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Sample records for hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

  1. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  2. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  3. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a catalyst composition. It comprises: a modified Y zeolite having a unit cell size below about 24.45 {angstrom}, a degree of crystallinity which is at least retained at increasing SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios, a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio between about 8 to about 15, a water adsorption capacity at (25{degree}C and a p/p{sub {ital o}} value of 0.2) of between about 10--15% by weight of modified zeolite and a pore volume of at lest about 0.25 ml/g. Between about 10 to about 40% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least about 8 nm; an amorphous cracking component comprising a silica-alumina containing 50--95% by weight of silica; a binder comprising alumina; from about 0.05 to about 10 percent by weight of nickel and from about 2 to about 40 percent by weight of tungsten, calculated as metals per 100 parts by weight of total catalyst. The modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component comprises about 60--85% by weight of the total catalyst, the binder comprises about 15--40% by weight of the total catalyst and the amount of modified Y zeolite ranges between about 10--75% of the combined amount of modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component.

  4. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts(1-4). Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon source

  5. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons using modified clinoptilolite catalysts. Investigation of catalyst lifetime and reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, G.J.; Themistocleous, T.; Copperthwaite, R.G.

    1988-10-17

    A study of the deactivation and reactivation of modified clinoptilolite catalysts for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is reported. Clinoptilolite catalysts, modified by either ammonium ion exchange or hydrochloric acid treatment, exhibit a short useful catalyst lifetime for this reaction (ca. 2-3 h) due to a high rate of coke deposition (3-5.10/sup -3/ g carbon/g catalyst/h). A comparative study of reactivation using oxygen, nitrous oxide and ozone/oxygen as oxidants indicated that nitrous oxide reactivation gives improved catalytic performance when compared to the activity and lifetime of the fresh catalyst. Both oxygen and ozone/oxygen were found to be ineffective for the reactivation of clinoptilolite. Initial studies of in situ on-line reactivation are also described. 3 figs., 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  7. Direct Conversion of Syngas-to-Hydrocarbons over Higher Alcohols Synthesis Catalysts Mixed with HZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.; Li, Jinjing; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-10

    The synthesis of hydrocarbon fuels directly from synthesis gas (i.e. one step process) was investigated with a catalytic system comprised of HZSM-5 physically mixed with either a methanol synthesis catalyst or a higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) catalyst. The metal sites of the methanol or HAS synthesis catalyst enable the conversion of syngas to alcohols, whereas HZSM-5 provides acid sites required for methanol dehydration, and dimethyl ether-to-hydrocarbons reactions. Catalytic performance for HZSM-5 when mixed with either a 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst or a HAS catalyst was evaluated at 300°C, 70 bars, GHSV=700 h-1 and H2/CO=1 using a HZSM-5: alcohols synthesis catalyst weight ratio of 3:1. The major difference observed between the methanol synthesis and HAS catalyst mixtures was found in the production of durene which is an undesirable byproduct. While durene formation is negligible with any of the HAS catalysts mixed with the HZSM-5 evaluated in this study, it represents almost 50% of the C5+ fraction for the methanol synthesis catalyst (5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 ) mixed with HZSM-5. This presents an advantage for using HAS catalysts over the methanol synthesis catalyst to minimize the durene by-product. The yield toward the desired C5+ hydrocarbons is thus twice higher with selected HAS catalysts as compared to when HZSM-5 is mixed with 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3. Among all the HAS catalysts evaluated in this study, a catalyst with 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst was found the most promising due to higher production of C5+ hydrocarbons and low durene formation. The efficiency of the one-step process was thus further evaluated using the HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst mixture under a number of process conditions to maximize liquid hydrocarbons product yield. At 300oC, 70 bars, GHSV = 700 h-1 and HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu = 3:1 (wt.), the C5+ fraction represents 48.5% of the hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to achieve higher selectivity

  8. Spatial Distribution of Zeolite ZSM-5 within Catalyst Bodies Affects Selectivity and Stability of Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño, P.; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Epelde, E.; Gayubo, A.G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Solid acids, such as zeolites, are used as catalyst materials in a wide variety of important crude oil refinery, bulk chemical synthesis, and green processes. Examples include fluid catalytic cracking (FCC),[1] methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion,[ 2] plastic waste valorization,[3] and biomass

  9. Metal-Exchanged β Zeolites as Catalysts for the Conversion of Acetone to Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various metal-β zeolites have been synthesized under similar ion-exchange conditions. During the exchange process, the nature and acid strength of the used cations modified the composition and textural properties as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acidity of the final materials. Zeolites exchanged with divalent cations showed a clear decrease of their surface Brönsted acidity and an increase of their Lewis acidity. All materials were active as catalysts for the transformation of acetone into hydrocarbons. Although the protonic zeolite was the most active in the acetone conversion (96.8% conversion, the metal-exchanged zeolites showed varied selectivities towards different products of the reaction. In particular, we found the Cu-β to have a considerable selectivity towards the production of isobutene from acetone (over 31% yield compared to 7.5% of the protonic zeolite. We propose different reactions mechanisms in order to explain the final product distributions.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional transition-metal/silica-alumina catalysts for the chloromethane conversion to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.F. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, L.O.A.; Nascimento, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: leopoldo@ctgas.com.br; Ruiz, J.A.C. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil); Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-10-15

    In this work bifunctional (metal-acid) catalysts of Fe, Ni, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO over amorphous silica alumina support were characterized (acidity) and evaluated for the conversion of chloromethane in a fixed bed reactor. Temperature program tests TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) and TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) were performed to characterize the chemisorption sites for the impregnated and unimpregnated support. New adsorption sites were created on the metal supported catalysts. The conversion yield of chloromethane was evaluated for the five materials. The highest conversion conversion (85%) was observed for the unmodified support (SiAl) after 6 of reaction at 860 K and a WHSV (Weight Hourly Space Velocity) of 4,5 h{sup -1}. The best selectivity toward desirable hydrocarbons (C{sup 3}, C{sup 4}) was found for the Fe-SiAl catalyst. C{sup 3} was also found in the products stream when Ni/SiAl and NiO/SiAl catalysts were tested. Ni catalysts were the most favorable to methane production. The catalytic tests showed coke formation in all materials. For the SiAl support the desorption energy of chloromethane, determined by TPD runs, was 101,9 KJ/mol. The metals presented lower desorption energies (75,2 KJ/mol for Ni and 133,4 KJ/mol for Fe) than the oxides (190,1 KJ/mol for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 322,4 KJ/mol for NiO). (author)

  11. On the impact of olefins and aromatics in the methanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion over H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.; Mueller, S.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Methanol-to-hydrocarbons processes using HZSM-5 archetype acidic zeolites or zeotype SAPO-34 catalysts are regarded as a vital suite of conversion technologies to bypass petroleum-based routes for the production of specific fuels and petrochemical commodities. Special significance of the methanol chemistry originates from its versatility enabling selective transformations towards various products. Industry demonstrated successfully implementations of Methanol-To-Gasoline, Methanol-To-Olefin, and Methanol-To-Propylene processes, although the typical single-pass selectivity remained limited and recycling is necessary. Considerable fundamental research efforts both from experimental and computational sides contributed to unravel the underlying complex reaction mechanism. The indirect hydrocarbon pool mechanism, in which Broensted acid sites combined with adsorbed light olefins or lower methylbenzenes act as active centers, is generally accepted to explain the formation of light olefins. As olefin and aromatics populated catalytic sites show different reactivity in terms of activity and selectivity to ethylene or propylene, one could envision optimizing the product distribution by suitable co-feeding of specific hydrocarbons. The present work addresses three questions with an experimental study conducted under realistic MTP operation conditions: (1) How are ethylene and propylene formed at molecular level? (2) Which reaction pathway leads to the formation of undesired hydrogen transfer products? (3) Does olefin or aromatics co-feeding change the selectivity to ethylene or propylene? Xylenes and various olefins were co-fed with methanol to achieve a detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism over acidic HZSM-5 zeolites. Results suggest, that an olefin homologation/cracking route (olefin cycle) accounts for the autocatalytic (-like) nature and the majority of methanol consumption rather than the route involving aromatic intermediates (aromatics cycle). Co

  12. Effects of P content in a P/HZSM-5 catalyst on the conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyin Lu; Yancong Liu

    2011-01-01

    A series of P/HZSM-5 catalysts prepared by impregnation method were used for ethanol conversion to lower olefins.The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),NH3-temperature-programmed desorption(NH3-TPD)and N2 adsorption-desorption measurements.It was found that the P/HZSM-5 catalysts showed high activity and selectivity toward light olefins.The selectivities of propylene and butylene can be improved with the introduction of phosphorus(P).When the content of P reached 3.0 wt%,more than 18.9% propylene in the gaseous products was obtained over the P/HZSM-5 catalyst at 450 ℃.The introduction of P modified the strong Br()nsted acid sites of the original HZSM-5 catalysts and P/HZSM-5 catalysts could resist coke formation and showed good stability.

  13. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product is unprecedented, asymmetrically distributed towards heavier alkanes. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Features of non-oxidative conversion of methane into aromatic hydrocarbons over Mo-containing zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. A.; Korobitsyna, L. L.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of study of methane conversion under non-oxidative conditions over molybdenum containing zeolite catalysts prepared by solid-phase synthesis using nanosized molybdenum powder are presented. The kinetic mechanisms of the process behavior under different conditions of methane dehydroaromatization are determined. It is shown that nonoxidative conversion of methane can occur both in the external diffusion and kinetic regions, depending on the methane flow rate. It is found out, that the optimum temperature of the methane conversion is 750 °C. It is shown that increased methane conversion is observed at the feed space velocity of methane decreasing from 1500 to 500 h-1.

  15. Esterification of bio-oil from mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves with a solid acid catalyst: Conversion of the cyclic ether and terpenoids into hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xun; Gunawan, Richard; Mourant, Daniel; Wang, Yi; Lievens, Caroline; Chaiwat, Weerawut; Wu, Liping; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Bio-oil from pyrolysis of mallee (Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. gratiae) leaves differs from that obtained with wood by its content of cyclic ethers, terpenoids and N-containing organic compounds. Upgrading of the leaf bio-oil in methanol with a solid acid catalyst was investigated and it was found that the N-containing organics in the bio-oil lead to deactivation of the catalyst in the initial stage of exposure and have to be removed via employing high catalyst loading to allow the occurrence of other acid-catalysed reactions. Eucalyptol, the main cyclic ether in the bio-oil, could be converted into the aromatic hydrocarbon, p-cymene, through a series of intermediates including α-terpineol, terpinolene, and α-terpinene. Various steps such as ring-opening, dehydration, isomerisation, and aromatization were involved in the conversion of eucalyptol. The terpenoids in bio-oil could also be converted into aromatic hydrocarbons that can serve as starting materials for the synthesis of fine chemicals, via the similar processes.

  16. Conversion of dimethyl ether on zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, A.V.; Kulumbegov, R.V.; Khadzhiev, S.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis

    2006-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrocarbons was investigated using zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 type. 2% MexOy - 60% HZVM(analogue of ZSM-5)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Me = Zn, Ga, Fe, Co, V, Ni) catalyst samples have been obtained. The reaction was carried out in a fixed bed reaction set-up at 350-400 C, pressure 3 MPa, gas mix (% vol.): 24 DME, 76 N{sub 2}, WHSV=1300 l/l-{sub kat.}h. Most effective catalysts of DME conversion are pentasil based catalysts with promoter metals zinc, iron and cobalt by totality DME-conversion, gas and liquid hydrocarbon selectivity, ethylene and propylene content in gas. The best work temperatures are 350 and 375 C, thereupon increasing of temperature to 400 C leads to considerable growth of methane in hydrocarbon gas. Liquid hydrocarbons have high content of aromatics and iso-paraffins. Liquid hydrocarbon product is characterized by high octane number (RON) 90-98. (orig.)

  17. An apparatus for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-03-23

    The installation for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv) with the formation of a mixture of H2 and C02 is a catalyst chamber (KK) filled with longitudinally disposed thin pipes (with thin walls) or with pipe units made of dolomite, MgO or potassium aluminate. These pipes have a multilayered coating (Pk) on their internal and external surfaces (Pv), which contain catalytically active components. Such pipes or pipe units form a honeycombed structure with through longitudinal channels. The catalyst chamber itself is made of a ceramic material and has a heating winding outside for heating the catalyst. To save fuel and to increase the efficiency (KPD) of the heating device, the catalyst chamber is in turn enclosed by two additional shells filled with heat conducting packings which are easily penetrated by the gases being processed. The hydrocarbon vapors or gaseous fuel from the natural gas or methane and the steam are fed through the above cited heat exchange layers with packings into the facial part of the catalytic chamber, in which the conversion of the hydrocarbons occurs with the production of H2 and C02. From the catalyzer layer the mixture of gases and steam goes through a refrigerator into a trap for the steam excess and when it is necessary, into a C02 absorber and then, pure H2 is discharged from the latter. Such a catalytic installation is convenient to use for producing pure H2 from natural gas, methane, propane or kerosene.

  18. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbons over a two-component (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO and ZSM-5 zeolite) catalyst: kinetic modelling and catalyst deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erena, J.; Arandes, J.M.; Bilbao, J.; Gayubo, A.G. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingeneria Quimica; De Lasa, H.I. [University of Western Ontario, London, ONT (Canada). Chemical Reactor Engineering Centre

    2000-05-01

    The present study describes the kinetics of syngas transformation into liquid hydrocarbons (boiling point in the gasoline range) using as catalyst a mixture of a metallic component, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO, and of an acidic component, ZSM-5 zeolite. Experimental results were obtained in an isothermal fixed-bed integral reactor. The validity of several kinetic models, available for methanol synthesis, is analysed and modifications are proposed. These changes involve a rate equation with a CO{sub 2} concentration-dependent term. Catalyst deactivation is also evaluated and the effect of the operating conditions on coke deposition is established. Moreover, the rate of CO conversion and the change of catalytic activity with time-on-stream were described using a kinetic model showing a weak influence of temperature. (Author)

  19. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  20. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  1. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  2. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

    2014-12-09

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  3. Towards Carbon-Neutral CO2 Conversion to Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Jones, Matthew D; O'Byrne, Justin P; Griffiths, Owen G; Owen, Rhodri E; Sackville, Emma; McManus, Marcelle; Plucinski, Pawel

    2015-12-07

    With fossil fuels still predicted to contribute close to 80 % of the primary energy consumption by 2040, methods to limit further CO2 emissions in the atmosphere are urgently needed to avoid the catastrophic scenarios associated with global warming. In parallel with improvements in energy efficiency and CO2 storage, the conversion of CO2 has emerged as a complementary route with significant potential. In this work we present the direct thermo-catalytic conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons using a novel iron nanoparticle-carbon nanotube (Fe@CNT) catalyst. We adopted a holistic and systematic approach to CO2 conversion by integrating process optimization-identifying reaction conditions to maximize conversion and selectivity towards long chain hydrocarbons and/or short olefins-with catalyst optimization through the addition of promoters. The result is the production of valuable hydrocarbons in a manner that can approach carbon neutrality under realistic industrial process conditions.

  4. Catalyst mixture for aromatic hydrocarbon synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minderhoud, J.K.; Huizinga, T.; Sie, S.T.

    1989-06-06

    The present invention is concerned with catalyst mixtures consisting of two catalysts, characterized in that one, which is based on zinc, is capable of catalysing the conversion of a H/sub 2//CO mixture into oxygen-containing organic compounds, and the other is a crystalline iron/boron silicate which, after one hour's calcination in air at 500/sup 0/C, has the following properties: a certain X-ray powder diffraction pattern and, in the formula that represents the composition of the silicate, expressed in moles of the oxides, a SiO/sub 2//Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3 molar ratio that is 20-2000, a SiO/sub 2//B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ molar ratio 50-5000, and a Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3//B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ molar ratio higher than 1.0. Said catalyst mixtures show higher aromatics selectivity in the preparation of hydrocarbon mixtures from H/sub 2//CO mixtures than such a mixture comprising an iron silicate instead of the above iron/boron silicates. 3 tabs.

  5. Synthesis of light hydrocarbons over Fe/AC catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jianjun; Zong Zhimin; Wang Taotao; Liu Tong; Wei Xianyong

    2012-01-01

    A series of Fe/AC catalysts for catalytic hydrogenation of CO to light hydrocarbons (LHCs) were prepared by decomposing Fe(CO)5 in an autoclave.The catalysts activities were tested in a high-pressure micro reactor.The results show that both CO conversion and LHCs selectivity were significantly affected by the amount of Fe loaded onto the catalysts.The optimum Fe content was determined to be 10% by weight of the catalyst.Over the corresponding catalyst (i.e.,10% Fe/C catalyst),the conversion of CO and the selectivity of LHC5 were 94.8% and 59.2%,respectively,at 360 ℃.Based on various catalyst characterization techniques,such as XRD,BET and SEM,the catalysts surface areas and pore volume decreased and the smaller particles agglomerated at the edges and corners in the outer region of the support with the increasing Fe content.The agglomerated particles increased greatly when the iron content of the catalyst was higher than 10%.The decrease of catalyst activity can be due to the agglomerated particles.

  6. Study of Methanol Conversion over Fe-Zn-Zr Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoming Ni; Yisheng Tan; Yizhuo Han

    2007-01-01

    The methanol conversion over Fe-Zn-Zr catalyst was studied at 0.1 MPa and 280-360℃.The experimental results indicate that the main products of methanol conversion are methane and butane,and that other hydrocarbons are scarcely produced.All results show that propylene is most probably the olefin formed first in methanol conversion rather than ethene over Fe-Zn-Zr catalyst.Methane is formed from methoxy group,and C4 is possibly yielded on the surface from propylene through binding with a methoxy group.

  7. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  8. Study on Olefins Yield from Methanol Conversion over Different Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Munib Shahda; Yan Dengchao; Wang Zhihe; Wen Huixin

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of Methanol to Olefins (MTO) under different reaction conditions was experimentally investigated over different catalysts, and comparison was made between the SAPO-34 and GOR-MLC catalysts. Optimization of reaction conditions has been explored. Conversion of methanol to olefins over these catalysts under different reaction temperatures was experimentally studied. In a fixed bed micro-reactor, the influence of temperature was found to be one of the major factors. For both catalysts the olefins yield was increased significantly when water was added to the methanol feed. A temperature range of 460-480 ℃ appeared to be the optimum range suitable for methanol conversion with appropriate catalyst activity and C2-C3 olefins yield. Some other hydrocarbons appeared during the MTO reaction in the presence of the SAPO-34 catalyst, while a lot of dimethylether was formed when the GOR-MLC catalyst was used. In the course of the MTO reaction, the GOR-MLC catalyst was found to have a faster catalyst deactivation rate compared to the SAPO-34 catalyst.

  9. Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV; Haynes, Daniel [Morgantown, WV; Smith, Mark [Morgantown, WV; Spivey, James J [Baton Rouge, LA

    2012-03-13

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  10. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Cold Plasma Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons via cold plasma reaction with catalysts has been studied at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Methane can be converted into C2 hydrocarbons in different selectivity depending on the form of the reactor, power of plasma, flow rate of methane, ratio of N2/CH4 and nature of the catalysts. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons can reach as high as 98.64%, and the conversion of methane as high as 60% and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons as high as 50% are obtained. Coking can be minimized under the conditions of: proper selection of the catalysts,appropriate high flow rate of inlet methane and suitable ratio of N2 to CH4. The catalyst surface provides active sites for radical recombination.

  11. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  12. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  13. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ghorbanzadeh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  14. The Hydrocarbon Pool in Ethanol-to-Gasoline over HZSM-5 Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Roger; Hruby, S.L.; Hansen, Jeppe Rass

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the conversion of ethanol-to-gasoline over an HZSM-5 catalyst yields essentially the same product distribution as for methanol-to-gasoline performed over the same catalyst. Interestingly, there is a significant difference between the identity of the hydrocarbon molecules trapped...... inside the HZSM-5 catalyst when ethanol is used as a feed instead of methanol. In particular, the hydrocarbon pool contains a significant amount of ethylsubstituted aromatics when ethanol is used as feedstock, but there remains only methyl-substituted aromatics in the product slate....

  15. Ethylene Conversion to Higher Hydrocarbon over Copper Loaded BZSM-5 in the Presence of Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramli Mat; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Zainab Ramli; W.Azelee W.Abu Bakar

    2006-01-01

    The successful production of higher hydrocarbons from methane depends on the stability or the oxidation rate of the intermediate products. The performances of the BZSM-5 and the modified BZSM-5 catalysts were tested for ethylene conversion into higher hydrocarbons. The catalytic experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed micro reactor at atmospheric pressure. The catalysts were characterized using XRD, NH3-TPD, and IR for their structure and acidity. The result suggests that BZSM-5 is a weak acid. The introduction of copper into BZSM-5 improved the acidity of BZSM-5. The conversion of ethylene toward higher hydrocarbons is dependent on the acidity of the catalyst. Only weaker acid site is required to convert ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The loading of Cu on BZSM-5 improved the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons especially at low percentage. The reactivity of ethylene is dependent on the amount of acidity as well as the presence of metal on the catalyst surface. Cu1%BZSM-5 is capable of converting ethylene to higher hydrocarbons. The balances between the metal and acid sites influence the performance of ethylene conversion and higher hydrocarbon selectivity. Higher loading of Cu leads to the formation of COx.

  16. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  17. Influence of Gas Feed Composition and Pressure on the Catalytic Conversion of CO2 to Hydrocarbons Using a Traditional Cobalt-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-25

    availability. Fuel independence would alleviate uncertainties in the world market supply of oil along with commercial fluctuations in price. In addition...this supply by supporting the development of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel from the vast natural resources, such as coal, shale, gas hydrates, and CO2...product a day by steam-reforming coal to generate syngas for the FT process.5 A water-gas shift is needed to obtain a 2:1 ratio of hydrogen/carbon

  18. Control of hydrocarbon content of a reforming gas by using a hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kenichiro; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    To control of hydrocarbon content in waste pyrolysis-gasification and reforming processes, the use of a hydrogenation catalyst was examined in a test system with a model gas. To reduce the concentration of benzene in the reforming gas, benzene was hydrogenated with a nickel catalyst. The catalyst is usually used to convert gas-phase unsaturated hydrocarbons to saturated hydrocarbons, and the benzene was converted to cyclohexane at a temperature range of about 130 to 180 degrees C in the presence of steam. However, the conversion to methane occurred at about 250 to 300 degrees C. Methane seems to be a useful conversion compound because it does not cohere as a light tar. Sometimes the reforming gas needs to be cooled for use as generator fuel. In this case, it is possible to avoid the tar cohesion if the benzene in the gas is converted to methane at about 300 degrees C after the reforming. Reduction of the efficiency of conversion to methane was not observed over a 60h reaction period. The lower hydrocarbons (ethylene, ethane, and propylene) were also converted to methane at about 300 degrees C. Conversion of benzene was also possible when other hydrocarbons were present at high concentrations.

  19. Conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons in a ZSM-5 coated monolithic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antia, J.E.; Govind, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Novel reactor configurations featuring catalysts supported on monolithic or honeycomb structures are being increasingly used for a number of applications. In this work, a zeolite-coated monolithic reactor is employed for the conversion of methanol to gasoline-range hydrocarbons. Experimental results show that the conversion and hydrocarbon product distribution compare favorably with data reported for fixed and fluid beds. Mathematical modeling shows that the conversion here is controlled by diffusion in the molecule-sized intracrystalline pores of the zeolite structure. This finding is of considerable important because it demonstrates that monolithic reactors are well-suited to zeolite-based catalytic processes.

  20. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 mL@min?1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is 76%, and the total selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons and C3 hydrocarbons is nearly 100%. The conversion of methane increases with the increase of voltage and decreases with the flow of methane increase; the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons decreases with the increase of voltage and increases with the flow of methane increase. The selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons is improved with catalyst for conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons in plasma field. Methane molecule collision with radicals is mainly responsible for product formation.

  1. Catalysts for converting syngas into liquid hydrocarbons and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Yan, Qiangu; Batchelor, William

    2016-03-15

    The presently-disclosed subject matter includes methods for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas. In some embodiments the syngas is obtained from biomass and/or comprises a relatively high amount of nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide. In some embodiments the present methods can convert syngas into liquid hydrocarbons through a one-stage process. Also provided are catalysts for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas, wherein the catalysts include a base material, a transition metal, and a promoter. In some embodiments the base material includes a zeolite-iron material or a cobalt-molybdenum carbide material. In still further embodiments the promoter can include an alkali metal.

  2. Heterobimetallic Zeolite, InV-ZSM-5, Enables Efficient Conversion of Biomass Derived Ethanol to Renewable Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Li, Zhenglong; Casbeer, Erik M.; Geiger, Robert A.; Moses-Debusk, Melanie; Keller, Martin; Buchanan, Michelle V.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-01

    Direct catalytic conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon blend-stock can increase biofuels use in current vehicles beyond the ethanol blend-wall of 10-15%. Literature reports describe quantitative conversion of ethanol over zeolite catalysts but high C2 hydrocarbon formation renders this approach unsuitable for commercialization. Furthermore, the prior mechanistic studies suggested that ethanol conversion involves endothermic dehydration step. Here, we report the complete conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbons over InV-ZSM-5 without added hydrogen and which produces lower C2 (products come from the hydrocarbon pool type mechanism and dehydration step is not necessary. Thus, our method of direct conversion of ethanol offers a pathway to produce suitable hydrocarbon blend-stock that may be blended at a refinery to produce fuels such as gasoline, diesel, JP-8, and jet fuel, or produce commodity chemicals such as BTX.

  3. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silks, Louis A.; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2016-10-18

    The present invention is directed to the one step selective conversion of starch, cellulose, or glucose to molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. The invention is also directed to the conversion of those intermediates to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  4. Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yongchun; Periana, Roy; Chen, Weiqun; van Duin, Adri; Nielsen, Robert; Shuler, Patrick; Ma, Qisheng; Blanco, Mario; Li, Zaiwei; Oxgaard, Jonas; Cheng, Jihong; Cheung, Sam; Pudar, Sanja

    2009-09-28

    This is the Final Report of the five-year project Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes (DE-FC36-04GO14276, July 1, 2004- June 30, 2009), in which we present our major accomplishments with detailed descriptions of our experimental and theoretical efforts. Upon the successful conduction of this project, we have followed our proposed breakdown work structure completing most of the technical tasks. Finally, we have developed and demonstrated several optimized homogenously catalytic methane conversion systems involving applications of novel ionic liquids, which present much more superior performance than the Catalytica system (the best-to-date system) in terms of three times higher reaction rates and longer catalysts lifetime and much stronger resistance to water deactivation. We have developed in-depth mechanistic understandings on the complicated chemistry involved in homogenously catalytic methane oxidation as well as developed the unique yet effective experimental protocols (reactors, analytical tools and screening methodologies) for achieving a highly efficient yet economically feasible and environmentally friendly catalytic methane conversion system. The most important findings have been published, patented as well as reported to DOE in this Final Report and our 20 Quarterly Reports.

  5. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  6. Plasma conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas is widely abundant, is easily withdrawn from reservoirs, is commonly produced as an associated gas along with crude oil production, and is found in many geologic settings as a resource separate from oil. A much larger fraction of the natural gas may be produced from a gas reservoir, as compared with a crude oil reservoir. However, natural gas is normally transported by pipeline, and the energy throughput of such a pipeline is perhaps only 20% to 30% of the throughput of an oil pipeline of the same size and cost. Gas is difficult to transport in moderate quantities at low cost, as it must either have a special pipeline or must be liquified into LNG, shipped in cryogenic LNG tankers, and regasified chemical stability of methane has made it difficult to convert it directly into conventional hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, and has also impeded its use as a feedstock for petrochemical production. Experiments are described in which a methane plasma is created, and the resulting methyl and hydrogen ions have been accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 15 ev to greater than 100 ev, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces has caused the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 8} molecules. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The costs of production of the plasma conversion devices are projected to be quite low, and the technology appears to be commercially and economically feasible.

  7. Catalysis Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons via Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Wei WANG; Gen Hui XU

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effect of catalyst and carrier in electric field enhanced plasma on methane conversion into C2 hydrocarbons was investigated. Methane coupling reaction was studied in the system of continuous flow reactor on Ni, MoO3, MnO2 catalysts and different ZSM-5 carriers. The per pass conversion of methane can be as high as 22%, the selectivity of ethylene can be as high as 23.8%, of acetylene 60.8%, of ethane 5.4% and of total C2 hydrocarbons was more than 90%. ZSM-5-25 was the better carrier and MnO2 was the better active component. The efficiency of energy was as high as 7.81%.

  8. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons Using Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong

    2007-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H', CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The process of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was investigated. The experiment showed that the time and conditions of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation were different. Methane conversion rate increased with the increase in the current and decrease in the amount of methane. Furthermore, an examination of the reaction mechanisms revealed that free radicals played an important role in the chain reaction.

  9. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, hydrolysates or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silks, Louis A; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2017-09-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to the conversion of a source material (e.g., a depolymerized oligosaccharide mixture, a monomeric sugar, a hydrolysate, or a mixture of monomeric sugars) to intermediate molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. These intermediates may also be converted to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  10. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  11. Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, P.T.; Spehlmann, B.C.; Gajda, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    The initial objective of this program was to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutylene via the isosynthesis process. Preliminary work directed at identifying potential catalysts for this reaction did not have promising results. Therefore, the objectives of this program were revised to the development of a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol. Two approaches have been investigated in this area: the direct conversion of synthesis gas to higher alcohols and indirect conversion via methanol produced using conventional methanol synthesis technology. The isosynthesis reaction for the conversion of synthesis gas to branched hydrocarbons was pioneered by German workers during World War II The primary products of this reaction are either isobutane or isobutylene depending on the catalyst system used. Thoria-based catalysts were found to give the highest yields, but virtually all of the products were alkanes. More recently, there have been several reports of olefin production using ZrO{sub 2}-based. The preliminary work in this program focussed on the evaluation of ZrO{sub 2} and modified ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for the direct conversion of CO/H{sub 2} to isobutylene via the isosynthesis reaction. All of the catalysts and conditions evaluated in this work gave isobutylene yields of less than 4% which is far below that required for an economically viable process. A summary of the key results from this portion of the project is given in Section 3.6. In view of the poor performance of these catalysts and the lack any encouraging results from other research groups working in the isosynthesis area, this approach was abandoned in favor of approaches related to higher alcohols synthesis.

  12. Selective transformation of syngas into light hydrocarbons in the presence of a composite [Molybdenum/ZnO + Mordenite] catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrault, J.; Avila, Y. (Ecole Superieure d' Ingenieurs, 86 - Poitiers (France))

    1994-01-06

    A catalyst obtained from the impregnation of a molybdenum salt on a zinc oxide used as support is rather selective in the syngas transformation into light alcohols (specially methanol). Moreover a composite catalyst formulated from the above molybdenum system and a dealuminated mordenite can be used for the one step selective conversion of syngas into light hydrocarbons (C[sub 2] - C[sub 4] [approx] 65%) where ethane and ethylene are the major compounds (40-45%). (authors).

  13. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  14. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  15. Green technology for conversion of renewable hydrocarbon based on plasma-catalytic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedirchyk, Igor; Nedybaliuk, Oleg; Chernyak, Valeriy; Demchina, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    The ability to convert renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals is one of the most important steps on our path to green technology and sustainable development. However, the complex composition of biomass poses a major problem for established conversion technologies. The high temperature of thermochemical biomass conversion often leads to the appearance of undesirable byproducts and waste. The catalytic conversion has reduced yield and feedstock range. Plasma-catalytic reforming technology opens a new path for biomass conversion by replacing feedstock-specific catalysts with free radicals generated in the plasma. We studied the plasma-catalytic conversion of several renewable hydrocarbons using the air plasma created by rotating gliding discharge. We found that plasma-catalytic hydrocarbon conversion can be conducted at significantly lower temperatures (500 K) than during the thermochemical ( 1000 K) and catalytic (800 K) conversion. By using gas chromatography, we determined conversion products and found that conversion efficiency of plasma-catalytic conversion reaches over 85%. We used obtained data to determine the energy yield of hydrogen in case of plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol and compared it with other plasma-based hydrogen-generating systems.

  16. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  17. Conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧

    2002-01-01

    The experiments are carried out in the system of continuous flow reactors with dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) for studies on the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through plasma catalysis under the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of discharge frequency, structure of electrode, discharge voltage, number of electrode, ratio of H2/CH4, flow rate and catalyst on conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are investigated. At the same time, the reaction process is investigated. Higher conversion of methane and selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons are achieved and deposited carbons are eliminated by proper choice of parameters. The appropriate operation parameters in dielectric-barrier discharge plasma field are that the supply voltage is 20-40 kV (8.4-40 W), the frequency of power supply is 20 kHz, the structure of (b) electrode is suitable, and the flow of methane is 20-60 ml · min-1. The conversion of methane can reach 45%, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons i

  18. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of syngas (CO + H2 to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent. Methanol was synthesized from syngas over Cu-ZnO; subsequently, was converted to hydrocarbons through the formation of dimethyl ether (DME over the metal-loaded ZSM-5. When 0.5 wt% Pd/ZSM-5 and 5 wt% Cu/ZSM-5 among the metal-loaded ZSM-5 catalysts with Pd, Co, Fe or Cu were employed as a portion of the hybrid catalyst, the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons were selectively produced (the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons in all hydrocarbons: 59% for the hybrid catalyst with Pd/ZSM-5 and 64% for that with Cu/ZSM-5 with a similar CO conversion during the reaction. An increase in the Cu loading on ZSM-5 resulted in increasing the yield of the gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons, and in decreasing the yield of DME. Furthermore, the hybrid catalyst with Cu/ZSM-5 exhibited no deactivation for 30 h of the reaction. It was revealed that a hybrid catalyst containing Cu/ZSM-5 was efficient in the selective synthesis of gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons from syngas via methanol in the near-critical n-hexane fluid.

  19. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  20. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  1. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals using catalysts with different concentrations of acid sites. It shows that greater separation of acid sites makes catalysts more efficient at producing hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. The conversion of biomass into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant attention because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Biomass is a renewable resource, which is abundant worldwide and can potentially be exploited to produce transportation fuels that are less damaging to the environment. This renewable resource consists of cellulose (40–50%), hemicellulose (25–35%), and lignin (16–33%) biopolymers in addition to smaller quantities of inorganic materials such as silica and alkali and alkaline earth metals (calcium and potassium). Fast pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical technology for converting biomass into precursors for hydrocarbon fuels because it produces up to 75 wt% bio-oil,1 which can be upgraded to feedstocks and/or blendstocks for further refining to finished fuels. Bio-oil that has not been upgraded has limited applications because of the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups, derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which gives rise to high acidity, high viscosity, low heating value, immiscibility with hydrocarbons and aging during storage. Ex situ catalytic vapor phase upgrading is a promising approach for improving the properties of bio-oil. The goal of this process is to reject oxygen and produce a bio-oil with improved properties for subsequent downstream conversion to hydrocarbons.

  2. Oxygen-containing coke species in zeolite-catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-06

    Zeolites are the most commonly used catalysts for methanol-to-hydrocarbon (MTH) conversion. Here, we identified two oxygen-containing compounds as coke species in zeolite catalysts after MTH reactions. We investigated the possible influences of the oxygen-containing compounds on coke formation, catalyst deactivation, product selectivity, and the induction period of the MTH reaction through a series of controlled experiments in which one of the identified compounds (2,3-dimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) was co-fed with methanol over a zeolite H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Our results allow us to infer that once produced, the oxygen-containing compounds block the Brønsted acid sites by strong chemisorption and their rapid conversion to aromatics expedites the formation of coke and thus the deactivation of the catalyst. A minor effect of the production of such compounds during the MTH reaction is that the aromatic-based catalytic cycle can be slightly promoted to give higher selectivity to ethylene.

  3. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  4. Hydrocarbon cracking with yttrium exchanged zeolite y catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochow, C.F.; Kovacs, D.B.

    1987-05-12

    A process is described for cracking a gas oil boiling range hydrocarbon feedstock comprising the step of contacting the feedstock in a catalytic cracking zone under catalytic cracking conditions to produce convulsion products comprising gasoline with a catalyst composition. The process comprises: a Y crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite, having the structure of faujasite and having uniform pore diameters and a silica to alumina mole ratio of at least about 5; an inorganic oxide matrix; and the zeolite having been ion exchanged with a mixture of rare earths prior to compositing with the matrix; and the zeolite having been subsequently further ion exchanged with yttrium following compositing with the matrix, whereby the catalyst composition contains 0.30 to 3.0 wt% yttrium.

  5. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Jr., Lawrence [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  6. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  7. Enhancement of NOx and hydrocarbon conversion in plasma-activated catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill; Adress, Wahmeed; Goguet, Alexandre; Yang, Hui; De Rosa, Fabio; Hardacre, Christopher; Stere, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure, non-thermal plasma-activated-catalysis is showing real promise in a number of applications. Here we report on how electrical, visible and FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy measurements in a kHz atmospheric pressure He plasma jet coupled with a Ag/Al2O3 catalyst allowed us produce and confirm a strong enhancement of both NOx and hydrocarbon conversion at a measured gas temperature of <= 250° C. How these and other measurements have provided an insight into the fundamental physical and chemical processes in the plasma environment that have helped us move to a more efficient system and other processes will be discussed.

  8. Reactivity of metal catalysts in glucose-fructose conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Claudia; van Rijn, Jeaphianne; Ruby, Marc-Philipp; Tong, Qiong; Schüth, Ferdi; Thiel, Walter

    2014-09-15

    A joint experimental and computational study on the glucose-fructose conversion in water is reported. The reactivity of different metal catalysts (CrCl3, AlCl3, CuCl2, FeCl3, and MgCl2) was analyzed. Experimentally, CrCl3 and AlCl3 achieved the best glucose conversion rates, CuCl2 and FeCl3 were only mediocre catalysts, and MgCl2 was inactive. To explain these differences in reactivity, DFT calculations were performed for various metal complexes. The computed mechanism consists of two proton transfers and a hydrogen-atom transfer; the latter was the rate-determining step for all catalysts. The computational results were consistent with the experimental findings and rationalized the observed differences in the behavior of the metal catalysts. To be an efficient catalyst, a metal complex should satisfy the following criteria: moderate Brønsted and Lewis acidity (pKa = 4-6), coordination with either water or weaker σ donors, energetically low-lying unoccupied orbitals, compact transition-state structures, and the ability for complexation of glucose. Thus, the reactivity of the metal catalysts in water is governed by many factors, not just the Lewis acidity.

  9. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over ZSM-5 zeolite: an examination of the role of aromatic hydrocarbons using /sup 13/carbon and deuterium-labeled feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, T.; Bett, G.; Seddon, D.

    1983-12-01

    A mechanism is suggested for the acceleration by aromatic hydrocarbons of zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion. According to this mechanism, the aromatic hydrocarbon undergoes successive ring methylation, prototropic conversion to an exo-methylene-cyclohexadiene, side-chain methylation, and ring de-ethylation. The overall result is that two methanol molecules give an ethylene molecule. The mechanism is supported by various reactions observed over ZSM-5 catalyst at methanol conversion temperatures: (I) deuteration of p-xylene by D/sub 2/O in the ring and methyl positions; (II) de-alkylation of p-ethyltoluene and n-propylbenzene; and (III) incorporation of the aromatic carbon of benzenes and alkylbenzenes into ethylene product, as revealed by /sup 13/C-labeling studies. 3 tables.

  10. Methane Conversion Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge: Comparison with Thermal Process and Catalyst Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2006-01-01

    The direct conversion of methane using a dielectric barrier discharge has been experimentally studied. Experiments with different values of flow rates and discharge voltages have been performed to investigate the effects on the conversion and reaction products both qualitatively and quantitatively.Experimental results indicate that the maximum conversion of methane has been 80% at an input flow rate of 5 ml/min and a discharge voltage of 4 kV. Experimental results also show that the optimum condition has occurred at a high discharge voltage and higher input flow rate. In terms of product distribution, a higher flow rate or shorter residence time can increase the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons. No hydrocarbon product was detected using the thermal method, except hydrogen and carbon. Increasing selectivity for ethane was found when Pt and Ru catalysts presented in the plasma reaction. Hydrogenation of acetylene in the catalyst surface could have been the reason for this phenomenon as the selectivity for acetylene in the products was decreasing.

  11. Hydrogenation Conversion of Phenanthrene over Dispersed Mo-based Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yiwen; Da Zhijian; Wang Zijun

    2015-01-01

    With oil-soluble molybdenum compound and sublimed sulfur serving as raw materials, two dispersed Mo-based catalysts were prepared, characterized and then applied to the hydrogenation conversion of phenanthrene. The test results showed that under the conditions speciifed by this study, the catalyst prepared in a higher sulifding atmosphere was more catalytically active due to its higher content of MoS2 and stronger intrinsic catalytic activity of MoS2 unit, which demon-strated that the sulifding atmosphere for the preparation of catalysts not only could inlfuence the yield of MoS2 but also the structure of MoS2. The analysis on the selectivity of octahydrophenanthrene isomers revealed that the catalyst prepared in a lower sulifding atmosphere had a relatively higher catalytic selectivity to the hydrogenation of outer aromatic ring and the structure of catalysts could be modiifed under the speciifc reaction conditions. Moreover, the selectivity between the isomers of as-octahydrophenanthrene at different reaction time and temperature was analyzed and, based on the results, a hydroge-nation mechanism over dispersed Mo-based catalysts was suggested, with monatomic hydrogen transfer and catalytic sur-face desorption of the half-addition intermediates functioning as the key points. In addition, it is concluded that the catalyst prepared in a lower sulifding atmosphere was more capable of adsorption than the other one.

  12. Light Absorbers and Catalysts for Solar to Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Nikolay I.

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and the resulting consequences to the environment has propelled research into means of utilizing alternative, clean energy sources. Solar power is among the most promising of renewable energy sources but must be converted into an energy dense medium such as chemical bonds to render it useful for transport and energy storage. Photoelectrochemistry (PEC), the splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel or reducing CO 2 to hydrocarbon fuels via sunlight is a promising approach towards this goal. Photoelectrochemical systems are comprised of several components, including light absorbers and catalysts. These parts must all synergistically function in a working device. Therefore, the continual development of each component is crucial for the overall goal. For PEC systems to be practical for large scale use, the must be efficient, stable, and composed of cost effective components. To this end, my work focused on the development of light absorbing and catalyst components of PEC solar to fuel converting systems. In the direction of light absorbers, I focused of utilizing Indium Phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) as photocathodes. I first developed synthetic techniques for InP NW solution phase and vapor phase growth. Next, I developed light absorbing photocathodes from my InP NWs towards PEC water splitting cells. I studied cobalt sulfide (CoSx) as an earth abundant catalyst for the reductive hydrogen evolution half reaction. Using in situ spectroscopic techniques, I elucidated the active structure of this catalyst and offered clues to its high activity. In addition to hydrogen evolution catalysts, I established a new generation of earth abundant catalysts for CO2 reduction to CO fuel/chemical feedstock. I first worked with molecularly tunable homogeneous catalysts that exhibited high selectivity for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media. Next, in order to retain molecular tunability while achieving stability and efficiency in aqueous

  13. Selective Synthesis of Gasoline-Ranged Hydrocarbons from Syngas over Hybrid Catalyst Consisting of Metal-Loaded ZSM-5 Coupled with Copper-Zinc Oxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ting Ma; Hiroyuki Imai; Manami Yamawaki; Kazusa Terasaka; Xiaohong Li

    2014-01-01

      The conversion of syngas (CO + H2) to gasoline-ranged hydrocarbons was carried out using a hybrid catalyst consisting of metal-loaded ZSM-5 coupled with Cu-ZnO in a near-critical n-hexane solvent...

  14. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  15. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1994-05-06

    Previous work on isosynthesis (conversion of synthesis gas to isobutane and isobutylene) was performed at very low conversions or extreme process conditions. The objectives of this research were (1) determine the optimum process conditions for isosynthesis; (2) determine the optimum catalyst preparation method and catalyst composition/properties for isosynthesis; (3) determine the kinetics for the best catalyst; (4) develop reactor models for trickle bed, slurry, and fixed bed reactors; and (5) simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for isosynthesis. More improvement in catalyst activity and selectivity is needed before isosynthesis can become a commercially feasible (stand-alone) process. Catalysts prepared by the precipitation method show the most promise for future development as compared with those prepared hydrothermally, by calcining zirconyl nitrate, or by a modified sol-gel method. For current catalysts the high temperatures (>673 K) required for activity also cause the production of methane (because of thermodynamics). A catalyst with higher activity at lower temperatures would magnify the unique selectivity of zirconia for isobutylene. Perhaps with a more active catalyst and acidification, oxygenate production could be limited at lower temperatures. Pressures above 50 atm cause an undesirable shift in product distribution toward heavier hydrocarbons. A model was developed that can predict carbon monoxide conversion an product distribution. The rate equation for carbon monoxide conversion contains only a rate constant and an adsorption equilibrium constant. The product distribution was predicted using a simple ratio of the rate of CO conversion. This report is divided into Introduction, Experimental, and Results and Discussion sections.

  16. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  17. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  18. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  19. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, J; Sokoto, A M; Tambuwal, A D; Garba, N A

    2017-05-01

    Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration) at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm(3) resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%). The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16), high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg), kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm(2)/s), density (0.94 g/ml), saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g), and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g) respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  20. Effect of NiO/SiO2 on thermo-chemical conversion of waste cooking oil to hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Increase in organic waste generation, dwindling nature of global oil reserves coupled with environmental challenges caused by waste oil disposal and burning of fossil fuels necessitated the need for alternative energy resources. Waste cooking oil obtained from the frying fish outlet was analyzed for its physicochemical properties using ASTM D-975 methods. Acid and Iodine values of the oil were 30.43 ± 0.32 mgKOH/g and 57.08 ± 0.43 mgI2/100 g respectively. Thermo-chemical conversion of the oil using NiO/SiO2 at different reaction conditions (pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration at a residence time of 3 h yielded 33.63% hydrocarbons. Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis of waste cooking oil at 400 °C, H2 pressure of 15 bars, and catalyst to oil ratio of 0.25 g/100 cm3 resulted in highest hydrocarbon yield (41.98%. The fuel properties of the product were: cetane number (71.16, high heating value (41.43 MJ/kg, kinematic viscosity (2.01 mm2/s, density (0.94 g/ml, saponification value (185.1 ± 3.96 mgKOH/g, and iodine value (20.57 ± 0.20 I2/100 g respectively. These results show that the NiO/SiO2 could be a suitable catalyst for conversion of waste vegetable oil to hydrocarbons.

  1. Novel, benign, solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasamy, Paul; Raja, Robert; Srinivas, Darbha

    2005-04-15

    The catalytic properties of two classes of solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid phase are discussed: (i) microporous solids, encapsulating transition metal complexes in their cavities and (ii) titanosilicate molecular sieves. Copper acetate dimers encapsulated in molecular sieves Y, MCM-22 and VPI-5 use dioxygen to regioselectively ortho-hydroxylate L-tyrosine to L-dopa, phenol to catechol and cresols to the corresponding o-dihydroxy and o-quinone compounds. Monomeric copper phthalocyanine and salen complexes entrapped in zeolite-Y oxidize methane to methanol, toluene to cresols, naphthalene to naphthols, xylene to xylenols and phenol to diphenols. Trimeric mu3-oxo-bridged Co/Mn cluster complexes, encapsulated inside Y-zeolite, oxidize para-xylene, almost quantitatively, to terephthalic acid. In almost all cases, the intrinsic catalytic activity (turnover frequency) of the metal complex is enhanced very significantly, upon encapsulation in the porous solids. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies suggest that the geometric distortions of the complex on encapsulation change the electron density at the metal ion site and its redox behaviour, thereby influencing its catalytic activity and selectivity in oxidation reactions. Titanosilicate molecular sieves can oxidize hydrocarbons using dioxygen when loaded with transition metals like Pd, Au or Ag. The structure of surface Ti ions and the type of oxo-Ti species generated on contact with oxidants depend on several factors including the method of zeolite synthesis, zeolite structure, solvent, temperature and oxidant. Although, similar oxo-Ti species are present on all the titanosilicates, their relative concentrations vary among different structures and determine the product selectivity.

