WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrocarbon chc profiles

  1. Colony fusion in Argentine ants is guided by worker and queen cuticular hydrocarbon profile similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Gissella M; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2009-08-01

    Introduced populations of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, have experienced moderate to severe losses of genetic diversity, which may have affected nestmate recognition to various degrees. We hypothesized that cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) serve as nestmate recognition cues, and facilitate colony fusion of unrelated L. humile colonies that share similar CHC profiles. In this study, we paired six southeastern U.S. L. humile colonies in a 6-month laboratory fusion assay, and determined if worker and queen CHC profile similarity between colonies was associated with colony fusion and intercolony genetic similarity. We also compared worker and queen CHC profiles between fused colony pairs and unpaired controls to determine if worker and queen chemical profiles changed after fusion. We found that colony fusion correlated with the CHC similarity of workers and queens, with the frequency of fusion increasing with greater CHC profile similarity between colonies. Worker and queen CHC profile similarity between colonies also was associated with genetic similarity between colonies. Queen CHC profiles in fused colonies appeared to be a mix of the two colony phenotypes. In contrast, when only one of the paired colonies survived, the CHC profile of the surviving queens did not diverge from that of the colony of origin. Similarly, workers in non-fused colonies maintained their colony-specific CHC, whereas in fused colonies the worker CHC profiles were intermediate between those of the two colonies. These results suggest a role for CHC in regulating interactions among mutually aggressive L. humile colonies, and demonstrate that colony fusion correlates with both genetic and CHC similarities. Further, changes in worker and queen chemical profiles in fused colonies suggest that CHC plasticity may sustain the cohesion of unrelated L. humile colonies that had fused.

  2. Chlorinated hydrocarbons- (CHC) and PCDD/F-levels in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from the river Elbe (contribution to the German Environmental Specimen Banking)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxynos, K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schramm, K.W. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Marth, P. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schmitzer, J. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kettrup, A. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been determined in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from different locations along the river Elbe, starting from the border to the Czech Republic down-stream up to Cumlosen (river km 470), near the frontier of the former German Democratic Republic. High levels of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) have been found in sediments. HCB, DDT-metabolites and octachlorostyrene (OCS) have been the most dominant compounds in bream, especially fish from eastern sampling sites have been heavily contaminated. Furthermore, sediments from 1991-1993 have been analysed to determine polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F). The CHC-burden of the river Elbe declines downstream, whereas the PCDD/F-content increases in that direction. (orig.)

  3. Dicty_cDB: CHC251 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHC251 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16381-1 - (Link to Original site) CHC2...51F 150 - - - - - - Show CHC251 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHC251 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC251Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CHC251 (CHC251Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC251Q.Seq.d/ CTGTTGGCCTACTGGTA...d/ 186 6e-47 CHC476 (CHC476Q) /CSM/CH/CHC4-D/CHC476Q.Seq.d/ 186 6e-47 CHC251 (CHC251Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC251Q.Seq.d/ 186 6e-47 CHC2

  4. Dicty_cDB: CHC270 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHC270 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11649-1 CHC270P (Link to Original site) CHC2...70F 433 CHC270Z 724 CHC270P 1137 - - Show CHC270 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHC2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC270Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID CHC2...70P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CHC270 (CHC270Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC2...-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value CHC270 (CHC270Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-C/CHC27

  5. Genetic architecture of natural variation in cuticular hydrocarbon composition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Böröczky, Katalin; Huang, Wen; Schal, Coby; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-14

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) prevent desiccation and serve as chemical signals that mediate social interactions. Drosophila melanogaster CHCs have been studied extensively, but the genetic basis for individual variation in CHC composition is largely unknown. We quantified variation in CHC profiles in the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and identified novel CHCs. We used principal component (PC) analysis to extract PCs that explain the majority of CHC variation and identified polymorphisms in or near 305 and 173 genes in females and males, respectively, associated with variation in these PCs. In addition, 17 DGRP lines contain the functional Desat2 allele characteristic of African and Caribbean D. melanogaster females (more 5,9-C27:2 and less 7,11-C27:2, female sex pheromone isomers). Disruption of expression of 24 candidate genes affected CHC composition in at least one sex. These genes are associated with fatty acid metabolism and represent mechanistic targets for individual variation in CHC composition.

  6. Cuticular hydrocarbons as queen adoption cues in the invasive Argentine ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Gissella M; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2008-04-01

    In social insects, individuals typically recognize and behave aggressively towards alien conspecifics, thereby maintaining colony integrity. This is presumably achieved via a nestmate recognition system in which cuticular compounds, usually cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC), of genetic and/or environmental origin serve as recognition cues. Most invasive populations of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), display minimal nestmate-non-nestmate discrimination, resulting in low levels of intraspecific aggression allowing free movement of workers and queens among nests. However, invasive L. humile in the southeastern United States show relatively high levels of intraspecific aggression, and selectively adopt non-nestmate queens. Using behavioral assays and gas chromatography, we found an association between non-nestmate queen adoption and similarity of the CHC profiles of adopted and host colony queens. Also, nestmate and non-nestmate queen CHC profiles became more similar after adoption by queenless colonies. Furthermore, queens treated with non-nestmate queen CHC had distinct CHC profiles and were generally attacked by nestmate workers. We suggest that in L. humile, CHC are used as queen recognition cues, and that queen recognition errors are more likely to occur when the CHC profiles of non-nestmate and host colony queens are similar. Our findings provide further evidence for the complex and dynamic nature of L. humile nestmate discrimination, which may in part underlie the success of introduced populations of this invasive ant.

  7. Dicty_cDB: CHC222 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHC222 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16381-1 - (Link to Original site) CHC2...22F 152 - - - - - - Show CHC222 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHC222 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CH/CHC2-A/CHC222Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CHC222 (CHC222Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-A/CHC222Q.Seq.d/ CACTGTTGGCCTACTGG...NA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value CHC222 (CHC222Q) /CSM/CH/CHC2-A/CHC222Q.

  8. Hydrocarbon Patterns and Mating Behaviour in Populations of Drosophila yakuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Denis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila yakuba is widespread in Africa. Here we compare the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC profiles and mating behavior of mainland (Kounden, Cameroon and island (Mayotte, Sao-Tome, Bioko populations. The strains each had different CHC profiles: Bioko and Kounden were the most similar, while Mayotte and Sao-Tome contained significant amounts of 7-heptacosene. The CHC profile of the Sao-Tome population differed the most, with half the 7-tricosene of the other populations and more 7-heptacosene and 7-nonacosene. We also studied the characteristics of the mating behavior of the four strains: copulation duration was similar but latency times were higher in Mayotte and Sao-Tome populations. We found partial reproductive isolation between populations, especially in male-choice experiments with Sao-Tome females.

  9. Premating isolation is determined by larval rearing substrates in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis. IX. Host plant and population specific epicuticular hydrocarbon expression influences mate choice and sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, J A; Etges, W J

    2013-03-01

    Sexual signals in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis include cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), contact pheromones that mediate female discrimination of males during courtship. CHCs, along with male courtship songs, cause premating isolation between diverged populations, and are influenced by genotype × environment interactions caused by different host cacti. CHC profiles of mated and unmated adult flies from a Baja California and a mainland Mexico population of D. mojavensis reared on two host cacti were assayed to test the hypothesis that male CHCs mediate within-population female discrimination of males. In multiple choice courtship trials, mated and unmated males differed in CHC profiles, indicating that females prefer males with particular blends of CHCs. Mated and unmated females significantly differed in CHC profiles as well. Adults in the choice trials had CHC profiles that were significantly different from those in pair-mated adults from no-choice trials revealing an influence of sexual selection. Females preferred different male CHC blends in each population, but the influence of host cactus on CHC variation was significant only in the mainland population indicating population-specific plasticity in CHCs. Different groups of CHCs mediated female choice-based sexual selection in each population suggesting that geographical and ecological divergence has the potential to promote divergence in mate communication systems.

  10. Dicty_cDB: CHC836 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucing significant alignments: (bits) Value CHC836 (CHC836Q) /CSM/CH/CHC8-B/CHC836Q.Seq.d/ 170 3e-42 SFF285 (...te 2009. 4. 4 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value...ificant alignments: (bits) Value U61987_1( U61987 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoideum phosphoprotei... 37 0.

  11. Variations on a theme: diversification of cuticular hydrocarbons in a clade of cactophilic Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Larry L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We characterized variation and chemical composition of epicuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs in the seven species of the Drosophila buzzatii cluster with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Despite the critical role of CHCs in providing resistance to desiccation and involvement in communication, such as courtship behavior, mating, and aggregation, few studies have investigated how CHC profiles evolve within and between species in a phylogenetic context. We analyzed quantitative differences in CHC profiles in populations of the D. buzzatii species cluster in order to assess the concordance of CHC differentiation with species divergence. Results Thirty-six CHC components were scored in single fly extracts with carbon chain lengths ranging from C29 to C39, including methyl-branched alkanes, n-alkenes, and alkadienes. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that CHC amounts were significantly different among all species and canonical discriminant function (CDF analysis resolved all species into distinct, non-overlapping groups. Significant intraspecific variation was found in different populations of D. serido suggesting that this taxon is comprised of at least two species. We summarized CHC variation using CDF analysis and mapped the first five CHC canonical variates (CVs onto an independently derived period (per gene + chromosome inversion + mtDNA COI gene for each sex. We found that the COI sequences were not phylogenetically informative due to introgression between some species, so only per + inversion data were used. Positive phylogenetic signal was observed mainly for CV1 when parsimony methods and the test for serial independence (TFSI were used. These results changed when no outgroup species were included in the analysis and phylogenetic signal was then observed for female CV3 and/or CV4 and male CV4 and CV5. Finally, removal of divergent populations of D. serido significantly increased the amount of phylogenetic signal as

  12. Variations on a theme: diversification of cuticular hydrocarbons in a clade of cactophilic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Cássia C; Manfrin, Maura H; Sene, Fábio de M; Jackson, Larry L; Etges, William J

    2011-06-23

    We characterized variation and chemical composition of epicuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) in the seven species of the Drosophila buzzatii cluster with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Despite the critical role of CHCs in providing resistance to desiccation and involvement in communication, such as courtship behavior, mating, and aggregation, few studies have investigated how CHC profiles evolve within and between species in a phylogenetic context. We analyzed quantitative differences in CHC profiles in populations of the D. buzzatii species cluster in order to assess the concordance of CHC differentiation with species divergence. Thirty-six CHC components were scored in single fly extracts with carbon chain lengths ranging from C29 to C39, including methyl-branched alkanes, n-alkenes, and alkadienes. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that CHC amounts were significantly different among all species and canonical discriminant function (CDF) analysis resolved all species into distinct, non-overlapping groups. Significant intraspecific variation was found in different populations of D. serido suggesting that this taxon is comprised of at least two species. We summarized CHC variation using CDF analysis and mapped the first five CHC canonical variates (CVs) onto an independently derived period (per) gene + chromosome inversion + mtDNA COI gene for each sex. We found that the COI sequences were not phylogenetically informative due to introgression between some species, so only per + inversion data were used. Positive phylogenetic signal was observed mainly for CV1 when parsimony methods and the test for serial independence (TFSI) were used. These results changed when no outgroup species were included in the analysis and phylogenetic signal was then observed for female CV3 and/or CV4 and male CV4 and CV5. Finally, removal of divergent populations of D. serido significantly increased the amount of phylogenetic signal as up to four out of five CVs then displayed

  13. Do Cuticular Hydrocarbons Provide Sufficient Information for Optimal Sex Allocation in the Ant Formica exsecta?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zweden, Jelle Stijn; Vitikainen, Emma; D'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    of CHC recognition cues reflects colony kin structure in the ant Formica exsecta. Our results show that CHC variability does not covary with kin structure or the overall genetic diversity of the colony, and that patrilines and matrilines can have distinct CHC profiles in some but not all colonies......Split sex ratio theory predicts that when kin structure varies among colonies of social insects, in order to maximize the inclusive fitness, colonies with relatively high sister-sister relatedness should specialize in producing reproductive females, whereas in those with relatively low sister......-sister relatedness workers should bias their sex ratio towards males. However, in order to achieve this, workers need to be able to reliably assess the type of colony in which they live. The information on colony kin structure may be encoded in cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), assuming that genetic variability...

  14. Cuticle hydrocarbons in saline aquatic beetles

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    María Botella-Cruz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are the principal component of insect cuticle and play an important role in maintaining water balance. Cuticular impermeability could be an adaptative response to salinity and desiccation in aquatic insects; however, cuticular hydrocarbons have been poorly explored in this group and there are no previous data on saline species. We characterized cuticular hydrocarbons of adults and larvae of two saline aquatic beetles, namely Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae and Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae, using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The CHC profile of adults of both species, characterized by a high abundance of branched alkanes and low of unsaturated alkenes, seems to be more similar to that of some terrestrial beetles (e.g., desert Tenebrionidae compared with other aquatic Coleoptera (freshwater Dytiscidae. Adults of E. jesusarribasi had longer chain compounds than N. baeticus, in agreement with their higher resistance to salinity and desiccation. The more permeable cuticle of larvae was characterized by a lower diversity in compounds, shorter carbon chain length and a higher proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons compared with that of the adults. These results suggest that osmotic stress on aquatic insects could exert a selection pressure on CHC profile similar to aridity in terrestrial species.

  15. Insect Adhesion Secretions: Similarities and Dissimilarities in Hydrocarbon Profiles of Tarsi and Corresponding Tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Heike; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Spatially controlled in vivo sampling by contact solid phase microextraction with a non-coated silica fiber combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was utilized for hydrocarbon profiling in tarsal adhesion secretions of four insect species (Nicrophorus vespilloides, Nicrophorus nepalensis, Sagra femorata, and Gromphadorhina portentosa) by using distinct adhesion systems, viz. hairy or smooth tarsi. For comparison, corresponding samples from tibiae, representing the general cuticular hydrocarbon profile, were analyzed to enable the statistical inference of active molecular adhesion principles in tarsal secretions possibly contributed by specific hydrocarbons. n-Alkanes, monomethyl and dimethyl alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, and one aldehyde were detected. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analyses) gave insights into distinctive molecular features among the various insect species and between tarsus and tibia samples. In general, corresponding hydrocarbon profiles in tarsus and tibia samples largely resembled each other, both qualitatively and in relative abundances as well. However, several specific hydrocarbons showed significantly different relative abundances between corresponding tarsus and tibia samples, thus indicating that such differences of specific hydrocarbons in the complex mixtures might constitute a delicate mechanism for fine-tuning the reversible attachment performances in tarsal adhesive fluids that are composed of substances originating from the same pool as cuticular hydrocarbons. Caused by melting point depression, the multicomponent tarsal adhesion secretion, made up of straight chain alkanes, methyl alkanes, and alkenes will have a semi-solid, grease-like consistency, which might provide the basis for a good reversible attachment performance.

