used two quantitative indicators - EVA level per unit of production and profitability of production (for EVA, as well as a quality parameter - the level of demand. Developed by the evaluation program transformation product structure represented as a matrix management capabilities, allowing to achieve a balance of interests of the triune main participants in business activity.

  4. Collision processes of hydrocarbon species in hydrogen plasmas. II The ethane and propane families

    CERN Document Server

    Janev, R K

    2002-01-01

    Cross sections and rate coefficients are provided for collision processes of electrons and protons with C sub x H sub y and C sub x H sub y sup + (x = 2, 3; 1 <= y <= 2x + 2) hydrocarbon species in a wide range of collision energies and plasma (gas) temperatures. The considered processes include: electron-impact ionization and dissociation of C sub x H sub y , dissociative excitation, ionization and recombination of C sub x H sub y sup + with electrons, and both charge transfer and atom exchange in proton channels are considered separately. Information is also provided for the energies of each individual reaction channel. The cross sections and rate coefficients are presented in compact analytic forms.

  5. Effect of NiW Modified HZSM-5 and HY Zeolites on Hydrocracking Conversion of Crude Palm Oil to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Subsadsana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic conversion of crude palm oil over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites modified with NiW as catalysts in the hydrocracking process was investigated. These zeolites supported by NiW catalysts were prepared employing the impregnation technique. NiW was added to the zeolites in order to induce bi-functional properties (both acid and metal sites in the catalysts. Subsequently, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD andnitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis. The catalytic activity of prepared catalysts was evaluated through the conversion of crude palm oil to biofuels. These results indicate that the incorporation of NiW over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites improves the conversion efficiency and enhances the yield of biofuel (gasoline, kerosene, and diesel, possibly due to NiW promote of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reaction.

  6. Process for the separation of C sub 2 hydrocarbons from natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, H.; Sapper, R.

    1990-08-21

    A process for the separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas under pressure is disclosed, in which the natural gas is cooled, partially condensed, and separated into a liquid fraction and a gaseous fraction. The liquid fraction is subcooled and then expanded into the upper zone of a rectifying column. The gaseous fraction, after engine expansion, is also introduced into the rectifying column. During rectification, a product stream containing essentially C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons and a residual gas stream containing predominantly lower-boiling components are obtained. The residual gas stream is initially heated by heat exchange with the liquid fraction and then heated by heat exchange with the gaseous fraction obtained after partial condensation. The residual gas stream is then further heated by heat exchange with the feed stream of natural gas to be partially condensed. The heated residual gas is then engine expanded and reheated again by heat exchange with the feed stream of natural gas to be partially condensed.

  7. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heidi; Johnson, David K.

    2015-03-22

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. The high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.

  8. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J., Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents an exploration of the relationships between biomass feedstocks and the conversion processes that utilize them. Specifically, it discusses the effect of the physical and chemical structure of biomass on conversion yields, rates, and efficiencies in a wide variety of available or experimental conversion processes. A greater understanding of the complex relationships between these conversion systems and the production of biomass for energy uses is required to help optimize the complex network of biomass production, collection, transportation, and conversion to useful energy products. The review of the literature confirmed the scarcity of research aimed specifically at identifying the effect of feedstock properties on conversion. In most cases, any mention of feedstock-related effects was limited to a few brief remarks (usually in qualitative terms) in the conclusions, or as a topic for further research. Attempts to determine the importance of feedstock parameters from published data were further hampered by the lack of consistent feedstock characterization and the difficulty of comparing results between different experimental systems. Further research will be required to establish quantitative relationships between feedstocks and performance criteria in conversion. 127 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. A novel cloud-point extraction process for preconcentrating selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, D.; Li, J.; Chen, S.B.; Chen, B.-H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2001-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released in such processes as incomplete coal combustion and during the disposal of coal tar, are subject to strict emission controls in which the determination of PAHs has to be addressed. PAHs have low aqueous solubility which necessitates preconcentration prior to the analytical determination of PAHs. A novel but simple cloud-point extraction (CPE) process is developed to preconcentrate the trace of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with the use of the readily biodegradable nonionic surfactant of secondary ethyoxylated alcohol Tergitol 15-S-7 as extractant. The concentrations of PAHs, mixtures of naphthalene and phenanthrene as well as pyrene in the spiked samples were determined with the new CPE process at ambient temperature (23{degree}C) followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. More than 80% of phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively, and 96% of naphthalene initially present in the aqueous solutions with concentrations near or below their aqueous solubilities were recovered using this new CPE process. Importantly Tergitol 15-S-7 does not give any fluorometric signal to interfere with fluorescence detection of PAHs in the UV range. No special washing step is, thus, required to remove surfactant before HPLC analyses. Different experimental conditions were studied. The optimum conditions for the preconcentration and determination of these selected PAHs at ambient temperature have been established as the following: (1) 3 wt% surfactant; (2) addition of 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}; (3) 10 min for equilibration time; and (4) 3000 rpm for centrifugal speed with duration of 10 min. 50 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  11. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  12. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate’s application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein.

  13. The future of electronic power processing and conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Consoli, A.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    building blocks for computers and other applications. The main push is for lower cost, and production technology becomes the important issue. - Demands for improved performance in a diversity of applications will stimulate R&D in power electronics in future. Intelligent control and energy management......At a workshop held on the Aeolian Islands in Sicily during May 2004 a group of academic and industry engineers from all over the world discussed the medium-and long-term future of power electronics and its applications in specific areas. The following main issues were identified and discussed....... - The demand is not for power electronic solutions but for system integration of electronic power processing. A more multidisciplinary approach is needed. - We will witness a proliferation of energy storage in systems. The technology is in place and the improvement in system performance makes it worthwhile...

  14. Process and Equipment for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: (1) directing a vapor stream containing at least nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; (2) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen- containing oxidizing agent; (3) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; (4) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrite form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; (5) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; (6) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level on hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1% by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; (7) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and (8) removing sais solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  15. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  16. Abstracts of the first ORNL workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: characterization and measurement with a view toward personnel protection. [PAH from coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B. (comp.)

    1976-11-01

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at a workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as those produced by coal conversion technologies. Their often carcinogenic nature imposes the obligation of providing adequate protection and measurement devices for workers and for the general public. The primary questions are as follows: What should be measured. Where and how should it be measured. What are the maximum permissible concentrations. This workshop and future workshops are intended to bring these problems into better focus and to help establish a consensus on what needs to be done in order to provide a dosimetry effort that will ensure the adequate protection of personnel. There were 32 attendees of this one-day meeting. The papers and discussions included current industrial hygiene practices, the development of government agency guidelines for worker protection, and a wide range of analytical techniques for PAH detection, some of which are still in the research stage and are unproven. The workshop was held at ORNL on February 26, 1976.

  17. Estimation of the Heat Balance of the Liquid Hydrocarbons Evaporation Process from the Open Surface During Geotechnical Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    Researchers in Tyumen State Oil and Gas University (TSOGU) have conducted a complex research of the heat and mass transfer processes and thermophysical properties of hydrocarbons, taking into account their impact on the reliability and safety of the hydrocarbon transport and storage processes. It has been shown that the thermodynamic conditions on the surface and the color of oil influence the degree of temperature rise in the upper layers of oil when exposed to direct solar radiation. In order to establish the nature of solar radiation impact on the surface temperature the experimental studies were conducted in TSOGU on the hydrocarbon evaporation and the temperature change of various petroleum and petroleum products on the free surface with varying degrees of thermal insulation of the side walls and bottom of the vessel.

  18. Solution-Processed Two-Dimensional Metal Dichalcogenide-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiehong; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The development of renewable energy storage and conversion devices is one of the most promising ways to address the current energy crisis, along with the global environmental concern. The exploration of suitable active materials is the key factor for the construction of highly efficient, highly stable, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy storage and conversion devices. The ability to prepare two-dimensional (2D) metal dichalcogenide (MDC) nanosheets and their functional composites in high yield and large scale via various solution-based methods in recent years has inspired great research interests in their utilization for renewable energy storage and conversion applications. Here, we will summarize the recent advances of solution-processed 2D MDCs and their hybrid nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion applications, including rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, electrocatalytic hydrogen generation and solar cells. Moreover, based on the current progress, we will also give some personal insights on the existing challenges and future research directions in this promising field.

  19. The use of non-fossil derived hydrogen in coal conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. S.; Merrick, D.; Smith, M.; Rasmussen, G.

    The National Coal Board, UK, carried out a technical and economic study of the use of non-fossil derived (NFD) hydrogen on three coal conversion processes: methanol synthesis, solid phase hydrogenation (hydrogasification) for substitute natural gas production, and liquid phase hydrogenation (liquifaction) for the manufacture of liquid fuels. Use of NFD hydrogen generally resulted in an increase in the conversion efficiency and carbon utilization, and a reduction in the number of component stages of the process. It was also shown that market conditions could exist in which the use of NFD hydrogen in coal conversion would be preferable to both conventional coal conversion and the direct use of hydrogen, irrespective of the coal price. Substitute natural gas production from synthesis gas (methanation) and the production of liquid fuels from synthesis gas by a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis route were also evaluated and showed similar technical and economic results. Preliminary results of the overall costs of using NFD hydrogen from a nuclear power/electrolysis plant showed that at present fuel prices, coal conversion processes using NFD hydrogen are not competitive with conventional processes, but would be if the price of coal were to double.

  20. Irreversible k-threshold and majority conversion processes on complete multipartite graphs and graph products

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Sarah Spence; Stokes, Connor; Troxell, Denise Sakai

    2011-01-01

    In graph theoretical models of the spread of disease through populations, the spread of opinion through social networks, and the spread of faults through distributed computer networks, vertices are in two states, either black or white, and these states are dynamically updated at discrete time steps according to the rules of the particular conversion process used in the model. This paper considers the irreversible k-threshold and majority conversion processes. In an irreversible k-threshold (resp., majority) conversion process, a vertex is permanently colored black in a certain time period if at least k (resp., at least half) of its neighbors were black in the previous time period. A k-conversion set (resp., dynamic monopoly) is a set of vertices which, if initially colored black, will result in all vertices eventually being colored black under a k-threshold (resp., majority) conversion process. We answer several open problems by presenting bounds and some exact values of the minimum number of vertices in k-co...

  1. Economics of coal conversion processing. Advances in coal gasification: support research. Advances in coal gasification: process development and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The fall meeting of the American Chemical Society, Division of Fuel Chemistry, was held at Miami Beach, Florida, September 10-15, 1978. Papers involved the economics of coal conversion processing and advances in coal gasification, especially support research and process development and analysis. Fourteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; three papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tappe, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-72, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rho, J. [SOFIA Science Mission Operations/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Boersma, C. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Micelotta, E. R., E-mail: atappe@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 {mu}m mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 {mu}m region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edge of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 {mu}m appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.

  3. Process of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Tamagawa karyuiki ni okeru sekiyukei tanka suiso no biseibutsu bunkai katei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morito, M. (Sumitomo 3M Co., Kanagawa (Japan)); Okada, M.; Murakami, A. (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-12-10

    The process of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Petroleum hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane, octylbenzene, and 1-methylnaphtalene were observed to be rapidly degraded by microorganisms in the water sampled from the surface of the river after a period of lag time. The longer lag time was observed in order of hexadecane hydrocarbons, but the rates was not be promoted by physical and chemical emulsification. It was suggested that petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded not in physical and chemical process in which the hydrocarbons were emulsified by microbial extracellular products, microfinded and enhanced contact area or frequency to microbes, but in biochemical process in which the microorganisms gained the ability of petroleum hydrocarbons degradation, that is, induction of production of a degrading enzyme. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  5. Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Wet Biomass Feedstocks and Upgrading – Process Design and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    Liquid biofuels will play a major role for a more sustainable energy system of the future. The CatLiq® process is a 2nd generation biomass conversion process that is based on hydrothermal liquefaction. Hydrothermal liquefaction offers a very efficient and feedstock flexible way of converting...... biomass to bio-oil. Bio-oils from hydrothermal liquefaction are characterised by their high feedstock flexibility. Upgrading of complete bio-oils derived from hydrothermal conversion has not yet been extensively studied. Purpose of this work is to reduce the oxygen content of the bio-oil to improve...

  6. "Superluminal" FITS File Processing on Multiprocessors: Zero Time Endian Conversion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    The FITS is the standard file format in astronomy, and it has been extended to meet the astronomical needs of the day. However, astronomical datasets have been inflating year by year. In the case of the ALMA telescope, a ~TB-scale four-dimensional data cube may be produced for one target. Considering that typical Internet bandwidth is tens of MB/s at most, the original data cubes in FITS format are hosted on a VO server, and the region which a user is interested in should be cut out and transferred to the user (Eguchi et al. 2012). The system will equip a very high-speed disk array to process a TB-scale data cube in 10 s, and disk I/O speed, endian conversion, and data processing speeds will be comparable. Hence, reducing the endian conversion time is one of issues to solve in our system. In this article, I introduce a technique named "just-in-time endian conversion", which delays the endian conversion for each pixel just before it is really needed, to sweep out the endian conversion time; by applying this method, the FITS processing speed increases 20% for single threading and 40% for multi-threading compared to CFITSIO. The speedup tightly relates to modern CPU architecture to improve the efficiency of instruction pipelines due to break of "causality", a programmed instruction code sequence.

  7. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burlage, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  8. A process economic assessment of hydrocarbon biofuels production using chemoautotrophic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, NE; Myers, JA; Tuerk, AL; Curtis, WR

    2014-11-01

    Economic analysis of an ARPA-e Electrofuels (http://arpa-e.energy.gov/?q=arpa-e-programs/electrofuels) process is presented, utilizing metabolically engineered Rhodobacter capsulatus or Ralstonia eutropha to produce the C30+ hydrocarbon fuel, botryococcene, from hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The analysis is based on an Aspen plus (R) bioreactor model taking into account experimentally determined Rba. capsulatus and Rls. eutropha growth and maintenance requirements, reactor residence time, correlations for gas-liquid mass-transfer coefficient, gas composition, and specific cellular fuel productivity. Based on reactor simulation results encompassing technically relevant parameter ranges, the capital and operating costs of the process were estimated for 5000 bbl-fuel/day plant and used to predict fuel cost. Under the assumptions used in this analysis and crude oil prices, the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) required for economic feasibility must be less than 2(sic)/kWh. While not feasible under current market prices and costs, this work identifies key variables impacting process cost and discusses potential alternative paths toward economic feasibility. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution, partition and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during coking wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanhui; Wei, Chaohai; An, Guanfeng

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we report the performance of a full-scale conventional activated sludge (A-O1-O2) treatment in eliminating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both aqueous and solid phases along with the coking wastewater treatment processes were analyzed for the presence of 18 PAHs. It was found that the target compounds occurred widely in raw coking wastewater, treated effluent and sludge samples. In the coking wastewater treatment system, 4-5 ring PAHs were the dominant compounds, while 4 rings PAHs predominated in the sludge samples. Over 98% of the PAH removal was achieved in the coking wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), with the total concentration of PAHs being 21.3 ± 1.9 μg L(-1) in the final effluent. During the coking wastewater treatment processes, the association of the lower molecular weight PAH with suspended solids was generally less than 60%, while the association of higher molecular weight PAHs was greater than 90%. High distribution efficiencies (Kdp and Kds) were found, suggesting that adsorption was the potential removal pathway of PAHs. Finally, the mass balances of PAHs in various stages of the coking WWTP were obtained, and the results indicated that adsorption to sludge was the main removal pathway for PAHs in the coking wastewater treatment processes.

  10. A process economic assessment of hydrocarbon biofuels production using chemoautotrophic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nymul E; Myers, John A; Tuerk, Amalie L; Curtis, Wayne R

    2014-11-01

    Economic analysis of an ARPA-e Electrofuels (http://arpa-e.energy.gov/?q=arpa-e-programs/electrofuels) process is presented, utilizing metabolically engineered Rhodobacter capsulatus or Ralstonia eutropha to produce the C30+ hydrocarbon fuel, botryococcene, from hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The analysis is based on an Aspen plus® bioreactor model taking into account experimentally determined Rba. capsulatus and Rls. eutropha growth and maintenance requirements, reactor residence time, correlations for gas-liquid mass-transfer coefficient, gas composition, and specific cellular fuel productivity. Based on reactor simulation results encompassing technically relevant parameter ranges, the capital and operating costs of the process were estimated for 5000 bbl-fuel/day plant and used to predict fuel cost. Under the assumptions used in this analysis and crude oil prices, the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) required for economic feasibility must be less than 2¢/kWh. While not feasible under current market prices and costs, this work identifies key variables impacting process cost and discusses potential alternative paths toward economic feasibility.

  11. Evaluation of hydrogen sulfide conversion processes. Final report, May 1, 1987-October 15, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Pound, B.G.

    1989-10-01

    The research was sponsored by the Gas Research Institute to evaluate the status of hydrogen sulfide conversion processes and to recommend areas of research that are of interest to the natural gas industry. Several processes that convert hydrogen sulfide to sulfur and water were reviewed and they include Claus process, Claus plant tail gas treatment processes, liquid phase oxidation processes and direct catalytic oxidation processes. Electrochemical, photochemical, thermal, thermochemical and plasmachemical methods of producing both hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide were also reviewed.

  12. "Superluminal" FITS File Processing on Multiprocessors: Zero Time Endian Conversion Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Eguchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The FITS is the standard file format in astronomy, and it has been extended to agree with astronomical needs of the day. However, astronomical datasets have been inflating year by year. In case of ALMA telescope, a ~ TB scale 4-dimensional data cube may be produced for one target. Considering that typical Internet bandwidth is a few 10 MB/s at most, the original data cubes in FITS format are hosted on a VO server, and the region which a user is interested in should be cut out and transferred to the user (Eguchi et al., 2012). The system will equip a very high-speed disk array to process a TB scale data cube in a few 10 seconds, and disk I/O speed, endian conversion and data processing one will be comparable. Hence to reduce the endian conversion time is one of issues to realize our system. In this paper, I introduce a technique named "just-in-time endian conversion", which delays the endian conversion for each pixel just before it is really needed, to sweep out the endian conversion time; by applying this met...

  13. Simulation and modeling of the hydrocarbon generation-migration-mixing processes in Louisiana`s sedimentary basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.K.; Shi, Ying [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Mixed-age Mesozoic and Cenozoic hydrocarbons are present in many Louisiana oil and gas reservoirs. This phenomenon has added fuel to the controversy over whether the hydrocarbon source rocks underwent {open_quotes}shallow{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}deep{close_quotes} burial. Source rock generating capacities and timing of maturation, expulsion, and migration are important factors in providing a potential solution to the problem. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct the dynamic processes of oil and gas generation-migration-mixing in Louisiana basins by using numerical simulation. Problem solution employed a finite difference model which simulates numerically five processes on 2D vertical grids: (1) reconstruction of geological evolution as a result of sedimentation, erosion, and compaction; (2) computation of paleotemperatures based on constant crustal heat flow; (3) computation of source rock maturity based on a first-order kinetic model; (4) computation of geopressure based upon the result of compaction disequilibrium; and (5) computation of hydrocarbon expulsion and migration rates based on calculated results of maturity and geopressure reconstruction. This simulation/model yields plausible results for estimating potential regional reservoir volumetric distributions. The integrated approach used in this study provides a means for analyzing the dynamic processes of oil and gas generation-migration-mixing in Louisiana`s hydrocarbon systems. It also provides a basis for designing objective oil and gas trend analysis.

  14. Formation, Molecular Structure, and Morphology of Humins in Biomass Conversion : Influence of Feedstock and Processing Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zandvoort, Ilona; Wang, Yuehu; Rasrendra, Carolus B.; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Heeres, Hero J.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    Neither the routes through which humin byproducts are formed, nor their molecular structure have yet been unequivocally established. A better understanding of the formation and physicochemical properties of humins, however, would aid in making biomass conversion processes more efficient. Here, an ex

  15. The Impact of Knowledge Conversion Processes on Implementing a Learning Organization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-adaileh, Raid Moh'd; Dahou, Khadra; Hacini, Ishaq

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to explore the influence of the knowledge conversion processes (KCP) on the success of a learning organization (LO) strategy implementation. Design/methodology/approach: Using a case study approach, the research model examines the impact of the KCP including socialization, externalization, combination and…

  16. Agricultural land for urban development : The process of land conversion in Central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuc, Nguyen Quang; Westen, A. C M van; Zoomers, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Vietnam's progressive integration into the global market economy has triggered major economic and social transformations. In spatial terms, these are marked by a massive conversion of agricultural land for industrial and urban development. While this process has attracted considerab

  17. Agricultural land for urban development: The process of land conversion in Central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, C.P.; Westen, A.C.M. van; Zoomers, A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Vietnam’s progressive integration into the global market economy has triggered major economic and social transformations. In spatial terms, these are marked by a massive conversion of agricultural land for industrial and urban development. While this process has attracted considerab

  18. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in different types of processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumosani, Taha A; Moselhy, Said S; Asseri, Abdullah M; Asseri, Amer Hamzah

    2013-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PCAHs), particularly those with a high molecular weight, have been classified as probable carcinogens to humans. The aim of the present study is to determine the levels of PCAHs in samples of meat, fish, chicken, fried potato, and toasted bread, which will be thermally processed using conventional and microwave ovens. Different samples will be collected and analyzed for five PCAHs including pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzoflouroanthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. The analytical method involves saponification with methanolic potassium hydroxide, extraction with cyclohexane, and determination by high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained results showed that there is a variation in the detected PCAHs in different foodstuffs. Fried potato processed by conventional oven or microwave oven showed none of the selected studied PCAHs. It was found that, chicken showed higher content levels of total PCAHs than the meat and fish. Data are the highest mean concentrations of fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene but within low limit. The obtained results were compared with international permissible levels to avoid pollution, which may cause hazardous effects on individual and society.

  19. Hydrocarbon fuels from brown grease: Moving from the research laboratory toward an industrial process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Lawrence M.; Strothers, Joel; Pinnock, Travis; Hilaire, Dickens Saint; Bacolod, Beatrice; Cai, Zhuo Biao; Sim, Yoke-Leng

    2017-04-01

    Brown grease is a generic term for the oily solids and semi-solids that accumulate in the sewer system and in sewage treatment plants. It has previously been shown that brown grease undergoes pyrolysis to form a homologous series of alkanes and 1-alkenes between 7 and 17 carbon atoms, with smaller amounts of higher hydrocarbons and ketones up to about 30 carbon atoms. The initial study was performed in batch mode on a scale of up to 50 grams of starting material. However, continuous processes are usually more efficient for large scale production of fuels and commodity chemicals. This work describes the research and development of a continuous process. The first step was to determine the required reactor temperature. Brown grease consists largely of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and they react at different rates, and produce different products and intermediates. Intermediates include ketones, alcohols, and aldehydes, and Fe(III) ion catalyzes at least some of the reactions. By monitoring the pyrolysis of brown grease, its individual components, and intermediates, it was determined that a reactor temperature of at least 340 °C is required. A small scale (1 L) continuous stirred tank reactor was built and its performance is described.

  20. Applications of density functional theory calculations to selected problems in hydrocarbon processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabar, Rahul

    Recent advances in theoretical techniques and computational hardware have made it possible to apply Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods to realistic problems in heterogeneous catalysis. Hydrocarbon processing is economically, and strategically, a very important industrial sector in today's world. In this thesis, we employ DFT methods to examine several important problems in hydrocarbon processing. Fischer Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) is a mature technology to convert synthesis gas derived from coal, natural-gas or biomass into liquid fuels, specifically diesel. Iron is an active FTS catalyst, but the absence of detailed reaction mechanisms make it difficult to maximize activity and optimize product distribution. We evaluate thermochemistry, kinetics and Rate Determining Steps (RDS) for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis on several models of Fe catalysts: Fe(110), Fe(211) and Pt promoted Fe(110). Our studies indicated that CO-dissociation is likely to be the RDS under most reaction conditions, but the DFT-calculated activation energy ( Ea) for direct CO dissociation was too large to explain the observed catalyst activity. Consequently we demonstrate that H-assisted CO-dissociation pathways are competitive with direct CO dissociation on both Co and Fe catalysts and could be responsible for a major fraction of the reaction flux (especially at high CO coverages). We then extend this alternative mechanistic model to closed-packed facets of nine transition metal catalysts (Fe, Co, Ni, Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir and Pt). H-assisted CO dissociation offers a kinetically easier route on each of the metals studied. DFT methods are also applied to another problem from the petroleum industry: discovery of poison-resistant, bimetallic, alloy catalysts (poisons: C, S, CI, P). Our systematic screening studies identify several Near Surface Alloys (NSAs) that are expected to be highly poison-resistant yet stable and avoiding adsorbate induced reconstruction. Adsorption trends are also correlated with

  1. A comparison of thermal conversion process for several coal tar pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y.; Shui, H.; Yuan, X. [East China Metallurgical Institute, Ma`anshan (China)

    1995-03-01

    The property and constituents of coal tar pitch are of great importance to the production of raw material for needle coke. Structural constituents of five coal tar pitches were determined using {sup 1}H-NMR. Besides, thermal conversion process of these pitches in which primary quinoline in soluble fraction was removed by centrifugal separation method was also investigated. The experimental results show Baogang (I) and Meishan coal tar pitches meet the requirements of raw material for needle coke. The thermal conversion data was correlated with structural parameters. 6 refs.,1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Engineering bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between two numerical models describing the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. Both models consider the incoming biomass as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed...... of the syngas predicted by the two models is equal to about 7%. The application to different types of biomass shows that the difference in the predictions increases as the carbon content grows. The phenomenological model, in fact, generally considers higher conversion rates of this element to volatiles...

  3. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  4. Bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2013-01-01

    to describe the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. In this work both models consider the incoming solid fuel as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed is treated as a 0D system, but the thermo......Because of the complexity to describe and solve thermo-chemical processes occurring in a fuel bed in grate-fired boiler, it is often necessary to simplify the process and use modeling techniques based on overall mass, energy and species conservation. A comparison between two numerical models......-chemical processes are divided in two successive sections: drying and conversion (which includes pyrolysis, gasification and combustion). The second model is an empirical 1D approach. The two models need input data such as composition, temperature and feeding rate of biomass and primary air. Temperature, species...

  5. Development of sustainable CO2 conversion processes for the methanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of CO2 feedstock through CO2 conversion for producing valuable chemicals as an alternative to sequestration of the captured CO2 is attracting increasing attention in recent studies. Indeed, the methanol production process via thermochemical CO2 conversion reactions is considered a prime...... candidate for commercialization. The aim of this study is to examine two different options for a sustainable methanol plant employing the combined reforming and CO2 hydrogenation reactions, respectively. In addition, process improvement strategies for the implementation of the developed processes are also...... considered. The two methanol plants are developed using Aspen Plus®, the commercial process simulator. The net CO2 flows and methanol production costs are evaluated using ECON® and compared with those of the conventional methanol plant, which uses two-stage reforming. It is verified that the combined...