  2. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  3. Nickel and potassium co-modified β-Mo2C catalyst for CO conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglin Xiang; Juan Zou; Debao Li; Wenhuai Li; Yuhan Sun; Xichun She

    2009-01-01

    Nickel and potassium co-medified β-Mo2C catalysts were prepared and used for CO hydrogenation reaction. The major products over β-Mo2C were C1-C4 hydrocarbons, only few alcohols were obtained. Addition of potassium resulted in remarkable selectivity shift from hydrocarbons to alcohols at the expense of CO conversion over β-Mo2C. Moreover, it was found that potassium enhanced the ability of chain propagation with a higher C2+OH production. Modified by nickel, β-Mo-2C showed a relatively high CO conversion, however, the products were similar to those of pure β-Mo2C. When co-modified by nickel and potassium,β-Mo2C exhibited high activity and selectivity towards mixed alcohols synthesis, and also the whole chain propagation to produce alcohols especially for the stage of C1OH to C2OH was remarkably enhanced. It was concluded that the Ni and K had, to some extent, synergistic effect on CO conversion.

  4. Methods of reforming hydrocarbon fuels using hexaaluminate catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H [Morgantown, WV; Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-27

    A metal substituted hexaaluminate catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas of the general formula AB.sub.yAl.sub.12-yO.sub.19-.delta., A being selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and lanthanide metals or mixtures thereof. A dopant or surface modifier selected from a transitions metal, a spinel of an oxygen-ion conductor is incorporated. The dopant may be Ca, Cs, K, La, Sr, Ba, Li, Mg, Ce, Co, Fe, Ir, Rh, Ni, Ru, Cu, Pe, Os, Pd, Cr, Mn, W, Re, Sn, Gd, V, Ti, Ag, Au, and mixtures thereof. The oxygen-ion conductor may be a perovskite selected from M'RhO.sub.3, M'PtO.sub.3, M'PdO.sub.3, M'IrO.sub.3, M'RuO.sub.3 wherein M'=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca; a spinel selected from MRh.sub.2O.sub.4, MPt.sub.2O.sub.4, MPd.sub.2O.sub.4, MIr.sub.2O.sub.4, MRu.sub.2O.sub.4 wherein M=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca and mixtures thereof; a florite is selected from M''O.sub.2.

  5. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  6. Heterogeneous catalysts for the transformation of fatty acid triglycerides and their derivatives to fuel hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vadim A.; Khromova, Sofia A.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-10-01

    The results of studies devoted to the catalysts for transformation of fatty acid triglycerides and their derivatives to fuel hydrocarbons are presented and described systematically. Various approaches to the use of heterogeneous catalysts for the production of biofuel from these raw materials are considered. The bibliography includes 134 references.

  7. Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

  8. Understanding of Electrochemical Mechanisms for CO2 Capture and Conversion into Hydrocarbon Fuels in Transition-Metal Carbides (MXenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Xingzhu; Ong, Wee-Jun; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Zhao, Xiujian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sun, Chenghua

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal (groups IV, V, VI) carbides (MXenes) with formulas M3C2 have been investigated as CO2 conversion catalysts with well-resolved density functional theory calculations. While MXenes from the group IV to VI series have demonstrated an active behavior for the capture of CO2, the Cr3C2 and Mo3C2 MXenes exhibit the most promising CO2 to CH4 selective conversion capabilities. Our results predicted the formation of OCHO(•) and HOCO(•) radical species in the early hydrogenation steps through spontaneous reactions. This provides atomic level insights into the computer-aided screening for high-performance catalysts and the understanding of electrochemical mechanisms for CO2 reduction to energy-rich hydrocarbon fuels, which is of fundamental significance to elucidate the elementary steps for CO2 fixation.

  9. Valorization of biogas into liquid hydrocarbons in plasma-catalyst reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravech, Mehrdad; Rahmani, Abdelkader; Labidi, Sana; Saintini, Noiric

    2016-09-01

    Biogas represents an important source of renewable energy issued from biological degradation of biomass. It is planned to produce in Europe the amount of biogas equivalent to 6400 kWh electricity and 4500 kteo (kilo tons equivalent oil) in 2020. Currently the biogas is used in cogeneration engines to produce heat and electricity directly in farms or it is injected in gas networks after purification and odorisation. The aim of this work is to propose a third option that consists of valorization of biogas by transformation into liquid hydrocarbons like acetone, methanol, ethanol, acetic acid etc. These chemicals, among the most important feed materials for chemical industries, retain CO2 molecules participating to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and have high storage energy capacity. We developed a low temperature atmospheric plasma-catalyst reactor (surface dielectric barrier discharge) to transform biogas into chemicals. The conversion rates of CH4 and CO2 are respectively about 50% and 30% depending on operational conditions. The energetic cost is 25 eV/molecule. The yields of liquid hydrocarbon reaches currently 10% wt. More the 11 liquid chemicals are observed in the liquid fraction. Acknowledgements are due to SPC Programme Energie de demain.

  10. Review of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Catalytically Upgrading Vegetable Oils into Hydrocarbon Biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhui Zhao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To address the issues of greenhouse gas emissions associated with fossil fuels, vegetable oilseeds, especially non-food oilseeds, are used as an alternative fuel resource. Vegetable oil derived from these oilseeds can be upgraded into hydrocarbon biofuel. Catalytic cracking and hydroprocessing are two of the most promising pathways for converting vegetable oil to hydrocarbon biofuel. Heterogeneous catalysts play a critical role in those processes. The present review summarizes current progresses and remaining challenges of vegetable oil upgrading to biofuel. The catalyst properties, applications, deactivation, and regeneration are reviewed. A comparison of catalysts used in vegetable oil and bio-oil upgrading is also carried out. Some suggestions for heterogeneous catalysts applied in vegetable oil upgrading to improve the yield and quality of hydrocarbon biofuel are provided for further research in the future.

  11. Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Higher Alcohols over Carbide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst. At the same general activity level Li, K, and Cs provide similar promotional effects for Mo2C, although K at a loading level of alkali metal/Mo = 0.164 mol/mol provides the better behavior at equal conditions. The effect of further additives on the K2CO3/Mo2C system......This work investigates the use of the bulk carbides Mo2C, WC, and NbC as catalysts for the conversion of syngas into higher alcohols. K2CO3/WC produces mainly CH3OH and CH4 with a low activity. NbC has a very low activity in CO hydrogenation. K2CO3/Mo2C produces mixed alcohols with a reasonable...... activity and selectivity. In a 94 h test the activity and the specific surface area of the K2CO3/Mo2C catalyst decreased significantly, but X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy did not indicate a strong sintering of the carbide. A likely cause for the deactivation is the formation...

  12. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  13. Utilization of biomass: Conversion of model compounds to hydrocarbons over zeolite H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Holm, Martin Spangsberg

    2011-01-01

    Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of small oxygenates present in bio-oil or selected as model compounds was performed under Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons (MTH) like reaction conditions using H-ZSM-5 as the catalyst. Co-feeding of the oxygenates with methanol generally decreases catalyst lifetime due to ...

  14. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  15. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  16. Oxygen-assisted conversion of propane over metal and metal oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laate, Leiv

    2002-07-01

    An experimental set-up has been build and applied in activity/selectivity studies of the oxygen-assisted conversion of propane over metals and metal oxide catalysts. The apparatus has been used in order to achieve an improved understanding of the reactions between alkanes/alkenes and oxygen. Processes that have been studied arc the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over a VMgO catalyst and the selective combustion of hydrogen in the presence of hydrocarbons over Pt-based catalysts and metal oxide catalysts. From the experiments, the following conclusions are drawn: A study of the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over a vanadium-magnesium-oxide catalyst confirmed that the main problem with this system is the lack of selectivity due to complete combustion. Selectivity to propene up to about 60% was obtained at 10% conversion at 500{sup o}C, but the selectivity decreased with increasing conversion. No oxygenates were detected, the only by- products were CO and CO{sub 2}. The selectivity to propene is a strong function of the conversion of propane. The reaction rate of propane was found to be 1.0 {+-} 0.1 order in propane and 0.07 {+-} 0.02 order in oxygen. The kinetic results are in agreement with a Mars van Krevelen mechanism with the activation of the hydrocarbons as the slow step. The rate of propene oxidation to CO{sub 2} was studied and found to be significantly higher than that of propane. Another possible process involves the simultaneous equilibrium dehydrogenation of alkanes to alkenes and combustion of the hydrogen formed to shift the equilibrium dehydrogenation reaction further to the product alkenes. A study of the selective combustion of hydrogen in the presence of propane/propene was found to be possible under certain reaction conditions over some metal oxide catalysts. In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}, unsupported Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZSM-5 show the ability to combust hydrogen in a gas mixture with propane and oxygen with good selectivity. Bi{sub 2

  17. Characterization and Activity of Cr,Cu and Ga Modified ZSM-5 for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2003-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane using a metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite prepared via acidic ion exchange was investigated to elucidate the roles of metal and acidity in the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. ZSM-5 (SiO2/Al2O3=30) was loaded with different metals (Cr, Cu and Ga) according to the acidic ion-exchange method to produce metal-loaded ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. XRD, NMR, FT-IR and N2 adsorption analyses indicated that Cr and Ga species managed to occupy the aluminum positions in the ZSM-5 framework. In addition, Cr species were deposited in the pores of the structure. However, Cu oxides were deposited on the surface and in the mesopores of the ZSM-5 zeolite. An acidity study using TPD-NH3, FT-IR, and IR-pyridine analyses revealed that the total number of acid sites and the strengths of the Bronsted and Lewis acid sites were significantly different after the acidic ion exchange treatment.Cu loaded HZSM-5 is a potential catalyst for direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. The successful production of gasoline via the direct conversion of methane depends on the amount of aluminum in the zeolite framework and the strength of the Bronsted acid sites.

  18. Jet-Fuel Range Hydrocarbons from Biomass-Derived Sorbitol over Ni-HZSM-5/SBA-15 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Weng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aromatics and cyclic-hydrocarbons are the significant components of jet fuel with high energy-density. However, conventional technologies for bio-fuel production cannot produce these products without further aromatization and isomerization. In this work, renewable liquid fuel with high content of aromatics and cyclic-hydrocarbons was obtained through aqueous catalytic conversion of biomass sorbitol over Ni-HZSM-5/SBA-15 catalyst. Texture characteristics of the catalyst were determined by physisorption of N2, which indicated its bimodal pore structures were microporous (HZSM-5, pore width: 0.56 nm and mesoporous (SBA-15, pore width: 8 nm. The surface acidity included weak and strong acid sites, predominantly Lewis type, and was further confirmed by the NH3-TPD and Py-IR analysis. The catalytic performances were tested in a fixed-bed reactor under the conditions of 593 K, WHSV of 0.75 h−1, GHSV of 2500 h−1 and 4.0 MPa of hydrogen pressure, whereby oil yield of 40.4 wt. % with aromatics and cyclic-hydrocarbons content of 80.0% was obtained.

  19. Zeolites Modified Metal Cations as Catalysts in Hydrocarbon Oxidation and the Alkyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadadsh Makhmud Aliyev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the creation of highly metalltceolitnyh systems and the study of their catalytic activities in the oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons (ethylene to acetaldehyde, acetone, propylene, butylene methyl ethyl ketone; aliphatic C1-C5 alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid esters; oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes in the alicyclic diene hydrocarbons and the oxidative dimerization of methane to acetylene. It has been established that the selectivity of these catalysts determined optimal combination of metal components with the acidity and the structure of the zeolite. Selected highly effective catalysts for the reactions studied. Based on the results of experimental studies of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons and aliphatic alcohols, the oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes and oxidative coupling of methane on the synthesized catalysts are represented by their probable stepwise mechanism and kinetic models developed reactions.

  20. Pilot plant evaluation of hydrotreating catalysts for heavy gas oil conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Y.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. [CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    As world reserves of oil are depleted, most of the oil remaining is heavy and sour and improvements in the technology are thus required to process it and produce transportation fuels. In terms of catalysts, alumina supported hydrotreating catalysts are commonly used; but activated carbon (AC) could also be a catalyst support option with its high microporosity and surface area combined with its thermal stability and resistance to coke deposition. This paper aims at determining the effect of the catalyst support on heavy crude oil processing. Experiments were conducted using two AC based catalysts, an alumina supported catalyst and two hydrotreating catalysts; results were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope. Results demonstrated that the AC based catalysts provide a better hydrotreating performance than the other catalysts. This study finds that the use of activated carbon based catalysts can provide better heavy oil conversion than others.

  1. Adsorption, Diffusion and Reaction Studies of Hydrocarbons on Zeolite Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, Sander van

    2002-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline microporous materials that are widely applied as catalysts in industries like oil refining, basic petrochemistry and fine chemistry. The major benefit of the use of zeolites as catalysts lies in their unique microporous structures. However, in some cases the presence of micr

  2. Preparation Of KF-Modified Kaolinite As Green And Reusable Catalyst For Microwave Assisted Biodiesel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, I.; Andiena, R. Z.; Yudha, S. P.

    2017-02-01

    Preparation of KF-modified kaolinite catalyst for microwave-assisted biodiesel conversion has been investigated. Kaolinite modification was conducted by solid-solid reaction between naturally occurring kaolinite mineral and KF salt followed by heating at 200oC for 2h. Prepared catalyst was characterized by using XRD, BET surface area analyzer, and SEM-EDX analysis and for catalytic activity tests, biodiesel conversion of jatropha oil was simulated. The comparison between microwave utilization and conventional method of biodiesel conversion were studied, moreover study on the catalyst reusability was performed. The results show that prepared catalyst gives the better physicochemical character of kaolinite as heterogeneous catalysts application as shown by the higher conversion and also reusability. Furthermore, the use of microwave irradiation exhibits the more time effectiveness. In general, the greener biodiesel conversion using presented methods is promising technique to be developed.

  3. Studies on Catalyst Deactivation Rate and Byproducts Yield during Conversion of Methanol to Olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Dengchao; Munib Shahda; Weng Huixin

    2006-01-01

    The conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO) over the SAPO-34 catalyst in fixed-bed microreactor was studied. The effect of reaction temperatures for methanol conversion to olefins and byproducts was investigated. A temperature of 425 ℃ appeared to be the optimum one suitable for conversion of methanol to olefins. Since the presence of water could increase the olefins selectivity, the methanol conversion reactions with mixed water/methanol feed were also studied. The effect of weight hourly space velocity on conversion of methanol was also studied. The results indicated that the olefins selectivity was significantly increased as WHSV increased till approximately 7.69 h-1 then it began to level off. Different factors affecting the catalyst deactivation rate was studied, showing that the catalyst deactivation time was dependent on reaction conditions, and temperatures higher and lower than the optimal one made the catalyst deactivation faster.Adding water to methanol could slow down the catalyst deactivation rate.

  4. Biosyngas Fischer. Tropsch conversion by high Fe loaded supported catalysts prepared with ultrasound and microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirola, C.; Di Fronzo, A.; Boffito, D.C.; Bianchi, C. [Milano Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica; Di Michele, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Catalysts with iron high loading of 30 wt%, promoted with K (2.0 wt%) and Cu (3.75 wt%), have been synthesized according to three different methods: (1) the traditional impregnation method (TR); (2) Ultrasound (US) assisted TR method; (3) Microwave (MW) assisted TR method. All the samples have been fully characterized by BET, ICP/OES, XRPD, TG-DTA, FT-IR, TPR, SEM and TEM and tested in a laboratory pilot plant for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis working at 220 C and 20 bar. The results of the catalysts characterization indicated that the morphology of the samples strongly depends on the method of preparation. The best FTS results in term of C{sub 2+} yield (41%) has been obtained using MW with a good value of the selectivity towards heavy hydrocarbons, while in term of CO conversion (58%), using US. The samples prepared with non-traditional methods show FTS better results, probably due to a more wide and uniform distribution of Fe in the medium during the synthesis phase. (orig.)

  5. Module filter for separating hydrocarbons and catalytic conversion of CO into CO sub 2. Modulfilter zur Abscheidung von Kohlenwasserstoffen und katalytischen Umwandlung von CO in CO sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Igelbuescher, H.; Gresch, H.; Dewert, H.

    1988-02-11

    A process is known for separating the hydrocarbons contained in the outside air via chemical absorption filters and for converting the CO into harmless CO{sub 2} by means of a catalyst. However, it proves to be a disadvantage that the catalyst in the CO conversion is saturated by humidity and becomes ineffective. In order to overcome this disadvantage, it is proposed, according to the invention, that a chemical absorption filter layer to separate acid harmful gases and/or those containing hydrocarbons on the clean gas side is provided with a cassette-shaped, easily replaceable catalyst layer which can be placed on it, which consists of a drying layer, preferably silica gel, and a subsequent hopkalite layer, where the cassettes are inserted in reusable transport containers which must be closed airtight. The transport containers can consist of plastic envelopes, which are provided with a damp-proof means of closing. (orig.).

  6. Raney Ni-Sn catalyst for H2 production from biomass-derived hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, G W; Shabaker, J W; Dumesic, J A

    2003-06-27

    Hydrogen (H2) was produced by aqueous-phase reforming of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons at temperatures near 500 kelvin over a tin-promoted Raney-nickel catalyst. The performance of this non-precious metal catalyst compares favorably with that of platinum-based catalysts for production of hydrogen from ethylene glycol, glycerol, and sorbitol. The addition of tin to nickel decreases the rate of methane formation from C-O bond cleavage while maintaining the high rates of C-C bond cleavage required for hydrogen formation.

  7. Conversion and reaction kinetics of coke oven gas over a commercial Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈一新; 徐贺明; 赵见峰; 王志彦; 王亚涛

    2016-01-01

    Producing methanol from coke oven gas (COG) is one of the important applications of COG. Removal of sulfur from COG is a key step of this process. Conversion and reaction kinetics over a commercial Fe−Mo/Al2O3 catalyst (T-202) were studied in a continuous flow fixed bed reactor under pressures of 1.6−2.8 MPa, space time of 1.32−3.55 s and temperatures of 240−360 °C. Though the COG contains about 0.6 mol/mol H2, hydrogenation of CO and CO2 is not significant on this catalyst. The conversions of unsaturated hydrocarbons depend on their molecular structures. Diolefins and alkynes can be completely hydrogenated even at relatively low temperature and pressure. Olefins, in contrast, can only be progressively hydrogenated with increasing temperature and pressure. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of CS2 on this catalyst is easy. Complete conversion of CS2 was observed in the whole range of the conditions used in this work. The original COS in the COG can also be easily converted to a low level. However, its complete HDS is difficult due to the relatively high concentration of CO in the COG and due to the limitation of thermodynamics. H2S can react with unsaturated hydrocarbons to form ethyl mercaptan and thiophene, which are then progressively hydrodesulfurized with increasing temperature and pressure. Based on the experimental observations, reaction kinetic models for the conversion of ethylene and sulfur-containing compounds were proposed; the values of the parameters in the models were obtained by regression of the experimental data.

  8. Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

    2014-01-14

    A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

  9. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

  10. Catalytic conversion of palm oil over mesoporous aluminosilicate MCM-41 for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twaiq, Farouq A.; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, SPS, Pinang (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati M. [Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Sri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2003-11-15

    The catalytic cracking of palm oil to liquid hydrocarbon fuels was studied in a fixed bed micro-reactor operated at atmospheric pressure, reaction temperature of 723 K and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 2.5 h{sup -1} over the synthesized mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 materials. Mesoporous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratio of 50 was synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Different pore sizes were obtained by changing the type of template and organic directing agent (ODA) used. The synthesized materials were characterized using various analytical methods such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), BET surface area, inductive coupled plasma (ICP), MAS NMR, FTIR and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The materials exhibit a crystalline structure of MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves with surface area varying from 550 to 1200 m{sup 2}/g and an average pore size (APS) ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 nm. The synthesized MCM-41 catalysts show high activity for palm oil cracking. The conversion of palm kernel oil, lower-molecular-weight oil, was higher as compared to higher-molecular-weight, palm olein oil. MCM-41 materials were selective for the formation of linear hydrocarbons, particularly, C{sub 13} when palm kernel oil was used and C{sub 17} when palm olein oil was fed. The yield of liquid product decreased with the increase of surface area of the catalyst. The gasoline selectivity increased whereas diesel selectivity decreased with the conversion of palm oil.

  11. Final Technical Report: Tandem and Bimetallic Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Light Hydrocarbon with Renewable Feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-01-06

    An estimated 490 million metric tons of lignocellulosic biomass is available annually from U.S. agriculture and forestry. With continuing concerns over greenhouse gas emission, the development of efficient catalytic processes for conversion of biomass derived compounds is an important area of research. Since carbohydrates and polyols are rich in oxygen, approximately one oxygen atom per carbon, removal of hydroxyl groups via deoxygenation is needed. The necessary hydrogen required for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) would either come from reforming biomass itself or from steam reforming of natural gas. Both processes contribute to global CO2 emission. The hope is that eventually renewable sources such as wind and solar for hydrogen production will become more viable and economic in the future. In the meantime, unconventional natural gas production in North America has boomed. As a result, light hydrocarbons present an opportunity when coupled with biomass derived oxygenates to generate valuable products from both streams without co-production of carbon dioxide. This concept is the focus of our current funding period. The objective of the project requires coupling two different types of catalysis, HDO and dehydrogenation. Our hypothesis was formulated around our success in establishing oxorhenium catalysts for polyol HDO reactions and known literature precedence for the use of iridium hydrides in alkane dehydrogenation. To examine our hypothesis we set out to investigate the reaction chemistry of binuclear complexes of oxorhenium and iridium hydride.

  12. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  13. Liquid phase in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds to hydrocarbons over bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find an effective method for converting renewable biomass-derived phenolic compounds into hydrocarbons bio-fuel via in situ catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds was carried out in methanol-water solvent over bifunctional catalysts of Raney Ni and HZSM-5 or H-Beta. In the in...

  14. Effect of La2O3/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst on the Activation of CH4 and CO2 to C2 Hydrocarbons under Non-equilibrium Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the reaction of methane and carbon dioxide to C2 hydrocarbons under non-equilibrium plasma, methane conversion was decreased, but selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons was increased when using La2O3/γ-Al2O3 as catalyst. So the yield of C2 hydrocarbons was higher than using plasma alone. The synergism of La2O3/γ-Al2O3 and plasma gave methane conversion of 24.9% and C2 yield of 18.1%. The distribution of C2 hydrocarbons changed when Pd- La2O3/γ-Al2O3 was used as catalyst, the major C2 product was ethylene.

  15. Detecting Elusive Intermediates in Carbohydrate Conversion: A Dynamic Ensemble of Acyclic Glucose-Catalyst Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose

    2017-01-01

    monitoring with sensitivity-optimized NMR spectroscopy in the molybdatecatalyzed epimerization of glucose to mannose. We detect an exchanging pool of at least five acyclic glucose-catalyst complexes under near-optimum reaction conditions. In the presence of catalyst, the acyclic glucose population increases...... and catalytic conversion. Epimerization occurs 2-3 orders of magnitude-fold faster than the binding of acyclic glucose to the catalyst at near-optimum reaction conditions. The current study brings insight in to the nature of acyclic intermediate-catalyst complexes of very low population and into experimental...... strategies for characterizing very minor intermediates in carbohydrate conversion to value-added compounds....

  16. Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using molecular oxygen as an environmentally benign oxidant, these processes face tremendous difficulties, most importantly in control

  17. Investigating the Influence of Mesoporosity in Zeolite Beta on its Catalytic Performance for the Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-08-26

    Hierarchically porous zeolite Beta (Beta-MS) synthesized by a soft-templating method contains remarkable intra-crystalline mesoporosity, which reduces the diffusion length in zeolite channels down to several nanometers and alters the distribution of Al among distinct crystallographic sites. When used as a catalyst for the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) at 330 oC, Beta-MS exhibited a 2.7-fold larger conversion capacity, a 2.0-fold faster reaction rate, and a remarkably longer lifetime than conventional zeolite Beta (Beta-C). The superior catalytic performance of Beta-MS is attributed to its hierarchical structure, which offers full accessibility to all catalytic active sites. In contrast, Beta-C was easily deactivated because a layer of coke quickly deposited on the outer surfaces of the catalyst crystals, impeding access to interior active sites. This difference is clearly demonstrated by using electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy to probe the distribution of coke in the deactivated catalysts. At both low and high conversions, ranging from 20% to 100%, Beta-MS gave higher selectivity towards higher aliphatics (C4-C7) but lower ethene selectivity compared to Beta-C. Therefore, we conclude that a hierarchical structure decreases the residence time of methylbenzenes in zeolite micropores, disfavoring the propagation of the aromatic-based catalytic cycle. This conclusion is consistent with a recent report on ZSM-5 and is also strongly supported by our analysis of soluble coke species residing in the catalysts. Moreover, we identified an oxygen-containing compound, 4-methyl-benzaldehyde, in the coke, which has not been observed in the MTH reaction before.  

  18. Conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in thermal protection reactors of hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Mikhaylov, A. M.; Korabelnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal protection of heat-stressed surfaces of a high-speed vehicle flying in dense layers of atmosphere is one of the topical issues. Not of a less importance is also the problem of hydrocarbon fuel combustion in a supersonic air flow. In the concept under development, it is supposed that in the most high-stressed parts of airframe and engine, catalytic thermochemical reactors will be installed, wherein highly endothermic processes of steam conversion of hydrocarbon fuel take place. Simultaneously with heat absorption, hydrogen generation will occur in the reactors. This paper presents the results of a study of conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in a slit reactor.

  19. Hydrocarbon cracking selectivities with a dual zeolite fluid cracking catalyst containing REY and ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K.; Young, G.W. (W.R. Grace and Company, Columbia, MD (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Synthetic Y faujasite zeolites have been used commercially as cracking catalysts for the past two decades, and more recently dual zeolite fluid cracking catalysts, containing faujasite and ZSM-5 were discovered to increase the octane number of the gasoline during catalytic cracking of gas oil. This concept, where ZSM-5 constitutes only a small fraction (about 1 wt %) of the cracking catalyst, has been tested commercially in Europe and in the United States. Cracking of paraffinic and olefinic hydrocarbons by ZSM-5 catalysts has been studied by several investigators over a range of temperatures (350 to 540{degree}C) and using nearly pure ZSM-5 as the catalyst. The mechanism of octane number enhancement with the dual zeolite catalyst was investigated by examining the effect on product selectivity of addition of 1 wt % ZSM-5 to a cracking catalyst composition during catalytic cracking of a commercial gas oil at 500{degree}C. Changes in composition of the product gasoline (paraffins, olefins, naphthenes and aromatics) caused by ZSM-5 were measured. Since commercial cracking catalysts undergo continuous high temperature regeneration in the presence of steam, the effect of hydrothermal treatment of ZSM-5 was also investigated.

  20. Sulfur Tolerance of Carbide Catalysts Under Hydrocarbon Reforming Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    with a low surface area bulk catalyst produce similar activities. In addition it was also found that incomplete carburization during TPR synthesis...reduces the oxycarbide to Mo, which is easily carburized under reforming conditions. Pretreatment at 600 oC, was largely ineffective and it is...at atmospheric pressure [3]. They attributed this to competitive kinetics between oxidation and carburization , concluding that carburization

  1. Conversion of xylose into furfural using lignosulfonic acid as catalyst in ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyan; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Linxin; Peng, Xinwen; Sun, Runcang; Fang, Junjie; Zheng, Shaobo

    2014-07-30

    Preparation of biopolymer-based catalysts for the conversion of carbohydrate polymers to new energies and chemicals is a hot topic nowadays. With the aim to develop an ecological method to convert xylose into furfural without the use of inorganic acids, a biopolymer-derived catalyst (lignosulfonic acid) was successfully used to catalyze xylose into furfural in ionic acid ([BMIM]Cl). The characteristics of lignosulfonic acid (LS) and effects of solvents, temperature, reaction time, and catalyst loading on the conversion of xylose were investigated in detail, and the reusability of the catalytic system was also studied. Results showed that 21.0% conversion could be achieved at 100 °C for 1.5 h. The method not only avoids pollution from conventional mineral acid catalysts and organic liquids but also maked full use of a byproduct (lignin) from the pulp and paper industry, thus demonstrating an environmentally benign process for the conversion of carbohydrates into furfural.

  2. Process and catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesis gas containing CO and H.sub.2 is converted to a high-octane hydrocarbon liquid in the gasoline boiling point range by bringing the gas into contact with a heterogeneous catalyst including, in physical mixture, a zeolite molecular sieve, cobalt at 6-20% by weight, and thoria at 0.5-3.9% by weight. The contacting occurs at a temperature of 250.degree.-300.degree. C., and a pressure of 10-30 atmospheres. The conditions can be selected to form a major portion of the hydrocarbon product in the gasoline boiling range with a research octane of more than 80 and less than 10% by weight aromatics.

  3. Breaking the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis selectivity: direct conversion of syngas to gasoline over hierarchical Co/H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.; Parashar, K.; Makkee, M.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the combination of Fischer–Tropsch catalyst with acid functionality in one single catalyst particle. The resulting bifunctional catalyst is capable of producing gasoline range hydrocarbons from synthesis gas in one catalytic step with outstanding activities and selectivities.

  4. Conversion of syngas to higher alcohols over Cu-Fe-Zr catalysts induced by ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao Zhang; Xiaomei Yang; Lipeng Zhou; Yunlai Su; Zhongmin Liu

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol induced method was applied to prepare Cu-Fe-Zr catalysts for conversion of syngas to higher alcohols. The catalytic performance of the catalysts induced by ethanol was superior to that of the catalyst prepared by the conventional precipitation method. Among various procedures for ethanol induced method,it was found that incorporation of ethanol in the precipitation process was the better. After incorporation of ethanol,the crystal size of CuO decreased and the reduction of copper species became easier. The better activity of Cu-Fe-Zr catalysts prepared by ethanol induced procedures was probably caused by the higher dispersion of Cu species.

  5. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  6. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  7. Low temperature conversion of plastic waste into light hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sajid Hussain; Khan, Zahid Mahmood; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Mahmood, Qaisar; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Khan, Jamil; Farooq, Ather; Rashid, Naim [Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060 (Pakistan); Wu, Donglei, E-mail: wudl@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Advance recycling through pyrolytic technology has the potential of being applied to the management of plastic waste (PW). For this purpose 1 l volume, energy efficient batch reactor was manufactured locally and tested for pyrolysis of waste plastic. The feedstock for reactor was 50 g waste polyethylene. The average yield of the pyrolytic oil, wax, pyrogas and char from pyrolysis of PW were 48.6, 40.7, 10.1 and 0.6%, respectively, at 275 deg. C with non-catalytic process. Using catalyst the average yields of pyrolytic oil, pyrogas, wax and residue (char) of 50 g of PW was 47.98, 35.43, 16.09 and 0.50%, respectively, at operating temperature of 250 deg. C. The designed reactor could work at low temperature in the absence of a catalyst to obtain similar products as for a catalytic process.

  8. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  9. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  10. Synthesis of SWNTs over nanoporous Co-Mo/MgO and using as a catalyst support for selective hydrogenation of syngas to hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.M.Rashidi; A.Karimi; H.R.Bozorgzadeh; K.Kashefi; M.Zare

    2010-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes(SWNTs)with high surface area were synthesized over nanoporous Co-Mo/MgO by a chemical vapor deposition(CVD)method.The SWNTs were used as catalyst support for selective hydrogenation of syngas to hydrocarbons.Here an extensive study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis(FTS)on CNT-supported cobalt catalysts with different amounts of cobalt loading up to 40 wt% is reported.The catalysts were characterized by different methods including N2 adsorption-desorption,X-ray diffraction,hydrogen chemisorption,inductively coupled plasma(ICP)and temperature-programmed reduction.Enhancement of the reducibility of Co3O4 to CoO,CoO to Co° and small cobalt oxide particles,dispersion of the cobalt,and activity and selectivity of FTS were investigated and compared with a conventional support.The CNT supported catalysts achieve a high dispersion and high loading of the active metal,cobalt in particular,so that the bulk formation of cobalt metal,which tends to occur in conventional support,can be avoided.The results showed that the specific activity of CNT supported catalysts increase significantly(there is a two fold increase in CO Conversion per gram of the active metal)with respect to the conventional supported catalyst.

  11. The role of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxuan; ZHAO Zhen

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the role of catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites (active sites: supported atoms f≤0.5 % ) in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane and propane, into oxygenatesand the epoxidation of olefins. The plausible structures of the highly dispersed and isolated active species, as well as their effects on the catalytic performances are discussed. The special physico-chemical properties and the functional mechanism of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites, as well as the preparation, characterization of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites and their applications in other types of reactions of lower hydrocarbons are summarized.

  12. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  13. Process for converting hydrocarbon oils and catalyst for use in such a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, T.; Schaper, H.; Hoek, A.

    1990-05-08

    This invention is directed at increasing the utilization of residual oil found in currently available crude oil feedstocks. The process of the invention is particularly suitable for hydrocracking, and comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil in the presence of hydrogen with a hydrocracking catalyst. Suitable feedstocks include tar oils, vacuum gas oil, deasphalted oils, long and short residues, catalytically cracked cycle oils, thermally cracked gas oils, and synthetic crudes, or combinations of various such oils. Suitable process conditions comprise temperatures from 200 to 500{degree}C, hydrogen pressures up to 300 bar, space velocities of 0.1-10 kg feed per liter of catalyst per hour, and gas/feed ratios of 100-5000 Nl/kg feed. The catalyst used in the process comprises zeolite Y particles, with an average size in the range of 0.8 to 5.0 mm, and a unit cell size preferably from 24.19 to 24.35 {angstrom}. Preference is given to zeolite Y having a silica/alumina molar ratio of 8-15. The zeolite is combined with a hydrogenation component of a Group VI and/or VIII metal, preferably nickel and tungsten. Alumina is the preferred binder. The catalyst contains 60-85% zeolite and 15-40% binder, based on the total amount of zeolite and binder. The products of the process include gaseous material (in general C1-4 hydrocarbons), naphtha, and a middle distillate fraction. Experiments are described to illustrate the preparation of catalysts and the process of the invention. 1 tab.

  14. Mesoporous zeolite single crystals for catalytic hydrocarbon conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, C.H.; Hasselriis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport.......Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...

  15. Mesoporous zeolite single crystals for catalytic hydrocarbon conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, C.H.; Hasselriis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  16. Catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight hydrocarbons. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.B.

    1979-12-01

    The recent demands on the available energy have stimulated the search for alternatives to oil. Methanol, because of its abundance and the availability of technology to produce it from coal, is projected as an alternative source for producing low molecular weight olefins. Utilizing chabazite ion exchanged with ammonium and rare earth chlorides, methanol is converted to ethylene, propylene and propane with carbon yields of 70 to 90% at reaction temperatures of 633 to 723/sup 0/K and pressures from 1 to 18 atmospheres. X-ray diffraction studies, using Cu-K radiation, show no permanent structural changes after a long use. No permanent deactivation was observed even though the catalyst was overheated once, and have been deactivated and regenerated as many as 21 times. The ammonium exchange coupled with the water at high temperature suggest the formation of an ultrastable zeolite. Ethylene yields increase as the temperature increases from 633/sup 0/K to 723/sup 0/K.

  17. Effect of chemically reduced palladium supported catalyst on sunflower oil hydrogenation conversion and selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of sunflower oil was studied in order to improve the conversion and to reduce the trans-isomerization selectivity. The hydrogenation was performed using Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 prepared catalyst and Pd/Al2O3 commercial catalyst under similar conditions. The Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation and chemical reduction processes. It was characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis (BET, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The result of sunflower oil hydrogenation on Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed a 17% higher conversion and a 23% lower trans-isomerization selectivity compared to the commercial Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. The chemical reduction of palladium supported catalyst using potassium borohydride (KBH4 has affected the Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst’s structure and particle size. These most likely influenced its catalytic performance toward higher conversion and lower trans-isomerization selectivity.

  18. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  19. First Principles Simulations of Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes in Functionalized Zeolitic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar, Mark Nickolaus

    is responsible for the largest activation energy of the catalytic cycle. This assessment is similar to the findings of alkane metathesis studies on alumina/silica supports and indicates that the entire AM cycle can be performed in zeolites by isolated single-atom transition metal hydrides. Performed over acid form zeolites, MTH is used in the conversion of methanol into a broad range of hydrocarbons, including alkenes, alkanes, and aromatics. For reasons that are not yet rigorously quantified, product selectivities vary dramatically based on the choice of catalyst and reaction conditions. The methylation of species containing double bonds (i.e., co-catalysts) is central to the overall process. Distinct structure-function relationships were found with respect to the elementary steps in the methylation and beta-scission of olefins. In Chapter 4, the role of zeolite topology in the step-wise methylation of ethene by surface methoxides is investigated. Elementary steps are studied across multiple frameworks (i.e., BEA, CHA, FER, MFI, and MOR) constituting a wide variety of confinement environments. The reaction of surface methoxides with ethene is found to require a transition state containing a primary carbocation. The barrier height is found to decrease nearly monotonically with respect to the degree of dispersion interactions stabilizing the primary carbocationic species in the transition state. In addition, quantification of the ``local'' dispersion energy indicates that confinement effects can not be simply correlated to pore size. The beta-scission of olefins plays an important role in the product selectivities of many important chemical processes, including MTH. In Chapter 5, beta-scission modes involving C6 and C8 isomers are investigated at a single, isolated Bronsted acid site within H-ZSM-5. We find that the relative enthalpic barriers of beta-scission elementary steps can be rationalized by the substitution order of the two different carbocationic carbon

  20. Study on Aromatization of C6 Aliphatic Hydrocarbons on ZRP Zeolite Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yongjun; Xie Chaogang

    2004-01-01

    The performance of ZRP zeolite catalysts for aromatization of C6 aliphatic hydrocarbons was investigated in a pulsed microreactor. The influence of metal modified ZRP zeolites on aromatization reaction was also studied, coupled with comparison of aromatization tendencies of olefins, paraffins and paraffins with different degrees of chain branching. Test results had shown that the lower the silicon/aluminum ratio in the ZRP zeolite, the higher the aromatization reactivity of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Modification of ZRP zeolite by zinc and its zinc content had apparent impact on the yield and distribution of aromatics. The aromatization tendency of olefins was apparently better than paraffins, while the aromatization tendency of monomethyl paraffins was better than that of straight-chain paraffins with the exception of dimethyl paraffins, which had worse aromatization tendency because of their steric hindrance.

  1. SHS-produced intermetallides as catalysts for hydrocarbons synthesis from CO and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Kazantsev, R.V.; Davydov, P.E.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry; Borshch, V.N.; Pugacheva, E.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation). Inst. of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science

    2012-07-01

    Raney-type polymetallic alloys were prepared by Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis followed by alkaline treating. Surface morphology and composition of were studied using XRD, BET, SEM and EMPA techniques. The samples were tested in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis demonstrated rather high activity and very high selectivity to heavy paraffins. High selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons is attributed to high thermal conductivity of alloys which prevents hot spots formation and therefore suppresses formation of methane and light hydrocarbons. Selectivity can be further improved by adding some d-metals in catalyst composition. Promotion with La seems to be particularly suitable for lowering methane formation while doping with Ni enhances methane yield greatly. (orig.)

  2. Hydrocarbon oxidation over catalysts prepared by the molecular layer deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltsov, S.I.; Smirnov, V.M.; Postnov, V.N.; Postnova, A.M.; Aleskovskii, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    By depositing consecutive uniform monolayers of phosphorus pentoxide and vanadium pentoxide on a large-surface-area (240 sq m/g) silica gel, active and selective catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation were obtained. Thus, in piperylene oxidation by air at 330/sup 0/-430/sup 0/C and 2000-18,000/hr space velocity, a productive capacity of 220 g/l./hr with 41 mole % each maleic anhydride yield and selectivity was achieved over a SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst (120 sq cm/g surface area), compared with 80 g/l./hr for a P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst prepared by impregnation. In benzene oxidation, maleic anhydride yields of 52 and 60% and selectivities of 63 and 79% were achieved over SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts, respectively, compared with a 6% yield and very low selectivity over the impregnated P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst. The molecular-layer catalysts retained their total activity for 100 hr on stream and permitted to reduce the oxidation temperature by 50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/C.

  3. Plasma-chemical Synthesis and Regeneration of Catalysts for CH4 Steam Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We carried out experimental studies concerning the plasma-chemical synthesis(PCS) of a catalyst for CH4 steam conversion and designed and built the equipment for PCS and/ or regeneration of spent catalyst for CH4 steam conversion. Under the conditions of an electric-arc low-temperature plasma (LTP), we studied the Ni-O-Al system and performed a comprehensive physicochemical analysis of the ultradispersed product obtained. It's the first time worldwide when the conditions of plasma-chemical synthesis and/ or regeneration of CH4 steam conversion catalysts under the conditions of electric-arc LTP are investigated depending on the plasma-chemical process (PCP) parameters and the plasma-chemical reactor (PCP) type (with CW-"cold walls" Tw = 500 K or WW-"warm walls" Tw = 1500 K), samples with a specific surface of 120 m2/g are obtained. Plasma-chemically synthesized and/ or regenerated samples have a homogenous chemical composition similar to that the Girdller (USA) conventional industrial catalyst. It is empirically established that the optimal temperature range in PCR for synthesis of samples with maximum dispersity is (2000 ~ 3000) K. Results from investigation on dynamics and kinetics of plasma-chemically synthesized and / or regenerated catalysts for CH4 steam conversion show that under LTP conditions premises for the formation of catalyst compositions are established. They are reduced 3 to 4 times faster than their industrial analogues. High specific surface of the samples, homogenous composition, high rate of active chemical surface formed by reduction, faulty crystal lattice of catalytically active phases and mostly high catalytic activity make them a potential competitor with their industrial analogues for their probable production in catalyst shops.

  4. Paraselectivity and Formation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons over ZSM-5 Type Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unneberg, E.

    1996-12-31

    The zeolite ZSM-5, patented by Mobil Oil Corporation in 1972, is able to convert methanol to gasoline (MTG) and water. Due to the size of the channels, undesired hydrocarbons larger than C{sub 11} are not present in the mixture, and a high octane gasoline is obtained. This has aroused a great deal of interest in the ZSM-5. Rather than being concerned with energy considerations, this doctoral thesis describes syntheses of ZSM-5 and discusses the ZSM-5 as such and studies the possible paraselectivities in various reactions over the catalyst ZSM-5. 774 refs., 113 figs., 54 tabs.

  5. Understanding of catalyst deactivation caused by sulfur poisoning and carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chao

    2011-12-01

    The present work was conducted to develop a better understanding on the catalyst deactivation in steam reforming of sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon fuels for hydrogen production. Steam reforming of Norpar13 (a liquid hydrocarbon fuel from Exxon Mobile) without and with sulfur was performed on various metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Ni) supported on different materials (Al2O3, CeO2, SiO2, MgO, and CeO2- Al2O3). A number of characterization techniques were applied to study the physicochemical properties of these catalysts before and after the reactions. Especially, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was intensively used to investigate the nature of sulfur and carbon species in the used catalysts to reveal the catalyst deactivation mechanism. Among the tested noble metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd), Rh catalyst is the most sulfur tolerant. Al2O3 and CeO2 are much better than SiO2 and MgO as the supports for the Rh catalyst to reform sulfur-containing hydrocarbons. The good sulfur tolerance of Rh/Al2O3 can be attributed to the acidic nature of the Al2O3 support and its small Rh crystallites (1-3 nm) as these characteristics facilitate the formation of electron-deficient Rh particles with high sulfur tolerance. The good catalytic performance of Rh/CeO2 in the presence of sulfur can be ascribed to the promotion effect of CeO2 on carbon gasification, which significantly reduced the carbon deposition on the Rh/CeO2catalyst. Steam reforming of Norpar13 in the absence and presence of sulfur was further carried out over CeO2-Al2O3 supported monometallic Ni and Rh and bimetallic Rh-Ni catalysts at 550 and 800 °C. Both monometallic catalysts rapidly deactivated at 550 °C, iv and showed poor sulfur tolerance. Although ineffective for the Ni catalyst, increasing the temperature to 800 °C dramatically improved the sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst. Sulfur K-edge XANES revealed that metal sulfide and organic sulfide are the dominant sulfur

  6. Conversion of pine sawdust bio-oil (raw and thermally processed) over equilibrium FCC catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertero, Melisa; Sedran, Ulises

    2013-05-01

    A raw bio-oil from pine sawdust, the liquid product from its thermal conditioning and a synthetic bio-oil composed by eight model compounds representing the main chemical groups in bio-oils, were converted thermally and over a commercial equilibrium FCC catalyst. The experiments were performed in a fixed bed reactor at 500 °C. The highest hydrocarbon yield (53.5 wt.%) was obtained with the conditioned liquid. The coke yields were significant in all the cases, from 9 to 14 wt.%. The synthetic bio-oil produced lesser hydrocarbons and more oxygenated compounds and coke than the authentic feedstocks from biomass. The previous thermal treatment of the raw bio-oil had the positive effects of increasing 25% the yield of hydrocarbons, decreasing 55% the yield of oxygenated compounds and decreasing 20% the yield of coke, particularly the more condensed coke.

  7. Liquid phase conversion of Glycerol to Propanediol over highly active Copper/Magnesia catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyanarayana Murty Pudi; Abdul Zoeb; Prakash Biswas; Shashi Kumar

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a series of Cu/MgO catalysts with different copper metal loading were prepared by the precipitation-deposition method. Their catalytic behaviour was investigated for glycerol hydrogenolysis to 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO). The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The characterization results showed that the copper metal was well-dispersed over MgO support and a new phase Cu-MgO was also identified from XRD results after calcination. The 25Cu/MgO (Cu:25 wt%) catalyst exhibited the highest glycerol conversion of 88.7% and 1,2-PDO selectivity of 91.7% at 210°C, 4.5MPa of hydrogen pressure after 12 h. The high glycerol conversion was mainly due to the Cu dispersion on MgO support and high acidic strength. Further, the effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, catalyst loading and glycerol concentration were studied over 25Cu/MgO catalyst for optimization of reaction parameters. Kinetic study over highly active 25Cu/MgO catalyst showed that the reaction followed the pseudo second order rate with respect to glycerol and the apparent activation energy was found to be 28.7 ± 0.8 kcal/mol.

  8. Fe-modified HZSM-5 catalysts for ethanol conversion into light olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyin Lu; Yancong Liu; Na Li

    2011-01-01

    A series of Fe/HZSM-5 catalysts with different iron loadings were prepared by impregnation method.Characterization was performed by N2 adsorption-desorption,X-ray diffraction (XRD),NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD),temperature-programmed reduction (TPR),temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis.Iron content in the synthesized samples varied from 1.1 wt% to 20 wt%.The obtained samples have been used for ethanol conversion into light olefins.It was found that the amount of strong acidity at 300-550 ℃ on Fe-modified samples was decreased,going with another new acid site appearance at 550-600 ℃ and that Fe/HZSM-5 catalysts were highly selective towards light olefins,especially the 9FZ sample.In addition,Fe-modified catalysts suppressed the conversion of ethanol to aromatics and paraffins and enhanced their anti-carbon deposit ability.