  16. Rapid desiccation hardening changes the cuticular hydrocarbon profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Sové, Richard J; Rundle, Howard D; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-02-01

    The success of insects in terrestrial environments is due in large part to their ability to resist desiccation stress. Since the majority of water is lost across the cuticle, a relatively water-impermeable cuticle is a major component of insect desiccation resistance. Cuticular permeability is affected by the properties and mixing effects of component hydrocarbons, and changes in cuticular hydrocarbons can affect desiccation tolerance. A pre-exposure to a mild desiccation stress increases duration of desiccation survival in adult female Drosophila melanogaster, via a decrease in cuticular permeability. To test whether this acute response to desiccation stress is due to a change in cuticular hydrocarbons, we treated male and female D. melanogaster to a rapid desiccation hardening (RDH) treatment and used gas chromatography to examine the effects on cuticular hydrocarbon composition. RDH led to reduced proportions of unsaturated and methylated hydrocarbons compared to controls in females, but although RDH modified the cuticular hydrocarbon profile in males, there was no coordinated pattern. These data suggest that the phenomenon of RDH leading to reduced cuticular water loss occurs via an acute change in cuticular hydrocarbons that enhances desiccation tolerance in female, but not male, D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Drosophila cuticular hydrocarbons revisited: mating status alters cuticular profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Everaerts

    Full Text Available Most living organisms use pheromones for inter-individual communication. In Drosophila melanogaster flies, several pheromones perceived either by contact/at a short distance (cuticular hydrocarbons, CHs, or at a longer distance (cis-vaccenyl acetate, cVA, affect courtship and mating behaviours. However, it has not previously been possible to precisely identify all potential pheromonal compounds and simultaneously monitor their variation on a time scale. To overcome this limitation, we combined Solid Phase Micro-Extraction with gas-chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry. This allowed us (i to identify 59 cuticular compounds, including 17 new CHs; (ii to precisely quantify the amount of each compound that could be detected by another fly, and (iii to measure the variation of these substances as a function of aging and mating. Sex-specific variation appeared with age, while mating affected cuticular compounds in both sexes with three possible patterns: variation was (i reciprocal in the two sexes, suggesting a passive mechanical transfer during mating, (ii parallel in both sexes, such as for cVA which strikingly appeared during mating, or (iii unilateral, presumably as a result of sexual interaction. We provide a complete reassessment of all Drosophila CHs and suggest that the chemical conversation between male and female flies is far more complex than is generally accepted. We conclude that focusing on individual compounds will not provide a satisfactory understanding of the evolution and function of chemical communication in Drosophila.

  18. Nestmate recognition in social wasps: manipulation of hydrocarbon profiles induces aggression in the European hornet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruther, Joachim; Sieben, Stefan; Schricker, Burkhard

    2002-03-01

    The influence of individual cuticular hydrocarbons on nestmate recognition in the European hornet, Vespa crabro L., was investigated. We observed the behavioural response of workers towards differently treated dead conspecifics in a bioassay. Dummies were extracted with dichloromethane and extracts were spiked with microgram amounts of synthetic hydrocarbons naturally occurring on the cuticle of V. crabro. These modified extracts were reapplied to extracted workers that were subsequently tested in the bioassay. Non-spiked nestmate dummies (negative control) and untreated non-nestmate dummies (positive control) were tested in control experiments. The addition of only heneicosane or a mixture of heneicosane, tricosane, and ( Z)-9-tricosene to the extracts led to a significant increase of agonistic behaviour in workers leaving the nest for foraging flights. Returning workers reacted much less aggressively than those leaving. This is one of the first behavioural proofs that manipulation of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles can be perceived by a social insect species. The results support the hypothesis that colony-specific cuticular hydrocarbon profiles are involved in the phenomenon of nestmate recognition among social insects.

  19. IS CHC student surface learner A cross-cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佩绮

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, the "CH"(Confucian Heritage Culture)learner phenomenon had aroused the interest of sociologists, educators and psychologists. Examination orientation, achievement orientation, use of repetitive learning, synthesis of memorization and understanding, and the use of recitation to bring about sharp focus for better understanding were some of the themes of these researches. This paper will explain what the general paradox of CHC learners is and how cultural difference can affect students' motivation for learning according to Chen and Stevenson's model of cultural influence, and discuss the major misconception of CHC learners' study approach.

  20. Cuticular hydrocarbons as a basis for chemosensory self-referencing in crickets: a potentially universal mechanism facilitating polyandry in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddle, Carie B; Steiger, Sandra; Hamaker, Christopher G; Ower, Geoffrey D; Mitchell, Christopher; Sakaluk, Scott K; Hunt, John

    2013-03-01

    Females of many species obtain benefits by mating polyandrously, and often prefer novel males over previous mates. However, how do females recognise previous mates, particularly in the face of cognitive constraints? Female crickets appear to have evolved a simple but effective solution: females imbue males with their own cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) at mating and utilise chemosensory self-referencing to recognise recent mates. Female CHC profiles exhibited significant additive genetic variation, demonstrating that genetically unique chemical cues are available to support chemosensory self-referencing. CHC profiles of males became more similar to those of females after mating, indicating physical transfer of CHCs between individuals during copulation. Experimental perfuming of males with female CHCs resulted in a female aversion to males bearing chemical cues similar to their own. Chemosensory self-referencing, therefore, could be a widespread mechanism by which females increase the diversity of their mating partners. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. On the interpretation of the CHC factor Gc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.-J. Kan; R.A. Kievit; C. Dolan; H. van der Maas

    2011-01-01

    On the one hand, the factors Gf and Gc in the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence are hypothesized to represent individual differences in unique psychological or biological capacities. On the other hand, they are interpreted as representing the theoretical variables fluid and crystalliz

  2. Compilation of a source profile database for hydrocarbon and OVOC emissions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua

    2016-10-01

    Source profiles are essential for quantifying the role of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in air pollution. This study compiled a database of VOC source profiles in China, with 75 species drawn from five major categories: transportation, solvent use, biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, and industrial processes. Source profiles were updated for diesel vehicles, biomass burning, and residential coal burning by measuring both hydrocarbons and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), while other source profiles were derived from the available literature. The OVOCs contributed 53.8% of total VOCs in the profiles of heavy - duty diesel vehicle exhaust and 12.4%-46.3% in biomass and residential coal burning, which indicated the importance of primary OVOCs emissions from combustion-related sources. Taking the national emission inventory from 2008 as an example, we established an approach for assigning source profiles to develop a speciation-specific VOC and OVOC emission inventory. The results showed that aromatics contributed 30% of the total 26 Tg VOCs, followed by alkanes (24%), alkenes (19%) and OVOCs (12%). Aromatics (7.9 Tg) were much higher than in previous results (1.1 Tg and 3.4 Tg), while OVOCs (3.1 Tg) were comparable with the 3.3 Tg and 4.3 Tg reported in studies using profiles from the US. The current emission inventories were built based on emission factors from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements, and therefore the proportions from OVOC emissions was neglected, leading to up to 30% underestimation of total VOC emissions. As a result, there is a need to deploy appropriate emission factors and source profiles that include OVOC measurements to reduce the uncertainty of estimated emissions and chemical reactivity potential.

  3. Effect of age on cuticular hydrocarbon profiles in adult Chrysomya putoria (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Marina Vianna; Pinto, Zeneida Teixeira; Queiroz, Margareth Maria de Carvalho; Blomquist, Gary James

    2016-02-01

    A species-specific complex mixture of highly stable cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) covers the external surface of all insects. Components can be readily analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to obtain a cuticular hydrocarbon profile, which may be used as an additional tool for the taxonomic differentiation of insect species and also for the determination of the age and sex of adult and immature forms. We used GC-MS to identify and quantify the CHCs of female and male Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann, 1818) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from one to five days old. CHCs ranged from C21 to C35 for females and from C21 to C37 in males. Major compounds were the same for both sexes and were 2-MeC28, C29:1, n-C29, 15-,13-MeC29, 2-MeC30, C31:1, n-C31 and 15-,13-MeC31. The relative abundance of each component, however, varied with age. Cluster Analysis using Bray-Curtis measure for abundance showed that cuticular hydrocarbon profiles are a strong and useful tool for the determination of age in adult C. putoria.

  4. Profiling of microbial communities in a bioreactor for treating hydrocarbon-sulfide-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Bo; JI Guodong; CHENG Liqiu

    2008-01-01

    A technology of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to profile the structure and dynamic changes of microbial communities in a bioreactor for treating hydrocarbon-sulfide-containing (HSC) wastewater. The results showed that the heterotrophic genus of Acinetobacter and the autotrophic genera of Thiobacillus and Thiomonas could survive well in all of three operating conditions. Some special genera were also observed with changes of micro-ecoenvironment in the reactor, such as the halophilic genus of Nesterenkonia. Further, a new genus was found in the reactor, which was likely to have the ability to degrade sulfide and hydrocarbon at the same time. All of these detected and the new found genera have widely applicable potential in the treatment of HSC wastewater.

  5. Post-mating shift towards longer-chain cuticular hydrocarbons drastically reduces female attractiveness to males in a digger wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, Carlo; Giordani, Irene; Wurdack, Mareike; Tormos, José; Asís, Josep D; Schmitt, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Females of most aculeate Hymenoptera mate only once and males are therefore under a strong competitive pressure which is expected to favour the evolution of rapid detection of virgin females. In several bee species, the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profile exhibited by virgin females elicits male copulation attempts. However, it is still unknown how widespread this type of sexual communication is within Aculeata. Here, we investigated the use of CHCs as mating cues in the digger wasp Stizus continuus, which belongs to the family (Crabronidae) from within bees arose. In field experiments, unmanipulated, recently emerged virgin female dummies promptly elicit male copulation attempts, whereas 1-4days old mated females dummies were still attractive but to a much lesser extent. In contrast, old (10-15days) mated female dummies did not attract males at all. After hexane-washing, attractiveness almost disappeared but could be achieved by adding CHC extracts from virgin females even on hexane-washed old mated females. Thus, the chemical base of recognition of females as appropriate mating partner by males is coded in their CHC profile. Accordingly, differences in CHC profiles can be detected between sexes, with males having larger amounts of alkenes and exclusive long-chain alkanes, and within females specially according to their mating status. Shortly after mating, almost all of the major hydrocarbons found on the cuticle of females undergo significant changes in their abundance, with a clear shift from short-chain to long-chain linear and methyl-branched alkanes. The timely detection of virgin females by males in S. continuus could be advantageous within the narrow period of female emergence, when male-male competition is strongest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Improved CHC Algorithm for Damage Diagnosis of Offshore Platforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Weiping; WANG Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    An improved CHC algorithm is proposed in the paper and it could be used for the damage diagnosis of structures. It breaks the bottle neck of genetic algorithm in the damage diagnosis of large structures and takes a shorter time than the SGA (Standard Genetic Algorithm) in diagnosing structural damage with the same level of error. The case studies show that the algorithm is rapid in convergence and produces satisfactory results in diagnosing both fixed-end beams and jacket offshore platforms.

  7. Divergence of cuticular hydrocarbons in two sympatric grasshopper species and the evolution of fatty acid synthases and elongases across insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Jonas; Berdan, Emma L.; Mayer, Frieder; Ronacher, Bernhard; Geiselhardt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation between insect species. The CHC profiles of two closely related sympatric grasshopper species, Chorthippus biguttulus and C. mollis, differ mainly in the position of the first methyl group in major methyl-branched CHCs. The position of methyl branches is determined either by a fatty acid synthase (FAS) or by elongases. Both protein families showed an expansion in insects. Interestingly, the FAS family showed several lineage-specific expansions, especially in insect orders with highly diverse methyl-branched CHC profiles. We found five putative FASs and 12 putative elongases in the reference transcriptomes for both species. A dN/dS test showed no evidence for positive selection acting on FASs and elongases in these grasshoppers. However, one candidate FAS showed species-specific transcriptional differences and may contribute to the shift of the methyl-branch position between the species. In addition, transcript levels of four elongases were expressed differentially between the sexes. Our study indicates that complex methyl-branched CHC profiles are linked to an expansion of FASs genes, but that species differences can also mediated at the transcriptional level. PMID:27677406

  8. Dietary effects on cuticular hydrocarbons and sexual attractiveness in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Y Fedina

    Full Text Available Dietary composition is known to have profound effects on many aspects of animal physiology, including lifespan, general health, and reproductive potential. We have previously shown that aging and insulin signaling significantly influence the composition and sexual attractiveness of Drosophila melanogaster female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs, some of which are known to be sex pheromones. Because diet is intimately linked to aging and to the activity of nutrient-sensing pathways, we asked how diet affects female CHCs and attractiveness. Here we report consistent and significant effects of diet composition on female CHC profiles across ages, with dietary yeast and sugar driving CHC changes in opposite directions. Surprisingly, however, we found no evidence that these changes affect female attractiveness. Multivariate comparisons among responses of CHC profiles to diet, aging, and insulin signaling suggest that diet may alter the levels of some CHCs in a way that results in profiles that are more attractive while simultaneously altering other CHCs in a way that makes them less attractive. For example, changes in short-chain CHCs induced by a high-yeast diet phenocopy changes caused by aging and by decreased insulin signaling, both of which result in less attractive females. On the other hand, changes in long-chain CHCs in response to the same diet result in levels that are comparable to those observed in attractive young females and females with increased insulin signaling. The effects of a high-sugar diet tend in the opposite direction, as levels of short-chain CHCs resemble those in attractive females with increased insulin signaling and changes in long-chain CHCs are similar to those caused by decreased insulin signaling. Together, these data suggest that diet-dependent changes in female CHCs may be sending conflicting messages to males.

  9. The CHC22 clathrin-GLUT4 transport pathway contributes to skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Sachiko; Sakamoto, Kazuho; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Camus, Stéphane M; Griffin, Christine A; Esk, Christopher; Torres, Jorge A; Ohkoshi, Norio; Ishii, Akiko; Tamaoka, Akira; Funke, Birgit H; Kucherlapati, Raju; Margeta, Marta; Rando, Thomas A; Brodsky, Frances M

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization of the GLUT4 glucose transporter from intracellular storage vesicles provides a mechanism for insulin-responsive glucose import into skeletal muscle. In humans, clathrin isoform CHC22 participates in formation of the GLUT4 storage compartment in skeletal muscle and fat. CHC22 function is limited to retrograde endosomal sorting and is restricted in its tissue expression and species distribution compared to the conserved CHC17 isoform that mediates endocytosis and several other membrane traffic pathways. Previously, we noted that CHC22 was expressed at elevated levels in regenerating rat muscle. Here we investigate whether the GLUT4 pathway in which CHC22 participates could play a role in muscle regeneration in humans and we test this possibility using CHC22-transgenic mice, which do not normally express CHC22. We observed that GLUT4 expression is elevated in parallel with that of CHC22 in regenerating skeletal muscle fibers from patients with inflammatory and other myopathies. Regenerating human myofibers displayed concurrent increases in expression of VAMP2, another regulator of GLUT4 transport. Regenerating fibers from wild-type mouse skeletal muscle injected with cardiotoxin also showed increased levels of GLUT4 and VAMP2. We previously demonstrated that transgenic mice expressing CHC22 in their muscle over-sequester GLUT4 and VAMP2 and have defective GLUT4 trafficking leading to diabetic symptoms. In this study, we find that muscle regeneration rates in CHC22 mice were delayed compared to wild-type mice, and myoblasts isolated from these mice did not proliferate in response to glucose. Additionally, CHC22-expressing mouse muscle displayed a fiber type switch from oxidative to glycolytic, similar to that observed in type 2 diabetic patients. These observations implicate the pathway for GLUT4 transport in regeneration of both human and mouse skeletal muscle, and demonstrate a role for this pathway in maintenance of muscle fiber type. Extrapolating

  10. Induction of a reproductive-specific cuticular hydrocarbon profile by a juvenile hormone analog in the termite zootermopsis nevadensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive division of labor within social insect colonies relies on clear communication between nestmates. Fertile members must convey their status to prevent others from becoming reproductively active. Recent findings in some basal termites indicate that cuticular hydrocarbon profiles may re...

  11. Urinary profiles to assess polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure in coke-oven workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Laura; Rossella, Federica; Pavanello, Sofia; Mielzynska, Danuta; Siwinska, Ewa; Kapka, Lucyna; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2010-01-15

    Aim of the study was the assessment of exposure of coke-oven workers to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by determination of urinary profiles of hydroxylated and unmetabolized PAHs. Fifty-five Polish coke-oven workers were investigated by measurement of 12 hydroxylated metabolites of PAHs (OHPAHs) (1-, 2-hydroxynaphthalene; 2-, 9-hydroxyfluorene; 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene; 1-hydroxyypyrene, 6-hydroxychrysene and 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene) and 13 unmetabolized PAHs (U-PAHs) (from naphthalene to benzo[a]pyrene), in spot urine samples collected at the end of the workshift. U-PAHs with four or less rings were detected in all samples. In particular, median levels for urinary naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were 0.806, 0.721, 0.020, 0.032 and 0.035 microg/L. OHPAHs up to 1-hydroxypyrene were found in all samples, while high molecular-weight OHPAHs were always below quantification limit. Median level of 1-hydroxyypyrene was 15.4 microg/L. In all subjects significant correlations between OHPAHs and U-PAHs were observed (0.27 < r < 0.70, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that both hydroxylated metabolites and unmetabolized PAHs in urine are useful biomarkers of exposure to PAHs. Moreover, the simultaneous determination of several biomarkers permits to obtain specific excretion profiles that might help in exposure characterization and in better defining the excretion patterns.