  6. A mild thermomechanical process for the enzymatic conversion of radiata pine into fermentable sugars and lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, Ian D; Jack, Michael W; Lloyd, John A; Murton, Karl D; Newman, Roger H; Stuthridge, Trevor R; Torr, Kirk M; Vaidya, Alankar A

    2017-01-01

    Conversion of softwoods into sustainable fuels and chemicals is important for parts of the world where softwoods are the dominant forest species. While they have high theoretical sugar yields, softwoods are amongst the most recalcitrant feedstocks for enzymatic processes, typically requiring both more severe pretreatment conditions and higher enzyme doses than needed for other lignocellulosic feedstocks. Although a number of processes have been proposed for converting softwoods into sugars suitable for fuel and chemical production, there is still a need for a high-yielding, industrially scalable and cost-effective conversion route. We summarise work leading to the development of an efficient process for the enzymatic conversion of radiata pine (Pinus radiata) into wood sugars. The process involves initial pressurised steaming of wood chips under relatively mild conditions (173 °C for 3-72 min) without added acid catalyst. The steamed chips then pass through a compression screw to squeeze out a pressate rich in solubilised hemicelluloses. The pressed chips are disc-refined and wet ball-milled to produce a substrate which is rapidly saccharified using commercially available enzyme cocktails. Adding 0.1% polyethylene glycol during saccharification was found to be particularly effective with these substrates, reducing enzyme usage to acceptable levels, e.g. 5 FPU/g OD substrate. The pressate is separately hydrolysed using acid, providing additional hemicellulose-derived sugars, for an overall sugar yield of 535 kg/ODT chips (76% of theoretical). The total pretreatment energy input is comparable to other processes, with the additional energy for attrition being balanced by a lower thermal energy requirement. This pretreatment strategy produces substrates with low levels of fermentation inhibitors, so the glucose-rich mainline and pressate syrups can be fermented to ethanol without detoxification. The lignin from the process remains comparatively unmodified, as

  7. Petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites: a review of investigation and remediation regulations and processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epelbaum, Michel; Claudio, Jair R. [Bureau Veritas do Brasil Sociedade Classificadora e Certificadora Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    This paper discusses alternatives on remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites which include groundwater remediation techniques and soil remediation techniques. Finally, the work points out some trends of sites remediation in Brazil and abroad. 6 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  8. Optimization of purification processes to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in polluted raw fish oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra-Pimentel, Iria; Fernández-González, Ricardo; Martínez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    Fish oils are one of the main sources of health promoting nutrients such as n-3 fatty acids in animal and human diet. Nevertheless, they could be an important source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Different strategies of decontamination processes to reduce polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in fish oils, such as solvent extraction (ethanol) and adsorbent extraction using commercially available (activated carbon) and sustainable adsorbents (mussel shell and wood ashes), were compared. Adsorption conditions were evaluated and optimized by an experimental design and the experimental results were adjusted to response surfaces. In this way, PAH removals increased with increasing of individual PAH molecular weight and they range from 80% to 100% using activated carbon and from 10% to 100% using wood ashes. Pine wood ashes showed similar removal rates to activated carbon (87%-100%) excluding F (51%) and P (42%). No PAH removal was observed using mussel shell ashes. Ethanol extraction was also optimized and showed a good performance in the extraction of PAHs. However, it does affect their ω-3 fatty acid contents. Finally, real oil samples from different fishing areas: Spain, South America, and North Europe were selected for the decontamination experiments under experimental conditions previously optimized.

  9. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized.

  10. Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated sludge from a soil washing process: evaluation of bioremediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, F J García; Pérez, R; Escolano, O; Rubio, A; Gimeno, A; Fernandez, M D; Carbonell, G; Perucha, C; Laguna, J

    2012-01-15

    The usual fate of highly contaminated fine products (silt-clay fractions) from soil washing plants is disposal in a dump or thermal destruction (organic contaminants), with consequent environmental impacts. Alternative treatments for these fractions with the aim of on-site reuse are needed. Therefore, the feasibility of two technologies, slurry bioremediation and landfarming, has been studied for the treatment of sludge samples with a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of 2243 mg/kg collected from a soil washing plant. The treatability studies were performed at the laboratory and pilot-real scales. The bioslurry assays yielded a TPH reduction efficiency of 57% and 65% in 28 days at the laboratory and pilot scale, respectively. In the landfarming assays, a TPH reduction of 85% in six months was obtained at laboratory scale and 42% in three months for the bioremediation performed in the full-scale. The efficiency of these processes was evaluated by ecotoxicity assessments. The toxic effects in the initial sludge sample were very low for most measured parameters. After the remediation treatments, a decrease in toxic effects was observed in earthworm survival and in carbon mineralisation. The results showed the applicability of two well known bioremediation technologies on these residues, this being a novelty.

  11. Evaluation of electrochemical processes for the removal of several target aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalka, Yamen; Karabet, François; Hashem, Shahir

    2011-03-01

    Ground and surface water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products is a serious and growing environmental problem throughout the world. Consequently, a study of the use of electrochemical treatment in the clean-up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination by aromatic pollutants to more acceptable levels. In the experiments described, water contamination by refined petroleum products was simulated under laboratory conditions. Electrochemical treatment, using aluminium electrodes, has been optimised by full factorial design and surface response analysis in term of BTEX and PAHs removal and energy consumption. The optimal conditions of pH, current density, electrolysis time, electrolyte type, and electrolyte concentration have then been applied in the treatment of real water samples which were monitored as petroleum contaminated samples. Treatment results have shown that electrochemical methods could achieve the concentration of these pollutants to undetectable levels in particular groundwater and surface water, hence, they can be highly effective in the remediation of water contaminated by aromatic hydrocarbons, and the use of these processes is therefore recommended.

  12. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  13. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm. PMID:25748023

  14. Cleanup of metals and hydrocarbons contaminated soils using the ChemTech process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, R.; Yan, V.; Lim, S. [Klohn-Crippen Consultants Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    1997-10-01

    The ChemTech soil treatment process, an on-site ex-situ system, comprised of a three-phase fluidized bed to scour, emulsify and chemically leach soil contaminants into a process water, was described. The cleaned soils are then removed from the process circuit by means of a hydrodynamic classifier. At this point they are suitable for return to the excavation site. The process was demonstrated on a pilot scale in January 1997 by Klohn-Crippen Consultants at a demonstration program of emerging and innovative technologies sponsored by the Bay Area Defence Conversion Action Team (BADCAT), to assist with the remediation of twelve closing military bases in the San Francisco area. The ChemTest demonstration involved the removal of copper, chromium, lead and zinc from the Hunter Point Naval Reserve, plus treatability tests on a number of other contaminated soil samples. The ChemTech process was selected by federal and state regulatory agencies from 21 proposed technologies on the basis of performance, effectiveness, low cost, and absence of secondary environmental impacts. This paper provides details of the demonstration program, addresses the applicability of the technology to other sites, and provides cost estimates of unit cleanup costs. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Transformation, Conversion, Storage, Transportation of thermal energy by thermochemical processes and thermo-hydraulic processes

    OpenAIRE

    Stitou, Driss

    2013-01-01

    The research presented aims to meet the major challenges of sustainable management and rational use of energy (transport and storage of heat energy), to develop thermodynamic analysis tools and propose appropriate solutions for minimizing environmental impacts resulting from the transformation or conversion of thermal energy. The different developed themes are based on three axes. The first part concerns the development of thermodynamic analysis tools for the assessment, design and optimizati...

  17. Novel antifoam for fermentation processes: fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon hybrid unsymmetrical bolaform surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Pinar; Ileri, Nazar; Erdinç, Burak I; Aydogan, Nihal; Argun, Muharrem

    2005-09-13

    As foaming appears as a problem in chemical and fermentation processes that inhibits reactor performance, the eminence of a novel fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon unsymmetrical bolaform (FHUB: OH(CH2)11N+(C2H4)2(CH2)2(CF2)5CF3 I-) surfactant as an antifoaming agent as well as a foam-reducing agent was investigated and compared with other surfactants and a commercial antifoaming agent. The surface elasticity of FHUB was determined as 4 mN/m, indicating its high potential on thinning of the foam film. The interactions between FHUB and the microoganism were investigated in a model fermentation process related with an enzyme production by recombinant Escherichia coli, in V = 3.0 dm3 bioreactor systems with V(R) = 1.65 dm3 working volume at air inlet rate of Q(o)/V(R) = 0.5 dm3 dm(-3) min(-1) and agitation rate of N = 500 min(-1) oxygen transfer conditions, at T = 37 degrees C, pH(o) = 7.2, and C(FHUB) = 0 and 0.1 mM, in a glucose-based defined medium. As FHUB did not influence the metabolism, specific enzyme activity values obtained with and without FHUB were close to each other; however, because of the slight decrease in oxygen transfer coefficient, slightly lower volumetric enzyme activity and cell concentrations were obtained. However, when FHUB is compared with widely used silicon oil based Antifoam A, with the use of the FHUB, higher physical oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) values are obtained. Moreover, as the amount required for the foam control is very low, minute changes in the working volume of the bioreactor were obtained indicating the high potential of the use of FHUB as an antifoaming agent as well as a foam-reducing agent.

  18. A review of conversion processes for bioethanol production with a focus on syngas fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha Devarapalli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol production from corn is a well-established technology. However, emphasis on exploring non-food based feedstocks is intensified due to dispute over utilization of food based feedstocks to generate bioethanol. Chemical and biological conversion technologies for non-food based biomass feedstocks to biofuels have been developed. First generation bioethanol was produced from sugar based feedstocks such as corn and sugar cane. Availability of alternative feedstocks such as lignocellulosic and algal biomass and technology advancement led to the development of complex biological conversion processes, such as separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP, and syngas fermentation. SHF, SSF, SSCF, and CBP are direct fermentation processes in which biomass feedstocks are pretreated, hydrolyzed and then fermented into ethanol. Conversely, ethanol from syngas fermentation is an indirect fermentation that utilizes gaseous substrates (mixture of CO, CO2 and H2 made from industrial flue gases or gasification of biomass, coal or municipal solid waste. This review article provides an overview of the various biological processes for ethanol production from sugar, lignocellulosic, and algal biomass. This paper also provides a detailed insight on process development, bioreactor design, and advances and future directions in syngas fermentation.

  19. Technical and economical evaluation of carbon dioxide capture and conversion to methanol process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Aditya Anugerah; Juwari, Handogo, Renanto

    2017-05-01

    Phenomenon of global warming, which is indicated by increasing of earth's surface temperature, is caused by high level of greenhouse gases level in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide, which increases year by year because of high demand of energy, gives the largest contribution in greenhouse gases. One of the most applied solution to mitigate carbon dioxide level is post-combustion carbon capture technology. Although the technology can absorb up to 90% of carbon dioxide produced, some worries occur that captured carbon dioxide that is stored underground will be released over time. Utilizing captured carbon dioxide could be a promising solution. Captured carbon dioxide can be converted into more valuable material, such as methanol. This research will evaluate the conversion process of captured carbon dioxide to methanol, technically and economically. From the research, it is found that technically methanol can be made from captured carbon dioxide. Product gives 25.6905 kg/s flow with 99.69% purity of methanol. Economical evaluation of the whole conversion process shows that the process is economically feasible. The capture and conversion process needs 176,101,157.69 per year for total annual cost and can be overcome by revenue gained from methanol product sales.

  20. The Conversion of a Zimbabwean Processing Plant from Manual to Smart Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Collier; Ernest; Bhero

    2010-01-01

    <正>The automation of several key processes in a factory in Zimbabwe is described.The plant is a producer of bolts and nails for the southern Africa region.Being built in the 1950s,the equipment was intended for manual operation.To improve efficiency and reduce overhead costs, this project was commissioned to add electronic intelligence to some of the processing equipment.In particular the conversion of forging furnaces to computer control and the intelligent implementation of heat-treatment processes are described.Results of the project in economic and quality terms are presented.

  1. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  2. Symmetry, vibrational energy redistribution and vibronic coupling: The internal conversion processes of cycloketones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Sølling, Theis I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discern two basic mechanisms of internal conversion processes; one direct, where immediate activation of coupling modes leads to fast population transfer and one indirect, where internal vibrational energy redistribution leads to equidistribution of energy, i.e., ergodicity......, and slower population transfer follows. Using model vibronic coupling Hamiltonians parameterized on the basis of coupled-cluster calculations, we investigate the nature of the Rydberg to valence excited-state internal conversion in two cycloketones, cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone. The two basic mechanisms...... can amply explain the significantly different time scales for this process in the two molecules, a difference which has also been reported in recent experimental findings [T. S. Kuhlman, T. I. Sølling, and K. B. Møller, ChemPhysChem. 13, 820 (2012)]...

  3. Biomass as an energy source: thermodynamic constraints on the performance of the conversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratieri, M; Baggio, P; Fiori, L; Grigiante, M

    2008-10-01

    In the present work an equilibrium model (gas-solid), based on the minimization of the Gibbs energy, has been used in order to estimate the theoretical yield and the equilibrium composition of the reaction products (syngas and char) of biomass thermochemical conversion processes (pyrolysis and gasification). The data obtained from this model have also been used to calculate the heating value of the fuel gas, in order to evaluate the overall energy efficiency of the thermal conversion stage. The proposed model has been applied both to partial oxidation and steam gasification processes with varying air to biomass (ER) and steam to carbon (SC) ratio values and using different feedstocks; the obtained results have been compared with experimental data and with other model predictions obtaining a satisfactory agreement.

  4. Performance Evolution of Phytic Acid Conversion Film in the Forming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve conversion film techniques, control film properties and improve quality of following techniques, in this study, the environment-friendly phytic conversion films were deposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy. The performance evolution of the film during the forming process such as mechanical property, residual stress, corrosion resistance, micromorphology, composition, and roughness was investigated by nanomechanical testing system, electrochemical workstation, scanning electron microscope, Auger electron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that, in the forming process, the changes of micromorphology, roughness, mechanical property, and corrosion property are closely related to the variation of elements and residual stress. With the prolonging of film formation time, the difference between film elements and substrate elements gradually increases, and the residual stress first increases then decreases. When the film formation time is about 30 min, the film begins to crack and the residual stress is released, which leads to the decrease of mechanical property and corrosion resistance of the film.

  5. Solution-processed organic tandem solar cells with power conversion efficiencies >12%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaomiao; Gao, Ke; Wan, Xiangjian; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Xia, Ruoxi; Liu, Feng; Yang, Xuan; Feng, Huanran; Ni, Wang; Wang, Yunchuang; Peng, Jiajun; Zhang, Hongtao; Liang, Ziqi; Yip, Hin-Lap; Peng, Xiaobin; Cao, Yong; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-12-01

    An effective way to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells is to use a tandem architecture consisting of two subcells, so that a broader part of the solar spectrum can be used and the thermalization loss of photon energy can be minimized. For a tandem cell to work well, it is important for the subcells to have complementary absorption characteristics and generate high and balanced (matched) currents. This requires a rather challenging effort to design and select suitable active materials for use in the subcells. Here, we report a high-performance solution-processed, tandem solar cell based on the small molecules DR3TSBDT and DPPEZnP-TBO, which offer efficient, complementary absorption when used as electron donor materials in the front and rear subcells, respectively. Optimized devices achieve a power conversion efficiency of 12.50% (verified 12.70%), which represents a new level of capability for solution-processed, organic solar cells.

  6. Complex evaluation of health status and life quality of employees occupied in mining and processing of hydrocarbon raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    G.G. Gimranova; A.B. Bakirov; L.K. Karimova; Z.F. Gimaeva; N.A. Beigul

    2016-01-01

    A complex social-hygienic investigation for the assessment of health-related life quality and living standards among 1200 male workers occupied in mining and primary processing of hydrocarbon raw materials has been performed. The study included the method of the anonymous survey for the employee with using a questionnaire developed by WHO experts for the realization of Health, environment and social capital management in enterprises (HESME). The health risk factors’ prevalence associated with...

  7. Conversion of paper sludge to ethanol, II: process design and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiliang; Lynd, Lee R

    2007-01-01

    Process design and economics are considered for conversion of paper sludge to ethanol. A particular site, a bleached kraft mill operated in Gorham, NH by Fraser Papers (15 tons dry sludge processed per day), is considered. In addition, profitability is examined for a larger plant (50 dry tons per day) and sensitivity analysis is carried out with respect to capacity, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Conversion based on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with intermittent feeding is examined, with ethanol recovery provided by distillation and molecular sieve adsorption. It was found that the Fraser plant achieves positive cash flow with or without xylose conversion and mineral recovery. Sensitivity analysis indicates economics are very sensitive to ethanol selling price and scale; significant but less sensitive to the tipping fee, and rather insensitive to the prices of cellulase and power. Internal rates of return exceeding 15% are projected for larger plants at most combinations of scale, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Our analysis lends support to the proposition that paper sludge is a leading point-of-entry and proving ground for emergent industrial processes featuring enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass.

  8. Biological treatment process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil field produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez, G.; Khandan, N.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil fields produced waters using biological treatment was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. Based on previous laboratory studies, a field-scale prototype system was designed and operated over a period of four months. Two different sources of produced waters were tested in this field study under various continuous flow rates ranging from 375 1/D to 1,800 1/D. One source of produced water was an open storage pit; the other, a closed storage tank. The TDS concentrations of these sources exceeded 50,000 mg/l; total n-alkanes exceeded 100 mg/l; total petroleum hydrocarbons exceeded 125 mg/l; and total BTEX exceeded 3 mg/l. Removals of total n-alkanes, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX remained consistently high over 99%. During these tests, the energy costs averaged $0.20/bbl at 12 bbl/D.

  9. Integrated process for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas into transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier; Smith, Colin; Flake, Matthew; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gray, Michel J.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of renewable fuels that will enable cost competitiveness with petroleum-derived fuels remains a grand challenge for U.S. scientists. In this paper, we report on an integrated catalytic approach for producing transportation fuels from biomass-derived syngas. The composition of the resulting hydrocarbon fuel can be modulated to meet specified requirements. Biomass-derived syngas is first converted over an Rh-based catalyst into a complex aqueous mixture of condensable C2+ oxygenated compounds (predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate). This multi-component aqueous mixture then is fed to a second reactor loaded with a ZnxZryOz mixed oxide catalyst, which has tailored acid-base sites, to produce an olefin mixture rich in isobutene. The olefins then are oligomerized using a solid acid catalyst (e.g., Amberlyst-36) to form condensable olefins with molecular weights that can be targeted for gasoline, jet, and/or diesel fuel applications. The product rich in long-chain olefins (C7+) is finally sent to a fourth reactor that is needed for hydrogenation of the olefins into paraffin fuels. Simulated distillation of the hydrotreated oligomerized liquid product indicates that ~75% of the hydrocarbons present are in the jet-fuel range. Process optimization for the oligomerization step could further improve yield to the jet-fuel range. All of these catalytic steps have been demonstrated in sequence, thus providing proof-of-concept for a new integrated process for the production of drop-in biofuels. This unique and flexible process does not require external hydrogen and also could be applied to non-syngas derived feedstock, such as fermentation products (e.g., ethanol, acetic acid, etc.), other oxygenates, and mixtures thereof containing alcohols, acids, aldehydes and/or esters.

  10. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] in processed meat products using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Olatunde S; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Opeolu, Beatrice O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked, grilled and boiled meats were determined using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). PAHs in the processed meats were extracted in n-hexane after hydrolysis with methanolic KOH. Clean-up was achieved using solid phase extraction in neutral-Si/basic-Si/acidic-Si/neutral-Si frits. The fractions, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[123-cd]pyrene (IP) and benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) were separated and quantified using GC-FID. The method and instrument limits of detections were 0.1, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3μg/kg and 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5μg/kg, respectively, for BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP. The method's recovery and precision generally varied between 83.69% and 94.25% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.18-15.60%; and 90.38-96.71% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.82-12.87% respectively. The concentration of BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP in smoked, grilled and boiled meat samples were ranged 0.64-31.54μg/kg, 0.07-7.04μg/kg, 0.09-15.03, 0.51-46.67μg/kg and 0.01-5.11μg/kg, respectively.

  11. Curable liquid hydrocarbon prepolymers containing hydroxyl groups and process for producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydroxyl containing curable liquid hydrocarbon prepolymers by ozonizing a high molecular weight saturated hydrocarbon polymer such as polyisobutylene or ethylene propylene rubber is discussed. The ozonized material is reduced using reducing agents, preferably diisobutyl aluminum hydride, to form the hydroxyl containing liquid prepolymers having a substantially lower molecular weight than the parent polymer. The resulting curable liquid hydroxyl containing prepolymers can be poured into a mold and readily cured, with reactants such as toluene diisocyanate, to produce highly stable elastomers having a variety of uses such as binders for solid propellants.

  12. Process and catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesis gas containing CO and H.sub.2 is converted to a high-octane hydrocarbon liquid in the gasoline boiling point range by bringing the gas into contact with a heterogeneous catalyst including, in physical mixture, a zeolite molecular sieve, cobalt at 6-20% by weight, and thoria at 0.5-3.9% by weight. The contacting occurs at a temperature of 250.degree.-300.degree. C., and a pressure of 10-30 atmospheres. The conditions can be selected to form a major portion of the hydrocarbon product in the gasoline boiling range with a research octane of more than 80 and less than 10% by weight aromatics.

  13. Changing the composition of the group hydrocarbons of diesel fractions in the process of hydrotreating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivtcova, N.; Baklashkina, К; Sabiev, Sh; Krivtsov, E.; Syskina, A.

    2016-09-01

    Change in group composition of sulfur compounds and structural group composition of the diesel fractions in the course of hydrotreating is presented in the paper. The removal degree of sulfur compounds is shown to comprise 95.8% rel. The homologs of benzothiophenes are removed for 93.9% rel., ones of the dibenzothiophenes are for 90.7% rel. A considerable change in group composition of diesel fraction is established in the course of hydrotreating. Hydrogenation degree of aromatic hydrocarbons is 24.4% wt., the amount of saturated hydrocarbons has increased by 20.4% wt.

  14. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  15. Numerical modelling of biomass combustion: Solid conversion processes in a fixed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal

    2017-06-01

    Increasing demand for energy and rising concerns over global warming has urged the use of renewable energy sources to carry a sustainable development of the world. Bio mass is a renewable energy which has become an important fuel to produce thermal energy or electricity. It is an eco-friendly source of energy as it reduces carbon dioxide emissions. Combustion of solid biomass is a complex phenomenon due to its large varieties and physical structures. Among various systems, fixed bed combustion is the most commonly used technique for thermal conversion of solid biomass. But inadequate knowledge on complex solid conversion processes has limited the development of such combustion system. Numerical modelling of this combustion system has some advantages over experimental analysis. Many important system parameters (e.g. temperature, density, solid fraction) can be estimated inside the entire domain under different working conditions. In this work, a complete numerical model is used for solid conversion processes of biomass combustion in a fixed bed furnace. The combustion system is divided in to solid and gas phase. This model includes several sub models to characterize the solid phase of the combustion with several variables. User defined subroutines are used to introduce solid phase variables in commercial CFD code. Gas phase of combustion is resolved using built-in module of CFD code. Heat transfer model is modified to predict the temperature of solid and gas phases with special radiation heat transfer solution for considering the high absorptivity of the medium. Considering all solid conversion processes the solid phase variables are evaluated. Results obtained are discussed with reference from an experimental burner.

  16. Process integration for the conversion of glucose to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, A.; Christensen, T.B.; Fu, Wenjing

    2009-01-01

    The development of biorefineries means that a key feedstock for many new processes will be sugars in various forms, such as glucose or fructose. From these feedstocks a range of chemicals can be synthesized using heterogeneous catalysis, immobilized enzymes, homogeneous catalysts, soluble enzymes......, fermentations or combinations thereof. This presents a particularly interesting process integration challenge since the optimal conditions for each conversion step will be considerably different from each other. Furthermore, compared to oil-based refineries the feedstock represents a relatively high proportion...

  17. A modular ex situ conversion process for thick MOD-fluoride RBCO precursors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feenstra, R.; List, F. A.; Li, X. P.; Rupich, M. W.; Miller, D. J.; Maroni, V. A.; Zhang, Y.; Thompson, J. R.; Christen, D. K.; Materials Science Division; ORNL; American Superconductor Corp.

    2009-06-01

    Following a review of heating induced chemical and structural changes in RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (RBCO) fluoride precursors (R = rare earth of Y) deposited by metalorganic deposition (MOD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD), a modular process comprising successive, functionally distinct, brief annealing steps (modules) is introduced. By decoupling events that otherwise occur simultaneously, the modular process provides a framework for addressing the complex kinetics associated with the temperature ramp of the ex situ conversion anneal. Modules for modifying the F concentration, porosity and microstructure, and RBCO nucleation are described.

  18. Conversion Coatings Produced on AZ61 Magnesium Alloy by Low-Voltage Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resultes of anodic oxide conversion coatings on wrought AZ61 magnesium alloy production are describe. The studies were conducted in a solution containing: KOH (80 g/l and KF (300 g/l using anodic current densities of 3, 5 and 10 A/dm2 and different process durations. The obtained coatings were examined under a microscope and corrosion tests were performed by electrochemical method. Based on these results, it was found that the low-voltage process produces coatings conferring improved corrosion resistance to the tested magnesium alloy.

  19. The role of proteinase enzymes in the process of conversion of muscle to meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dümen Emek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Post mortem meat tenderization is a complex mechanism and unfortunately it has not been fully identified scientifically. It is known that endogenous proteinases have an important role in this mechanism. Detailed studies are being performed about the destructive effects of lysosomal proteinases and calcium dependent proteinases on the myofibrils and these are most common topics that are being investigated about meat tenderization processes by the scientists. The aim of this paper is to review the role of proteinase enzymes in the process of conversion of muscle to meat. .

  20. Photosynthesis and other processes of energy conversion in cells; Photosynthese und andere Energieumwandlungsprozesse in Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterhelt, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany). Abt. Membranchemie

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthesis is the fundamental physico-chemical process sustaining life on our planet. Initially energy was available via organic compounds which arose in the energy rich atmosphere of the young planet. From these building blocks cellular life originated. The degradation and conversion of such compounds in cells under anaerobic conditions and ATP production was dominant in the early phase of biological evolution. Such fermentative processes still occur today in a multitude of organisms which survived in ecological niches and conserved the original metabolic pathways. With depletion of energy supply via organic compounds cells adopted stepwise sunlight for energy conversion. Two principle modes of photosynthesis developed: the retinal-based photosynthesis in archaea and the more efficient chlorophyll-based in bacteria and eucaryotes. Photosynthesis reached perfection when photon-driven electron flow was connected to the reduction of carbon dioxide with water and production of oxygen. The water-splitting reaction initially caused an ecological catastrophy and only in the course of further evolution respiration was invented reducing oxygen again to water and thereby forming a closed circuit with photosynthesis. The contribution deals with the evolutionary aspects of cellular energy conversion, fermentation and photosynthesis and describes the molecular details of the three fundamental photosystems in archaea, in bacteria and in eucarya. (orig.)