  9. Direct conversion of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural in ionic liquids with lanthanide catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Tim; Sørensen, Mathilde Grau; Riisager, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The direct conversion of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) in ionic liquids with lanthanide catalysts was examined in search of a possibly more environmentally feasible process not involving chromium. The highest HMF yield was obtained with ytterbium chloride or triflate together...

  10. Conversion of alcohols ({alpha}-methylated series) on AlPO{sub 4} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campelo, J.M.; Garcia, A.; Herencia, J.F. [Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    The conversion (dehydration/dehydrogenation) of alcohols in {alpha}-methylated series (methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and tert-butanol) on AlPO{sub 4} catalysts differently prepared has been studied by microcatalytic pulse reactor technique at different temperatures and flow rates. The kinetic parameters have been obtained by analysis of the data through the Bassett-Habgood equation. Dehydration to ether and/or olefin is the major reaction process. Dehydrogenation product was only scarcely found in 2-propanol conversion. The influence of the reaction temperature upon the conversion of alcohols and the selectivities of the products was investigated. Activity increases as a function of surface acidity of the AlPO{sub 4} catalyst as well as with the {alpha}-substitution in the alcohol. Moreover, selectivity studies indicated that ethanol and 2-propanol dehydration follows a combination pathway of parallel and consecutive reactions. A good correlation between the results of dehydration conversion and acid properties, gas-chromatographically measured through the irreversible adsorption of pyridine (473 and 573 K) and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (573 K), is observed. Also, activity poisoning results indicated that Broensted acid sites of AlPO{sub 4} catalyst participated in dehydradation processes, thus strengthening the carbenium ion reaction pathway in AlPO{sub 4} catalysts. 49 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Conversion of furan derivatives for preparation of biofuels over Ni-Cu/C catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Zhaolin; Wang, Z.; Lin, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Conversions of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural as model components in bio-oil were investigated over Ni-Cu/C catalyst with formic acid as hydrogen donor in isopropanol solvent to produce biofuels. The effects of reaction temperature, feed ratio, and reaction time were studied. A high yield...... biofuels from furan derivatives....

  12. Fluoride-free synthesis of a Sn-BEA catalyst by dry gel conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chun-Chih [Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, USA; Cho, Hong Je [Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, USA; Wang, Zhuopeng [Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, USA; Wang, Xuanting [Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, USA; Fan, Wei [Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, USA

    2015-01-01

    A Sn-BEA catalyst was synthesized in a fluoride-free medium for the first timeviaa dry gel conversion method. The use of alkali ions, zeolite BEA seed crystals and ion-exchange before the removal of the organic template has been shown to be indispensable to obtain the desired material.

  13. Selective Conversion of Lignin-Derivable 4-Alkylguaiacols to 4-Alkylcyclohexanols over Noble and Non-Noble-Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutyser, Wouter; Van den Bossche, Gil; Raaffels, Anton; Van den Bosch, Sander; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso; Renders, Tom; Sels, Bert F.

    2016-10-03

    Recent lignin-first catalytic lignocellulosic biorefineries produce large quantities of two potential platform chemicals, 4-n-propylguaiacol (PG) and 4-n-propylsyringol. Because conversion into 4-n-propylcyclohexanol (PCol), a precursor for novel polymer building blocks, presents a promising valorization route, reductive demethoxylation of PG was examined here in the liquid-phase over three commercial hydrogenation catalysts, viz. 5 wt % Ru/C, 5 wt % Pd/C and 65 wt % Ni/SiO2-Al2O3, at elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 300 degrees C under hydrogen atmosphere. Kinetic profiles suggest two parallel conversion pathways: Pathway I involves PG hydrogenation to 4-n-propyl-2-methoxycyclohexanol (PMCol), followed by its demethoxylation to PCol, whereas Pathway II constitutes PG hydrodemethoxylation to 4-n-propylphenol (PPh), followed by its hydrogenation into PCol. The slowest step in the catalytic formation of PCol is the reductive methoxy removal from PMCol. Moreover, under the applied reaction conditions, PCol may react further into hydrocarbons. The following criteria are therefore essential to reach a high PCol yield: (i) catalytic pathway II is preferred as this route does not involve stable intermediates; (ii) reactivity of PMCol should be higher than that of PCol, and (iii) the overall carbon balance should be high. Both the catalyst type and the reaction conditions have a substantial impact on the PCol yield. Only the commercial Ni catalyst meets the three criteria, provided the reaction is performed at 250 degrees C in hexadecane. Additional advantages of this solvent choice are a high boiling point (low operational pressure in closed reactor systems), high solubility of PG and derived products, high thermal, reductive stability, and easy derivability from fatty biomass feedstock. This Ni catalyst also showed an excellent stability in recycling runs and is capable of converting highly concentrated (up to 20 wt %) PG in hexadecane. Ru and Pd on carbon

  14. In situ observation of self-assembled hydrocarbon Fischer-Tropsch products on a cobalt catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Violeta; van Spronsen, Matthijs A.; Frenken, Joost W. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that creates approximately 2% of the world's fuel. It involves the synthesis of linear hydrocarbon molecules from a gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high pressures (from a few to tens of bars) and high temperatures (200-350 °C). To gain further insight into the fundamental mechanisms of this industrial process, we have used a purpose-built scanning tunnelling microscope to monitor a cobalt model catalyst under reaction conditions. We show that, after 30 minutes of reaction, the terraces of the cobalt catalyst are covered by parallel arrays of stripes. We propose that the stripes are formed by the self-assembly of linear hydrocarbon product molecules. Surprisingly, the width of the stripes corresponds to molecules that are 14 or 15 carbon atoms long. We introduce a simple model that explains the accumulation of such long molecules by describing their monomer-by-monomer synthesis and explicitly accounting for their thermal desorption.

  15. Recyclable Magnetite Nanoparticle Catalyst for One-Pot Conversion of Cellobiose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Bhalkikar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally benign and easily recoverable magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs were demonstrated to catalyze the one-pot conversion of cellobiose, a glucose disaccharide, to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF. The conversion was achieved in water under hydrothermal conditions. The catalytic activity of Fe3O4 NPs surpassed those of iron (II and iron (III chlorides in this reaction. Optimized cellobiose conversion reactions catalyzed with Fe3O4 NPs gave the highest 5-HMF yields of 23.4 ± 0.6% at 160°C for 24 hours. After three reuses, the Fe3O4 NP catalyst retained its catalytic activity with similar 5-HMF yields, demonstrating the recyclability of this eco-friendly catalyst in water.

  16. Fractional Multistage Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass and Catalytic Conversion into Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy; Rozmiarek, Robert; Dally, Brice; Holland, Chris

    2017-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an improved multistage process for the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to serve as a new front-end, deconstruction process ideally suited to feed Virent’s well-proven catalytic technology, which is already being scaled up. This process produced water soluble, partially de-oxygenated intermediates that are ideally suited for catalytic finishing to fungible distillate hydrocarbons. Through this project, Virent, with its partners, demonstrated the conversion of pine wood chips to drop-in hydrocarbon distillate fuels using a multi-stage fractional conversion system that is integrated with Virent’s BioForming® process. The majority of work was in the liquefaction task and included temperature scoping, solvent optimization, and separations.

  17. Cellulose conversion to polyols on supported Ru catalysts in aqueous basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is of great significance and challenge to achieve direct conversion of cellulose to specific polyols,e.g.,ethylene glycol and propylene glycol.For such selective conversion,a novel one-pot approach was studied by combination of alkaline hydrolysis and hydrogenation on supported Ru catalysts.A wide range of bases including solid bases,e.g.,Ca(OH)2 and La2O3,and phosphate buffers were examined in the cellulose reaction in water,and the cellulose conversions and polyol products depended largely on the basicity or pH values in the aqueous solutions.Ethylene glycol,1,2-propanediol,and especially 1,2,5-pentanetriol were obtained with selectivities of 15%,14% and 22%,respectively,at 38% cellulose conversion at pH 8 in phosphate buffer solution.These preliminary results provide potentials for efficient conversion of cellulose to targeted polyols by using the advantages of bases.

  18. A multi-heme flavoenzyme as a solar conversion catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Murphy, Bonnie J; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2014-09-17

    The enzyme flavocytochrome c3 (fcc3), which catalyzes hydrogenation across a C═C double bond (fumarate to succinate), is used to carry out the fuel-forming reaction in an artificial photosynthesis system. When immobilized on dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles, fcc3 catalyzes visible-light-driven succinate production in aqueous suspension. Solar-to-chemical conversion using neutral water as the oxidant is achieved with a photoelectrochemical cell comprising an fcc3-modified indium tin oxide cathode linked to a cobalt phosphate-modified BiVO4 photoanode. The results reinforce new directions in the area of artificial photosynthesis, in particular for solar-energy-driven synthesis of organic chemicals and commodities, moving away from simple fuels as target molecules.

  19. Atomic layer deposition overcoating: tuning catalyst selectivity for biomass conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Gu, Xiang-Kui; Canlas, Christian; Kropf, A Jeremy; Aich, Payoli; Greeley, Jeffrey P; Elam, Jeffrey W; Meyers, Randall J; Dumesic, James A; Stair, Peter C; Marshall, Christopher L

    2014-11-01

    The terraces, edges, and facets of nanoparticles are all active sites for heterogeneous catalysis. These different active sites may cause the formation of various products during the catalytic reaction. Here we report that the step sites of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) can be covered precisely by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, whereas the terrace sites remain as active component for the hydrogenation of furfural. Increasing the thickness of the ALD-generated overcoats restricts the adsorption of furfural onto the step sites of Pd NPs and increases the selectivity to furan. Furan selectivities and furfural conversions are linearly correlated for samples with or without an overcoating, though the slopes differ. The ALD technique can tune the selectivity of furfural hydrogenation over Pd NPs and has improved our understanding of the reaction mechanism. The above conclusions are further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  20. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Tan, E. C. D.; Biddy, M. J.; Beckham, G. T.; Scarlata, C.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.; Ross, J.; Lukas, J.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.

    2013-10-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of biological conversion of lingnocellulosic-dervied sugars. The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, using dilute-acid pretreatement, enzymatic saccharification, and bioconversion. Ancillary areas--feed handling, hydrolysate conditioning, product recovery and upgrading (hydrotreating) to a final blendstock material, wastewater treatment, lignin combusion, and utilities--are also included in the design.

  1. A tailored catalyst for the sustainable conversion of glycerol to acrolein: mechanistic aspect of sequential dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Danim; Kim, Tae Yong; Park, Dae Sung; Yun, Yang Sik; Han, Jeong Woo; Yi, Jongheop

    2014-08-01

    Developing a catalyst to resolve deactivation caused from coke is a primary challenge in the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein. An open-macropore-structured and Brønsted-acidic catalyst (Marigold-like silica functionalized with sulfonic acid groups, MS-FS) was synthesized for the stable and selective production of acrolein from glycerol. A high acrolein yield of 73% was achieved and maintained for 50 h in the presence of the MS-FS catalyst. The hierarchical structure of the catalyst with macropores was found to have an important effect on the stability of the catalyst because coke polymerization and pore blocking caused by coke deposition were inhibited. In addition, the behavior of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) during the sequential dehydration was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations because 3-HPA conversion is one of the main causes for coke formation. We found that the easily reproducible Brønsted acid sites in MS-FS permit the selective and stable production of acrolein. This is because the reactive intermediate (3-HPA) is readily adsorbed on the regenerated acid sites, which is essential for the selective production of acrolein during the sequential dehydration. The regeneration ability of the acid sites is related not only to the selective production of acrolein but also to the retardation of catalyst deactivation by suppressing the formation of coke precursors originating from 3-HPA degradation.

  2. Interplay between nanoscale reactivity and bulk performance of H-ZSM-5 catalysts during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Teketel, Shewangizaw; Svelle, Stian; Bare, Simon R.; Arstad, Bjornar; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Olsbye, Unni; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    H-ZSM-5 catalyst powders before and after a steaming post-treatment have been investigated during the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) process at 350 degrees C. Bulk and surface characterization techniques have been combined with in situ Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the aluminum an

  3. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons in Solid State Oxide Electrolyte Membrane Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHAO Ling; ZHU Zhong-nan; XI Dan-li

    2005-01-01

    Provskite-type catalysts, Ln0.6 Sr0.4 FexCo1-x O3 (Ln = Nd,Pr, Gd, Sm, La, 0<x<1) and Ln0.8Na0.2CoO3(Ln= La,Gd, Sm) were synthesized, their catalytic properties in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) were examined in a fixed-bed reactor. The former group presented higher activity in the OCM, but the main product was carbon dioxide. While the later group showed lower activity but much higher selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons compared with the former. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a solid oxide membrane reactor with La0.8 Na0.2CoO3 as catalyst. The results showed that methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide and ethane by two parallel reactions. Ethane was oxidized to ethene and carbon dioxide. A fraction of ethene was oxidized deeply to carbon dioxide. The total selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons exceeded 70%. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model was suggested to describe the reaction results.

  4. Effects of Catalyst Preparation on Hydrocarbon Product Distribution in Hydrocracking of the Fischer-Tropsch Product with Low Pt-Loaded Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Hanaoka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For the effective production of hydrocarbon liquid fuel in the hydrocracking of the Fischer-Tropsch (FT product, the catalytic performance of Pt-loaded catalysts with low Pt content was investigated using an autoclave at 250 °C, an initial H2 pressure of 0.5 MPa, and a reaction time of 1 h. A screening study using Pt-loaded catalysts with a Pt content of 0.1 wt. % indicated that zeolite supports were more favorable for jet fuel (carbon numbers 9–15 production than amorphous oxide supports. The small particle size of the supported Pt particles and the high amount of medium acid sites for the supports led to higher performance of the Pt-loaded zeolite catalysts. In the hydrocracking reaction over Pt catalysts using the zeolite support with the high amount of medium acid sites, the yields of the corresponding jet fuel at 0.02 and 0.1 wt. % were almost the same. Pt-loaded catalysts with a Pt content of 0.02 wt. % were prepared using water-in-oil (w/o microemulsions and their particle size was controlled between 1.0 and 2.6 nm. While the yield of the corresponding jet fuel was independent of Pt particle size, smaller Pt particles typically promoted the production of lighter hydrocarbons.

  5. Glycerol conversion into value added chemicals over bimetallic catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Luthfiana N.; Sudiyarmanto, Adilina, Indri B.

    2017-01-01

    Development of alternative energy from biomass encourage the experiments and production of biodiesel lately. Biodiesel industries widely expand because biodiesel as substitute of fossil fuel recognized as promising renewable energy. Glycerol is a byproduct of biodiesel production, which is resulted 10% wt average every production. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide is a gas that is very abundant amount in the atmosphere. Glycerol and carbon dioxide can be regarded as waste, possibly will produce value-added chemical compounds through chemically treated. In this preliminary study, conversion of glycerol and carbon dioxide using bimetallic catalyst Ni-Sn with various catalyst supports : MgO, γ-Al2O3, and hydrotalcite. Catalysts which have been prepared, then physically characterized by XRD, surface area and porosity analysis, and thermal gravity analysis. Catalytic test performance using supercritical carbon dioxide conditions. Furthermore, the products were analyzed by GC. The final product mostly contained of propylene glycol and glycerol carbonate.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

    2011-12-31

    The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

  7. Microwave assisted conversion of microcrystalline cellulose into value added chemicals using dilute acid catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Teck Wei; Haritos, Victoria; Tanksale, Akshat

    2017-02-10

    One of the grand challenges of this century is to transition fuels and chemicals production derived from fossil feedstocks to renewable feedstocks such as cellulosic biomass. Here we describe fast microwave conversion of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) in water, with dilute acid catalyst to produce valuable platform chemicals. Single 10min microwave assisted treatment was able to convert >60% of MCC, with >50mol% yield of desirable products such as glucose, HMF, furfural and levulinic acid. Recycling of residual MCC with make-up fresh MCC resulted in an overall conversion of >93% after 5 cycles while maintaining >60% conversion in each cycle. Addition of isopropanol (70%v/v) as a co-solvent increased the yields of HMF and levulinic acid. This work shows for the first time proof of concept for complete conversion of recalcitrant microcrystalline cellulose in mild conditions of low temperature, dilute acid and short residence time using energy efficient microwave technology.

  8. Methane conversion into higher hydrocarbons with dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei; Wang; Wenjuan; Yan; Wenjie; Ge; Xiaofei; Duan

    2013-01-01

    We reported a coaxial,micro-dielectric barrier discharge(micro-DBD)reactor and a conventional DBD reactor for the direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure.The effects of input power,residence time,discharge gap and external electrode length were investigated for methane conversion and product selectivity.We found the conversion of methane in a micro-DBD reactor was higher than that in a conventional DBD reactor.And at an input power of 25.0 W,the conversion of methane and the total C2+C3 selectivity reached 25.10% and 80.27%,respectively,with a micro-DBD reactor of 0.4 mm discharge gap.Finally,a nonlinear multiple regression model was used to study the correlations between both methane conversion and product selectivity and various system variables.The calculated data were obtained using SPSS 12.0 software.The regression analysis illustrated the correlations between system variables and both methane conversion and product selectivity.

  9. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons by catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae with zeolites: catalyst screening in a pyroprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenyi; Ma, Xiaochen; Li, Yun; Chen, Paul; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites was investigated to evaluate the performance of different zeolites for the production of aromatic hydrocarbons. Three zeolites with different structures (H-Y, H-Beta and H-ZSM5) were used to study the effect of catalyst type on the aromatic yield. All three catalysts significantly increased the aromatic yields from pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites compared with non-catalytic runs, and H-ZSM5 was most effective with a yield of 18.13%. Three H-ZSM5 with silica-to-alumina ratios of 30, 80 and 280 were used to study the effect of Si/Al ratio on the aromatic yield. The maximum yield was achieved at the Si/Al ratio of 80, which provides moderate acidity to achieve high aromatic production and reduce coke formation simultaneously. Aromatic production increased with the incorporation of copper or gallium to HZSM-5. However, other studied metals either had no significant influence or led to a lower aromatic yield.

  10. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons by Abnormal Glow Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Wei; Yu Hui; Chen Qi; Yin Yongxiang; Dai Xiaoyan

    2005-01-01

    Methane conversion to C2 hydrocarbons has been investigated with the addition of hydrogen in a plasma reactor of abnormal glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The aim of this experiment is to minimize coke formation and improve discharge stability. The typical conditions in the experiment are 300 ml of total feed flux and 400 W of discharge power. The experimental results show that methane conversion is from 91.6% to 35.2% in mol, acetylene selectivity is from 90.2% to 57.6%, and ethylene selectivity is approximately from 7.8% to 3.6%,where the coke increases gradually along with the increase of CH4/H2 from 2: 8 to 9: 1. A stable discharge for a considerable running time can be obtained only at a lower ratio of CH4/H2= 2:8 or 3: 7. These phenomena indicate that the coke deposition during methane conversion is obviously reduced by adding a large amount of hydrogen during an abnormal glow discharge.A qualitative interpretation is presented, namely, with abundant hydrogen, the possibility that hydrogen molecules are activated to hydrogen radicals is increased with the help of the abnormal glow discharge. These hydrogen radicals react with carbon radicals to form C2 hydrocarbon products. Therefore, the deposition of coke is restrained.

  11. Direct conversion of cellulose using carbon monoxide and water on a Pt-Mo2C/C catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    CO and H2O were employed as the hydrogen source for cellulose conversion to polyols. Pt-Mo2C/C tandem catalyst with the Pt-Mo 2C domain responsible for H2 and/or H production and the Pt-C domain for cellulose conversion was fabricated. Considerable polyols were obtained over this tandem Pt-Mo2C/C catalyst. This journal is © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scarlata, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, E. C. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ross, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Lukas, J. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States); Sexton, D. [Harris Group Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic-derived hydrolysate. This model leverages expertise established over time in biomass deconstruction and process integration research at NREL, while adding in new technology areas for sugar purification and catalysis. The overarching process design converts biomass to die die diesel- and naphtha-range fuels using dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, purifications, and catalytic conversion focused on deoxygenating and oligomerizing biomass hydrolysates.

  13. Layered double hydroxide catalyst for the conversion of crude vegetable oils to a sustainable biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaeian, Keyvan

    Over the last two decades, the U.S. has developed the production of biodiesel, a mixture of fatty acid methyl esters, using chiefly vegetable oils as feedstocks. However, there is much concern about the availability of high-quality vegetable oils for longterm biodiesel production. Problems have also risen due to the production of glycerol, an unwanted byproduct, as well as the need for process wash water. Therefore, this study was initiated to produce not only fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) but also fatty acid glycerol carbonates (FAGCs) by replacing methanol with dimethyl carbonate (DMC). The process would have no unnecessary byproducts and would be a simplified process compared to traditional biodiesel. In addition, this altering of the methylating agent could convert triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phospholipids to a sustainable biofuel. In this project, Mg-Al Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) was optimized by calcination in different temperature varied from 250°C to 450°C. The gallery between layers was increased by intercalating sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). During catalyst preparation, the pH was controlled ~10. In our experiment, triazabicyclodecene (TBD) was attached with trimethoxysilane (3GPS) as a coupling agent, and N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was added to remove SDS from the catalyst. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the heterogeneous catalyst on the conversion of canola oil, corn oil, and free fatty acids was investigated. To analyze the conversion of lipid oils to biofuel an in situ Raman spectroscopic method was developed. Catalyst synthesis methods and a proposed mechanism for converting triglycerides and free fatty acids to biofuel will be presented.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Conversion by Homogeneous Salen Catalyst Systems under Very Mild Reaction Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyungsock; Song, Sanghoon; Ahn, Sunghyun; Kim, Taesoon; Kim, Beomsik; Chang, Taesun [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Homogeneous salen catalyt systems were investigated for the conversion of greenhouse gas into cyclic carbonate under room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Salen complexes were more active than salophen complexes. Neither electron withdrawing nor donating group showed lower conversion efficiency. Co-catalysts such as moisture or ammonium salt increased the conversion efficiency dramatically. These results have potential to decrease carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel combustions under mild condition. One of the main scientific challenges in the 21st century is the global warming due to the increasing level of carbon dioxide. The consumption of fossil fuels is continue to increase with emitting substantial amount of green house gas. The solution currently considered is capturing and storing of carbon dioxide which compressing carbon dioxide and then storing it into oil wells or under the ocean. The other solution include converting the carbon dioxide into useful chemicals with significant commercial demand, but low chemical reactivity of carbon dioxide restricts the chemical reactions.

  15. Two-step thermal conversion of oleaginous microalgae into renewable hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Asomaning, Justice; Mussone, Paolo; Bressler, David C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the conversion of microalgal biomass to renewable chemicals and fuels through a two-step reaction and separation process. High density Chlorella protothecoides culture with 40% lipid accumulation (dwb) was produced in 10 L bioreactors and hydrolyzed in batch stainless steel reactors under subcritical conditions. After hydrolysis, fatty acids free of sulfur and low in nitrogen and salts, were recovered by hexane extraction. The fatty acids were pyrolyzed at 410°C for 2h under N2 yielding n-alkanes, α-olefins and internal olefins and low molecular weight fatty acids. This study demonstrated the direct conversion of microalgal biomass into valuable platform chemicals and fuels compatible with the existing industrial hydrocarbon infrastructure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all

  17. Conversion of n-Butane to iso-Butene on Gallium/HZSM-5 Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Gheno

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of n-butane to iso-butene on gallium/HZSM-5 catalysts at 350ºC and WHSV=2.5h8-1 was studied. The catalysts were prepared by ion exchange from a Ga(NO32 solution and further submitted to calcination in air at 530ºC. TEM analysis with an EDAX detector and TPR-H2 data showed that after calcination the Ga species were present mainly as Ga2O3, which are reduced to Ga2O at temperatures near 610ºC. The specific acid activity (SAA of the catalysts increased with the increase in aluminum content in the zeolite, and for a fixed Si/Al ratio, the SAA increased with Ga content. Values for specific hydro/dehydrogenation activity (SH/DHA were significantly higher than those for SAA, indicating that the catalytic process is controlled by the kinetics on acid sites. Moreover, the production of iso-butene with a selectivity higher than 25% was a evidence that in gallium/HZSM-5-based catalysts the rate of the hydrogenation reaction is lower than that of the dehydrogenation reaction; this behavior confirmed the dehydrogenation nature of gallium species, thereby showing great promise for iso-butene production.

  18. Cationic organobismuth complex as an effective catalyst for conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowen ZHANG; Weili DAI; Shuangfeng YIN; Shenglian LUO; Chak-Tong AU

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve high-efficiency conversion of CO2 into valuable chemicals, and to exploit new appli-cations of organobismuth compounds, cationic organo-bismuth complex with 5,6,7,12-tetrahydrodibenz[c,f] [ 1,5 ]azabismocine framework was examined for the first time for the coupling of CO2 into cyclic carbonates, using ter-minal epoxides as substrates and tetrabutylammonium halide as co-catalyst in a solvent-free environment under mild conditions. It is shown that the catalyst exhibited high activity and selectivity for the coupling reaction of CO2 with a wide range of terminal epoxide. The selectivity of propylene carbonates could reach 100%, and the max-imum turnover frequency was up to 10740 h-1 at 120℃ and 3 MPa CO2 pressure when tetrabutylammonium iod-ide was used as co-catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst is environment friendly, resistant to air and water, and can be readily reused and recycled without any loss of activity,demonstrating a potential in industrial application.

  19. Direct conversion of cellulose to glycolic acid with a phosphomolybdic acid catalyst in a water medium

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2012-08-03

    Direct conversion of cellulose to fine chemicals has rarely been achieved. We describe here an eco-benign route for directly converting various cellulose-based biomasses to glycolic acid in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere in which heteromolybdic acids act as multifunctional catalysts to catalyze the hydrolysis of cellulose, the fragmentation of monosaccharides, and the selective oxidation of fragmentation products. With commercial α-cellulose powder as the substrate, the yield of glycolic acid reaches 49.3%. This catalytic system is also effective with raw cellulosic biomass, such as bagasse or hay, as the starting materials, giving rise to remarkable glycolic acid yields of ∼30%. Our heteropoly acid-based catalyst can be recovered in solid form after reaction by distilling out the products and solvent for reuse, and it exhibits consistently high performance in multiple reaction runs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Base-Free, One-Pot Chemocatalytic Conversion of Glycerol to Methyl Lactate using Supported Gold Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pazhavelikkakath Purushothaman, Rajeesh Kumar; van Haveren, Jacco; Melian Cabrera, Ignacio; van Eck, Ernst R.H.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2014-01-01

    We report an efficient one-pot conversion of glycerol (GLY) to methyl lactate (MLACT) in methanol in good yields (73% at 95% GLY conversion) by using Au nanoparticles on commercially available ultra-stable zeolite-Y (USY) as the catalyst (160 degrees C, air, 47bar pressure, 0.25M GLY, GLY-to-Au mol

  1. Conversion of corn stalk into furfural using a novel heterogeneous strong acid catalyst in γ-valerolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiping; Li, Wenzhi; Du, Zhijie; Wu, Hao; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min; Ma, Longlong

    2015-12-01

    A novel solid acid catalyst was prepared by the copolymerization of p-toluenesulfonic acid and paraformaldehyde and then characterized by FT-IR, TG/DTG, HRTEM and N2-BET. Furfural was successfully produced by the dehydration of xylose and xylan using the novel catalyst in γ-valerolactone. This investigation focused on effects of various reaction conditions including solvent, acid catalyst, reaction temperature, residence time, water concentration, xylose loading and catalyst dosage on the dehydration of xylose to furfural. It was found that the solid catalyst displayed extremely high activity for furfural production. 80.4% furfural yield with 98.8% xylose conversion was achieved at 170°C for 10 min. The catalyst could be recycled at least five times without significant loss of activity. Furthermore, 83.5% furfural yield and 19.5% HMF yield were obtained from raw corn stalk under more severe conditions (190°C for 100 min).

  2. Catalytic conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural over carbon solid acid catalyst in γ-valerolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingwei; Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Zhiping; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Ma, Longlong

    2016-06-01

    A novel carbon solid acid catalyst was synthesized by the sulfonation of carbonaceous material which was prepared by carbonization of sucrose using 4-BDS as a sulfonating agent. TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption, elemental analysis, XPS and FT-IR were used to characterize the catalyst. Then, the catalyst was applied for the conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural in GVL. The influence of the reaction time, temperature and dosage of catalyst on xylose dehydration were also investigated. The Brønsted acid catalyst exhibited high activity in the dehydration of xylose, with a high furfural yield of 78.5% at 170°C in 30min. What's more, a 60.6% furfural yield from corn stalk was achieved in 100min at 200°C. The recyclability of the sulfonated carbon catalyst was perfect, and it could be reused for 5times without the loss of furfural yields.

  3. Role of cobalt catalyst porosity in the reaction of hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Tsapkina, V.; Davydov, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; United Research and Development Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-30

    Effect of surface properties on catalyst performance is challenging problem for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We have studied a number of cobalt-alumina and cobalt-silica-alumina catalysts prepared by wet impregnation technique. Average pore diameter of supports varied from 6 to 100 nm. All the catalysts were activated uniformly in hydrogen and tested in FT synthesis. Non-linear dependence of cobalt crystallite size on average pore diameter of support have been found. For large pore aluminas with pore diameter 40 nm and more, cobalt crystallite size in activated Co-alumina catalysts reaches 14 nm and almost independent on pore diameter. Catalytic tests demonstrate that large-pore, low surface area supports are preferable in terms of activity. Calculated turnover rates reach 2.6-3.7 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} at 190 C for these catalysts. On the contrary, catalysts based on narrow-pore silica-aluminas display smaller turnover rate of about 0.4-0.8 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. Thus, specific activity of small cobalt crystallites, 6 nm or less, was found to be lower than that of large particles. Molar selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches maximal values of 88-90% for supports with 7-12 nm average pore diameter. These samples provide lowest CH{sub 4} selectivity, 5-7 mol.%. (orig.)

  4. Multi-metallic oxides as catalysts for light alcohols and hydrocarbons from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Miguel [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, L; Galindo, H de J; Dominguez, J. M; Salmon, Manuel [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    A series of Cu-Co-Cr oxides doped with alkaline metals (M), were prepared by the coprecipitation method with metal nitrates (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) and (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} in aqueous solution. The calcined products were used as catalysts for the Fisher-Tropsch synthesis in a stainless-steel fixed bed microreactor. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, and the specific surface area, pore size and nitrogen adsorption-desorption properties were also determined. The alkaline metals favored the methanol synthesis and prevent the dehydration reactions whereas the hydrocarbon formation is independent to these metals. [Spanish] Una serie de oxidos Cu-Co-Cr soportados con metales alcalinos (M), fueron preparados por el metodo con nitratos metalicos (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) y (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} en soluciones acuosas. Los productos calcinados fueron usados como catalizadores para la sintesis de Fisher-tropsch en la superficie fija de un microreactor de acero inoxidable. El material fue caracterizado por difraccion de rayos X y el area de superficie especifica, el tamano de poro y propiedades de absorcion-desorcion de nitrogeno fueron determinadas. Los metales alcalinos favorecieron la sintesis de metanol y previnieron las reacciones de deshidratacion, mientras que la formacion de hidrocarburos es independiente de estos metales.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  6. Process and apparatus for conversion of water vapor with coal or hydrocarbon into a product gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, W.; Barnert, H.; Oertel, M.; Schulten, R.

    1990-03-27

    A process and apparatus are provided for conversion of steam and hydrocarbon, or steam and coal, into a product gas which contains hydrogen. The conversion rate is augmented by effective extraction and removal of hydrogen as and when hydrogen is generated. Within a reaction vessel wherein the conversion takes place, a chamber for collection of hydrogen is formed by the provision of a hydrogen permeable membrane. The chamber is provided with a hydrogen extraction means and houses a support structure, for example, in the form of a mesh providing structural support to the membrane. The membrane may be of a pleated or corrugated construction, so as to provide an enlarged surface for the membrane to facilitate hydrogen extraction. Also, to further facilitate hydrogen extraction, a hydrogen partial pressure differential is maintained across the membrane, such as, for example, by the counter pressure of an inert gas. A preferred configuration for the apparatus of the invention is a tubular construction which houses generally tubular hydrogen extraction chambers. 5 figs.

  7. Understanding the surface and structural characteristics of tungsten oxide supported on tin oxide catalysts for the conversion of glycerol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Srinivas; G Raveendra; G Parameswaram; P S Sai Prasad; S Loridant; N Lingaiah

    2015-05-01

    Catalysts with varying WO3 content on SnO2 were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, in situ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption of NH3. In situ Raman analysis reveals the presence isolated monomers and polymeric species of WO3. These catalysts were evaluated for the conversion of glycerol into value added chemicals. Etherification of glycerol with tertiary butanol and preparation of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea are studied over these catalysts. The catalytic activity results suggest that the glycerol conversion and selectivity depends on the morphology of WO3 which in turn is related to its content in the catalyst. The catalysts with 5 wt.% of WO3 on SnO2 resulted in high dispersion with larger number of strong acidic sites. The selectivity in the glycerol etherification is related to the nature of the catalyst and reaction time. These catalysts also exhibited high activity for synthesis of glycerol carbonate. The effect of various reaction parameters was studied to optimize the reaction conditions. The catalysts also exhibited consistent activity upon reuse.

  8. Partial Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in a Segmented Bed Using Oxide-based Catalysts and Oxygen-conducting Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W.

    Two objectives for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons to produce synthesis gas are investigated herein: (1) the effect of oxygen-conducting supports with partially substituted mixed-metal oxide catalysts, and (2) a segmented bed approach using different catalyst configurations. Excess carbon deposition was the primary cause of catalyst deactivation, and was the focus of the experiments for both objectives. The formation and characterization of deposited carbon was examined after reaction for one of the selected catalysts to determine the quantity and location of the carbon on the catalyst surface leading to deactivation. A nickel-substituted barium hexaaluminate (BNHA), with the formula BaAl 11.6Ni0.4O18.8, and a Rh-substituted lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore (LCZR) with the formula La1.89Ca0.11 Zr1.89Rh0.11, were combined with two different doped ceria supports. These supports were gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) and zirconium-doped ceria (ZDC). The active catalyst phases were combined with the supports in different ratios using different synthesis techniques. The catalysts were characterized using several different techniques and were tested under partial oxidation (POX) of n-tetradecane (TD), a diesel fuel surrogate. It was found that the presence of GDC and ZDC reduced the formation of carbon for both catalysts; the optimal ratio of catalyst to support was different for the hexaaluminate and the pyrochlore; a loading of 20 wt% of the pyrochlore with ZDC produced the most stable performance in the presence of common fuel contaminants (>50 h); and, the incipient wetness impregnation synthesis method of applying the active catalyst to the support produced more stable product yields than the catalyst prepared by a solid-state mixing technique. Different hexaaluminate and pyrochlore catalysts were used in different configurations in a segmented bed approach. The first strategy was to promote the indirect reforming mechanism by placing a combustion catalyst in the

  9. Designation of highly efficient catalysts for one pot conversion of glycerol to lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meilin; Dan Zhang; Guan, Hongyu; Huang, Guohui; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    Production of lactic acid from glycerol is a cascade catalytic procedure using multifunctional catalysts combined with oxidative and acidic catalytic sites. Therefore, a series of silver-exchanged phosphomolybdic acid catalysts (AgxH3‑xPMo12O40, x = 1 ~ 3, abbreviated as AgxPMo) was designed and applied in glycerol oxidation with O2 as an oxidant to produce lactic acid (LA) without adding any base. Among all, total silver exchanged phosphomolybdic acid (Ag3PMo) was found to be the most active one with LA selectivity of 93% at 99% conversion under mild conditions of 5 h at 60 °C. The exceptionally high efficiency was contributed to the generation of strong Lewis acid sites, enhanced redox potentials and water-tolerance. More importantly, Ag3PMo was tolerant in crude glycerol from biodiesel production. And the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Meanwhile, Ag3PMo acted as a heterogeneous catalyst for 12 recycles without loss of activity.

  10. Green chemistry perspectives of methane conversion via oxidative methylation of aromatics over zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebajo, M.O. [University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld. (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This paper provides a general overview of the recent work that we and other researchers have done on the utilisation of methane for catalytic methylation of aromatic compounds and for direct coal liquefaction for the production of liquid hydrocarbons. In particular, the paper presents a detailed description of more recent substantial experimental evidence that we have provided for the requirement of oxygen as a stoichiometry reactant for benzene methylation with methane over moderately acidic zeolite catalysts. The reaction, which has been termed 'oxidative methylation', was thus postulated to involve a two-step mechanism involving intermediate methanol formation by methane partial oxidation, followed by benzene methylation with methanol in the second step. However, strongly acidic zeolites can cause cracking of benzene to yield methylated products in the absence of oxygen. The participation of methane and oxygen, and the effective use of zeolite catalysts in this methylation reaction definitely have some positive green chemistry implications. Thus, the results of these previous studies are also discussed in this review in light of the principles and tools of green chemistry. Various metrics were used to evaluate the greenness, cost-effectiveness, and material and energy efficiency of the oxidative methylation reaction.

  11. H3PO4/Al2O3 catalysts: characterization and catalytic evaluation of oleic acid conversion to biofuels and biolubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Regina Raddi de Araujo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 and H3PO4/Al2O3 catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to biofuels and biolubricant at 1 atm and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor, using an oleic acid-catalyst ratio of 4 and N2 as the carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. N2 adsorption-desorption, X ray diffraction, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and FT-IR spectroscopy were also employed to evaluate the textural, structural and acidic properties of the catalysts. The results showed that phosphoric acid impregnation improved the alumina decarboxylation activities, generating hydrocarbons in the range of gasoline, diesel oil and lubricant oil. The best catalytic performance was achieved with the highest surface area alumina impregnated with H3PO4, which was the solid that allied high total acidity with a large quantity of mesopores.

  12. Microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Martin; Beckmaann, Sabrina; Siegert, Michael; Grundger, Friederike; Richnow, Hans [Geomicrobiology Group, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, oil production has increased enormously but almost half of the oil now remaining is heavy/biodegraded and cannot be put into production. There is therefore a need for new technology and for diversification of energy sources. This paper discusses the microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs. The objective of the study is to identify microbial and geochemical controls on methanogenesis in reservoirs. A graph shows the utilization of methane for various purposes in Germany from 1998 to 2007. A degradation process to convert coal to methane is shown using a flow chart. The process for converting oil to methane is also given. Controlling factors include elements such as Fe, nitrogen and sulfur. Atmospheric temperature and reservoir pressure and temperature also play an important role. From the study it can be concluded that isotopes of methane provide exploration tools for reservoir selection and alkanes and aromatic compounds provide enrichment cultures.

  13. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis of Methanol Conversion to Hydrocarbons Using Cantera Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duminda A. Gunawardena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactions associated with removal of oxygen from oxygenates (deoxygenation are an important aspect of hydrocarbon fuels production process from biorenewable substrates. Here we report the equilibrium composition of methanol-to-hydrocarbon system by minimizing the total Gibbs energy of the system using Cantera methodology. The system was treated as a mixture of 14 components which had CH3OH, C6H6, C7H8, C8H10 (ethyl benzene, C8H10 (xylenes, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, CH4, H2O, C, CO2, CO, H2. The carbon in the equilibrium mixture was used as a measure of coke formation which causes deactivation of catalysts that are used in aromatization reaction(s. Equilibrium compositions of each species were analyzed for temperatures ranging from 300 to 1380 K and pressure at 0–15 atm gauge. It was observed that when the temperature increases the mole fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene pass through a maximum around 1020 K. At 300 K the most abundant species in the system were CH4, CO2, and H2O with mole fractions 50%, 16.67%, and 33.33%, respectively. Similarly at high temperature (1380 K, the most abundant species in the system were H2 and CO with mole fractions 64.5% and 32.6% respectively. The pressure in the system shows a significant impact on the composition of species.

  14. Sn-MCM-41 as Efficient Catalyst for the Conversion of Glucose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, much attention has been paid to the development of technologies that facilitate the conversion of biomass into platform chemicals such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF. In this paper, a tin-containing silica molecular sieve (Sn-MCM-41 was found to act as a bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst for the efficient conversion of glucose into 5-HMF in ionic liquid. In the presence of [EMIM]Br, the yield of 5-HMF converted from glucose reached 70% at 110 °C after 4 h. During the reaction, the active center of the catalyst first catalyzed the isomerization of glucose into fructose and then the dehydration of fructose into 5-HMF. After the reaction, the heterogeneous catalyst Sn-MCM-41 could be easily recovered and reused without a significant loss in activity. The catalyst Sn-MCM-41 was also able to catalyze the conversion of fructose into 5-HMF at an 80% yield. Moreover, the low toxicity of the Sn-based catalyst makes the method a greener approach for the conversion of saccharides into 5-HMF.

  15. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY TEST OF CoMo/ZnO CATALYST ON ETHANOL CONVERSION USING STEAM REFORMING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wega Trisunaryanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation, characterization and catalytic activity test of CoMo/ZnO catalyst for steam reforming of ethanol have been investigated. The catalysts preparation was carried out by impregnation of Co and/or Mo onto ZnO sample. Water excess was used in ethanol feed for steam reforming process under mol ratio of ethanol:water (1:10. Characterizations of catalysts were conducted by analysis of metal content using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. Determination of catalysts acidity was conducted by gravimetric method of adsorption of pyridine base. Catalytic activity test on ethanol conversion using steam reforming method was conducted in a semi-flow reactor system, at a temperature of 400 oC, for 1.5 h under N2 flow rate of 10 mL/min. Gas product was analyzed by gas chromatograph with TCD system. The results of catalysts characterizations showed that the impregnation of Co and/or Mo metals on ZnO sample increased its acidity and specific surface area. The content of Co in Co/ZnO and CoMo/ZnO catalysts was 1.14 and 0.49 wt%. The Mo content in CoMo/ZnO catalyst was 0.36 wt%. The catalytic activity test result on ethanol conversion showed that the ZnO, Co/ZnO, and CoMo/ZnO catalysts produced gas fraction of 16.73, 28.53, and 35.53 wt%, respectively. The coke production of ZnO, Co/ZnO, and CoMo/ZnO catalysts was 0.86, 0.24, and 0.08 wt%, respectively. The gas products consisted mainly of hydrogen.   Keywords: CoMo/ZnO catalyst, steam reforming, ethanol

  16. ZnCl2 Induced Catalytic Conversion of Softwood Lignin to Aromatics and Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang; Zhang, Libing; Deng, Tiansheng; Ruan, Hao; Hou, Xianglin; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-19

    Selective cleavage of C-O-C bonds in lignin without disrupting C-C linkages can result in releasing aromatic monomers and dimers that can be subsequently converted into chemicals and fuels. Results showed that both biomass-derived lignin and lignin model compounds were depolymerized in a highly concentrated ZnCl2 solution. Zn2+ ions in highly concentrated ZnCl2 solutions appeared to selectively coordinate with C-O-C bonds to cause key linkages of lignin much easier to cleave. In 63 wt.% ZnCl2 solution at 200 °C for 6 h, nearly half of the softwood technical lignin was converted to liquid products, of which the majority was alkylphenols. Results indicated that most β-O-4 and Cmethyl-OAr bonds of model compounds were cleaved undersame conditions, providing a foundation towards understanding lignin depolymerization in a concentrated ZnCl2 solution. The phenolic products were further converted into cyclic hydrocarbons via hydrodeoxygenation and coupling reactions by co-catalyst Ru/C.

  17. Conversion of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons to valuable synthetic feed for steamcrackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesana, A.; Dalloro, L.; Rivetti, F.; Buzzoni, R.; Bignazzi, R. [ENI S.p.A., Novara (Italy). Refining and Marketing Div.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of the present study was upgrading a set of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures whose commercial value ranks close to fuel oil and should become even lower in the next future because of the introduction of more stringent regulations on fuels, through hydro-conversion to a synthetic feed for steam-cracking. The resulting process provides an opportunity to improve the economic return of a steamcracking plant, offering the chance of converting low-value mixtures produced by the plant itself, such as fuel oil of cracking (FOK), saving an equivalent amount of naphtha. The method can also be used for converting pyrolysis gasoline (pygas). Although pygas has at present a fair commercial value, it could suffer a significant penalization in the future due to further limitations on total aromatic content in gasoline. Pygas hydro-conversion to a synthetic steam-cracking feedstock has been recently reported. Fractions from refinery, such as heavy distillates (e.g. Heavy Vacuum Gas Oil, VGO), deasphalted resides (DAO), or some FCC streams (e.g. LCO) resulted suitable and very attractive mixtures to be treated as well. No more than deasphalting was required as pretreatment of the feed mixture and only when the asphalts were >2%. Hetero-elements are often present in such kind of feeds at quite high concentrations, but no problems were observed due to the presence of sulphur and nitrogen, respectively, up to 15000 and 5500 ppm. (orig.)

  18. Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons over Tungsten-ZSM-5 and Tungsten Loaded Cu/ZSM-5 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Didi Dwi Anggoro; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2006-01-01

    Metal containing ZSM-5 can produce higher hydrocarbons in methane oxidation. Many researchers have studied the applicability of HZSM-5 and modify ZSM-5 for methane conversion to liquid hydrocarbons, but their research results still lead to low conversion, low selectivity and low heat resistance.The modified HZSM-5, by loading with tungsten (W), could enhance its heat resistant performance, and the high reaction temperature (800 ℃) did not lead to a loss of the W component by sublimation. The loading of HZSM-5 with tungsten and copper (Cu) resulted in an increment in the methane conversion as well as CO2 and C5+ selectivities. In contrast, CO, C2-3 and H2O selectivities were reduced. The process of converting methane to liquid hydrocarbons (C5+) was dependent on the metal surface area and the acidity of the zeolite. High methane conversion and C5+ selectivity, and low H2O selectivity are obtained over W/3.0Cu/HZSM.

  19. Conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, olefins and fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh; Lee, Suh-Jane

    2016-12-13

    Embodiments of an integrated method for step-wise conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, and optionally to hydrocarbons, are disclosed. The method includes providing an acidic catalyst, exposing a composition comprising aqueous 2,3-butanediol to the acidic catalyst to produce an intermediate composition comprising methyl ethyl ketone, providing a hydrogenation catalyst that is spatially separated from the acidic catalyst, and subsequently exposing the intermediate composition to the hydrogenation catalyst to produce a composition comprising 2-butanol. The method may further include subsequently exposing the composition comprising 2-butanol to a deoxygenation catalyst, and deoxygenating the 2-butanol to form hydrocarbons. In some embodiments, the hydrocarbons comprise olefins, such as butenes, and the method may further include subsequently exposing the hydrocarbons to a hydrogenation catalyst to form saturated hydrocarbons.

  20. Direct conversion of corn cob to formic and acetic acids over nano oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyuan; Cheng; Hong; Liu; Yuming; Cui; Nianhua; Xue; Weiping; Ding

    2014-01-01

    Considering energy shortage, large molecules in corn cob and easy separation of solid catalysts, nano oxides are used to transform corn cob into useful chemicals. Because of the microcrystals, nano oxides offer enough accessible sites for cellulose, hemicellulose and monosaccharide from corn cob hydrolysis and oxidant. Chemical conversion of corn cob to organic acids is investigated over nano ceria, alumina, titania and zirconia under various atmospheres. Liquid products are mainly formic and acetic acids. A small amount of other compounds, such as D-xylose,D-glucose, arabinose and xylitol are also detected simultaneously. The yield of organic acids reaches 25%–29% over the nano oxide of ceria,zirconia and alumina with 3 h reaction time under 453 K and 1.2 MPa O2. The unique and fast conversion of corn cob is directly approached over the nano oxides. The results are comparative to those of biofermentation and offer an alternative method in chemically catalytic conversion of corn cob to useful chemicals in a one-pot chemical process.

  1. Deep catalytic oxidation of heavy hydrocarbons on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Oxydation catalytique totale des hydrocarbures lourds sur Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, F.