  12. Ovarian activity correlates with extreme changes in cuticular hydrocarbon profile in the highly polygynous ant, Linepithema humile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biseau, Jean-Christophe; Passera, Luc; Daloze, Désiré; Aron, Serge

    2004-07-01

    In social insects, cuticular hydrocarbons of adults may vary with ovarian activity. Such variations are suggested to function in the regulation of reproduction within colonies. The modification of the CH profile with ovarian activity is usually interpreted as a signal of fertility causing workers to refrain from reproducing in the presence of the queen. We examined the effect of ovarian activity on the CH profiles in the Argentine ant Linepithema humile, a species where workers lack ovaries and are completely sterile. Our data show considerable differences in the CH profiles between fertile and infertile individuals. These differences are mainly qualitative. The CH profile strongly changes at the start of egg laying, both in mated and unmated queens. These results show that variation in cuticular hydrocarbons with ovarian activity in ants is not restricted to species with worker reproduction. We propose that in the Argentine ant, the cuticular hydrocarbons of laying queens correspond to a signal of fertility involved in the regulation of various aspects of reproduction, such as the rearing of new sexuals.

  13. Historical Profiles of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Marine Sediment Cores from Northwest Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Begoña; Viñas, Lucía; Bargiela, Jesica

    2016-11-01

    The northwest coast of Spain is characterized by an irregular coastline rich in marine life and with the highest mussel production in Europe. Taking this into account, the characterization of the pollution levels and the sources involved appear necessary. Not only were parent Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) analysed but also their alkylated homologues. In total, 35 compounds were analyzed in 5 sediment cores. Sediments were collected using a box core dredge and extracted by (Pressurized Liquid Extraction) whilst the quantification of PAHs was performed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The total concentration detected varied from 49.6 to 2489 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.) of which parent PAHs ranged from 44.5 to 2254 ng g(-1) d.w. and alkylated PAHs varied from 5.04 to 317 ng g(-1) d.w. Temporal and spatial evolution were outlined and pollution sources were identified along with a possible correlation between this pollution and local history and industry. Most of the PAHs from the superficial samples have a biomass and coal combustion profile, and some specific, localized events are reflected in the total PAH concentration evolution. Moreover, the study of the deepest layers of the sampled cores provides a baseline to develop background concentration values that will help in future sediment quality assessment.

  14. Investigating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons profiles in higher plants using statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojinu, O Samuel; Sonibare, O Oluwadayo; Gayawan, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-six higher plants sampled from Olomoro, Irri, Uzere, and Oginni exploration sites in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria were subjected to GC/MS analysis to assess the occurrence, distribution and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in them. The sigma28PAHs ranged from 335 to 3094 ng/g. The results of the nonparametric regression models showed that PAHs concentration in a plant cannot be used in isolation to deduce the total PAHs concentration in soils hosting the plant since PAHs concentration in a plant is influenced by the presence (or absence) of other plants in that location. A combination of Factor analysis (FA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to recognize PAHs concentration patterns among the plants in the studied locations and individual PAHs compounds. Woody annuals and perennial plants formed similar patterns in Oginni and Irri locations. Three main clusters were formed by all the compounds with naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene standing as outliers in all the four locations.

  15. The CHC22 clathrin-GLUT4 transport pathway contributes to skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Hoshino

    Full Text Available Mobilization of the GLUT4 glucose transporter from intracellular storage vesicles provides a mechanism for insulin-responsive glucose import into skeletal muscle. In humans, clathrin isoform CHC22 participates in formation of the GLUT4 storage compartment in skeletal muscle and fat. CHC22 function is limited to retrograde endosomal sorting and is restricted in its tissue expression and species distribution compared to the conserved CHC17 isoform that mediates endocytosis and several other membrane traffic pathways. Previously, we noted that CHC22 was expressed at elevated levels in regenerating rat muscle. Here we investigate whether the GLUT4 pathway in which CHC22 participates could play a role in muscle regeneration in humans and we test this possibility using CHC22-transgenic mice, which do not normally express CHC22. We observed that GLUT4 expression is elevated in parallel with that of CHC22 in regenerating skeletal muscle fibers from patients with inflammatory and other myopathies. Regenerating human myofibers displayed concurrent increases in expression of VAMP2, another regulator of GLUT4 transport. Regenerating fibers from wild-type mouse skeletal muscle injected with cardiotoxin also showed increased levels of GLUT4 and VAMP2. We previously demonstrated that transgenic mice expressing CHC22 in their muscle over-sequester GLUT4 and VAMP2 and have defective GLUT4 trafficking leading to diabetic symptoms. In this study, we find that muscle regeneration rates in CHC22 mice were delayed compared to wild-type mice, and myoblasts isolated from these mice did not proliferate in response to glucose. Additionally, CHC22-expressing mouse muscle displayed a fiber type switch from oxidative to glycolytic, similar to that observed in type 2 diabetic patients. These observations implicate the pathway for GLUT4 transport in regeneration of both human and mouse skeletal muscle, and demonstrate a role for this pathway in maintenance of muscle fiber

  16. Cuticular hydrocarbons of Drosophila montana: geographic variation, sexual dimorphism and potential roles as pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jackson H; Etges, William J; Schmitt, Thomas; Hoikkala, Anneli

    2014-02-01

    Sexual selection within populations can play an important role in speciation when divergence in mating signals and their corresponding preferences occur along different coevolutionary trajectories in different populations. In insects, one potential target of sexual selection is the blend of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), which often show intra- and interspecific variation, sexual dimorphism and may act as pheromones. In Drosophila montana, a cold-adapted, circumboreal member of the Drosophila virilis species group, flies from different populations have been found to show significant premating isolation as well as variation in male mating signal (song) and female preference. While the role of male courtship song in mate choice has been studied extensively, CHCs in this species have received little attention. In this study, we identified most of the CHCs found on the cuticle of D. montana and characterized population divergence and sexual dimorphism of CHC profiles among flies established from three natural populations - one European and two North American. We also studied their potential role as pheromones by analyzing CHCs of flies used in female-choice mating experiments. We report significant population×sex effects on CHC profiles, as well as significant relationships between some CHC principal components and particular mating behaviours, such as female attractiveness and male mating success, providing evidence that CHCs may play a role in mate choice in this species. The study also provides evidence for variation in the degree to which CHCs play a role in chemical communication among these populations, which may have an influence on the speciation process itself, and could be due to variation in interactions with other closely-related species that occur sympatrically with D. montana in some, but not other, parts of its distribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cuticular hydrocarbon profiles differentiate tropical fire ant populations (Solenopsis geminata, Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) from hexane rinses of workers from two Florida populations (dark and red forms) of the tropical fire ant, Solenopsis geminata, were separated by silica gel chromatography and identified by GC-MS analysis. Both the dark form and the red form produce similar CHCs with...

  18. Occurrence, profiles, and toxic equivalents of chlorinated and brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in E-waste open burning soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Chiya; Horii, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shuhei; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Ballesteros, Florencio; Viet, Pham Hung; Itai, Takaaki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Fujimori, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We conducted this study to assess the occurrence, profiles, and toxicity of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Cl-PAHs) and brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Br-PAHs) in e-waste open burning soils (EOBS). In this study, concentrations of 15 PAHs, 26 Cl-PAHs and 14 Br-PAHs were analyzed in EOBS samples. We found that e-waste open burning is an important emission source of Cl-PAHs and Br-PAHs as well as PAHs. Concentrations of total Cl-PAHs and Br-PAHs in e-waste open burning soil samples ranged from 21 to 2800 ng/g and from 5.8 to 520 ng/g, respectively. Compared with previous studies, the mean of total Cl-PAH concentrations of the EOBS samples in this study was higher than that of electronic shredder waste, that of bottom ash, and comparable to fly ash from waste incinerators in Korea and Japan. The mean of total Br-PAH concentrations of the EOBS samples was generally three to four orders of magnitude higher than those in incinerator bottom ash and comparable to incinerator fly ash, although the number of Br-PAH congeners measured differed among studies. We also found that the Cl-PAH and Br-PAH profiles were similar among all e-waste open burning soil samples but differed from those in waste incinerator fly ash. The profiles and principal component analysis results suggested a unique mechanism of Cl-PAH and Br-PAH formation in EOBS. In addition, the Cl-PAHs and Br-PAHs showed high toxicities equivalent to PCDD/Fs measured in same EOBS samples when calculated based on their relative potencies to benzo[a]pyrene. Along with chlorinated and brominated dioxins and PAHs, Cl-PAHs and Br-PAHs are important environmental pollutants to investigate in EOBS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diet-related modification of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, diminishes intercolony aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; Kumar, Ranjit; Suib, Steven L; Silverman, Jules

    2005-04-01

    Territorial boundaries between conspecific social insect colonies are maintained through a highly developed nestmate recognition system modulated by heritable and, in some instances, nonheritable cues. Argentine ants, Linepithema humile, use both genetic and environmentally derived cues to discriminate nestmates from nonnestmates. We explored the possibility that intraspecific aggression in the Argentine ant might diminish when colonies shared a common diet. After segregating recently field-collected colony pairs into high or moderate aggression categories, we examined the effect of one of three diets: two hydrocarbon-rich insect prey, Blattella germanica and Supella longipalpa, and an artificial (insect-free) diet, on the magnitude of aggression loss. Aggression diminished between colony pairs that were initially moderately aggressive. However, initially highly aggressive colony pairs maintained high levels of injurious aggression throughout the study, independent of diet type. Each diet altered the cuticular hydrocarbon profile by contributing unique, diet-specific cues. We suggest that acquisition of common exogenous nestmate recognition cues from shared food sources may diminish aggression and promote fusion in neighboring colonies of the Argentine ant.

  20. A cross-battery, reference variable, confirmatory factor analytic investigation of the CHC taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Keith, Timothy Z; Flanagan, Dawn P; Alfonso, Vincent C

    2013-08-01

    The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) taxonomy has been used to classify and describe human cognitive abilities. The ability factors derived from the CHC taxonomy are often assumed to be invariant across multiple populations and intelligence batteries, which is an important assumption for research and assessment. In this study, data from five different test batteries that were collected during separate Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004) concurrent validity studies were factor-analyzed jointly. Because the KABC-II was administered to everyone in the validity studies, it was used as a reference battery to link the separate test batteries in a "cross-battery" confirmatory factor analysis. Some findings from this analysis were that CHC-based test classifications based on theory and prior research were straightforward and accurate, a first-order Fluid/Novel Reasoning (Gf) factor was equivalent to a second-order g factor, and sample heterogeneity related to SES and sex influenced factor loadings. It was also shown that a reference variable approach, used in studies that incorporate planned missingness into data collection, may be used successfully to analyze data from several test batteries and studies. One implication from these findings is that CHC theory should continue to serve as a useful guide that can be used for intelligence research, assessment, and test development.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission profiles and removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettore Guerriero; Antonina Lutri; Rosanna Mabilia; Maria Concetta Tomasi Sciano; Mauro Rotatori [Istituto sull' Inquinamento Atmosferico, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy). Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

    2008-11-15

    A monitoring campaign of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl was carried out in an Italian iron ore sintering plant by sampling the combustion gases at the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) outlet, at the Wetfine scrubber (WS) outlet, and by collecting the ESP dust. Few data are available on these micropollutants produced in iron ore sintering plants, particularly from Italian plants. This study investigates the PAH emission profiles and the removal efficiency of ESPs and WS. PAHs were determined at the stack, ESP outlet flue gases, and in ESP dust to characterize the emission profiles and the performance of the ESP and the WS for reducing PAH emission. The 11 PAHs monitored are listed in the Italian legislative decree 152/2006. The mean total PAH sum concentration in the stack flue gases is 3.96 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, in ESP outlet flue gases is 9.73 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, and in ESP dust is 0.53 {mu}g/g. Regarding the emission profiles, the most abundant compound is benzo(b)fluoranthene, which has a relative low BaP toxic equivalency factors (TEF) value, followed by dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, which has a very high BaP(TEF) value. The emission profiles in ESP dust and in the flue gases after the ESP show some changes, whereas the fingerprint in ESP and stack flue gases is very similar. The removal efficiency of the ESP and of WS on the total PAH concentration is 5.2 and 59.5%, respectively. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Levels, composition profiles and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sludge from ten textile dyeing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xun-An; Lin, Mei-Qing; Shen, Ling-Zhi; Zhang, Jian-Hao; Wang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Zuo-Yi; Liu, Jing-Yong

    2014-07-01

    As components of synthetic dyes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present as contaminants in textile dyeing sludge due to the recalcitrance in wastewater treatment process, which may pose a threat to environment in the process of sludge disposal. In order to evaluate PAHs in textile dyeing sludge, comprehensive investigation comprising 10 textile dyeing plants was undertaken. Levels, composition profiles and risk assessment of 16 EPA-priority PAHs were analyzed in this study. The total concentrations of 16 PAHs (∑16 PAHs) varied from 1463 ± 177 ng g(-1) to 16,714 ± 1,507 ng g(-1) with a mean value of 6386 ng g(-1). The composition profiles of PAHs were characterized by 3- and 4-ring PAHs, among which phenanthrene, anthracene and fluoranthene were the most dominant components. The mean benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) concentration of ∑16 PAHs in textile dyeing sludge was 423 ng g(-1), which was 2-3 times higher than concentrations reported for urban soil. According to ecological risk assessment, the levels of PAHs in the textile dyeing sludge may cause a significant risk to soil ecosystem after landfill or dumping on soil.

  3. Flexible origin of hydrocarbon/pheromone precursors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker-Thomas, Claude; Garrido, Damien; Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Napal, Laura; Mazuras, Nicolas; Denis, Béatrice; Rubin, Thomas; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Montagne, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    In terrestrial insects, cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) provide protection from desiccation. Specific CHCs can also act as pheromones, which are important for successful mating. Oenocytes are abdominal cells thought to act as specialized units for CHC biogenesis that consists of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) synthesis, optional desaturation(s), elongation to very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and removal of the carboxyl group. By investigating CHC biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, we showed that VLCFA synthesis takes place only within the oenocytes. Conversely, several pathways, which may compensate for one another, can feed the oenocyte pool of LCFAs, suggesting that this step is a critical node for regulating CHC synthesis. Importantly, flies deficient in LCFA synthesis sacrificed their triacylglycerol stores while maintaining some CHC production. Moreover, pheromone production was lower in adult flies that emerged from larvae that were fed excess dietary lipids, and their mating success was lower. Further, we showed that pheromone production in the oenocytes depends on lipid metabolism in the fat tissue and that fatty acid transport protein, a bipartite acyl-CoA synthase (ACS)/FA transporter, likely acts through its ACS domain in the oenocyte pathway of CHC biogenesis. Our study highlights the importance of environmental and physiological inputs in regulating LCFA synthesis to eventually control sexual communication in a polyphagous animal.