  1. Experimental study of the bio-oil production from sewage sludge by supercritical conversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Guanyi; Li, Yanbin; Yan, Beibei; Pan, Donghui

    2013-11-01

    Environment-friendly treatment of sewage sludge has become tremendously important. Conversion of sewage sludge into energy products by environment-friendly conversion process, with its energy recovery and environmental benefits, is being paid significant attention. Direct liquefaction of sewage sludge into bio-oils with supercritical water (SCW) was therefore put forward in this study, as de-water usually requiring intensive energy input is not necessary in this direct liquefaction. Supercritical water may act as a strong solvent and also a reactant, as well as catalyst promoting reaction process. Experiments were carried out in a self designed high-pressure reaction system with varying operating conditions. Through orthogonal experiments, it was found that temperature and residence time dominated on bio-oil yield compared with other operating parameters. Temperature from 350 to 500°C and reaction residence time of 0, 30, 60min were accordingly investigated in details, respectively. Under supercritical conversion, the maximum bio-oil yield could achieve 39.73%, which was performed at 375°C and 0min reaction residence time. Meanwhile, function of supercritical water was concluded. Fuel property analysis showed the potential of bio-oil application as crude fuel.

  2. The Impact of Natural Hazards such as Turbulent Wind Gusts on the Wind Energy Conversion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wächter, M.; Hölling, M.; Milan, P.; Morales, A.; Peinke, J.

    2012-12-01

    Wind turbines operate in the atmospheric boundary layer, where they are exposed to wind gusts and other types of natural hazards. As the response time of wind turbines is typically in the range of seconds, they are affected by the small scale intermittent properties of the turbulent wind. We show evidence that basic features which are known for small-scale homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and in particular the well-known intermittency problem, have an important impact on the wind energy conversion process. Intermittent statistics include high probabilities of extreme events which can be related to wind gusts and other types of natural hazards. As a summarizing result we find that atmospheric turbulence imposes its intermittent features on the complete wind energy conversion process. Intermittent turbulence features are not only present in atmospheric wind, but are also dominant in the loads on the turbine, i.e. rotor torque and thrust, and in the electrical power output signal. We conclude that profound knowledge of turbulent statistics and the application of suitable numerical as well as experimental methods are necessary to grasp these unique features and quantify their effects on all stages of wind energy conversion.

  3. Speech rate effects on the processing of conversational speech across the adult life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Xaver; Janse, Esther

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of speech rate on spoken word recognition across the adult life span. Contrary to previous studies, conversational materials with a natural variation in speech rate were used rather than lab-recorded stimuli that are subsequently artificially time-compressed. It was investigated whether older adults' speech recognition is more adversely affected by increased speech rate compared to younger and middle-aged adults, and which individual listener characteristics (e.g., hearing, fluid cognitive processing ability) predict the size of the speech rate effect on recognition performance. In an eye-tracking experiment, participants indicated with a mouse-click which visually presented words they recognized in a conversational fragment. Click response times, gaze, and pupil size data were analyzed. As expected, click response times and gaze behavior were affected by speech rate, indicating that word recognition is more difficult if speech rate is faster. Contrary to earlier findings, increased speech rate affected the age groups to the same extent. Fluid cognitive processing ability predicted general recognition performance, but did not modulate the speech rate effect. These findings emphasize that earlier results of age by speech rate interactions mainly obtained with artificially speeded materials may not generalize to speech rate variation as encountered in conversational speech.

  4. Toward the Development and Deployment of Large-Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    In light of the depletion of fossil fuels and the increased daily requirements for liquid fuels and chemicals, CO2 should indeed be regarded as a valuable C-1. additional feedstock for sustainable manufacturing of liquid fuels and chemicals. Development and deployment of CO2 capture and chemical...... conversion processes are among the grand challenges faced by today's scientists and engineers. Very few of the reported CO2 capture and conversion technologies have been employed for industrial installations on a large scale, where high-efficiency, cost/energy-effectiveness, and environmental friendliness...... are three keys factors. The CO2 capture technologies from stationary sources and ambient air based on solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes are discussed first. Transforming CO2 to liquid fuels and chemicals, which are presently produced from petroleum, through thermochemical, electrochemical...

  5. Entanglement, coherence, and redistribution of quantum resources in double spontaneous down-conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Paraoanu, Gheorghe Sorin

    2017-06-01

    We study the properties of bisqueezed tripartite Gaussian states created by two spontaneous parametric down-conversion processes that share a common idler. We give a complete description of the quantum correlations across all partitions, as well as of the genuine multipartite entanglement, obtaining analytical expressions for most of the quantities of interest. We find that the state contains genuine tripartite entanglement, in addition to the bipartite entanglement among the modes that are directly squeezed. We also investigate the effect of homodyne detection of the photons in the common idler mode, and analyze the final reduced state of the remaining two signal modes. We find that this measurement leads to a conversion of the coherence of the two signal modes into entanglement, a phenomenon that can be regarded as a redistribution of quantum resources between the modes. The applications of these results to quantum optics and circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms are also discussed.

  6. Availabiltiy and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Controlling processes and comparison of testing methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskam, G.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from two contaminated materials, a tar-containing asphalt granulate (¿16 US-EPA PAHs 3412 mg/kg) and gasworks soil (¿PAHs 900 mg/kg), by comparing results from three typical types of leaching tests: a column, se

  7. Trace elements and petroleum hydrocarbons in the aquatic bird food chain of process water evaporation ponds at the Little America Refinery, Casper, Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study determined the nature and extent of trace elements, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons in evaporation ponds used for the disposal of process water from...

  8. Webinar Presentation: Exposures to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Childhood Growth Trajectories and Body Composition: Linkages to Disrupted Self-Regulatory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Exposures to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Childhood Growth Trajectories and Body Composition: Linkages to Disrupted Self-Regulatory Processes, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2016 Webinar Series: Childhood Obesity

  9. A methodological framework for the development of feasible CO2 conversion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Lee, Jay H.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    Converting captured CO2 feedstock into valuable chemical products is viewed as one of the potential ways to reduce atmospheric CO2 emission. To this end, a methodological framework is suggested to support the development of feasible CO2 conversion processes that can contribute to the CO2 reduction...... combined reforming (CR) of methane reaction is developed. To supply the CO2 feedstock, the aMDEA-based CO2 capture applied to a SMR-based H2 plant is considered. A baseline process is developed and is compared with a non-CO2 utilizing conventional methanol plant (process substitution) and a gasoline...... production process (product substitution) in terms of the established criteria. For the former, it is verified that the methanol production via combined reforming leads to cheaper unit production cost as well as lower net CO2 emission compared to the conventional methanol plant. For the latter, it is shown...

  10. Energy conversion in isothermal nonlinear irreversible processes - struggling for higher efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, W.; Feistel, R.

    2017-06-01

    First we discuss some early work of Ulrike Feudel on structure formation in nonlinear reactions including ions and the efficiency of the conversion of chemical into electrical energy. Then we give some survey about isothermal energy conversion from chemical to higher forms of energy like mechanical, electrical and ecological energy. Isothermal means here that there are no temperature gradients within the model systems. We consider examples of energy conversion in several natural processes and in some devices like fuel cells. Further, as an example, we study analytically the dynamics and efficiency of a simple "active circuit" converting chemical into electrical energy and driving currents which is roughly modeling fuel cells. Finally we investigate an analogous ecological system of Lotka-Volterra type consisting of an "active species" consuming some passive "chemical food". We show analytically for both these models that the efficiency increases with the load, reaches values higher then 50 percent in a narrow regime of optimal load and goes beyond some maximal load abruptly to zero.

  11. Processes controlling water and hydrocarbon composition in seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Henrik; Karlsen, Dag A.; Sturz, Anne; Backer-Owe, Kristian; Banks, David A.; Planke, Sverre

    2007-01-01

    Water-, mud-, gas-, and petroleum-bearing seeps are part of the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) in Southern California. Seeps in the Davis-Schrimpf seep field (˜14,000 m2) show considerable variations in water temperature, pH, density, and solute content. Water-rich springs have low densities (98 vol%). Halogen geochemistry of the waters indicates that mixing of deep and shallow waters occurs and that near-surface dissolution of halite may overprint the original fluid compositions. Carbon isotopic analyses suggest that hydrocarbon seep gases have a thermogenic origin. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of petroleum in a water-dominated spring, composed of 53% saturated compounds, 35% aromatics, and 12% polar compounds. The abundance of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and immature biomarkers suggests a hydrothermal formation of the petroleum, making the SSGS a relevant analogue to less accessible hydrothermal seep systems, e.g., the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.

  12. Solid hydrocarbon assisted reduction: a new process of generating micron scale metal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan M McCabe

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The goal of this research is to test a central hypothesis: that gas species generated by the thermal and/or catalytically assisted decomposition of hydrocarbons in an inert atmosphere can reduce metal oxides to a metallic state. It is postulated that the decomposition releases gas phase radicals that can bind with oxygen in the metal oxides, forming volatile, stable oxides such as CO2 and water. This research consisted of thermally dec...

  13. Internal Conversion Process of Chlorophyll a in Solvents in Femtosecond Pump-Probe Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Niu; Li-qing Dong; Shu-lin Cong

    2008-01-01

    The internal conversion (IC) processes of chlorophyll a (chl-a) in solvents are studied based on the reduced density matrix theory. The IC times can be obtained by simulating the experimental fluorescence depletion spectra (FDS). The calculated IC times of chl-a in ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran and dimethyl formamide are 141, 147, and 241 fs, respectively. The oscillation feature of the FDS results from the forward and backward transfer of the population between coupled electronic states. The effects of diabatic coupling between two electronic states on the IC time and the FDS are described. The influence of molecule-reservoir coupling on the IC time is also investigated.

  14. Escherichia coli as a potential hydrocarbon conversion microorganism. Oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds by recombinant E. coli in two-liquid phase (aqueous-organic) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favre-Bulle, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    The increased interest in the study of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms in recent years has been stimulated by the possibility of using their monooxygenases in the selective oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. As an example, long chain (>C16) n-alkanes are converted to dicarboxylic

  15. Photon spectrum and polarization for high conversion coefficient in the Compton backscattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    This study looks to simulate the nonlinear Compton backscattering (CBS) process based on the Monte Carlo technique for the conversion coefficient Kc ⩾ 1 , which can be considered as the average number of photons emitted by each electron. The characteristics of the nonlinear CBS process simulated in this work are as follows: the number of absorbed photons of a laser, the distance in the laser pulse in which the electron passes between two collisions, the energy and the polarization of the emitted photon in each collision, and the polarization of the electron before and after collision. The developed approach allows us to find the spectra and polarization characteristics of the final electrons and photons. When Kc > 1 , the spin-flip processes need to be considered for a correct simulation of the polarization of the final photons and electrons for energies typical of a γ- γ collider.

  16. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, B.; Bastos Fanta, A.; Burrows, A.; Hellman, A.; Wagner, J. B.; Iandolo, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation. These films show the largest average grain size and the highest charge carrier density, as determined from electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analysis. We believe that the fast processing enabled by RTP makes this technique a preferred method for investigation of novel materials and architectures, potentially also on nanostructured electrodes, where retaining high surface area is crucial to maximize performance. PMID:28091573

  17. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, B.; Bastos Fanta, A.; Burrows, A.; Hellman, A.; Wagner, J. B.; Iandolo, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation. These films show the largest average grain size and the highest charge carrier density, as determined from electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analysis. We believe that the fast processing enabled by RTP makes this technique a preferred method for investigation of novel materials and architectures, potentially also on nanostructured electrodes, where retaining high surface area is crucial to maximize performance.

  18. Systems studies of coal conversion processes using a reference simulator. Quarterly progress report, June 13--September 12, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, G.V.; Woods, J.M.

    1976-09-27

    This project has two principal objectives. The first is to construct a modular computer simulation/design package for coal conversion systems. The second is to use this package to study in a programmatic fashion an array of coal conversion flowsheet alternatives. The computerized package is to be based on bench- and large-scale pilot plant data developed by other organizations under ERDA contracts. It is to have sufficient flexibility to permit the user to incorporate process alternatives and engineering design modifications and is to have the capability for detailed cost estimation and economic evaluation. The Illinois Coal Gasification Group Demonstration Plant based on COED and COGAS development work is the first conversion process to be investigated with the simulation package. Other variations to this flowsheet, which retain the COGAS and COED primary conversion sections will be investigated, as well as several alternatives involving other primary conversion technologies currently under development for ERDA.

  19. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1993. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low- rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  20. Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process, Phase IIIB (Progress)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt E. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    From June 1998 through September 1999, direct process residue (DPR, a waste byproduct) hydrogenolysis has been studied at a large pilot plant within Dow Corning's Carrollton, KY, facility. The system reacts filtered DPR with chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and pressure. The process routinely demonstrates DPR conversions from 59% to 89% on a monthly basis. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. An expansion of the current unit's capacity is planned to be on-line by the end of CY2000. Furthermore, a larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning's Barry, Wales, site.

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 3: Gasification, process fuels, and balance of plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, W. A.; Corman, J. C.; Johnson, G. G.; Cassel, T. A. V.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation of gasification and clean fuels from coal. Factors discussed include: coal and coal transportation costs; clean liquid and gas fuel process efficiencies and costs; and cost, performance, and environmental intrusion elements of the integrated low-Btu coal gasification system. Cost estimates for the balance-of-plant requirements associated with advanced energy conversion systems utilizing coal or coal-derived fuels are included.

  2. A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

  3. Analysis of Optimal Process Flow Diagrams of Light Naphtha Isomerization Process by Mathematic Modelling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuzlov Vjacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to simulation of hydrocarbons refining processes catalytic reactors. The kinetic and thermodynamic research of light naphtha isomerization process was conducted. The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon feedstock chemical conversion on different types of platinum-content catalysts was established. The estimation of efficiency of including different types of isomerization technologies in oil refinery flow diagram was performed.

  4. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI: Major differences in deactivation behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Højholt, Karen Thrane; Holm, Martin Spangsberg;

    2012-01-01

    Methanol has been converted to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI. The gallium based zeotypes are analogous to H-ZSM-5, but the Brønsted acidity is introduced by framework incorporation of gallium rather than aluminum, which leads to lower intrinsic acid strength. ...... (hydrolysis) of the Ga&sbnd;O bonds in the zeolite structure rather than coke deposition....

  5. Renewable Energy Supply for Power Dominated, Energy Intense Production Processes - A Systematic Conversion Approach for the Anodizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    >D Stollenwerk, T Kuvarakul, I Kuperjans,

    2013-06-01

    European countries are highly dependent on energy imports. To lower this import dependency effectively, renewable energies will take a major role in future energy supply systems. To assist the national and inter-European efforts, extensive changes towards a renewable energy supply, especially on the company level, will be unavoidable. To conduct this conversion in the most effective way, the methodology developed in this paper can support the planning procedure. It is applied to the energy intense anodizing production process, where the electrical demand is the governing factor for the energy system layout. The differences between the classical system layout based on the current energy procurement and an approach with a detailed load-time-curve analysis, using process decomposition besides thermodynamic optimization, are discussed. The technical effects on the resulting energy systems are shown besides the resulting energy supply costs which will be determined by hourly discrete simulation.

  6. Up conversion processes in yttrium-lithium-flouride crystals co-doped with erbium and ytterbium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinger, B.; Danilov, Valery P.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schwan, L. O.; Schmid, D.

    2002-07-01

    We report on studies of the up-conversion process in YLiF4 single crystals co-doped with Er3+ and with Yb3+. Er3+ has a well known complicated energy level system within the 4f shell which gives rise to the up- conversion process. Yb3+ with a broad absorption band int eh regime 940 nm conversion process considerably. We have performed steady state and time-resolved measurements of emission and absorption spectra as well as luminescence excitation spectra following either excitation with a light emitting diode, a laser diode or a pulsed dye laser. We have tried to trace some of the channels for energy transfer, relaxation and up-conversion and to optimize the system for an optimum up-conversion efficiency. At optimum conditions we can estimate quantum yields for up-conversion of RI to green light in the order of about 2.5 to 3 percent. Three-step up- conversion to UV emission is also observed. These observation suggest that YliF4 single crystal co-doped with Er3+ and with Yb3+ may be considered as suitable candidates for diode-laser-pumped displays and for solid state laser system int eh visible and near UV region.

  7. Hydrocarbons in the Bay of Bengal and Central Indian Basin bottom sediments: Indicators of geochemical processes in the lithosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chernova, T.G.; Paropkari, A.L.; Pikovskii, Yu.I.; Alekseeva, T.A.

    that the hydrocarbons are mostly derived from marine sources. Sharp increases fo hydrocarbons are found in the vicinity of the tectonically active region of the Central Indian Basin, particularly in the sediments collected from the fracture zone. The total concentration...

  8. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  9. Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Sara; Barr, Dale J; Garrod, Simon; Kessler, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Humans are especially good at taking another's perspective-representing what others might be thinking or experiencing. This "mentalizing" capacity is apparent in everyday human interactions and conversations. We investigated its neural basis using magnetoencephalography. We focused on whether mentalizing was engaged spontaneously and routinely to understand an utterance's meaning or largely on-demand, to restore "common ground" when expectations were violated. Participants conversed with 1 of 2 confederate speakers and established tacit agreements about objects' names. In a subsequent "test" phase, some of these agreements were violated by either the same or a different speaker. Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex). Theta oscillations (3-7 Hz) were modulated most prominently, and we observed phase coupling between functionally distinct neural circuits. The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated. In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances.

  10. Measurements of conversion electrons in the s-process branching point nucleus {sup 176}Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, A.; Tan, W.; Avetisyan, R.; Casarella, C.; Gyurijinyan, A.; Manukyan, K.V.; Marley, S.T.; Nystrom, A.; Paul, N.; Siegl, K.; Smith, K.; Smith, M.K.; Strauss, S.Y.; Aprahamian, A. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Conversion coefficients, gamma-gamma and gamma-electron coincidences were measured in the s-process branching point nucleus {sup 176}Lu. Our goal was to determine the multipolarities of the γ-ray transitions that connect the high and low K states of {sup 176}Lu. This {sup 176}Lu nucleus has a long-lived ground state (K=7{sup -}) of 37.6 Gy, a short-lived isomeric state (K=0{sup -}) at 122.8 keV with half-life of 3.6 h, as well as a 58 μs isomer at 1588 keV (K=14{sup +}). The excitation structure of this nucleus contains bands of intermediate spins of both positive and negative parities. The intermediate states can under certain stellar temperatures completely change the equilibrium between the isomer and ground state of {sup 176}Lu and change the abundance of this nucleus. We populated 37 previously known levels in this nucleus via the {sup 176}Yb(p,n) reaction and measured 42 conversion coefficients for γ-ray transitions including 17 of them for the first time. (orig.)

  11. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  12. Impact of bacterial and fungal processes on {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adetutu, Eric M.; Ball, Andy S. [School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001 (Australia); Weber, John; Aleer, Samuel; Dandie, Catherine E. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Juhasz, Albert L., E-mail: Albert.Juhasz@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the impact of bacterial and fungal processes on {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was investigated in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The extent of {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation varied depending on the bioremediation strategy employed. Under enhanced natural attenuation conditions, {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation after 98 days was 8.5 {+-} 3.7% compared to < 1.2% without nitrogen and phosphorus additions. {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was further enhanced through Tween 80 amendments (28.9 {+-} 2.4%) which also promoted the growth of a Phanerochaete chyrsosporium fungal mat. Although fungal growth in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil could be promoted through supplementing additional carbon sources (Tween 80, sawdust, compost, pea straw), fungal {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was negligible when sodium azide was added to soil microcosms to inhibit bacterial activity. In contrast, when fungal activity was inhibited through nystatin additions, {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation ranged from 6.5 {+-} 0.2 to 35.8 {+-} 3.8% after 98 days depending on the supplied amendment. Bacteria inhibition with sodium azide resulted in a reduction in bacterial diversity (33-37%) compared to microcosms supplemented with nystatin or microcosms without inhibitory supplements. However, alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms, highlighting the important role of this bacterial group in {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The roles of different microbial groups in hydrocarbon mineralisation was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting fungal growth did not affect {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting bacterial growth resulted in negligible {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms. Black

  13. The Influence of Process Parameters on Properties of Conversion Coatings Deposited on Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaś M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of process parameters of conversion coatings on the corrosion resistance was investigated. To produce anodic coatings, the solutions of H2SO4 of 0.5 and 1 M concentrations and current densities of 0.5 and 1 A/dm2 were applied. The coatings were deposited by galvanostatic technique on titanium Grade 1. The result of the study was comparison of the corrosion resistance of coatings produced under varying parameters such as: the anodic current density, the electrolyte concentration, and the speed of reaching the preset voltage. Corrosion tests performed by potentiodynamic polarization test have shown that even nanometric anodic films of amorphous structure improve the corrosion resistance of titanium alloy. The lowest corrosion current and the corrosion potential of the most cathodic nature were observed in the sample with anodic coating produced at J = 1 A/dm2 in a 0.5 M H2SO4 electrolyte concentration.

  14. Efficient energy conversion in the pulp and paper industry: application to a sulfite wood pulping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, F.

    2007-07-01

    This report measures the actions performed in 2006 and the actions planned for 2007 within the framework of the project Efficient Energy Conversion in the Pulp and Paper Industry. In addition to the data reconciliation models of the steam and condensate networks and of the process of Borregaard Schweiz AG, process models have been developed with the goal of defining the heat requirements of the process. The combination of utility system data reconciliation with the process models allows to considerably reduce the need for detailed process modelling and for on-site data collection and measurement. A systematic definition of the hot and cold streams in the process has been developed in order to compute the minimum energy requirement of the process. The process requirements have been defined using the dual representation concept where the energy requirement of the process unit operations are systematically analysed from their thermodynamic requirement and the way they are satisfied by the technology that implements the operation. Corresponding to the same energy requirement but realised with different temperature allows on one hand to define the exergy efficiency of the heat transfer system in each of the process unit operations and to identify possible energy savings by heat exchange in the system. The analysis has been completed by the definition of the possible energy recovery from waste streams. The minimum energy requirement of the process using the different requirement representation has been realised and the analysis of the energy savings opportunities is now under preparation. This new step will first concern the definition of the utility system integration and the systematic analysis of the energy savings opportunities followed by the techno-economic evaluation of the most profitable energy savings options in the process. The national and international collaborations constitute also an important part of this project. The project is done in close

  15. Effects of Neutralization, Decoloration, and Deodorization on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons during Laboratory-Scale Oil Refining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of technological operations during oil refining process on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in neutralized, bleached, and deodorized oils was investigated on the basis of laboratory-scale study. Under the best experimental conditions, benzo[a]pyrene decreased by 85.1%, 99.7%, and 40.8% in neutralized, bleached, and deodorized oils, respectively. Total of 16 analytes decreased by 55.7%, 87.5%, and 47.7%, respectively. Bleaching with activated charcoal was the most efficient procedure to reduce PAHs in crude oil. Neutralization had a modest influence on sixteen analytes; however, deodorization was only responsible for a slight decrease in the light PAHs and heavy PAHs contents. Data obtained in this study suggest that the use of activated carbon during oil refining process is highly recommended; moreover, these results provide a useful guidance for oil refining plant to reduce security risk and ensure the quality of the vegetable oil products.

  16. 甲烷等离子体转化合成碳二烃反应过程和过渡态理论%Theoretical Study of Reaction Paths and Transition States on Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 杨恩翠; 许根慧; 郝金库

    2007-01-01

    The direct synthesis of C2 hydrocarbons (ethylene, acetylene and ethane) from methane is one of the most important task in C1 chemistry. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can be realized through plasma reaction. In order to explore the reaction process and mechanism, the possible reaction paths (1)-(4) were proposed on coupling reaction of methane through plasma and studied theoretically using semi-PM3 method [PM3 is parametcrization method of modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO)] including determining the transition state, calculating the activation energy and thermodynamic state functions and analyzing the bond order and intrinsic reaction coordinate. The reaction heat results indicate that the reactions (2) and (4) are exothermic,while reactions of (1) and (3) are endothermic. The activation energy results show that activation energy for reactions (1) and (2) was much lower than that of reaction paths (3) and (4). Therefore, paths (1) and (2) is the favorable reaction path energetically. More interestingly by comparing the intrinsic reaction coordinated (IRC) of the reaction paths (1) and (2), it is found that the variations of bond lengths in reaction path (1) has a crucial effect on the potential energy, while in reaction path (2), the adjustment of the system geometry also contributes to the whole potential energy of the system.

  17. Co-conversion of Ethane and Methanol into Higher Hydrocarbons over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Rovik, Anne; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    Ethane and methanol are converted simultaneously over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5 to produce light olefins and aromatics. The presence of methanol in the reactant stream is intended to facilitate activation of ethane following literature reports on co-conversion of methane and methanol....... However, the conversion of ethane actually decreases significantly when methanol is present. To gain insight into mechanistic details, C-13-labeled methanol is co-converted with unlabeled ethane. These isotopic labeling studies show that carbon atoms from ethane and methanol are mixed in the products...

  18. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbons over a two-component (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO and ZSM-5 zeolite) catalyst: kinetic modelling and catalyst deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erena, J.; Arandes, J.M.; Bilbao, J.; Gayubo, A.G. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingeneria Quimica; De Lasa, H.I. [University of Western Ontario, London, ONT (Canada). Chemical Reactor Engineering Centre

    2000-05-01

    The present study describes the kinetics of syngas transformation into liquid hydrocarbons (boiling point in the gasoline range) using as catalyst a mixture of a metallic component, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO, and of an acidic component, ZSM-5 zeolite. Experimental results were obtained in an isothermal fixed-bed integral reactor. The validity of several kinetic models, available for methanol synthesis, is analysed and modifications are proposed. These changes involve a rate equation with a CO{sub 2} concentration-dependent term. Catalyst deactivation is also evaluated and the effect of the operating conditions on coke deposition is established. Moreover, the rate of CO conversion and the change of catalytic activity with time-on-stream were described using a kinetic model showing a weak influence of temperature. (Author)

  19. Geochemical constraints on mixed source and hydrocarbon filling process in theYingjisu Sag, Tarim Basin, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Lingyun; CHANG Xiangchun; WANG Mingzhen; YU Xinghe; MA Lixin; DUAN Yunge

    2009-01-01

    The Yingjisu Sag was petroliferous for normal oil, condensate oil, reservoir bitumen and natural gases. Geochemical studies showed that natural gases in the Yingjisu Sag were a gas mixture consisting mainly of Cambrian pyrolysis gas, Jurassic condensate oil in well Yingnan 2 and normal oil in well Tadong 2, reflecting the characteristics of marine-phase gases and oils, while crude oils in well Longkou 1 demonstrated the characteristics of both marine and terrestrial oils, which were derived from lower algae and higher plants. Jurassic oils from wells Longkou 1 and Huayingcan 1 and Cambrian crude oils from well Tadong 2 were derived mainly from Cambrian-Lower Ordovician source rocks. Jurassic and Silurian reservoir bitumens from well Yingnan 2 were biodegradated, suggesting they are of marine and terrestrial origins. The bitumens have similar geochemical characteristics, which are correlated well with Ordovician crude oils from well Tadong 2 and Jurassic condensate oil from well Yingnan 2. Based on the characteristics of tectonic evolution in this area and the analysis of hydrocarbon accumulation, the constraints on the mixed source and hydrocarbon filling process in the Yingjisu Sag were brought forward.

  20. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  1. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal Process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal Process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,5000 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb), by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the ACCP Demonstration Project team was to expand SynCoal market awareness and acceptability for both the products and the technology. The ACCP Project team continued to focus on improving the operation, developing commercial markets, and improving the SynCoal products as well as the product`s acceptance.