    1998-12-09

    Deep oxidation by air on Pt supported on alumina of a large number of heavy hydrocarbons representative of those found in a real Diesel car exhaust has been studied. Light-off temperatures between 140 and 320 deg. C on 1%Pt/alumina (80% metal dispersion) have been found. Results show that not only the physical state around the conversion area but also the chemical nature of the hydrocarbon plays an important role. Heavy hydrocarbons deep oxidation behaviour has been classified as a function of their chemical category (alkane, alkene, aromatics etc..). Oxidation of binary mixtures of hydrocarbons has shown strong inhibition effects on n-alkane or CO oxidation by polycyclic compounds like 1-methyl-naphthalene. In some cases, by-product compounds in the gas effluent (other than CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) have been identified by mass-spectrometry leading to oxidation mechanism proposals for different hydrocarbons. Catalyst nature (metal dispersion, content) influence has also been studied. It is shown that turn-over activity is favoured by the increase of the metal bulk size. Acidity influence of the carrier has shown only very little influence on n-alkane or di-aromatic compound oxidation. (author)

  2. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37°C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ≤ 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light.

  3. Single-catalyst particle spectroscopy of alcohol-to-olefins conversions : Comparison between SAPO-34 and SSZ-13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, Qingyun; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Mokhtar, Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A.; Basahel, Suliman N.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct hydrocarbon pool (HCP) species on individual micron-sized SAPO-34 and SSZ-13 crystals have been compared during methanol-to-olefins (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversion processes. In situ UV-vis micro-spectroscopy reveals the formation of 400 nm and 580 nm absorpti

  4. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

    1988-05-20

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

  5. Low-Temperature CO Oxidation over a Ternary Oxide Catalyst with High Resistance to Hydrocarbon Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew J; Toops, Todd J; Unocic, Raymond R; Parks, James E; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. This catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic activity of mono and bimetallic Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalysts for the thermocatalyzed conversion of methane to hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, B.; Oriňak, A.; Oriňaková, R.; Lorinčík, J.; Jerigová, M.; Velič, D.; Mičušík, M.; Omastová, M.; Smith, R. M.; Girman, V.

    2017-02-01

    Mono and bimetallic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fortified with Cu and Zn metal particles were studied to improve the efficiency of the thermocatalytic conversion of methane to hydrogen. The surface of the catalyst and the dispersion of the metal particles were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was confirmed that the metal particles were successfully dispersed on the MWCNT surface and XPS analysis showed that the Zn was oxidised to ZnO at high temperatures. The conversion of methane to hydrogen during the catalytic pyrolysis was studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography using different amounts of catalyst. The best yields of hydrogen were obtained using pyrolysis conditions of 900 °C and 1.2 mg of Zn/Cu/MWCNT catalyst for 1.5 mL of methane.The initial conversion of methane to hydrogen obtained with Zn/Cu/MWCNTs was 49%, which represent a good conversion rate of methane to hydrogen for a non-noble metal catalyst.

  7. One-pot conversion of cellulose to ethylene glycol with multifunctional tungsten-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2013-07-16

    With diminishing fossil resources and increasing concerns about environmental issues, searching for alternative fuels has gained interest in recent years. Cellulose, as the most abundant nonfood biomass on earth, is a promising renewable feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals. In principle, the ample hydroxyl groups in the structure of cellulose make it an ideal feedstock for the production of industrially important polyols such as ethylene glycol (EG), according to the atom economy rule. However, effectively depolymerizing cellulose under mild conditions presents a challenge, due to the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding network. In addition, control of product selectivity is complicated by the thermal instabilities of cellulose-derived sugars. A one-pot catalytic process that combines hydrolysis of cellulose and hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of cellulose-derived sugars proves to be an efficient way toward the selective production of polyols from cellulose. In this Account, we describe our efforts toward the one-pot catalytic conversion of cellulose to EG, a typical petroleum-dependent bulk chemical widely applied in the polyester industry whose annual consumption reaches about 20 million metric tons. This reaction opens a novel route for the sustainable production of bulk chemicals from biomass and will greatly decrease the dependence on petroleum resources and the associated CO₂ emission. It has attracted much attention from both industrial and academic societies since we first described the reaction in 2008. The mechanism involves a cascade reaction. First, acid catalyzes the hydrolysis of cellulose to water-soluble oligosaccharides and glucose (R1). Then, oligosaccharides and glucose undergo C-C bond cleavage to form glycolaldehyde with catalysis of tungsten species (R2). Finally, hydrogenation of glycolaldehyde by a transition metal catalyst produces the end product EG (R3). Due to the instabilities of glycolaldehyde and cellulose

  8. Nanostructured materials and their role as heterogeneous catalysts in the conversion of biomass to biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Chris

    Prior to the discovery of inexpensive and readily available fossil fuels, the world relied heavily on biomass to provide its energy needs. Due to a worldwide growth in demand for fossil fuels coupled with the shrinkage of petroleum resources, and mounting economic, political, and environmental concerns, it has become more pressing to develop sustainable fuels and chemicals from biomass. The present dissertation studies multiple nanostructured catalysts investigated in various processes related to gasification of biomass into synthesis gas, and further upgrading to biofuels and value added chemicals. These reactions include: syngas conditioning, alcohol synthesis from carbon monoxide hydrogenation, and steam reforming ethanol to form higher hydrocarbons. Nanomaterials were synthesized, characterized, studied in given reactions, and then further characterized post-reaction. Overall goals were aimed at determining catalytic activities towards desired products and determining which material properties were most desirable based on experimental results. Strategies to improve material design for second-generation materials are suggested based on promising reaction results coupled with pre and post reaction characterization analysis.

  9. CO2 capture and conversion with a multifunctional polyethyleneimine-tethered iminophosphine iridium catalyst/adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Nicholas D; Hicks, Jason C

    2014-04-01

    Tunable, multifunctional materials able to capture CO2 and subsequently catalyze its conversion to formic acid were synthesized by the modification of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) with an iminophosphine ligand coordinated to an Ir precatalyst. The molecular weight of the PEI backbone was an important component for material stability and catalytic activity, which were inversely related. The amine functionalities on PEI served three roles: 1) primary amines were used to tether the ligand and precatalyst, 2) amines were used to capture CO2 , and 3) amines served as a base for formate stabilization during catalysis. Ligand studies on imine and phosphine based ligands showed that a bidentate iminophosphine ligand resulted in the highest catalytic activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that an increase in Ir 4f binding energy led to an increase in catalytic activity, which suggests that the electronics of the metal center play a significant role in catalysis. Catalyst loading studies revealed that there is a critical balance between free amines and ligand-metal sites that must be reached to optimize catalytic activity. Thus, it was found that the CO2 capture and conversion abilities of these materials could be optimized for reaction conditions by tuning the structure of the PEI-tethered materials.

  10. Effect Of Solid Acids In The Conversion Of Glycerol Over Ru/Bentonite Catalyst In Glycerol Hydrogenolysis Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraini Hamzah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol known as by-product of transesterification of vegetables oil become an important materials after some chemical modification. In this study, hydrogenolysis reaction of glycerol to 1,2-propanediol was conducted using various supported ruthenium based catalyst. The support materials used in this study are bentonite ,TiO2, Al2O3 and SiO2. All experiments were carried out at reaction condition of 150°C, hydrogen pressure 20-30 bar for 7 hours and the 20%(wt glycerol content in distilled water. The result shows that activity of the catalyts increased following this order: Ru/SiO2< Ru/TiO2 ≈ Ru/Al2O3 < Ru/bentonite. High selectivity to 1,2-propanediol was obtained in hydrogenolysis glycerol over Ru/TiO2 (83.7% and Ru/bentonite (80.1% catalysts. Since Ru/bentonite catalyst performed better than other tested catalyst, we choose this catalyst system to investigate the effect of various solid acids (zeolite, ZrO2, Nb2O5 and amberlyst on conversion of glycerol in hydrogenolysis reaction. Addition of solid acid in hydrogenolysis glycerol had promote the activity of Ru/bentonite catalyst drastically. The result shows that the presence of zeolite make the conversion of glycerol increased to maximum from 62.8% to 81.6% compared the other solid acids. Interestingly, selectivity to 1,2-propanediol still was achieved over 80.0%. These catalysts system were characterized by XRD, XPS, BET, and TEM for obtaining some physicochemical properties of the catalysts.

  11. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  12. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. C. Kwon

    2006-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor

  13. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. C. Kwon

    2006-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor

  14. Aromatic hydrocarbon production via eucalyptus urophylla pyrolysis over several metal modified ZSM-5 catalysts – an analysis by py-GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by ion exchange of NH4ZSM-5 (SIO2/Al2O3 = 23) using gallium, molybdenum, nickel and zinc, and their combinations thereof. The prepared catalysts were used to evaluate catalytic pyrolysis for the conversion of Eucalyptus urophylla to fuels and chemicals, ...

  15. Conversion of palm oil sludge to biodiesel using alum and KOH as catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of palm oil sludge was studied by esterification and transesterification which used methanol as a reactant. The esterification of palm oil sludge was performed by variation of molar ratios of methanol to palm oil sludge (5:1, 10:1, 15:1, 20:1, and 25:1 and percentages of alum catalyst (3–7 wt% at 60 °C for 3 h with stirring rate 300 rpm. Transesterification was also carried out by variation of KOH (0.5–2.5 wt% at 60 °C and stirring rate 300 rpm for 1 h. The optimum molar ratio of methanol to palm oil sludge was 20:1 (6% alum catalyst. Meanwhile, the optimum concentration for transesterification was 1.5% of KOH. The yield of biodiesel production was 93%, the density and kinematic viscosity were 0.864 g mL−1 and 12.8 mm2 s−1, respectively. The existence of ester compounds in the product was shown by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry spectrum data of carbonyl group (CO at 1744 cm−1 and CO of ester at 1234; 1119 and 1026 cm−1. Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry analysis showed the biodiesel product contains palmitic acid methyl ester (23.4%, trans-methyl oleate (75.5%, cis-methyl oleate (< 0.1%, and methyl stearate (1.2%.

  16. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor

  17. CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH ELECTRIC FIELD ENHANCED LOW TEMPERATURE PLASMA CATALYSIS%电场增强低温等离子催化合成C2烃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas is not only playing an increasing important role in energy and chemicals supplies in 21st century but is also the second most important component of the greenhouse gases. Clean and direct conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons (ethane, ethene and acetylene) through AC and DC plasma catalysis enhanced by electric field was studied at low temperature ranging from 50?℃ to 100?℃, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions. The influence of form of the electrode, distance between the electrodes, voltage, diameter of reactor, flow of inlet methane, N2/CH4(mole) and 20 catalysts were tested under low temperature plasma. The results indicated that best form of the electrode was plate; the better distance between the electrode was 5mm; the appropriate voltage was 38V(AC);the apparent diameter of reactor was 17mm, the likely flow range flux of inlet methane was 60—80?ml*min-1, the suitable ratio of N2/CH4 (mole) was 0.5—1.0.The yield of C2 hydrocarbons was the highest on V2O5,ZnO(5%)/ZSM-5-38 catalyst, the yield of ethene was the highest on La0.8Sr0.2CrO3,ZnO catalyst. The results are better than those obtained through conventional reaction of oxidation coupling of methane.

  18. Ultradispersed Hydrocarbon Synthesis Catalyst from CO and H[2] Based on Electroexplosion of Iron Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Popok, Evgeniy Vladimirovich; Levashova, Albina Ivanovna; Chekantsev, Nikita Vitalievich; Kirgina, Mariya Vladimirovna; Rafegerst, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of disperse particles of electroexplosive iron-based powder are studied with a laser diffraction method, transmission electron microscopy analysis and X-ray photography. The catalytic activity of ultradispersed iron powders in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H[2] by Fischer - Tropsch method is measured by concentration of the paramagnetic particles with electron paramagnetic resonance. In the laboratory of catalytic plant, hydrocarbons are synthesized at...

  19. Zeolites Modified Metal Cations as Catalysts in Hydrocarbon Oxidation and the Alkyl Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Agadadsh Makhmud Aliyev; Zumrud Abdulmutallib Shabanova; Fikret Vakhid Aliyev; Alla M. Guseynova

    2014-01-01

    The results of studies on the creation of highly metalltceolitnyh systems and the study of their catalytic activities in the oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons (ethylene to acetaldehyde, acetone, propylene, butylene methyl ethyl ketone); aliphatic C1-C5 alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid esters; oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes in the alicyclic diene hydrocarbons and the oxidative dimerization of methane to acetylene. It has bee...

  20. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is

  1. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor

  2. Effect of NiW Modified HZSM-5 and HY Zeolites on Hydrocracking Conversion of Crude Palm Oil to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Subsadsana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic conversion of crude palm oil over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites modified with NiW as catalysts in the hydrocracking process was investigated. These zeolites supported by NiW catalysts were prepared employing the impregnation technique. NiW was added to the zeolites in order to induce bi-functional properties (both acid and metal sites in the catalysts. Subsequently, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD andnitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis. The catalytic activity of prepared catalysts was evaluated through the conversion of crude palm oil to biofuels. These results indicate that the incorporation of NiW over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites improves the conversion efficiency and enhances the yield of biofuel (gasoline, kerosene, and diesel, possibly due to NiW promote of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reaction.

  3. Comparison between liquid and solid acids catalysts on reducing sugars conversion from furfural residues via pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keying; Ma, Baojun; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Wanyi

    2014-09-01

    Liquid sulphuric acid is adopted and compared with carbon-based sulfonated solid acids (coal tar-based and active carbon-based) for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of liquid acid are at 4% of sulphuric acid, 25:1 of liquid and solid ratio, 175°C of reaction temperature and 120 min of reaction time. The reducing sugar yields are reached over 60% on liquid acid via NaOH/H2O2, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasonic pretreatments, whereas only over 30% on solid acids. The TOFs (turnover number frequency) via NaOH/H2O2 pretreatments are 0.093, 0.020 and 0.023 h(-1) for liquid sulphuric acid, coal tar-based and active carbon-based solid acids catalysts, respectively. Considering the efficiency, cost and environment factors, the liquid and solid acids have their own advantages of potential commercial application values.

  4. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30

    CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is

  5. Synthesis of a Sulfonated Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Framework as an Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Biobased Chemical Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongwu; Hu, Zhigang; Gao, Yongjun; Yuan, Daqiang; Kang, Zixi; Qian, Yuhong; Yan, Ning; Zhao, Dan

    2015-10-12

    Because of limited framework stability tolerance, de novo synthesis of sulfonated covalent organic frameworks (COFs) remains challenging and unexplored. Herein, a sulfonated two-dimensional crystalline COF, termed TFP-DABA, was synthesized directly from 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and 2,5-diaminobenzenesulfonic acid through a previously reported Schiff base condensation reaction, followed by irreversible enol-to-keto tautomerization, which strengthened its structural stability. TFP-DABA is a highly efficient solid acid catalyst for fructose conversion with remarkable yields (97 % for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 65 % for 2,5-diformylfuran), good chemoselectivity, and good recyclability. The present study sheds light on the de novo synthesis of sulfonated COFs as novel solid acid catalysts for biobased chemical conversion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolllins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  7. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.; Philip, C.V.; Erkey, C.; Feng, Z.; Postula, W.S.; Wang, J.

    1995-03-01

    This project was initiated because the supply of isobutylene had been identified as a limitation on the production of methyl-t-butyl ether, a gasoline additive. Prior research on isobutylene synthesis had been at low conversion (less than 5%) or extremely high pressures (greater than 300 bars). The purpose of this research was to optimize the synthesis of a zirconia based catalyst, determine process conditions for producing isobutylene at pressures less than 100 bars, develop kinetic and reactor models, and simulate the performance of fixed bed, trickle bed and slurry flow reactors. A catalyst, reactor models and optimum operating conditions have been developed for producing isobutylene from coal derived synthesis gas. The operating conditions are much less severe than the reaction conditions developed by the Germans during and prior to WWII. The low conversion, i.e. CO conversion less than 15%, have been perceived to be undesirable for a commercial process. However, the exothermic nature of the reaction and the ability to remove heat from the reactor could limit the extent of conversion for a fixed bed reactor. Long residence times for trickle or slurry (bubble column) reactors could result in high CO conversion at the expense of reduced selectivities to iso C{sub 4} compounds. Economic studies based on a preliminary design, and a specific location will be required to determine the commercial feasibility of the process.

  8. Characterization of surface carbon formed during the conversion of methane to benzene over Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Rosynek, Michael P.; Lunsford, Jack H.

    2001-01-01

    During the conversion of methane to benzene in the absence of oxygen over a 2 wt% Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalyst at 700 °C, three different types of surface carbon have been observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: adventitious or graphitic-like C (284.6 eV), carbidic-like C (282.7 eV), and hydrogen-poor

  9. Cobalt--zirconia catalysts for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanova, T.F.; Lapidus, A.L.

    1972-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot plant experiments were done in order to replace thoria by more readily available and biologically inactive promoters in kieselguhr-supported cobalt and cobalt-magnesia catalysts. Maximum activity, stability, and yields of ceresins boiling above 460/sup 0/C were obtained with a zirconia-cobalt weight ratio of 1:10. The activity of this catalyst remained spectacularly high for five months. The optimum reaction temperature was 190/sup 0/C at 8 to 9 atm pressure of the carbon monoxide-hydrogen mixture. The experimental procedures and the chemical and grain-size composition of five catalysts are given, as well as the yields of methane, C/sub 2-4/fraction, gasoline, oils, and ceresin.

  10. A predictive tool for selective oxidation of hydrocarbons: optical basicity of catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriceau, P.; Lebouteiller, A.; Bordes, E.; Courtine, P. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, 60 (France). Dept. de Genie Chimique

    1998-12-31

    Whatever the composition of the catalyst (promoted, supported, multicomponent, etc.) is, it is possible to calculate its electron donor capacity {Lambda}. However, one important question remains: How are the surface and the bulk values of {Lambda} related? Most oxidation catalysts exhibit either a layered structure as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and approximately {Lambda}{sub th}{proportional_to}{Lambda}{sub surf}, or a molecular structure as polyoxometallates, and no correction seems to be needed. Work is in progress on that point. Of great importance is also the actual oxidation and coordination states of cations at the stedy state: {Lambda}s have been calculated from the composition determined by XANES and XPS. Finally, the model is able to discriminate between `paraffins` and olefins as reactants. These calibration curves should help to find new catalysts. (orig.)

  11. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs.

  12. Synthesis of Hydrocarbons from H2-Deficient Syngas in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Co-Based Catalyst Coupled with Fe-Based Catalyst as Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of metal species in an Fe-based catalyst on structural properties were investigated through the synthesis of Fe-based catalysts containing various metal species such, as Mn, Zr, and Ce. The addition of the metal species to the Fe-based catalyst resulted in high dispersions of the Fe species and high surface areas due to the formation of mesoporous voids about 2–4 nm surrounded by the catalyst particles. The metal-added Fe-based catalysts were employed together with Co-loaded beta zeolite for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from syngas with a lower H2/CO ratio of 1 than the stoichiometric H2/CO ratio of 2 for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS. Among the catalysts, the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst exhibited a high activity for the water-gas shift (WGS reaction with a comparative durability, leading to the enhancement of the CO hydrogenation in the FTS in comparison with Co-loaded beta zeolite alone. Furthermore, the loading of Pd on the Mn-added Fe-based catalyst enhanced the catalytic durability due to the hydrogenation of carbonaceous species by the hydrogen activated over Pd.

  13. Mechanistic Insights into the Structure-Dependent Selectivity of Catalytic Furfural Conversion on Platinum Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qiuxia; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    The effects of structure and size on the selectivity of catalytic furfural conversion over supported Pt catalysts in the presence of hydrogen have been studied using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and microkinetic modeling. Four Pt model systems, i.e., periodic Pt(111), Pt(211) surfaces, as well as small nanoclusters (Pt13 and Pt55) are chosen to represent the terrace, step, and corner sites of Pt nanoparticles. Our DFT results show that the reaction routes for furfural hydrogenation and decarbonylation are strongly dependent on the type of reactive sites, which lead to the different selectivity. On the basis of the size-dependent site distribution rule, we correlate the site distributions as a function of the Pt particle size. Our microkinetic results indicate the critical particle size that controls the furfural selectivity is about 1.0 nm, which is in good agreement with the reported experimental value under reaction conditions. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21306169, 21176221, 21136001, 21101137 and 91334103). This work was also partially supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  14. Rapid conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural using single and combined metal chloride catalysts in ionic liquid%Rapid conversion of cellulose to5-hydroxymethylfurfural using single and combined metal chloride catalysts in ionic liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hussein Abou-Yousef; El Barbary Hassan; Philip Steele

    2013-01-01

    Direct conversion of cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was performed by using single or combined metal chloride catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM] Cl) ionic liquid.Our study demonstrated formation of 2-furyl hydroxymethyl ketone (FHMK),and furfural (FF) simultaneously with the formation of HMF.Various reaction parameters were addressed to optimize yields of furan derivatives produced from cellulose by varying reaction temperature,time,and the type of metal chloride catalyst.Catalytic reaction by using FeCl3 resulted in 59.9% total yield of furan derivatives (HMF,FHMK,and FF) from cellulose.CrCl3 was the most effective catalyst for selective conversion of cellulose into HMF (35.6%) with less concentrations of FHMK,and FF.Improving the yields of furans produced from cellulose could be achieved via reactions catalyzed by different combinations of two metal chlorides.Further optimization was carried out to produce total furans yield 75.9% by using FeC13/CuCl2 combination.CrCl3/CuCl2 was the most selective combination to convert cellulose into HMF (39.9%) with total yield (63.8%) of fttrans produced from the reaction.The temperature and time of the catalytic reaction played an important role in cellulose conversion,and the yields of products.Increasing the reaction temperature could enhance the cellulose conversion and HMF yield for short reaction time intervals (5 ~ 20 min).

  15. Screening of MgO- and CeO2-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Oxidative Coupling of Methane to C2+ Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Istadi; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2004-01-01

    The catalyst screening tests for carbon dioxide oxidative coupling of methane (CO2-OCM)have been investigated over ternary and binary metal oxide catalysts. The catalysts are prepared by doping MgO- and CeO2-based solids with oxides from alkali (Li2O), alkaline earth (CaO), and transition metal groups (WO3 or MnO). The presence of the peroxide (O22-) active sites on the Li2O2, revealed by Raman spectroscopy, may be the key factor in the enhanced performance of some of the Li2O/MgO catalysts.The high reducibility of the CeO2 catalyst, an important factor in the CO2-OCM catalyst activity, may be enhanced by the presence of manganese oxide species. The manganese oxide species increases oxygen mobility and oxygen vacancies in the CeO2 catalyst. Raman and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopies revealed the presence of lattice vibrations of metal-oxygen bondings and active sites in which the peaks corresponding to the bulk crystalline structures of Li2O, CaO, WO3 and MnO are detected. The performance of 5%MnO/15%CaO/CeO2 catalyst is the most potential among the CeO2-based catalysts,although lower than the 2%Li2O/MgO catalyst. The 2%Li2O/MgO catalyst showed the most promising C2+ hydrocarbons selectivity and yield at 98.0% and 5.7%, respectively.

  16. Directed plant cell-wall accumulation of iron: embedding co-catalyst for efficient biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien-Yuan Lin; Joseph E. Jakes; Bryon S. Donohoe; Peter N. Ciesielski; Haibing Yang; Sophie-Charlotte Gleber; Stefan Vogt; Shi-You Ding; Wendy A. Peer; Angus S. Murphy; Maureen C. McCann; Michael E. Himmel; Melvin P. Tucker; Hui Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plant lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock for the production of biobased fuels and chemicals. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a co-catalyst to improve the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, directly adding iron catalysts into biomass prior to pretreatment is diffusion limited,...

  17. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  18. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  19. Metallosalen-Based Ionic Porous Polymers as Bifunctional Catalysts for the Conversion of CO2 into Valuable Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rongchang; Chen, Yaju; He, Qian; Lin, Xiaowei; Xu, Qihang; He, Xiaohui; Zhang, Wuying; Zhou, Xiantai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-12-31

    A series of new metallosalen-based ionic porous organic polymers (POPs) were synthesized for the first time using a simple unique strategy based on the free-radical copolymerization reaction. Various techniques were used to characterize the physicochemical properties of these catalysts. These well-designed materials endowed high surface area, hierarchical porous structures, and enhanced CO2 /N2 adsorptive selectivity. Moreover, these POPs having both metal centers (Lewis acid) and ionic units (nucleophile) could serve as bifunctional catalysts in the catalytic conversion of CO2 into high value-added chemicals without any additional co-catalyst under mild and solvent-free conditions, for example, CO2 /epoxides cycloaddition and Nformylation of amines from CO2 and hydrosilanes. The results demonstrated that the irregular porous structure was very favorable for the diffusion of substrates and products, and the microporous structural property resulted in the enrichment of CO2 near the catalytic centers in the CO2 -involved transformations. Additionally, the superhydrophobic property could not only enhance the chemoselectivity of products but also promote the stability and recyclability of catalysts.

  20. Dynamical properties of nano-structured catalysts for methane conversion: an in situ scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan

    The reactivity of catalyst particles can be radically enhanced by decreasing their size down to the nanometer range. The nanostructure of a catalyst can have an enormous and positive influence on the reaction rate, for example strong structure sensitivity was observed for methane reforming....../NiO particles in a fresh catalyst sample showed a Ni/NiO core shell structure. The Ni lattice parameter decreased during the reduction due to the release of stress between the Ni core and the NiO shell. Ni particles sintered during heating in hydrogen after the reduction of the NiO shell. Dry reforming...

  1. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times.

  2. Effect of external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite on product distribution in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhui Li; Yanan Wang; Wenzhi Jia; Zhiwen Xi; Huanhui Chen; Zhirong Zhu∗; Zhonghua Hu

    2014-01-01

    The external surface of HZSM-5 zeolite was passivated by liquid siliceous deposition and by acidic sites poisoning with lepidine, respectively. Then methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction was investigated over the above as-prepared catalysts and the dissoluble coke on these used catalysts was analyzed by GC-MS, to study the role of the external surface of HZSM-5 in the catalytic reaction. Comparison with the experi-mental results based on parent ZSM-5 showed that the product distribution of MTH reaction was obviously influenced by the external surface. Evidences were listed as follows:(1) the final product on parent HZSM-5 showed higher aromatic selectivity, lower olefin selectivity, lower ra-tio of C2/C3+aliphatics and higher ratio of C3/C4+aliphatics than the reaction mixture produced by the sole catalysis of acidic sites in HZSM-5 channel;(2) a little of pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene in the product on parent HZSM-5, was produced via multi-methylation of methylbenzene on the external surface. The above conclusion may also be suitable for MTH reaction over other zeolites with 10-ring channel.

  3. Methane Direct Conversion on Mo/ZSM-5 Catalysts Modified by Pd and Ru

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Priscila Dias Sily; Fabio Bellot Noronha; Fabio Barboza Passos

    2006-01-01

    The effect of addition of Ru and Pd to Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts used in the dehydroaromatization of methane was investigated. Catalytic tests and temperature-programmed oxidation results showed that Pd-based catalysts were more selective to naphthalene and suffered strong deactivation. The presence of Ru improved the activity and stability, with a decrease in the carbonaceous deposit probably because of a mechanism of protection of the Mo2C surface.

  4. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT, hydrocracking (HC, and catalytic cracking (CC of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products.

  5. Conversion of isoprenoid oil by catalytic cracking and hydrocracking over nanoporous hybrid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al₂O₃ and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al₂O₃/H-USY and ns Al₂O₃/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al₂O₃]/ns Al₂O₃/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al₂O₃/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products.

  6. Formation, phase composition, texture and catalytic properties of Co-MgO-alumino-calcium catalysts in synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Bruk, I.A.; Mal' tsev, V.V.; Iem, K.C.; Yakerson, V.I.; Golosman, Y.Z.; Mamayeva, I.A.; Kalacheva, N.B.; Danyushevskii, V.Y.; Nissenbaum, V.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the mechanism of formation of catalysts; a special feature of this mechanism is the interaction of components (calcium aluminates and basic carbonates of cobalt and magnesium); the carrier with a developed surface and the active component distributed on this surface are formed during this process. Catalysts show maximum selectivity in synthesis of liquid hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ with a degree of reduction of the metal of 65-84% and a dispersion (according to chemisorption of CO) of 6 x 10/sup -3/ - 10 x 10/sup -3/. Maximum yield of liquid hydrocarbons (114.1 g/nm/sup 3/) was obtained in the pressure of a system of 33Co-3MgO-64 talum treated with hydrogen at 550/sup 0/C.

  7. Session 4: Atr catalyst for natural gas conversion to hydrogen: performance, simulation, and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, F.; Duisberg, M.; Sextl, G.; Wieland, S. [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Karlsruhe Univ., Institute for Chemical Technology (Germany); Maier, L. [Heidelberg Univ., IWR (Germany); Schmidt, L.D. [Minnesota Univ., Chem. Engineering and Mat. Sciences Minneapolis (United States)

    2004-07-01

    A non-pyrophoric precious metal based auto-thermal reforming catalyst was developed and, the performance of the catalyst at different operational conditions was measured. Additionally, the physical properties of the catalytic layer such as precious metal loading, the BET surface, and the dispersion were determined. A profound knowledge of the ATR process is required to improve the performance of the catalyst. Therefore, a detailed reaction mechanism consisting of 42 reactions among six stable gas-phase and further 23 adsorbed species was developed for the simultaneous description of the partial oxidation, heated steam reforming, water-gas shift reactions and the undesired methanation. A variety of numerical simulations of the ATR process at various conditions were performed using the CFD code DETCHEM(CHANNEL), which models the flow field in monolithic channels and the chemical processes in the gas phase and on the surface including diffusion and reactions in the wash coat structure. The results demonstrate the applicability of the developed mechanism for Umicore's ATR catalyst. The simulation offers an insight into the processes occurring in the catalytic reactor. The figure, for instance, reveals the surface coverage of the reacting species along the catalytic channel wall. In the first centimetre of the catalyst the concentrations vary drastically. The initially high oxygen coverage, leading to total oxidation and heat release, decreases rapidly. Farther downstream the processes on the catalyst are predominated by steam reforming; oxygen on the surface now comes from re-adsorbed water. Thus, the verified model allows the localization of different reaction zones. This information can be generated for different operation conditions such as start up or load alternation. Thus the model is a valuable tool for further improvement of the catalyst performance by 'designing' new formulations. (authors)

  8. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  9. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  10. Conversion of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons to valuable synthetic feed for steamcrackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesana, A.; Dalloro, L.; Rivetti, F.; Buzzoni, R. [Eni S.p.A., Centro Ricerche per le Energie non Convenzionali, Novara (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    Low value aromatic fractions, i.e. heavy pygas and pyrolysis fuel oil from naphtha steamcrackers or heavy distillates and ends from refinery, can be conveniently upgraded as high quality steamcracker feeds by severe hydrocracking treatment at 450 -530 C, 6 MPa H{sub 2} employing Ni-Mo or Zn-Mo on H-USY zeolite as catalysts. The process mainly leads to linear C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} alkanes with a low yield to CH{sub 4}. The robust catalytic system allows upgrading fractions with a high content of sulfur and nitrogen. Catalyst like and industrial feasibility have been assessed by long life runs using genuine industrial feedstocks. (orig.)

  11. Biomass Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels Using the MixAlcoTM Process Conversion de la biomasse en combustibles hydrocarbonés au moyen du procédé MixAlcoTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taco-Vasquez S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The MixAlcoTM process converts biomass to hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline using the following generic steps: pretreatment, fermentation, descumming, dewatering, thermal ketonization, distillation, hydrogenation, oligomerization and saturation. This study describes the production of bio-gasoline from chicken manure and shredded office paper, both desirable feedstocks that do not require pretreatment. Using a mixed culture of microorganisms derived from marine soil, the biomass was fermented to produce a dilute aqueous solution of carboxylate salts, which were subsequently descummed and dried. The dry salts were thermally converted to raw ketones, which were distilled to remove impurities. Using Raney nickel catalyst, the distilled ketones were hydrogenated to mixed secondary alcohols ranging from C3 to C12. Using zeolite HZSM-5 catalyst, these alcohols were oligomerized to hydrocarbons in a plug -flow reactor. Finally, these unsaturated hydrocarbons were hydrogenated to produce a mixture of hydrocarbons that can be blended into commercial gasoline. Le procédé MixAlcoTM convertit la biomasse en hydrocarbures (par exemple, en essence selon les étapes génériques suivantes : prétraitement, fermentation, écumage, déshydratation, cétonisation thermique, distillation, hydrogénation, oligomérisation et saturation. Cette étude décrit la production de bioessence à partir de fumier de poulet et de papier en lambeaux, ces deux sources étant des matières premières convoitées ne nécessitant pas de prétraitement. À l’aide d’une culture mixte de microorganismes dérivés de sols marins, la biomasse a été soumise à une fermentation de manière à produire une solution aqueuse diluée de sels de carboxylates, ultérieurement écumés et séchés. Les sels séchés ont été thermiquement convertis en cétones brutes, ensuite distillées afin d’éliminer les impuretés. À l’aide du catalyseur à base de nickel de Raney, les c

  12. Improving Heterogeneous Catalyst Stability for Liquid-phase Biomass Conversion and Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroguel, Florent; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Luterbacher, Jeremy S

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a possible renewable alternative to fossil carbon sources. Today, many bio-resources can be converted to direct substitutes or suitable alternatives to fossil-based fuels and chemicals. However, catalyst deactivation under the harsh, often liquid-phase reaction conditions required for biomass treatment is a major obstacle to developing processes that can compete with the petrochemical industry. This review presents recently developed strategies to limit reversible and irreversible catalyst deactivation such as metal sintering and leaching, metal poisoning and support collapse. Methods aiming to increase catalyst lifetime include passivation of low-stability atoms by overcoating, creation of microenvironments hostile to poisons, improvement of metal stability, or reduction of deactivation by process engineering.

  13. STUDY ON THE CONCENTRATION EFFECT OF Nb2O5-ZAA CATALYST TOWARDS TOTAL CONVERSION OF BIODIESEL IN TRANSESTERIFICATION OF WASTED COOKING OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astuti Tri Padmaningsih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Study on the concentration effect of Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst towards total conversion of biodiesel has been conducted. The natural zeolite (ZA was activated by dipping in NH4Cl solution and was calcined using N2 atmosphere at 500 °C for 5h to produce the ZAA sample. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst was made by mixing the activated natural zeolite (ZAA, Nb2O5 3 % (w/w and oxalic acid 10 % (w/w solution, until the paste was formed, followed by drying and calcining the catalyst for 3 h at 500 °C under N2 atmosphere. Catalyst characterizations were conducted by measuring acidity with NH3 gas using gravimetric method and porosimetric analysis using N2 gas adsorption based on the BET equation by surface area analyzer instrument. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst was then used as an acid catalyst in free fatty acid esterification reaction of wasted cooking oil in methanol medium with variation of catalyst concentration: 1.25%; 2.5%; 3.75% and 5% towards the weight of oil+methanol. The reaction was continued by transesterification of triglyceride in the used cooking oil using NaOH catalyst in methanol medium. For comparison, the esterification reaction using H2SO4 catalyst 1.25% towards the weight of oil+methanol has been conducted as well. Methyl ester (biodiesel product was analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The characters of biodiesel were analyzed using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM method. The results showed that modification of ZAA by impregning Nb2O5 3% (w/w increased the total catalyst acidity from 5.00 mmol/g to 5.65 mmol/g. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst has specific surface area of 60.61 m2/g, total pore volume of 37.62x10-3 cc/g and average pore radius of 12.41 Å. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst with concentration of 1.25%-5% produced higher total conversion of biodiesel than that of H2SO4 catalyst 1.25%. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst with concentration of 3.75% produced the highest total conversion of biodiesel, i

  14. Conversion of bio-feedstocks through acid and basic zeolites and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, R.; Bosetti, A.; Delledonne, D.; Perego, C. [eni S.p.A. Research Centre for Non-Conventional Energy, Novara (Italy). Ist. eni Donegani

    2012-07-01

    Not far in the future, a significant part of fuels and chemicals will be originated by renewable biomass resources. In this respect, zeolite catalysts may help to develop a new generation of bio-fuel and chemical processes. In the new bio-paradigm not only acid but also basic materials will have an important and dominant role. Just to give some examples, basic zeolites based catalysts have been proposed for transesterification of triglyceride esters of fatty acids to biodiesel, for disrupting the lignin polymer by base catalyzed depolymerisation and for one pot lignin liquefaction by hydrogenation. (orig.)

  15. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)–(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized. PMID:27877800

  16. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-06-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)-(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized.

  17. H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: characterization and catalytic evaluation of oleic acid conversion to biofuels and biolubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Lucia Regina Raddi de; Scofield, Cynthia Fraga [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: luraddi@uerj.br. Pastura, Nidia Maria Ribeiro; Gonzalez, Wilma de Araujo [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2006-04-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to bio fuels and bio lubricant at 1 atm and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor, using an oleic acid-catalyst ratio of 4 and N{sub 2} as the carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, X ray diffraction, {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance and FT-IR spectroscopy were also employed to evaluate the textural, structural and acidic properties of the catalysts. The results showed that phosphoric acid impregnation improved the alumina decarboxylation activities, generating hydrocarbons in the range of gasoline, diesel oil and lubricant oil. The best catalytic performance was achieved with the highest surface area alumina impregnated with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, which was the solid that allied high total acidity with a large quantity of meso pores. (author)

  18. Equipment for gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    Equipment is proposed for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv), possibly in a mixture with air, in order to produce an inorganic gas, which chiefly consists of H2 and COx. It consists of a reaction pipe made of an inorganic refractory ceramic and equipped along the wall circumference with heaters. The reaction pipe is filled with a combined, multilayer catalyst (Kt) carrier, made of gamma-A1203 which in the transverse cross section has a multipore reticular or fibrous structure. Replacement of the traditional steel (St) materials for the walls of the reaction pipe with ceramic materials reduces the output of the hydrocarbon which contaminates the surface (Pv) of the catalyst; the use of a multilayer carrier for the catalyst made of gamma-A1203 with a porous reticular or fibrous structure reduces the pressure losses in the reactor and facilitates the replacement of the spent catalyst. The equipment is designed for vapor conversion of natural gas, C3H8, and vapors of kerosene, naphtha and so on.

  19. Hydrocracking for oriented conversion of heavy oils. Recent trends for catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoncini, F.; Bonduelle, A.; Simon, L.J. [IFP Energies nouvelles, Lyon Establishment, Solaize (France). Catalysis and separation Division; Raybaud, P.; Dulot, H. [IFP Energies nouvelles, Lyon Establishment, Solaize (France). Process Desing Modeling Division

    2011-07-01

    As a result of the global economic crisis since the end of 2008, HCK operators have been looking to increase the profitability of the unit by processing heavier feed streams, including sourer VGO. These feeds present the drawbacks of increased H{sub 2} consumption, lower products yields and quality, and reduction in cycle lengths. Along with optimised process parameters, catalysts manufacturers are also investigating novel formulations to deal with challenging feeds. This lecture briefly summarizes the market trends (fuel demand, refinery's product specification) and the driving forces for HCK catalyst development in order to face these new challenges. Finally, this lecture highlights the innovating trends for HCK catalyst's development. Overview of various ideas developed recently in our research laboratory about (i) rational approaches for the atomic scale design of active phases (morphology, preparation, inhibitor effects), (ii) new preparations of transition metal sulphides for maximising the hydrogenating function (precursors, activation,.), (iii) rational approaches of HCK acidic supports for maximizing the selectivity and (iv) better understanding of HCK reactions. These improvements will be discussed in term of improvement of activity and selectivity of HCK catalyst to cope with future market needs. (orig.)

  20. LC-finer catalyst testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, D.; Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    The activity and aging rate of modified Shell 324 Ni-Mo-Al catalyst were studied in ICRC's process development unit (PDU) under SRC-I Demonstration Plant hydroprocessing conditions. The studies determined variations in SRC conversion, hydrocarbon gas production, hydrogen consumption, and heteroatom removal at both constant and increasing reaction temperatures. Samples of spent catalyst were analyzed to ascertain the reasons for catalyst deactivation. Finally, the PDU hydroprocessing results were compared with those generated at Lummus and Wilsonville pilot plants. 14 references, 25 figures, 16 tables.

  1. Effect of combining the metals of group VI supported on H-ZSM-5 zeolite as catalysts for non-oxidative conversion of natural gas to petrochemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Aboul-Gheit; A.E.Awadallah

    2009-01-01

    The most prestigious catalyst applied in natural gas (methane) non-oxidative conversion to petrochemicals is 6%Mo/H-ZSM-5.Chromium,molybdenum and tungsten are the group VI metals.Hence,in this work,6%Mo/H-ZSM-5 was correlated with 3%Cr+3%Mo/H-ZSM-5 and 3%W+3%Mo/H-ZSM-5 as catalysts to examine their promoting or inhibiting effects on the various reactions taking place during methane conversion.The catalytic activities of these catalysts were tested in a continuous flow fixed bed reactor at 700℃ and a GHSV of 1500 ml·g-1 ·h-1. Characterization of the catalysts using XRD,TGA and TPD were investigated.XRD and NH3-TPD showed greater interaction between the W-phase and the Bronsted acid sites in the channels of the zeolite than between Cr-phase and the acid sites in the zeolite.

  2. Distribution of Electrical Field Energy for Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons via Dissymmetrical Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Genhui Xu; Hongwei Sun

    2006-01-01

    Direct conversion of methane into C2 hydrocarbons through alternating current electric field enhanced plasma was studied under room temperature, atmospheric pressure and low power conditions.The distribution of electrical field intensity and distribution of energy were calculated with software that was developed by us according to the charge simulation method. The results indicated that the energy of tip of electrode was 0.36 J/mm3 and it was higher than the methane dissociation energy (0.0553 J/mm3).The methane located at this area can be activated easily. The higher-energy particles produced by dissociation collided with molecules around them and initiated consecutive reactions between free radicals and molecules. The method was proved to be valided and could be taken as a basis for the electrical field study concerned.

  3. An installation for vapor conversion of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, I.; Tabata, K.

    1983-01-28

    An installation is proposed for converting a mixture of hydrocarbon gases with steam in the presence of nickel, platinum, lead and cobalt catalysts (Kt) on a carrier of Si0/sub 2/, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, Ti0/sub 2/ and so on. The reaction tower (RK1) for conversion is made of an inorganic, heat resistant ceramic material (for instance, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/ ceramic), heaters are located inside the walls of the reaction tower, while on the outside the reaction conversion tower is equipped with an external tubular housing made of heat resistant materials or of inorganic heat resistant ceramic material. Here, there is a space between the external walls of the reaction conversion tower and the walls of the housing along the entire circumference of the reaction conversion tower which serves for preheating of the hydrocarbon gas and the steam before their input into the reaction conversion tower. The installation is designed for conversion of natural gas, C/sub 3/H/sub 8/ and other hydrocarbon gases and of liquid hydrocarbons (Uv) into synthesis gas. The design provides for even heating of the catalyst during reforming. The use of ceramic materials for the reaction conversion tower prevents sedimentation of coke on the walls of the reaction tower.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of mangenese(III) porphyrin supported on imidazole modified chloromethylated MIL-101(Cr): A heterogeneous and reusable catalyst for oxidation of hydrocarbons with sodium periodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadehahmadi, Farnaz; Tangestaninejad, Shahram, E-mail: stanges@sci.ui.ac.ir; Moghadam, Majid, E-mail: moghadamm@sci.ui.ac.ir; Mirkhani, Valiollah, E-mail: mirkhani@sci.ui.ac.ir; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Khosropour, Ahmad R.; Kardanpour, Reihaneh

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, chloromethylated MIL-101(Cr) modified with imidazole, Im-MIL-101, was applied as a support for immobilizing of tetraphenylporphyrinatomangenese(III) chloride. The imidazole-bound MIL-101, Im-MIL-101, not only used as support for immobilization of manganese porphyrin but also applied as a heterogeneous axial base. The Mn(TPP)Cl@Im-MIL-101 catalyst was characterized by UV–vis, FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), elemental analysis and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) methods. The catalytic activity of this new catalytic system was investigated in the alkene epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation using NaIO{sub 4} as an oxidant in CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O at room temperature. This heterogeneous catalyst is highly efficient, stable and reusable in the oxidation of hydrocarbons. - Highlights: • MIL-101 was modified by covalent post synthetic modification. • Mn(TPP)Cl was anchored to imidazole modified MIL-101 by covalent attachment. • A heterogeneous catalyst was prepared. • The catalyst was used for epoxidation of alkenes and hydroxylation of alkanes. • The catalyst was reusable.

  5. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification.

  6. Conversion of waste cooking oil to jet biofuel with nickel-based mesoporous zeolite Y catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    Three types of zeolites (Meso-Y, SAPO-34, and HY) loaded with nickel were used to convert waste cooking oil to jet biofuel. Mesoporous zeolite Y exhibited a high jet range alkane selectivity of 53% and a proper jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity of 13.4% in liquid fuel products. Reaction temperature was optimized to produce quality jet biofuel. Zeolite Meso-Y exhibited a high jet range alkane yield of 40.5% and a low jet range aromatic hydrocarbon yield of 11.3% from waste cooking oil at 400°C. The reaction pathway for converting waste cooking oil to jet biofuel was proposed. Experimental results showed that waste cooking oil mainly deoxygenated to heptadecane (C17H36) and pentadecane (C15H30) through the decarbonylation pathway for the first 3h. Long chain alkanes cracked into jet range alkanes (C8-C16). Cycloalkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were produced through cyclization and dehydrogenation pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysts to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-07-29

    This fact sheet discusses the Bioenergy Technologies Office's thermochemical conversion critical technology goal. And, how through the application of heat, robust thermochemical processes can efficiently convert a broad range of biomass.

  8. Catalytic Conversion of Pinus densiflora Over Mesoporous Catalysts Using Pyrolysis Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung Kyun; Lee, In-Gu; Lee, Hyung Won; Chea, Kwang-Seok; Jo, Tae Su; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Sang Chai; Ko, Chang Hyun; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis experiments were conducted to investigate the possibility of obtaining valuable chemicals from Pinus densiflora, a native Korean tree species occupying 21.4% of the total area under forests in South Korea. Two representative mesoporous catalysts, Al-MCM-41 and Al-MSU-F, as well as hierarchical mesoporous MFI (Meso-MFI) that has both mesopores and micropores, were used as catalysts. Compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis, catalytic pyrolysis was shown to reduce the fractions of levoglucosan, phenolics, and acids in bio-oil, while increasing the fractions of aromatics, PAHs, and furans. Meso-MFI with strong acid sites showed a high selectivity toward aromatics and PAHs, whereas Al-MCM-41 and Al-MSU-F with weak acid sites exhibited a high selectivity toward furanic compounds. The results of this study indicate that choosing a catalyst with an adequate quantity of acidic sites with the required strength is critical for enhancing the production of desired chemicals from Pinus densiflora.

  9. One-pot conversions of raffinose into furfural derivatives and sugar alcohols by using heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabral, Saumya; Nishimura, Shun; Ebitani, Kohki

    2014-01-01

    Inedible and/or waste biomass reserves are being strongly focused upon as a suitable new energy and chemical source. Raffinose, which is an indigestible trisaccharide composed of glucose, galactose, and fructose, is found abundantly in beet molasses, sugar cane, and seeds of many leguminous plants. Herein, we demonstrate the one-pot synthesis of furan derivatives and sugar alcohols from raffinose by using heterogeneous acid, base, and/or metal-supported catalysts. The combination of Amberlyst-15 and hydrotalcite (HT) showed a high activity (37% yield) for 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF) through continuous hydrolysis, isomerization, and dehydration reactions. In addition, the use of a hydrotalcite-supported ruthenium catalyst (Ru/HT) successfully afforded 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF, 27% yield) from HMF produced by raffinose, directly. Moreover, the hydrogenation of hexoses obtained by raffinose hydrolysis into sugar alcohols (galactitol, mannitol, sorbitol) was also achieved in a high yield (91%) with Amberlyst-15 and Ru/HT catalysts. Thus, we suggest that raffinose has great potential for the synthesis of important industrial intermediates under mild reaction conditions.