  4. Residual indoor contamination from world trade center rubble fires as indicated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Funk, William E; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2006-02-15

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on Sept. 11, 2001 (9/11) created an immense dust cloud followed by fires that emitted smoke and soot into the air of New York City (NYC) well into December. Outdoor pollutant levels in lower Manhattan returned to urban background levels after about 200 days as the fires were put out and the debris cleanup was completed. However, particulate matter (PM) from the original collapse and fires also penetrated into commercial and residential buildings. This has created public concern because WTC dust is thought to cause adverse pulmonary symptoms including "WTC cough" and reduced lung capacity. Additionally, some recent studies have suggested a possible link between exposure to WTC contamination and other adverse health effects. Distinguishing between normal urban pollutant infiltration and residual WTC dust remaining in interior spaces is difficult; efforts are underway to develop such discriminator methods. Some progress has been made in identifying WTC dust by the content of fibers believed to be associated with the initial building collapse. There are also contaminants created by the fires that burned for 100 days in the debris piles of the building rubble. Using WTC ambient air samples, we have developed indicators for fire related PM based on the relative amounts of specific particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mass fraction of PAHs per mass of PM. These two parameters are combined, and we show a graphical method for discriminating between fire sources and urban particulate sources as applied to samples of settled dusts. We found that our PAHs based discriminator method can distinguish fire source contributions to WTC related particulate matter and dusts. Other major building fires or large open burn events could have similar PAHs characteristics. We found that random samples collected approximately 3.5 years after the WTC event from occupied indoor spaces (primarily residential

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban street dust and surface soil: comparisons of concentration, profile, and source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Gao; Yang, Meng; Jia, Hong-Liang; Zhou, Lei; Li, Yi-Fan

    2009-02-01

    Street dust and surface soil samples in urban areas of Dalian, a coastal city in Liaoning Province, China, were collected and analyzed for 25 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations, distribution, and sources of PAHs in dust and soil were determined. The concentrations of total PAHs in street dust ranged between 1890 and 17,070 ng/g (dry weight), with an average of 7460 ng/g, whereas the concentrations of total PAHs in surface soil varied greatly, from 650 to 28,900 ng/g, with a mean value of 6440 ng/g. Statistical paired t-test confirmed that total PAH concentrations have no significant difference between street dust and surface soil. Mean PAH concentrations in two type samples were much higher at industrial sites than at business/residential or garden sites. PAHs were dominated by higher molecular weight PAH (4- to 6-ring) homologues, which accounted for about 73% and 72% of total PAHs in street dust and surface soil, respectively. Principal component analysis was used in source apportionment of PAHs in dust and soil. Pyrogenic and petrogenic sources contributed 70% and 22.4% of total PAHs in street dusts, and fossil fuel (coal and petroleum) and biomass combustion accounted for 64.4% and 5.6% of total PAHs in pyrogenic sources, respectively. In surface soil, total PAHs were dominated by pyrogenic sources. The diagnostic ratios of benz[a]anthracene/chrysene confirmed that PAHs in street dust and surface soil of a Dalian urban zone might come mostly from the emission of local sources.

  6. Sex-specific genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus: implications for the evolution of signal reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddle, C B; Mitchell, C; Bay, S K; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic traits that convey information about individual identity or quality are important in animal social interactions, and the degree to which such traits are influenced by environmental variation can have profound effects on the reliability of these cues. Using inbred genetic lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, we manipulated diet quality to test how the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles of males and females respond across two different nutritional rearing environments. There were significant differences between lines in the CHC profiles of females, but the effect of diet was not quite statistically significant. There was no significant genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic variation in female CHCs are independent of genotype. There was, however, a significant effect of GEI for males, with changes in both signal quantity and content, suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic expression of male CHCs are dependent on genotype. The differential response of male and female CHC expression to variation in the nutritional environment suggests that these chemical cues may be under sex-specific selection for signal reliability. Female CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of identity: high genetic variability, low condition dependence and a high degree of genetic determination. This supports earlier work showing that female CHCs are used in self-recognition to identify previous mates and facilitate polyandry. In contrast, male CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of quality: condition dependence and a relatively higher degree of environmental determination. This suggests that male CHCs are likely to function as cues of underlying quality during mate choice and/or male dominance interactions.

  7. CHC: A Robust P2P Overlay Network with Simple Routing and Small-World Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Xiao

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all recent researches on P2P systems focus on howto build a highly usable P2P overlay network. Researchersinclude small routing table, short query path and goodrobustness into their design objectives of overlay topology. Inthis paper, we present a general group theory method anddefine a new Cayley graph. Based on this Cayley graph, wepropose a novel P2P overlay network called CHC, which hassimple routing (searching scheme and many other excellentproperties such as short query path, high clustering and goodrobustness because of its symmetry. The performance isevaluated by simulation to show that CHC possesses shorterquery path length and higher clustering and better robustnessthan several popular P2P overlay networks such as Chord andUlysses.

  8. Profile distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils of drained peatlands after wildfires (Moscow region, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibart, Anna; Gennadiev, Alexander; Koshovskii, Timur; Kovach, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) are formed in different natural and anthropogenic processes and could be found in many landscape components. These compounds are carcinogenic and belong to the group of persistent organic pollutants. The anthropogenic sources of PAHs are well-studied, but insufficient data are available on the hightemperature production of PAHs in natural processes. For example, natural fires are frequently related to the PAHs sources in landscapes, but very little factual data are on this topic. The soils of drained peatlands affected by catastrophic wildfires of 2010 and 2002 were studied in the Eastern part of Moscow Region (Russia). A total of 14 profiles of histosols and histic podsols were investigated. These series included soils of plots subjected to fires of different intensities and age, as well as soils of the background plots. Soil samples were taken from genetic horizons and from every 10 cm. The samples were analyzed for the contents of 14 prevailing individual compounds: fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, anthracene, tetraphene, benz[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, benzo[e]pyrene, coronene, dibenztiophene, triphenilene, benz(k)fluorantene. Morfological properties of soils after wildfires on drained peatlands were changed dramatically, the horizons of ash and char instead of organic layers were formed. These new horizons differ in the capability of PAHs accumulation. The char horizons have the highest concentrations of PAHs - up to 300 ng/g because of incomplete burning of organic matter in this sites, and the ash horizons, where the complete burning occured, contain only 10 ng/g PAHs. The highest concentrations of PAHs in soil profiles were detected after recent fires, and in cases of thick peat layers. After the combustion of peat chrysene, benz[a]pyrene, benz[e]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, benz(k)fluorantene and tetraphene accumulated in soils. This is mainly the group of 4-6-nuclear compounds. The formation of

  9. Species-Specific Cuticular Hydrocarbon Stability within European Myrmica Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem, Rhian M; Drijfhout, Falko P; Martin, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    Recognition is a fundamental process on which all subsequent behaviors are based at every organizational level, from the gene up to the super-organism. At the whole organism level, visual recognition is the best understood. However, chemical communication is far more widespread than visual communication, but despite its importance is much less understood. Ants provide an excellent model system for chemical ecology studies as it is well established that compounds known as cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are used as recognition cues in ants. Therefore, stable species-specific odors should exist, irrespective of geographic locality. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the CHC profiles of workers of twelve species of Myrmica ants from four countries across Europe, from Iberia to the Balkans and from the Mediterranean to Fennoscandia. CHCs remained qualitatively stable within each species, right down to the isomer level. Despite the morphological similarity that occurs within the genus Myrmica, their CHCs were highly diverse but remarkably species-specific and stable across wide geographical areas. This indicates a genetic mechanism under strong selection that produces these species-specific chemical profiles, despite each species encountering different environmental conditions across its range.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic freshwater and marine enrichment cultures efficient in hydrocarbon degradation: effect of profiling method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Y.J.; Stephen, J.R.; Richter, A.P.; Venosa, A.D.; Bruggemann, J.; MacNaughton, S.J.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Haines, J.R.; Kline, E.; White, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aerobically grown enrichment cultures derived from hydrocarbon- contaminated seawater and freshwater sediments were generated by growth on crude oil as sole carbon source. Both cultures displayed a high rate of degradation for a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds. The bacterial species composition

  11. Profiles and removal efficiency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by two different types of sewage treatment plants in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yu Bon; Chow, Ka Lai; Cheng, Zhang; Mo, Wing Yin; Chan, Yung Hau; Lam, James Chung Wah; Lau, Frankie Tat Kwong; Fung, Wing Cheong; Wong, Ming Hung

    2017-03-01

    Sewage discharge could be a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the coastal waters. Stonecutters Island and Shatin Sewage Treatment Works (SCISTW and STSTW) in Hong Kong, adopted chemically enhanced primary treatment and biological treatment, respectively. This study aimed at (1) determining the removal efficiencies of PAHs, (2) comparing the capabilities in removing PAHs, and (3) characterizing the profile of each individual PAHs, in the two sewage treatment plants (STPs). Quantification of 16 PAHs was conducted by a Gas Chromatography. The concentrations of total PAHs decreased gradually along the treatment processes (from 301±255 and 307±217ng/L to 14.9±12.1 and 63.3±54.1ng/L in STSTW and SCISTW, respectively). It was noted that STSTW was more capable in removing total PAHs than SCISTW with average total removal efficiency 94.4%±4.12% vs. 79.2%±7.48% (pPAHs was probably due to sorption in particular matter, confirmed by the higher distribution coefficient of individual and total PAHs in solid samples (dewatered sludge contained 92.5% and 74.7% of total PAHs in SCISTW and STSTW, respectively) than liquid samples (final effluent-total contained 7.53% and 25.3% of total PAHs in STSTW and SCISTW, respectively). Despite the impressive capability of STSTW and SCISTW in removing PAHs, there was still a considerable amount of total PAHs (1.85 and 39.3kg/year, respectively for the two STPs) being discharged into Hong Kong coastal waters, which would be an environmental concern. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  13. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Toyoshi, E-mail: umechan2@nies.go.jp; Shibata, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yshibata@nies.go.jp

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles.

  14. Bioinformatic Approaches Including Predictive Metagenomic Profiling Reveal Characteristics of Bacterial Response to Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contamination in Diverse Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Chettri, Bobby; Langpoklakpam, James S; Basak, Pijush; Prasad, Aravind; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Bhattacharyya, Maitree; Singh, Arvind K; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2017-04-24

    Microbial remediation of oil polluted habitats remains one of the foremost methods for restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environments. The development of effective bioremediation strategies however, require an extensive understanding of the resident microbiome of these habitats. Recent developments such as high-throughput sequencing has greatly facilitated the advancement of microbial ecological studies in oil polluted habitats. However, effective interpretation of biological characteristics from these large datasets remain a considerable challenge. In this study, we have implemented recently developed bioinformatic tools for analyzing 65 16S rRNA datasets from 12 diverse hydrocarbon polluted habitats to decipher metagenomic characteristics of the resident bacterial communities. Using metagenomes predicted from 16S rRNA gene sequences through PICRUSt, we have comprehensively described phylogenetic and functional compositions of these habitats and additionally inferred a multitude of metagenomic features including 255 taxa and 414 functional modules which can be used as biomarkers for effective distinction between the 12 oil polluted sites. Additionally, we show that significantly over-represented taxa often contribute to either or both, hydrocarbon degradation and additional important functions. Our findings reveal significant differences between hydrocarbon contaminated sites and establishes the importance of endemic factors in addition to petroleum hydrocarbons as driving factors for sculpting hydrocarbon contaminated bacteriomes.

  15. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  16. Implementing CHC to Counter Shoulder Surfing Attack in PassPoint – Style Graphical Passwords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joshuva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Graphical passwords are an alternative to existing alphanumeric passwords. In Graphical passwords users click on images than type a long, complex password. Passpoints scheme is one of the Graphical user authentication techniques. In this method the password is represented by multiple clicks on a single image. One of the advantages with Passpoints scheme is that, a user can click on any place in the image as a click point. Graphical authentication suffers a major drawback of Shoulder-surfing. Shoulder-surfing refers to someone observing the user’s action as the user enters a password. Due to this, the user’s action can be monitored by the attacker or it can be captured using recording devices such as camera. Sobrado and Birget suggested Convex Hull Click (CHC scheme to counter shoulder-surfing using PassIcons which is different from PassPoint scheme. In this paper, we described how CHC is implemented in Passpoint-sheme to counter Shoulder Surfing Attack.

  17. The role of the Environmental Specimen Bank in environmental monitoring: The example of CHC in selected matrices; Die Rolle der Umweltprobenbank in der Umweltueberwachung am Beispiel von chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen in ausgewaehlten Matrizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marth, P.; Kettrup, A. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie]|[Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie und Umweltanalytik; Schramm, K.W.; Henkelmann, B.; Wolf, A.; Oxynos, K.; Schmitzer, J. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie

    1999-03-01

    For precautionary environmental protection the Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) has been successfully established as a permanent environmental surveillance tool in Germany. The presented monitoring results on chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) show very clearly the effects of political decisions and can be used for the identification of pollutant sources. The CHC burden of breams (Abramis brama) from five German rivers (Elbe, Rhein, Saar, Mulde, Saale) gives an current overview of the pollution situation of different limnic ecosystems in Germany. A calculation model about the distribution of organic pollutants between different tissues offers the possibility to predict concentrations in liver and muscle of breams. Legislative emission restrictions have led to a significant decrease of dioxin levels in herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs between 1988-1996. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Umweltprobenbank des Bundes hat sich im Rahmen der Oekologischen Umweltbeobachtung zu einem wichtigen und permanenten Instrument der Umweltpolitik entwickelt. Neben der Langzeitkonservierung fuer zukuenftige Forschungsaufgaben wird am Beispiel der chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffe demonstriert, dass das durchgefuehrte Monitoring-Programm als Nachweis fuer die Effektivitaet gesetzlicher Massnahmen und zur Identifizierung von Schadstoffeintragsquellen genutzt werden kann. Der vorliegende Beitrag vermittelt am Beispiel der Brassen (Abramis brama) als Akkumulationsindikator einen aktuellen und raeumlich differenzierten Ueberblick ueber die chlororganische Belastungssituation bundesdeutscher Gewaesser (Elbe, Rhein, Saar, Mulde, Saale). Betrachtungen zur Verteilung organischer Chemikalien zwischen Gewebetypen von Brassen zeigen, dass sich die Verteilung der Schadstoffkonzentrationen in Leber und Muskel mit einem geringen Fehler errechnen laesst. Die Dioxingehalte von Silbermoeweneiern (Larus argentatus) belegen, dass die Belastung durch strengere Emissionsgrenzwerte seit Beginn der neunziger Jahre

  18. Investigation of an Outbreak of Diphtheria in Dabela Village of Amirgagh Taluka and CHC, Banaskantha, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niti Talsania, Jignesh Chauhan, Himanshu Nayak, Chintul Shah, Krunal Modi, Jaydeep devaliya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As outbreak of diphtheria reflects the impact of immunization outbreak investigation was carried out to assess the diphtheria outbreak pattern and case fatality rate in Dabela Village of Amirgagh Taluka and CHC, District, Banaskantha, Gujarat in 2007. Population stabilization, poverty alleviation, lifestyle modification, surveillance and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases constitute the major challenges demanding urgent attention in the future. Vaccine was efficacious among those who received >4 doses. The proportion of the population receiving boosters was low, especially among Muslims. We recommend increasing booster dose coverage. We investigated epidemic to 1 describe the epidemiology of diphtheria in terms of time, place, and person; 2 estimate vaccine coverage; and 3 to do SWOT analysis in Immunization services.4 To suggest successful vaccination.