  2. CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH ELECTRIC FIELD ENHANCED LOW TEMPERATURE PLASMA CATALYSIS%电场增强低温等离子催化合成C2烃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas is not only playing an increasing important role in energy and chemicals supplies in 21st century but is also the second most important component of the greenhouse gases. Clean and direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons (ethane, ethene and acetylene) through AC and DC plasma catalysis enhanced by electric field was studied at low temperature ranging from 50?℃ to 100?℃, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions. The influence of form of the electrode, distance between the electrodes, voltage, diameter of reactor, flow of inlet methane, N2/CH4(mole) and 20 catalysts were tested under low temperature plasma. The results indicated that best form of the electrode was plate; the better distance between the electrode was 5mm; the appropriate voltage was 38V(AC);the apparent diameter of reactor was 17mm, the likely flow range flux of inlet methane was 60—80?ml*min-1, the suitable ratio of N2/CH4 (mole) was 0.5—1.0.The yield of C2 hydrocarbons was the highest on V2O5,ZnO(5%)/ZSM-5-38 catalyst, the yield of ethene was the highest on La0.8Sr0.2CrO3,ZnO catalyst. The results are better than those obtained through conventional reaction of oxidation coupling of methane.

  3. Integrated Electrochemical Processes for CO2 Capture and Conversion to Commodity Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, T. Alan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Jamison, Timothy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Siemens Corporations (SCR) are developing new chemical synthesis processes for commodity chemicals from CO2. The process is assessed as a novel chemical sequestration technology that utilizes CO2 from dilute gas streams generated at industrial carbon emitters as a raw material to produce useful commodity chemicals. Work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) commenced on October 1st, 2010, and finished on September 30th, 2013. During this period, we have investigated and accomplished five objectives that mainly focused on converting CO2 into high-value chemicals: 1) Electrochemical assessment of catalytic transformation of CO2 and epoxides to cyclic carbonates; 2) Investigation of organocatalytic routes to convert CO2 and epoxide to cyclic carbonates; 3) Investigation of CO2 Capture and conversion using simple olefins under continuous flow; 4) Microwave assisted synthesis of cyclic carbonates from olefins using sodium bicarbonates in a green pathway; 5) Life cycle analyses of integrated chemical sequestration process. In this final report, we will describe the detailed study performed during the three year period and findings and conclusions drawn from our research.

  4. Conversion of pine sawdust bio-oil (raw and thermally processed) over equilibrium FCC catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertero, Melisa; Sedran, Ulises

    2013-05-01

    A raw bio-oil from pine sawdust, the liquid product from its thermal conditioning and a synthetic bio-oil composed by eight model compounds representing the main chemical groups in bio-oils, were converted thermally and over a commercial equilibrium FCC catalyst. The experiments were performed in a fixed bed reactor at 500 °C. The highest hydrocarbon yield (53.5 wt.%) was obtained with the conditioned liquid. The coke yields were significant in all the cases, from 9 to 14 wt.%. The synthetic bio-oil produced lesser hydrocarbons and more oxygenated compounds and coke than the authentic feedstocks from biomass. The previous thermal treatment of the raw bio-oil had the positive effects of increasing 25% the yield of hydrocarbons, decreasing 55% the yield of oxygenated compounds and decreasing 20% the yield of coke, particularly the more condensed coke.

  5. Methanol to olefin Conversion on HSAPO-34 zeolite from periodic density functional theory calculations: a complete cycle of side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.M.; Wang, Y.D.; Xie, Z.K.; Liu, Z.P. [SINOPEC, Shanghai (China)

    2009-03-15

    For its unique position in the coal chemical industry, the methanol to olefin (MTO) reaction has been a hot topic in zeolite catalysis. Due to the complexities of catalyst structure and reaction networks, many questions such as how the olefin chain is built from methanol remain elusive. On the basis of periodic density functional theory calculations, this work establishes the first complete catalytic cycle for MTO reaction via hexamethylbenzene (HMB) trapped in HSAPO-34 zeolite based on the so-called side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism. The cycle starts from the methylation of HMB that leads to heptamethylbenzenium ion (heptaMB{sup +}) intermediate. This is then followed by the growth of side chain via repeated deprotonation of benzenium ions and methylation of the exocyclic double bond. Ethene and propene can finally be released from the side ethyl and isopropyl groups of benzenium ions by deprotonation and subsequent protonation steps. We demonstrate that (i) HMB/HSAPO-34 only yields propene as the primary product based on the side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism and (ii) an indirect proton-shift step mediated by water that is always available in the system is energetically more favorable than the traditionally regarded internal hydrogen-shift step. Finally, the implications of our results toward understanding the effect of acidity of zeolite on MTO activity are also discussed.

  6. Enzymes and microorganisms in food industry waste processing and conversion to useful products: a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroad, P.A.; Wilke, C.R.

    1976-12-01

    Bioconversion of food processing wastes is receiving increased attention with the realization that waste components represent an available and utilizable resource for conversion to useful products. Liquid wastes are characterized as dilute streams containing sugars, starches, proteins, and fats. Solid wastes are generally cellulosic, but may contain other biopolymers. The greatest potential for economic bioconversion is represented by processes to convert cellulose to glucose, glucose to alcohol and protein, starch to invert sugar, and dilute waste streams to methane by anaerobic digestion. Microbial or enzymatic processes to accomplish these conversions are described.

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  8. Technical-economic assessment of the production of methanol from biomass. Conversion process analysis. Final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, E.I.; Simmons, J.A.; Price, J.D.; Nguyen, T.D.

    1979-07-12

    A comprehensive engineering system study was conducted to assess various thermochemical processes suitable for converting biomass to methanol. A summary of the conversion process study results is presented here, delineating the technical and economic feasibilities of producing methanol fuel from biomass utilizing the currently available technologies. (MHR)

  9. Complex evaluation of health status and life quality of employees occupied in mining and processing of hydrocarbon raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Gimranova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A complex social-hygienic investigation for the assessment of health-related life quality and living standards among 1200 male workers occupied in mining and primary processing of hydrocarbon raw materials has been performed. The study included the method of the anonymous survey for the employee with using a questionnaire developed by WHO experts for the realization of Health, environment and social capital management in enterprises (HESME. The health risk factors’ prevalence associated with alcohol, smoking, low physical activity, poor nutrition, stress in the workplace has been established. The feeling of stress and nervousness is generated by the fear of dismissal (18 % of employees, conflicts with administration (4% and by financial problems. About 47% of persons are anxious about social and economic instability. Not more than 4% of employees consider that the health deterioration is directly related to harmful working conditions. The survey has revealed an inflated self-esteem regarding the health. Thus 59.00 % of employee considers their health status to be excellent or normal, while an objective assessment revealed only 29.7 % of healthy employee. Due to the employee’s opinion, the saving of health is conditioned by healthy lifestyle, but the practice of self-preservation behavior is poorly spread. Not more than 37 % of respondents follow the doctors’ recommendations. Among the positive process there are changes in dietary habits in everyday life, namely 60 % of the respondents have chosen the balanced diet. The obtained data regarding the quality and way of life of the employee, occupied in mining and processing of hydrocarbon raw materials, should be taken into consideration when developing complex social development programs on an enterprise.

  10. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound. [Ultrasonic thermometry proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    A study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems has been carried out. The instrumentation types studied include Thermocouples, Radiation Pyrometers, and Acoustical Thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. The study determined that ultrasonic thermometry has the potential of providing viable instrumentation. Consequently, a feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry was undertaken. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible. To experimentally verify the technique it is needed (a) to test the available sensor materials at high temperatures under erosive and corrosive conditions and (b) upon the selection of the appropriate sensor material to validate the proposed signal processing technique. The base for the applicability of this technique will be the frequency of operation, which will determine the length of the sensor and the noise background at the frequency of interest. It is, however, believed that the proposed technique will provide reliable estimates under the noise background.

  11. Blending Influence on the Conversion Efficiency of the Cogasification Process of Corn Stover and Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ike Anukam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterizations of biomass and coal were undertaken in order to compare their properties and determine the combustion characteristics of both feedstocks. The study was also intended to establish whether the biomass (corn stover used for this study is a suitable feedstock for blending with coal for the purpose of cogasification based on composition and properties. Proximate and ultimate analyses as well as energy value of both samples including their blends were undertaken and results showed that corn stover is a biomass material well suited for blending with coal for the purpose of cogasification, given its high volatile matter content which was measured and found to be 75.3% and its low ash content of 3.3% including its moderate calorific value of 16.1%. The results of the compositional analyses of both pure and blended samples of corn stover and coal were used to conduct computer simulation of the cogasification processes in order to establish the best blend that would result in optimum cogasification efficiency under standard gasifier operating conditions. The final result of the cogasification simulation process indicated that 90% corn stover/10% coal resulted in a maximum efficiency of about 58% because conversion was efficiently achieved at a temperature that is intermediate to that of coal and corn stover independently.

  12. An intensified π-hole in beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes: its determinant role in CO2 conversion into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2016-02-28

    DFT investigations on beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes or sheets (BNs) predict the existence of a very reactive kind of novel material capable of spontaneously reducing the first hydrogenation step in the CO2 conversion mechanism. This impressive behaviour appears as a result of the very deep π-hole generated by the beryllium moieties, and also determines its selectivity towards the production of CH4.

  13. Sustainable resource recovery and energy conversion processes using microbial electrochemical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Matthew D.

    Microbial Electrochemical Technologies (METs) are emerging technological platforms for the conversion of waste into usable products. METs utilize naturally occurring bacteria, called exoelectrogens, capable of transferring electrons to insoluble terminal electron acceptors. Electron transfer processes in the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens were exploited here to develop sustainable processes for synthesis of industrially and socially relevant end products. The first process examined was the removal of soluble metals from solution to form catalytic nanoparticles and nanoporous structures. The second process examined was the biocatalytic conversion of electrons into hydrogen gas using electrons supplied directly to an electrode. Nanoparticle formation is desirable because materials on the nanoscale possess different physical, optical, electronic, and mechanical properties compared to bulk materials. In the first process, soluble palladium was used to form catalytic palladium nanoparticles using extracellular electron transfer (EET) processes of G. sulfurreducens, typically the dominant member of mixedculture METs. Geobacter cells reduced the palladium extracellularly using naturally produced pili, which provided extracellular adsorption and reduction sites to help delay the diffusion of soluble metals into the cell. The extracellular reduction prevented cell inactivation due to formation of intracellular particles, and therefore the cells could be reused in multiple palladium reduction cycles. A G. sulfurreducens biofilm was next investigated as a biotemplate for the formation of a nanoporous catalytic palladium structure. G. sulfurreducens biofilms have a dense network of pili and extracellular cytochromes capable of high rates of electron transfer directly to an electrode surface. These pili and cytochromes provide a dense number of reduction sites for nanoparticle formation without the need for any synthetic components. The cells within the biofilm also can

  14. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.; Philip, C.V.; Erkey, C.; Feng, Z.; Postula, W.S.; Wang, J.

    1995-03-01

    This project was initiated because the supply of isobutylene had been identified as a limitation on the production of methyl-t-butyl ether, a gasoline additive. Prior research on isobutylene synthesis had been at low conversion (less than 5%) or extremely high pressures (greater than 300 bars). The purpose of this research was to optimize the synthesis of a zirconia based catalyst, determine process conditions for producing isobutylene at pressures less than 100 bars, develop kinetic and reactor models, and simulate the performance of fixed bed, trickle bed and slurry flow reactors. A catalyst, reactor models and optimum operating conditions have been developed for producing isobutylene from coal derived synthesis gas. The operating conditions are much less severe than the reaction conditions developed by the Germans during and prior to WWII. The low conversion, i.e. CO conversion less than 15%, have been perceived to be undesirable for a commercial process. However, the exothermic nature of the reaction and the ability to remove heat from the reactor could limit the extent of conversion for a fixed bed reactor. Long residence times for trickle or slurry (bubble column) reactors could result in high CO conversion at the expense of reduced selectivities to iso C{sub 4} compounds. Economic studies based on a preliminary design, and a specific location will be required to determine the commercial feasibility of the process.

  15. Availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Controlling processes and comparison of testing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, G.D. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environment, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Comans, R.N.J. [Wageningen University, Department of Soil Quality, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2009-01-15

    We have studied the availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from two contaminated materials, a tar-containing asphalt granulate (R16 US-EPA PAHs 3412 mg/kg) and gasworks soil (RPAHs 900 mg/kg), by comparing results from three typical types of leaching tests: a column, sequential batch, and two different availability tests. The sequential batch test was found to largely resemble the column test. However, the leaching of particularly the larger PAHs (>5 aromatic rings) was found to be enhanced in the batch test by up to an order of magnitude, probably due to their association with large DOC (dissolved organic carbon) molecules generated by the vigorous mixing. The release of PAHs in the two availability tests, in which the leaching is facilitated by either a high concentration of DOC or Tenax resin, was similar, although the latter test was easier to perform and yielded more repeatable results. The availability was much higher than the amount leached in the column and sequential batch tests. However, biodegradation had apparently occurred in the column test and the total amount of PAHs released by either leaching or biodegradation, 9% and 26% for asphalt granulate and gasworks soil, respectively, did equal the amount leached in the availability tests. Therefore, the availability was found to provide a relevant measure of the PAH fraction that can be released from the solid phase. These results stress the importance of using the available instead of the total amount of contaminant in the risk analysis of solid materials in utilization or disposal.

  16. Availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Controlling processes and comparison of testing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Gerlinde D; Comans, Rob N J

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from two contaminated materials, a tar-containing asphalt granulate (Sigma16 US-EPA PAHs 3412mg/kg) and gasworks soil (SigmaPAHs 900mg/kg), by comparing results from three typical types of leaching tests: a column, sequential batch, and two different availability tests. The sequential batch test was found to largely resemble the column test. However, the leaching of particularly the larger PAHs (>5 aromatic rings) was found to be enhanced in the batch test by up to an order of magnitude, probably due to their association with large DOC (dissolved organic carbon) molecules generated by the vigorous mixing. The release of PAHs in the two availability tests, in which the leaching is facilitated by either a high concentration of DOC or Tenax resin, was similar, although the latter test was easier to perform and yielded more repeatable results. The availability was much higher than the amount leached in the column and sequential batch tests. However, biodegradation had apparently occurred in the column test and the total amount of PAHs released by either leaching or biodegradation, 9% and 26% for asphalt granulate and gasworks soil, respectively, did equal the amount leached in the availability tests. Therefore, the availability was found to provide a relevant measure of the PAH fraction that can be released from the solid phase. These results stress the importance of using the available instead of the total amount of contaminant in the risk analysis of solid materials in utilization or disposal.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) sorption process to the "black carbon" (BC) component in river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Séquaris, Jean-Marie; Narres, Hans-Dieter; Vereecken, Harry; Klumpp, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    The importance of BC for the long term sequestration of organic carbon is actually discussed for mitigating climate change. In this context, the role of BC as a filter or source of nutrients or toxic chemicals is questioned. The fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is especially concerned. In this study, we have investigated the binding of PAH compounds, pyrene and phenanthrene, to Yangtze River sediments. For this purpose, the PAHs sorption to pristine and preheated sediments at 375°C was studied, which allow discriminating the contributions of amorphous organic carbon (AOC) and black carbon (BC) fractions to the PAH sorption extent. An analytical procedure for the determination of PAHs in the solution phase of the batch experiments has been developed with fluorescence spectroscopy. The PAHs sorption isotherms to pristine sediments were fitted by Freundlich and composite models as linear Langmuir model (LLM) and linear Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model (LPDMM). The sequential application of composite models LLM and LPDMM to the sorption isotherms allows assessing the partition of PAHs into AOC and its nonlinear adsorption in the porous structure of BC. The modelling results indicate that the PAHs sorption to minor BC component of sediments (molecular sieving plays an important role in the competitive PAHs sorption in a multi-solute system. J. Zhang, Ph.D. Dissertation, RWTH Aachen, Germany, 2010 J. Zhang et al., Effects of organic carbon and clay fractions on the pyrene sorption and distribution in Yangtze River sediments (submitted). J. Zhang et al., Pyrene and phenanthrene sorptions to Yangtze River sediments and their components in single and binary solute systems (submitted)

  18. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of fuel derived from waste plastics by various waste to energy (W-t-E) conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.; Khan, M. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of plastic wastes by means of producing energy can be treated as a good investment in the waste management and recycling sectors. In this article, conversion of plastics into liquid fuel by two thermo-chemical processes, pyrolysis and gasification, are reviewed. The study showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of homogenous waste plastics produces better quality and higher quantity of liquefied fuel than that of non-catalytic pyrolysis process at a lower operating temperature. The syngas produced from gasification process, which occurs at higher temperature than the pyrolysis process, can be converted into diesel by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction process. Conducive bed material like Olivine in the gasification conversion process can remarkably reduce the production of tar. The waste plastics pyrolysis oil showed brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of about 27.75%, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 0.292 kg/kWh, unburned hydrocarbon emission (uHC) of 91 ppm and NOx emission of 904 ppm in comparison with the diesel for BTE of 28%, BSFC of 0.276 kg/kWh, uHC of 57 ppm and NOx of 855 ppm. Dissolution of Polystyrene (PS) into biodiesel also showed the potential of producing alternative transport fuel. It has been found from the literature that at higher engine speed, increased EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) quantity based biodiesel blends reduces CO, CO2, NOx and smoke emission. EPS-biodiesel fuel blend increases the brake thermal efficiency by 7.8%, specific fuel consumption (SFC) by 7.2% and reduces brake power (Pb) by 3.2%. More study using PS and EPS with other thermoplastics is needed to produce liquid fuel by dissolving them into biodiesel and to assess their suitability as a transport fuel. Furthermore, investigation to find out most suitable W-t-E process for effective recycling of the waste plastics as fuel for internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce environmental pollution and generate revenue which will be addressed in this article.

  19. Disulfide mapping reveals the domain swapping as the crucial process of the structural conversion of prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner-Bratkovič, Iva; Jerala, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious conformational diseases. Despite the determination of many native prion protein (PrP) structures and in vitro production of infectious prions from recombinant PrP the structural background of PrP conversion remains the largest unsolved problem. The aggregated state of PrP (Sc) makes it inaccessible to high resolution techniques, therefore indirect methods have to be used to investigate the conversion process. We engineered disulfide bridges into the structured domain of PrP in order to determine the secondary structure elements that remain conserved upon conversion. Rather surprisingly, introduction of disulfides into each or both of the subdomains B1-H1-B2 and H2-H3 of the C-terminal globular domain retained the robust ability to convert into fibrils with increased content of β-structure, indistinguishable from the wild-type PrP. On the other hand disulfide bridges tethering the two subdomains completely prevented conversion, while their reduction reversed their conversion ability. The same conversion propensity was replicated also in prion infected cell lines. Experiments with combinations of engineered cysteine residues further support that domain swapping, centered on the B2-H2 loop, previously associated to species barrier, leads to PrP swapped dimers as the building block of prion fibrils.

  20. Effective field theory approach to parton-hadron conversion in high energy QCD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    A QCD based effective action is constructed to describe the dynamics of confinement and symmetry breaking in the process of parton-hadron conversion. The deconfined quark and gluon degrees of freedom of the perturbative QCD vacuum are coupled to color singlet collective fields representing the non-perturbative vacuum with broken scale and chiral symmetry. The effective action recovers QCD with its scale and chiral symmetry properties at short space-time distances, but yields at large distances (r > 1 fm) to the formation of symmetry breaking gluon and quark condensates. The approach is applied to the evolution of a fragmenting q\\bar q pair with its generated gluon distribution, starting from a large hard scale Q^2. The modification of the gluon distribution arising from the coupling to the non-perturbative collective field results eventually in a complete condensation of gluons. Color flux tube configurations of the gluons in between the q\\bar q pair are obtained as solutions of the equations of motion. With ...

  1. Biochemical Conversion Processes of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brethauer, Simone; Studer, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass - such as wood, agricultural residues or dedicated energy crops - is a promising renewable feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals that is available at large scale at low cost without direct competition for food usage. Its biochemical conversion in a sugar platform biorefinery includes three main unit operations that are illustrated in this review: the physico-chemical pretreatment of the biomass, the enzymatic hydrolysis of the carbohydrates to a fermentable sugar stream by cellulases and finally the fermentation of the sugars by suitable microorganisms to the target molecules. Special emphasis in this review is put on the technology, commercial status and future prospects of the production of second-generation fuel ethanol, as this process has received most research and development efforts so far. Despite significant advances, high enzyme costs are still a hurdle for large scale competitive lignocellulosic ethanol production. This could be overcome by a strategy termed 'consolidated bioprocessing' (CBP), where enzyme production, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation is integrated in one step - either by utilizing one genetically engineered superior microorganism or by creating an artificial co-culture. Insight is provided on both CBP strategies for the production of ethanol as well as of advanced fuels and commodity chemicals.

  2. Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Various Solar Energy Conversion Processes Leading to the Photolysis of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergene, T.

    1995-12-31

    In the application of solar energy, hydrogen is likely to be used as an energy carrier and a storage medium. Production of molecular hydrogen and oxygen from water requires energy input, which may come from solar energy in various ways. This thesis begins with a literature survey of the different conversion processes and the efficiencies, which is an introduction to a series of enclosed papers. These papers are: (1) Trapping of Minority Charge Carriers at Irradiated Semiconductor/Electrolyte Heterojunctions, (2) Model Calculations on Flat-Plate Solar Heat Collector With Integrated Solar Cells, and (3) Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Photolysis of Water By Microalgae. In the papers, The qualitative features of the ``illumination-current``-characteristic curve are deduced. The hypothesis is that trapping originates in some specific cases because of confinement, which leads to charge injections into energy states above that corresponding to the band edge. The quantitative features of certain hybrid photovoltaic/thermal configuration are deduced. An analysis of the theoretical and realizable efficiencies of the photolysis of water by micro algae is given. 151 refs., 18 figs., 1 table

  3. A thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) method to determine the catalytic conversion of cellulose from carbon-supported hydrogenolysis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Glauco F. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), C.P. 6192, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (IQSC), University of São Paulo (USP), C.P. 780, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Ramos, Luiz A. [Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (IQSC), University of São Paulo (USP), C.P. 780, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Barrett, Dean H. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), C.P. 6192, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Curvelo, Antonio Aprígio S. [Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos (IQSC), University of São Paulo (USP), C.P. 780, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Brazilian Bioethanol Science and Technology Laboratory (CTBE), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), C.P. 6179, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rodella, Cristiane B., E-mail: cristiane.rodella@lnls.br [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), C.P. 6192, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new method to determine the catalytic conversion of cellulose using TGA has been developed. • TGA is able to differentiate between carbon from cellulose and carbon from the catalyst. • Building an analytical curve from TGA results enables the accurate determination of cellulose conversion. - Abstract: The ability to determine the quantity of solid reactant that has been transformed after a catalytic reaction is fundamental in accurately defining the conversion of the catalyst. This quantity is also central when investigating the recyclability of a solid catalyst as well as process control in an industrial catalytic application. However, when using carbon-supported catalysts for the conversion of cellulose this value is difficult to obtain using only a gravimetric method. The difficulty lies in weighing errors caused by loss of the solid mixture (catalyst and non-converted cellulose) after the reaction and/or moisture adsorption by the substrate. These errors are then propagated into the conversion calculation giving erroneous results. Thus, a quantitative method using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has been developed to determine the quantity of cellulose after a catalytic reaction by using a tungsten carbide catalyst supported on activated carbon. Stepped separation of TGA curves was used for quantitative analysis where three thermal events were identified: moisture loss, cellulose decomposition and CO/CO{sub 2} formation. An analytical curve was derived and applied to quantify the residual cellulose after catalytic reactions which were performed at various temperatures and reaction times. The catalytic conversion was calculated and compared to the standard gravimetric method. Results showed that catalytic cellulose conversion can be determined using TGA and exhibits lower uncertainty (±2%) when compared to gravimetric determination (±5%). Therefore, it is a simple and relatively inexpensive method to determine

  4. Renewable hydrocarbons for jet fuels from biomass and plastics via microwave-induced pyrolysis and hydrogenation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong

    This dissertation aims to enhance the production of aromatic hydrocarbons in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis, and maximize the production of renewable cycloalkanes for jet fuels in the hydrogenation process. In the process, ZSM-5 catalyst as the highly efficient catalyst was employed for catalyzing the pyrolytic volatiles from thermal decomposition of cellulose (a model compound of lignocellulosic biomass). A central composite experiment design (CCD) was used to optimize the product yields as a function of independent factors (e.g. catalytic temperature and catalyst to feed mass ratio). The low-density polyethylene (a mode compound of waste plastics) was then carried out in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis in the presence of ZSM-5 catalyst. Thereafter, the catalytic microwave-induced co-pyrolysis of cellulose with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was conducted over ZSM-5 catalyst. The results showed that the production of aromatic hydrocarbons was significantly enhanced and the coke formation was also considerably reduced comparing with the catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose or LDPE alone. Moreover, practical lignocellulosic biomass (Douglas fir sawdust pellets) was converted into aromatics-enriched bio-oil by catalytic microwave pyrolysis. The bio-oil was subsequently hydrogenated by using the Raney Ni catalyst. A liquid-liquid extraction step was implemented to recover the liquid organics and remove the water content. Over 20% carbon yield of liquid product regarding lignocellulosic biomass was obtained. Up to 90% selectivity in the liquid product belongs to jet fuel range cycloalkanes. As the integrated processes was developed, catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose with LDPE was conducted to improve aromatic production. After the liquid-liquid extraction by the optimal solvent (n-heptane), over 40% carbon yield of hydrogenated organics based on cellulose and LDPE were achieved in the hydrogenation process. As such, real

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Electrochemical Processes in Renewable Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmand, Maryam [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-05-19

    The development of better energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells and batteries, is crucial for reduction of our global carbon footprint and improving the quality of the air we breathe. However, both of these technologies face important challenges. The development of lower cost and better electrode materials, which are more durable and allow more control over the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface, is perhaps most important for meeting these challenges. Hence, full characterization of the electrochemical processes that occur at the electrodes is vital for intelligent design of more energy efficient electrodes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a short-range order, element specific technique that can be utilized to probe the processes occurring at operating electrode surfaces, as well for studying the amorphous materials and nano-particles making up the electrodes. It has been increasingly used in recent years to study fuel cell catalysts through application of the and #916; and mgr; XANES technique, in combination with the more traditional X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques. The and #916; and mgr; XANES data analysis technique, previously developed and applied to heterogeneous catalysts and fuel cell electrocatalysts by the GWU group, was extended in this work to provide for the first time space resolved adsorbate coverages on both electrodes of a direct methanol fuel cell. Even more importantly, the and #916; and mgr; technique was applied for the first time to battery relevant materials, where bulk properties such as the oxidation state and local geometry of a cathode are followed.