  10. Partial conversion of hydrocarbons to syngas and hydrogen in volumetric radiation burners as a prospective way to enhance the performance characteristics of power engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, V. S.; Shmelev, V. M.; Shapovalova, O. V.; Rakhmetov, A. N.; Strekova, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    New type of syngas generator based on the partial conversion of natural gas (methane) or heavier hydrocarbons in volumetric permeable matrix burners in the conditions of locked infrared (IR) radiation is suggested as a high-productive, adaptable, and rather simple way of syngas and hydrogen production for various low-scale applications including enhancing the performance characteristics of power engines.

  11. Lanthanide Catalysts for Conversion of Exhaust Gas from Compressed Natural Gas Automobiles%压缩天然气汽车稀土型尾气转化催化剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚如杰; 董新彬

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at improving the air quality, more and more automobiles with compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel are being used in some big cities now. The three way catalysts (TWC) for gasoline cars are not suitable for CNG cars. In the exhaust gases from CNG cars, the hydrocarbon is mainly methane, which is converted into carbon dioxide quite difficultly compared with other hydrocarbons. In this paper, a specially designed catalyst dosage was developed, which contained lanthanide oxides, transition element oxides and a minor part of noble metal oxides. The catalysts can reach a high conversion ratio for the exhaust pollutants above 700℃. More than 98.0 per cent of CH4 and CO in CNG engine exhaust gases can be converted into CO2 and H2O. At 1 000℃, the catalyst maintains a 99.0 per cent conversion ratio for CH4 and CO in 1.5 h, showing a high thermal stability. A resistance to sulfur oxides was also behaved.%压缩天然气(CNG)汽车因其良好的排放特性,正被越来越多的大型城市公交系统使用,但是汽油车辆用尾气净化催化剂对天然气汽车的主要烃类排放物甲烷转化效率低.针对天然气车辆排放物特点,设计了天然气汽车尾气净化催化剂,其成分包括稀土金属和过渡金属化合物、少量贵金属氧化物、结构稳定剂等.试验结果表明,在700℃以上,CO和CH4转化率达到98%以上,催化剂耐高温性能好,在1 000℃,1.5 h试验时间内HC和CO转化率达到99%,此外该催化剂具有一定的抗硫化物中毒能力.

  12. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  13. Methanol dehydration on carbon-based acid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Valero-Romero, Mª José; Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa Mª; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Methanol dehydration to produce dimethyl ether (DME) is an interesting process for the chemical industry since DME is an important intermediate and a promising clean alternative fuel for diesel engines. Pure or modified γ-aluminas (γ-Al2O3) and zeolites are often used as catalysts for this reaction. However, these materials usually yield non desirable hydrocarbons and undergo fast deactivation. In this work, we study the catalytic conversion of methanol over an acid carbon catalyst obtaine...

  14. Influence of copper on nickel-based catalysts in the conversion of glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Barbara C.; Chimentao, Ricardo J.; Szanyi, Janos; Braga, Adriano H.; Santos, Joao Batista O.; Gispert-Guirado, Francesc; Llorca, Jordi; Medina, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic transformation of glycerol to value-added compounds was investigated over bimetallic Ni-Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts with Ni/Cu atomic ratios of 8/1, 4/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8. XPS analysis revealed that the surface composition of the catalyst exhibited progressive enrichment of Cu as its content in the catalyst increased. H2-chemisorption indicated that the total number of exposed Ni atoms decreased as the Cu content increased. As a result, deep hydrogenolysis to produce CH4 was inhibited by the addition of Cu to the Ni catalyst, yielding higher selectivity towards the dehydration products of glycerol such as hydroxyacetone. FTIR spectra of adsorbed CO reveals that Cu asserts both geometric and electronic effects on the adsorption properties of Ni. The geometrical effect is visualized by the progressive disappearance of the bridge-bound adsorbed CO on metallic Ni by the incorporation of Cu. This suggests that the deep hydrogenolysis of glycerol to CH4 formation requires an ensemble of adjacent active Ni atoms. The electronic effect of Cu on Ni is indicated by the red shift of the IR peak of adsorbed CO as the Cu content increases. The electronic interaction between Cu and Ni species was also substantiated by XANES results. HTREM revealed metal particles very well distributed on the support with particle size of 1.5 to 5 nm. The Ni-Cu samples were not a total intermetallic alloys. We also gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division for the support of this work. The research related to the FTIR of adsorption of CO (Proposal 48209) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under

  15. Conversion of furfuryl alcohol into ethyl levulinate using solid acid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jean-Paul; van de Graaf, Wouter D; Haan, René J

    2009-01-01

    Furfural, a potential coproduct of levulinic acid, can be converted into levulinic acid via hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol and subsequent ethanolysis to ethyl levulinate. The ethanolysis reaction is known to proceed in the presence of H(2)SO(4). We show here that several strongly acidic resins are comparably effective catalysts for this reaction. Optimal performance is achieved by balancing the number of acid sites with their accessibility in the resin. Acidic zeolites such as H-ZSM-5 also catalyze this reaction, although with a lower activity and a higher co-production of diethyl ether.

  16. Design and synthesis of copper-cobalt catalysts for the selective conversion of synthesis gas to ethanol and higher alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Beijer, Steven; Smith, Miranda L; He, Ming; Au, Yuen; Wang, Zi; Bruce, David A; de Jong, Krijn P; Spivey, James J; de Jongh, Petra E

    2014-06-16

    Combining quantum-mechanical simulations and synthesis tools allows the design of highly efficient CuCo/MoO(x) catalysts for the selective conversion of synthesis gas (CO+H2) into ethanol and higher alcohols, which are of eminent interest for the production of platform chemicals from non-petroleum feedstocks. Density functional theory calculations coupled to microkinetic models identify mixed Cu-Co alloy sites, at Co-enriched surfaces, as ideal for the selective production of long-chain alcohols. Accordingly, a versatile synthesis route is developed based on metal nanoparticle exsolution from a molybdate precursor compound whose crystalline structure isomorphically accommodates Cu(2+) and Co(2+) cations in a wide range of compositions. As revealed by energy-dispersive X-ray nanospectroscopy and temperature-resolved X-ray diffraction, superior mixing of Cu and Co species promotes formation of CuCo alloy nanocrystals after activation, leading to two orders of magnitude higher yield to high alcohols than a benchmark CuCoCr catalyst. Substantiating simulations, the yield to high alcohols is maximized in parallel to the CuCo alloy contribution, for Co-rich surface compositions, for which Cu phase segregation is prevented.

  17. The shape conversion of silver nanoparticles through heating and its application as homogeneous catalyst in reduction of 4- nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyanta, H. A.; Yulizar, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The shape conversion of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through heating and its application as a homogeneous catalyst in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol is reported here. Synthesis of AgNPs by reduction of AgNO3 using NaBH4 and sodium citrate as reducing agent were successfully conducted. The addition of PVP was used as stabilizing agent. The synthesized AgNPs were heated at 95 °C and observed using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and particle size analyzer (PSA). Characteristics of AgNPs before heated were blue with UV- Vis absorbance spectrum at λmax = 786 nm and the shape was pseudo nano prism sized ± 28 nm. During the heating process, the color changed gradually from blue (λmax = 786 nm) to orange (λmax = 486 nm) and also its shape from nano prism to nanodisk. Silver nano prism has a lattice constant, 4.160 Å, larger than the silver nanodisk, 4.081 Å, which was possibly achieved through rearrangement of silver atoms on the surface of AgNPs. Both silver nanodisk and nano prism were tested as a homogeneous catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4- NP) with NaBH4.

  18. Conversion of Sugars to Lactic Acid Derivatives Using Heterogeneous Zeotype Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Martin Spangsberg; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Taarning, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Presently, very few compounds of commercial interest are directly accessible from carbohydrates by using nonfermentive approaches. We describe here a catalytic process for the direct formation of methyl lactate from common sugars. Lewis acidic zeotypes, such as Sn-Beta, catalyze the conversion...

  19. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  20. Modification of the performance of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts by metal addition in hydrocarbon reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Gerardo Carlos; Manuale, Debora Laura; Benitez, Viviana Monica; Vera, Carlos Roman; Yori, Juan Carlos, E-mail: jyori@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientifica y Tecnicas, Santiago del Estero Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    A study of the different hydrocarbon reactions over Ni doped WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts was performed. Ni was found as NiO at low Ni concentration while at high Ni concentrations a small fraction was present as a metal. For both cases, Ni strongly modified total acidity and concentration of strong acid sites. In the cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction, Ni addition promotes both benzene and methyl cyclopentane production. The hydroconversion activity (n-butane and n-octane) increases with the augment of total acidity produced by Ni. The selectivity to reaction products is modified according to the acid strength distribution changes produced by Ni addition. (author)

  1. Brønsted Acid Ionic Liquids (BAILs) as Efficient and Recyclable Catalysts in the Conversion of Glycerol to Solketal at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Zhenyou; Zahrtmann, Nanette; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan

    2016-01-01

    Brønsted acid ionic liquids (BAILs) have been prepared and applied for the first time - to the best of our knowledge - as efficient catalysts in the acetylation of glycerol with acetone to form solketal ((2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methanol) at very mild reaction conditions (room temperature......) and short reaction times. The BAILs showed a superior catalytic performance in terms of both conversion and selectivity compared to the common mineral acid methanesulfonic acid as well as to other reported homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Catalyst reusability was demonstrated with one of the BAILs...... (BAIL-1), which was recovered and reused by a simple procedure in four consecutive reaction runs without any loss of catalytic activity and selectivity. Thus, the BAILs combine the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis with respect to excellent conversion and selectivity as well...

  2. Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report, 1 January 1995--31 March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, P.T.; Kurek, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    The goals of this project are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol. The research will identify and optimize key catalyst characteristics. In addition, the commercial potential of the new process will be evaluated by an economic analysis. Previous work identified Pt or Pd on Zn/Mn/Zr co-precipitated metal oxides as promising catalysts for the conversion of a 10/1 methanol/ethanol blend to higher oxygenates. Supports with high Zn (>45%) and low Zr (< 33%) have afforded the best selectivities for the desired branched C{sub 4} products in the standard pilot plant test after impregnation with 2% Pt. In this report the analytical characterization of this series of materials is summarized. A large scale preparation of Zn/Mn/Zr oxide support has been completed for use in future process variable studies.

  3. Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report number 19, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spehlmann, B.C.

    1996-07-01

    The goals of this project are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol. After identification and optimization of key catalyst and process characteristics, the commercial potential of the process is to be evaluated by an economic analysis. From independent process variable studies to investigate the conversion of a methanol/ethanol feed to isobutanol, the best performance to date has been achieved with the 2% Pt on Zn/Mn/Zr oxide catalyst. Using Hyprotech Hysim v2.5 process simulation software, and considering both gas and liquid recycle loops in the process flow diagram, the overall carbon conversion is 98% with 22% selectivity to isobutanol. The expected production of isobutanol is 92 MT/day from 500 MT/day of methanol and 172 MT/day of ethanol feed. An additional 13 MT/day of isobutryaldehyde intermediate is recovered in the liquid product and vent streams. Because of the low selectivity (22%) of the methanol conversion catalyst to isobutanol, the process is uneconomical, even if the isobutanol is valued as a solvent ($903/MT) and not as isobutylene for MTBE production ($352/MT).

  4. Metal supported on natural zeolite as catalysts for conversion of ethanol to gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiani Anis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A various of metal supported into natural zeolite was prepared via wet impregnation method. The transition metals impregnated are nickel, cobalt, copper and zinc. The catalytic properties both of physical and chemical properties were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermo Gravimetri Analysis (TGA-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Surface Area Analyzer-Porositymeter and also gravimetry method for acidity measurement following by the adsorption of organic bases. The results showed that different metals impregnated into natural zeolite affected physical and chemical properties, i.e. crystalinity, surface area, pore size, pore volume and acidity. Their catalytic activity was tested for conversion ethanol to gasoline and showed high conversion up to 80-90% with the aromatics as major product.

  5. Combination of carbon nitride and carbon nanotubes: synergistic catalysts for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yutong; Wang, Jing; Wei, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Haoran; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Due to their versatile features and environmental friendliness, functionalized carbon materials show great potential in practical applications, especially in energy conversion. Developing carbon composites with properties that can be modulated by simply changing the ratio of the original materials is an intriguing synthetic strategy. Here, we took cyanamide and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as precursors and introduced a facile method to fabricate a series of graphitic carbon nitride/carbon nanotubes (g-C3 N4 /CNTs) composites. These composites demonstrated different practical applications with different weight ratios of the components, that is, they showed synergistic effects in optoelectronic conversion when g-C3 N4 was the main ingredient and in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) when CNTs dominated the composites. Our experiments indicated that the high electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes promoted the transmission of the charges in both cases.

  6. The role of Pt and Pd in enhancing the conversion of sorbitol to hydrogen over supported Ni-Pt and Ni-Pd catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanksale, A.; Lu, G.Q. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia); Beltramini, J.N. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the enhanced activity of bimetallic nickel-platinum (Ni-Pt) and nickel-palladium (Ni-Pd) catalysts for the production of hydrogen from reformed biomass-based products. The catalysts were prepared on an aluminum oxide (Al203) nanofibre. Mesoporous zirconia and composite silica-zirconia-ceria were used to determine the role of noble metals and supports. Desorption, oxidation, and temperature programmed reduction studies were conducted to investigate metal-metal and metal-support interactions. The study showed that Pt and Pd additions increased the reducibility of Ni catalysts. The bimetallic catalysts exhibited rates of hydrogen production 6 times higher than rates observed in pure metal catalysts. Sorbitol conversion increased from 35 per cent for the Ni catalyst to 62 per cent for the Ni-Pt catalyst. It was concluded that the alloying effect of the Ni-Pt and Ni-Pd systems lowered the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption heat, and facilitated removal of the adsorbed CO by the water gas shift reaction.

  7. Cu exchanged microporous titanium silicalite (TS-1) coated on polycrystalline mullite fibres as catalyst for the CO and NO conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, L.; Soria, J.; Cataluna, R. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Campus Universitario de Cantoblanco, Madrid, (Spain); Dimitrov, L.; Spasov, L.; Dimitrov, P. [Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-02-29

    A surface coated with TS-1 mullite fibre was prepared. From this material, a copper containing zeolite catalyst was produced by ion exchange, that was more active for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction than the noble metal containing supported catalysts. By combining the copper containing catalyst with rhodium and ceria, a catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation and nitric oxide reduction reactions, superior in activity to noble metals supported catalysts were prepared

  8. Electrocatalytic Production of C3-C4 Compounds by Conversion of CO2 on a Chloride-Induced Bi-Phasic Cu2O-Cu Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghwa; Kim, Dahee; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-12-01

    Electrocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) has recently received considerable attention as one of the most feasible CO2 utilization techniques. In particular, copper and copper-derived catalysts have exhibited the ability to produce a number of organic molecules from CO2. Herein, we report a chloride (Cl)-induced bi-phasic cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and metallic copper (Cu) electrode (Cu2OCl) as an efficient catalyst for the formation of high-carbon organic molecules by CO2 conversion, and identify the origin of electroselectivity toward the formation of high-carbon organic compounds. The Cu2OCl electrocatalyst results in the preferential formation of multi-carbon fuels, including n-propanol and n-butane C3-C4 compounds. We propose that the remarkable electrocatalytic conversion behavior is due to the favorable affinity between the reaction intermediates and the catalytic surface.

  9. Non-oxidative dehydroaromatization of methane:an effective reaction regeneration cyclic operation for catalyst life extension

    OpenAIRE

    Portilla Ovejero, Mª Teresa; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO JAVIER; Martínez, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane aromatization is an attractive direct route for producing higher hydrocarbons. It is highly selective to benzene despite the low conversion due to thermodynamic limitations, and Mo/H-ZSM-5, the first catalyst proposed for this reaction, is still considered as one of the most adequate. The major problem of this process is the severe catalyst deactivation due to the rapid build-up of carbonaceous deposits on the catalysts. Here we present an effective regeneration procedur...

  10. Sulfonated graphene oxide as effective catalyst for conversion of 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural into biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Margarida M; Russo, Patrícia A; Wiper, Paul V; Veiga, Jacinto M; Pillinger, Martyn; Mafra, Luís; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Pinna, Nicola; Valente, Anabela A

    2014-03-01

    The acid-catalyzed reaction of 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural with ethanol is a promising route to produce biofuels or fuel additives within the carbohydrate platform; specifically, this reaction may give 5-ethoxymethylfurfural, 5-(ethoxymethyl)furfural diethylacetal, and/or ethyl levulinate (bioEs). It is shown that sulfonated, partially reduced graphene oxide (S-RGO) exhibits a more superior catalytic performance for the production of bioEs than several other acid catalysts, which include sulfonated carbons and the commercial acid resin Amberlyst-15, which has a much higher sulfonic acid content and stronger acidity. This was attributed to the cooperative effects of the sulfonic acid groups and other types of acid sites (e.g., carboxylic acids), and to the enhanced accessibility to the active sites as a result of the 2D structure. Moreover, the acidic functionalities bonded to the S-RGO surface were more stable under the catalytic reaction conditions than those of the other solids tested, which allowed its efficient reuse.

  11. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels. PMID:26035711

  12. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Petit

    Full Text Available Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  13. Synthesis of light hydrocarbons from CO hydrogenation over Co_xMn_(0.06)/SiO_2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of CoxMn0.06/SiO2 catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method for catalytic hydrogenation of CO to Light Hydrocarbons(LHCs).The catalysts were characterized by XRD,SEM,N2 adsorption and NH3-TPD techniques.Catalyst activities were evaluated in a high-pressure micro reactor.The results show that the performance of the catalysts was significantly affected by the amount of Co loaded onto the substrate.The activity of the Co0.10Mn0.06/SiO2 catalyst was stable with time-on-stream.The CO conversion ...

  14. PLASTIC WASTE CONVERSION TO LIQUID FUELS OVER MODIFIED-RESIDUAL CATALYTIC CRACKING CATALYSTS: MODELING AND OPTIMIZATION USING HYBRID ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK – GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The plastic waste utilization can be addressed toward different valuable products. A promising technology for the utilization is by converting it to fuels. Simultaneous modeling and optimization representing effect of reactor temperature, catalyst calcinations temperature, and plastic/catalyst weight ratio toward performance of liquid fuel production was studied over modified catalyst waste. The optimization was performed to find optimal operating conditions (reactor temperature, catalyst calcination temperature, and plastic/catalyst weight ratio that maximize the liquid fuel product. A Hybrid Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA method was used for the modeling and optimization, respectively. The variable interaction between the reactor temperature, catalyst calcination temperature, as well as plastic/catalyst ratio is presented in surface plots. From the GC-MS characterization, the liquid fuels product was mainly composed of C4 to C13 hydrocarbons.KONVERSI LIMBAH PLASTIK MENJADI BAHAN BAKAR CAIR DENGAN METODE PERENGKAHAN KATALITIK MENGGUNAKAN KATALIS BEKAS YANG TERMODIFIKASI: PEMODELAN DAN OPTIMASI MENGGUNAKAN GABUNGAN METODE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK DAN GENETIC ALGORITHM. Pemanfaatan limbah plastik dapat dilakukan untuk menghasilkan produk yang lebih bernilai tinggi. Salah satu teknologi yang menjanjikan adalah dengan mengkonversikannya menjadi bahan bakar. Permodelan, simulasi dan optimisasi simultan yang menggambarkan efek dari suhu reaktor, suhu kalsinasi katalis, dan rasio berat plastik/katalis terhadap kinerja produksi bahan bakar cair telah dipelajari menggunakan katalis bekas termodifikasi Optimisasi ini ditujukan untuk mencari kondisi operasi optimum (suhu reaktor, suhu kalsinasi katalis, dan rasio berat plastik/katalis yang memaksimalkan produk bahan bakar cair. Metode Hybrid Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA telah digunakan untuk permodelan dan optimisasi simultan tersebut. Inetraksi antar variabel

  15. H3PO4/Al2O3 catalysts: characterization and catalytic evaluation of oleic acid conversion to biofuels and biolubricant

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Regina Raddi de Araujo; Cynthia Fraga Scofield; Nídia Maria Ribeiro Pastura; Wilma de Araujo Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Al2O3 and H3PO4/Al2O3 catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to biofuels and biolubricant at 1 atm and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor, using an oleic acid-catalyst ratio of 4 and N2 as the carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. N2 adsorption-desorption, X ray diffraction, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and FT-IR spectroscopy were also employed to evaluate the...

  16. Polyoxometalate-based Catalysts for Toxic Compound Decontamination and Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weiwei

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been attracting interest from researchers in the fields of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Biomolecular Chemistry, etc. Their unique structures and properties render them versatile and facilitate applications in medicine, magnetism, electrochemistry, photochemistry and catalysis. In particular, toxic compound (chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial compounds (TICs)) decontamination and solar energy conversion by POM-based materials have becoming promising and important research areas that deserve much attention. The focus of this thesis is to explore the structural features of POMs, to develop POM-based materials and to investigate their applications in toxic compound decontamination and solar energy conversion. The first part of this thesis gives a general introduction on the history, structures, properties and applications of POMs. The second part reports the synthesis, structures, and reactivity of different types of POMs in the destruction of TICs and CWAs. Three tetra-n-butylammonium (TBA) salts of polyvanadotungstates, [n-Bu4N]6[ PW9V3], [n-Bu4N] 5H2PW8V4O40 (PW 8V4), [n-Bu4N]4H 5PW6V6O40· 20H2O (PW6V6) are discussed in detail. These vanadium-substituted Keggin type POMs show effective activity for the aerobic oxidation of formaldehyde (a major TIC and human-environment carcingen) to formic acid under ambient conditions. Moreover, two types of POMs have also been developed for the removal of CWAs and/or their simulants. Specifically, a layered manganese(IV)-containing heteropolyvanadate with a 1:14 Stoichiometry, K4Li2[MnV14O40]˙21H2 O has been prepared. Its catalytic activity for oxidative removal of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (a mustard simulant) is discussed. The second type of POM developed for decontamination of CWAs and their simulants is the new one-dimensional polymeric polyniobate (P-PONb), K12[Ti 2O2][GeNb12O40]˙19H2O (KGeNb). The complex has been applied to the decontamination of a wide range

  17. Time- and space-resolved high energy operando X-ray diffraction for monitoring the methanol to hydrocarbons reaction over H-ZSM-22 zeolite catalyst in different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Pablo; Slawinski, Wojciech Andrzej; Henry, Reynald; Erichsen, Marius Westgård; Svelle, Stian; Beato, Pablo; Wragg, David; Olsbye, Unni

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) over H-ZSM-22 was studied by operando time- and space-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) at 370-385 °C and WHSV = 2 g/g h at the Swiss-Norwegian Beamline at ESRF. The performance of a commercial H-ZSM-22 sample was compared before and after acid-base treatment, and with and without propanol co-feed, respectively. N2 adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy and propyl amine desorption experiments showed that acid-base treatment led to enhanced accessibility of acid sites, mainly due to the formation of mesopores between agglomerated H-ZSM-22 crystals. The catalytic set-up allowed us to simultaneously observe the catalyst activity and unit cell volume variations by time- and space-resolved HXRD in operando conditions. The expansion of the unit cell and final flattening at different positions in the catalytic bed matched very nicely with the catalytic activity gradients. Different scenarios provided different behaviors and gave insights in the effect of morphology and co-feed process on the activity in the MTH process. This technique is the only one which has so far been able to provide direct evidence of the behavior of the species inside the catalytic reactor.

  18. A one-pot method for the selective conversion of hemicellulose from crop waste into C5 sugars and furfural by using solid acid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ramakanta; Dhepe, Paresh Laxmikant

    2012-04-01

    We present a solid-acid catalyzed one-pot method for the selective conversion of solid hemicellulose without its separation from other lignocellulosic components, such as cellulose and lignin. The reactions were carried out in aqueous and biphasic media to yield xylose, arabinose, and furfural. To overcome the drawbacks posed by mineral acid methods in converting hemicelllulose, we used heterogeneous catalysts that work at neutral pH. In a batch reactor, these heterogeneous catalysts, such as solid acids (zeolites, clays, metal oxides etc.), resulted in >90 % conversion of hemicellulose. It has been shown that the selectivity for the products can be tuned by changing the reaction conditions, for example, a reaction carried out in water at 170 °C for 1 h with HBeta (Si/Al=19) and HUSY (Si/Al=15) catalysts gave yields of 62 and 56 % for xylose and arabinose, respectively. With increased reaction time (6 h) and in presence of only water, HUSY resulted in yields of 30 % xylose + arabinose and 18 % furfural. However, in a biphasic reaction system (water + p-xylene, 170 °C, 6 h) yields of 56 % furfural with 17 % xylose+arabinose could be achieved. It was shown that with the addition of organic solvent the furfural yield could be increased from 18 to 56 %. Under optimized reaction conditions, >90 % carbon balance was observed. The study revealed that catalysts were recyclable with a 20 % drop in activity for each subsequent run. It was observed that temperature, pressure, reaction time, substrate to catalyst ratio, solvent, and so forth had an effect on product formation. The catalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed desorption of NH(3), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR ((29)Si, (27)Al) spectroscopy techniques.

  19. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-12-21

    Research is proposed on two groups of zeolite based catalysts that contain two transition elements. In one group both metals are fully reduced, in the other group one element is left as a positive ion; it can act as a chemical anchor'', or as a catalyst promoter for the reduced metal. The objective is to explore the potential of such materials for designing superior catalysts for synthesis and conversion of hydrocarbons and other energy carriers. ENDOR, EXAFS, CO-FTIR and TPD will be used to identify the interaction of Mn[sup 2+] ions with Rh[sub n] particles in the same zeolite cage. EXAFS at the Kedge of Fe and Pd, FTIR and Moessbauer spectroscopy will be used to characterize Fe ions and alloyed Fe atoms in PdFe/NaHY. The catalysts will be probed with CO hydrogenation and conversion of hydrocarbons. Methods Which proved successful in our study of Y supported bimetal systems will be applied to identify the state of Pt and Cu in ZSM-5, a catalyst system holding large promise for NO abatement, even in the presence of oxygen.

  20. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C4 hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhi -Yang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  1. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C{sub 4} hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Z.Y.

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  2. Effect of MCM-41 on the physicochemical properties of Mo and NiMo catalysts and their performance in DBT conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzechowiak, Jolanta R.; Mrozinska, Karolina; Masalska, Aleksandra [Department of Chemistry and Technology of Fuel, Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, 7/9 Gdanska Str., 50-344 Wroclaw (Poland); Goralski, Jacek; Rynkowski, Jacek [Institute of General and Ecological Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz, 36 Zwirki Str., 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Tylus, Wlodzimierz [Institute of Inorganic Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, Smoluchowskiego Str., 50-353 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2006-05-15

    The influence of mesoporous materials on the properties and HDS activity of Mo and NiMo catalysts was investigated for supports containing 50wt.% of MCM-41. A series of catalysts was characterized by different techniques (S{sub BET}, TPD-NH{sub 3}, TPR, SEM, XPS) and tested in dibenzothiophene (DBT) conversion. On the surface of the catalysts containing mesoporous materials, agglomerations of the Mo oxo-species were observed. The presence of MCM-41 in the support visibly weakened the promoting effect of TiO{sub 2} on the reducibility of Mo oxides. The results of DBT HDS showed that the NiMo catalyst supported on MCM-41 was not only less efficient than that supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} but also that supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}. From the distribution of DBT HDS products we can conclude that over catalysts containing MCM-41 the desulphurization of DBT runs mostly via the DDS route. (author)

  3. Selective conversion of cotton cellulose to glucose and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural with SO4(2-)/MxOy solid superacid catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Li, Yang; Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofeng; Fan, Hongxian; Xu, Nian; Li, Gang

    2015-10-20

    This paper presented a mild hydrothermal process for degradation of cotton cellulose with solid superacid catalyst and selective conversion of cotton cellulose to glucose and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Five kinds of solid superacid catalyst such as SO4(2-)/SnO2, SO4(2-)/TiO2, SO4(2-)/ZrO2, SO4(2-)/Fe2O3 and SO4(2-)/Al2O3 were prepared by impregnation method. The BET surface area of catalyst SO4(2-)/SnO2 was up to 118.8m(2)g(-1) when impregnation was performed with 1molL(-1) H2SO4 of impregnating solution at 550°C calcination temperature for 3h. It made the hydrothermal temperature of cellulose degradation decrease to 190°C successfully and suppressed the side reaction. The NH3-TPD profile of SO4(2-)/SnO2 indicated there was a wide region of stronger acid sites on the catalyst surface. The depolymerization of cotton cellulose obtained 11.0% yield and 22.0% selectivity of HMF and 26.8% yield and 53.4% selectivity of glucose, respectively. The regeneration and reuse of solid superacid catalyst were also discussed in this paper.

  4. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane with K-MoO3/MgAl2O4 catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Serkan Naci Koc; Kubra Dayioglu; Hasan Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    In this study, for the first time, MoO3/MgAl2O4 catalysts and their potassium-promoted forms were prepared and tested for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. Catalysts were characterized with XRD, BET, NH3-TPD, TPR and XPS methods. Catalytic activity measurement was done with quartz microreactor between 450 and 550°C. It has been observed that the conversion of propane increased with temperature and total hydrocarbon selectivity increased with molybdenum oxide content. The acidity of catalysts decreased with potassium addition due to interaction with MoO3 sites. For this reason total hydrocarbon selectivity highly increased.

  5. 4,6-Dimethyl-dibenzothiophene conversion over Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}-supported noble metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Sara [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Escobar, Jose, E-mail: jeaguila@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Gustavo A. Madero, 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez, Armando; Reyes, Jose Antonio de los [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Barrera, Melissa [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Gustavo A. Madero, 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} (molar ratio Al/Ti = 2, AT2) mixed oxides were pore-filling impregnated to obtain Pd, Pt and Pd-Pt catalysts with {approx}1 wt% nominal metal loading. {yields} Reduced catalysts were tested in the 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS). {yields} In Pd-containing materials, TiO{sub 2} incorporation into the alumina support was favorable to the catalytic activity of noble metal catalysts. {yields} Enhanced intrinsic activity (per exposed metallic site) was obtained in Pt-containing catalysts supported on the AT2 mixed oxide. {yields} Yield to different products over various catalysts seemed to be strongly influenced by metallic particles dispersion. - Abstract: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} (molar ratio Al/Ti = 2, AT2) mixed oxides were synthesized using a low-temperature sol-gel method and were further pore-filling impregnated to obtain Pd and Pt catalysts with {approx}1 wt% nominal metal loading. Simultaneous impregnation was used to prepare bimetallic materials at Pd:Pt = 80:20. Solids characterization was carried out by N{sub 2}-physisorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM and E-FTEM), X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction and CO-chemisorption. Reduced (350 deg. C, H{sub 2} flow) catalysts were tested in the 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) (in n-dodecane, at 300 deg. C and 5.5 MPa, batch reactor). In Pd-containing materials, TiO{sub 2} incorporation into the alumina support was favorable to the catalytic activity of noble metal catalysts, where bimetallic Pd-Pt with AT2 carrier had the highest organo-S compound conversion. Enhanced intrinsic activity (per exposed metallic site) was obtained in Pt-containing catalysts supported on the AT2 mixed oxide (as compared to alumina-supported ones). Yield to different products over various catalysts seemed to be strongly influenced by

  6. Tuning functionality of photocatalytic materials: an infrared study on hydrocarbon oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrollahi Buky, Rezvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the research described in this thesis was on the engineering and design of effective photocatalysts able to catalyze the oxidative conversion of hydrocarbons. The prepared catalysts were synthesized by using different procedures involving sol gel precursors, and impregnation or photo-de

  7. Conversion of Dimethyl Ether to Branched Hydrocarbons Over Cu/BEA: the Roles of Lewis Acidic and Metallic Sites in H2 Incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Jesse E.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Cheah, Singfoong; Habas, Susan E.; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Guanghui; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2017-04-26

    Conversion of biomass to fuels remains as one of the most promising approach to support our energy needs. It has been previously shown that the gasification of non-edible cellulosic biomass can be used to derive fuels like methanol and dimethyl ether (DME). However, the use of methanol and DME is limited due to the fact that they have low energy densities, poor lubricity and lower viscosity when compared to long-chain hydrocarbons. Increasing the blending percentage can also lead to undesired amounts of oxygenated molecules in the transportation fuel infrastructure, which restrict their applicability as jet or diesel fuels. Consequently, the petroleum-derived hydrocarbons remain as the main constituent of the middle-distillate based fuels. One way to increase the share of biofuels in middle-distillates is to use methanol/DME as building blocks for producing renewable, energy-dense hydrocarbons. One way to achieve this is by catalytically converting the DME and methanol to light olefins, followed by oligomerization to higher molecular weight premium alkanes, which can directly be used as kerosene/diesel fuels. Here, we report the catalytic dimerization of biomass-derived deoxygenated olefins into transportation fuel-range hydrocarbons under liquid-phase stirred-batch conditions. Specifically, the effect of operating conditions, such as reaction temperature, solvent-type, reaction duration and olefin-structure, on the conversion, selectivity and kinetics of dimerization of triptene (2,3,3-trimethyl-1-butene) were investigated. Triptene, as previously reported, is one of the major products of DME-homologation reaction over a BEA zeolite4. We show that triptene can be converted to high quality middle-distillates using a commercially available ion-exchange acid resin, Amberlyst-35 (dry) by the process of catalytic dimerization.

  8. New insight in oxidative conversion of alkanes : exploring Li-promoted MgO catalysts and plasma micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trionfetti, Cristiano

    2008-01-01

    In this study the preparation of Li-promoted MgO catalysts is described using, respectively, (i) wet impregnation and (ii) sol-gel method. In the case of Li-promoted MgO catalysts, defects sites, due to the surface substitution of Mg2+ ions by a Li+ ion in the MgO matrix, are reported to play a sign

  9. Hydrothermal conversion of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural using ionic liquid as a recycled catalyst in a water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hongjun; Yu, Songbai; Yu, Pengfei; Ding, Hongying; Du, Yannan; Yang, Yuchan; Zhang, Yiwen

    2017-04-10

    Here, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), the monomer composing the second most abundant biopolymer, chitin, was efficiently converted into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) using ionic liquid (IL) catalysts in a water/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixture solvent. Various reaction parameters, including reaction temperature and time, DMSO/water mass ratios and catalyst dosage were optimized. A series of ILs with different structures were analyzed to explore their impact on GlcNAc conversion. The substrate scope was expanded from GlcNAc to d-glucosamine, chitin, chitosan and monosaccharides, although 5-HMF yields obtained from polymers and other monosaccharides were generally lower than those from GlcNAc. Moreover, the IL N-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Hmim][HSO4]) exhibited the best catalyst performance (64.6% yield) when GlcNAc was dehydrated in a DMSO/water mixture at 180 °C for 6 h without the addition of extra catalysts. To summarize, these results could provide knowledge essential to the production of valuable chemicals that are derived from renewable marine resources and benefit biofuel-related applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct conversion of natural gas into COx-free hydrogen and MWCNTs over commercial Ni–Mo/Al2O3 catalyst: Effect of reaction parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A commercial hydrotreating nickel molybdate/alumina catalyst was used for the direct conversion of natural gas (NG into COx-free hydrogen and a co-valuable product of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The catalytic runs were carried out atmospherically in a fixed-bed flow reactor. The effect of reaction temperature between 600 and 800 °C, and dilution of the NG feed with nitrogen as well as pretreatment of the catalyst with hydrogen were investigated. At a reaction temperature of 700 °C and dilution ratio of NG/N2 = 20/30, the optimum yield of H2 (∼80% was obtained with higher longevity. However, using the feed ratio of NG/N2 = 30/20, the optimum yield of MWCNTs was obtained (669%. X-ray diffraction pattern for the catalyst after the reaction showed that the MWCNTs were grown on the catalyst at all reaction temperatures under study. TEM pictures revealed that the as-grown MWCNTs at 600, 650 and 800 °C are short and long with a low graphitization degree. At 700 °C a forest of condensed CNTs is formed, whereas both carbon nanofibers and CNTs were formed at 750 °C.

  11. An Experimental and Kinetic Calculation of the Promotion Effect of Hydrocarbons on the NO-NO2 Conversion in a Flow Reacto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M; Marinov, N; Matsunaga, N; Pitz, W; Westbrook, C

    1998-01-06

    The main route to nitrogen dioxide (NOz) formation in combustion systems is through the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO). This process was originally invcstigafed in order to explain the high proportion of NOz found in NOx emissions from the exhaust of gas turbine engines [l]. Moreover, the understanding of the NO-NO2 conversion mechanism is relevant to a number of issues including NOz emission from unflued space heaters, development of NOx control technologies, behavior of NO/N02 in the atmosphere, formation and reduction chemistry of NOx, and the probe sampling techniques for NOx concentration measurements. Originally, the NO-NO2 conversion was thought to proceed through the rapid oxidation of NO by oxidative radicals without much attention to the effect of fuels on the conversion [2-41. Although, in later studies, it was revealed that the conversion was greatly promoted by small quantities of fuels such as hydrocarbons, Hz, CO, and methanol [S-9]. In our former experiment and model calculation of the NO-NO2 conversion in the mixing of hot combustion gas with cold air and nine different fuels [6], the results indicated that NO-NO2 conversion appeared only in the low temperature range, and showed a strong dependence on fuel type. Thus, the interaction between the NO-NO2 reactions and the oxidation reactions of the fuel in the low temperature range must be .understood in order to explain the effect of fuel type on the NO-NO2 conversion and consequently to predict the NO/NO2 emission levels from combustion systems.

  12. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis of catalysts for hydrotreating of fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Spies, Kurt A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Zhu, Yuanyuan

    2016-03-01

    Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass requires multi-stage catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon drop-in fuels. The current proposed process design involves fixed beds of ruthenium-based catalyst and conventional petroleum hydrotreating catalyst. Similar to petroleum processing, the catalyst is spent as a result of coking and other deactivation mechanisms, and must be changed out periodically. Biofuel life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) assessments typically ignore the impact of catalyst consumed during fuel conversion as a result of limited lifetime, representing a data gap in the analyses. To help fill this data gap, life cycle GHGs were estimated for two representative examples of fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydrotreating catalyst, NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C, and integrated into the conversion-stage GHG analysis. Life cycle GHGs for the NiMo/Al2O3 and Ru/C catalysts are estimated at 5.5 and 81 kg CO2-e/kg catalyst, respectively. Contribution of catalyst consumption to total conversion-stage GHGs is 0.5% for NiMo/Al2O3 and 5% for Ru/C. This analysis does not consider secondary sourcing of metals for catalyst manufacture and therefore these are likely to be conservative estimates compared to applications where a spent catalyst recycler can be used.

  13. Engineering a cyanobacterium as the catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-propanediol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern society primarily relies on petroleum and natural gas for the production of fuels and chemicals. One of the major commodity chemicals 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO, which has an annual production of more than 0.5 million tons in the United States, is currently produced by chemical processes from petroleum derived propylene oxide, which is energy intensive and not sustainable. In this study, we sought to achieve photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Compared to the previously reported biological 1,2-PDO production processes which used sugar or glycerol as the substrates, direct chemical production from CO2 in photosynthetic organisms recycles the atmospheric CO2 and will not compete with food crops for arable land. Results In this study, we reported photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Introduction of the genes encoding methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA, glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA, and aldehyde reductase (yqhD resulted in the production of ~22mg/L 1,2-PDO from CO2. However, a comparable amount of the pathway intermediate acetol was also produced, especially during the stationary phase. The production of 1,2-PDO requires a robust input of reducing equivalents from cellular metabolism. To take advantage of cyanobacteria’s NADPH pool, the synthetic pathway of 1,2-PDO was engineered to be NADPH-dependent by exploiting the NADPH-specific secondary alcohol dehydrogenases which have not been reported for 1,2-PDO production previously. This optimization strategy resulted in the production of ~150mg/L 1,2-PDO and minimized the accumulation of the incomplete reduction product, acetol. Conclusion This work demonstrated that cyanobacteria can be engineered as a catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-PDO. This work also characterized two NADPH

  14. Hydrogen-Permeable Tubular Membrane Reactor: Promoting Conversion and Product Selectivity for Non-Oxidative Activation of Methane over an Fe©SiO2 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakbodin, Mann; Wu, Yiqing; Oh, Su Cheun; Wachsman, Eric D; Liu, Dongxia

    2016-12-23

    Non-oxidative methane conversion over Fe©SiO2 catalyst was studied for the first time in a hydrogen (H2 ) permeable tubular membrane reactor. The membrane reactor is composed of a mixed ionic-electronic SrCe0.7 Zr0.2 Eu0.1 O3-δ thin film (≈20 μm) supported on the outer surface of a one-end capped porous SrCe0.8 Zr0.2 O3-δ tube. Significant improvement in CH4 conversion was achieved upon H2 removal from the membrane reactor compared to that in a fixed-bed reactor. The Fe©SiO2 catalyst in the H2 permeable membrane reactor demonstrated a stable ≈30 % C2+ single-pass yield, with up to 30 % CH4 conversion and 99 % selectivity to C2 (ethylene and acetylene) and aromatic (benzene and naphthalene) products, at the tested conditions. The selectivity towards C2 or aromatics was manipulated purposely by adding H2 into or removing H2 from the membrane reactor feed and permeate gas streams. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  16. Methanol to olefin Conversion on HSAPO-34 zeolite from periodic density functional theory calculations: a complete cycle of side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.M.; Wang, Y.D.; Xie, Z.K.; Liu, Z.P. [SINOPEC, Shanghai (China)

    2009-03-15

    For its unique position in the coal chemical industry, the methanol to olefin (MTO) reaction has been a hot topic in zeolite catalysis. Due to the complexities of catalyst structure and reaction networks, many questions such as how the olefin chain is built from methanol remain elusive. On the basis of periodic density functional theory calculations, this work establishes the first complete catalytic cycle for MTO reaction via hexamethylbenzene (HMB) trapped in HSAPO-34 zeolite based on the so-called side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism. The cycle starts from the methylation of HMB that leads to heptamethylbenzenium ion (heptaMB{sup +}) intermediate. This is then followed by the growth of side chain via repeated deprotonation of benzenium ions and methylation of the exocyclic double bond. Ethene and propene can finally be released from the side ethyl and isopropyl groups of benzenium ions by deprotonation and subsequent protonation steps. We demonstrate that (i) HMB/HSAPO-34 only yields propene as the primary product based on the side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism and (ii) an indirect proton-shift step mediated by water that is always available in the system is energetically more favorable than the traditionally regarded internal hydrogen-shift step. Finally, the implications of our results toward understanding the effect of acidity of zeolite on MTO activity are also discussed.

  17. The generation of efficient supported (Heterogeneous) olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, Robert H

    2013-04-05

    Over the past decade, a new family of homogeneous metathesis catalysts has been developed that will tolerate most organic functionalities as well as water and air. These homogeneous catalysts are finding numerous applications in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the production of functional polymers. In addition the catalysts are being used to convert seed oils into products that can substitute for those that are now made from petroleum products. Seed oils are unsaturated, contain double bonds, and are a ready source of linear hydrocarbon fragments that are specifically functionalized. To increase the number of applications in the area of biomaterial conversion to petrol chemicals, the activity and efficiency of the catalysts need to be as high as possible. The higher the efficiency of the catalysts, the lower the cost of the conversion and a larger number of practical applications become available. Active supported catalysts were prepared and tested in the conversion of seed oils and other important starting materials. The outcome of the work was successful and the technology has been transferred to a commercial operation to develop viable applications of the discovered systems. A biorefinery that converts seed oils is under construction in Indonesia. The catalysts developed in this study will be considered for the next generation of operations.

  18. Sulfur the archetypal catalyst poison? The sulfur-induced promotion of the bonding of unsaturated hydrocarbons on Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, G B D; Bovet, N; Kadodwala, M

    2006-11-02

    We have shown using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption and UV photoelectron spectroscopy that the presence of preadsorbed atomic sulfur promotes the bonding of cyclic unsaturated hydrocarbons (benzene and cyclohexene) to Cu(111). This promoting behavior of sulfur can be rationalized in terms of the ability of adsorbed sulfur to influence the balance between charge donation from the adsorbate to metal, and back-donation from the metal to adsorbate. The effects of sulfur on Cu(111) are dramatically different from those observed in previous studies on Pt(111), which found that it caused a downward shift in the desorption temperature of adsorbed benzene, through purely steric effects.

  19. Microplasma reforming of hydrocarbons for fuel cell power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, R. S.; Lindner, P. J.

    The implementation of a microplasma approach for small scale reforming processes is explored as an alternative to more standard catalyst-based processes. Plasmas are a known approach to activating a chemical reaction in place of catalysts, and microplasmas are particularly attractive owing to their extremely high electron and power densities. Their inherent compactness gives them appeal for portable applications, but their modularity leads to scalability for higher capacity. We describe the realization of experimental microplasma reactors based on the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) structure by silicon micromachining for device fabrication. Experiments were carried out with model hydrocarbons methane and butane in the reactors within a microfluidic flow and analytical setup. We observe several key phenomena, including the ability to liberate hydrogen from the hydrocarbons at temperatures near ambient and sub-Watt input power levels, the tendency toward hydrocarbon decomposition rather than oxidation even in the presence of oxygen, and the need for a neutral carrier to obtain conversion. Mass and energy balances on these experiments revealed conversions up to nearly 50%, but the conversion of electrical power input to chemical reaction enthalpy was only on the order of 1%. These initial, exploratory results were recorded with devices and at process settings without optimization, and are hence promising for an emerging, catalyst-free reforming approach.

  20. Investigation of Aerogel/Xerogel Catalysts for Autothermal Reforming of JP-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    supercritical conditions, where CO2 is typically used as the supercritical fluid. This conventional approach has proven to be costly as well as time...reforming catalysts for hydrogen production . Conversion of hydrocarbon fuels, such as gasoline, methanol , diesel, JP-8 and isobutanol by reforming is an...and Ar analysis (Carboxen 1000). The fractional conversion of n-Dodecane resulting from reforming (Xref) and the product yields of H2, CO, CO2 , and C1

  1. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  2. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, E. C. D.; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, A.; Hensley, J.; Schaidle, J.; Biddy, M.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  3. Phenol-containing macrocyclic diamides as new catalysts in the highly regioselective conversion of epoxides to beta-hydroxy thiocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharghi, H; Nasseri, M A; Niknam, K

    2001-11-02

    The regioselective ring-opening reactions of some epoxides with ammonium thiocyanate in the presence of a series of new phenol-containing macrocyclic diamides and also dibenzo-18-crown-6-, 18-crown-6-, benzo-15-crown-5-, and pyridine-containing macrocyclic diamide have been studied. The epoxides were subject to cleavage by NH(4)SCN in the presence of these catalysts under mild reaction conditions in various aprotic solvents. In this study, reagents and conditions have been discovered with which the individual beta-hydroxy thiocyanates can be synthesized in high yield and with more than 90% regioselectivity. The results can be discussed in terms of a four-step mechanism: (1) formation of complex between catalyst and NH(4)SCN, (2) release of SCN(-) nucleophile from the complex, (3) reaction of the active nucleophile at the less sterically hindered site in the epoxide, and (4) regeneration of catalyst. The major advantages of this method are as follows: (1) high regioselectivity, (2) simple regeneration of catalyst, (3) its reuse through several cycles without a decrease in activity, and (4) ease of workup of the reaction.