  19. An alternative Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) factor structure of the WAIS-IV: age invariance of an alternative model for ages 70-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niileksela, Christopher R; Reynolds, Matthew R; Kaufman, Alan S

    2013-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) is by the far the most popular intelligence test for the assessment of adults in clinical and neuropsychological practice. Despite a number of studies examining the factor structure of the WAIS-IV from a Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) perspective (Benson, Hulac, & Kranzler, 2010; Ward, Bergman, & Hebert, 2012), a CHC interpretation of the WAIS-IV for individuals ages 70 and above has been absent from the literature. The exclusion of individuals ages 70 and above in previous research is likely due to the absence of several key supplemental subtests used to create a full CHC model. We provide an alternative five-factor CHC model of the WAIS-IV which includes only the subtests administered to individuals ages 70 and above in the standardization sample. Our results show (a) the alternative CHC model fits the data well; (b) this alternative CHC model met criteria for partial strict measurement invariance across the life span (only Similarities showed noninvariance) using strict criteria; (c) the five factors for ages 70-90 measure the same five CHC broad abilities identified in previous analyses reported for ages 16-69; and (d) the five-factor CHC solution for ages 70-90 is valid for the entire WAIS-IV age range and can be used whenever examiners administer the core battery but opt not to administer supplemental subtests. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. A visit to CHC of a larger number of women. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Yen Than district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh Xuan Hong

    1999-01-01

    The situation of the Bac Than Commune Health Center (CHC) in Yen Than District, Vietnam is reported. Promotion of education, improvement in health care, and economic development are the strategic programs for improving the commune people's standard of living. For the promotion of education, the CHC upgraded educational facilities and trained teachers on the use of efficient teaching methods. In order to generate a bigger income, efforts are exerted to promote the development of agriculture by producing agricultural products that are popular and sell high in the market. These activities have yielded positive results. Many students are doing well in their classes and are attending universities and the per capita yield of products has increased. For the improvement in health care, the Japan International Cooperation Agency Reproductive Health project has contributed much to the CHC. The three activities observed were 1) implementation of information, education and communication activities; 2) training of health staff members; and 3) renovation of the health facility. Such improvements have led to a visit to CHC of a larger number of women for gynecological examinations and prenatal check-ups and safe delivery.

  1. The Role of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) Cognitive Abilities in Predicting Writing Achievement during the School-Age Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Damien C.; Bulut, Okan; McGrew, Kevin S.; Frison, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Writing is a complex academic task--it involves numerous mental processes. Given the necessity for developing writing skills from elementary to secondary school, this study aimed to investigate the role of broad cognitive abilities derived from the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of intelligence in predicting skills associated with writing…

  2. Profiles of Mycobacterium communities under polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination stress in the Shenfu Irrigation Area, northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Li, Xu; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xiujuan; Sun, Jian; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Huiwen; Li, Peijun

    2013-10-01

    Indigenous Mycobacterium communities play an important role in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but little is known about Mycobacterium distribution in situ at PAH-contaminated sites. In this study, the diversity and distribution of Mycobacterium communities were investigated in sediments and soils at sites upstream, midstream, and downstream of an oil-sewage irrigation channel, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results show that heavy PAH contamination in upstream sites negatively affected Mycobacterium community diversity compared with midstream and downstream sites in all 3 sample types (sediments, corn field soils, and rice field soils). There was a correlation between the distribution of Mycobacterium communities and PAH contamination, as indicated by canonical correspondence analysis. Mycobacterium diversity and distribution was found to vary between the 3 sample types.

  3. The Mutasynthetic Production of CHC-B1 from a Streptomyces avermitilis Mutant in the Presence of Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acid%阿维菌素衍生物CHC-B1的突变生物合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜薇; 汪洋; 张晓琳; 郭伟群; 刘娣

    2009-01-01

    利用成功构建的基因缺失载体pLJ04(pKC1139∶∶△bkdF+△bkdH)对阿维菌素(avennectin)高产菌阿维链霉菌(Streptomyces avermitilis)76-02-e的bkdFGH基因进行缺失,获得的bkdFGH缺失突变株经过摇瓶发酵和HPLC检测,发现该突变株完全丧失了产生阿维菌素的能力.2-甲基丁酸及异丁酸的前体添加试验表明,当有外源前体存在时,突变株又能恢复阿维菌素合成的能力.将该bkdFGH基因缺失突变株命名为S.avermitilis bkd76-3.环己羧酸(CHC)前体添加试验及HPLC检测发现存在4种产物,经LC/MS分析验证,其中两种产物分别为CHC-B1和CHC-A2.

  4. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe; Zeng, Fangang; Xue, Nandong; Li, Fasheng

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (200 μm coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 μg/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 μg/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand>coarse sand>silt>clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay>silt>coarse sand>fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites.

  5. Intraspecific and Intracolonial Variation in the Profile of Venom Alkaloids and Cuticular Hydrocarbons of the Fire Ant Solenopsis saevissima Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson Fox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire ants are aggressive Neotropical ants that are extensively similar in general biology and morphology, making species identification difficult. Some fire ant species are top-rated pests spreading throughout the world by trade vessels. Many researchers attempted to sort between invasive and native species by using chemical characters, including patterns of venom alkaloids. The present study is the first to report intraspecific variation in some chemical characters, namely, cuticular hydrocarbons and venom alkaloids, within the Brazilian fire ant species Solenopsis saevissima and also reports on within-nest variations among members of different castes. Two different haplotypes (cryptic species of S. saevissima were clearly identified, one presenting a predominant combination of the venom alkaloids cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-undecylpiperidine with the cuticular hydrocarbons C23, 3-Me-C23, 10-C25 : 1, C25, and 3-Me-C25, and the other a predominant combination of cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-tridecenylpiperidine with predominance of 12-C25 : 1, C25, 11-Me-C25, 3-Me-C25, 13-C27 : 1, C27, and 13-Me-C27. Intranest variations revealed that the proportions among these compounds varied sensibly among workers of different sizes, gynes, and males (no alkaloids were detected in the latter. Larva contained vestiges of the same compounds. The recorded chemical profiles are quite different from previous reports with S. saevissima samples from São Paulo. The finds thus support other recent claims that S. saevissima includes cryptic species; the study, moreover, adds the find that they can occur in the same geographical location.

  6. Growth of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Mavinkurve, S.

    Two isolates from marine mud having broad spectrum hydrocarbon utilizing profile were identified as Arthrobacter simplex and Candida tropicalis.Both the organisms grew exponentially on crude oil. The cell yield of the organisms was influenced...

  7. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Strand

    2004-09-27

    The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

  8. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Zeng, Fangang [School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Xue, Nandong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Fasheng, E-mail: ligulax@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (< 2 {mu}m clay, 2-20 {mu}m silt, 20-200 {mu}m fine sand, and > 200 {mu}m coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 {mu}g/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 {mu}g/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand > coarse sand > silt > clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest PAH concentrations were associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil organic

  9. Treatability of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils of different textures along a vertical profile by mechanical soil aeration: A laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Shi, Yi; Hou, Deyi; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhifen; Xu, Zhu; Li, Fasheng; Du, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is a simple, effective, and low-cost soil remediation technology that is suitable for sites contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs). Conventionally, this technique is used to treat the mixed soil of a site without considering the diversity and treatability of different soils within the site. A laboratory test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical soil aeration for remediating soils of different textures (silty, clayey, and sandy soils) along a vertical profile at an abandoned chloro-alkali chemical site in China. The collected soils were artificially contaminated with chloroform (TCM) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Mechanical soil aeration was effective for remediating VCHs (removal efficiency >98%). The volatilization process was described by an exponential kinetic function. In the early stage of treatment (0-7hr), rapid contaminant volatilization followed a pseudo-first order kinetic model. VCH concentrations decreased to low levels and showed a tailing phenomenon with very slow contaminant release after 8hr. Compared with silty and sandy soils, clayey soil has high organic-matter content, a large specific surface area, a high clay fraction, and a complex pore structure. These characteristics substantially influenced the removal process, making it less efficient, more time consuming, and consequently more expensive. Our findings provide a potential basis for optimizing soil remediation strategy in a cost-effective manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission in Spitzer/IRS Maps. II. A Direct Link between Band Profiles and the Radiation Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.

    2017-03-01

    We decompose the observed 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission complexes in a large sample of over 7000 mid-infrared spectra of the interstellar medium using spectral cubes observed with the Spitzer/IRS-SL instrument. In order to fit the 7.7 μm PAH emission complex we invoke four Gaussian components, which are found to be very stable in terms of their peak positions and widths across all of our spectra, and subsequently define a decomposition with fixed parameters, which gives an acceptable fit for all the spectra. We see a strong environmental dependence on the interrelationships between our band fluxes—in the H ii regions all four components are intercorrelated, while in the reflection nebulae (RNs) the inner and outer pairs of bands correlate in the same manner as previously seen for NGC 2023. We show that this effect arises because the maps of RNs are dominated by emission from strongly irradiated photodissociation regions, while the much larger maps of H ii regions are dominated by emission from regions much more distant from the exciting stars, leading to subtly different spectral behavior. Further investigation of this dichotomy reveals that the ratio of two of these components (centered at 7.6 and 7.8 μm) is linearly related to the UV-field intensity (log G 0). We find that this relationship does not hold for sources consisting of circumstellar material, which are known to have variable 7.7 μm spectral profiles.

  11. Concentration profiles, source apportionment and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dumpsite soils from Agbogbloshie e-waste dismantling site, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Adegbenro P; Akortia, Eric; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2016-06-01

    The concentrations of eighteen (18) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including the 16 USEPA's priority PAHs as well as two alkyl-substituted naphthalenes were determined in dumpsite soils collected from different sampling sites within the Agbogbloshie e-waste dismantling site in Accra, Ghana. Following their isolation with ultrasonic-assisted extraction technique, the concentrations of the PAHs were determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Loss-on-ignition (LOI) method was employed for the determination of total organic carbon (TOC) of the soil samples. The mean Σ18PAHs obtained were 3006, 5627, 3046, 5555, and 7199 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) for sampling sites A (mosque), B (dismantling site), C (residential house/police station), D (personal computer repairers' shop) and E (e-waste open burning area), respectively. In all cases, the prevalence of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene was generally observed across the sampling sites. In this study, PAHs with two to three rings and four to six rings exhibited strong positive correlations, whereas BbF and BkF showed weak positive and negative correlations with other PAHs investigated. With the exception of BbF and BkF, all the PAHs had moderate to strong positive correlations with the TOC. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) concentration is a useful indicator of the carcinogenic potency of environmental matrices and these ranged between 111 and 454 ng g(-1), which are generally below the 'safe' level of 600 ng g(-1) established for the protection of the environment and human health. Interestingly, the seven carcinogenic PAHs were the major contributors to the BaPeq concentrations accounting between 97.7 and 98.3 %. Despite the minimal risk to cancer via exposure to the investigated dumpsite soil as indicated in the present study, the prolonged exposure to these pollutants via various exposure pathways may result in increased risk to cancer over time. The application of several

  12. Experimental investigation of HFC407C/HC290/HC600a mixture in a window air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabaraj, D.B.; Avinash, P.; Lal, D. Mohan; Renganarayan, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2006-09-15

    HCFC22, one of the widely used refrigerants in window air conditioners must be phased out soon as per the Montreal protocol. Presently, HFC407C is considered as a potential drop in substitute for HCFC22, but retrofitting HCFC22 systems with HFC407C with polyol ester oil (POE) is a major issue as HFC407C is immiscible with mineral oil. The miscibility issue of HFC407C with mineral oil was overcome with the addition of a HC blend to it. The above technoeconomic feasibility issues to retrofit the existing HCFC22 systems with an ozone friendly refrigerant and retain the energy efficiency of the system are challenges in the air conditioning sector. In this present work, an experimental analysis has been conducted in a window air conditioner retrofitted with eco-friendly refrigerant mixtures of HFC407C/HC290/HC600a without changing the mineral oil. Its performance, as well as energy consumption, was compared with the conventional one. It is observed that the mixtures demand lengthening of the condenser in order to maintain the discharge pressure within acceptable limits. This also resulted in better heat transfer at the condenser. Therefore, in this study, the condenser tube length was increased by 19% to suit the mixtures as compared to HCFC22. Compared to HCFC22, the refrigeration capacity of the new mixture was 9.54-12.76% higher than that of HCFC22, while the actual COP was found to be 11.91-13.24% higher than that of HCFC22. The overall performance has proved that the HFC407C/HC blend refrigerant mixture could be an eco-friendly substitute to phase out HCFC22. (author)

  13. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  14. Global, Broad, or Specific Cognitive Differences? Using a MIMIC Model to Examine Differences in CHC Abilities in Children with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niileksela, Christopher R.; Reynolds, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to better understand the relations between learning disabilities and different levels of latent cognitive abilities, including general intelligence (g), broad cognitive abilities, and specific abilities based on the Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory of intelligence (CHC theory). Data from the "Differential Ability…

  15. Comparing Models of Intelligence in Project TALENT: The VPR Model Fits Better than the CHC and Extended Gf-Gc Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jason T.; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Three prominent theories of intelligence, the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC), extended fluid-crystallized (Gf-Gc) and verbal-perceptual-image rotation (VPR) theories, provide differing descriptions of the structure of intelligence (McGrew, 2009; Horn & Blankson, 2005; Johnson & Bouchard, 2005b). To compare these theories, models representing them were…

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T polymorphism and high plasma homocysteine in chronic hepatitis C (CHC infected patients from the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Filipe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Hyperhomocysteinemia due to Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR gene, in particular the C677T (Ala222Val polymorphism were recently associated to steatosis and fibrosis. We analyzed the frequency of MTHFR gene in a cross-sectional study of patients affected by Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC from Northeast of Brazil. Method One hundred seven-four untreated patients with CHC were genotyped for the C677T MTHFR. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells and the C677T MTHFR polymorphism was identified by PCR-RFLP. The homocysteine (Hcy levels were determined by chemiluminescence method. All patients were negative for markers of Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis and autoimmune diseases and have current and past daily alcohol intake less than 100 g/week. Results Among subjects infected with CHC genotype non-1 the frequency of MTHFR genotypes TT was 9.8% versus 4.4% genotype 1 (p = 0.01. Nevertheless, association was found between the MTHFR genotype TT × CT/CC polymorphism and the degree of steatosis and fibrosis in both hepatitis C genotype (p Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma Hcy levels is highly prevalent in subjects with chronic hepatits C with steatosis regardless of HCV genotype and vitamin deficiency. The presence of genotype TT of MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more common in CHC genotype non-1 infected patient regardless of histopathological classification and genotype TT+CT frequencies were significant in the presence of fibrosis grade 1+2 and of steatosis in CHC infected patients from the northeast of Brazil regardless of HCV genotype. The genetic susceptibility of MTHFR C677T polymorphism should be confirmed in a large population.

  17. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  18. Isolation and determination of absolute configurations of insect-produced methyl-branched hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Jan E; McElfresh, J Steven; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2015-01-27

    Although the effects of stereochemistry have been studied extensively for volatile insect pheromones, little is known about the effects of chirality in the nonvolatile methyl-branched hydrocarbons (MBCHs) used by many insects as contact pheromones. MBCHs generally contain one or more chiral centers and so two or more stereoisomeric forms are possible for each structure. However, it is not known whether insects biosynthesize these molecules in high stereoisomeric purity, nor is it known whether insects can distinguish the different stereoisomeric forms of MBCHs. This knowledge gap is due in part to the lack of methods for isolating individual MBCHs from the complex cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) blends of insects, as well as the difficulty in determining the absolute configurations of the isolated MBCHs. To address these deficiencies, we report a straightforward method for the isolation of individual cuticular hydrocarbons from the complex CHC blend. The method was used to isolate 36 pure MBCHs from 20 species in nine insect orders. The absolute stereochemistries of the purified MBCHs then were determined by digital polarimetry. The absolute configurations of all of the isolated MBCHs were determined to be (R) by comparison with a library of synthesized, enantiomerically pure standards, suggesting that the biosynthetic pathways used to construct MBCHs are highly conserved within the Insecta. The development of a straightforward method for isolation of specific CHCs will enable determination of their functional roles by providing pure compounds for bioassays.