  6. Influence of Torrefaction on the Conversion Efficiency of the Gasification Process of Sugarcane Bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anukam, Anthony; Mamphweli, Sampson; Okoh, Omobola; Reddy, Prashant

    2017-03-10

    Sugarcane bagasse was torrefied to improve its quality in terms of properties prior to gasification. Torrefaction was undertaken at 300 °C in an inert atmosphere of N₂ at 10 °C·min(-1) heating rate. A residence time of 5 min allowed for rapid reaction of the material during torrefaction. Torrefied and untorrefied bagasse were characterized to compare their suitability as feedstocks for gasification. The results showed that torrefied bagasse had lower O-C and H-C atomic ratios of about 0.5 and 0.84 as compared to that of untorrefied bagasse with 0.82 and 1.55, respectively. A calorific value of about 20.29 MJ·kg(-1) was also measured for torrefied bagasse, which is around 13% higher than that for untorrefied bagasse with a value of ca. 17.9 MJ·kg(-1). This confirms the former as a much more suitable feedstock for gasification than the latter since efficiency of gasification is a function of feedstock calorific value. SEM results also revealed a fibrous structure and pith in the micrographs of both torrefied and untorrefied bagasse, indicating the carbonaceous nature of both materials, with torrefied bagasse exhibiting a more permeable structure with larger surface area, which are among the features that favour gasification. The gasification process of torrefied bagasse relied on computer simulation to establish the impact of torrefaction on gasification efficiency. Optimum efficiency was achieved with torrefied bagasse because of its slightly modified properties. Conversion efficiency of the gasification process of torrefied bagasse increased from 50% to approximately 60% after computer simulation, whereas that of untorrefied bagasse remained constant at 50%, even as the gasification time increased.

  7. The formation mechanism of CO2 and its conversion in the process of coal gasification under arc plasma conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun; Zheng, Mingdong; Qiu, Jieshan; Zhao, Zongbin; Ma, Tengcai

    2006-05-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) formation mechanism and co-conversion of CO2 with coal was investigated in the process of coal gasification in a steam medium at atmospheric pressure under arc plasma conditions in a tube-type setup. The arc plasma was diagnosed in situ by optical emission spectroscopy and the gas products were analysed by gas chromatography. CO2 yields are correlated with the quantitative emission peak intensity of the active species in plasma when the operating parameter is changed. The results show that the greater the emission peak intensity of the CH radicals, C2 radicals, OH radicals or O atoms, the smaller the CO2 yield is, which means that the CO2 formation process is inhibited by increasing the concentration of the mentioned active species under arc plasma conditions. On the basis of the diagnosis results, co-conversion of CO2 and coal in a steam medium under plasma conditions was carried out in the same setup and the results show that CO2 conversion reaches 88.6% while the concentration of CO + H2 reaches 87.4%; at the same time, coal conversion is in the range 54.7-68.7%, which proves that co-conversion of CO2 and coal in a steam medium under plasma conditions might be a prospective way to utilize CO2 and the production of synthesis gas.

  8. Bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil--effect of poultry droppings and natural rubber processing sludge application on biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okieimen, C O; Okieimen, F E

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory bioremediation experiments were carried out on crude oil-polluted soil samples by applying various amounts of poultry droppings and natural rubber processing sludge as nutrient supplements at 29 degrees and using slurry-phase and solid-phase biodegradation techniques. Changes in the total hydrocarbon content of the soil were determined using a spectrophotometric technique as a function of time. It was found that the extent of crude oil degradation in untreated soil samples was markedly lower (by up to 100%) than in the soil samples treated with nutrient supplements. Hydrocarbon degradation efficiency was higher in the slurry-phase than in the soil-phase technique.

  9. Systems studies of coal conversion processes using a reference simulator. Quarterly report, December 12, 1976--March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, G.V.; Woods, J.M.; Kayihan, F.; Sood, M.

    1977-04-01

    Progress is reported in the development of a modular computer simulation/design package for coal conversion systems based on bench-scale and large pilot plant data. The initial work is based on COGAS and COED process results. The package should be useful for evaluating various flowsheet alternatives. (LTN)

  10. A multi-process phytoremediation system for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xiaodong; El-Alawi, Yousef; Penrose, Donna M.; Glick, Bernard R.; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2004-08-01

    To improve phytoremediation processes, multiple techniques that comprise different aspects of contaminant removal from soils have been combined. Using creosote as a test contaminant, a multi-process phytoremediation system composed of physical (volatilization), photochemical (photooxidation) and microbial remediation, and phytoremediation (plant-assisted remediation) processes was developed. The techniques applied to realize these processes were land-farming (aeration and light exposure), introduction of contaminant degrading bacteria, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), and plant growth of contaminant-tolerant tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Over a 4-month period, the average efficiency of removal of 16 priority PAHs by the multi-process remediation system was twice that of land-farming, 50% more than bioremediation alone, and 45% more than phytoremediation by itself. Importantly, the multi-process system was capable of removing most of the highly hydrophobic, soil-bound PAHs from soil. The key elements for successful phytoremediation were the use of plant species that have the ability to proliferate in the presence of high levels of contaminants and strains of PGPR that increase plant tolerance to contaminants and accelerate plant growth in heavily contaminated soils. The synergistic use of these approaches resulted in rapid and massive biomass accumulation of plant tissue in contaminated soil, putatively providing more active metabolic processes, leading to more rapid and more complete removal of PAHs. - Persistent PAH contaminants in soils can be removed more completely and rapidly by using multiple remediation processes.

  11. Effects of acid impregnated steam explosion process on xylose recovery and enzymatic conversion of cellulose in corncob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Hongjia; Li, Menghua; Wang, Shizeng; Yuan, Qipeng

    2014-12-19

    Corncob residue is a cellulose-rich byproduct obtained from industrial xylose production via dilute acid hydrolysis processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in acid hydrolysis residue of corncob (AHRC) is often less efficient without further pretreatment. In this work, the process characteristics of acid impregnated steam explosion were studied in conjunction with a dilute acid process, and their effects on physiochemical changes and enzymatic saccharification of corncob residue were compared. With the acid impregnated steam explosion process, both higher xylose recovery and higher cellulose conversion were obtained. The maximum conversion of cellulose in acid impregnated steam explosion residue of corncob (ASERC) reached 85.3%, which was 1.6 times higher than that of AHRC. Biomass compositional analysis showed similar cellulose and lignin content in ASERC and AHRC. XRD analysis demonstrated comparable crystallinity of ASERC and AHRC. The improved enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was attributed to higher porosity in ASERC, measured by mercury porosimetry.

  12. Photo-reduction of CO{sub 2} into gaseous hydrocarbon through photocatalytic process. Paper no. IGEC-1-009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, S.S.; Zou, L.; Hu, E. [Deakin Univ., School of Engineering and Technology (Australia)]. E-mail: erichu@deakin.edu.au

    2005-07-01

    The present concern of the global warming has made the photoreduction of CO{sub 2} under the artificial conditions of vital interest. It has been established that CO{sub 2} could be transformed into hydrocarbons when it is in contact with water and catalysts (eg. titanium oxides) under the UV irradiation. However, the current efficiency of the artificial photoreduction of CO{sub 2} process is still quite low. This paper presents a new approach of heterogeneous photocatalysis involving gas-solid interfaces using titanium oxides pellets instead of immobilized photocatalysts on solid substrates. In this study, the CO{sub 2} mixed with H{sub 2}O vapour in saturation state was discharged into a quartz tube reactor composed of the UVC lamp illuminated for 48 hrs continuously. The reformed species collected were identified by gas chromatography. The results showed fairly good yield as compared with process using thin-film technique. The pellet form of catalyst was confirmed to be feasible and attractive for use in further investigation of CO{sub 2} reforming. (author)

  13. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols from coking wastewater by simultaneously synthesized organobentonite in a one-step process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhua Wu; Lizhong Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The optimal condition for a one-step process removing organic compounds from coiking wastewater by simultaneously synthesized organobentonite as a pretreatment was investigated.Results showed that sorption of organic compounds by organobentonite was positively correlated to the cation surfactant exchange on the bentonite and the octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) of the solutes.With 0.75 g/L bentonite and 180 mg/L (60% of bentonite cation exchange capacity) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide,the removal efficiencies of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency in coking waste0water except naphthalene were more than 90%,and that of benzo(a)pyrene was 99.5%.At the same time,the removal efficiencies of CODCr,NH3-N,volatile phenols,colour and turbidity were 28.6%,13.2%,8.9%,55% and 84.3%,respectively,and the ratio of BOD5/CODcr increased from 0.31 to 0.41.These results indicated that the one-step process had high removal efficiency for toxic and refractory hydrophobic organic compounds,and could improve the biodegradability of the coking wastewater.Therefore it could be a promising technology for the pretreatment of toxic and refractory organic wastewater.

  14. Kinetic simulation of the O-X conversion process in dense magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Asgarian, M Ali; Parvazian, A; Trines, R

    2013-01-01

    The ordinary-extraordinary-Bernstein (O-X-B) double conversion is considered and simulated with a kinetic particle model vs full wave model for parameters of the TJ-II stellarator. This simulation has been done with the particle-in-cell code, XOOPIC (X11-based object-oriented particle-incell). XOOPIC is able to model the non-monotonic density and magnetic profile of TJ-II. The first step of conversion, O-X conversion, is observed clearly. By applying some optimizations such as increasing the number of computational particles in the region of the X-B conversion, the simulation of the second step is also possible. By considering the electric and magnetic components of launched and reflected waves, the O-mode wave and the X-mode wave can be easily detected. Via considering the power of launched O-mode wave and converted X-mode wave, the efficiency of O-X conversion for the best theoretical launch angle is obtained, which is in good agreement with previous computed efficiencies via full-wave simulations. For the ...

  15. A mesoscopic formalism for simulating particle-laden flows with applications in energy conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse Samuel

    species in circulating uidized bed risers reveals that the non-homogeneities caused by the formation of clusters significantly reduces the efficiency of the conversion process. To better understand the fundamental nature of particle clustering and its effects on the carrier-phase turbulence, a canonical ow is introduced, referred to as cluster-induced turbulence (CIT). Simulations of fully-developed, gravity-driven CIT are investigated, revealing for the first time the local instantaneous distribution of particle-phase dynamics in collisional gas-solid flows.

  16. Collision processes of hydrocarbon species in hydrogen plasmas. Pt. 3. The Silane-family

    CERN Document Server

    Janev, R K

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections are provided for most important collision processes of the Silicon-Hydrides from the ''Silane-family'': SiH sub y (y = 1 - 4) molecules and their ions SiH sub y sup + , with (plasma) electrons and protons. The processes include: electron impact ionization and dissociation of SiH sub y , dissociative excitation, ionization and recombination of SiH sub y sup + ions with electrons, and charge - and atom - exchange in proton collisions with SiH sub y. All important channels of dissociative processes are considered. Information is also provided on the energetics (reactants/products energy loss / gain) of each individual reaction channel. Total and partial cross sections are presented in compact analytic forms. The critical assessment of data, derivation of new data and presentation of results follow closely the concepts of the recently published related databases for Carbon-Hydrides, namely for the Methane family, and for the Ethane- and the Propane families, respectively.

  17. Control of hydrocarbon content of a reforming gas by using a hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kenichiro; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    To control of hydrocarbon content in waste pyrolysis-gasification and reforming processes, the use of a hydrogenation catalyst was examined in a test system with a model gas. To reduce the concentration of benzene in the reforming gas, benzene was hydrogenated with a nickel catalyst. The catalyst is usually used to convert gas-phase unsaturated hydrocarbons to saturated hydrocarbons, and the benzene was converted to cyclohexane at a temperature range of about 130 to 180 degrees C in the presence of steam. However, the conversion to methane occurred at about 250 to 300 degrees C. Methane seems to be a useful conversion compound because it does not cohere as a light tar. Sometimes the reforming gas needs to be cooled for use as generator fuel. In this case, it is possible to avoid the tar cohesion if the benzene in the gas is converted to methane at about 300 degrees C after the reforming. Reduction of the efficiency of conversion to methane was not observed over a 60h reaction period. The lower hydrocarbons (ethylene, ethane, and propylene) were also converted to methane at about 300 degrees C. Conversion of benzene was also possible when other hydrocarbons were present at high concentrations.

  18. Functional genes to assess nitrogen cycling and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: primers and processing matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ryan Penton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeting sequencing to genes involved in key environmental processes, i.e. ecofunctional genes, provides an opportunity to sample nature’s gene guilds to greater depth and help link community structure to process-level outcomes. Vastly different approaches have been implemented for sequence processing and, ultimately, for taxonomic placement of these gene reads. The overall quality of next generation sequence analysis of functional genes is dependent on multiple steps and assumptions of unknown diversity. To illustrate current issues surrounding amplicon read processing we provide examples for three ecofunctional gene groups. A combination of in-silico, environmental and cultured strain sequences was used to test new primers targeting the dioxin and dibenzofuran degrading genes dxnA1, dbfA1, and carAa. The majority of obtained environmental sequences were classified into novel sequence clusters, illustrating the discovery value of the approach. For the nitrite reductase step in denitrification, the well-known nirK primers exhibited deficiencies in reference database coverage, illustrating the need to refine primer-binding sites and/or to design multiple primers, while nirS primers exhibited bias against five phyla. Amino acid-based OTU clustering of these two N-cycle genes from soil samples yielded only 114 unique nirK and 45 unique nirS genus-level groupings, likely a reflection of constricted primer coverage. Finally, supervised and non-supervised OTU analysis methods were compared using the nifH gene of nitrogen fixation, with generally similar outcomes, but the clustering (non-supervised method yielded higher diversity estimates and stronger site-based differences. High throughput amplicon sequencing can provide inexpensive and rapid access to nature’s related sequences by circumventing the culturing barrier, but each unique gene requires individual considerations in terms of primer design and sequence processing and classification.

  19. Up-conversion processes of rare earth ions in heavy metal glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Grobelny; W A. Pisarski; J. Pisarska; R. Lisiecki; W. Ryba-Romanowski

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal lead germanate glasses doubly doped with Yb3+ and Ln3+ ions (Ln=Er,Tm) were investigated.Up-conversion spectra of Er3+ and Tm3+ were registered under diode-laser excitation of Yb3+.Up-conversion luminescence bands corresponded to 4S3/2→4I15/2 (green)and 4F9/2→4I15/2 (red) transitions of Er3+ as well as 1G4→3H6 (blue) and 3H4→3H6 (NIR) transitions of Tm3+,respectively.

  20. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  1. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities.

  2. Modeling Parameters of Reliability of Technological Processes of Hydrocarbon Pipeline Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalay Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of methods of system analysis and parametric reliability theory, the mathematical modeling of processes of oil and gas equipment operation in reliability monitoring was conducted according to dispatching data. To check the quality of empiric distribution coordination , an algorithm and mathematical methods of analysis are worked out in the on-line mode in a changing operating conditions. An analysis of physical cause-and-effect relations mechanism between the key factors and changing parameters of technical systems of oil and gas facilities is made, the basic types of technical distribution parameters are defined. Evaluation of the adequacy the analyzed parameters of the type of distribution is provided by using a criterion A.Kolmogorov, as the most universal, accurate and adequate to verify the distribution of continuous processes of complex multiple-technical systems. Methods of calculation are provided for supervising by independent bodies for risk assessment and safety facilities.

  3. Prospects for applications of electron beams in processing of gas and oil hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, A. V., E-mail: ponomarev@ipc.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation); Pershukov, V. A. [ROSATOM National Nuclear Corporation (Russian Federation); Smirnov, V. P. [CJSC “Nauka i Innovatsii” (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Waste-free processing of oil and oil gases can be based on electron-beam technologies. Their major advantage is an opportunity of controlled manufacturing of a wide range of products with a higher utility value at moderate temperatures and pressures. The work considers certain key aspects of electron beam technologies applied for the chain cracking of heavy crude oil, for the synthesis of premium gasoline from oil gases, and also for the hydrogenation, alkylation, and isomerization of unsaturated oil products. Electronbeam processing of oil can be embodied via compact mobile modules which are applicable for direct usage at distant oil and gas fields. More cost-effective and reliable electron accelerators should be developed to realize the potential of electron-beam technologies.

  4. Study of the Radical Chain Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Oxidation for In Situ Combustion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ushakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundance of in situ combustion models of oil oxidation, many of the effects are still beyond consideration. For example, until now, initial stages of oxidation were not considered from a position of radical chain process. This is a serious difficulty for the simulation of oil recovery process that involves air injection. To investigate the initial stages of oxidation, the paper considers the sequence of chemical reactions, including intermediate short-living compounds and radicals. We have attempted to correlate the main stages of the reaction with areas of heat release observed in the experiments. The system of differential equations based on the equations of oxidation reactions was solved. Time dependence of peroxides formation and start of heat release is analytically derived for the initial stages. We have considered the inhibition of initial oxidation stages by aromatic oil compounds and have studied the induction time in dependence on temperature. Chain ignition criteria for paraffins and crude oil in presence of core samples were obtained. The calculation results are compared with the stages of oxidation that arise by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry. According to experimental observations we have determined which reactions are important for the process and which can be omitted or combined into one as insignificant.

  5. Conversion chimique du gaz naturel Chemical Conversion of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaumette P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article sont passés en revue les travaux de recherche et développement et les procédés existants dans le domaine de la conversion chimique du gaz naturel. Les deux voies possibles, conversion directe du méthane et conversion indirecte, via le gaz de synthèse, sont présentées. Tant la préparation d'hydrocarbures utilisables comme carburants, que celle des composés de bases pour la pétrochimie ou la chimie sont évoquées. L'accent est mis sur l'étape clé du développement de chaque procédé qui, selon le produit visé, consiste en la mise au point d'un nouveau système catalytique, en un changement de la technologie du réacteur, ou en la mise au point d'une section fractionnement moins complexe. This article reviews the research and development work and the existing processes in the area of chemical conversion of natural gas. The two possible methods, direct conversion of methane and indirect conversion via synthesis gas, are discussed. The preparation of hydrocarbons that can be used as fuels and the production of building blocks for the petrochemical and chemical industries are both dealt with. The accent is placed on the key step in developing each process. Depending on the target product, this key step consists in working out a new catalytic system, changing reactor technology or engineering a less complex fractionation section.

  6. AVAILABILITY AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF RESIDUES FROM MAJOR AGRICULTURAL CROPS FOR ENERGY CONVERSION THROUGH THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaning Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant residues from the major agricultural crops (wheat, rice, corn, soybean, sugarcane, coffee and cotton are abundantly available renewable resources that can be used to supply energy through thermochemical conversion processes. The available amounts of plant residues from these crops and their physical properties (moisture content, particle size, bulk density and porosity were determined. The annual residues from the wheat, rice, corn, soybean, sugarcane, coffee and cotton were 763.42, 698.10, 1729.92, 416.62, 16.85, 4.01 and 107.13 million tons, respectively. The total amount of plant residues was estimated at 3736.05 million tons with total energy content of 66.92 EJ. These residues can replace 2283.52 million tons of coal, 1551.78 million tons of oil and 1847.63 million m3 of natural gas. The moisture contents were 7.79, 6.58, 6.40, 7.30, 8.15, 7.86 and 7.45% for the wheat straw, rice straw, corn stalk, soybean stalk, sugarcane stalk, coffee husk and cotton stalk, respectively. The corn stalk and sugarcane stalk had a convex particle size distribution, the soybean stalk and cotton stalk had a concave particle size distribution, the wheat straw and rice straw had an increasing trend particle size distribution and the coffee husk had a decreasing trend particle size distribution. The average particle sizes for the wheat straw, rice straw, corn stalk, soybean stalk, sugarcane stalk, coffee husk and cotton stalk were 0.42, 0.40, 0.49, 0.43, 0.55, 0.67 and 0.38 mm, respectively. The average bulk density was 160.75, 166.29, 127.32, 242.34, 110.86, 349.06 and 230.55 kg m-3 for the wheat straw, rice straw, corn stalk, soybean stalk, sugarcane stalk, coffee husk and cotton stalk, respectively. The average porosity was 51.25, 83.20, 58.51, 68.03, 77.58, 64.85 and 74.55% for the wheat straw, rice straw, corn stalk, soybean stalk, sugarcane stalk, coffee husk and cotton stalk, respectively. The results obtained from this study indicate that different

  7. Microplasma reforming of hydrocarbons for fuel cell power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, R. S.; Lindner, P. J.

    The implementation of a microplasma approach for small scale reforming processes is explored as an alternative to more standard catalyst-based processes. Plasmas are a known approach to activating a chemical reaction in place of catalysts, and microplasmas are particularly attractive owing to their extremely high electron and power densities. Their inherent compactness gives them appeal for portable applications, but their modularity leads to scalability for higher capacity. We describe the realization of experimental microplasma reactors based on the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) structure by silicon micromachining for device fabrication. Experiments were carried out with model hydrocarbons methane and butane in the reactors within a microfluidic flow and analytical setup. We observe several key phenomena, including the ability to liberate hydrogen from the hydrocarbons at temperatures near ambient and sub-Watt input power levels, the tendency toward hydrocarbon decomposition rather than oxidation even in the presence of oxygen, and the need for a neutral carrier to obtain conversion. Mass and energy balances on these experiments revealed conversions up to nearly 50%, but the conversion of electrical power input to chemical reaction enthalpy was only on the order of 1%. These initial, exploratory results were recorded with devices and at process settings without optimization, and are hence promising for an emerging, catalyst-free reforming approach.

  8. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-05-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the production of ethanol and other liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in the program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the production economics of these fuels.

  9. The Acquaintanceship Process: An Examination of Uncertainty, Information Seeking, and Social Attraction during Initial Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, William

    1994-01-01

    Finds the conjunction between subjects' uncertainty and their use of question asking and disclosure strategies was limited to preliminary conversation and derived from global uncertainty. Finds that, although uncertainty and liking were related synchronously in ways consistent with uncertainty reduction theory, there was little evidence of…

  10. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion proc

  11. [Dynamics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the paddy-soil system during the crop rotation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xing-chun; Ye, Chuan-yong; Chen, Su-hua; Yang, Yong-liang; Wu, Zhen-yan

    2010-07-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the paddy root-soil system were determined to study the dynamic and the influencing factors during crop rotation period. It showed that the dynamic of PAHs in paddy roots was most correlative with the factor of root surface area, but less correlated with PAHs in air and particles, which indicates that the physiological characters rather than the environment media are the main factors influencing the PAHs accumulation in paddy roots. According to the EPA risk standard about BaP and sigma PAHs, the PAHs accumulation in the paddy seeds won't decrease the food security to human being. The PAHs concentrations in paddy soil showed a declined trend during the period of paddy growth, which was affected not only by the processes of water elution and microbe degradation, but also depended on the absorption rate of paddy roots. When the crop rotation begins and paddy planting rolls into the next growing period, the PAHs in the paddy soil will again increase into a higher level which is correlated with the TOC content in the soil.

  12. Fenton process for degradation of selected chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons exemplified by trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene and chloroform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin QIANG; Weiwei BEN; ChinPao HUANG

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of selected chlorinated ali-phatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) exemplified by trichloroethy-lene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), and chloroform (CF) was investigated with Fenton oxidation process. The results indicate that the degradation rate was primarily affected by the chemical structures of organic contami-nants. Hydroxyl radicals (·OH) preferred to attack the organic contaminants with an electron-rich structure such as chlorinated alkenes (i.e., TCE and DCE). The dosing mode of Fenton's reagent, particularly of Fe2+, significantly affected the degradation efficiency of studied organic compound. A new "time-squared" kinetic model, C = Coexp(-kobst2), was developed to express the degrada-tion kinetics of selected CAHs. This model was applicable to TCE and DCE, but inapplicable to CF due to their varied reaction rate constants towards ·OH. Chloride release was monitored to examine the degree of dechlorina- tion during the oxidation of selected CAHs. TCE was more easily dechlorinated than DCE and CF. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was identified as the major reaction intermediate in the oxidation of TCE, which could be completely removed as the reaction proceeded. No reaction intermedi- ates or byproducts were identified in the oxidation of DCE and CF. Based on the identified intermediate, the reaction mechanism of TCE with Fenton's reagent was proposed.

  13. Solid Hydrocarbon Assisted Reduction: A New Process of Generating Micron Scale Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    2C O2  2CO (2) This reaction is exothermic with a -32.808 kcal/mol change in standard free energy, and provides the heat needed for furnace...operation. The temperature can be controlled through the precise control of moisture in the supplied air, as it reacts endothermically in the manner...Rearranging this definition then yields the unknown X in Table 16. X  Keq 1 Keq  79.025 1 79.025  0.987 (20) This process shows that when a

  14. Efficiency of in-vessel composting process in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from bottom sludge of crude oil storage tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Naddafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Remaining of crude oil in storage tanks usually results in accumulating oily sludge at the bottom of the tank, which should be treated and disposed of in a suitable manner. The efficiency of in-vessel composting process in removing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH from bottom sludge of crude oil storage tanks was investigated in the present study. Material and methods: The sludge was mixed with immature compost at the ratios of 1:0 (as control, 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, 1:8, and 1:10 (as dry basis with the initial C:N:P and moisture content of 100:5:1 and 55% respectively for a period of 10 weeks. The moisture adjustment and mixing process were done 3 times a day during the composting period. Sampling and analysis of TPH and pH were done every week and every two days, respectively. Results: TPH removal in the 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, 1:8, and 1:10 composting reactors was 66.59, 73.19, 74.81, 80.20, and 79.91%, respectively. Thus, initial adjustment of sludge to immature compost ratios plays a great role in reduction of TPH. The results of the control reactors indicated that the main mechanism of TPH removal in the composting reactors was biological process. Conclusions: In-vessel composting by addition of immature compost as amendment is a viable choice for bioremediation of the bottom sludge of crude oil storage tanks.

  15. Synthesis and processing of materials for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis

    Currently, fossil fuels are the primary source of energy. Mechanical heat engines convert the chemical potential energy in fossil fuels to useful electrical energy through combustion; a relatively low efficiency process that generates carbon dioxide. This practice has led to a significant increase in carbon dioxide emissions and is contributing to climate change. However, not all heat engines are mechanical. Alternative energy generation technologies to mechanical heat engines are known, yet underutilized. Thermoelectric generators are solid-state devices originally developed by NASA to power deep space spacecraft, which can also convert heat into electricity but without any moving parts. Similar to their mechanical counterparts, any heat source, including the burning of fossil fuels, can be used. However, clean heat sources, such as concentrated solar, can alternatively be used. Since the energy sources for many of the alternative energy technologies is intermittent, including concentrated solar for thermoelectric devices, load matching is difficult or impossible and an energy storage technology is needed in addition to the energy conversion technology. This increases the overall cost and complexity of the systems since two devices are required and represents a significant barrier for mass adoption of an alternative energy technology. However, it is possible to convert heat energy to electrical energy and store excess charge for use at a later time when the demand increases, in a single device. One such of a device is a thermogalvanic generator and is the electrochemical analog of electronic thermoelectric devices. Essentially, a thermogalvanic device represents the combination of thermoelectric and galvanic systems. As such, the rich history of strategies developed by both the thermoelectric community to better the performance of thermoelectric devices and by the electrochemical community to better traditional galvanic devices (i.e. batteries) can be applied to

  16. On the enhancement of the efficiency of the energy complexes of crude hydrocarbon processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolotovskij, I. V.; Larin, E. A.; Dolotovskaja, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    A method for circuit-parametric analysis of the efficiency of the heat-and-power system of the energy complexes at gas and natural-gas condensate processing plants is proposed. An energy complex of an alternative structure with an independent source of thermal and electric energy integrated into the production line has been developed. The energy carriers are produced accompanied by recovery of the secondary energy resources, waste, and effluents. Using the developed information-analytical software, multicriterion assessment of the efficiency of the alternative energy complexes and its systems based on independent energy sources of the combined-cycle cogeneration plant type has been performed for the gas processing plant in Astrakhan and the most effective equipment composition variant has been determined. The effect of the basic technical and economic factors on the economic efficiency has been established. The investments in construction of the power- and water-supply system within the plant's energy complex pay off in 8-9 years.