  4. An iron molybdate catalyst for methanol to formaldehyde conversion prepared by a hydrothermal method and its characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beale, A.M.; Jacques, S.D.M.; Sacaliuc-Parvulescu, E.; O'Brien, M.G.; Barnes, P.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A one-step, low-temperature hydrothermal method has been successfully employed to prepare iron molybdate catalysts with Mo:Fe ratios ranging from 1.5:1 to 3.0:1. The resulting materials were characterized using a number of techniques including: XRD, Raman, N2 adsorption, SEM/EDX, DTA, EDXRD and comb

  5. Deactivation of solid catalysts in liquid media: the case of leaching of active sites in biomass conversion reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sádaba, Irantzu; Lopez Granados, Manuel; Riisager, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    This review is aimed to be a brief tutorial covering the deactivation of solid catalysts in the liquid phase, with specific focus on leaching, which can be especially helpful to researchers not familiarized with catalytic processes in the liquid phase. Leaching refers to the loss of active specie...

  6. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  7. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  8. Optimization of methane conversion to liquid fuels over W-Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Didi Dwi Anggoro; Istadi

    2008-01-01

    The conversion of methane to liquid fuels is still in the development process. The modified HZSM-5 by loading with Tungsten (W) enhanced its heat resistant performance, and the high reaction temperature (800 ℃) did not lead to the loss of W component by sublimation. The loading of ZSM-5 with Tungsten and Copper (Cu) resulted in an increment in the methane conversion, CO2, and C5+ selectivities. The high methane conversion and C5+ selectivity, and low H2O selectivity are obtained by using W/3.OCu/ZSM-5. The optimization of methane conversion over 3.0 W/3.0Cu/ZSM-5 under different temperature and oxygen concentration using response surface methodology (RSM) are studied. The optimum point for methane conversion is 19% when temperature is 753 ℃, and oxygen concentration is 12%. The highest C5+ selectivity is 27% when temperature is 751 ℃, and oxygen concentration is 11%.

  9. Evaluation of Promoters for Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

    2008-12-08

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially-available catalysts or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially-available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. A total of 28 tests were conducted to evaluate 22 different promoters as well as an unpromoted catalyst. The following general trends were observed for the test results: • The highest carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates occurred at the lowest reaction temperatures and accompanying lowest space time yields (STYs). • The lowest carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates occurred at the highest reaction temperatures because of high carbon conversion to hydrocarbons. • The highest C2+-oxygenate STYs occurred between 300°C and 325°C, with the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) adjusted when necessary to maintain carbon conversion ranges between ~ 30 and 40 percent. Higher carbon selectivity to hydrocarbons at higher temperatures resulted in lower C2+-oxygenate STYs. • When catalysts were heated to between 300°C and 325°C the catalysts showed evidence of some deactivation with respect to C2+ oxygenate productivity, accompanied by reduced chain growth for the hydrocarbon products. The degree of deactivation and the temperature at which it occurred varied between the different catalysts tested. Of all of the catalysts evaluated, the Li-promoted catalysts had the highest carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates (47 percent) under the conditions at which the maximum C2+-oxygenate STYs were obtained.

  10. Investigation on Interaction between Cold Plasma with Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic parameters were measured with floating double probe method when cold plasma was interacting with catalysts, such as MoO3/Al2O3, NiY, Pd/Al2O3, which were used in the conversion of natural gas to C2 hydrocarbons through electrical field enhanced plasma catalysis. These parameters were compared in different input voltage, different atmosphere, before and after reaction in plasma field. The interaction between catalysts and cold plasma was also investigated. This confirm that cold plasma can enhanced catalysis effect.

  11. A mechanistic basis for the effect of aluminum content on ethene selectivity in methanol-to-hydrocarbons conversion on HZSM-5

    KAUST Repository

    Khare, Rachit

    2017-03-20

    Increasing crystallize size or aluminum content in MFI-type zeolites independently enhances the propagation of the aromatics-based methylation/dealkylation cycle relative to that of the olefins-based methylation/cracking cycle in methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) conversion and consequentially results in higher ethene selectivity. Ethene selectivity increases monotonically with increasing aluminum content for HZSM-5 samples with nearly identical crystallite size consequent to an increase in the intracrystalline contact time analogous to our recent report detailing the effects of crystallite size (Khare et al., 2015) on MTH selectivity. The confected effects of crystallite size and site density on MTH selectivity can therefore, be correlated using a descriptor that represents the average number of acid sites that an olefin-precursor will interact with before elution.

  12. 对称电场催化增强甲烷转化合成Q研究%STUDY ON THE CONVERSION OF METHANE TO C2 HYDROCARBONS THROUGH SYMMETRIC ELECTRICAL FIELD ENHANCING CATALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保伟; 许根慧; 孙洪伟

    2001-01-01

    利用电场作用通过交流和直流等离子体在低温、常压和低功率下催化反应将甲烷直接转化为碳二烃(乙烷、乙烯、乙炔)。考察了在对称电场作用下催化剂的催化性能。实验结果表明,在交流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别不大;甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:MnO2/Al2O3>Ni/Al2O3>MoO—Al2O3>Ni/NaY>Pd/ZSM-5>Ni/H4Mg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>无催化剂:在直流电场作用下,碳二烃选择性差别也不大(除Ni/NaY外),甲烷转化率的大小顺序为:Ni/Al2O3>Ni/HaMg2Si3O4>Ni/ZSM-5>Co/ZSM-5>MnO2/Al2O3>MoO3/Al2O3>Ni/NaY>无催化剂>Pd/ZSM-5。%Low-power catalytic conversion of methane to C2 hydrocarbons(ethane, ethCene and acetylene) through AC or DC plasma catalysis reactionsin symmetric electrical field was studied under low temperature andatmospheric pressure. The function of catalyst was tested. The appropriate condition was: voltage 90 V~1l0 V (power 15 W~20 W DC); voltage 20 V~40 V (AC). The appropriate inlet flow of methane was 45 mL/min~80mL/min under AC and DC field. The selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons was above 95%.

  13. Hydrocarbon processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Seddon, D.

    1989-06-28

    A process for the catalytic conversion of synthesis-gas into a product which comprises naphtha, kerosene and distillate is characterized in that the catalyst is a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst also containing a zeolite, the naphtha fraction contains 60% or less linear paraffins and the kerosene and distillated fractions contain more linear paraffins and olefins than found in the naphtha fraction. Reduction of the relative amount of straight chain material in the naphtha fraction increases the octane number and so enhances the quality of the gasoline product, while the high quality of the kerosene and distillate fractions is maintained.

  14. Conversion of Methanol on CuO/H-MOR and CuO/H-ZSM-5 Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Sameh M K; Hassan, Marwa M I

    2010-12-01

    This paper deals with maximizing dimethyl ether (DME) production from methanol due to its industrial importance as a future diesel fuel. The high acidity and the micro-porous structure of the catalysts encouraged this reaction. Catalysts containg 6% CuO supported on H-ZSM-5 and H-MOR zeolites give high activities for DME production. The 6% CuO/HMOR is more selective for DME production, while the 6% CuO/HZSM-5 is more selective for olefins (ethylene and propylene) formation. The higher acid site strength of CuO/HMOR is the principal factor for DME formation whereas olefins production is more activated on CuO/HZSM-5 due to its narrower pore volume.

  15. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  16. Improvement of Lifetime Using Transition Metal-Incorporated SAPO-34 Catalysts in Conversion of Dimethyl Ether to Light Olefins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyo-Sub; Lee, Su-Gyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jin-Bae; Park, Chu-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal (Mn, Fe, or Ni) incorporated SAPO-34 (MeAPSO-34) nanocatalysts were synthesized using a hydrothermal method to improve the catalytic lifetime in the conversion of dimethyl ether to light olefins (DTO...

  17. Conversion of Syngas-Derived C2+ Mixed Oxygenates to C3-C5 Olefins over ZnxZryOz Mixed Oxides Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Colin D.; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Flake, Matthew D.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Onfroy, Thomas; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study we report on a ZnxZryOz mixed oxide type catalyst capable of converting a syngas-derived C2+ mixed oxygenate feedstock to isobutene-rich olefins. Aqueous model feed comprising of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, methanol, and propanol was used as representative liquid product derived from a Rh-based mixed oxygenate synthesis catalyst. Greater than 50% carbon yield to C3-C5 mixed olefins was demonstrated when operating at 400-450oC and 1 atm. In order to rationalize formation of the products observed feed components were individually evaluated. Major constituents of the feed mixture (ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate) were found to produce isobutene-rich olefins. C-C coupling was also demonstrated for propanol feedstock - a minor constituent of the mixed oxygenate feed - producing branched C6 olefins, revealing scalability to alcohols higher than ethanol following an analogous reaction pathway. Using ethanol and propanol feed mixtures, cross-coupling reactions produced mixtures of C4, C5, and C6 branched olefins. The presence of H2 in the feed was found to facilitate hydrogenation of the ketone intermediates, thus producing straight chain olefins as byproducts. While activity loss from coking is observed complete catalyst regeneration is achieved by employing mild oxidation. For conversion of the mixed oxygenate feed a Zr/Zn ratio of 2.5 and a reaction temperature of 450oC provides the best balance of stability, activity, and selectivity. X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals the presence of primarily cubic phase ZrO2 and a minor amount of the monoclinic phase, with ZnO being highly dispersed in the lattice. The presence of ZnO appears to stabilize the cubic phase resulting in less monoclinic phase as the ZnO concentration increases. Infrared spectroscopy shows the mixed oxide acid sites are characterized as primarily Lewis type acidity. The direct relationship between

  18. Bifunctional carbohydrate biopolymers entrapped lipase as catalyst for the two consecutive conversions of α-pinene to oxy-derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, Madalina; Gheorghe, Andreea; Negoi, Alina; Enache, Madalin; Maria, Gabriel-Mihai; Parvulescu, Vasile I

    2016-11-01

    Bifunctional catalysts designed as carbohydrate biopolymers entrapping lipase have been investigated for the biotransformation of a natural compound (α-pinene) to oxy-derivatives. Lipases assisted the epoxidation of α-pinene using H2O2 as oxidation reagent and ethyl acetate as both acetate-supplier and solvent affording α-pinene oxide as the main product. Further, the biopolymer promoted the isomerization of α-pinene oxide to campholenic aldehyde and trans-carenol. In this case, the biopolymers played double roles of the support and also active part of the bifunctional catalyst. Screening of enzymes and their entrapping in a biopolymeric matrix (e.g. Ca-alginate and κ-carrageenan) indicated the lipase extracted from Aspergillus niger as the most efficient. In addition, the presence of biopolymers enhanced the catalytic activity of the immobilized lipase (i.e. 13.39×10(3), 19.76×10(3)and 26.46×10(3) for the free lipase, lipase-carrageenan and lipase-alginate, respectively). The catalysts stability and reusability were confirmed in eight consecutively reaction runs.

  19. Conversion of fructose, glucose, and cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by alkaline earth phosphate catalysts in hot compressed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daorattanachai, Pornlada; Khemthong, Pongtanawat; Viriya-Empikul, Nawin; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak

    2012-12-01

    The phosphates of alkaline earth metals (calcium and strontium) synthesized by precipitation process in acetone-water media system were used as catalysts for converting fructose, glucose, and cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) under hot compressed water condition. It was found that the phosphates of calcium and strontium effectively catalyzed the HMF formation from fructose and glucose dehydration and cellulose hydrolysis/dehydration reaction, as compared with the non-catalytic system. The XRD analysis confirmed the CaP(2)O(6) and α-Sr(PO(3))(2) crystalline phases of the catalyst samples, while acid strength of both catalysts was in a range of +3.3 ≤ H(0) ≤ +4.8. From the study, CaP(2)O(6) and α-Sr(PO(3))(2) showed similar catalytic performance toward the dehydration of sugars, providing the HMF yields of 20-21% and 34-39% from glucose and fructose, respectively; whereas the total yield of glucose and HMF from the hydrolysis/dehydration of cellulose over α-Sr(PO(3))(2) (34%) was higher than that over CaP(2)O(6) (17.4%).

  20. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao Duvvuri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low, 650°C (medium and 731°C (high. The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1% while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%.

  1. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  2. Insights into the deactivation mechanism of supported tungsten hydride on alumina (W-H/Al2O3) catalyst for the direct conversion of ethylene to propylene

    KAUST Repository

    Mazoyer, Etienne

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten hydride supported on alumina prepared by the surface organometallic chemistry method is an active precursor for the direct conversion of ethylene to propylene at low temperature and pressure. An extensive contact time study revealed that the dimerization of ethylene to 1-butene is the primary and also the rate limiting step. The catalytic cycle further involves isomerization of 1-butene to 2-butene, followed by cross-metathesis of ethylene and 2-butene to yield propylene with high selectivity. The deactivation mechanism of this reaction has been investigated. The used catalyst was extensively examined by DRIFTS, solid-state NMR, EPR, UV-Vis, TGA and DSC techniques. It was found that a large amount of carbonaceous species, which were due to side reaction like olefin polymerization took place with time on stream, significantly hindering the dimerization of ethylene to 1-butene and therefore the production of propylene. Crown Copyright © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellulose sulphuric acid as a biodegradable catalyst for conversion of aryl amines into azides at room temperature under mild conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Firouzeh Nesmati; Ali Elhampour

    2012-07-01

    This article describes simple and efficient method for the diazotization and azidation of different aromatic amines over cellulose sulphuric acid, sodium nitrite and sodium azide under mild conditions at room temperature. Various aryl amines possessing electron-withdrawing groups or electron-donating groups have been converted into the corresponding aryl azides with 71-99% yields. The use of mild reaction conditions, avoids the use of harmful acids and toxic solvents and short reaction times are advantages of this methodology. The selected catalyst is found to be highly efficient and recyclable.

  4. Two-Stage Conversion of High Free Fatty Acid Jatropha curcas Oil to Biodiesel Using Brønsted Acidic Ionic Liquid and KOH as Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel was produced from high free fatty acid (FFA Jatropha curcas oil (JCO by two-stage process in which esterification was performed by Brønsted acidic ionic liquid 1-(1-butylsulfonic-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BSMIM]Cl followed by KOH catalyzed transesterification. Maximum FFA conversion of 93.9% was achieved and it reduced from 8.15 wt% to 0.49 wt% under the optimum reaction conditions of methanol oil molar ratio 12 : 1 and 10 wt% of ionic liquid catalyst at 70°C in 6 h. The ionic liquid catalyst was reusable up to four times of consecutive runs under the optimum reaction conditions. At the second stage, the esterified JCO was transesterified by using 1.3 wt% KOH and methanol oil molar ratio of 6 : 1 in 20 min at 64°C. The yield of the final biodiesel was found to be 98.6% as analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical composition of the final biodiesel was also determined by GC-MS analysis.

  5. Synthesis of dimethyl ether and alternative fuels in the liquid phase from coal-derived synthesis gas. Task 3.2: Screen novel catalyst systems; Task 3.3:, Evaluation of the preferred catalyst system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the DOE-sponsored contract ``Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether and Alternative Fuels in the Liquid Phase from Coal-Derived Syngas`` experimental evaluations of the one-step synthesis of alternative fuels were carried out. The objective of this work was to develop novel processes for converting coal-derived syngas to fuels or fuel additives. Building on a technology base acquired during the development of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) process, this work focused on the development of slurry reactor based processes. The experimental investigations, which involved bench-scale reactor studies, focused primarily on three areas: (1) One-step, slurry-phase syngas conversion to hydrocarbons or methanol/hydrocarbon mixtures using a mixture of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol conversion catalyst in the same slurry reactor. (2) Slurry-phase conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols using various catalysts. (3) One-step, slurry-phase syngas conversion to mixed ethers using a mixture of mixed alcohols synthesis catalyst and dehydration catalyst in the same slurry reactor. The experimental results indicate that, of the three types of processes investigated, slurry phase conversion of syngas to mixed alcohols shows the most promise for further process development. Evaluations of various mixed alcohols catalysts show that a cesium-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst, developed in Air Products` laboratories, has the highest performance in terms of rate and selectivity for C{sub 2+}-alcohols. In fact, once-through conversion at industrially practical reaction conditions yielded a mixed alcohols product potentially suitable for direct gasoline blending. Moreover, an additional attractive aspect of this catalyst is its high selectivity for branched alcohols, potential precursors to iso-olefins for use in etherification.

  6. Two-step processing of oil shale to linear hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Ryzhov, A.N.; Latypova, D.Zh.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry; Avakyan, T.A. [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01

    Thermal and catalytic steam reforming of oil shale mined from Leningrad and Kashpir deposits was studied. Experiments were performed in fixed bed reactor by varying temperature and steam flow rate. Data obtained were approximated by empirical formulas containing some parameters calculated by least-squares method. Thus predicting amount of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane in producer gas is possible for given particular kind of oil shale, temperature and steam flow rate. Adding Ni catalyst enriches hydrogen and depletes CO content in effluent gas at low gasification temperatures. Modeling gas simulating steam reforming gases (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} mixture) was tested in hydrocarbon synthesis over Co-containing supported catalyst. Selectivity of CO conversion into C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons reaches 84% while selectivity to methane is 7%. Molecular weight distribution of synthesized alkanes obeys Anderson-Schulz-Flory equation and chain growth probability 0.84. (orig.)

  7. Copper-Zinc Alloy Nanopowder : A Robust Precious-Metal-Free Catalyst for the Conversion of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottari, Giovanni; Kumalaputri, Angela J; Krawczyk, Krzysztof K; Feringa, Ben L; Heeres, Hero J; Barta, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Noble-metal-free copper-zinc nanoalloy (<150 nm) is found to be uniquely suited for the highly selective catalytic conversion of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to potential biofuels or chemical building blocks. Clean mixtures of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran (DMTHF) with com

  8. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-02-18

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Biotic conversion of sulphate to sulphide and abiotic conversion of sulphide to sulphur in a microbial fuel cell using cobalt oxide octahedrons as cathode catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli; Kumar, Senthil

    2017-02-08

    Varying chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulphate concentrations in substrate were used to determine reaction kinetics and mass balance of organic matter and sulphate transformation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). MFC with anodic chamber volume of 1 L, fed with wastewater having COD of 500 mg/L and sulphate of 200 mg/L, could harvest power of 54.4 mW/m(2), at a Coulombic efficiency of 14%, with respective COD and sulphate removals of 90 and 95%. Sulphide concentration, even up to 1500 mg/L, did not inhibit anodic biochemical reactions, due to instantaneous abiotic oxidation to sulphur, at high inlet sulphate. Experiments on abiotic oxidation of sulphide to sulphur revealed maximum oxidation taking place at an anodic potential of -200 mV. More than 99% sulphate removal could be achieved in a MFC with inlet COD/sulphate of 0.75, giving around 1.33 kg/m(3) day COD removal. Bioelectrochemical conversion of sulphate facilitating sulphur recovery in a MFC makes it an interesting pollution abatement technique.

  10. Direct and Highly Selective Conversion of Synthesis Gas into Lower Olefins: Design of a Bifunctional Catalyst Combining Methanol Synthesis and Carbon-Carbon Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kang; Gu, Bang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Kang, Jincan; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2016-04-01

    The direct synthesis of lower (C2 to C4) olefins, key building-block chemicals, from syngas (H2/CO), which can be derived from various nonpetroleum carbon resources, is highly attractive, but the selectivity for lower olefins is low because of the limitation of the Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution. We report that the coupling of methanol-synthesis and methanol-to-olefins reactions with a bifunctional catalyst can realize the direct conversion of syngas to lower olefins with exceptionally high selectivity. We demonstrate that the choice of two active components and the integration manner of the components are crucial to lower olefin selectivity. The combination of a Zr-Zn binary oxide, which alone shows higher selectivity for methanol and dimethyl ether even at 673 K, and SAPO-34 with decreased acidity offers around 70% selectivity for C2-C4 olefins at about 10% CO conversion. The micro- to nanoscale proximity of the components favors the lower olefin selectivity.

  11. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous ZnO-ZrO2 doped by Cr, Nd and Dy as a catalyst for conversion of coumarin using ultrasensitive fluorometric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    Doping of mesoporous ZnO-ZrO2 nanoparticles with transition metal and lanthanides (Cr, Nd, Dy) were used as a catalyst to develop an ultrasensitive fluorometric method for the conversion of non fluorescent coumarin to highly fluorescent 7-hydroxycoumarin using H2O2 or light. It was found that doped- ZnO-ZrO2 mixed oxide can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 to produce •OH radicals, which in turn convert coumarin to 7-hydroxycoumarin. At contrast, the doping has deleterious effect on conversion of coumarin by light due to high band gap and high concentrations of doping increase the recombination rate of electron and holes. Doped mixed oxides prepared by impregnation method and characterized by studying their structural, surface and optical properties. Chromium doped ZnO-ZrO2 had the highest rate of formation of hydroxyl radical due to decomposition of H2O2 and therefore 7-hydroxycoumarin due to surface area, small crystal size and high redox potential.

  12. Catalytic plastics cracking for recovery of gasoline-range hydrocarbons from municipal plastic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buekens, A.G.; Huang, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry - CHIS 2, Free University of Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    1998-08-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in plastics cracking, a process developed to recycle plastic wastes into useful petrochemical materials. Under thermal cracking conditions, plastic wastes can be decomposed into three fractions: gas, liquid and solid residue. The liquid products are usually composed of higher boiling point hydrocarbons. By adopting customary fluid cracking catalysts and reforming catalysts, more aromatics and naphthenes in the C{sub 6}-C{sub 8} range can be produced, which are valuable gasoline-range hydrocarbons. More tests are, however, needed to verify the pyrolysis process in a pilot scale particularly for treatment of mixtures of bulk plastics. Plastics cracking is only an elementary conversion technology; its application has to be combined with other technologies such as municipal solid waste collection, classification and pretreatment at the front end, as well as hydrocarbon distillation and purification at the back end. Social, environmental and economic factors are also important in industrial implementation of the technology

  13. Catalyst mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  14. LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelias, Christos T. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2009-11-01

    Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

  15. A KINETIC-MODEL FOR THE METHANOL HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS FROM CO/CO2/H-2 OVER CU/ZNO-BASED CATALYSTS INCLUDING SIMULTANEOUS FORMATION OF METHYL-ESTERS AND HYDROCARBONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREMAN, BB; BEENACKERS, ACCM; OESTERHOLT, E

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the conversion of syngas (CO/CO2/H-2) to a methanol-higher alcohol mixture over a Cs-Cu/ZnO/Al2O3, catalyst were measured at a pressure of 5-100 bar, a temperature of 200-300 degrees C, a H-2/CO ratio in the feed of 0.66-4.37, a mole fraction of CO2 in the feed of 0-0.114 and a space

  16. A KINETIC-MODEL FOR THE METHANOL HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS FROM CO/CO2/H-2 OVER CU/ZNO-BASED CATALYSTS INCLUDING SIMULTANEOUS FORMATION OF METHYL-ESTERS AND HYDROCARBONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREMAN, BB; BEENACKERS, ACCM; OESTERHOLT, E

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the conversion of syngas (CO/CO2/H-2) to a methanol-higher alcohol mixture over a Cs-Cu/ZnO/Al2O3, catalyst were measured at a pressure of 5-100 bar, a temperature of 200-300 degrees C, a H-2/CO ratio in the feed of 0.66-4.37, a mole fraction of CO2 in the feed of 0-0.114 and a space

  17. Abstracts of the first ORNL workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: characterization and measurement with a view toward personnel protection. [PAH from coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B. (comp.)

    1976-11-01

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at a workshop on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as those produced by coal conversion technologies. Their often carcinogenic nature imposes the obligation of providing adequate protection and measurement devices for workers and for the general public. The primary questions are as follows: What should be measured. Where and how should it be measured. What are the maximum permissible concentrations. This workshop and future workshops are intended to bring these problems into better focus and to help establish a consensus on what needs to be done in order to provide a dosimetry effort that will ensure the adequate protection of personnel. There were 32 attendees of this one-day meeting. The papers and discussions included current industrial hygiene practices, the development of government agency guidelines for worker protection, and a wide range of analytical techniques for PAH detection, some of which are still in the research stage and are unproven. The workshop was held at ORNL on February 26, 1976.

  18. Catalytic carbon deposition-oxidation over Ni, Fe and Co catalysts: a new indirect route to store and transport gas hydrocarbon fuels.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Patrícia E. F.; Ribeiro, Leandro Passos; Rosmaninho, Marcelo Gonçalves; Ardisson, José Domingos; Dias, Anderson; Oliveira,Luiz Carlos Alves; Lago, Rochel Montero

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a new two-step route to store and transport associated natural gas, promoted by Ni, Fe and Co supported catalyst was presented. Initially, CH4 is converted into carbon deposits (M/C composite), being Fe catalyst the most active catalyst. In Step 2, M/C composite reacts with H2O producing H2, CO and CH4. TPO experiments showed that efficiency and selectivity of oxidation depends on the metal. Ni catalyst produced mainly H2 and CO, while Fe system was more selective to convert car...

  19. Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofibers as heterogeneous catalysts for efficient conversion of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Huanfeng; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lv, Chunxiao; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Dongjiang; Li, Zhenhuan; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional γ-Al2O3 nanofibers were modified with Nb2O5 to be used as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst to catalyze biomass into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). At low Nb2O5 loading, the niobia species were well dispersed on γ-Al2O3 nanofiber through Nb–O–Al bridge bonds. The interaction between Nb2O5 precursor and γ-Al2O3 nanofiber results in the niobia species with strong Lewis acid sites and intensive Brønsted acid sites, which made 5-HMF yield from glucose to reach the maximum 55.9~59.0% over Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber with a loading of 0.5~1 wt% Nb2O5 at 150 °C for 4 h in dimethyl sulfoxide. However, increasing Nb2O5 loading could lead to the formation of two-dimensional polymerized niobia species, three-dimensional polymerized niobia species and crystallization, which significantly influenced the distribution and quantity of the Lewis acid sites and Brönst acid sites over Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber. Lewis acid site Nbδ+ played a key role on the isomerization of glucose to fructose, while Brønsted acid sites are more active for the dehydration of generated fructose to 5-HMF. In addition, the heterogeneous Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber catalyst with suitable ratio of Lewis acid to Brönsted sites should display an more excellent catalytic performance in the conversion of glucose to 5-HMF. PMID:27666867

  20. Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofibers as heterogeneous catalysts for efficient conversion of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Huanfeng; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lv, Chunxiao; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Dongjiang; Li, Zhenhuan; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional γ-Al2O3 nanofibers were modified with Nb2O5 to be used as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst to catalyze biomass into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). At low Nb2O5 loading, the niobia species were well dispersed on γ-Al2O3 nanofiber through Nb–O–Al bridge bonds. The interaction between Nb2O5 precursor and γ-Al2O3 nanofiber results in the niobia species with strong Lewis acid sites and intensive Brønsted acid sites, which made 5-HMF yield from glucose to reach the maximum 55.9~59.0% over Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber with a loading of 0.5~1 wt% Nb2O5 at 150 °C for 4 h in dimethyl sulfoxide. However, increasing Nb2O5 loading could lead to the formation of two-dimensional polymerized niobia species, three-dimensional polymerized niobia species and crystallization, which significantly influenced the distribution and quantity of the Lewis acid sites and Brönst acid sites over Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber. Lewis acid site Nbδ+ played a key role on the isomerization of glucose to fructose, while Brønsted acid sites are more active for the dehydration of generated fructose to 5-HMF. In addition, the heterogeneous Nb2O5-γ-Al2O3 nanofiber catalyst with suitable ratio of Lewis acid to Brönsted sites should display an more excellent catalytic performance in the conversion of glucose to 5-HMF.

  1. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  2. Dispersed catalysts for co-processing and coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockrath, B.; Parfitt, D.; Miller, R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The basic goal is to improve dispersed catalysts employed in the production of clean fuels from low value hydrocarbons. The immediate objective is to determine how the properties of the catalysts may be altered to match the demands placed on them by the properties of the feedstock, the qualities of the desired end products, and the economic constraints put upon the process. Several interrelated areas of the application of dispersed catalysts to co-processing and coal conversion are under investigation. The first involves control of the selectivity of MoS{sub 2} catalysts for HDN, HDS, and hydrogenation of aromatics. A second area of research is the development and use of methods to evaluate dispersed catalysts by means of activity and selectivity tests. A micro-flow reactor has been developed for determining intrinsic reactivities using model compounds, and will be used to compare catalysts prepared in different ways. Micro-autoclaves will also be used to develop data in batch experiments at higher partial pressures of hydrogen. The third area under investigation concerns hydrogen spillover reactions between MoS{sub 2} catalysts and carbonaceous supports. Preliminary results obtained by monitoring H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} exchange reactions with a pulse-flow microreactor indicate the presence of spillover between MoS{sub 2} and a graphitic carbon. A more complete study will be made at a later stage of the project. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  3. Mechanistic studies of the methanol-to-olefin process on acidic zeolite catalysts by in situ solid-state NMR-UV/Vis spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yijiao

    2007-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand for light olefins, the catalytic conversion of methanol-to-olefins (MTO) on acidic zeolite catalysts continues to be an industrially interesting process in heterogeneous catalysis. During the last decades, increasing efforts were made to clarify the mechanism of the MTO process. Recent progress revealed that, in the MTO process, the conversion of an equilibrium mixture of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) is dominated by a “hydrocarbon pool” route in which methano...

  4. Methanol to hydrocarbons reaction over HZSM-22 and SAPO-11:Effect of catalyst acid strength on reaction and deactivation mechanism%HZSM-22和SAPO-11催化甲醇转化制烯烃(MTH)反应:酸强度对反应和失活机理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金棒; 张雯娜; 武新强; 郭新闻; 刘中民; 李金哲; 徐舒涛; 郅玉春; 魏迎旭; 何艳丽; 陈景润; 张默之; 王全义

    2015-01-01

      12C/13C-甲醇切换实验表明, HZSM-22和SAPO-11催化的甲醇转化机理主要是烯烃循环,然而由于酸强度的差异导致两种分子筛上甲基化反应和裂解反应对烯烃最终产物分布贡献不同。对于HZSM-22分子筛,催化活性较高,当反应温度低于400 oC时,产物以C5+高碳烃为主,随着反应温度的升高,产物以C2–C4低碳烃为主,且乙烯的增长速率高于丙烯;对于SAPO-11分子筛,催化活性较低,无论反应温度高或低,甲醇转化产物均以C5+高碳烃为主。以上结果表明,催化剂的活性与酸强度相关,且随着反应温度的升高,在酸性较强的HZSM-22分子筛上高碳烃的裂解活性要远高于酸性较弱的SAPO-11分子筛。该推论得到13C-甲醇和12C-1-丁烯共进料实验数据的支持。失活催化剂的GC-MS和TG结果显示,催化剂的失活与酸强度和反应温度密切相关:对于HZSM-22分子筛,较低温度下(450 oC)的失活是源于分子筛表面石墨碳的沉积;对于SAPO-11分子筛,低温下(400 oC)的失活是源于分子筛表面石墨碳的沉积。此外,由于酸强度的差异,与SAPO-11相比,低温下积碳物种更倾向于在HZSM-22分子筛孔口快速形成。这也是HZSM-22分子筛在低温下快速失活的原因。为了进一步证明该结论,本文采用原位红外装置对HZSM-22催化甲醇转化过程中的Brönsted酸和芳烃物种进行了连续监测。结果显示,在最初的15 min内归属为Brönsted酸的峰(3585 cm–1)有明显的下降,但随着反应时间的延长, Brönsted酸的量不再发生变化;与此同时,归属为芳烃物种的峰(3136 cm–1)增加到一定程度后随着反应时间的延长也几乎不再增加。这进一步说明了低温下HZSM-22分子筛的失活是由非活性芳烃积碳物种堵塞孔口造成的。%The conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons has been investigated over HZSM-22 and SAPO-11. Both of these catalysts possess one-dimensional 10

  5. Effects of promoters on catalytic performance of Fe-Co/SiO_2 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangdong Ma; Qiwen Sun; Weiyong Ying; Dingye Fang

    2009-01-01

    2%Fe-10%Co/SiO_2 catalysts with different potassium or zirconium Ioadings were prepared by aqueous incipient wetness impregnation and tested for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a flow reactor,using H_2/CO = 1.6 (molar ratio) in the feed,under the condition of an overall pressure of 1 MPa,GHSV of 600 h~(-1) and temperature of 503 K. The zirconium and potassium promoters remarkably influenced hydrocarbon distribution of the products. CO conversion increased on the catalysts with the increase of zirconium loadings,which indicated that zirconium enhanced the activity of iron-cobalt catalysts. Low potassium Ioadings also enhanced the activity of the catalysts. However,high potassium loading made CO conversion on the catalysts decrease and weakened the secondary hydrogenations. The catalyst was characterized by BET,XRD and TPR. The catalyst characterization revealed that the Co_3O_4 phase was presented on the fresh catalyst,whereas the spinel phase of Fe-Co alloy and CoO existed on the used catalyst.

  6. Investigations of the conversion of inorganic carbonates to methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy; Rao, C N R

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic carbonates, which occur abundantly on earth, constitute an inexpensive natural source of carbon. Therefore, the direct conversion of these carbonates into methane is of considerable importance. Thermal decomposition of transition metal carbonates with the composition MCa(CO(3))(2) (where M=Co, Ni, or Fe, and M/Ca is 1:1) and M(1)M(2)Ca(CO(3))(3) (where M(1)M(2)=CoNi, NiFe, or FeCo, and M(1)/M(2)/Ca is 1:1:2) shows that the reduced transition metals in combination with metal oxide nanoparticles (e.g., Co/CoO/CaO) act as catalysts for the conversion of CO(2) (produced from the carbonates) into methane. The favorable decomposition conditions include heating at 550 degrees C in an H(2) atmosphere for 5-6 h. These catalysts are found to be excellent for the methanation of CaCO(3), exhibiting high efficiency in the utilization of H(2) with 100 % conversion and 100 % selectivity. The best catalyst for conversion of CaCO(3) into CH(4) is Co/CoO/CaO. There are also indications that similar catalysts based on Fe may yield higher hydrocarbons.

  7. Directed evolution of phenylacetone monooxygenase as an active catalyst for the Baeyer-Villiger conversion of cyclohexanone to caprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Loreto P; Acevedo, Juan P; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-07-01

    Phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) is an exceptionally robust Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, which makes it ideal for potential industrial applications. However, its substrate scope is limited, unreactive cyclohexanone being a prominent example. Such a limitation is unfortunate, because this particular transformation in an ecologically viable manner would be highly desirable, the lactone and the respective lactam being of considerable interest as monomers in polymer science. We have applied directed evolution in search of an active mutant for this valuable C-C activating reaction. Using iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM), several active mutants were evolved, with only a minimal trade-off in terms of stability. The best mutants allow for quantitative conversion of 2 mM cyclohexanone within 1 h reaction time. In order to circumvent the NADP(+) regeneration problem, whole E. coli resting cells were successfully applied. Molecular dynamics simulations and induced fit docking throw light on the origin of enhanced PAMO activity. The PAMO mutants constitute ideal starting points for future directed evolution optimization necessary for an industrial process.

  8. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  9. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  10. Down-conversion phosphors as noble-metal-free co-catalyst in ZnO for efficient visible light photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Jiaqing; Lei, Wenyan; Li, Jinliang; Wu, Tianyang; Li, Ping; Li, Huili; Pan, Likun

    2017-01-01

    Exploring novel visible light responsive photocatalysts is one of greatly significant issues from the viewpoint of using solar energy. Here we report the yellow-orange emitting α-Si3N4-doped Lu3Al5O12:Ce3+ (Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+) phosphors as a noble-metal-free co-catalyst for enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity of ZnO. The results show that ZnO-Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+ hybrid photocatalysts using a fast microwave-assisted approach exhibits a 91% methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation at 240 min, which evidence the synergistic effect of ZnO and Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+ that suppress the rate of charge recombination and increase the self-sensitized degradation of MB. ZnO-down conversion phosphors can be envisaged as potential candidate in environmental engineering and solar energy applications.

  11. Low-temperature activation of methane over rare earth metals promoted Zn/HZSM-5 zeolite catalysts in the presence of ethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengqiang Zhang; Aiguo Kong; Yongjie Ding; Chengyong Dai; Yongkui Shan

    2011-01-01

    At low temperature of 723 K, methane can be easily activated in the presence of ethylene in the feed, and converted to higher hydrocarbons (C2-C4) and aromatics (C6-C10), through its reaction over rare metals modified Zn/HZSM-5 zeolite catalysts without undesirable carbon oxides formation.Methane can get 37.3% conversion over the above catalysts under Iow temperature, and the catalysts show a longer lifetime than usual metal supported HZSM-5 zeolite catalysts without adding any rare earth metals.The effects of methane activation over various rare earth metal promoted Zn/HZSM-5 catalysts on the products and influences of several reaction conditions such as temperature, catalyst lifetime and molar ratio of CH4/C2H4 have been discussed.

  12. Final technical report for the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization (an EFRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    Greater than 95% of all materials produced by the chemical industry are derived from a small slate of simple hydrocarbons that are derived primarily from natural gas and petroleum, predominantly through oxygenation, C–C bond formation, halogenation or amination. Yet, current technologies for hydrocarbon conversion are typically high temperature, multi-step processes that are energy and capital intensive and result in excessive emissions (including carbon dioxide). The Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization (CCHF) brought together research teams with the broad coalition of skills and knowledge needed to make the fundamental advances in catalysis required for next-generation technologies to convert hydrocarbons (particularly light alkanes and methane) at high efficiency and low cost. Our new catalyst technologies offer many opportunities including enhanced utilization of natural gas in the transportation sector (via conversion to liquid fuels), more efficient generation of electricity from natural gas using direct methane fuel cells, reduced energy consumption and waste production for large petrochemical processes, and the preparation of high value molecules for use in biological/medical applications or the agricultural sector. The five year collaborative project accelerated fundamental understanding of catalyst design for the conversion of C–H bonds to functionalized products, essential to achieve the goals listed above, as evidenced by the publication of 134 manuscripts. Many of these fundamental advancements provide a foundation for potential commercialization, as evidenced by the submission of 11 patents from research support by the CCHF.

  13. Non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林胜; 徐奕德; 陶龙骧

    1997-01-01

    The non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons such as aroma tics and C2 hydrocarbons in a low temperature range of 773-973 K with Mo/HZSM-5,Mo-Zr/HZSM-5 and Mo-W/HZSM-5 catalysts is studied.The means for enhancing the activity and stability of the Mo-containing catalysts under the reaction conditions is reported.Quite a stable methane conversion rate of over 10% with a high selectivity to the higher hydrocarbons has been obtained at a temperature of 973 K.Pure methane conversions of about 5.2% and 2.0% have been obtained at 923 and 873 K,respectively.In addition,accompanied by the C2-C3 mixture,tht- methane reaction can be initiated even at a lower temperature and the conversion rate of methane is enhanced by the presence of tne initiator of C2-C3 hydrocarbons.Compared with methane oxidative coupling to ethylene,the novel way for methane transformation is significant and reasonable for its lower reaction temperatures and high selectivity to the desired prod

  14. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hybrid catalysts, direct synthesis of aromatic from carbon dioxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuei Chikung; Lee Mindar (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan))

    1991-02-01

    To improve climatic conditions and to solve the carbon resource problem, it is desirable to develop techniques whereby carbon dioxide can be converted to valuable liquid hydrocarbons which can be used either as fuels or industrial raw materials. Direct synthesis of aromatics from carbon dioxide hydrogenation was investigated in a single stage reactor using hybrid catalysts composed of iron catalysts and HZSM-5 zeolite. Carbon dioxide was first converted to CO by the reverse water gas shift reaction, followed by the hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons on iron catalyst, and finally the hydrocarbons were converted to aromatics in HZSM-5. Under the operating conditions of 350{degree}C, 2100 kilopascals and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}={1/2} the maximum aromatic selectivity obtained was 22% with a CO{sub 2} conversion of 38% using fused iron catalyst combined with the zeolite. Together with the kinetic studies, thermodynamic analysis of the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation was also conducted. It was found that unlike Fischer Tropsch synthesis, the formation of hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2} may not be thermodynamically favored at higher temperature. However, the sufficiently high yields of aromatics possible with this process provides a route for the direct synthesis of high-octane gasoline from carbon dioxide. 24 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. The doping effect of fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbon solvents on the performance of common olefin metathesis catalysts: application in the preparation of biologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samojłowicz, Cezary; Bieniek, Michał; Zarecki, Andrzej; Kadyrov, Renat; Grela, Karol

    2008-12-21

    Aromatic fluorinated hydrocarbons, used as solvents for olefin metathesis reactions, catalysed by standard commercially available Ru precatalysts, allow substantially higher yields to be obtained, especially of challenging substrates, including natural and biologically active compounds.

  16. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  17. Sulfur Tolerant Magnesium Nickel Silicate Catalyst for Reforming of Biomass Gasification Products to Syngas

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Scott L.; Paul H. Matter; Gene B. Arkenberg; Long, Richard Q.; Scott M. Monfort

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium nickel silicate (MNS) has been investigated as a catalyst to convert tars and light hydrocarbons to syngas (CO and H2) by steam reforming and CO2 reforming in the presence of H2S for biomass gasification process at NexTech Materials. It was observed that complete CH4 conversion could be achieved on MNS catalyst granules at 800–900 °C and a space velocity of 24,000 mL/g/h in a simulated biomass gasification stream. Addition of 10–20 ppm H2S to the feed had no apparent impact on CH4 c...

  18. Catalytic Conversion of Castor Oil to Biodiesel Using Ionic Liquid as Catalyst%碱性离子液体在制备生物柴油中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洁; 顾俊; 夏晓莉; 倪邦庆; 王海军

    2012-01-01

    Efficient catalytic conversion of castor oil to biodiesel,is achieved using 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium hydroxide(OH) as the catalyst.The influence factors,such as alcohol-oil ratio,catalyst dosage,reaction temperature,reaction time are investigated in detail.The results showed that OH was an efficient catalyst for catalytic conversion of castor oil to biodiesel,and 82.3 % yield of HMF was obtained for 90 min at 50 ℃ in the presence of the load of catalyst was 8 % and the CH3OH: oil ratio was 9∶1.%文章研究了碱性离子液体1-丁基-3-甲基咪唑氢氧盐([Bmim]OH)催化蓖麻油酯交换制备生物柴油的工艺。考察了醇油比、催化剂用量、反应温度、反应时间等因素对脂肪酸甲酯的得率的影响。研究表明以[Bmim]OH为催化剂,脂肪酸甲酯得率达到82.3%。最佳反应条件为:醇油摩尔比9∶1,催化剂用量8%,反应温度50℃,反应时间90 min。

  19. Highly cost-effective and sulfur/coking resistant VOx-grafted TiO2 nanoparticles as an efficient anode catalyst for direct conversion of dry sour methane in solid oxide fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, A.; Yan, N.; Vincent, A.; Singh, A.; Hill, J.M.; Chuang, K. T.; Luo, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that grafted metal oxide can be a highly cost-effective and active anode for solid oxide fuel cells for sour methane conversion. The developed electro-catalyst was composed of vanadium oxide grafted TiO2 nanoparticles (VOx/TiO2) infiltrated into a porous La0.4Sr0.5Ba0.1TiO3+δ e

  20. Organic chemistry. A rhodium catalyst for single-step styrene production from benzene and ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Benjamin A; Webster-Gardiner, Michael S; Cundari, Thomas R; Gunnoe, T Brent

    2015-04-24

    Rising global demand for fossil resources has prompted a renewed interest in catalyst technologies that increase the efficiency of conversion of hydrocarbons from petroleum and natural gas to higher-value materials. Styrene is currently produced from benzene and ethylene through the intermediacy of ethylbenzene, which must be dehydrogenated in a separate step. The direct oxidative conversion of benzene and ethylene to styrene could provide a more efficient route, but achieving high selectivity and yield for this reaction has been challenging. Here, we report that the Rh catalyst ((Fl)DAB)Rh(TFA)(η(2)-C2H4) [(Fl)DAB is N,N'-bis(pentafluorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene; TFA is trifluoroacetate] converts benzene, ethylene, and Cu(II) acetate to styrene, Cu(I) acetate, and acetic acid with 100% selectivity and yields ≥95%. Turnover numbers >800 have been demonstrated, with catalyst stability up to 96 hours.

  1. Mobis HRH process residue hydroconversion using a recoverable nano-catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romocki, S.; Rhodey, G. [Mobis Energy Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described a newly developed pseudo-homogeneous catalyst (PHC) for hydroconversion of heavy hydrocarbon feeds with high levels of sulphur, nitrogen, resins, asphaltenes and metals. An active catalyst is formed in the reaction system, consisting of particles that are 2-9 nm in size and whose properties resemble those of a colloid solution at both room and reaction temperature. Residue processing with this pseudo-homogeneous catalyst system results in better cracking and hydrogenation at lower process severity. The PHC system in heavy residue hydroconversion (HRH) process achieves up to 95 per cent residue conversion at pressures below 7.3 MPa, reaction temperatures between 400 to 460 degrees C, and with feed space velocity between 1 to 2 per hour, thus rendering the PHC catalyst system suitable for deep conversion of hydrocarbon residues. As much as 95 per cent of the catalyst can be recovered and regenerated within the process. Pilot plants are in operation for the hydroconversion of Athabasca vacuum bottoms using this technology. The use of the HRH process in oilsands and refinery operations were discussed along with comparative yields and economics. tabs., figs.

  2. Detailed surface reaction mechanism in a three-way catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, D; Deutschmann, O; Warnatz, J

    2001-01-01

    Monolithic three-way catalysts are applied to reduce the emission of combustion engines. The design of such a catalytic converter is a complex process involving the optimization of different physical and chemical parameters (in the simplest case, e.g., length, cell densities or metal coverage of the catalyst). Numerical simulation can be used as an effective tool for the investigation of the catalytic properties of a catalytic converter and for the prediction of the performance of the catalyst. To attain this goal, a two-dimensional flow-field description is coupled with a detailed surface reaction model (gas-phase reactions can be neglected in three-way catalysts). This surface reaction mechanism (with C3H6 taken as representative of unburnt hydrocarbons) was developed using sub-mechanisms recently developed for hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane oxidation, literature values for C3H6 oxidation, and estimates for the remaining unknown reactions. Results of the simulation of a monolithic single channel are used to validate the surface reaction mechanism. The performance of the catalyst was simulated under lean, nearly stoichiometric and rich conditions. For these characteristic conditions, the oxidation of propene and carbon monoxide and the reduction of NO on a typical Pt/Rh coated three-way catalyst were simulated as a function of temperature. The numerically predicted conversion data are compared with experimentally measured data. The simulation further reveals the coupling between chemical reactions and transport processes within the monolithic channel.