  19. Autoantibody profiles in autoimmune hepatitis and chronic hepatitis C identifies similarities in patients with severe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Kawa; Rasool, Aram H; Hattem, Ali; Al-Karboly, Taha AM; Taher, Taher E; Bystrom, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine how the auto-antibodies (Abs) profiles overlap in chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and correlate to liver disease. METHODS Levels of antinuclear Ab, smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver/kidney microsomal-1 (LKM-1) Ab and markers of liver damage were determined in the sera of 50 patients with CHC infection, 20 AIH patients and 20 healthy controls using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and other immune assays. RESULTS We found that AIH patients had more severe liver disease as determined by elevation of total IgG, alkaline phosphatase, total serum bilirubin and serum transaminases and significantly higher prevalence of the three non-organ-specific autoantibodies (auto-Abs) than CHC patients. Antinuclear Ab, SMA and LKM-1 Ab were also present in 36% of CHC patients and related to disease severity. CHC cases positive for auto-Abs were directly comparable to AIH in respect of most markers of liver damage and total IgG. These cases had longer disease duration compared with auto-Ab negative cases, but there was no difference in gender, age or viral load. KLM-1+ Ab CHC cases showed best overlap with AIH. CONCLUSION Auto-Ab levels in CHC may be important markers of disease severity and positive cases have a disease similar to AIH. Auto-Abs might have a pathogenic role as indicated by elevated markers of liver damage. Future studies will unravel any novel associations between these two diseases, whether genetic or other. PMID:28293081

  20. Carcinoma hepatocelular (CHC. Factores de riesgo, diagnóstico y tratamiento. Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe, 1995-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzálo Correa Arango

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Por estudios epidemiológicos sabemos que el CHC es el octavo
    cáncer más frecuente en el mundo; también que es 3 veces más
    frecuente en hombres que en mujeres tanto en el mundo como en
    Antioquia (1,2 y que se presentan 350.000 casos nuevos cada año.
    Nuestro objetivo es describir el comportamiento clínico y epidemiológico del CHC en la población usuaria del HPTU entre enero de 1995 y julio del 2000.

     

     

  1. Study of General Awareness, Attitude, Behavior, and Practice Study on Dog Bites and its Management in the Context of Prevention of Rabies Among the Victims of Dog Bite Attending the OPD Services of CHC Muradnagar

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Piyush; Jain, Garima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This is a recent study conducted during 15th September 2013 to 15th December 2013 at the community health centre (CHC), Muradnagar, distt Ghaziabad, among the victims of dog/animal bite attending the daily OPD services of CHC. To identify the level of general awareness and knowledge of wound management and rabies among the cases of dog bite and to study the awareness of people about antirabies vaccines and health service utilization. Methods: The study population composed of 250 v...

  2. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  3. Synergistic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons with microorganisms and zero valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöftner, Philipp; Summer, Dorothea; Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) are located mainly within build-up regions. Therefore in most cases only in-situ technologies without excavation of soil material can be used for remediation. This project examines a novel in-situ remediation method, in which the biotic degradation via bacteria is combined with abiotic degradation via zero-valent iron particles (ZVI). ZVI particles are injected into the aquifer where CHC-molecules are reductively dechlorinated. However Fe0 is also oxidized by reaction with water leading to generation of H2 without any CHC degradation. To achieve biotic degradation often strictly anaerobic strains of the bacteria Dehalococcoides are used. These bacteria can dechlorinate CHC by utilizing H2. By combining these processes the H2, produced during the anaerobic corrosion of Fe0, could be used by bacteria for further CHC degradation. Therefore the amount of used Fe0 and as a consequence also remediation costs could be reduced. Additionally the continuous supply of H2 could make the bacterial degradation more controllable. Different Fe0 particles (nano- and micro-scale) were tested for their perchloroethene (PCE) degradation rate and H2 production rate in microcosms. PCE-degradation rate by different bacterial cultures was investigated in the same microcosm system. In course of these experiments the 13C enrichment factors of the PCE degradation of the different particles and cultures were determined to enable the differentiation of biotic and abiotic degradation. Preliminary results showed, that the nano-scale particles reacted faster with PCE and water than their micro-scaled counterparts. The PCE degradation via micro-scaled particles lead to 13C enrichment factors in the range of -3,6 ‰ ± 0,6 to -9,5 ‰ ± 0,2. With one of the examined bacterial cultures a fast reduction of PCE to ethene was observed. Although PCE and TCE were completely degraded by this culture the metabolites DCE and VC could still be detected

  4. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  5. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  6. The Distribution and the Origin of Oxygenated Non-Hydrocarbons in Soil Profiles in Beijing, China%北京典型土壤剖面含氧非烃化合物分布及成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张枝焕; 杨晓洁; 万甜甜; 贺光秀; 朱雷

    2013-01-01

    根据对北京地区6个典型采样点土壤样品的试验分析结果,探讨了含氧非烃化合物的含量、组成及其在采样点剖面上的分布特征,并对其污染源进行了讨论.结果表明,检测到的含氧非烃化合物主要包括C6~C28正构烷酸类、C12~C28正构烷醇类、正构烷酸甲酯类、酞酸酸类、甾醇类和脱氢松香酸等.含氧非烃化合物总质量分数及各类化合物的质量分数均有随深度增大而降低的趋势,其中0~40 cm含氧非烃化合物总质量分数(4.539 ~60.689 μg/g)较高且变化明显,深度大于40 cm的土壤中降至<9.000 μg/g且均趋于稳定.各采样点含氧非烃化合物的总质量分数纵向变化特征与w(TOC)的变化趋势基本一致,表明w(TOC)是控制土壤中含氧非烃化合物分布的重要因素.不同采样点正构烷酸类化合物都以C16为主峰碳,次主峰碳为C18,除个别采样点表层土壤中高碳数正构烷酸存在较明显奇偶优势外,中低碳数正构烷酸偶碳优势不明显,推测其主要来源于化石燃料或原土中的有机质,部分高分子量正构烷酸来源于生物质;正构烷醇类以C22为主峰碳,并具有明显的偶碳优势,主要来源于植物或者微生物源等天然源;酞酸醋中DBP(邻苯二甲酸二丁基酯)、DEHP[邻苯二甲酸二(2-乙基己基)酯]和DIBP(邻苯二甲酸二异丁基酯)质量分数较高,其来源与这些化合物的人为使用有关;甾醇类以β-谷甾醇占优势,并且大部分集中在表层,主要为生物源.%Oxygenated non-hydrocarbons are widely distributed in soil environment and most of the species are toxic,teratogenetic and persistent.They could be fatally harmful to soil ecosystem and human health.Recently,many studies reported that oxygenated nonhydrocarbons widely existed in different environments in Beijing.However,the distribution and the origin of those compounds in soil profiles still remain unclear.To investigate the

  7. Use of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Simulate the Profiles of 3-Hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene in Workers Exposed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia Ortiz, Roberto; Maître, Anne; Barbeau, Damien; Lafontaine, Michel; Bouchard, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Biomathematical modeling has become an important tool to assess xenobiotic exposure in humans. In the present study, we have used a human physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and an simple compartmental toxicokinetic model of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) kinetics and its 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (3-OHBaP) metabolite to reproduce the time-course of this biomarker of exposure in the urine of industrially exposed workers and in turn predict the most plausible exposure scenarios. The models were constructed from in vivo experimental data in rats and then extrapolated from animals to humans after assessing and adjusting the most sensitive model parameters as well as species specific physiological parameters. Repeated urinary voids from workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been collected over the course of a typical workweek and during subsequent days off work; urinary concentrations of 3-OHBaP were then determined. Based on the information obtained for each worker (BaP air concentration, daily shift hours, tasks, protective equipment), the time courses of 3-OHBaP in the urine of the different workers have been simulated using the PBPK and toxicokinetic models, considering the various possible exposure routes, oral, dermal and inhalation. Both models were equally able to closely reproduce the observed time course of 3-OHBaP in the urine of workers and predicted similar exposure scenarios. Simulations of various scenarios suggest that the workers under study were exposed mainly by the dermal route. Comparison of measured air concentration levels of BaP with simulated values needed to obtain a good approximation of observed time course further pointed out that inhalation was not the main route of exposure for most of the studied workers. Both kinetic models appear as a useful tool to interpret biomonitoring data of PAH exposure on the basis of 3-OHBaP levels. PMID:25032692

  8. Comparison of concentrations and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in bile of fishes from offshore oil platforms and natural reefs along the California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael J.; Love, Milton S.; Nishimoto, Mary M.; Schroeder, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the environmental consequences of decommissioning offshore oil platforms on local and regional fish populations, contaminant loads in reproducing adults were investigated at seven platform sites and adjacent, natural sites. Specimens of three species (Pacific sanddab, Citharichthys sordidus; kelp rockfish, Sebastes atrovirens; and kelp bass, Paralabrax clathratus) residing at platforms and representing the regional background within the Santa Barbara Channel and within the San Pedro Basin were collected. Some of the most important contaminant classes related to oil operations are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their potential toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, acute exposure cannot be related directly to PAH tissue concentrations because of rapid metabolism of the parent chemicals in fish; therefore, PAH metabolites in bile were measured, targeting free hydroxylated PAHs (OH-PAHs) liberated by enzymatic hydrolysis of the bound PAH glucuronides and sulfates. An ion-pairing method was developed for confirmatory analysis that targeted PAH glucuronides and sulfates. Concentrations of hydroxylated PAHs in all samples (76 fish from platforms and 64 fish from natural sites) were low, ranging from less than the limits of detection (5 to 120 nanograms per milliliter bile; 0.03 to 42 nanograms per milligram protein) to a maximum of 320 nanograms per milliliter bile (32 nanograms per milligram protein). A previously proposed dosimeter of PAH exposure in fish, 1-hydroxypyrene, was not detected at any platform site. Low concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene were detected in 3 of 12 kelp rockfish collected from a natural reef site off Santa Barbara. The most prevalent OH-PAH, 2-hydroxyfluorene, was detected at low concentrations in seven fish of various species; of these, four were from two of the seven platform sites. The greatest concentrations of 2-hydroxyfluorene were found in three fish of various species from Platform Holly and were only

  9. The reaction of the acrylonitrile ion CH 2dbnd CH-C tbnd N rad + with HCN: Proton-transport catalysis vs formation of ionized pyrimidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Henri K.; Jobst, Karl J.; Gerbaux, Pascal; Burgers, Peter C.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2009-11-01

    The CBS-QB3 model chemistry predicts that the title ion-molecule reaction, of potential interest in astrochemistry, yields a stable head-to-tail dimer, [HC dbnd N-CH 2C(H)C tbnd N] rad + ( D1). Cyclization of D1 into ionized pyrimidine seems possible, but the initiating 1,2-H shift is close in energy to back-dissociation into CH 2dbnd C(H)CN rad + ( AN) + HCN. Less energy demanding is formation of the H-bridged isomers [CH 2dbnd C(CN)H--N tbnd CH] rad + and [HC tbnd N--HC(H) dbnd C(H)CN] rad +, whose HCN component may catalyze isomerization of AN into CH 2dbnd C dbnd C dbnd NH rad + ( AN1) and CH dbnd C(H)C dbnd NH rad + ( AN2) respectively. Tandem mass spectrometry based experiments using 15N/ 13C labelling show that cyclization of D1 does not occur and that AN1 is the predominant reaction product instead.

  10. A silica gel based method for extracting insect surface hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Ramírez, Santiago R; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-02-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for the extraction of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using silica gel, herein referred to as "silica-rubbing". This method permits the selective sampling of external hydrocarbons from insect cuticle surfaces for subsequent analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cuticular hydrocarbons are first adsorbed to silica gel particles by rubbing the cuticle of insect specimens with the materials, and then are subsequently eluted using organic solvents. We compared the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that resulted from extractions using silica-rubbing and solvent-soaking methods in four ant and one bee species: Linepithema humile, Azteca instabilis, Camponotus floridanus, Pogonomyrmex barbatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Euglossa dilemma (Hymenoptera: Apidae). We also compared the hydrocarbon profiles of Euglossa dilemma obtained via silica-rubbing and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Comparison of hydrocarbon profiles obtained by different extraction methods indicates that silica rubbing selectively extracts the hydrocarbons that are present on the surface of the cuticular wax layer, without extracting hydrocarbons from internal glands and tissues. Due to its surface specificity, efficiency, and low cost, this new method may be useful for studying the biology of insect cuticular hydrocarbons.

  11. Chronic hepatitis C and persistent occult hepatitis C virus infection are characterized by distinct immune cell cytokine expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, T N Q; Mercer, S E; Michalak, T I

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in immune cells in both chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and occult HCV infection, but the extent of virus replication in this compartment in these opposing infection forms varies greatly. It was unknown whether this could be linked to HCV genotype or to differences in host gene expression shaping the immune response, and whether HCV replication in immune cells is sensitive to endogenous antiviral cytokines. In this study, we uncovered that significantly greater HCV load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not in plasma, coincided with HCV genotypes 2 and 3 in CHC, but with genotype 1 in residual occult infection after clinical resolution of hepatitis C. Moreover, PBMC from individuals with occult infection transcribed significantly greater levels of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, but less interleukin (IL)-10 than those from CHC. In CHC, PBMC with low HCV load expressed significantly more IFN-gamma but less IL-12 than did cells with high virus content. In occult infection, HCV RNA detection in PBMC was associated with much lower IFN-alpha and IL-12 expression. Further, HCV replication in T lymphocytes could be completely eliminated by activation of endogenous IFN-gamma in CHC, but of IFN-alpha in occult infection. In conclusion, CHC and persistent occult HCV infection are characterized by clearly different profiles of antiviral cytokine response in circulating immune cells which are also different from those of healthy individuals. Higher expression of IL-10, combined with lower transcription of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, is associated with a more robust HCV replication in immune cells.

  12. Relationships between Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) cognitive abilities and math achievement within a sample of college students with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Briley

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between cognitive abilities and math achievement within a sample of college students with learning disabilities (LD). The cognitive abilities were seven areas identified by Stratum II of the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities, in addition to the eighth area of Working Memory. Math performance was assessed via math calculation and math reasoning tasks. Instruments include the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement. Participants were 158 college students with a diagnosed LD in math. Multiple regression analyses found that Processing Speed and Working Memory were related to Math Calculation scores and that Comprehension-Knowledge, Fluid Reasoning, and Working Memory were related to Math Reasoning. Implications for the assessment of math LD in the college populations are discussed.

  13. Site profiles of low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons - cause-oriented monitoring in aquatic media. Vol.2. Low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in surface water, sediments, suspended matter and fish of the Elbe river and its tributaries; Standortprofile schwerfluechtiger chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien. Bd. 2. SCKW in Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Schwebstoffen und Fischen aus der Elbe und Nebenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Gebefuegi, I.; Martens, D.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2001-07-01

    Evaluating the primary data from ARGE ELBE, LAU Halle/Saale and the Environmental Specimen Banking (Umweltprobenbank) as well from publications from the Czech Republic (CHMU) the concentrations of the following low volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were established for surface water, sediment, breams and eels from the rivers Elbe, Schwarze Elster, Mulde and Saale partly from 1989 till 1999: DDT and its metabolites DDE and DDD, partly as 2,4'- and 4,4' isomers; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- and {delta} isomers); chlorinated benzenes with 1-6 Cl atoms and octachlorostyrene. The data evaluated were drawn up into tables - comprehensive in a separate supplement, in short versions within the text - and consolidated into graphs. Aim of the paper was a cause-oriented monitoring. The by far most important emission sources, found from the distance and time profiles as well as from special assessments of the substance patterns, were chemical plants. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten der ARGE ELBE, des LAU Halle/Saale und der Umweltprobenbank sowie von Publikationen aus Tschechien (CHMU) wurden fuer Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Brassen/Bleien und Aale aus der Elbe, Schwarzen Elster, Mulde und Saale fuer die Jahre von z.T. 1989 bis 1999 die Konzentrationen der folgenden schwerfluechtigen Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) ermittelt: DDT und seine Metabolite DDE und DDD, z.T. als 2,4'- und 4,4'-Isomere; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- und {delta}-Isomere); chlorierte Benzole mit 1-6 Cl-Atomen und Octachlorstyrol. Die ausgewerteten Daten wurden zu Tabellen - ausfuehrlich in einem gesonderten Tabellenanhang und verkuerzt im Textteil - zusammengestellt sowie zu Grafiken verdichtet. Ziel der Arbeit war ein ursachenorientiertes Monitoring. Als mit Abstand wesentlichste Emissionsquellen konnten anhand von Streckenprofilen und Zeitrastern sowie durch spezielle Auswertungen der Stoffmusterverteilungen Chemibetriebe ermittelt werden. (orig.)