  17. Decreasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission from bitumen using alternative bitumen production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulzadeh, Y; Mortazavi, S B; Yousefi, A A; Khavanin, A

    2011-01-30

    In 1988, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended that bitumen fumes should also be considered a potential occupational carcinogen and management practices such as engineering controls should be implemented. Changing the production process of bitumen, as a source control method, was investigated in our study. For the first time, a novel alternative process was used to produce paving grade bitumen with decreased PAH emissions as well as improved bitumen performance grade (PG). Post-consumer latex and natural bitumen (NB) were used as additives to obtain 60/70 modified bitumen directly from the vacuum bottom (VB) without any need for air-blowing. The emissions were produced by a laboratory fume generation rig and were sampled and analyzed by GC-Mass and GC-FID as described in NIOSH method 5515. The PG of the resulting modified 60/70 bitumen in this study covers a wider range of climatic conditions and has higher total resistance against deformation than conventional 60/70 bitumen. The total PAH emissions from modified 60/70 bitumen (100.2619 ng/g) were decreased approximately to 50% of PAHs emitted from conventional 60/70 bitumen (197.696 ng/g). Therefore, it is possible to obtain modified bitumen with lower PAH emissions and better quality than conventional bitumen via additives and without air-blowing.

  18. Process for separating C/sub 2+/ hydrocarbons from natural gas. Verfahren zur Abtrennung von C/sub 2+/-Kohlenwasserstoffen aus Erdgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, H.; Sapper, R.

    1987-03-05

    A process for separating C/sub 2+/ hydrocarbons from natural gas is claimed in which the natural gas is cooled, partially condensed, and separated into a liquid and a gaseous fraction. The liquid fraction is subcooled, expanded in the top region of a rectification column, and mixed with the expanded gaseous fraction. The rectification process produces a product flow containing C/sub 2+/ hydrocarbons, and a residual gas containing mostly lower-boiling constituents. The residual gas is heated up by indirect heat exchange with condensate and then by heat exchange with the gaseous fraction after partial condensation and with the natural gas led into the partial condensation process. The heated residual gas is expanded, producing work, and heated again by heat exchange with the natural gas to be cooled.

  19. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  20. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  1. Hydrogen production with short contact time. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds: Recent advances in pilot- and bench-scale testing and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarinoni, A.; Ponzo, R.; Basini, L. [ENI Refining and Marketing Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    ENI R and D has been active for fifteen years in the development of Short Contact Time - Catalytic Partial Oxidation (SCT-CPO) technologies for producing Hydrogen/Synthesis Gas. From the beginning the experimental work addressed either at defining the fundamental principles or the technical and economical potential of the technology. Good experimental responses, technical solutions' simplicity and flexibility, favourable techno-economical evaluations promoted the progressive widening of the field of the investigations. From Natural Gas (NG) the range of ''processable'' Hydrocarbons extended to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Gasoils, including those characterised by high levels of unsaturated and sulphurated molecules and, lately, to other compounds with biological origin. The extensive work led to the definition of different technological solutions, grouped as follows: Technology 1: Air Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 2: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 3: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Liquid Hydrocarbons and/or Compounds with biological origin Recently, the licence rights on a non-exclusive basis for the commercialisation of SCT-CPO based processes for H{sub 2}/Synthesis gas production from light hydrocarbons with production capacity lower than 5,000 Nm{sup 3}/h of H{sub 2} or 7,500 Nm3/h of syngas have been assigned to two external companies. In parallel, development of medium- and large-scale plant solutions is progressing within the ENI group framework. These last activities are addressed to the utilisation of SCT-CPO for matching the variable Hydrogen demand in several contexts of oil refining operation. This paper will report on the current status of SCT-CPO with a focus on experimental results obtained, either at pilot- and bench- scale level. (orig.)

  2. I. Textural/Structural tuning and nanoparticle stabilization of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. II. Generation of reducing agents for automotive exhaust gas purification via the processing of hydrocarbons in a PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu

    This research consists of two parts. The first part deals with the preparation and properties of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. For studies of textural tuning, structural tuning, or material sintering, copper/aluminum and copper/zinc nanocomposites were prepared via various inorganic synthesis methods including conventional coprecipitation methods and a novel urea-gelation/thermal-modification method that produces narrow distributions of pore sizes, high surface areas, and significantly higher specific metal loadings. Solid-solid reaction analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis were developed for the determination of the mixing homogeneities of the copper/aluminum nanocomposites. A sintering experiment at 250-600°C for 350 h under methanol-steam reforming conditions was carried out to compare the stability of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The mixing homogeneities of CuO/Al2O3 nanocomposites significantly affected the thermal stability of their reduced Cu0 crystallites. Creation of relatively narrow distributions of pore sizes with relatively small major pore diameters (e.g., 3.5 nm) can also be used for the stabilization of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The supported nanoparticles with a relatively small initial size cannot ensure good thermal stability. A "hereditary" character on the homogeneity of copper/aluminum nanocomposites was revealed. Stepwise reduction and reoxidation were studied for the structural tuning and purification of Cu-Al-O spinels with isotropic and gradual unit-cell contractions. The second part of the research deals with the processing of hydrocarbons. Conversion of a model hydrocarbon (n-hexane or n-octane) in an AC discharge PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor was verified to be an effective method to instantly produce reducing agents (e.g., hydrogen or/and light alkanes and alkenes), at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for automotive exhaust gas purification. Effects of

  3. Metagenomics of hydrocarbon resource environments indicates aerobic taxa and genes to be unexpectedly common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dongshan; Caffrey, Sean M; Soh, Jung; Agrawal, Akhil; Brown, Damon; Budwill, Karen; Dong, Xiaoli; Dunfield, Peter F; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M; Hallam, Steven J; Hanson, Niels W; He, Zhiguo; Jack, Thomas R; Klassen, Jonathan; Konwar, Kishori M; Kuatsjah, Eugene; Li, Carmen; Larter, Steve; Leopatra, Verlyn; Nesbø, Camilla L; Oldenburg, Thomas; Pagé, Antoine P; Ramos-Padron, Esther; Rochman, Fauziah F; Saidi-Mehrabad, Alireeza; Sensen, Christoph W; Sipahimalani, Payal; Song, Young C; Wilson, Sandra; Wolbring, Gregor; Wong, Man-Ling; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-09-17

    Oil in subsurface reservoirs is biodegraded by resident microbial communities. Water-mediated, anaerobic conversion of hydrocarbons to methane and CO2, catalyzed by syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea, is thought to be one of the dominant processes. We compared 160 microbial community compositions in ten hydrocarbon resource environments (HREs) and sequenced twelve metagenomes to characterize their metabolic potential. Although anaerobic communities were common, cores from oil sands and coal beds had unexpectedly high proportions of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Likewise, most metagenomes had high proportions of genes for enzymes involved in aerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. Hence, although HREs may have been strictly anaerobic and typically methanogenic for much of their history, this may not hold today for coal beds and for the Alberta oil sands, one of the largest remaining oil reservoirs in the world. This finding may influence strategies to recover energy or chemicals from these HREs by in situ microbial processes.

  4. Analytical Method for Energy Spectra and Eigenstates in the Process of k-Photon Down-Conversion with Quantized Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jia-Hua; CHEN Ai-Xi; WANG Wen-Yi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, using the arguments of Wu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 2200] we analytically discussthe energy spectra and corresponding eigenstates for the process of k-photon down-conversion with quantized pump ina high-Q cavity by the aid of the computer programme. Remarkably, it is also shown that such a method can be usedfor solving numerically the equations in a much simpler manner than the previous ones.

  5. Efficient conversion from infrared to red light by cascaded nonlinear optical processes using an aperiodically poled lithium niobate crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Eduardo González

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a scheme for conversion of pulsed light from the infrared to the red spectral region, using an aperiodically poled ferroelectric crystal within a resonant cavity in which two cascaded nonlinear optical processes occur when pumped with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This device emits 9 ns pulses of over 1 mJ at 710 nm and is a viable source for future biomedical applications.

  6. The effect of acid strength on the MTO reaction : Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over H-SAPO-34 and high silica Chabazite (H-SSZ-13)

    OpenAIRE

    Bleken, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    The Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process for the production of polymer-grade olefins is a possible step in the upgrading of natural gas. The preferred MTO catalyst is the microporous silicoaluminophosphate H-SAPO-34 (CHA topology). In the present work, H-SAPO-34 is compared with H-SSZ-13 which has the same topology and density of acid sites, but is slightly more acidic due to the framework composition. This is a one-parameter study where the effect of acidity on the MTO-process is ...

  7. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  8. Full-Wave Calculations of the O-X Mode Conversion Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F.R.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Maroli, C.

    1988-01-01

    A two-point boundary-value problem has been formulated that describes the conversion between ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) wave modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma. Numerical solutions to this problem have been obtained for various values of the WKB parameter k0L; where k0 is the vacuum...... wavenumber and L the density-gradient scale length. The results are compared with three different theoretical expressions for the O-X mode conversion efficiency derived by others in the WKB limit of k0 L >> l. Most of the results presented in this paper are obtained for a collisionless plasma with finite...... density near the plasma cut-off density. However, some examples are also given of wave propagation from vacuum. In these examples, collision effects are added to the equations in order to remove the singularity otherwise present at the position of the upper hybrid resonance layer....

  9. Biomass pre-extraction, hydrolysis and conversion process improvements fro an integrated biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Robert [Virdia, Inc., Danville, VA (United States)

    2014-12-23

    In this project, Virdia will show that it can improve the production of sugars suitable for the conversion into advanced biofuels from a range of woods. Several biomass feedstocks (Pine wood chips & Eucalyptus wood chips) will be tested on this new integrated biorefinery platform. The resultant drop-in biodiesel can be a cost-effective petroleum-replacement that can compete with projected market prices

  10. Feasibility study: Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.; Grey, A.E.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M.; Haefner, D.R.

    1991-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of selected conceptual processes for pyrolytic conversion of organic feedstocks or the decomposition/detoxification of hazardous wastes by coupling the process to the geopressured-geothermal resource. The report presents a detailed discussion of the resource and of each process selected for evaluation including the technical evaluation of each. A separate section presents the economic methodology used and the evaluation of the technically viable process. A final section presents conclusions and recommendations. Three separate processes were selected for evaluation. These are pyrolytic conversion of biomass to petroleum like fluids, wet air oxidation (WAO) at subcritical conditions for destruction of hazardous waste, and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) also for the destruction of hazardous waste. The scientific feasibility of all three processes has been previously established by various bench-scale and pilot-scale studies. For a variety of reasons detailed in the report the SCWO process is the only one deemed to be technically feasible, although the effects of the high solids content of the geothermal brine need further study. This technology shows tremendous promise for contributing to solving the nation's energy and hazardous waste problems. However, the current economic analysis suggests that it is uneconomical at this time. 50 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated groundwater by the combined technique of adsorption onto perlite followed by the O3/H2O2 process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Bagheri, Amir

    2012-09-01

    Groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons was treated using a combined system of adsorption onto powdered expanded perlite (PEP) followed by the O3/H2O2 process. The pretreatment investigations indicated a high capacity for PEP to remove petroleum hydrocarbons from the contaminated water. An experimental total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) adsorption capacity of 275 mg/g PEP was obtained at the natural pH of water. The experimental data fit best with the Freundlich isotherm model and pseudo-second-order adsorption model. The second phase of the experiment evaluated the performance of the O3/H2O2 process in the removal of residual TPH from pretreated water and compared the results with that of raw water. The O3/H202 process attained a maximum TPH removal rate for the pretreated water after 70 min, when 93% of the residual TPH in the effluent of the adsorption system was removed. Overall, the combination of adsorption onto PEP for 100 min and the subsequent treatment with the O3/H2O2 process for 70min eliminated over 99% of the TPH of highly petroleum-contaminated groundwater, with initial values of 162 mg/L. Therefore, we can conclude that the developed treatment system is an appropriate method of remediation for petroleum-contaminated waters.

  12. Using Bathymodiolus tissue stable isotope signatures to infer biogeochemical process at hydrocarbon seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, D.; Kiel, S.; Qiu, J.; Yang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Peng, Y.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the tissue of two bathymodiolin mussel species with different chemotrophic symbionts (methanotrophs in B. platifrons and sulfide-oxidizers in B. aduloides) to gain insights into the biogeochemical processes at an active site in 1120 m depth on the Formosa Ridge, called Site F. Because mussels with methanotrophic symbionts acquire the isotope signature of the used methane, the average δ13C values of B. platifrons (-70.3‰; n=36) indicates a biogenic methane source at Site F, consistent with the measured carbon isotope signature of methane (-61.1‰ to -58.7‰) sampled 1.5 m above the mussel beds. The only small offset between the δ13C signatures of the ascending methane and the authigenic carbonate at site F (as low as -55.3‰) suggests only minor mixing of the pore water with marine bicarbonate, which in turn may be used as an indicator for advective rather than diffusive seepage at this site. B. aduloides has much higher average δ13C values of -34.4‰ (n=9), indicating inorganic carbon (DIC) dissolved in epibenthic bottom water as its main carbon source. The DIC was apparently marine bicarbonate with a small contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from locally oxidized methane. The δ34S values of the two mussel species indicate that they used two different sulfur sources. B. platifrons (average δ34S = +6.4±2.6‰; n=36) used seawater sulfate mixed with isotopically light re-oxidized sulfide from the sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), while the sulfur source of B. aduloides (δ34S = -8.0±3.1‰; n=9) was AOM-derived sulfide used by its symbionts. δ15N values differed between the mussels, with B. platifrons having a wider range of on average slightly lower values (mean = +0.5±0.7‰, n=36) than B. aduloides (mean = +1.1±0.0‰). These values are significantly lower than δ15N values of South China Sea deep-sea sediments (+5‰ to +6‰), indicating that the organic nitrogen

  13. Systems studies of coal conversion processes using a reference simulator. Quarterly report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, G.V.; Sood, M.K.; Raghavan, S.; Overturf, B.W.; Fazzoni, G.F.; Ford, J.R.

    1977-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop a conceptual flowsheet of a coal conversion plant which will process Illinois No. 6 coal and will employ the basic processing sequence proposed by the Illinois Coal Gasification Group. The conceptual flowsheet differs from the ICGG proposal in that proprietary or otherwise ill-defined processing steps are replaced with units whose operating data is adequately reported in the open literature and for which satisfactory design models can be formulated. The purpose for formulating this flowsheet is to define a base case conceptual process which will be modelled using both the steady state process simulation package being developed for DOE/FE under our current contract as well as the dynamic simulation library being developed by Lehigh University under a separate contract. Key elements in the process are described.

  14. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to- Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Dougall, James [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    Many U.S. manufacturing facilities generate unrecovered, low-grade waste heat, and also generate or are located near organic-content waste effluents. Bioelectrochemical systems, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells, provide a means to convert organic-content effluents into electric power and useful chemical products. A novel biochemical electrical system for industrial manufacturing processes uniquely integrates both waste heat recovery and waste effluent conversion, thereby significantly reducing manufacturing energy requirements. This project will enable the further development of this technology so that it can be applied across a wide variety of US manufacturing segments, including the chemical, food, pharmaceutical, refinery, and pulp and paper industries. It is conservatively estimated that adoption of this technology could provide nearly 40 TBtu/yr of energy, or more than 1% of the U.S. total industrial electricity use, while reducing CO2 emissions by more than 6 million tons per year. Commercialization of this technology will make a significant contribution to DOE’s Industrial Technology Program goals for doubling energy efficiency and providing a more robust and competitive domestic manufacturing base.

  15. 对称电场催化增强甲烷转化合成Q研究%STUDY ON THE CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH SYMMETRIC ELECTRICAL FIELD ENHANCING CATALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    利用电场作用通过交流和直流等离子体在低温、常压和低功率下催化反应将甲烷直接转化为碳二烃(乙烷、乙烯、乙炔)。考察了在对称电场作用下催化剂的催化性能。实验结果表明,在交流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别不大;甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:MnO2/Al2O3>Ni/Al2O3>MoO—Al2O3>Ni/NaY>Pd/ZSM-5>Ni/H4Mg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>无催化剂:在直流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别也不大(除Ni/NaY外),甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:Ni/Al2O3>Ni/HaMg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>MnO2/Al2O3>MoO3/Al2O3>Ni/NaY>无催化剂>Pd/ZSM-5。%Low-power catalytic conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons(ethane, ethCene and acetylene) through AC or DC plasma catalysis reactionsin symmetric electrical field was studied under low temperature andatmospheric pressure. The function of catalyst was tested. The appropriate condition was: voltage 90 V~1l0 V (power 15 W~20 W DC); voltage 20 V~40 V (AC). The appropriate inlet flow of methane was 45 mL/min~80mL/min under AC and DC field. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons was above 95%.

  16. Relation between soil matrix potential changes and water conversion ratios during methane hydrate formation processes in loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Guanli Jiang; Yibin Pu

    2011-01-01

    With a new apparatus designed and assembled by ourselves,the matrix potential of non-saturated loess was firstly measured and studied during methane hydrate formation processes.The experimental results showed that during two formation processes,the matrix potential changes of the loess all presented a good linear relationship with water conversion ratios.In addition,although it was well known that the secondary gas hydrate formation was easier than the initial,our experimental results showed that the initial hydrate formation efficiency in non-saturated loess was higher than that of the secondary.

  17. Energetics, transition states, and intrinsic reaction coordinates for reactions associated with O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tianying; Hase, William L.; Doubleday, Charles

    2004-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations based on multiconfiguration wave functions are used to investigate a set of archetypal reactions relevant to O(3P) processing of hydrocarbon molecules and surfaces. These include O(3P) reactions with methane and ethane to give OH plus methyl or ethyl radicals, O(3P)+ethane to give CH3O+CH3, and secondary reactions of the OH product radical with ethane and the ethyl radical. Geometry optimization is carried out with CASSCF/cc-pVTZ for all reactions, and with CASPT2/cc-pVTZ for O(3P)+methane/ethane. Single-point energy corrections are applied with CASPT2, CASPT3, and MRCI+Q with the cc-pVTZ and cc-pVQZ basis sets, and the energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit (CBL). Where comparison of computed barriers and energies of reaction with experiment is possible, the agreement is good to excellent. The best agreement (within experimental error) is found for MRCI+Q/CBL applied to O(3P)+methane. For the other reactions, CASPT2/CBL and MRCI+Q/CBL predictions differ from experiment by 1-5 kcal/mol for 0 K enthalpies of reaction, and are within 1 kcal/mol of the best-estimate experimental range of 0 K barriers for O(3P)+ethane and OH+ethane. The accuracy of MRCI+Q/CBL is limited mainly by the quality of the active space. CASPT2/CBL barriers are consistently lower than MRCI+Q/CBL barriers with identical reference spaces.

  18. Process analysis of effluent hydrocarbon recycling for coal pyrolysis to acetylene in thermal plasma%热等离子体煤制乙炔裂解气烃类循环过程分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程炎; 颜彬航; 李天阳; 程易

    2015-01-01

    针对等离子体煤裂解制乙炔过程,提出了将过程裂解气中副产的烃类分离,循环输入等离子体反应器的新型工艺流程。基于新疆天业2 MW示范平台装置的典型运行参数,采用热力学分析手段,理论上分析了该工艺流程对于体系乙炔产量、单位质量乙炔煤耗和裂解电耗等的影响。结果表明,裂解气烃类循环可以有效提高裂解气中乙炔浓度和产率,同时减少煤粉输送气等流程气体的使用。典型操作条件下,采用裂解气烃类循环工艺可以增加35.6%的乙炔收率和13.4%的氢气收率,降低30%的单位乙炔煤耗和裂解电耗,是高效可行的优化方案。%Coal pyrolysis via thermal plasma provides an alternative path to realize the effective conversion from coal to acetylene. Recycling the hydrocarbons in the effluent gas to the plasma pyrolysis process is proposed in this work to improve the reactor performance. Thermodynamic analysis is made as the reference on the basis of the pilot-plant results of Xinjiang Tianye 2 MW plasma pyrolysis device. The comparison results show that the recycling of effluent hydrocarbons (except acetylene) can raise the volume fraction and mass flow rate of acetylene in the product gas. The hydrocarbons in cracked gas is ample to be used as the conveying and accelerating gas for coal and the protecting gas for plasma torch, which can reduce the input amount of working gas and optimize the whole gas flow of the process. Different optimization cases are discussed to compare the products (i.e., acetylene and hydrogen) output and the gas input of the thermal plasma pyrolysis system. The optimized results show that the recycling process is feasible and effective, with reduced coal consumption (30%) and pyrolysis energy consumption (30%) as well as increased acetylene yield (35.6%).

  19. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report for the period July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from July 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. The ACCP Demonstration Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the cola is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal.

  20. Isomaltulose production using free cells: optimisation of a culture medium containing agricultural wastes and conversion in repeated-batch processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguti, Haroldo Y; Buzzato, Michele F; Sato, Hélia H

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme glucosyltransferase is an industrially important enzyme since it produces non-cariogenic isomaltulose (6-O-alpha-D-glucopyronosyl-1-6-D-fructofuranose) from sucrose by intramolecular transglucosylation. The experimental designs and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied for the optimisation of the nutrient concentrations in the culture medium for the production of glucosyltransferase by Erwinia sp. D12 in shaken flasks at 200 rpm and 30 degrees C. A statistical analysis of the results showed that, in the range studied, the factors had a significant effect (P free Erwinia sp. D12 cells in a batch process using an orbital shaker. The influence of the parameters sucrose concentration, temperature, pH, and cell concentration on the conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose was studied. The free cells showed a high conversion rate of sucrose into isomaltulose using batch fermentation, obtaining an isomaltulose yield of 72.11% from sucrose solution 35% at 35 degrees C.

  1. Conversational Telugu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop elementary conversational skills in Telugu. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The first, and most predominant, is the unit microwave cycle. These cycles divide the learning process into two basic phases, the first of which involves mimicry, memorization, and…

  2. Communication: GAIMS—Generalized Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Rauer, Clemens; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-03-01

    Full multiple spawning is a formally exact method to describe the excited-state dynamics of molecular systems beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, it has been limited until now to the description of radiationless transitions taking place between electronic states with the same spin multiplicity. This Communication presents a generalization of the full and ab initio multiple spawning methods to both internal conversion (mediated by nonadiabatic coupling terms) and intersystem crossing events (triggered by spin-orbit coupling matrix elements) based on a spin-diabatic representation. The results of two numerical applications, a model system and the deactivation of thioformaldehyde, validate the presented formalism and its implementation.

  3. Is conversion a syntactic or a lexical process of word formation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Soares Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion is sometimes described as a syntactic phenomenon by which a lexical item changes its lexical category according to the syntactic environment where it is inserted. This syntactic-ordered approach comes from theoretical fields that conceive the lexicon as the domain of irregularity, whilst regular patterns are treated in syntax (Chomsky 1995. However, Portuguese converted deverbal nouns (remendo ‘event of mending’, curte ‘event of having fun’, trinca ‘event of biting’ manifest a structural behaviour that permits us to situate their formation in the lexicon instead of in the syntax. According to the theoretical allusion we made above, this would characterise converted deverbal nouns as lacking a regular pattern. However, what we mean is that the lexicon is not the field of irregularity. Apart from the irregular material that must be stored in long term memory as to be used by speakers, such as inherited lexemes (e.g. rato ‘mouse’, cão ‘dog’, rir ‘to laugh’, verde ‘green’, etc., the lexicon is the domain of word formation, which is constraint-based (Rodrigues 2008, 2009. This means the word formation part of the lexicon is constrained by regular patterns that are neither directional in principle, nor syntactic in nature. We follow Jackendoff (2002 conception on the lexicon, conceiving it an interface of syntax, phonology and semantics. Converted deverbal nouns formation seems to agree with this conception, since it depends on phonological, semantic and syntactical constraints (Rodrigues 2004, 2009. Portuguese verb-into-noun conversion is not a simple case of syntactic environment. This is specially visible when we confront this lexical conversion with a purely syntactic type of nominalisation (Kerleroux 1996, such as the one that occurs in O estudar matemática traz-me vantagens. ‘Studying maths brings me advantages’ or O remendar roupa é um recurso nesta época. ‘Mending cloths is a good resource

  4. Case studies of a COED-based coal-conversion process. Final report, August 1, 1979-July 15, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, G.V.

    1983-02-01

    The objectives of this project were to investigate the process section models developed under a previous DOE contract into a single modified COED coal-conversion process model; to conduct case studies with selected process section models; and to supplement these studies by developing several additional models. A cyclone coal/char combustor model was developed, implemented and documented. A major program of case studies involving three alternative coal-conversion-process configurations (modified COED, COGAS, and COED) was executed. The COGAS configuration proved superior to the modified COED but was shown to be quite limited in the range of feasible operating conditions. Based on a second-law analysis the COED configuration was the most energy efficient of the three. An oil-vapor-quench-process section model was developed. The key element was a three phase stage-wise absorber with external heat removal and side streams. The model was validated against literature performance data. Comparison of the two quench systems showed them to be comparable in capital cost. Finally, flowsheet models were created of three bulk methanation systems. Suitable base cases were identified for each flowsheet. Extensive experimentation was carried out to speed up integration and to improve recycle convergence calculations. Because of excessive computer charges further case studies were terminated.

  5. Modeling recombination processes and predicting energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Meng, Sheng

    2014-03-01

    We present a set of algorithms based on solo first principles calculations, to accurately calculate key properties of a DSC device including sunlight harvest, electron injection, electron-hole recombination, and open circuit voltages. Two series of D- π-A dyes are adopted as sample dyes. The short circuit current can be predicted by calculating the dyes' photo absorption, and the electron injection and recombination lifetime using real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulations. Open circuit voltage can be reproduced by calculating energy difference between the quasi-Fermi level of electrons in the semiconductor and the electrolyte redox potential, considering the influence of electron recombination. Based on timescales obtained from real time TDDFT dynamics for excited states, the estimated power conversion efficiency of DSC fits nicely with the experiment, with deviation below 1-2%. Light harvesting efficiency, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and the current-voltage characteristics can also be well reproduced. The predicted efficiency can serve as either an ideal limit for optimizing photovoltaic performance of a given dye, or a virtual device that closely mimicking the performance of a real device under different experimental settings.