  3. Fundamental Studies of the Reforming of Oxygenated Compounds over Supported Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The main objective of our research has been to elucidate fundamental concepts associated with controlling the activity, selectivity, and stability of bifunctional, metal-based heterogeneous catalysts for tandem reactions, such as liquid-phase conversion of oxygenated hydrocarbons derived from biomass. We have shown that bimetallic catalysts that combine a highly-reducible metal (e.g., platinum) with an oxygen-containing metal promoter (e.g., molybdenum) are promising materials for conversion of oxygenated hydrocarbons because of their high activity for selective cleavage for carbon-oxygen bonds. We have developed methods to stabilize metal nanoparticles against leaching and sintering under liquid-phase reaction conditions by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to apply oxide overcoat layers. We have used controlled surface reactions to produce bimetallic catalysts with controlled particle size and controlled composition, with an important application being the selective conversion of biomass-derived molecules. The synthesis of catalysts by traditional methods may produce a wide distribution of metal particle sizes and compositions; and thus, results from spectroscopic and reactions kinetics measurements have contributions from a distribution of active sites, making it difficult to assess how the size and composition of the metal particles affect the nature of the surface, the active sites, and the catalytic behavior. Thus, we have developed methods to synthesize bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled particle size and controlled composition to achieve an effective link between characterization and reactivity, and between theory and experiment. We have also used ALD to modify supported metal catalysts by addition of promoters with atomic-level precision, to produce new bifunctional sites for selective catalytic transformations. We have used a variety of techniques to characterize the metal nanoparticles in our catalysts, including scanning transmission electron

  4. Environmental Remediation: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2012-11-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous persistent semi-volatile organic compounds. They are contaminants that are resistant to degradation and can remain in the environment for long periods due to their high degree of conjugation, and aromaticity. PAHs are present in industrial effluents as products of incomplete combustion processes of organic compounds. Petroleum, coal and shale oil contain extremely complex mixtures of these PAHs, and their transport and refining process can also result in the release of PAHs. It is therefore prudent that such effluents are treated before discharge into the environment. In this project, different approaches to the treatment of PAHs have been investigated. Hydrous pyrolysis has been explored as a potential technique for degrading PAHs in water using anthracene as a model compound. The experiments were performed under different conditions of temperature, substrate, redox systems and durations. The conditions include oxidising systems comprising pure water, hydrogen peroxide and Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts to assess a range of reactivities. Products observed in GCMS analysis of the extract from the water phase include anthrone, anthraquinone, xanthone and multiple hydro-anthracene derivatives (Paper I). In addition a modified version of the Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water oxidising system was tested; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts were adopted for the conversion of a mixture of anthracene, fluorene and fluoranthene. The rate of conversion in the mixture was high as compared to that of only anthracene (Paper II). Also the use of LECA (Lightweight expanded clay aggregates) as an adsorbent (Paper III) for PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) removal from water has been.(Author)

  5. 等离子体条件Cu/SiO2对甲烷偶联的催化作用%Methane Coupling over Cu/SiO2 Catalyst under a Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代斌; 宫为民; 张秀玲; 何仁

    2002-01-01

    @@ It has been reported that methane coupling by plasma techniques with catalysts, such as direct current corona discharge with a Sr/La2O3 catalyst[1], dielectric-barrier discharge with zeolites[2] and pulsed corona discharge with metal oxide catalysts[3], give C2 hydrocarbons under atmospheric pressure. But acetylene predominates over other C2 hydrocarbons in the products. Our recent work reported that good results can be obtained for methane coupling under a pulsed corona plasma in the presence of hydrogen[4]. The addition of hydrogen improves the conversion of methane and the yield of C2 hydrocarbons. A methane conversion of 57.1% and a yield of C2 hydrocarbons of 43.4% were obtained at lower power, but acetylene was inevitably the main product. With the introduction of a Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalyst prepared by a cold plasma into the plasma reaction, the distribution of C2 hydrocarbons changed, and the content of C2H4 was 66.1%[5].

  6. Kinetics of the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane over a VMgO Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. L(a)te; E.A. Blekkan

    2002-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane was studied at 475-550℃over a VMgO catalyst. Vanadium-magnesium-oxides are among the most selective and active catalysts forthe dehydrogenation of propane to propylene. Selectivity to propylene up to about 60% was obtained at10% conversion, but the selectivity decreased with increasing conversion. No oxygenates were detected, theonly by-products were CO and CO2. The reaction rate of propane was found to be first order in propaneand close to zero order in oxygen, which is in agreement with a Mars van Krevelen mechanism with theactivation of the hydrocarbon as the rate determining step. The activation energy of the conversion ofpropane was found to be 122±6 kJ/mol.

  7. Kinetics of Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propance over a VMgO Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Late; E.A.Blekkan

    2002-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane was studied at 475-550℃ over a VMgO catalyst,Vanadium-magnesium-oxides are among the moste selective and active catalysts for the dehydrogenation of propance to propylene Selectivity to propylene up to about 60% was obtained at 10% conversion ,but the selectivity decreased with increasing conversion.No oxygenates were detected,the only by-products were CO and CO2 ,The reaction rate of propane was found to be first order in propane and close to zero order in oxygen ,which is in agreement with a Mars van Krevelen mechanism with the activation of the hydrocarbon as the rate detemining step.The activation energy,of the conversion of propane was found to be 122±6 kJ/mol.

  8. Kinetic studies of the oxidative coupling of methane over the Mn/Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mehdi Kamali Shahri; Seyed Mehdi Alavi

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative coupling of methane is a direct way to obtain C2 hydrocarbon,and Mn-Na-W/SiO2 catalyst is the most promising among all the catalysts.The 2%Mn/5%Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst was prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method.A 7-step heterogeneous reaction model of the oxidative coupling of methane to C2 hydrocarbons was conducted by co-feeding methane and oxygen at a total pressure of 1 bar over the catalyst.The kinetic measurements were carried out in a micro-catalytic fixed bed reactor.The kinetic data were obtained at the appropriate range of reaction conditions (4 kPa<Po2 <20 kPa,20 kPa<PCZH4 <80 kPa,800℃<T<900℃).The proposed reaction kinetic scheme consists of three primary and four consecutive reaction steps.The conversions of hydrocarbons and carbon oxides were evaluated by applying Langrnuir-Hinshelwood type rate equations.Power-law rate equation was applied only for the water-gas shift reaction.In addition,the effects of operating conditions on the reaction rate were studied.The proposed kinetic model can predict the conversion of methane and oxygen as well as the yield of C2 hydrocarbons and carbon oxides with an average accuracy of ±15%.

  9. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  10. Study and modelling of deactivation by coke in catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons on Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst; La microbalance inertielle: etude et modelisation cinetique de la desactivation par le coke en reformage catalytique des hydrocarbures sur catalyseur Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu-Deghais, S.

    2004-07-01

    Catalytic reforming is the refining process that produces gasoline with a high octane number. During a reforming operation, undesired side reactions promote the formation of carbon deposits (coke) on the surface of the catalyst. As the reactions proceed, the coke accumulation leads to a progressive decrease of the catalyst activity and to a change in its selectivity. Getting this phenomenon under control is interesting to optimize the industrial plants. This work aims to improve the comprehension and the modeling of coke formation and its deactivating effect on reforming reactions, while working under conditions chosen within a range as close as possible to the industrial conditions of the regenerative process. The experimental study is carried out with a micro unit that is designed to observe simultaneously the coke formation and its influence on the catalyst activity. A vibrational microbalance reactor (TEOM - Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance) is used to provide continuous monitoring of coke. On-line gas chromatography is used to observe the catalyst activity and selectivity as a function of the coke content. The coking experiments are performed on a fresh Pt-Sn/alumina catalyst, with mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules of 7 carbon atoms as hydrocarbon feeds. The coking tests permitted to highlight the operating parameters that may affect the amount of coke, and to identify the hydrocarbon molecules that behave as coke intermediate. A kinetic model for coke formation could be developed through the compilation of these results. The catalytic activity analysis permitted to point out the coke effect on both of the active phases of the catalyst, to construct a simplified reforming kinetic model that simulates the catalyst activity under the reforming conditions, and to quantify deactivation via deactivation functions. (author)

  11. Highly Active Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC Catalysts for the Conversion of CO2: The Metal/C Ratio as a Key Factor Defining Activity, Selectivity, and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Ramírez, Pedro J; Evans, Jaime; Viñes, Francesc; Liu, Ping; Illas, Francesc; Rodriguez, José A

    2016-07-01

    The ever growing increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is one of the main causes of global warming. Thus, CO2 activation and conversion toward valuable added compounds is a major scientific challenge. A new set of Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC catalysts exhibits high activity, selectivity, and stability for the reduction of CO2 to CO with some subsequent selective hydrogenation toward methanol. Sophisticated experiments under controlled conditions and calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the unique behavior of these systems. A detailed comparison of the behavior of Au/β-Mo2C and Au/δ-MoC catalysts provides evidence of the impact of the metal/carbon ratio in the carbide on the performance of the catalysts. The present results show that this ratio governs the chemical behavior of the carbide and the properties of the admetal, up to the point of being able to switch the rate and mechanism of the process for CO2 conversion. A control of the metal/carbon ratio paves the road for an efficient reutilization of this environmental harmful greenhouse gas.

  12. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  13. Study on Reaction Mechanism for Cracking FCC Gasoline on Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Youhao; Wang Xieqing

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on the experimental data on reaction of FCC naphtha in the presence of acid catalysts. The data published in the literature were reprocessed and compared with experimental data and the relationship of hydrogen and methane contained in the dry gas with the conversion rate was identified.The similarity between the route for cracking of olefin enriched FCC gasoline and the route for reaction of individual hydrocarbons was deduced, while the route for formation of ethylene in dry gas was also proposed to identify the relationship between the reaction path for formation of ethylene and the conversion rate.

  14. Reduction of light cycle oil in catalytic cracking of bitumen-derived crude HGOs through catalyst selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fuchen; Xu, Chunming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum Beijing, 102200 (China); Ng, Siauw H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, 1 Oil Patch Drive, Suite A202, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Yui, Sok [Syncrude Research Centre, 9421-17 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    In an attempt to reduce the production of light cycle oil (LCO), a non-premium fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) product in North America, a large-pore catalyst containing rare-earth-exchanged Y (REY) zeolite, was used to crack two Canadian bitumen-derived crude heavy gas oils (HGOs) hydrotreated to different extents. For comparison, a regular equilibrium FCC catalyst with ultra-stable Y (USY) zeolite and a conventional western Canadian crude HGO were also included in the study. Cracking experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed microactivity test (MAT) reactor at 510 C, 30 s oil injection time, and varying catalyst-to-oil ratios for different conversions. The results show that pre-cracking of heavy molecules with wide-pore matrix, followed by zeolite cracking, enhanced conversion at the expense of light and heavy cycle oils at a constant catalyst-to-oil ratio, giving improved product selectivities (e.g., higher gasoline and lower dry gas, LCO, and coke yields, in general, at a given conversion). To systematically assess the benefits of employing the specialty catalyst over the regular catalyst in cracking Canadian HGOs, individual product yields were compared at common bases, including constant catalyst-to-oil ratios, conversions, and coke yields for three feeds, and at maximum gasoline yield for one feed. In most cases, the preferred choice of large-pore zeolite-rich catalyst over its counterpart was evident. The observed cracking phenomena were explained based on properties of catalysts and characterization data of feedstocks, including their hydrocarbon type analyses by gas chromatograph with a mass-selective detector (GC-MSD). (author)

  15. Alternatives for recovering metals from spent catalysts for hydrotreating of heavy hydrocarbons: a case study; Alternativas para la recuperacion de metales a partir de catalizadores gastados del hidrotratamiento de hidrocarburos pesados: un caso de estudio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Fernando; Ramirez, Sergio; Ancheyta, Jorge; Mavil, Martha [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jancheyt@imp.mx

    2008-05-15

    The increasing production of spent hydrotreating catalysts used for processing heavy hydrocarbons and the problems related to their disposal are described in this work. These catalysts contain important amounts of heavy metals such as molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co) and vanadium (V), which can be recovered and hence an economical benefit may be obtained. The results of experimental tests for alkaline leaching (NaOH) to recover V and Mo, and the effect of operating conditions on metal recovery are also presented. The results show that, in general, the highest recovery of Mo is obtained at pH 8.5 and leaching time of 12 hours, while in the case of V, the highest recovery is observed at pH 9.0 and 8 hours. In both cases, the leaching solution contained 10 wt % alkaline. Based on the experimental information and data from a commercial plant, a preliminary economy study was developed, in which the expected economical benefits of metals recovery from spent catalysts used for hydrotreating heavy hydrocarbon are estimated. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se describe la problematica de la creciente produccion de catalizadores gastados de los procesos de hidrotratamiento de hidrocarburos pesados. Estos catalizadores contienen cantidades importantes de metales pesados como molibdeno (Mo), niquel (Ni), cobalto (Co) y vanadio (V), que son susceptibles de recuperarse y obtener con ello un beneficio economico. Tambien se presentan resultados de pruebas experimentales de lixiviacion alcalina (NaOH) para la recuperacion de V y Mo, y el efecto de las variables de operacion sobre la recuperacion de metales. En general, se encontro que las mejores recuperaciones de Mo fueron a pH de 8.5 y 12 h, mientras que para el V fueron a pH de 9.0 y 8 h, ambos a una concentracion del agente lixiviante de 10% en peso. Con base en la informacion experimental obtenida y datos de una planta industrial se presenta un estudio economico preliminar, en el que se estiman los beneficios

  16. Ethanolysis conversion of spent frying oils over aluminium, calcium-phosphate based bi-functional formulated catalysts. Catalytic activity assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zaini, Essam O.; Chesterfield, Dean; Adesina, Adesoji A. [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). Reactor Engineering and Technology Group; Olsen, John [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2013-06-01

    The current study compares the catalytic performance of two bi-functional solid catalysts for the transesterification of waste cooking vegetable oil in presence of bio-ethanol acyl-acceptor. The two catalysts were aluminum oxide and seashell-derived calcium oxide supported K{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The catalytic activity of the produced catalyst samples were assessed and evaluated in terms of their textural and surface chemical properties. Evaluative runs showed that increased amounts of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} have differently controlled the textural and surface chemical property of the finally synthesised catalyst samples. The behaviour revealed a strong correlation between the percentage yield of ethyl esters EEY% and acid-base site density and strength between the two types of catalysts. Possible leaching test of the catalysts was also used as a measure of performance and as a result, the optimum catalyst, on the basis of both ester yield and resistance to leaching was identified as the sample containing between 10 and 15wt% of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} on AlO{sub 3} and CaO respectively. (orig.)

  17. Influence of lanthanum on the performance of Zr-Co/activated carbon catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Yunjie Ding; Yuan Lü; Hejun Zhu; Liwu Lin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of La loading on Zr-Co/activated carbon (AC) catalysts has been studied for Fischer-Tropsch syn-thesis. The catalyst samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, CO-TPD, and temperature programmed CO hydrogenation.The catalytic property was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor. The experimental results showed that CO conversion increased from 86.4% to 92.3% and the selectivity to methane decreased from 14.2% to 11.5% and C5+ selectivity increased from 71.0% to 74.7% when low La loading (La=0.2wt%) was added into the Zr-Co/AC catalyst. However, high loadings of La (La= 0.3-1.0 wt%) would decrease catalyst activity as well as the C5+ selectivity and increase methane selectivity. XRD results displayed that La-modified Zr-Co/AC catalyst had little effect on the dispersion of Co catalyst. But, the results of TPR, CO-TPD, and temperature programmed CO hydrogenation techniques indicated that the extent of cobalt reduction was found to greatly influence the activity and selectivity of the catalyst. The addition of a small amount of La increased the reducibility of the Zr-Co/AC catalyst and restrained the formation of methane and improved the selectivity to long chain hydrocarbons. However, excess of La led to the decrease of the reducibility of Co catalyst thus resulted in higher methanation activity.

  18. Sulfur Tolerant Magnesium Nickel Silicate Catalyst for Reforming of Biomass Gasification Products to Syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Swartz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium nickel silicate (MNS has been investigated as a catalyst to convert tars and light hydrocarbons to syngas (CO and H2 by steam reforming and CO2 reforming in the presence of H2S for biomass gasification process at NexTech Materials. It was observed that complete CH4 conversion could be achieved on MNS catalyst granules at 800–900 °C and a space velocity of 24,000 mL/g/h in a simulated biomass gasification stream. Addition of 10–20 ppm H2S to the feed had no apparent impact on CH4 conversion. The MNS-washcoated monolith also showed high activities in converting methane, light hydrocarbons and tar to syngas. A 1200 h test without deactivation was achieved on the MNS washcoated monolith in the presence of H2S and/or NH3, two common impurities in gasified biomass. The results indicate that the MNS material is a promising catalyst for removal of tar and light hydrocarbons from biomass gasified gases, enabling efficient use of biomass to produce power, liquid fuels and valuable chemicals.

  19. Control of harmful hydrocarbon species in the exhaust of modern advanced GDI engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A. O.; Abu-jrai, A.; Turner, D.; Tsolakis, A.; Xu, H. M.; Golunski, S. E.; Herreros, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic but currently non-regulated hydrocarbon compounds ranging from C5-C11, before and after a zoned three-way catalytic converter (TWC) in a modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine has been studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The GDI engine has been operated under conventional and advanced combustion modes, which result in better fuel economy and reduced levels of NOx with respect to standard SI operation. However, these fuel-efficient conditions are more challenging for the operation of a conventional TWC, and could lead to higher level of emissions released to the environment. Lean combustion leads to the reduction in pumping losses, fuel consumption and in-cylinder emission formation rates. However, lean HCCI will lead to high levels of unburnt HCs while the presence of oxygen will lower the TWC efficiency for NOx control. The effect on the catalytic conversion of the hydrocarbon species of the addition of hydrogen upstream the catalyst has been also investigated. The highest hydrocarbon engine-out emissions were produced for HCCI engine operation at low engine load operation. The catalyst was able to remove most of the hydrocarbon species to low levels (below the permissible exposure limits) for standard and most of the advanced combustion modes, except for naphthalene (classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer) and methyl-naphthalene (which has the potential to cause lung damage). However, when hydrogen was added upstream of the catalyst, the catalyst conversion efficiency in reducing methyl-naphthalene and naphthalene was increased by approximately 21%. This results in simultaneous fuel economy and environmental benefits from the effective combination of advanced combustion and novel aftertreatment systems.

  20. Ammonia treated Mo/AC catalysts for CO hydrogenation with improved oxygenates selectivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHARIF F ZAMAN; NAGARAJU PASUPULETY; ABDULRAHIM A AL-ZAHRANI; MUHAMMAD A DAOUS; S S AL-SHAHRANI; HITOSHI INOKAWA; LACHEZAR A PETROV; HAFEDH DRISS

    2017-05-01

    A series of ammonia treated Mo/Activated Carbon (AC) catalysts were synthesized by wet impregnation method by nominal incorporation of 5, 10 and 15 wt% of molybdenum. The calcined catalysts (500◦C, 4 h, N₂ flow) were subjected to a stepwise ammonia treatment at temperatures from 25 up to 700◦C. This work reports for the first time, ammonia treated different loadings of Mo on DARCO mesoporous activated carbon for CO hydrogenation reaction. These catalysts were tested in the reaction temperature range of 250–325◦C, 7 MPa and 12000/h (GHSV for reactor volume 0.5 mL). At 250◦C, all the catalysts showed total oxygenate selectivity of ∼50%, mainly methanol. At 325◦C, total oxygenate selectivity of 16.5% with 18% CO conversion was obtained on 10Mo-N/AC. The result of alcohol distribution revealed high selectivity to propanol (39%) over methanol (34%) at 325◦C on 10Mo-N/AC which highlights its unique catalytic behavior in CO hydrogenation. Further, 10MoO3/AC catalyst, with no treatment of ammonia, showed only 4% of CO conversion with 96% hydrocarbon selectivity. Only 0.5% of CO conversion was observed on AC itself at 325◦C. The improved oxygenates selectivity on 10Mo-N/AC was associated with Moδ+ sites on AC generated viaammonolysis.

  1. Photocatalytic Synthesis of Hydrocarbon Oxygenates from C2H6 and CO2 over Pd-MoO3/SiO2 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xitao Wang; Zhong He; Shunhe Zhong; Xiufen Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Pd-MoO3/SiO2 catalyst has been prepared using the method of incipient wetness impregnation. The photo absorbing behaviors and chemisorbing properties of the catalyst have been characterized by UV-vis spectra and TPD-MS experiments. The results indicated that metal Pd loaded on MoO3/SiO2 has a significant effect on the photo absorbing performance of MoO3/SiO2, and an obvious blue shift of the absorption edge is produced. Under UV irradiation, the chemisorption state of CO2 undergoes decomposing process to form CO at 481 K, and a two-site adsorption state of ethane can be formed at around 496 K. Photo-oxidation of ethane using carbon dioxide can mainly produce propanal, ethanol and acetaldehyde in the temperature range of 353-423 K. The presence of metal Pd improves the catalytic activity remarkably.

  2. Correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and water-hydrocarbon ratio in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Zhou; Qingling Chen; Yuewu Tao; Huixin Weng

    2011-01-01

    In order to shorten the evaluation cycle of cobalt catalyst before the optimized catalyst is fixed on,a mathematical method is proposed to calculate weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons.Based on the carbide polymerization mechanism and the main hydrocarbons being linear alkanes and α-olefins,the correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and the molecular mass ratio of water to hydrocarbons is discussed.The result shows the ratio was within the range of 1.125-1.286 and the lower the ratio,the more gaseous hydrocarbons were obtained.Moreover,a linear equation between the weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons and the weight ratio of C5+ hydrocarbons to the total water is established.These results are validated by corresponding experiments.The weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons could be immediately calculated by this linear equation without detailed gas chromatography (GC) analysis of them.

  3. On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jr., John L.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

  4. Catalytic performance for CO{sub 2} conversion to methanol of gallium-promoted copper-based catalysts. Influence of metallic precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyir, Jamil; Ramirez de la Piscina, Pilar; Homs, Narcis [Departament de Quimica Inorganica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fierro, Jose Luis G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2001-11-28

    This study reports new gallium-promoted copper-based catalysts prepared by co-impregnation of methoxide-acetylacetonate (acac) precursors from methanolic solutions onto silica and zinc oxide supports. Catalyst performance in the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation to methanol was investigated at 2MPa and temperatures between 523 and 543K. A high activity and selectivity for ZnO-supported catalysts was found, which also showed a high stability in terms of both activity and selectivity. The maximum value for the activity was 378gMeOH/kgcath at 543K, with a selectivity of 88% towards methanol production. The high performance of these materials in the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation is related to the presence of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoter and highly dispersed Cu{sup +} species on the surface, determined by XPS and Auger on used catalysts.

  5. Preparation of hierarchical mesoporous Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst and its application in MTG reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youming Ni; Aiming Sun; Xiaoling Wu; Guoliang Hai; Jianglin Hu; Tao Li; Guangxing Li

    2011-01-01

    The hierarchical mesoporous Zn/ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst was prepared by NaOH treatment and Zn impregnation, and its application in the conversion of methanol to gasoline (MTG) was studied. N2 adsorption-desorption results showed that the mesopores with sizes of 2-20 nm in HZ5/0.3AT was formed by 0.3 M NaOH alkali treatment. The zeolite samples after modification were also characterized by XRF, AAS,XRD, SEM and NH3-TPD methods. Zn impregnated catalyst Zn/HZ5/0.3AT exhibited dramatic improvements in catalytic lifetime and liquid hydrocarbons yield. The selectivity of aromatic hydrocarbons was also improved after Zn impregnation. It is suggested that the mesopores of Zn/HZ5/0.3AT enhanced the synergetic effect of Zn species and acid sites and the capability to coke tolerance, which were confirmed by the results of catalytic test and TGA analysis, respectively.

  6. Chemical imaging of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Martin, David J.; Parsons, Aaron D.; Sławiński, Wojciech A.; Vamvakeros, Antonios; Keylock, Stephen J.; Beale, Andrew M.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2017-01-01

    Although we often understand empirically what constitutes an active catalyst, there is still much to be understood fundamentally about how catalytic performance is influenced by formulation. Catalysts are often designed to have a microstructure and nanostructure that can influence performance but that is rarely considered when correlating structure with function. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is a well-known and potentially sustainable technology for converting synthetic natural gas (“syngas”: CO + H2) into functional hydrocarbons, such as sulfur- and aromatic-free fuel and high-value wax products. FTS catalysts typically contain Co or Fe nanoparticles, which are often optimized in terms of size/composition for a particular catalytic performance. We use a novel, “multimodal” tomographic approach to studying active Co-based catalysts under operando conditions, revealing how a simple parameter, such as the order of addition of metal precursors and promoters, affects the spatial distribution of the elements as well as their physicochemical properties, that is, crystalline phase and crystallite size during catalyst activation and operation. We show in particular how the order of addition affects the crystallinity of the TiO2 anatase phase, which in turn leads to the formation of highly intergrown cubic close-packed/hexagonal close-packed Co nanoparticles that are very reactive, exhibiting high CO conversion. This work highlights the importance of operando microtomography to understand the evolution of chemical species and their spatial distribution before any concrete understanding of impact on catalytic performance can be realized. PMID:28345057

  7. Catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate using reduced copper-cerium oxide catalysts as low as 353 K and 1.3 MPa and the reaction mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiki eWada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC from CO2 and methanol under milder reaction conditions was performed using reduced cerium oxide catalysts and reduced copper-promoted Ce oxide catalysts. Although the conversion of methanol was low (0.005–0.11% for 2 h of reaction, DMC was synthesized as low as 353 K and at total pressure of as low as 1.3 MPa using reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.5 wt% of Cu. The apparent activation energy was 120 kJ mol–1 and the DMC synthesis rates were proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. An optimum amount of Cu addition to CeO2 was 0.1 wt% for DMC synthesis under the conditions at 393 K and total pressure of 1.3 MPa for 2 h (conversion of methanol: 0.15% due to the compromise of two effects of Cu: the activation of H2 during reduction prior to the kinetic tests and the block (cover of the surface active site. The reduction effects in H2 were monitored through the reduction of Ce4+ sites to Ce3+ based on the shoulder peak intensity at 5727 eV in the Ce L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES. The Ce3+ content was 10% for reduced CeO2 catalyst whereas it increased to 15% for reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.5wt% of Cu. Moreover, the content of reduced Ce3+ sites (10% associated with the surface O vacancy (defect sites decreased to 5% under CO2 at 290 K for reduced Cu–CeO2 catalyst (0.1wt% of Cu. The adsorption step of CO2 on the defect sites might be the key step in DMC synthesis and thus the DMC synthesis rate dependence on the partial pressure of CO2 was proportional. Subsequent H atom subtraction steps from methanol at the neighboring surface Lewis base sites should combine two methoxy species to the adsorbed CO2 to form DMC, water, and restore the surface O vacancy.

  8. Direct Catalytic Conversion of Cellobiose into Sorbitol in Extremely Low Acid over Ruthenium Catalysts%超低酸性环境中Ru/C催化纤维二糖一步法制备山梨醇的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李计彪; 武书彬; 张军

    2012-01-01

    以Ru/C为催化剂,在超低酸环境和氢气气氛下,将纤维二糖一步转化制备山梨醇.考察了反应温度、反应时间以及催化剂用量对山梨醇产率的影响.实验结果表明,在0.05%H3PO4环境,Ru/C催化剂用量15%,转速为600 r/min,反应温度为458 K以及3 MPa氢气条件下反应1h,产物山梨醇的产率最高,可达到87.1%.同时,催化剂重复利用研究表明Ru/C是一种较理想的氢化反应催化剂,可重复利用且催化效率较高.%Ru/C catalyst and extremely low acid were employed for one-step conversion of cellobiose into sorbitol in the presence of hydrogen. Effects of reaction temperature, reaction time and catalyst usage on sorbitol yield were discussed. Experimental results showed that the highest sorbitol yield of 87. 1% was obtained at reaction temperature of 458 K and catalyst usage of 15 % for 1 h under 3 MPa H2 with the stirring rate of 600 r/min. Meanwhile, catalyst recycling showed that Ru/C was an ideal hydro-genation catalyst with high catalytic efficiency, which could be recycled several times.

  9. Development of a CO2 Tolerant Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst:from Laboratory to Commercial-Scale Demonstration in Alaska

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joep J H M Font Freide; Tim D Gamlin; J Richard Hensman; Barry Nay; Christopher Sharp

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development of BP's Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, used for the conversion of carbon monoxide and hydrogen into liquid hydrocarbons. It covers the 18 year period from the early eighties, when laboratory scale preparations and micro-reactors were heavily used, right through to the present day with the commercial scale manufacture and proving of the finished catalyst in BP's new $86 million gas to liquids demonstration facility in Nikiski, Alaska. Extensive performance testing and scale-up experiments have been successfully carried out, all proof that a laboratory preparation can indeed be translated into a commercial manufacturing process. In addition, the resulting catalyst does not only meet the process design targets, but also exhibits enhanced stability and is tolerant to carbon dioxide.Above all, a commercial scale, fixed bed Fischer-Tropsch catalyst is now available and ready for licensing.Manufacturing procedures and quality control have all been successfully detailed and transferred to the commercial manufacturer.

  10. Escherichia coli as a potential hydrocarbon conversion microorganism. Oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds by recombinant E. coli in two-liquid phase (aqueous-organic) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favre-Bulle, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    The increased interest in the study of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms in recent years has been stimulated by the possibility of using their monooxygenases in the selective oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. As an example, long chain (>C16) n-alkanes are converted to dicarboxylic

  11. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  12. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  13. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrevaya, H.

    1992-05-06

    The objective of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. The performance targets are 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion with less than 1% deactivation/day for 1 month and a methane and ethane selectivity of no more than 7% (based on hydrocarbons and oxygenates only) at a space velocity of at least 2 normal liters per hr gram iron (NL/hr/gFe) using a synthesis gas with 0.5--1.0 H{sub 2}:Co ratio in a slurry reactor.

  14. Discerning the Location and Nature of Coke Deposition from Surface to Bulk of Spent Zeolite Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Bao, Jie; Guo, Mond F.; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Xu, Zhijie; Gray, Michel J.; Prodinger, Sebastian; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits (coke) in zeolite pores during catalysis leads to temporary deactivation of catalyst, necessitating regeneration steps, affecting throughput, and resulting in partial permanent loss of catalytic efficiency. Yet, even to date, the coke molecule distribution is quite challenging to study with high spatial resolution from surface to bulk of the catalyst particles at a single particle level. To address this challenge we investigated the coke molecules in HZSM-5 catalyst after ethanol conversion treatment by a combination of C K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), 13C Cross polarization-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography (APT). XAS and NMR highlighted the aromatic character of coke molecules. APT permitted the imaging of the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon molecules located within the pores of spent HZSM-5 catalyst from surface to bulk at a single particle level. 27Al NMR results and APT results indicated association of coke molecules with Al enriched regions within the spent HZSM-5 catalyst particles. The experimental results were additionally validated by a level-set–based APT field evaporation model. These results provide a new approach to investigate catalytic deactivation due to hydrocarbon coking or poisoning of zeolites at an unprecedented spatial resolution.

  15. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  16. Hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum heavy fractions using the TLC-FID technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.K.; Sarowha, S.L.S.; Bhagat, S.D. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India); Tiwari, R.K.; Gupta, S.K.; Venkataramani, P.S. [Defence Materials and Stores, Research and Development, Establishment, Kanpur (India)

    1998-03-01

    Hydrocarbon group type analysis is important in all conversion processes and in preparation of feed for these conversion processes so as to learn the selectivity of the different type of catalysts for product yield and quality. The use of the Mark 5 Iatroscan detector and the method reported here allowed for a rapid and quantitative hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum residues without prior separation of asphaltenes. SARA type analyses of petroleum residues have been performed by a three stage development using n-hexane, toluene and DCM (95%):MeOH (5%). The standard deviation and coefficient of variation in repeated measurements by this method were as low as 0.65 wt% or less and 3.5 wt% or less, respectively. The time required for analysis of 10 samples could be as short as 90 min. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 tabs., 21 refs.

  17. Effect of Manganese Incorporation Manner on an Iron-Based Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingzhen Li; Yong Yang; Chenghua Zhang; Zhichao Tao; Haijun Wan; Xia An; Hongwei Xiang; Yongwang Li

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the manganese incorporation manner on the textural properties,bulk and surface phase compositions,reduction/carburization behaviors,and surface basicity of an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst.The catalyst samples were characterized by N2 Physisorption,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS),H2(or CO) temperature-programmed reduction(TPR),CO2 temperature-programmed desorption(TPD),and Mossbauer spectroscopy.The FTS performance of the catalysts was studied in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor(CSTR).The characterization results indicated that the manganese promoter incor-porated by using the coprecipitation method could improve the dispersion of iron oxide,and decrease the size of the iron oxide crystallite.The manganese incorporated with the impregnation method is enriched on the catalyst's surface.The manganese promoter added with the impregnation method suppresses the reduction and carburization of the catalyst in H2,CO,and syngas because of the excessive enrichment of manganese on the catalyst surface.The catalyst added manganese using the coprecipitation method has the highest CO conversion (51.9%) and the lowest selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons(C12+).

  18. Normal hydrocarbons as a source of resin formation in the process of obtaining isoprene from isopentane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Sire, Y.M.; Vasil' yeva, V.P.; Gitis, K.M.; Rozengart, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on a catalyst of dehydrogenation of olefins of the conversion of isoamylenes and other C/sub 5/ hydrocarbons (isoprene, n-pentenes, piperylene), formed during dehydrogenation of isoamylenes to isoprene. It was found that the yield of heavy products increases on transition from hydrocarbons of iso-structure to normal hydrocarbons, which is due to the greater ease of polycondensation of cyclopentadiene formed from n-pentenes and particularly from piperylene under conditions of dehydrogenation. A study was made by chromato-mass-spectrometry of the composition of heavy products of conversion of piperylene and isoprene. In contrast with the catalysate of isoprene, the catalysate of piperylene contains a significant proportion of hydrocarbons containing a five-membered ring in the molecule (dicyclopentadiene, indane, indene, methylindenes, azilene), this being due to the participation of cyclopentadiene in the formation of heavy products. In the two-stage process of dehydrogenation of isopentane to isoprene 95% normal hydrocarbons are formed on dehydrogenation of isopentane to isoamylenes. (JMT)

  19. Conversion of polar and non-polar algae oil lipids to fatty acid methyl esters with solid acid catalysts--A model compound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Martta; Munter, Tony; Linnekoski, Juha

    2015-09-01

    Bio-based fuels are becoming more and more important due to the depleting fossil resources. The production of biodiesel from algae oil is challenging compared to terrestrial vegetable oils, as algae oil consists of polar fatty acids, such as phospholipids and glycolipids, as well as non-polar triglycerides and free fatty acids common in vegetable oils. It is shown that a single sulphonated solid acid catalyst can perform the esterification and transesterification reactions of both polar and non-polar lipids. In mild reaction conditions (60-70 °C) Nafion NR50 catalyst produces methyl palmitate (FAME) from the palmitic acid derivatives of di-, and tri-glyceride, free fatty acid, and phospholipid with over 80% yields, with the glycolipid derivative giving nearly 40% yields of FAME. These results demonstrate how the polar and non-polar lipid derivatives of algal oil can be utilised as feedstocks for biodiesel production with a single catalyst in one reaction step.

  20. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI: Major differences in deactivation behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Højholt, Karen Thrane; Holm, Martin Spangsberg;

    2012-01-01

    Methanol has been converted to hydrocarbons over conventional and mesoporous H-ZSM-5 and H-Ga-MFI. The gallium based zeotypes are analogous to H-ZSM-5, but the Brønsted acidity is introduced by framework incorporation of gallium rather than aluminum, which leads to lower intrinsic acid strength. ...... (hydrolysis) of the Ga&sbnd;O bonds in the zeolite structure rather than coke deposition....

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Catalytic activity in individual cracking catalyst particles imaged throughout different life stages by selective staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurmans, Inge L. C.; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Knowles, William V.; van der Beek, David; Bergwerff, Jaap A.; Vogt, Eelco T. C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2011-11-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the major conversion process used in oil refineries to produce valuable hydrocarbons from crude oil fractions. Because the demand for oil-based products is ever increasing, research has been ongoing to improve the performance of FCC catalyst particles, which are complex mixtures of zeolite and binder materials. Unfortunately, there is limited insight into the distribution and activity of individual zeolitic domains at different life stages. Here we introduce a staining method to visualize the structure of zeolite particulates and other FCC components. Brønsted acidity maps have been constructed at the single particle level from fluorescence microscopy images. By applying a statistical methodology to a series of catalysts deactivated via industrial protocols, a correlation is established between Brønsted acidity and cracking activity. The generally applicable method has clear potential for catalyst diagnostics, as it determines intra- and interparticle Brønsted acidity distributions for industrial FCC materials.

  3. Discerning the Location and Nature of Coke Deposition from Surface to Bulk of Spent Zeolite Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Bao, Jie; Guo, Mond F.; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Xu, Zhijie; Gray, Michel J.; Prodinger, Sebastian; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.

    2016-11-23

    The nanoscale compositional mapping of fresh HZSM-5 catalyst synthesized using hydrothermal process as well as after just steaming and after ethanol conversion reaction for 72 hours at realistic catalytic conditions was investigated using atom probe tomography. Atom probe tomography permitted direct atomic scale imaging of non-uniform distribution of Al within the HZSM-5 as well as for the first time image the hydrocarbon coking after ethanol reaction. Clear evidences for existence of multiple C-H molecular species which appear to aggregate as clusters within the pores of spent HZSM-5 catalyst materials is provided. These results provide evidence for the ability of atom probe tomography, a powerful 3D characterization tool in interrogating the atomic scale chemistry of zeolite catalyst materials at industrially relevant catalytic conditions.

  4. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, R.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The United States has vast natural gas reserves which could contribute significantly to our energy security if economical technologies for conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals were developed. Many of these reserves are small scale or in remote locations and of little value unless they can be transported to consumers. Transportation is economically performed via pipeline, but this route is usually unavailable in remote locations. Another option is to convert the methane in the gas to liquid hydrocarbons, such as methanol, which can easily and economically be transported by truck. Therefore, the conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons has the potential to decrease our dependence upon oil imports by opening new markets for natural gas and increasing its use in the transportation and chemical sectors of the economy. In this project, we are attempting to develop, and explore new catalysts capable of direct oxidation of methane to methanol. The specific objectives of this work are discussed.

  5. Conversion of Fe-rich waste sludge into nano-flake Fe-SC hybrid Fenton-like catalyst for degradation of AOII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingjun; Zhu, Yuting; Liu, Mingxiang; Chang, Xiangyang; Xiong, Ya; Chen, Diyun

    2016-09-01

    Permanently increasing in the amount of sludge resulted in the serious environment burden. This work reports a novel carbothermal process for converting the Fe-rich waste sludge into cleaner nano-flake Fenton-like catalyst to relieve the crisis. The transformation of Fe species at different carbothermal temperature was evaluated by XRD analysis. SEM and XPS analyses were involved to characterize the morphology and chemical bonds of the catalysts. Results shown that the resulted catalyst carbonized at 800 °C (Fe-SC-800) was composed of Fe(0) and Fe3O4, performing nano-flake-like structure. The Fe-SC-800 has the highest catalytic activity in degradation of AOII in C0 = 200 mg/L. The efficiency achieves at 98% within 30 min at neutral pH, which is ascribed to the hydroxyl radical oxidation. Moreover, no iron is leached and the Fe-SC-800 could be recycled for three times at least. Thus, the Fe rich sludge could be reutilized as a valuable source for eco-friendly catalyst production, constituting an ecological way to manage these sludge wastes and eliminate the sludge and organic pollution to environment.

  6. Exploratory Catalyst Screening Studies on the Base Free Conversion of Glycerol to Lactic Acid and Glyceric Acid in Water Using Bimetallic Au–Pt Nanoparticles on Acidic Zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purushothaman, R.K.P.; Haveren, van J.; Mayoral, A.; Melian-Cabrera, I.; Heeres, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The base free oxidation of glycerol with molecular oxygen in water using bimetallic Au-Pt catalysts on three different acidic zeolite supports (H-mordenite, H-beta and H-USY) was explored in a batch setup. At temperatures between 140 and 180 degrees C, lactic acid formation was significant and

  7. Kinetic Rates of the Fischer Tropsch Synthesis on a Co/Nb2O5 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Víctor R.Ahón; Paulo L.C.Lage; Carlos D.D.de Souza; Fabiana M.Mendes; Martin Schmal

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction over a Co/Nb2O5 catalyst in a fixed bed reactor was investigated experimentally. Experiments were carried out under isothermal and isobaric conditions (T=543 K, P=2.1 MPa) and under different conditions of several H2/CO feed molar ratio (0.49-4.79), space velocities (0.2-3.8 h-1), mass of catalyst (0.3-1.5 g), and CO conversion (10%-29%).Synthesis gas conversion was measured and data were reduced to estimate the kinetic parameters for different Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions. Differential and integral reactor models were used for the nonlinear regression of kinetics parameters. One of the rate equations could well explain the data. The hydrocarbon product distributions that were experimentally determined exhibited an unusual behavior,and a possible explanation was discussed.

  8. The effect of acid strength on the MTO reaction : Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over H-SAPO-34 and high silica Chabazite (H-SSZ-13)

    OpenAIRE

    Bleken, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    The Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process for the production of polymer-grade olefins is a possible step in the upgrading of natural gas. The preferred MTO catalyst is the microporous silicoaluminophosphate H-SAPO-34 (CHA topology). In the present work, H-SAPO-34 is compared with H-SSZ-13 which has the same topology and density of acid sites, but is slightly more acidic due to the framework composition. This is a one-parameter study where the effect of acidity on the MTO-process is ...

  9. Co-conversion of Ethane and Methanol into Higher Hydrocarbons over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Rovik, Anne; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    Ethane and methanol are converted simultaneously over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5 to produce light olefins and aromatics. The presence of methanol in the reactant stream is intended to facilitate activation of ethane following literature reports on co-conversion of methane and methanol....... However, the conversion of ethane actually decreases significantly when methanol is present. To gain insight into mechanistic details, C-13-labeled methanol is co-converted with unlabeled ethane. These isotopic labeling studies show that carbon atoms from ethane and methanol are mixed in the products...

  10. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  11. Catalytic cracking of non-edible sunflower oil over ZSM-5 for hydrocarbon bio-jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianhui; Wei, Lin; Julson, James; Qiao, Qiquan; Dubey, Ashish; Anderson, Gary

    2015-03-25

    Non-edible sunflower oils that were extracted from sunflower residual wastes were catalytically cracked over a ZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed reactor at three different reaction temperatures: 450°C, 500°C and 550°C. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, FT-IR, BET and SEM. Characterizations of the upgraded sunflower oils, hydrocarbon fuels, distillation residues and non-condensable gases were carried out. The effect of the reaction temperature on the yield and quality of liquid products was discussed. The results showed that the reaction temperature affected the hydrocarbon fuel yield but had a minor influence on its properties. The highest conversion efficiency from sunflower oils to hydrocarbon fuels was 30.1%, which was obtained at 550°C. The reaction temperature affected the component content of the non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gases generated at 550°C contained the highest content of light hydrocarbons (C1-C5), CO, CO2 and H2. Compared to raw sunflower oils, the properties of hydrocarbon fuels including the dynamic viscosity, pH, moisture content, density, oxygen content and heating value were improved.

  12. Performance of Ni/dolomite pellet catalyst on gas distribution from cassava rhizome gasification with a modular fixed-bed gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharoenchaikul, V; Atong, D; Sornkade, P; Nisamaneenate, J

    2016-08-19

    Thermal conversion of cassava rhizome was performed using a modular downdraft gasifier with the addition of Ni-based catalysts as promising tar eliminating and produced gas upgrading techniques. The activities of a synthesized 5% Ni/dolomite pellet catalyst prepared by impregnation method were investigated in a secondary reactor downstream of the gasifier. High reforming activity of the Ni/dolomite pellet catalyst on tar reduction was achieved. The conversion to H2 and CO was improved via steam reforming of methane and char reaction with CO2. Moreover, the formation of CH4 and CxHy was diminished through the tar or condensable hydrocarbon reformed on the catalyst surface. The carbon and hydrogen conversions of cassava rhizome with prepared catalyst were 83.79% and 61.78%, respectively, at an air flow rate of 1.98 m(3)/hr. At this condition, tar formation was low, while the lower heating value was 4.39 MJ/m(3) and H2 to CO molar ratio was 1.22. Generally, the addition of a catalyst not only enhanced gas production, but also reduced tar and particulate matter generation; thus, its implementation should help lessen the pollution control requirement and cost of operation, while allowing higher quality fuel gas production.

  13. Aromatization of n-octane over Pd/C catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Mengchen

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase aromatization of n-octane was investigated using Pd/C catalyst. The objectives were to: (1) determine the effects of temperature (400-600 °C), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) (0.8-∞), and hydrogen to hydrocarbon molar ratio (MR) (0-6) on conversion, selectivity, and yield (2) compare the activity of Pd/C with Pt/C and Pt/KL catalysts and (3) test the suitability of Pd/C for aromatization of different alkanes including n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane. Pd/C exhibited the best aromatization performance, including 54.4% conversion and 31.5% aromatics yield at 500 °C, WHSV = 2 h-1, and a MR of 2. The Pd/C catalyst had higher selectivity towards the preferred aromatics including ethylbenzene and xylenes, whereas Pt/KL had higher selectivity towards benzene and toluene. The results were somewhat consistent with adsorbed n-octane cyclization proceeding mainly through the six-membered ring closure mechanism. In addition, Pd/C was also capable of catalyzing aromatization of n-hexane and n-heptane. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of propane partial oxidation on vanadium-containing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, G.A.; Khalamejda, S.V.; Zazhigalov, V.A. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii

    1998-12-31

    The present results indicate that maximum selectivity to acrylic acid can be reached over V-P-Zr-O catalysts. When the hydrocarbon concentration is 5.1 vol.% the selectivity is about 30% at quite high paraffin conversion. Conclusively, some explanations to the observed facts can be given. The V-P-O catalyst promotion with lanthanum by means of mechanochemical treatment is distinguished by the additive uniform spreading all over the matrix surface. Such twophase system is highly active in propane conversion (lanthanum oxide) and further oxidation of the desired products. The similar properties are attributed to V-P-Bi-La-O catalyst. Bismuth, tellurium and zirconium additives having clearly defined acidic properties provoke the surface acidity strengthening and make easier desorption of the acidic product (acrylic acid) from the surface lowering its further oxidation. Additionally, since bismuth and zirconium are able to form phosphates and, according to, to create space limitations for the paraffin molecule movement out of the active group boundaries, this can be one more support in favour of the selectivity increase. With this point of view very interesting results were obtained. It has been shown that the more limited the size of the vanadium unit, the higher the selectivity is. Monoclinic phase AV{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 10} which consists in clusters of four vanadium atoms is sensibly more reactive than the orthorhombic phase consists in V{sub {infinity}} infinite chains. (orig.)

  15. Conversion of actual flue gas CO 2 via cycloaddition to propylene oxide catalyzed by a single-site, recyclable zirconium catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2017-06-12

    A reusable zirconium-based catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 to propylene oxide (PO) was prepared by the surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) methodology. Accordingly, well-defined amounts of the ZrCl4·(OEt2)2 precursor were grafted on the surface of silica dehydroxylated at 700°C (SiO2-700) and at 200°C (SiO2-200) in order to afford surface coordination compounds with different podality and chemical environment. The identity of the surface complexes was thoroughly investigated by FT-IR, elemental microanalysis and solid state NMR and applied as a recoverable and reusable heterogeneous catalyst for the title reaction using pure CO2 and flue gas samples from a cement factory. The observed catalytic activity for the isolated zirconium complexes is rationalized by means of systematic DFT calculations.

  16. The mechanism of action of titania catalysts in sulfur recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.D.; Dowling, N.I.; Huang, M.

    2010-01-15

    The mechanism recovering sulfur from hydrocarbons using titania catalysts in a commercial titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) Claus process was investigated. Titania (Ti{sup 3+}) was obtained by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) treatment at 320 degrees C for 1 hour. The presence of Ti{sup 3+} increases carbon disulphide (CS{sub 2}) hydrolysis as well as the CS{sub 2} conversion activities at the first converter condition. The catalytic behaviour of titania in the Claus process was described. The high CS{sub 2} activity of titania at first and second converted conditions was described along with its ability to promote conversion via either hydrolysis or reaction with sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). The surface sulfate on titania is more active at first converter condition, but the slow turnover of sulfate back to thiosulfates at low temperature inhibits the Claus reaction and the carbon disulphide conversion at the third converter condition. Comparing alumina and titania for carbon disulphide conversion, titania gives a better conversion over time, although during the first 6 hours of the process alumina appears to provide the better conversion. 12 figs.