  14. [A trans-hospital pilot programme for onco-geriatry. The experience of the CHC-Liege].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focan, C; Warzee, E; Demolin, G; Houbiers, G; Kreutz, F; Matus, G; Longree, L; Sondag, C; Dammel, F; Guillaume, Th; Graas, M P

    2013-03-01

    The authors offered to 296 consecutive cancer patients aged > or = 70 to undergo a joint comprehensive geriatric and oncological assessment. After pluridisciplinary discussion, several reflections have emerged: the need in 15 - 32% of cases to reinforce the role of the paramedical staff; the correlation between age, low clinical indices, alteration of renal function as well as geriatric characteristics; 67% of evaluated cases presented a significant geriatric profile; recommendations for patients' management in relation to their pattern of frailty and health aging (standard, adapted or palliative treatment).

  15. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  16. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  17. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  18. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  19. Cytokine profiles and hepatic injury in occult hepatitis C versus chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, N; Eldars, W; Eldegla, H; Fouda, O; Gad, Y; Abousamra, N; Elmasry, E; Arafa, M

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new entity that should be considered when diagnosing patients with abnormal liver functions of unknown origin. This work was carried out to evaluate T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (Th1/Th2) cytokine profiles in patients with occult HCV infection versus chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection, also to investigate any association between theses cytokines and liver histological features in both groups. Serum levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10) were measured in 35 patients with occult HCV infection compared to 50 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection and 30 healthy controls. We have found that Th1 cytokines were significantly increased in patients with CHC infection than in both occult HCV infection and control groups (p less than 0.001). On the other hand, serum IL-4 levels were higher in occult HCV infection than in CHC and control groups (p less than 0.001). Furthermore, serum IL-10 levels were higher in both patient groups vs control group (pless than 0.001), with no significant difference between CHC and occult HCV groups. Finally, only serum IL-10 levels were significantly higher among patients with high activity (A2-A3) than those with low activity (A0-A1) in both CHC and occult HCV groups (p=0.038, p=0.025, respectively). Patients with occult HCV infection exhibited a distinct immunoregulatory cytokine pattern that is shifted towards the Th2 arm.

  20. Persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PHC) - end products and intermediate products of technical synthesis processes in surface water of the Rhine region. Vol. 5: Site profiles of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons - source-oriented monitoring in aquatic media; Persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) - End- und Zwischenprodukte technischer Synthesen in Gewaessern der Rheinregion. Band 5 der Reihe: Standortprofile persistenter chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2003-07-01

    By evaluating the primary data from 20 regional institutions in the period 1984-2002 about persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHC) in fishes (eels, Anguilla anguilla; breams, Abramis brama; barbs, Barbus barbus and reaches, Rutilus rutilus), sediment and suspended matter it was tried to mark the burdens and substance profiles for sampling sites on the river Rhine and rivers in BW, Hess, RP and NRW. The compounds investigated were the isomere di-, tri- and tetrachlorobenzenes, penta- and hexachlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) as well as the 6 DIN (IUPAC, Ballschmiter) congeners of the PCB, substances which were - as to the REACH - described as PBT, partly as vPvB substances and regarded as ''priority harmful substances'' (PCBz; HCB, HCBD), respectively. The statistically elaborated single data were summarized in distance profiles and time series, aiming at marking local and regional immissions as well as hints to their origin and current importance. The background of these efforts is the lack of specialized publications about technical synthesis or compulsory yield of the compounds concerning kind, amount and period. Especially tetrachlorobenzene (mainly 1,2,4,5-TeCBz) and HCBD could be defined as indicator substances for past and recent technical synthesis of chloroorganic compounds. The higher chlorinated PCB congeners no. 138, 153 and 180 (HPCB) proved very persistent. The sites of chemical industry in the vicinity of the sampling points Rheinfelden, Grenzach, Lampertheimer Altrhein, Biebesheimer Rhein, Muendung Schwarzbach, Bischofsheim and Griesheim (Main), Hitdorf, Duisburg-Homberg und Huels (Lippe) could be made transparent by maxima and special substance patterns. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten ueber persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) in Fischen (Aale, Anguilla anguilla; Brachsen, Abramis brama; Barben, Barbus barbus und Rotaugen, Rutilus rutilus), Sediment und

  1. Does the ion-molecule reaction between HC tbnd CH rad + and HCN lead to CH 2dbnd CH-C tbnd N rad + ? A computational and experimental study of the reverse process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Hasan, Syed A.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2008-01-01

    The title ion-molecule reaction has been proposed to play an important role in interstellar chemistry if it yields acrylonitrile ions CH 2dbnd CH-C tbnd N rad + . This question was probed by examining the formation of HC tbnd CH rad + and HCN from low-energy ions CH 2dbnd CH-C tbnd N rad + and related isomers, using tandem mass spectrometry based experiments (D and 13C labelling) in conjunction with model chemistry calculations (CBS-QB3/APNO). We conclude that the title reaction is a barrierless multistep rearrangement that may not effectively compete with the straightforward formation of stable distonic ions HC dbnd CH-N dbnd CH rad + from HC tbnd CH rad + (ion)-HCN(dipole) encounter complexes.

  2. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Diorganotin Compounds {[R2Sn(ON=CHC6H5)]2O}2 and Crystal Structure of {[(C6H5CH2)2Sn(ON = CHC6H5)]2O}2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN,Han-Dong(尹汉东); XUE,Sheng-Cai(薛绳才); WANG,Qi-Bao(王其宝)

    2004-01-01

    Diorganotin compounds {[R2Sn(ON=CHC6H5)]2O}2 [R=C6H5CH2 (1), 2-FC6H4CH2 (2), 4-FC6H4CH2 (3),2-C1C6H4CH2 (4), 4-C1C6H4CH2 (5)] were synthesized by the reaction of R2SnO with HON=CHC6H5 in 1: 1 molar ratio in refluxing anhydrous benzene or toluene. They were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and 119sn NMR spectroscopy. And two sets of 119sn chemical shifts were observed in the 119Sn NMR spectra of these compounds, indicating the presence of two types of environment around the tin atoms. The crystal structure of compound 1 was determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. The results showed that the crystal of compound 1 belongs to a monoclinic system with space group P21/c and unit cell dimensions: a= 1.0718(9) nm, b=1.9666(17) nm, c=2.0480(17) nm, β=96.4371(14)°, Dc= 1.450 g/cm3, Z=2, F(000)= 1888, V=4.290(6) nm3, μ= 1.206 mm -1, R1 =0.0405, wR2= 0.0786. The compound 1 belongs to centrosymmetric dimer structure mode with a four-membered central endo-cyclic Sn2O2 unit in which the bridging oxygen atoms are tri-coordinated. Each bridging oxygen atom also connects with an exo-cyclic tin atom. The endo- and exo-cyclic tin atoms are both five-coordinated, and have coordination geometry of distorted trigonal bipyramid.

  4. Cool Sooting Flames of Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.A. MANSUROV

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paramagnetism of soot particles sampled from cool sooting flames of methane and propane in a separately-heated two-sectional reactor under atmospheric pressure at the reactor temperatures of 670-1170 K. The temperature profiles of the flames were studied. The sampling was carried out with a quartz sampler and the samples were frozen with liquid nitrogen. A number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, fluoranthene, coronene, anthanthrene, 1,12-benzperylene,were identified by spectroscopic methods in the extract of soot. The processes of soot formation at methaneoxygen mixture combustion in the electric field with applied potential changed from 0 to 2,2 kV at different polarity of electrodes have been investigated. It has been stated that at the electrical field application, an increase in soot particle sizes and soot yield occurs; besides, at the application of the field, speeding up the positively charged particles, the interplanar distance decreases. On the basis of investigation of soot particles paramagnetism, it was shown that initially soot particles have high carcinogetic activity and pollute the environment owing to a rapid decrease of the number of these radical centers. The reduction of the radical concentration is connected with radical recombination on soot.

  5. Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Profiles in Southeast Suburb of Beijing Wastewater Irrigation Area%北京东南郊污灌区PAHs垂向分布规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何江涛; 金爱芳; 陈素暖; 魏永霞

    2009-01-01

    3 borehole profiles samples were collected using Eijkelkamp soil sampler from the wastewater irrigation area of Beijing Southeast suburb. The soil samples were collected from surface to 5.5 m underground every 0.5 m. Physical-chemical properties of the samples such as clay content,total amount of clay minerals,cation exchange capacity (CEC),total organic compounds (TOC),etc. were analyzed. 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) defined by the U.S.EPA were also analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results show that 14 PAHs were detected in the surface soil samples. The concentrations of PAHs range from 4 μg/kg to 428 μg/kg. Under the surface,both species and concentrations of PAHs in soil samples drop very fast. Only 2 rings and 3 rings PAHs were detected,which were naphthalene,phenanthrene,fluorene,acenaphthylene,acenaphthene,and fluoranthene. Clay content,total amount of clay minerals,CEC and TOC have significant correlations at 0.05 level between each other. Under the surface,clay contents also have a relationship with low-rings PAHs concentration. Where the layers have higher clay contents,the PAHs have higher concentrations. The contents of PAHs changing along the profiles also show that,low-rings PAHs are easier to migrate than high-rings PAHs. The sequence of the migration capabilities of low-ring PAHs is acenaphthene>fluorene>naphthalene>phenanthrene>acenaphthylene>fluoranthene. However,high-ring PAHs were only detected in surface soil samples. That means low-rings PAHs can reach the deep layers of the vertical profiles under long-term wastewater irrigation. Therefore,the shallow groundwater has the possibility to be contaminated.%采用Eijkelkamp土壤采样器对北京东南郊污灌区进行了3个钻孔剖面采样,分析了土壤样品的理化参数,并且采用气相色谱-质谱联用仪对土壤样品的多环芳烃(PAHs)进行了定量分析,研究了土壤理化参数和16种PAHs从表层到5.5 m深的范围内垂向

  6. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  7. Miscellaneous hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat; DeWitt, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The solvents discussed in this article are common solvents not categorized as halogenated, aromatic, or botanical. The solvents discussed are categorized into two groups: hydrocarbon mixtures and single agents. The hydrocarbon mixtures discussed are Stoddard solvent, naphtha, and kerosene. The remaining solvents described are n-hexane, methyl n-butyl ketone, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and butyl mercaptans. Effects common to this group of agents and their unique effects are characterized. Treatment of exposures and toxic effects of these solvents is described, and physiochemical properties and occupational exposure levels are listed.

  8. New observational constraints on hydrocarbon chemistry in Saturn's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Tommi; Moses, Julianne I.; West, Robert; Guerlet, Sandrine; Jouchoux, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Until now there have been only a few observations of hydrocarbons and photochemical haze in the region where they are produced in Saturn's upper atmosphere. We present new results on hydrocarbon abundances and atmospheric structure based on more than 40 stellar occultations observed by the Cassini/UVIS instrument that we have combined with results from Cassini/CIRS to generate full atmosphere structure models. In addition to detecting CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6, we detect benzene (C6H6) in UVIS occultations that probe different latitudes and present the first vertical abundance profiles for this species in its production region. Benzene is the simplest ring polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a stepping stone to the formation of more complex molecules that are believed to form stratospheric haze. Our calculations show that the observed abundances of benzene can be explained by solar-driven ion chemistry that is enhanced by high-latitude auroral production at least in the northern spring hemisphere. Condensation of benzene and heavier hydrocarbons is possible in the cold polar night of the southern winter where we detect evidence for high altitude haze. We also report on substantial variability in the CH4 profiles that arise from dynamics and affects the minor hydrocarbon abundances. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrocarbon ion chemistry and coupled models of chemistry and dynamics for future studies of Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  9. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  10. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  11. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  12. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  13. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Langworthy, T. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  14. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  16. Cuticular Hydrocarbons as Potential Close Range Recognition Cues in Orchid Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Tamara; Ramírez, Santiago R; Weber, Marjorie Gail; Eltz, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Male Neotropical orchid bees collect volatile chemicals from their environment and compose species-specific volatile signals, which are subsequently exposed during courtship display. These perfumes are hypothesized to serve as attractants and may play a role in female mate choice. Here, we investigated the potential of cuticular hydrocarbons as additional recognition cues. The cuticular hydrocarbons of males of 35 species belonging to four of the five extant euglossine bee genera consisted of aliphatic hydrocarbons ranging in chain lengths between 21 and 37 C-atoms in distinct compositions, especially between sympatric species of similar coloring and size, for all but one case. Cleptoparasitic Exaerete spp. had divergent profiles, with major compounds predominantly constituted by longer hydrocarbon chains (>30 C-atoms), which may represent an adaptation to the parasitic life history ("chemical insignificance"). Phylogenetic comparative analyses imply that the chemical profiles exhibited by Exaerete spp. are evolutionarily divergent from the rest of the group. Female hydrocarbon profiles were not identical to male profiles in the investigated species, with either partial or complete separation between sexes in multivariate analyses. Sexually dimorphic hydrocarbon profiles are assumed to be the basis for sex recognition in a number of insects, and thus may supplement the acquired perfume phenotypes in chemical information transfer. Overall, cuticular hydrocarbons meet the requirements to function as intraspecific and intersexual close range recognition signals; behavioral experiments are needed to determine their potential involvement in mate recognition.

  17. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  18. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  19. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  20. Bioremediation of marine sediments contaminated by hydrocarbons: experimental analysis and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Regoli, Francesco; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2010-10-15

    This work deals with bioremediation experiments on harbor sediments contaminated by aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), investigating the effects of a continuous supply of inorganic nutrients and sand amendments on the kinetics of microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. Inorganic nutrients stimulated microbial growth and enhanced the biodegradation of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons, whereas sand amendment increased only the removal of high molecular weight compounds. The simultaneous addition of inorganic nutrients and sand provided the highest biodegradation (>70% for aliphatic hydrocarbons and 40% for PAHs). A semi-empirical kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental temporal changes of hydrocarbon residual concentrations and microbial abundances. The estimated values for parameters allowed to calculate a doubling time of 2.9 d and a yield coefficient biomass/hydrocarbons 0.39 g C biomass g-1C hydrocarbons, for the treatment with the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation yield. A comparison between the organic carbon demand and temporal profiles of hydrocarbons residual concentration allowed also to calculate the relative contribution of contaminants to carbon supply, in the range 5-32%. This suggests that C availability in the sediments, influencing prokaryotic metabolism, may have cascade effects on biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons. Even if these findings do not represent a general rule and site-specific studies are needed, the approach used here can be a relevant support tool when designing bioremediation strategies on site.

  1. Microbial production of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Progress report, February 1, 1979-September 30, 1979. [Optimization for commercial oily hydrocarbon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T G

    1979-09-01

    The neutral lipids of nine species of methanogenic bacteria, two thermoacidophiles, two alkalinophiles and 20 algal samples were analyzed. The major components were C/sub 30/, C/sub 25/, and/or C/sub 20/ acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons with a continuous range of hydroisoprenoid homologues. The range or acyclic isoprenoids detected were from C/sub 14/ to C/sub 30/. The neutral lipid composition from these bacteria resembles the isoprenoid distribution isolated from ancient sediments and petroleum. Therefore, these findings may have major implications to biological and biogeochemical evolution. In this connection, samples and cores from ancient sediments and future fossil fuel source beds are being analyzed for these neutral lipids as well as the more polar isopranyl glycerol-ether lipids. The derivation of fossil fuels and the biomass accumulations are the focal points of this phase of the study. Ancient and recent sediments, future source beds, and local esturaries are being enriched for microorganisms to establish a range and capability profile for hydrocarbon production. Only a relatively small percent of the microorganisms isolated demonstrated the ability to synthesize hydrocarbons; however, one particular algal isolate demonstrated that it can synthesize hydrocarbons while in a green physiological stage. Greater production is expected in the brown phase of growth. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis studies were conducted in an attempt to better understand the conditions required to maximize hydrocarbon production. The program involved physical and chemical parameters as well as assays of specifically labelled precusors with a cell free enzyme system to measure their conversions to hydrocarbons. The results have indicated a complex one enzyme system is involved in condensation and reduction of two fatty acids into hydrocarbons.