  6. Single step preparation of nanosilver loaded calcium phosphate by low temperature co-conversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanprateeb, J; Thammarakcharoen, F; Wasoontararat, K; Chokevivat, W; Phanphiriya, P

    2012-09-01

    The preparation and characterization of nanosilver loaded calcium phosphate aiming to enhance the bactericidal performance by a single step co-conversion technique using low temperature ion exchange phosphorization in combination with Tollen's reaction were performed. Silver nitrate was used as a silver ion supply source (0.001-0.1 M) and glucose was employed as a reducing agent. After conversion, surface and shell zones of all samples comprised hydroxyapatite and metallic silver as the main phases regardless of silver nitrate concentration. However, hydroxyapatite, residual calcium sulfate and monetite were found in the core zone when using silver nitrate concentration lower than 0.1 M. The microstructure of all samples comprised the distribution of spherical-shaped silver nanoparticles within the cluster of calcium phosphate nanocrystals. Total silver content (range, 0.09-6.5 %) in the converted samples was found to linearly increase with increasing silver nitrate content. Flexural modulus and strength of converted samples generally decreased with increasing silver content. Effective antibacterial activity of two selected samples (0.001 and 0.005 M AgNO(3)) against two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus) was observed. Cytotoxic potentials by MTT assay of both samples were observed at 24 and 48 h extraction respectively.

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Production of Algal Biomass: Algal Biomass Production in Open Pond Systems and Processing Through Dewatering for Downstream Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kinchin, Christopher [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Grundl, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric C.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This report describes in detail a set of aspirational design and process targets to better understand the realistic economic potential for the production of algal biomass for subsequent conversion to biofuels and/or coproducts, based on the use of open pond cultivation systems and a series of dewatering operations to concentrate the biomass up to 20 wt% solids (ash-free dry weight basis).

  8. Assessing Energy Efficiency of Compression Heat Pumps in Drying Processes when Zeotropic Hydrocarbon Mixtures are Used as Working Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurayts Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents the results of studies of innovative materials in the field of renewable energy.The paper proposes a design and a formula for assessing energy efficiency of the heat pump air dryer, which uses zeotropic hydrocarbon mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons as a working agent and applies the principle of a counter-current heat exchanger with a variable temperature of both the working and the drying agents. Energy efficiency of the heat pump is achieved by means of obtaining a greater part of heat from renewable energy sources, in this case by cooling the air and condensing the water vapors in the heat pump. A conducted analysis identified correlations in establishing the marginal real coefficient of performance of the compression heat pump dryer running on zeotropic hydrocarbon mixtures and operating a cycle with variable temperatures of both the working and the drying agent in the evaporator and the condenser of the heat pump. According to the established correlations, the marginal real coefficient of performance of the compression heat pump dryers running on zeotropic hydrocarbon mixtures of 40 mol% of R600a and 60 mol% of R601 is 1.92 times higher than that of the same dryers running on only R600 (n-butane.

  9. Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

    2011-07-29

    The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing

  10. MECHANISTIC STUDY OF THE CONVERSION FROM DMDFC TO DOHE IN THE LEVULINIC ACID FORMATION PROCESS BY THEORETICAL APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A reaction route accounting for the formation of levulinic acid from 5-hydroxymethylfuran-2-carbaldehyde was deduced on the basis of the mechanism previously offered by Horvat, to match the steps with more details. A newly deduced reaction route was proposed between two intermediate products within this mechanism, and the probabilities of the two mechanisms were compared by Gaussian 03 software. It was found that the conversion from the intermediate 2,3-dihydroxy-5-methyl-2,3-dihydro-furan-2-carbaldehyde (DMDFC to 2,5-dioxo-hex-3-enal (DOHE in the original mechanism has a lower net energy barrier than that in the newly deduced mechanism, and thus should be more preferred. The mechanism indicates that DMDFC is first protonized, followed by a proton shift process, and thereafter an OH- ion is added, completing the hydration process. Thereafter, an intramolecular H-shift reaction proceeds, leading to conversion to the intended intermediate product DOHE by the consecutive processes of isomerization and dehydration.

  11. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  12. Evaluation on levels and conversion profiles of DON, 3-ADON, and 15-ADON during bread making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Wang, Bujun

    2015-10-15

    The present study investigated the changes and conversion profiles of DON, its conjugations 3-ADON, and 15-ADON during bread making process, by spiking targeted mycotoxin standards to Fusarium mycotoxins-free wheat flour. No significant (p bread crust. Regarding ADONs, decreases of 20-40% for 3-ADON and 28-60% for 15-ADON were found during fermentation stage, and further losses of ADONs were observed after proofing process. Although ADONs levels gained an increase after baking. This study demonstrated that ADONs were converted to DON, while no ADONs were detectable in DON spiked samples during bread making process. The mechanism that ADONs could be converted into DON is unclear so far.

  13. Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ashley Brinson

    2002-06-20

    From 1994 to 2001, Dow Corning studied a waste recycling process to recover direct process residues (DPR) resulting from the production of silicone precursors. Over the course of eight years, Dow Corning constructed and operated a pilot plant, a small scale commercial plant, and a full scale plant. The process reacts DPR with hydrogen and chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and high pressure. The process converted 85% of the DPR to valuable chlorosilane monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. When feeding methyltrichlorosilane, the process converted 30% of the MeSiCl3 to other monomers. Alternate co-feed monomers were tested. By converting waste DPR to valuable intermediates, the technology significantly reduces waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.

  14. Use of a DBMS (data base management system) to aid in the software conversion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, A.F.; Bryant, R.A.; Buhrmaster, M.A.; Christian, J.L.; Hume, R.

    1987-02-01

    Procedures are described that provide for the automated conversion of a screen library containing over a thousand screen display definitions to a new screen definition software package. The first step is to extract the screen definition information from the original screen package. This information is then loaded into a data base management system (DBMS). The information is manipulated as necessary and output in a format that can be utilized by the new screen package. A major benefit of the procedures developed is that a DBMS allows bulk updates of multiple screen definitions to be performed. Both the source and target screen packages provide only for the updating of individual screens. Although the procedures described apply to the problem of converting screen definitions for a specific application using the two specific screen definition software packages, the flexibility inherent in a DBMS allows its use in solving many such complex problems. The concept can be modified to allow possibilities limited only by the creativity of the DBMS users and the information contained in the data base.

  15. Membrane filtration process and bioreactor for elimination of chlorinated hydrocarbons from industrial effluents; Membranfiltration und Bioreaktor zur Eliminierung chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe aus Industrieabwaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schierenbeck, A.

    2003-07-01

    Selective separation and elimination of chlorinated hydrocarbons from industrial effluents directly at the production site was to be achieved by a combined process including membrane technology and biodegradation. This way, closed cycle processes can be designed which will be a major contribution to environmental protection integrated in production processes. First, chlorinated hydrocarbons are characterized in terms of occurrence and biodegradability. Two model substances are discussed (3-chlorobenzoic acid and 4-chlorophenol), and a practical example is presented. The fundamentals of the processes used for treatment of industrial effluents are outlined, and their advantages and shortcomings are discussed, with particular regard to integrated application in production processes. [German] Das Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die Entwicklung einer Verfahrenstechnik, bei der durch die Kombination der Membrantechnik mit dem biologischen Abbau die selektive Abtrennung und Eliminierung chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe aus dem Industrieabwasser schon am Ort des Entstehens realisiert werden. Durch den Einsatz dieser Technik wird die Schliessung von Wasserkreislaeufen moeglich. Dies stellt fuer alle Bereiche, in denen chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe in das Abwasser gelangen koennen, einen wichtigen Beitrag zum produktionsintegrierten Umweltschutz dar. Dazu wird zunaechst die Problemstoffgruppe der chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffe hinsichtlich ihres Auftretens und der biologischen Abbaubarkeit charakterisiert. Zwei Modellsubstanzen (3-Chlorbenzoesaeure und 4-Chlorphenol) werden diskutiert sowie ein Beispiel aus der Praxis vorgestellt, bei dem ein Abwasser mit chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen anfaellt. Die Grundlagen der verwendeten Verfahren zur Behandlung von Industrieabwaessern mit entsprechenden Abwasserinhaltsstoffen werden dargestellt. Die Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen dieser Verfahren, insbesondere im Hinblick auf den produktionsintegrierten Einsatz, werden diskutiert. (orig.)

  16. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  17. Processes in petroleum chemistry. Technical and economical characteristics Vol. 1. Synthesis gas and derivatives. Main hydrocarbon intermediaries (2 ed. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvel, A.; Lefebvre, G.; Castex, L.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to give rudiments for a preliminary study to outline petrochemical operation and cost estimation. Basic operations are examined: Steam reforming or partial oxidation, steam or thermal cracking and catalytic reforming. The main topics examined include: hydrogen purification, hydrogen fabrication from hydrocarbons, carbonaceous materials or water, production of carbon monoxide, ammoniac synthesis methanol synthesis from synthesis gas, preparation of formol, urea, acetylene and monomers for the preparation of plastics.

  18. Conversion of Methane to Syngas by a Membrane-Based Oxidation-Reforming Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.S.; Chen, Chusheng; Feng, Shao-Jie; Ran, S.; Zhu, Du-Chun; Liu, W.; Liu, Wei; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Two processes in one space: Methane, the main component of natural gas, can be converted into syngas efficiently in a two-stage oxygen-permeable ceramic membrane reactor by means of integrated oxidation and reforming processes (see picture). This could be a cheaper alternative to the current steam-r

  19. Polymer:fullerene solar cells: materials, processing issues, and cell layouts to reach power conversion efficiency over 10%, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxebarria, Ikerne; Ajuria, Jon; Pacios, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the impressive development achieved by organic photovoltaics throughout the last decades, especially in terms of reported power conversion efficiencies, there are still important technological and fundamental obstacles to circumvent before they can be implemented into reliable and long-lasting applications. Regarding device processing, the synthesis of highly soluble polymeric semiconductors first, and then fullerene derivatives, was initially considered as an important breakthrough that would definitely change the fabrication of photovoltaics once and for all. The potential and the expectation raised by this technology is such that it is very difficult to keep track of the most significant progresses being now published in different and even monographic journals. In this paper, we review the development of polymeric solar cells from its origin to the most efficient devices published to date. We separate these achievements into three different categories traditionally followed by the scientific community to push devices over 10% power conversion efficiency: active materials, strategies-fabrication/processing procedures-that can mainly modify the active film morphology, and all the different cell layout/architectures that have been used in order to extract as high a photocurrent as possible from the Sun. The synthesis of new donors, the use of additives and postprocessing techniques, buffer interlayers, inverted and tandem designs are some of the most important aspects that are reviewed in detail in this paper. All have equally contributed to develop this technology and bring it at the doors of commercialization.

  20. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Pyrolysis as a key process in biomass combustion and thermochemical conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvero Petar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is a fuel with a highly volatile content and due to that, pyrolysis as a part of the combustion process, has a dominant role in the overall process development, as well as on final products and the process efficiency. It is of key importance to investigate the influence of the process parameters; as temperature, furnace/reactor environment, fuel properties, type, particle size, geometry, and the structure of the pyrolysis process has an influence regards the design of the combustion/pyrolysis equipment and the final products of the processes. This paper gives some results of the investigation’s related to this problem, mainly focussing on wooden biomass as the most important biomass type, as well as a comparison with relevant documented literature. Besides that, pyrolysis based technologies are one of the key directions in synthetic fuels production based on biomass. Biomass pyrolysis process parameters are crucial in reactor design as well as the quantity and quality of the final products. This paper provides discussion dedicated to this aspect with a focus on slow pyrolysis, targeting charcoal as the key product, and fast pyrolysis, targeting synthetic gas as the key product.

  2. Advancing understanding of microbial bioenergy conversion processes by activity-based protein profiling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yun; Fredrickson, James K; Sadler, Natalie C; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Smith, Richard D; Wright, Aaron T

    2015-01-01

    ... improved biofuel production platforms. We review general design strategies in ABPP, and highlight recent advances that are or could be pivotal to biofuels processes including applications of ABPP to cellulosic bioethanol, biodiesel...

  3. Conversion and Distribution of Lead and Tin in NaOH-NaNO3 Fusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingxin; Guo, Xueyi

    2017-04-01

    Oxidizing alkali fusion process has been studied to extract amphoteric metals. Transformation and distribution behaviors of typical amphoteric metals Pb and Sn in the NaOH-NaNO3 fusion process are systemically studied by theoretical analysis and experimental verification done in this work. Functions of NaOH and NaNO3 in the fusion process were also investigated. The results show the fused products, Na2PbO3 and Na2SnO3, are captured in the flux, and Na2PbO4 is speculated to reduce to Pb(II) in the following leaching process. By measuring solubility data of NaOH-Na2SnO3-PbO-H2O system, a strategy of crystallization is proposed to separate Sn with Pb in concentrated alkaline solution, and slice Na2Sn(OH)6 is obtained as a product.

  4. Nature of Electronically Excited States of Organic Compounds and Processes of Nonradiative Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, G. V.; Plotnikov, V. G.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.

    2016-08-01

    Models of quantum-chemical calculation of rate constants for internal processes and intersystem crossing in polyatomic molecules are considered. The influence of the nature of electronically excited states in organic compounds is investigated. It is shown that the explicit allowance for the nature of wave functions of electronic states for estimation of electronic matrix elements of nonadiabaticity operators and spin-orbit interaction allows photophysical processes in organic compounds to be considered in detail.

  5. Combined hydrothermal liquefaction and catalytic hydrothermal gasification system and process for conversion of biomass feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2017-09-12

    A combined hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) system and process are described that convert various biomass-containing sources into separable bio-oils and aqueous effluents that contain residual organics. Bio-oils may be converted to useful bio-based fuels and other chemical feedstocks. Residual organics in HTL aqueous effluents may be gasified and converted into medium-BTU product gases and directly used for process heating or to provide energy.

  6. Alternative process schemes for coal conversion. Progress report No. 4, September 1, 1979-March 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, M.J.

    1980-04-01

    This progress report is divided into two parts. In Part A, the results of the first three progress reports which dealt with the separation of H/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2//CH/sub 4//CO mixtures resulting from coal gasification processes are briefly summarized. The separation calculations were performed for ideal, cryogenic, clathrate (gas-hydrate), and absorption/stripping separation processes. The cryogenic separation indicates the least energy requirement. Work on this phase of the program has been concluded. An experimental coal gasification program is being undertaken. In Part B, a review smmary of existing and developing coal gasificaton processes is presented. The relative merits of gasifier type, heating method, operating mode, process conditions, and gasifying medium are considered. This is followed by a qualitative appraisal of several selected coal gasification processes based upon the above considerations. It is intended that this report will help focus attention on those areas in which significant process improvements can be realized. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for future work.

  7. A whole biodiesel conversion process combining isolation, cultivation and in situ supercritical methanol transesterification of native microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazzar, Souhir; Quesada-Medina, Joaquín; Olivares-Carrillo, Pilar; Marzouki, Mohamed Néjib; Acién-Fernández, Francisco Gabriel; Fernández-Sevilla, José María; Molina-Grima, Emilio; Smaali, Issam

    2015-08-01

    A coupled process combining microalgae production with direct supercritical biodiesel conversion using a reduced number of operating steps is proposed in this work. Two newly isolated native microalgae strains, identified as Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., were cultivated in both batch and continuous modes. Maximum productivities were achieved during continuous cultures with 318mg/lday and 256mg/lday for Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., respectively. Microalgae were further characterized by determining their photosynthetic performance and nutrient removal efficiency. Biodiesel was produced by catalyst-free in situ supercritical methanol transesterification of wet unwashed algal biomass (75wt.% of moisture). Maximum biodiesel yields of 45.62wt.% and 21.79wt.% were reached for Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., respectively. The analysis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of Chlorella sp. showed a decrease in their proportion when comparing conventional and supercritical transesterification processes (from 37.4% to 13.9%, respectively), thus improving the quality of the biodiesel.

  8. Enhancement of Electron Transfer in Various Photo-Assisted Oxidation Processes for Nitro-Phenolic Compound Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khue, Do Ngoc; Lam, Tran Dai; Minh, Do Binh; Loi, Vu Duc; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Bach, Vu Quang; Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Hoang, Nguyen; Hu'ng, Dao Duy

    2016-08-01

    The present study focuses on photo-assisted advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) with strongly enhanced electron transfer for degradation of nitro-phenolic compounds in aqueous medium. The effectiveness of these processes was estimated based on the pseudo-first order rate constant k determined from high-performance liquid chromatography. The degradation of four different nitro-phenolic compounds was systematically studied using selected AOPs; these four compounds were nitrophenol, dinitrophenol, trinitrophenol and trinitroresorcin. It was observed that the combination of ultraviolet light with hydrogen peroxide H2O2 enhanced and maintained hydroxyl radicals, and therefore increased the conversion yield of organic pollutants. These AOPs provided efficient and green removal of stable organic toxins found in a wide range of industrial wastewater.

  9. Analysis of sulfur dioxide conversion process%二氧化硫转化过程分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岩; 王全贵; 张晓晶

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur trioxide sulfonation technology has been widely used in synthetic detergent industry in our country, for our detergent production technology and product quality improvement and development has played a positive role in promoting, and has been applied to the petroleum and chemical industries. Sulfur dioxide conversion unit is also caled sulfur trioxide preparation unit, and is an important part of the apparatus. This paper mainly describes the importance of the conversion of sulfur dioxide and the reaction process, ilustrating The conversion of sulfur dioxide can be realized in the industrial production must be the role of the catalyst.%三氧化硫磺化技术在我国合成洗涤剂工业中已广泛使用,为我国洗涤剂生产技术及产品质量的提高和发展起到了积极的推动作用,并已推广应用到石油和化工行业。二氧化硫转化单元也称为三氧化硫制备单元,是SO3磺化装置中的重要组成部分。文中着重描述了二氧化硫转化的重要性及其反应过程,说明了二氧化硫的转化必须在触媒的作用下才可以实现工业化生产的事实。

  10. Final technical report for the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization (an EFRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    Greater than 95% of all materials produced by the chemical industry are derived from a small slate of simple hydrocarbons that are derived primarily from natural gas and petroleum, predominantly through oxygenation, C–C bond formation, halogenation or amination. Yet, current technologies for hydrocarbon conversion are typically high temperature, multi-step processes that are energy and capital intensive and result in excessive emissions (including carbon dioxide). The Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization (CCHF) brought together research teams with the broad coalition of skills and knowledge needed to make the fundamental advances in catalysis required for next-generation technologies to convert hydrocarbons (particularly light alkanes and methane) at high efficiency and low cost. Our new catalyst technologies offer many opportunities including enhanced utilization of natural gas in the transportation sector (via conversion to liquid fuels), more efficient generation of electricity from natural gas using direct methane fuel cells, reduced energy consumption and waste production for large petrochemical processes, and the preparation of high value molecules for use in biological/medical applications or the agricultural sector. The five year collaborative project accelerated fundamental understanding of catalyst design for the conversion of C–H bonds to functionalized products, essential to achieve the goals listed above, as evidenced by the publication of 134 manuscripts. Many of these fundamental advancements provide a foundation for potential commercialization, as evidenced by the submission of 11 patents from research support by the CCHF.

  11. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high moisture, low rank coals to a high quality, low sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal process enhances low rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,500 to 9,000 Btu/lb, by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. The 45 ton per hour unit is located adjacent to a unit train load out facility at Western Energy Company`s Rosebud coal mine near Colstrip, Montana. The demonstration plant is sized at about one-tenth the projected throughput of a multiple processing train commercial facility. During this report period the primary focus has been to continue the operation of the demonstration facility. Production has been going to area power plants. Modifications and maintenance work was also performed this quarter.

  12. Process analysis of the conversion of styrene to biomass and medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate in a two-phase bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Casey, Eoin; Duane, Gearoid F; Mitic, Dragana; Hume, Aisling R; Kenny, Shane T; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2011-10-01

    The improvement and modeling of a process for the supply of the volatile aromatic hydrocarbon, styrene, to a fermentor for increased biomass production of the medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) accumulating bacterium Pseudomonas putida CA-3 was investigated. Fed-batch experiments were undertaken using different methods to provide the styrene. Initial experiments where styrene was supplied as a liquid to the bioreactor had detrimental effects on cell growth and inhibited PHA polymer accumulation. By changing the feed of gaseous styrene to liquid styrene through the air sparger a 5.4-fold increase in cell dry-weight was achieved (total of 10.56 g L(-1)) which corresponds to a fourfold improvement in PHA production (3.36 g L(-1)) compared to previous studies performed in our laboratory (0.82 g L(-1)). In addition this final improved feeding strategy reduced the release of styrene from the fermentor 50-fold compared to initial experiments (0.12 mL total styrene released per 48 h run). An unstructured kinetic model was developed to describe cell growth along with substrate and oxygen utilization. The formation of dispersed gas (air) and liquid (styrene) phases in the medium and the transfer of styrene between the aqueous and dispersed liquid droplet phases was also modeled. The model provided a detailed description of these phase transitions and helped explain how the feeding strategy led to improved process performance in terms of final biomass levels. It also highlighted the key factors to be considered during further process improvement.

  13. The Linguistic Correlates of Conversational Deception: Comparing Natural Language Processing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Nicholas D.; Hall, Charles; McCarthy, Philip M.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2010-01-01

    The words people use and the way they use them can reveal a great deal about their mental states when they attempt to deceive. The challenge for researchers is how to reliably distinguish the linguistic features that characterize these hidden states. In this study, we use a natural language processing tool called Coh-Metrix to evaluate deceptive…

  14. Waste management in the meat processing industry: Conversion of paunch and DAF sludge into solid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamawand, Ihsan; Pittaway, Pam; Lewis, Larry; Chakrabarty, Sayan; Caldwell, Justin; Eberhard, Jochen; Chakraborty, Arpita

    2017-02-01

    This article addresses the novel dewatering process of immersion-frying of paunch and dissolved air flotation (DAF) sludge to produce high energy pellets. Literature have been analysed to address the feasibility of replacing conventional boiler fuel at meat processing facilities with high energy paunch-DAF sludge pellets (capsules). The value proposition of pelleting and frying this mixture into energy pellets is based on a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The CBA is based on information derived from the literature and consultation with the Australian Meat Processing Industry. The calorific properties of a mixture of paunch cake solids and DAF sludge were predicted from literature and industry consultation to validate the product. This study shows that the concept of pelletizing and frying paunch is economically feasible. The complete frying and dewatering of the paunch and DAF sludge mixture produces pellets with energy content per kilogram equivalent to coal. The estimated cost of this new product is half the price of coal and the payback period is estimated to be between 1.8 and 3.2years. Further research is required for proof of concept, and to identify the technical challenges associated with integrating this technology into existing meat processing plants. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  16. Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells with Power Conversion Efficiencies of 2.5% using Benzothiadiazole/Imide-Based Acceptors

    KAUST Repository

    Bloking, Jason T.

    2011-12-27

    A new series of electron-deficient molecules based on a central benzothiadiazole moiety flanked with vinylimides has been synthesized via Heck chemistry and used in solution-processed organic photovoltaics (OPV). Two new compounds, 4,7-bis(4-(N-hexyl-phthalimide)vinyl)benzo[c]1,2,5-thiadiazole (PI-BT) and 4,7-bis(4-(N-hexyl-naphthalimide)vinyl)benzo[c]1,2,5-thiadiazole (NI-BT), show significantly different behaviors in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the electron donor. Two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray scattering (2D GIXS) experiments demonstrate that PI-BT shows significant crystallization in spin-coated thin films, whereas NI-BT does not. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that while PI-BT maintains a planar structure in the ground state, steric interactions cause a twist in the NI-BT molecule, likely preventing significant crystallization. In BHJ solar cells with P3HT as donor, PI-BT devices achieved a large open-circuit voltage of 0.96 V and a maximum device power-conversion efficiency of 2.54%, whereas NI-BT containing devices only achieved 0.1% power-conversion efficiency. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Combining natural language processing and network analysis to examine how advocacy organizations stimulate conversation on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Christopher Andrew

    2016-10-18

    Social media sites are rapidly becoming one of the most important forums for public deliberation about advocacy issues. However, social scientists have not explained why some advocacy organizations produce social media messages that inspire far-ranging conversation among social media users, whereas the vast majority of them receive little or no attention. I argue that advocacy organizations are more likely to inspire comments from new social media audiences if they create "cultural bridges," or produce messages that combine conversational themes within an advocacy field that are seldom discussed together. I use natural language processing, network analysis, and a social media application to analyze how cultural bridges shaped public discourse about autism spectrum disorders on Facebook over the course of 1.5 years, controlling for various characteristics of advocacy organizations, their social media audiences, and the broader social context in which they interact. I show that organizations that create substantial cultural bridges provoke 2.52 times more comments about their messages from new social media users than those that do not, controlling for these factors. This study thus offers a theory of cultural messaging and public deliberation and computational techniques for text analysis and application-based survey research.

  18. A Reversed Photosynthesis-like Process for Light-Triggered CO2 Capture, Release, and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingguan; Liao, Shenglong; Zhang, Shiming; Wang, Yapei

    2017-06-22

    Materials for CO2 capture have been extensively exploited for climate governance and gas separation. However, their regeneration is facing the problems of high energy cost and secondary CO2 contamination. Herein, a reversed photosynthesis-like process is proposed, in which CO2 is absorbed in darkness while being released under light illumination. The process is likely supplementary to natural photosynthesis of plants, in which, on the contrary, CO2 is released during the night. Remarkably, the material used here is able to capture 9.6 wt.% CO2 according to its active component. Repeatable CO2 capture at room temperature and release under light irradiation ensures its convenient and cost-effective regeneration. Furthermore, CO2 released from the system is successfully converted into a stable compound in tandem with specific catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tailoring Mixed-Halide, Wide-Gap Perovskites via Multistep Conversion Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bae, D.; Palmstrom, A.; Roelofs, K.; Mei, B.T.; Chorkendorf, I.; Bent, S.F.; Vesborg, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Wide-band-gap mixed-halide CH3NH3PbI3–XBrX-based solar cells have been prepared by means of a sequential spin-coating process. The spin-rate for PbI2 as well as its repetitive deposition are important in determining the cross-sectional shape and surface morphology of perovskite, and, consequently, J

  20. Tailoring Mixed-Halide, Wide-Gap Perovskites via Multistep Conversion Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bae, D.; Palmstrom, A.; Roelofs, K.; Mei, Bastian Timo; Chorkendorf, I.; Bent, S.F.; Vesborg, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Wide-band-gap mixed-halide CH3NH3PbI3–XBrX-based solar cells have been prepared by means of a sequential spin-coating process. The spin-rate for PbI2 as well as its repetitive deposition are important in determining the cross-sectional shape and surface morphology of perovskite, and, consequently, J

  1. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickman, B.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Burrows, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation......, potentially also on nanostructured electrodes, where retaining high surface area is crucial to maximize performance....

  2. Conversion of a CHO cell culture process from perfusion to fed-batch technology without altering product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwly, F; Weber, U; Ziegler, T; Gervais, A; Mastrangeli, R; Crisci, C; Rossi, M; Bernard, A; von Stockar, U; Kadouri, A

    2006-05-03

    by a complementary set of studies (e.g. full physico-chemical characterization, assessment of in vitro and in vivo bioactivity, comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in relevant species, etc.) would be required. Finally, this illustrates the need to fix the production process early during the development of a new drug product in order to minimize process conversion efforts and to shorten product development time lines.