  17. An efficient hydrogenation catalyst in sulfuric acid for the conversion of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol: N-doped carbon with encapsulated molybdenum carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Dong, Zhen; Cai, Weimeng; Wang, Yongzheng; Fu, Teng; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Luming; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-23

    The transfer of catalytic function from molybdenum carbide to N-doped carbon has been tested by encapsulating molybdenum carbide with N-doped carbon using a one-pot preparation process. The outer layer of N-doped carbon, inert itself, exhibits high activity and excellent selectivity with molybdenum carbide as the catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol in sulfuric acid.

  18. Time- and space-resolved study of the methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction - influence of zeolite topology on axial deactivation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Gama, Daniel; Etemadi, Samaneh; Kirby, Eliot; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Beato, Pablo; Svelle, Stian; Olsbye, Unni

    2017-02-10

    Zeolites representing seven different topologies were subjected to life-time assessment studies as methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) catalysts at 400 °C, P(MeOH) = 13 kPa and P(tot) = 100 kPa. The following topologies were studied: ZSM-22 (TON), ZSM-23 (MTT), IM-5 (IMF), ITQ-13 (ITH), ZSM-5 (MFI), mordenite (MOR) and beta (BEA). Two experimental approaches were used. In the first approach, each catalyst was tested at three different contact times, all giving 100% initial conversion. The life-time before conversion decreased to 50% at each contact time was measured and used to calculate critical contact times (i.e. the contact time needed to launch the autocatalytic MTH reaction) and deactivation rates. It was found that the critical contact time is strongly correlated with pore size: the smaller the pore size, the longer the critical contact time. The second experimental approach consisted of testing the catalysts in a double tube reactor with 100% initial conversion, and quenching the reaction after 4 consecutive times on stream, representing full, partial, and zero conversion. After quenching, the catalyst bed was divided into four segments, which were individually characterised for coke content (temperature-programmed oxidation) and specific surface area (N2 adsorption). The axial deactivation pattern was found to depend on pore size. With increasing pore size, the main source of coke formation changed from methanol conversion (1D 10-ring structures), to partly methanol, partly product conversion (3D 10-ring structures) and finally mainly product conversion (3D 12-ring structure). As a result, the methanol conversion capacity changed little with contact time for ZSM-5, while it increased with increasing contact time for the catalysts with smaller pore sizes, and decreased with increasing contact time for pore sizes larger than ZSM-5.

  19. ACTIVITY TEST AND REGENERATION OF NiMo/Z CATALYST FOR HYDROCRACKING OF WASTE PLASTIC FRACTION TO GASOLINE FRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Activity test and regeneration of NiMo/active natural zeolite catalyst for hydrocracking of waste plastic fraction of polyprophylene (PP type have been carried out. The catalysts was prepared by loading Mo followed by Ni Metals onto the natural zeolite (Z sample, then calcined at 500oC, oxidized and reduced at 400oC under nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen stream, respectively. The characterization of catalysts including spesific surface area, average pore radius, and total pore volume were performed by gas sorption analyzer, amount of total acid sites was determined by gas sorption method, and acid site strength was confirmed by IR spectroscopy. The hydrocracking process was carried out in a semi-flow reactor system at 360 oC and catalyst:feed ratio 0.5 under hydrogen stream (150 mL/hour. The feed was vaporized from the pyrolisis reactor into the hydrocracking reactor. A liquid product was collected and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. The characterization results showed that spesific surface area, average pore radius, and total pore volume of the Z sample decreased after loading of the Ni and Mo metals. Amount of total acid sites of the NiMo/Z catalyst was higher than that of the Z sample. The activity of NiMo/Z catalyst decreased after several continously runs. Its regeneration produced the NiMo/Z reg catalyst with similar activity and selectivity to the fresh catalyst (NiMo/Z. The activity of catalysts at the optimum condition followed the order of NiMo/Z reg>NiMo/Z>Z (conversion of hydrocarbon C>12 and NiMo/Z reg>NiMo/Z>Z (total yield of gasoline fraction. The selectivity of catalysts for C7-C8 product followed the order of Z>NiMo/Z>NiMo/Z reg. Keywords: activity, polyprophylene, catalyst, gasoline fraction.

  20. An intensified π-hole in beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes: its determinant role in CO2 conversion into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2016-02-28

    DFT investigations on beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes or sheets (BNs) predict the existence of a very reactive kind of novel material capable of spontaneously reducing the first hydrogenation step in the CO2 conversion mechanism. This impressive behaviour appears as a result of the very deep π-hole generated by the beryllium moieties, and also determines its selectivity towards the production of CH4.

  1. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  2. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Meyer, P.; Snowden-Swan, L.; Padmaperuma, A.; Tan, E.; Dutta, A.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  3. Making fired bricks with spent equilibrium catalyst-a technical feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M.-L.; Chen, L.-M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Chou, S.-F.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking in an oil refinery uses a catalyst, such as an alumino-silicate zeolite, in the conversion of heavy hydrocarbons to light hydrocarbons. A small fraction of the catalyst is continually replaced with fresh catalyst to maintain activity. In North America, more than 400 tons of spent alumino-silicate equilibrium catalyst (spent e-cat), and worldwide, more than 1,100 tons, are generated daily, most of which is disposed of in landfills (municipal and on-site facilities). In this study, three spent e-cat samples were tested in a value-added application that would utilize this waste in the manufacturing of fired bricks. The results of this study indicate that spent e-cat is a technically feasible raw material substitute for the clay and shale commonly used in fired brick production. Fired bricks produced with up to 30 wt% of spent e-cat showed good physical appearance and their water absorption properties met the ASTM C 62 specifications for building bricks of either the moderate-or severe-weathering grade.

  4. Ruthenium promotion of Co/SBA-15 catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry-phase reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jocielys Jovelino Rodrigues; Gina Pecchi; Fabiano André Narciso Fernandes; Meiry Gláucia Freire Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the catalytic properties of a Ru promoted Co/SBA-15 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS).The Ru promoted Co/SBA-15 catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and was characterized by X-ray diffraction,X-ray energy dispersion spectrophotometer,N2 adsorption-desorption,temperature-programmed reduction and transmission electron microscopy.The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using the catalyst was carried out to evaluate the catalyst activity and its effect on FTS product distribution.The synthesis was carried out in a slurry reactor operating at 513 K,20 atm,CO ∶ H2 molar ratio of 1 ∶ 1.X-ray diffraction showed that the calcined cobalt catalyst did not modify the structure of SBA-15,proving that Co was present in the form of Co3O4 in the catalyst.The addition of cobalt in SBA-15 decreased the specific superficial area of the molecular sieve.Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity and C5+ hydrocarbon selectivity increased with the addition of Ru.The increases in activity and selectivity were attributed to the increased number of active sites resulting from higher reducibility and the synergetic effect of Ru and Co.Ru/Co/SBA-15 catalysts showed moderate conversion (40%) and high selectivity towards the production of C5+ (80 wt%).

  5. Metal segregation in supported bimetallic catalysts:. gamma. -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported CO hydrogenation catalysts prepared from RhOs/sub 3/, Rh/sub 4/, and FeOs/sub 3/ clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budge, J.R.; Lucke, B.F.; Gates, B.C.; Toran, J.

    1985-02-01

    Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported metals were prepared from (H/sub 2/RhOs/sub 3/(CO)/sub 10/(acetylacetonate)), (Rh/sub 4/(CO)/sub 12/), and (H/sub 2/FeOs/sub 3/(CO)/sub 13/). The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy after reaction with CO + H/sub 2/ and tested as catalysts for conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ in a flow reactor at 200 and 270/sup 0/C and 10 atm. Used catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The catalyst lost Os during operation, presumably as a result of formation of volatile carbonyls. The catalytic reaction products were a nearly Schulz-Flory-Anderson distribution of hydrocarbons with small yields of dimethyl ether (formed from methanol). The performance of the catalyst prepared from the RhOs/sub 3/ clusters was closely similar to that of the catalyst prepared from the Rh/sub 4/ cluster. Characterization of the samples after treatment in CO + H/sub 2/ and after catalysis demonstrated that the RhOs/sub 3/ clusters broke apart, first giving triosmium clusters and mononuclear Rh complexes and then, at higher temperatures, giving Rh crystallites and mononuclear Os complexes. The catalytic activity for hydrocarbon synthesis is attributed to the Rh metal; the activity for methanol synthesis is tentatively associated with ionic Rh complexes. The FeOs/sub 3/ catalyst was two orders of magnitude less active than the Rh Os/sub 3/ catalyst, apparently consisting of small iron oxide particles and mononuclear Os complexes. The selectivity of this catalyst for dimethyl ether formation increased markedly with time onstream in the flow reactor; after 55 h, 36 mol% of the organic product was ether. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Alkali/TX[sub 2] catalysts for CO/H[sub 2] conversion to C[sub 1]-C[sub 4] alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.; Bastian, R.; Kieke, M.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the patterns of variations of catalyst activity and selectivity for the synthesis of alcohols from H[sub 2]/CO synthesis gas. Since the source of carbon can be coal-derived synthesis gas, this research makes a contribution to the technology for high quality clean transportation fuels and for basic chemicals from coal. Catalysts prepared were principally based on MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], TaS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2]. Catalytic testing of these materials was carried out both before and after surface doping with Cs. In alcohol synthesis activation of hydrogen by the catalyst surface is essential. Knowledge of transition metal disulfide surface properties is important before the mechanism of hydrogen dissociation can be addressed. The electronic structures of MoS[sub 2], RuS[sub 2], and NbS[sub 2] were studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental valence bands were obtained by high resolution electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (HR-ESCA, also referred to as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and theoretical valence bands were calculated using solid state extended Hueckel theory. Comparison of two-dimensional (2-D) MoS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands with the experimental HR-ESCA valence bands of polycrystalline MoS[sub 2] led to parametrization of the S 3s, S 3p, and Mo 4d atomic ionization potentials and Slater-type coefficients and exponents. The S 3s and S 3p parameters obtained for MoS[sub 2] were used to obtain the NbS[sub 2] and RuS[sub 2] theoretical valence bands.

  7. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  8. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  9. OPTIMATION OF TIME AND CATALYST/FEED RATIO IN CATALYTIC CRACKING OF WASTE PLASTICS FRACTION TO GASOLINE FRACTION USING Cr/NATURAL ZEOLITE CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wega Trisunaryanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimation of time and catalyst/feed ratio in catalytic cracking of waste plastics fraction to gasoline fraction using Cr/Natural Zeolite catalyst has been studied.The natural zeolite was calcined by using nitrogen gas at 500 oC for 5 hours. The chromium supported on to the zeolite was prepared by ion exchange methode with Cr(NO33.9H2O solution with chromium/zeolite concentration of 1% (w/w. The zeolite samples were then calcined  with nitrogen gas at 500 oC for 2 hours, oxidyzed with oxygen gas and reduced with hydrogen at 400 oC for 2 hours. The characterization of the zeolite catalyst by means of Si/Al ratio by UV-Vis spectroscopy, acidity with pyridine vapour adsorption and Na, Ca and Cr contents by atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS. The catalyst activity test was carried out in the cracking process of waste plastics fraction with boiling point range of 150 - 250 °C (consisted of C12 - C16 hydrocarbons at 450 oC for 30 min, 60 min and 90 min, and catalyst/feed ratio 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, ¼ (w/w. The result of catalyst activity test  showed  that  the maximum number  conversion of gasoline fraction (C5-C11 is 53,27% with relatively low coke formation using 1/3 catalyst/feed ratio and the cracking time of 60 min.. This  catalyst has  Si/Al ratio = 1,21 (w/w , acidity = 0,16 mmol/g and Na content = 0,81%, Ca content = 0,15% and Cr content 0,24%.   Keywords: zeolite, catalytic cracking, gasoline, chromium.

  10. The effects of catalysts on the conversion of organic matter and bio-fuel production in the microwave pyrolysis of sludge at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Lin; Sun, Shichang; Zhang, Peixin; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhao, Xuxin

    2017-08-01

    Adding catalyst could improve the yields and qualities of bio-gas and bio-oil, and realize the oriented production. Results showed that the catalytic gas-production capacities of CaO were higher than those of Fe2O3, and the bio-gas yield at 800°C reached a maximum of 35.1%. Because the polar cracking active sites of CaO reduced the activation energy of the pyrolysis reaction and resulted in high catalytic cracking efficiencies. In addition, the quality of bio-oil produced by CaO was superior to that by Fe2O3, although the bio-oil yield of CaO was relatively weak. The light bio-fuel oriented catalytic pyrolysis could be realized when adding different catalysts. At 800°C, CaO was 45% higher than Fe2O3 in aspect of H2 production while Fe2O3 was 103% higher than CaO in aspect of CH4 production. Therefore, CaO was more suitable for H2 production and Fe2O3 was more suitable for CH4 production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  12. Catalytic and Noncatalytic Conversion of Methane to Olefins and Synthesis Gas in an AC Parallel Plate Discharge Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Khodagholi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of methane to ethylene, acetylene, and synthesis gas at ambient pressure and temperature in a parallel plate discharge reactor was investigated. The experiments were carried out using a quartz reactor of outer diameter of 9 millimeter and a driving force of ac current of 50 Hz. The input power to the reactor to establish a stable gas discharge varied from 9.6 to maximum 15.3 watts (w. The effects of ZSM5, Fe–ZSM5, and Ni–ZSM5 catalysts combined with corona discharge for conversion of methane to more valued products have been addressed. It was found that in presence or absence of a catalyst in gas discharge reactor, the rate of methane and oxygen conversion increased upon higher input power supplied to the reactor. The effect of Fe–ZSM5 catalyst combined with gas discharge plasma yields C2 hydrocarbons up to 21.9%, which is the highest productions of C2 hydrocarbons in this work. The effect of combined Ni–ZSM5 and gas discharge plasma was mainly production of synthesis gas. The advantage of introducing ZSM5 to the plasma zone was increase in synthesis gas and acetylene production. The highest energy efficiency was 0.22 mmol/kJ, which belongs to lower rate of energy injection to the reactor.

  13. Dealuminated ZSM—5 Zeolite Catalyst for Ethylene Oligomerization to Liquid Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NorAishahSaidinaAmin; DidiDwiAnggoro

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene oligomerization using ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated to study the role of Broensted acid sites in the formation of higher hydrocarbons,The oligomeriztion of olefins,dependent on the acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite ,is an important step in the conversion of natural gas to liquied fuels,The framework Si/Al ratio reflects the number of potential acid sites and the acid strength of the ZSM-5 catalyst,ZSM-5 with the mole ratio SiO2/Al2O3 equal to 30 was dealuminated for different periods of time according to the acidic ion-exchange method to produce ZSM-5 with various Si/Al ratios,The FT-IR analysis revealed that the integrated framework aluminum band,non-framework aluminum band,and silanol groups areas of the ZSM-5 zeolites decreased after being dealuminated,The performanc of the dealuminated zeolite was tested for ethylene oligomerization.The results demonstrated that the dealumination of ZSM-5 led to higher ethylene conversion,but the gasoline selectivity was reduced compared to the performance of a ZSM-5 zeolite ,The characterization results revealed the amount of aluminum in the zeolitic framework,the crystallinity of the ZSM-5 zeolite,and the Si/Al ration affected the formation of Broensted acid sites,The number of the Broensted acid sites on the catalyst active sites is important in the olefin conversion to liquied hydrocarbons.

  14. Dealuminated ZSM-5 Zeolite Catalyst for Ethylene Oligomerization to Liquid Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene oligomerization using ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated to study the role of Bronstedacid sites in the formation of higher hydrocarbons. The oligomerization of olefins, dependent on the acidityof ZSM-5 zeolite, is an important step in the conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels. The framework Si/Alratio reflects the number of potential acid sites and the acid strength of the ZSM-5 catalyst. ZSM-5 withthe mole ratio SiO2/Al2O3 equal to 30 was dealuminated for different periods of time according to theacidic ion-exchange method to produce ZSM-5 with various Si/Al ratios. The FT-IR analysis revealedthat the integrated framework aluminum band, non-framework aluminum band, and silanol groups areasof the ZSM-5 zeolites decreased after being dealuminated. The performance of the dealuminated zeolitewas tested for ethylene oligomerization. The results demonstrated that the dealumination of ZSM-5 ledto higher ethylene conversion, but the gasoline selectivity was reduced compared to the performance of aZSM-5 zeolite. The characterization results revealed the amount of aluminum in the zeolitic framework,the crystallinity of the ZSM-5 zeolite, and the Si/Al ratio affected the formation of Bronsted acid sites.The number of the Bronsted acid sites on the catalyst active sites is important in the olefin conversion toliquid hydrocarbons.

  15. 沥青质临氢热裂化转化规律初步研究%Preliminary Investigation on Behaviors of Thermal Conversion of Asphaltene in the Presence of Hydrogen and Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董明; 龙军; 王子军; 侯焕娣; 王威

    2015-01-01

    The asphaltene structure of Tahe VR was studied by using APPI + FT-ICR MS ,XPS et al .The behaviors of thermal conversion of Tahe VR asphaltene in the presence of hydrogen and catalyst were investigated .The results showed that the thermal conversion process was dominated by thermal cracking ,and the catalyst inhibited the condensation of asphaltene and hydrogenate aromatic rings to promote the conversion of asphaltene . In the appropriate conditions , the asphaltene conversion rate of Tahe VR reached 85.8% ,and cracking rate 78.2% .The conversion of secondary asphaltene was the key for the conversion of asphaltene . It is difficult for the condensed aromatics and N-heterocycle aromatics in the secondary asphaltene of Tahe VR to convert ,and conversion difficulties of HC (aromatic) ,N1 (N-heterocycle containing one N atom ) , N2 (N-heterocycle containing two N atoms) decreased in turn .The components of asphaltene with sulfur and two or more than two different heteroatoms were easier to convert .The hydrogenation reaction is the key for asphaltene upgrading .%运用APPI+结合FT-ICR MS、XPS等方法分析塔河沥青质结构。以塔河减压渣油为原料研究沥青质的临氢热裂化转化规律。结果表明,沥青质临氢热裂化过程中的裂化反应以热裂化为主,催化剂可以抑制沥青质的缩合反应,并对沥青质中芳环结构加氢以促进其转化。在合适的条件下,塔河减压渣油沥青质转化率可以达到85.8%,裂化率达到78.2%。次生沥青质的转化是沥青质转化的关键,次生沥青质中最难转化的是稠环芳烃结构和氮稠环结构,其转化难度按从难到易的顺序为 HC(芳烃结构)、N1(含1个氮原子的芳香性氮化物结构)、N2(含2个氮原子的芳香性氮化物结构)。含硫结构以及含有2种或多于2种杂原子的沥青质结构的转化率较高。加氢反应是沥青质轻质化的关键。

  16. 异丙醇探针反应表征Ce-Mo-O催化剂的酸性与氧化还原性%Characterization of Acidic and Oxidative Properties of Ce-Mo-O Catalysts Using the Probe Reaction of Isopropanol Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓东; 陈慧; 沈俭一

    2003-01-01

    Acidic and redox properties are two important aspects of metal oxide catalysts for selective oxidation reactions. Various methods have been used to characterize these properties, of which the isopropanol conversion is a useful probe reaction that can give qualitative information. It is well known that acidicsites catalyze the dehydration of isopropanol to propylene and basic sites catalyze the dehydrogenation of isopropanol to acetone.

  17. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  18. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia

    2009-09-22

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  19. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak

  20. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    a methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...

  1. Nanocrystalline Iron-Ore-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Seok; Park, Ji Chan; Lee, Ho-Tae; Yang, Jung-Il; Hong, SungJun; Jung, Heon; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Nanocrystalline iron ore particles were fabricated by a wet-milling process using an Ultra Apex Mill, after which they were used as raw materials of iron-based catalysts for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) below 280 degrees C, which usually requires catalysts with a high surface area, a large pore volume, and a small crystallite size. The wet-milling process using the Ultra Apex Mill effectively destroyed the initial crystallite structure of the natural iron ores of several tens to hundreds of nanometers in size, resulting in the generation of nanocrystalline iron ore particles with a high surface area and a large pore volume. The iron-ore-based catalysts prepared from the nanocrystalline iron ore particles effectively catalyzed the low-temperature FTS, displaying a high CO conversion (about 90%) and good C5+ hydrocarbon productivity (about 0.22 g/g(cat)(-h)). This demonstrates the feasibility of using the iron-ore-based catalysts as inexpensive and disposable catalysts for the low-temperature FTS.

  2. Enhanced gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. L.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, Jr., L. J.; Robertus, R. J.; Mitchell, D. E.

    Experimental results obtained in laboratory investigations of steam gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts are presented. These studies are designed to test the technical feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from wood by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of combined catalysts. The desired products include substitute natural gas, hydrocarbon synthesis gas and ammonia synthesis gas. The gasification reactions are controlled through the use of specific catalyst combinations and operating parameters. A primary alkali carbonate gasification catalyst impregnated into the wood combined with specific commercially available secondary catalysts produced the desired products. A yield of 50 vol % methane was obtained with a randomly mixed combination of a commercial nickel methanation catalyst and silica-alumina cracking catalyst at a weight ratio of 3:1 respectively. Steam gasification of wood in the presence of a commercial Si-Al cracking catalyst produced the desired hydrocarbon synthesis gas. Hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide ratios needed for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons were obtained with this catalyst system. A hydrogen-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 for ammonia synthesis gas was achieved with steam-air gasification of wood in the presence of catalysts. The most effective secondary catalyst system employed to produce the ammonia synthesis gas included two commercially prepared catalysts formulated to promote the water-gas shift reaction.

  3. Mesopore quality determines the lifetime of hierarchically structured zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milina, Maria; Mitchell, Sharon; Crivelli, Paolo; Cooke, David; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Deactivation due to coking limits the lifetime of zeolite catalysts in the production of chemicals and fuels. Superior performance can be achieved through hierarchically structuring the zeolite porosity, yet no relation has been established between the mesopore architecture and the catalyst lifetime. Here we introduce a top-down demetallation strategy to locate mesopores in different regions of MFI-type crystals with identical bulk porous and acidic properties. In contrast, well-established bottom-up strategies as carbon templating and seed silanization fail to yield materials with matching characteristics. Advanced characterization tools capable of accurately discriminating the mesopore size, distribution and connectivity are applied to corroborate the concept of mesopore quality. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy proves powerful to quantify the global connectivity of the intracrystalline pore network, which, as demonstrated in the conversions of methanol or of propanal to hydrocarbons, is closely linked to the lifetime of zeolite catalysts. The findings emphasize the need to aptly tailor hierarchical materials for maximal catalytic advantage.

  4. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blint, Richard J. [General Motors Corporation, Warren, MI (United States)

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  5. Bio-oil deoxygenation by catalytic pyrolysis: new catalysts for the conversion of biomass into densified and deoxygenated bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Aimaro; Andrésen, John M

    2012-10-01

    This work proposes an innovative catalytic pyrolysis process that converts bio-refinery residues, such as spent grains, into intermediate bio-oil with improved properties compared to traditional bio-oils, which allows the use of existing crude-oil refinery settings for bio-oil upgrading into fuels. The integration of bio-oil into a crude-oil refinery would decrease the economic disadvantage of biomass compared to fossil fuels. The catalytic pyrolysis was able to produce bio-oil with a lower O and N content and high levels of aliphatics and H by using activated serpentine and olivine at 430-460 °C. The activated materials seem to be beneficial to the bio-oil energy content by increasing it from less than 20 MJ kg(-1) in the original biomass to 26 MJ kg(-1). Approximately 70-74 % of the starting energy remains in the bio-oil using activated olivine (ACOL) and activated serpentine (ACSE) at 430 °C, whereas only 52 % is retained using alumina (ALU) at the same temperature. There was a strong reduction of the O content in the bio-oils, and the deoxygenation power decreased in the following order: ACOL>ACSE>ALU. In particular, ACOL at 430-460 °C was able to reduce the O content of the bio-oil by 40 %. The oxygenated bio-oil macromolecules interact in the catalyst's active sites with the naturally present metallic species and undergo decarboxylation with the formation of C(5)-C(6) O-depleted species. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Propane Dehydrogenation over a Commercial Pt-Sn/Al2O3 Catalyst for Isobutane Dehydrogenation: Optimization of Reaction Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farnaz Tahriri Zangeneh; Saeed Sahebdelfar; Mohsen Bahmani

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of a commercial Pt-Sn/Al2O3 isobutane dehydrogenation catalyst in dehydrogenation of propane was studied.Catalyst performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under different operating conditions.Generally,as the factors improving propane conversion decrease the propylene selectivity,the optimal operating condition to maximize propylene yield is expected.The optimal condition was obtained by the experimental design method.The investigated parameters were temperature,hydrogen/hydrocarbon (H2/HC) ratio and space velocity,being changed in three levels.Constrains such as the susceptibility of the catalyst components to sintering or phase transformation were also taken into account.Activity,selectivity and stability of the catalyst were considered as the measured response factors,while the space-time-yield (STY) was considered as the variable to be optimized due to its commercial interest.A STY of 16 mol·kg-1·h-1 was achieved under the optimal conditions of T=620 ℃,H2/HC =0.6 and,weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) =2.2 h-1.Single carbon-carbon bond rupture was found to be the main route for the formation of lower hydrocarbon byproducts.

  7. One-Pot Process for Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin to Alkanes Using Ru-Based Bimetallic and Bifunctional Catalysts Supported on Zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Ruan, Hao [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Feng, Maoqi [Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio TX 78238 USA; Qin, Yuling [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Job, Heather [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland WA 99354 USA; Luo, Langli [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Kuhn, Erik [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Yang, Bin [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-16

    The synthesis of high-efficiency and low-cost multifunctional catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of waste lignin into advanced biofuels is crucial for enhancing current biorefinery processes. Inexpensive transition metals, including Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, were severally co-loaded with Ru on HY zeolite to form bimetallic and bifunctional catalysts. These catalysts were subsequently tested for HDO conversion of softwood lignin and several lignin model compounds. Results indicated that the inexpensive earth abundant metals could modulate the hydrogenolysis activity of Ru and decrease the yield of low molecular weight gaseous side-products. Among all the prepared catalysts, Ru-Cu/HY showed the best HDO performance, giving the highest selectivity to hydrocarbon products. The improved catalytic performance of Ru-Cu/HY was probably due to the following three factors: (1) high total and strong acid sites, (2) good dispersion of metal species and limited segregation, (3) high adsorption capacity for polar fractions, including hydroxyl groups and ether bonds. Moreover, all the bifunctional catalysts were proven to be superior over the combination catalysts of Ru/Al2O3 and HY zeolite, and this could be attributed to the “intimacy criterion”. The practical use of the designed catalysts would be promising in lignin valorization.

  8. Effect of Lanthanum as a Promoter on Fe-Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron-Cobalt catalyst is well known from both operational and economical aspects for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Effort to increase the efficiency of this kind of catalyst is an important research topic. In this work, the effect of lanthanum on characteristic behavior, conversion and selectivity of a Fe-Co/SiO2 Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was studied. The Fe-Co-La/SiO2 Catalysts were prepared using an incipient wetness impregnation method. These catalysts were then characterized by XRF-EDAX, BET and TPR techniques, and their performance were evaluated in a lab-scale reactor at 250ºC, H2/CO = 1.8 of molar ratio, 16 barg pressure and GHSV=600 h-1. TPR analysis showed that the addition of La lowered the reduction temperature of Fe-Co catalyst, and due to a lower temperature, the sintering of the catalyst can be mitigated. Furthermore, from the micro reactor tests (about 4 days, it was found that lanthanum promoted catalyst had higher selectivity toward hydrocarbons, and lower selectivity toward CO2.Received: 8th July 2013; Revised: 18th November 2013; Accepted: 1st December 2013[How to Cite: Abbasi, A., Ghasemi, M., Sadighi, S. (2014. Effect of Lanthanum as a Promoter on Fe-Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (1: 23-27. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5142.23-27][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5142.23-27

  9. Recent Technological Developments in Cobalt Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junling Zhang; Jiangang Chen; Yongwang Li; Yuhan Sun

    2002-01-01

    Co-based catalysts are often utilized due to their high Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) activity,C+5 hydrocarbon selectivity, low water-gas shift reaction (WGS) activity and relatively low cost. Selective control of C5+ hydrocarbons and the catalyst longevity are critical in the design of cobalt catalysts.Thus, various methods to improve the performance of Co catalysts have been suggested. The progress in cobalt catalysts reviewed in the last few decades, mainly involved the support, promoter, preparation and deactivation of Co-based catalysts.

  10. Catalytic activity of in situ synthesized MoWNi sulfides in hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolyuk, Yu. A.; Maksimov, A. L.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.

    2017-02-01

    MoWNi-sulfide catalysts were obtained in situ by thermal decomposition of metal-polymer precursors based on the copolymers of polymaleic anhydride in a hydrocarbon raw material. The activity of the synthesized catalysts in hydrogenation of bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied, and the composition and structure of active phase nanoparticles were determined.

  11. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  12. Alcohol Synthesis over Pre-Reduced Activated Carbon-Supported Molybdenum-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin L. Kugler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC-supported molybdenum catalysts, either with or without a potassium promoter, were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. The materials were characterized using differential thermal analysis (DTA and temperature programmed reduction (TPR, and were used for mixed alcohol synthesis from syngas (CO+H2. DTA results showed that a new phase, related to the interaction between Mo species and the AC support, is formed during the calcination of the Mo/AC catalyst, and the introduction of a K promoter has noticeable effect on the interaction. TPR results indicated that the Mo is more difficult to reduce after being placed onto the AC support, and the addition of a K promoter greatly promotes the formation of Mo species reducible at relatively low temperatures, while it retards the generation of Mo species that are reducible only at higher temperatures. These differences in the reduction behavior of the catalysts are atributed to the interaction between the active components (Mo and K and the support. Potassium-doping significantly promotes the formation of alcohols at the expense of CO conversion, especially to hydrocarbons. It is postulated that Mo species with intermediate valence values (averaged around +3.5 are more likely to be the active phase(s for alcohol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, while those with lower Mo valences are probably responsible for the production of hydrocarbons.

  13. Aerobic Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene over TiZrCo Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbon is of great significance from the viewpoints of both fundamental and industry studies as it can transfer the petrochemical feedstock into valuable chemicals. In this work, we investigated the aerobic oxidation of cyclohexene over TiZrCo catalysts, in which 2-cyclohexen-1-one was produced with a high selectivity of 57.6% at a conversion of 92.2%, which are comparable to the best results reported for the aerobic oxidation of cyclohexene over heterogeneous catalysts. The influences of kinds of solvent, substrate concentration and reaction temperature were evaluated. Moreover, the catalytic performance of the TiZrCo catalyst and the main catalytic active species were also discussed. The results of SEM, XRD and XPS suggested that the surface CoO and Co3O4 species are the catalytic active species and contribute to the high activity and selectivity in the present cyclohexene oxidation. The present catalytic system should have wide applications in the aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons.

  14. Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  16. Hydrocarbon fuel processing of micro solid oxide fuel cell systems[Dissertation 17455

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    The scope of this thesis is the numerical and experimental investigation of the fuel processing of a micro solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) running on hydrocarbon fuel. The goal is to enhance the overall system efficiency by optimization of the reforming process in the steady state and the improvement of the start-up process. Micro SOFC are a potential alternative to the currently used batteries in portable devices. Liquid butane in a cartridge could be the energy source. This dissertation is focused on the fuel processing of the system, namely the reforming and post-combusting processes. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon fuel to a hydrogen rich gas that can be utilized by the SOFC. The post-combustor depletes the toxic and/or explosive gases before leaving the exhaust. Chapter One presents a short introduction to the field of hydrocarbon fuel processing in micro solid oxide fuel cell systems, the next three chapters deal with computational modeling of the transport phenomena inside a micro-reformer, which leads to a better understanding of the chemistry and the physics therein, hence progress in the design and operation parameters. The experimental part (i.e. Chapter Five) of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of a novel hybrid start-up method of a fuel cell system that employs existing components as an additional heat source. In Chapter Two the effect of wall heat conduction on the syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production of a micro-reformer, representing micro-fabricated channels or monoliths, is investigated. Methane is used as a model hydrocarbon fuel since its heterogeneous reaction path on rhodium is known and validated. The simulations demonstrate that the axial wall conduction strongly influences the performance of the micro-reformer and should not be neglected without a careful a priori investigation of its impact. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are strongly dependent of the wall inner surface temperature, which is influenced by the

  17. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  18. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  19. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  20. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  1. Enhancement of Glycerol Steam Reforming Activity and Thermal Stability by Incorporating CeO2 and TiO2 in Ni- and Co-MCM-41 Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade, William N.

    Hydrogen (H2) has many applications in industry with current focus shifted to production of hydrocarbon fuels and valuable oxygenates using the Fischer-Tropsch technology and direct use in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen is generally produced via steam reforming of natural gas or alcohols like methanol and ethanol. Glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel production process, is currently considered to be one of the most attractive sources of sustainable H2 due to its high H/C ratio and bio-based origin. Ni and Co based catalysts have been reported to be active in glycerol steam reforming (GSR); however, deactivation of the catalysts by carbon deposition and sintering under GSR operating conditions is a major challenge. In this study, a series of catalysts containing Ni and Co nanoparticles incorporated in CeO2 and TiO2 modified high surface area MCM-41 have been synthesized using one-pot method. The catalysts are tested for GSR (at H2O/Glycerol mole ratio of 12 and GHSV of 2200 h-1) to study the effect of support modification and reaction temperature (450 - 700 °C) on the product selectivity and long term stability. GSR results revealed that all the catalysts performed significantly well exhibiting over 85% glycerol conversion at 650 °C except Ni catalysts that showed better low temperature activities. Deactivation studies of the catalysts conducted at 650 °C indicated that the Ni-TiO2-MCM-41 and Ni-CeO 2-MCM-41 were resistant to deactivation with ˜100% glycerol conversion for 40 h. In contrast, Co-TiO2-MCM-41 perform poorly as the catalyst rapidly deactivated after 12 h to yield ˜20% glycerol conversion after 40 h. The WAXRD and TGA-DSC analyses of spent catalysts showed a significant amount of coke deposition that might explain catalysts deactivation. The flattening shape of the original BET type IV isotherm with drastic reduction of catalyst surface area can also be responsible for observed drop in catalysts activities.

  2. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  3. Novel fluidized bed reactor for integrated NO(x) adsorption-reduction with hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Terris T; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2009-07-01

    In order to avoid the negative impact of excessive oxygen in the combustion flue gases on the selectivity of most hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) catalysts, an integrated NO(x) adsorption-reduction process has been proposed in this study for the treatment of flue gases under lean burn conditions by decoupling the adsorption and reduction into two different zones. The hypothesis has been validated in a novel internal circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor using Fe/ZSM-5 as the catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. Effects of propylene to the NO(x) molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration, and gas velocity on NO(x) conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that increasing the ratio of HC:NO improved the reduction performance of Fe/ZSM-5 in the ICFB reactor. NO(x) conversion decreased with an increasing flue gas flow velocity in the annulus U(A) but increased with an increasing reductant gas flow velocity in the draft tube U(D). The NO(x) adsorption ratio decreased with increasing U(A). In most cases, NO(x) conversion was higher than the adsorption ratio due to the relatively poor adsorption performance of the catalyst. Fe/ZSM-5 showed a promising reduction performance and a strong inhibiting ability on the negative impact of excessive O2 in the ICFB reactor, proving that such an ICFB reactor possessed the ability to overcome the negative impact of excessive O2 in the flue gas using Fe/ZSM-5 as the deNO(x) catalyst.

  4. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

  6. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF MUNICIPAL WASTE PLASTIC INTO GASOLINE-RANGE PRODUCTS OVER MESOPOROUS MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Norberto Beltramini

    2006-01-01

    In the last 20 years, it has become apparent that waste produced from plastics was becoming an environmental problem because of their low biodegradability. Though several methods have been proposed for recycling waste plastics, it is generally accepted that material recovery is not a long-term solution to the present problem, and that energy or chemical recovery is a more attractive alternative, including cracking into the monomer constituents, combustion to produce energy, and thermal or catalytic conversion to produce useful intermediate chemicals.This paper is a contribution in the area of the last option for energy recovery. There have been a number of publications reporting the use of molecular sieves and amorphous silica-alumina catalysts for the cracking of polymers into a range of hydrocarbons. The research work reported here demonstrates the ability of mesoporous catalysts in cracking polyethylene into gasoline range products.It was found that for mesoporous MCM-41 catalysts, its cracking activity increases with its crystallinity, displaying higher activity with smaller pore diameters. The hydrocarbon product distribution strongly indicates a carbenium ion cracking mechanism. The product distribution was also compared with those obtained from thermal cracking tests.

  7. Catalytic Activity of Metal and Metal-Oxide Catalysts in Oxidative Coupling of CH4 with CO2 under Pulse Corona Plasma%等离子体条件下金属和金属氧化物对甲烷氧化反应的催化活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀玲; 朱爱民; 刘中凡; 李学慧; 宫为民

    2003-01-01

    @@ The uses of methane, the major component in natural gas, have been investigated by many research groups throughout the world. A number of catalysts, single or binary, have been proposed for the oxidative coupling of CH4 with CO2 as the oxidant[1~6]. Binary metal-oxide catalysts, such as La2O3-ZnO and CaO-ZnO, showed higher C2 hydrocarbon selectivity (>80%) with low CH4 conversion (<6%) at high temperatures (750~850 ℃)[7~9].

  8. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

  9. Evidence for an initiation of the methanol-to-olefin process by reactive surface methoxy groups on acidic zeolite catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Buchholz, Andreas; Seiler, Michael; Hunger, Michael

    2003-12-10

    Recent progress reveals that, in the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process on acidic zeolites, the conversion of an equilibrium mixture of methanol and DME is dominated by a "hydrocarbon pool" mechanism. However, the initial C-C bond formation, that is, the chemistry during the kinetic "induction period" leading to the reactive hydrocarbon pool, still remains unclear. With the application of a stopped-flow protocol, in the present work, pure surface methoxy groups [SiO(CH(3))Al] were prepared on various acidic zeolite catalysts (H-Y, H-ZSM-5, H-SAPO-34) at temperatures lower than 473 K, and the further reaction of these methoxy species was investigated by in situ (13)C MAS NMR spectroscopy. By using toluene and cyclohexane as probe molecules which are possibly involved in the MTO process, we show the high reactivity of surface methoxy species. Most importantly, the formation of hydrocarbons from pure methoxy species alone is demonstrated for the first time. It was found that (i) surface methoxy species react at room temperature with water to methanol, indicating the occurrence of a chemical equilibrium between these species at low temperatures. In the presence of aromatics and alkanes, (ii) the reactivity of surface methoxy groups allows a methylation of these organic compounds at reaction temperatures of ca. 433 and 493 K, respectively. In the absence of water and other organic species, that is, under flow conditions and on partially methylated catalysts, (iii) a conversion of pure methoxy groups alone to hydrocarbons was observed at temperatures of T >/= 523 K. This finding indicates a possible formation of the first hydrocarbons during the kinetic induction period of the MTO process via the conversion of pure surface methoxy species (case iii). After the first hydrocarbons are formed, or in the presence of a small amount of organic impurities, surface methoxy groups contribute to a further methylation of these organic compounds (case ii), leading to the formation of

  10. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  11. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  12. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

  13. Catalytic transformation of methyl benzenes over zeolite catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic transformation of three methyl benzenes (toluene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene) has been investigated over ZSM-5, TNU-9, mordenite and SSZ-33 catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. Catalytic experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 300-400 °C to understand the transformation of these alkyl benzenes over large pore (mordenite and SSZ-33) in contrast to medium-pore (ZSM-5 and TNU-9) zeolite-based catalysts. The effect of reaction conditions on the isomerization to disproportionation product ratio, distribution of trimethylbenzene (TMB) isomers, and p-xylene/o-xylene ratios are reported. The sequence of reactivity of the three alkyl benzenes depends upon the pore structure of zeolites. The zeolite structure controls primarily the diffusion of reactants and products while the acidity of these zeolites is of a secondary importance. In the case of medium pore zeolites, the order of conversion was m-xylene > 1,2,4-TMB > toluene. Over large pore zeolites the order of reactivity was 1,2,4-TMB > m-xylene > toluene for SSZ-33 catalyst, and m-xylene ∼ 1,2,4-TMB > toluene over mordenite. Significant effect of pore size between ZSM-5 and TNU-9 was observed; although TNU-9 is also 3D 10-ring channel system, its slightly larger pores compared with ZSM-5 provide sufficient reaction space to behave like large-pore zeolites in transformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. We have also carried out kinetic studies for these reactions and activation energies for all three reactants over all zeolite catalysts under study have been calculated. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Catalytic pyrolysis of model compounds and waste cooking oil for production of light olefins over La/ZSM-5 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F. W.; Ding, S. L.; Li, L.; Gao, C.; Zhong, Z.; Wang, S. X.; Li, Z. X.

    2016-08-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) and its model compounds (oleic acid and methyl laurate) are catalytically pyrolyzed in a fixed-bed reactor over La modified ZSM-5 catalysts (La/ZSM-5) aiming for production of C2-C4 light olefins. The LaO content in catalysts was set at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 wt%. The gas and liquid products are analyzed. The La/ZSM-5 catalyst with 6% LaO showed higher selectivity to light olefins when WCO and methyl laurate were pyrolyzed, and olefin content was 26% for WCO and 21% for methyl laurate. The catalyst with 10% LaO showed high selectivity to light olefins (28.5%) when oleic acid was pyrolyzed. The liquid products from WCO and model compounds mainly contain esters and aromatic hydrocarbons. More esters were observed in liquid products from methyl laurate and WCO pyrolysis, indicating that it is more difficult to pyrolyze esters and WCO than oleic acid. The coked catalysts were analyzed by temperature-programmed oxidation. The result shows that graphite is the main component of coke. The conversion of WCO to light olefins potentially provides an alternative and sustainable route for production of the key petrochemicals.

  15. Enhancement of bimetallic Fe-Mn/CNTs nano catalyst activity and product selectivity using microemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra; Zolfaghari; Ahmad; Tavasoli; Saber; Tabyar; Ali; Nakhaei; Pour

    2014-01-01

    Bimetallic Fe-Mn nano catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes(CNTs) were prepared using microemulsion technique with water-to-surfactant ratios of 0.4-1.6. The nano catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods and their activity and selectivity in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis(FTS) have been assessed in a fixed-bed microreactor. The physicochemical properties and performance of the nanocatalysts were compared with the catalyst prepared by impregnation method. Very narrow particle size distribution has been produced by the microemulsion technique at relatively high loading of active metal. TEM images showed that small metal nano particles in the range of 3–7 nm were not only confined inside the CNTs but also located on the outer surface of the CNTs. Using microemulsion technique with water to surfactant ratio of0.4 decreased the average iron particle sizes to 5.1 nm. The reduction percentage and dispersion percentage were almost doubled. Activity and selectivity were found to be dependent on the catalyst preparation method and average iron particle size. CO conversion and FTS rate increased from 49.1% to 71.0% and 0.144 to 0.289 gHC/(gcat h), respectively. While the WGS rate decreased from 0.097 to 0.056 gCO2/(gcat h). C5+liquid hydrocarbons selectivity decreased slightly and olefins selectivity almost doubled.

  16. Cobalt(III)-oxo cubane clusters as catalysts for oxidation of organic substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Birinchi Kumar Das; Rajesh Chakrabarty

    2011-03-01

    Transition metal coordination complexes play a vital role as catalysts in the oxidation of organic substrates including renewable chemicals in an economically viable and environmentally friendly way. Here we highlight the preparation, characterization and application of oxo-cubane complexes of cobalt(III) as oxidation catalysts using air and water as oxidants. Cobalt(III)-oxo complexes of the type Co4O4(O2CR)4L4 have been prepared by a general method and these have been characterized by analytical, spectroscopic, electrochemical and crystallographic methods. These soluble complexes have shown promising utility as catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of side chains of alkylaromatic hydrocarbon compounds. Oxidation of neat ethylbenzene has shown very high conversion and selectivity for acetophenone formation. On the other hand, oxidation of -xylene has been found to yield both -toluic acid and terephthalic acid. It is also possible to oxidize -xylene in an aqueous medium under moderate applied O2 pressure. Selective epoxidation of -pinene with air as the oxidant also takes place with the cobalt(III)-based homogeneous catalysts.

  17. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  18. Recycling polystyrene into fuels by means of FCC. Performance of various acidic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Puente, Gabriela; Sedran, Ulises [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, INCAPE, Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    1998-12-07

    In accordance with the option of recycling plastics into fuels by dissolving them in standard feedstocks for the process of catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons, FCC, various acidic catalysts (zeolites ZSM-5, mordenite, Y, and a sulfur-promoted zirconia) were tested in the conversion of polystyrene dissolved into inert benzene at 550C in a fluidized-bed batch reactor. Experiments were performed with very short contact times of up to 12s. Main products were in the gasoline range, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, and minor amounts of C{sub 9-12} aromatics and light C{sub 5-} compounds. Coke was always produced in very significant amounts. All the products can be justified with basis on the properties of each catalyst and the various possible catalytic reaction pathways: cracking after protolytic attack on the polymer fragments, styrene oligomerization and subsequent cracking, or hydrogen transfer to styrene. Styrene would be mainly produced in this system from thermal cracking of the polymer as the initial step. If present, shape selectivity effects due to catalyst structure can influence significantly the prevalence of the various reactions, because they would interfere with those undergoing bulky transition states, like styrene oligomerization or hydrogen transfer. Even though sulfur-promoted zirconia is highly acidic, the low proportion of Broensted-type acid sites does not allow the occurrence of secondary styrene reactions. It was shown that most favorable product distributions (higher yields of desirable products) are obtained on equilibrium commercial FCC catalysts

  19. Reaction pathways involved in CH4 conversion on Pd/Al2O3 catalysts : TAP as a powerful tool for the elucidation of the effective role of the metal/support interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor offers an alternative to draw direct structure/activity relationships checked on Natural Gas-fuelled Vehicle (NGV) catalysts Determination of accurate kinetic constants for methane adsorption from single pulse experiments and subsequent investigation of sequential surface reactions from alternative CH4/O2 pulse experiments provides a straightforward visualization of the involvement of the metal/support interface on freshly-prepared catalysts and the loss of this effect on aged single palladium based catalysts.

  20. Preliminary Economics for Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Cellulosic Sugars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, James R.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2014-05-18

    Biorefinery process and economic models built in CHEMCAD and a preliminary, genome-scale metabolic model for the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi were used to simulate the bioconversion of corn stover to lipids, and the upgrading of these hydrocarbon precursors to diesel and jet fuel. The metabolic model was based on the recently released genome sequence for L. starkeyi and on metabolic pathway information from the literature. The process model was based on bioconversion, lipid extraction, and lipid oil upgrading data found in literature, on new laboratory experimental data, and on yield predictions from the preliminary L. starkeyi metabolic model. The current plant gate production cost for a distillate-range hydrocarbon fuel was estimated by the process model Base Case to be $9.5/gallon ($9.0 /gallon of gasoline equivalent) with assumptions of 2011$, 10% internal return on investment, and 2205 ton/day dry feed rate. Opportunities for reducing the cost to below $5.0/gallon, such as improving bioconversion lipid yield and hydrogenation catalyst selectivity, are presented in a Target Case. The process and economic models developed for this work will be updated in 2014 with new experimental data and predictions from a refined metabolic network model for L. starkeyi. Attaining a production cost of $3.0/gallon will require finding higher value uses for lignin other than power generation, such as conversion to additional fuel or to a co-product.