  3. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  4. Progess in technology development for conversion of {sup 99}Mo production--BATAN's (Indonesia) conversion program, progress in the CNEA (Argentina) LEU foil/base-side process, and development of inorganic sorbents for {sup 99}Mo production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, A. J.; Stepinski, D. C.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Leyva, A.; Gelis, A. V.; Bond, A. H.; Mayes, H.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    Currently, nearly all of the world's supply of {sup 99}Mo is produced fiom the fissioning of {sup 235}U in targets of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Conversion of these targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) would ease worldwide concern over the use and transport of this weapons-grade material. This paper reviews three projects: (1) the ongoing conversion of BATAN's {sup 99}Mo production process from HEU oxide targets (Cintichem processing) to LEU foil targets (Cintichem processing), (2) demonstration of LEU foil targets and base-side processing in CNEA's facility, and (3) the evaluation of two inorganic Thermoxid sorbents for Mo recovery and purification in acidic U-bearing solutions.

  5. Conversion of a deasphalting unit for use in the process of supercritical solvent recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waintraub S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce energy consumption and to increase deasphalted oil yield, an old PETROBRAS deasphalting unit was converted for use in the process of supercritical solvent recovery. In-plant and pilot tests were performed to determine the ideal solvent-to-oil ratio. The optimum conditions for separation of the supercritical solvent from the solvent-plus-oil liquid mixture were determined by experimental tests in PVT cells. These tests also allowed measurement of the dew and bubble points, determination of the retrograde region, observation of supercritical fluid compressibility and as a result construction of a phase equilibrium diagram.

  6. Orange and IR to violet up-conversion processes in Nd:ZBLAN glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, M.; Malinowski, M.; Piramidowicz, R.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we investigate, compare and discuss UV and violet emission behaviour under pulsed, multi-photon orange and infra-red excitation in Nd 3+ doped ZBLAN samples of different concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 5 mol.%. Supported by the obtained spectroscopic results, orange and IR excitation schemes were proposed and verified by time dependent rate equation model, which has been employed to confirm the nature of observed processes. Proposed model returns fitting results which qualitatively reflect the experimentally obtained fluorescence decays.

  7. Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Talmadge, M.; Hensley, J.; Worley, M.; Dudgeon, D.; Barton, D.; Groendijk, P.; Ferrari, D.; Stears, B.; Searcy, E. M.; Wright, C. T.; Hess, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    This design report describes an up-to-date benchmark thermochemical conversion process that incorporates the latest research from NREL and other sources. Building on a design report published in 2007, NREL and its subcontractor Harris Group Inc. performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for a biomass-to-ethanol process via indirect gasification. The conceptual design presented herein considers the economics of ethanol production, assuming the achievement of internal research targets for 2012 and nth-plant costs and financing. The design features a processing capacity of 2,205 U.S. tons (2,000 metric tonnes) of dry biomass per day and an ethanol yield of 83.8 gallons per dry U.S. ton of feedstock. The ethanol selling price corresponding to this design is $2.05 per gallon in 2007 dollars, assuming a 30-year plant life and 40% equity financing with a 10% internal rate of return and the remaining 60% debt financed at 8% interest. This ethanol selling price corresponds to a gasoline equivalent price of $3.11 per gallon based on the relative volumetric energy contents of ethanol and gasoline.

  8. Processing needs and methodology for wastewaters from the conversion of coal, oil shale, and biomass to synfuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The workshop identifies needs to be met by processing technology for wastewaters, and evaluates the suitability, approximate costs, and problems associated with current technology. Participation was confined to DOE Environmental Control Technology contractors to pull together and integrate past wastewater-related activities, to assess the status of synfuel wastewater treatability and process options, and to abet technology transfer. Particular attention was paid to probable or possible environmental restrictions which cannot be economically met by present technology. Primary emphasis was focussed upon process-condensate waters from coal-conversion and shale-retorting processes. Due to limited data base and time, the workshop did not deal with transients, upsets, trade-offs and system optimization, or with solids disposal. The report is divided into sections that, respectively, survey the water usage and effluent situation (II); identify the probable and possible water-treatment goals anticipated at the time when large-scale plants will be constructed (III); assess the capabilities, costs and shortcomings of present technology (IV); explore particularly severe environmental-control problems (V); give overall conclusions from the Workshop and recommendations for future research and study (VI); and, finally, present Status Reports of current work from participants in the Workshop (VII).

  9. Application of the SULF-X process to coal conversion and utilization. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, E.; Bramer, H.C.; New, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pittsburgh Environmental and Energy Systems, Inc. contracted with the Department of Energy to demonstrate the efficacy of an iron sulfide flue gas treatment system (FGT) for removing sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and to correlate process variables to system performance. Laboratory and bench-scale testing was conducted with the SULF-X process, using both synthesized gas and actual flue gas from a coal-fired furnace. Laboratory tests resulted in 95% SO/sub 2/ removal and up to 95% NO/sub x/ removal. The bench-scale system demonstrated similar SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies, but achieved only 39% NO/sub x/ removal due to relatively high oxygen concentrations in the flue gas and insufficient liquid-gas interfacial area within the absorber. Elemental sulfur was recovered during the regeneration steps. Total capital investment for the SULF-X system was estimated to be $91 to $103 per kilowatt (electric), compared to $90/kw for sodium solution scrubbing, $78 to $83/kw for magnesia slurry scrubbing and $74/kw for limestone slurry scrubbing. Annual operating costs for the SULF-X system were estimated to be 5.44 to 6.90 mills per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.96 to 5.22 for sodium, 3.68 to 3.99 for magnesia and 3.73 to 4.25 for limestone. 6 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  10. Single-catalyst particle spectroscopy of alcohol-to-olefins conversions : Comparison between SAPO-34 and SSZ-13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, Qingyun; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Mokhtar, Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A.; Basahel, Suliman N.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct hydrocarbon pool (HCP) species on individual micron-sized SAPO-34 and SSZ-13 crystals have been compared during methanol-to-olefins (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversion processes. In situ UV-vis micro-spectroscopy reveals the formation of 400 nm and 580 nm absorpti

  11. A Soluble Dynamic Complex Strategy for the Solution-Processed Fabrication of Organic Thin-Film Transistors of a Boron-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kyohei; Saito, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-09-19

    The solution-processed fabrication of thin films of organic semiconductors enables the production of cost-effective, large-area organic electronic devices under mild conditions. The formation/dissociation of a dynamic B-N coordination bond can be used for the solution-processed fabrication of semiconducting films of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) materials. The poor solubility of a boron-containing PAH in chloroform, toluene, and chlorobenzene was significantly improved by addition of minor amounts (1 wt % of solvent) of pyridine derivatives, as their coordination to the boron atom suppresses the inherent propensity of the PAHs to form π-stacks. Spin-coating solutions of the thus formed Lewis acid-base complexes resulted in the formation of amorphous thin films, which could be converted into polycrystalline films of the boron-containing PAH upon thermal annealing. Organic thin-film transistors prepared by this solution process displayed typical p-type characteristics.

  12. Balanced bilinguals favor lexical processing in their opaque language and conversion system in their shallow language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetler, Karin A; de León Rodríguez, Diego; Laganaro, Marina; Müri, René; Nyffeler, Thomas; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-01

    Referred to as orthographic depth, the degree of consistency of grapheme/phoneme correspondences varies across languages from high in shallow orthographies to low in deep orthographies. The present study investigates the impact of orthographic depth on reading route by analyzing evoked potentials to words in a deep (French) and shallow (German) language presented to highly proficient bilinguals. ERP analyses to German and French words revealed significant topographic modulations 240-280 ms post-stimulus onset, indicative of distinct brain networks engaged in reading over this time window. Source estimations revealed that these effects stemmed from modulations of left insular, inferior frontal and dorsolateral regions (German>French) previously associated to phonological processing. Our results show that reading in a shallow language was associated to a stronger engagement of phonological pathways than reading in a deep language. Thus, the lexical pathways favored in word reading are reinforced by phonological networks more strongly in the shallow than deep orthography.

  13. Tailoring Mixed-Halide, Wide-Gap Perovskites via Multistep Conversion Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bae, Dowon; Palmstrom, Axel; Roelofs, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Wide-band-gap mixed-halide CH3NH3PbI3–XBrX-based solar cells have been prepared by means of a sequential spin-coating process. The spin-rate for PbI2 as well as its repetitive deposition are important in determining the cross-sectional shape and surface morphology of perovskite, and, consequently......, J–V performance. A perovskite solar cell converted from PbI2 with a dense bottom layer and porous top layer achieved higher device performance than those of analogue cells with a dense PbI2 top layer. This work demonstrates a facile way to control PbI2 film configuration and morphology simply...

  14. Catalytic plastics cracking for recovery of gasoline-range hydrocarbons from municipal plastic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buekens, A.G.; Huang, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry - CHIS 2, Free University of Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    1998-08-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in plastics cracking, a process developed to recycle plastic wastes into useful petrochemical materials. Under thermal cracking conditions, plastic wastes can be decomposed into three fractions: gas, liquid and solid residue. The liquid products are usually composed of higher boiling point hydrocarbons. By adopting customary fluid cracking catalysts and reforming catalysts, more aromatics and naphthenes in the C{sub 6}-C{sub 8} range can be produced, which are valuable gasoline-range hydrocarbons. More tests are, however, needed to verify the pyrolysis process in a pilot scale particularly for treatment of mixtures of bulk plastics. Plastics cracking is only an elementary conversion technology; its application has to be combined with other technologies such as municipal solid waste collection, classification and pretreatment at the front end, as well as hydrocarbon distillation and purification at the back end. Social, environmental and economic factors are also important in industrial implementation of the technology

  15. Conversion of Oleum papaveris seminis oil into methyl esters via esterification process optimization and kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syam, A.M.; Rashid, U.; Yunus, R.; Hamid, H.A.; Al-Resayes, S.I.; Nehdi, I.A.; Al-Muhtaseb, A.H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an acid pre-treatment process and a kinetic study for the esterification reaction of Oleum papaveris seminis oil with methanol in the presence of amberlite 120 as a solid catalyst to convert the oil into methyl esters. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the reaction parameters, i.e. reaction time, percentage of the catalyst and volume ratio of methanol to oil. The results revealed that 0.87% w/w of catalyst concentration and 44.70% v/v of methanol to oil ratio provided final free fatty acid (FFA) contents of 0.60% w/w at 102.40 min of reaction time. It proved that the contribution of Amberlite 120 in the esterification of FFA was highly significant. The kinetics of the esterification in Oleum papaveris seminis oil with methanol in the presence of the amberlite 120 catalyst were also investigated to establish the reaction rate constant (k), reaction order, and activation energy. The study was performed under the optimized parameters at three reaction temperatures (50, 55, and 60 ºC). The value of k was in the range of 0.013 to 0.027 min-1. The first-order kinetics’ model was suitable for this irreversible FFA esterification with the activation energy of about 60.9 KJ·mol-1. (Author)

  16. Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, William A.

    1980-06-01

    The program entails nondestructive testing, failure analysis, and studies of erosive wear, corrosion, and refractory degradation. Analysis of recent refractory-slag interaction tests suggests that as the chromia content is increased from 10 to 32%, the primary reaction product changes from calcium hexaluminate to spinel, significantly increasing the corrosion resistance of the refractory. Field reliability of the high-temperature ultrasonic erosion scanner was demonstrated at both a coal liquefaction plant (SRC at Tacoma, WA) and a coal gasification plant (Morgantown, WV). Continuous high-temperature operation has been demonstrated and an accuracy of +-0.025 mm seems achievable. Equipment has been ordered for field tests of passive acoustic systems at Exxon. This includes a four-channel tape recorder, differential amplifiers, and signal conditioners. Corrosion studies have been completed on effects of multicomponent gas environments on corrosion mechanisms and uniaxial tensile properties of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys. Results of these and other tests utilizing 10,000-h exposures suggest that corrosion rates of 0.6 mm/y can be expected. Failure analysis activities included studies of compressor diaphragms from the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center coal-liquefaction continuous-process unit. Cracks were found in two of the three diaphragms. Failure of an internal solids transfer line from HYGAS appears to have been caused by severe localized sulfidation of the high-nickel Inconel 182 weld metal used to fabricate the line.

  17. Modelling Chemical Kinetics of Soybean Oil Transesterification Process for Biodiesel Production: An Analysis of Molar Ratio between Alcohol and Soybean Oil Temperature Changes on the Process Conversion Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Tait

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model describing chemical kinetics of transesterification of soybean oil for biodiesel production has been developed. The model is based on the reverse mechanism of transesterification reactions and describes dynamics concentration changes of triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, biodiesel, and glycerol production. Reaction rate constants were written in the Arrhenius form. An analysis of key process variables such as temperature and molar ratio soybean oil- alcohol using response surface analysis was performed to achieve the maximum soybean conversion rate to biodiesel. The predictive power of the developed model was checked for the very wide range of operational conditions and parameters values by fitting different experimental results for homogeneous catalytic and non-catalytic processes published in the literature. A very good correlation between model simulations and experimental data was observed.

  18. Highly Efficient and Reproducible Nonfullerene Solar Cells from Hydrocarbon Solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    With chlorinated solvents unlikely to be permitted for use in solution-processed organic solar cells in industry, there must be a focus on developing nonchlorinated solvent systems. Here we report high-efficiency devices utilizing a low-bandgap donor polymer (PffBT4T-2DT) and a nonfullerene acceptor (EH-IDTBR) from hydrocarbon solvents and without using additives. When mesitylene was used as the solvent, rather than chlorobenzene, an improved power conversion efficiency (11.1%) was achieved without the need for pre- or post-treatments. Despite altering the processing conditions to environmentally friendly solvents and room-temperature coating, grazing incident X-ray measurements confirmed that active layers processed from hydrocarbon solvents retained the robust nanomorphology obtained with hot-processed chlorinated solvents. The main advantages of hydrocarbon solvent-processed devices, besides the improved efficiencies, were the reproducibility and storage lifetime of devices. Mesitylene devices showed better reproducibility and shelf life up to 4000 h with PCE dropping by only 8% of its initial value.

  19. Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, December 1994--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Lobban, L.L.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperature relax and thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.

  20. Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Lobban, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable products such as methanol, ethylene, and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field- enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperatures and also remove the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.

  1. Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Lobban, L.L.

    1995-11-01

    The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.

  2. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  3. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electro......The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future...... is electrolysis followed by conversion into synthetic hydrocarbons, alcohols or ethers. Several types of electrolysers exist. The various types are listed together with a short description of principle and status. It is argued that electrolysis will at least become part of large sustainable energy systems...

  4. Conversion of Oleum papaveris seminis oil into methyl esters via esterification process: Optimization and kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an acid pre-treatment process and a kinetic study for the esterification reaction of Oleum papaveris seminis oil with methanol in the presence of amberlite 120 as a solid catalyst to convert the oil into methyl esters. Response surface methodology (RSM was applied to optimize the reaction parameters, i.e. reaction time, percentage of the catalyst and volume ratio of methanol to oil. The results revealed that 0.87% w/w of catalyst concentration and 44.70% v/v of methanol to oil ratio provided final free fatty acid (FFA contents of 0.60% w/w at 102.40 min of reaction time. It proved that the contribution of Amberlite 120 in the esterification of FFA was highly significant. The kinetics of the esterification in Oleum papaveris seminis oil with methanol in the presence of the amberlite 120 catalyst were also investigated to establish the reaction rate constant (k, reaction order, and activation energy. The study was performed under the optimized parameters at three reaction temperatures (50, 55, and 60 ºC. The value of k was in the range of 0.013 to 0.027 min-1. The first-order kinetics’ model was suitable for this irreversible FFA esterification with the activation energy of about 60.9 KJ·mol-1.En este artículo se presenta un proceso de pre-tratamiento con ácido, y un estudio cinético de la reacción de esterificación. Se utiliza Oleum papaveris seminis con metanol en presencia de Amberlite 120 como catalizador sólido para la formación de los ésteres metílicos. Se aplicó una metodología de superficie de respuesta (RSM para optimizar los parámetros de la reacción; es decir, tiempo de reacción, porcentaje de la relación de catalizador y volumen de metanol - aceite. Los resultados mostraron que el 0,87% w/w de la concentración de catalizador y 44,70% v/v de metanol en relación al aceite dan lugar a un contenido final de ácidos grasos libres (FFA de 0,60% w/w en 102,40 min de tiempo de reacción. Se demostr

  5. Hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum heavy fractions using the TLC-FID technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.K.; Sarowha, S.L.S.; Bhagat, S.D. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India); Tiwari, R.K.; Gupta, S.K.; Venkataramani, P.S. [Defence Materials and Stores, Research and Development, Establishment, Kanpur (India)

    1998-03-01

    Hydrocarbon group type analysis is important in all conversion processes and in preparation of feed for these conversion processes so as to learn the selectivity of the different type of catalysts for product yield and quality. The use of the Mark 5 Iatroscan detector and the method reported here allowed for a rapid and quantitative hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum residues without prior separation of asphaltenes. SARA type analyses of petroleum residues have been performed by a three stage development using n-hexane, toluene and DCM (95%):MeOH (5%). The standard deviation and coefficient of variation in repeated measurements by this method were as low as 0.65 wt% or less and 3.5 wt% or less, respectively. The time required for analysis of 10 samples could be as short as 90 min. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 tabs., 21 refs.

  6. Correlation between work process-related exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and urinary levels of alpha-naphthol, beta-naphthylamine and 1-hydroxypyrene in iron foundry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Omland, Øyvind; Poulsen, O M

    1994-01-01

    risk of lung cancer, the present study suggests that the elevated risk may be due to exposure to carcinogenic PAH compounds in iron foundries, particularly in some high-risk work processes, e.g. casting and molding. In addition, the present study suggests that biological monitoring of 1-hydroxypyrene......In two Danish iron foundries the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in 24 personal air samples of workers employed in selected processes, i.e. melters, melted iron transporters, casters, machine molders, hand molders, shake-out workers and finishing workers, were measured...... foundry workers. Hand molders, finishing workers and truck drivers tended to have the highest levels. Concerning alpha-naphthol the highest concentrations were measured in urine from casters and shake-out workers. With regard to epidemiologic studies demonstrating that molders and casters have a higher...

  7. Conversational Dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  8. New Insight into the Formation Mechanism of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids from N-Alkyl Imidazoles and Halogenated Hydrocarbons: A Polar Microenvironment Induced and Autopromoted Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xueli; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Chengbu; Zhang, Dongju

    2017-02-09

    To illustrate the formation mechanism of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) from N-alkyl imidazoles and halogenated hydrocarbons, density functional theory calculations have been carried out on a representative system, the reaction of N-methyl imidazole with chloroethane to form 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([Emim]Cl) IL. The reaction is shown to proceed via an SN2 transition state with a free energy barrier of 34.4 kcal/mol in the gas phase and 27.6 kcal/mol in toluene solvent. The reaction can be remarkably promoted by the presence of ionic products and water molecules. The calculated barriers in toluene are 22.0, 21.7, and 19.9 kcal/mol in the presence of 1-3 ionic pairs of [Emim]Cl and 23.5, 21.3, and 19.4 kcal/mol in the presence of 1-3 water molecules, respectively. These ionic pairs and water molecules do not participate directly in the reaction but provide a polar environment that favors stabilizing the transition state with large charge separation. Hence, we propose that the synthesis of imidazolium-based ILs from N-alkyl imidazoles and halogenated hydrocarbons is an autopromoted process and a polar microenvironment induced reaction, and the existence of water molecules (a highly polar solvent) in the reaction may be mainly responsible for the initiation of reaction.

  9. Overcoming the Recalcitrance for the Conversion of Kenaf Pulp to Glucose via Microwave-Assisted Pre-Treatment Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Hurtado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the pre-treatment of cellulose from kenaf plant to yield sugar precursors for the production of ethanol or butanol for use as biofuel additives. In order to convert the crystalline cellulosic form to the amorphous form that can undergo enzymatic hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond to yield sugars, kenaf pulp samples were subjected to two different pre-treatment processes. In the acid pre-treatment, the pulp samples were treated with 37.5% hydrochloric acid in the presence of FeCl3 at 50 °C or 90 °C whereas in the alkaline method, the pulp samples were treated with 25% sodium hydroxide at room temperature and with 2% or 5% sodium hydroxide at 50 °C. Microwave-assisted NaOH-treatment of the cellulose was also investigated and demonstrated to be capable of producing high glucose yield without adverse environmental impact by circumventing the use of large amounts of concentrated acids i.e., 83–85% phosphoric acid employed in most digestion processes. The treated samples were digested with the cellulase enzyme from Trichoderma reesei. The amount of glucose produced was quantified using the QuantichromTM glucose bioassay for assessing the efficiency of glucose production for each of the treatment processes. The microwave-assisted alkaline pre-treatment processes conducted at 50 °C were found to be the most effective in the conversion of the crystalline cellulose to the amorphous form based on the significantly higher yields of sugar produced by enzymatic hydrolysis compared to the untreated sample.

  10. Conversion of wood residues to diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The general conversion scheme is shown. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, paraffinic fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A flow diagram of the continuous laboratory unit is shown. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. Capacity is about 10 lbs/h of feedstock. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. If a high octane gasoline is desired, the paraffinic fuel is passed through a conventional catalytic reformer. The normal propanol could be used as a fuel extender if blended with the hydrocarbon fuel products. Off gases from the downstream reactors are of high quality due to the accumulation of low molecular weight paraffins.

  11. Elements of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Elements of Energy Conversion brings together scattered information on the subject of energy conversion and presents it in terms of the fundamental thermodynamics that apply to energy conversion by any process. Emphasis is given to the development of the theory of heat engines because these are and will remain most important power sources. Descriptive material is then presented to provide elementary information on all important energy conversion devices. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of forms of energy, energy sources and storage, and energy conversion. This is foll

  12. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  13. New Informational Technologies in Processing of Hydrocarbon Raw Material--Outlook to the 21ST Century%信息技术在烃类原料加工中的应用--21 世纪展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿贝兹基尔金 A Y; 阿贝兹基尔金娜 M Y

    2000-01-01

    讨论了烃类原料加工流程图的图形传递新技术.%New ways are examined of the transmission of graphic information, containing in flow process diagrams of hydrocarbon raw material processing.

  14. Doubly stochastic Poisson processes in EMARG with detection of. beta. particles and internal-conversion electrons emitted from a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusov, V.D.; Zelentsova, T.N.; Grechan, V.I.; Semenov, M.Y.; Kravchenko, S.N.

    1985-12-01

    The form of the counting statistics is determined for detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons by a nuclear emulsion. It is shown experimentally for the first time that photographic detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons obeys a Neyman type-A distribution, and not a Poisson distribution as was previously assumed.

  15. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  16. Structural and chemical analysis of process residue from biochemical conversion of wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) to ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Anders Tengstedt; Jørgensen, Henning; Laursen, Kristian Holst

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulose to fermentable carbohydrates for ethanol production is now being implemented in large-scale industrial production. Applying hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis for the conversion process, a residue containing substantial amounts of lignin...... also contained significant amounts of protein, which is a valuable by-product when used as animal feed or when enzymes and yeast cells are separated for process recycling. Silica was the dominant constituent in the mineral fraction and except for few fragments of lignified middle lamellae most...

  17. Chemical storage of renewable electricity in hydrocarbon fuels via H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eilers, H.; Iglesias Gonzalez, M.; Schaub, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institute I

    2012-07-01

    The increased generation of renewable electricity leads to an increasing demand for storage due to its fluctuating production. Electrical energy can be stored as chemical energy carriers e.g. in form of H{sub 2} that can be further processed to hydrocarbons. Storage in form of hydrocarbons is advantageous compared to H{sub 2} storage since (i) a higher volumetric energy density in the product can be achieved and (ii) the infrastructure for hydrocarbon distribution, storage and utilization already exists. The present contribution introduces the potential of H{sub 2} integration in upgrading/production processes to hydrocarbon fuels, based on stoichiometry and kind of carbon feedstock. Processes include petroleum refining, vegetable oil hydrogenation, production of synfuel from lignocellulosic biomass and substitute natural gas from H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}. In the case of fossil raw materials, yields per feedstock can be increased and fossil CO{sub 2} emissions decreased since fossil resources for H{sub 2} production can be avoided. In the case of biomass conversion to synfuels, product yields per biomass/hectare can be increased. If CO{sub 2} is hydrogenated to fuels, no gasification step is needed, however lower hydrocarbon product yields per H{sub 2} are achieved since CO{sub 2} has the highest oxygen content. (orig.)

  18. Estimating N2O processes during grassland renewal and grassland conversion to maize cropping using N2O isotopocules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchen, Caroline; Well, Reinhard; Flessa, Heinz; Fuß, Roland; Helfrich, Mirjam; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2017-04-01

    Grassland break-up due to grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland can lead to a flush of mineral nitrogen from decomposition of the old grass sward and the decomposition of soil organic matter. Moreover, increased carbon and nitrogen mineralisation can result in enhanced nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. As N2O is known to be an important greenhouse gas and a major precursor for ozone depletion, its emissions need to be mitigated by adjusting agricultural management practices. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the N2O processes involved, as well as the contribution of N2O reduction to N2. Apart from the widely used 15N gas flux method, natural abundance isotopic analysis of the four most abundant isotopocules of N2O species is a promising alternative to assess N2O production pathways. We used stable isotope analyses of soil-emitted N2O (δ18ON2O, δ15NN2Obulk and δ15NN2OSP= intramolecular distribution of 15N within the linear N2O molecule) with an isotopocule mapping approach to simultaneously estimate the magnitude of N2O reduction to N2 and the fraction of N2O originating from the bacterial denitrification pathway or fungal denitrification and/or nitrification. This approach is based on endmember areas of isotopic values for the N2O produced from different sources reported in the literature. For this purpose, we calculated two main scenarios with different assumptions for N2O produced: N2O is reduced to N2 before residual N2O is mixed with N2O of various sources (Scenario a) and vice versa (Scenario b). Based on this, we applied seven different scenario variations, where we evaluated the range of possible values for the potential N2O production pathways (heterotrophic bacterial denitrification and/or nitrifier denitrification and fungal denitrification and/or nitrification). This was done by using a range of isotopic endmember values and assuming different fractionation factors of N2O reduction in order to find the most reliable scenario

  19. A safe, efficient and cost effective process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from a highly heterogeneous and relatively inaccessible shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Turlough F

    2015-10-01

    A rocky, intractable and highly heterogeneous, intertidal zone, was contaminated from a diesel fuel spill that occurred during refuelling of a grader used in road construction, on an operational mine's shiploading facility. A practical, cost-effective, and safer (to personnel by avoiding drilling and earthworks), and non-invasive sampling and remediation strategy was designed and implemented since the location and nature of the impacted geology (rock fill) and sediment, precluded conventional ex-situ and any in-situ treatment where drilling would be required. Enhanced biostimulation with surfactant, available N & P (which were highly constrained), and increased aeration, increased the degradation rate from no discernable change for 2 years post-spill, to 170 mg/kg/day; the maximum degradation rate after intervention. While natural attenuation was ineffective in this application, the low-cost, biostimulation intervention proved successful, allowing the site owner to meet their regulatory obligations. Petroleum hydrocarbons (aliphatic fraction) decreased from ∼20,000 mg/kg to <200 mg/kg at the completion of 180 weeks of treatment.

  20. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).