  2. Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  3. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  4. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein

  5. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  6. Hydrocarbon-released nestmate aggression in the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, following encounters with insect prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, D; Blomquist, G J; Silverman, J

    2001-07-01

    Argentine ants, Linepithema humile, were attacked by their nestmates following contact with a particular prey item, the brown-banded cockroach, Supella longipalpa. Contact with prey, as brief as 2 min, provoked nestmate aggression. Argentine ants contaminated with hydrocarbons extracted from S. longipalpa also released nestmate aggression behavior similar to that released by the whole prey item, confirming the involvement of hydrocarbons. In contrast to S. longipalpa, little or no nestmate aggression was induced by other ant prey from diverse taxa. A comparison of prey hydrocarbon profiles revealed that all hydrocarbons of S. longipalpa were very long chain components with 33 or more carbons, while other prey had either less, or none, of the very long chain hydrocarbons of 33 carbons or greater. We identified the hydrocarbons of S. longipalpa and some new groups of long chain hydrocarbons of L. humile. The majority of S. longipalpa hydrocarbons were 35 and 37 carbons in length with one to three methyl branches, and closely resembled two previously unidentified groups of compounds from L. humile of similar chain length. The hydrocarbons of S. longipalpa and L. humile were compared and their role in the Argentine ant nestmate recognition is discussed.

  7. Evidence of shallow hydrocarbons offshore northern Santa Cruz county, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, H.T.; Nagel, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and hydrocarbon samples indicate that natural hydrocarbon seepage is occurring along the San Gregorio and Monterey Bay fault zones offshore northern Santa Cruz County, California. A variety of anomalous seismic reflection features such as a water-column anomalies, subsurface amplitude anomalies (''bright spots''), and seismic ''smears/wipeouts'' has been observed and mapped. More than 100 water-column anomalies (probably gas seeps) occur in the study area of approximately 270 mi/sup 2/ (700 km/sup 2/). Many of these seismic anomalies are associated with subsurface geologic structures, which suggest hydrocarbon migration from depth. Samples of natural gas collected from a shallow coastal water well contain 74 to 91% methane, 7 to 23% nitrogen, approx.2% carbon dioxide, and < 1% ethane. The methane appears to be thermogenic in origin, having delta/sup 13/C values of -29.51 to -32.55% PDB. Rock dredges from 2,300 ft (700 m) of water in Ascension Submarine Canyon have also recovered oil-saturated sandstones, further suggesting the seepage of hydrocarbons. The shallow occurrence of most of these hydrocarbons are interpreted to be the result of migration from depth along active faults within the San Gregorio and Monterey Bay faults zones.

  8. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  9. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  10. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  11. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  12. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  13. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  14. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  15. The Cytokinome Profile in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Capone

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of the complex interaction network of cytokines, defined as ''cytokinome'', can be useful to follow progression and evolution of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC from its early stages as well as to define therapeutic strategies. Recently we have evaluated the cytokinome profile in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D and/or chronic hepatitis C (CHC infection and/or cirrhosis suggesting specific markers for the different stages of the diseases. Since T2D has been identified as one of the contributory cause of HCC, in this paper we examined the serum levels of cytokines, growth factors, chemokines, as well as of other cancer and diabetes biomarkers in a discovery cohort of patients with T2D, chronic hepatitis C (CHC and/or CHC-related HCC comparing them with a healthy control group to define a profile of proteins able to characterize these patients, and to recognize the association between diabetes and HCC. The results have evidenced that the serum levels of some proteins are significantly and differently up-regulated in all the patients but they increased still more when HCC develops on the background of T2D. Our results were verified also using a separate validation cohort. Furthermore, significant correlations between clinical and laboratory data characterizing the various stages of this complex disease, have been found. In overall, our results highlighted that a large and simple omics approach, such as that of the cytokinome analysis, supplemented by common biochemical and clinical data, can give a complete picture able to improve the prognosis of the various stages of the disease progression. We have also demonstrated by means of interactomic analysis that our experimental results correlate positively with the general metabolic picture that is emerging in the literature for this complex multifactorial disease.

  16. 魏氏兒童智力量表第四版建構內涵之探討 What Does the WISC-IV Measure? Validation of the Scoring and CHC-based Interpretative Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    陳心怡 Hsin-Yi Chen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available 本研究目的在分析魏氏兒童智力量表第四版(WISC-IV)所測量之認知內涵。根據臺灣標準化樣本(n = 968),研究者以高階驗證性因素分析針對「WISC-IV現行計分依據之四因素模式」及「Cattell-Horn-Carroll(CHC)認知理論模式」兩種架構進行系列性效度驗證。主要研究發現為:一、不同年齡組兒童展現一致的WISC-IV 建構內涵,亦即研究中報告的建構解釋方式適用於6-16 歲之各年齡層兒童;二、「WISC-IV 四因素模式」及「CHC 認知理論模式」二者均為合理且具意義之詮釋方式,且二架構所解釋到之分數變異量相當一致。其中,高階g因素約解釋2/3 之共同變異量,而其他初階因素則解釋到1/3 之共同變異量;三、在CHC 認知理論模式下,WISC-IV 測量之認知能力有結晶智力(Gc),視覺處理(Gv),流體推理(Gf),短期/工作記憶(Gsm)及處理速度(Gs)。值得注意的是,不論將Gf 與Gv 依CHC 理論分開解釋,或容許二者結合成WISC-IV 四因素內之知覺推理因素(PRI),兩種建構在本研究中均獲支持為可行詮釋方式;四、不論採哪一種理論模式,算術分測驗均明顯呈現跨因素負荷量(split loadings)。算術分測驗測量到多種內涵,其中包括流體推理能力(Gf),短期/工作記憶(Gsm),以及結晶智力(Gc)。 The validity of WISC-IV current four-factor scoring structure and the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC theory-based models of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV were investigated via the application of higher-order confirmatory factor analyses of scores from the Taiwan WISC-IV standardized sample (n = 968. Results reveal that the WISC-IV measures the same construct across ages, the resulting interpretation could be applied to children with various age levels. Both the four-factor structure and CHC

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  18. Parallel expression profiling of hepatic and serum microRNA-122 associated with clinical features and treatment responses in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Azeem Mehmood; Raja, Arsalan Jamil; Siddique, Shafiqa; Khan, Jahangir Sarwar; Shahid, Muhammad; Tayyab, Ghias-Un-Nabi; Minhas, Zahid; Umar, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Tong, Yigang

    2016-02-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate a variety of biological processes. Recently, human liver-specific miRNA miR-122 has been reported to facilitate hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in liver cells. HCV is one of the leading causes of liver diseases worldwide. In Pakistan, the estimated prevalence is up to 10%. Here, we report hepatic and serum miR-122 expression profiling from paired liver and serum samples from treatment-naive chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and controls. We aimed to elucidate the biomarker potential of serum miR-122 for monitoring disease progression and predicting end treatment response (ETR). Hepatic miR-122 levels were significantly down-regulated in CHC patients. A significant inverse correlation was observed between hepatic and serum miR-122 levels, indicating that serum miR-122 levels reflect HCV-associated disease progression. Both hepatic and serum miR-122 were significantly correlated (P disease progression and ETR in CHC patients.

  19. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  20. High Pressure Preignition Chemistry of Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and hydrocarbon blends in our various combustion systems, with emphasis on the effects of elevated pressure using our pressurized flow reactor ( PFR ...facility. Detailed experimental data were generated from the PFR for use in associated kinetic modeling work. We continued to develop and extend both

  1. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  2. The Dufour's gland and the cuticle in the social wasp Ropalidia marginata contain the same hydrocarbons in similar proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A; Gadagkar, R

    2014-01-23

    Queens in many social insects are known to maintain their status through chemicals (pheromones) and cuticular hydrocarbons and have been the focus of many investigations that have looked at the chemicals involved in queen signaling. In the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Vespidae), the Dufour's gland has been shown to be involved in queen signaling, and Dufour's gland hydrocarbons have been found to be correlated with fertility. Hence, this study analyzed the cuticle of R. marginata along with the Dufour's gland in order to compare their hydrocarbon profiles. The results show that the Dufour's gland and cuticle contained the same set of hydrocarbons in similar proportions (for the majority of compounds). Patterns pertaining to fertility signaling present in cuticular hydrocarbons were also similar to those present in the Dufour's gland hydrocarbons. Furthermore, the haemolymph contained the same hydrocarbons as found in the Dufour's gland and cuticle in similar proportions, thereby providing an explanation as to why the hydrocarbon profiles of the Dufour's gland and cuticle are correlated.

  3. Comprehensive geochemical identification of highly evolved marine hydrocarbon source rocks: Organic matter, paleoenvironment and development of effective hydrocarbon source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENGER; LIU Wenhui; XU Yongchang; CHEN Jianfa; HU Kai; GAO Changlin

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the developing environments of hydrocarbon source rocks in the Ordos Basin and evaluated carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon source rocks and their distributions on account of the fact that China's marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon source rocks are characterized by the intensive thermal evolution and relatively low abundance of organic matter, by taking the Lower Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin for example and in light of the calculated enrichment coefficients of trace elements, the profile analysis of trace element contents, ratios of relevant elements, and stable isotopic compositions and their three-dimensional diagrammatization in combination with the necessary organic parameters. As for the Ordos Basin, TOC=0.2% is an important boundary value. Studies have shown that in the strata TOC>0.2%, V/(V+Ni)>0.50, Zr/Rb<2, Rb/K(×104)>30, Z>122, Th/U>0.80, Zn and Mo are enriched with a positive δ13Ccarb excursion. All these indicated a stagnant and stratified sedimentary environment that has low energy, anoxia and high salinity in bottom water. In these strata the geological conditions are good for the preservation of organic matter, hence favoring the development of hydrocarbon source rocks. These strata have δ13Corg<-28‰ (Ⅰ-Ⅱtype) and high hydrocarbon-generated potential. The Klimory and Wulalik formations show certain regularities in those aspects, therefore, they can be regarded as the potential effective hydrocarbon source rocks. In the strata TOC≤0.2%, Zr/Rb>1, V/(V+Ni)<0.50, Rb/K<30, Th/U<0.80, Cu, Zn, etc are depleted, and δ13Corg values range from -24‰ to -28‰. All these facts showed that most of the carbonate rocks or mudstones were formed in high-energy oxidizing environments, thus unfavorable to the development of hydrocarbon source rocks. It is feasible to make use of the geochemical method to comprehensively assess the highly evolved marine carbonates rocks as potential hydrocarbon source rocks and

  4. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  5. Compositions and methods for hydrocarbon functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnoe, Thomas Brent; Fortman, George; Boaz, Nicholas C.; Groves, John T.

    2017-03-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of hydrocarbon functionalization, methods and systems for converting a hydrocarbon into a compound including at least one group ((e.g., hydroxyl group) (e.g., methane to methanol)), functionalized hydrocarbons, and the like.

  6. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  7. Fire-safe hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, G.E.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Wright, B.R.

    1979-11-06

    A stabilized, fire-safe, aqueous hydrocarbon fuel emulsion prepared by mixing: a diesel fuel; an emulsifier (consisting of oleyl diethanolamide, diethanolamine, and diethanolamine soap of oleic acid) which has been treated with about 0 to 7 1/2 of oleic acid. A modified version of this fuel also contains 0 to 0.5% of an antimisting agent, and water.

  8. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  9. Occurrence, sources and transport pathways of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbons in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinos, C.; Gogou, A.; Bouloubassi, I.; Pedrosa-Pàmies, R.; Hatzianestis, I.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Rousakis, G.; Velaoras, D.; Krokos, G.; Lykousis, V.

    2013-09-01

    Surface sediments collected from deep basins (1018-4087 m depth) of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Ionian Sea, southern Aegean Sea and northwestern Levantine Sea) were analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as tracers of natural and anthropogenic inputs. Concentrations of total aliphatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of aliphatic hydrocarbons varied significantly, ranging from 1.34 to 49.2 μg g-1, 145 to 4810 ng g-1 and 0.73 to 36.7 μg g-1, respectively, while concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranged between 11.6 and 223 ng g-1. Molecular profiles of determined hydrocarbons reflect a mixed contribution from both natural and anthropogenic sources in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, i.e., terrestrial plant waxes, degraded petroleum products, unburned fossil fuels and combustion of grass, wood and coal. Hydrocarbon mixtures display significant variability amongst sub-regions, reflecting differences in the relative importance of inputs from various sources and phase associations/transport pathways of individual hydrocarbons that impact on their overall distribution and fate. Hydrocarbon concentrations correlated significantly with the organic carbon content of sediments, indicating that the latter exerts an important control on their transport and ultimate accumulation in deep basins. Additionally, water masses' circulation characteristics also seem to influence the regional features and distribution patterns of hydrocarbons. Our findings highlight the role of deep basins/canyons as repositories of both natural and anthropogenic chemical species.

  10. Method for determining asphaltene stability of a hydrocarbon-containing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-02-05

    A method for determining asphaltene stability in a hydrocarbon-containing material having solvated asphaltenes therein is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, it involves the steps of: (a) precipitating an amount of the asphaltenes from a liquid sample of the hydrocarbon-containing material with an alkane mobile phase solvent in a column; (b) dissolving a first amount and a second amount of the precipitated asphaltenes by changing the alkane mobile phase solvent to a final mobile phase solvent having a solubility parameter that is higher than the alkane mobile phase solvent; (c) monitoring the concentration of eluted fractions from the column; (d) creating a solubility profile of the dissolved asphaltenes in the hydrocarbon-containing material; and (e) determining one or more asphaltene stability parameters of the hydrocarbon-containing material.

  11. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  12. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  13. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  14. Deciphering the Chemical Basis of Nestmate Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, Robert; Shea, Kenneth J.; Tsutsui, Neil D.

    2010-01-01

    Social insects maintain colony cohesion by recognizing and, if necessary, discriminating against conspecifics that are not part of the colony. This recognition ability is encoded by a complex mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), although it is largely unclear how social insects interpret such a multifaceted signal. CHC profiles often contain several series of homologous hydrocarbons, possessing the same methyl branch position but differing in chain length (e.g., 15-methyl-pentatriacontane, 15-methyl-heptatriacontane, 15-methyl-nonatriacontane). Recent studies have revealed that within species these homologs can occur in correlated concentrations. In such cases, single compounds may convey the same information as the homologs. In this study, we used behavioral bioassays to explore how social insects perceive and interpret different hydrocarbons. We tested the aggressive response of Argentine ants, Linepithema humile, toward nest-mate CHC profiles that were augmented with one of eight synthetic hydrocarbons that differed in branch position, chain length, or both. We found that Argentine ants showed similar levels of aggression toward nest-mate CHC profiles augmented with compounds that had the same branch position but differed in chain length. Conversely, Argentine ants displayed different levels of aggression toward nest-mate CHC profiles augmented with compounds that had different branch positions but the same chain length. While this was true in almost all cases, one CHC we tested elicited a greater aggressive response than its homologs. Interestingly, this was the only compound that did not occur naturally in correlated concentrations with its homologs in CHC profiles. Combined, these data suggest that CHCs of a homologous series elicit the same aggressive response because they convey the same information, rather than Argentine ants being unable to discriminate between different homologs. This study contributes to our understanding of the chemical basis of

  15. Enhanced characterization of reservoir hydrocarbon components using electromagnetic data attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2015-12-23

    Advances in electromagnetic imaging techniques have led to the growing utilization of this technology for reservoir monitoring and exploration. These exploit the strong conductivity contrast between the hydrocarbon and water phases and have been used for mapping water front propagation in hydrocarbon reservoirs and enhancing the characterization of the reservoir formation. The conventional approach for the integration of electromagnetic data is to invert the data for saturation properties and then subsequently use the inverted properties as constraints in the history matching process. The non-uniqueness and measurement errors may however make this electromagnetic inversion problem strongly ill-posed, leading to potentially inaccurate saturation profiles. Another limitation of this approach is the uncertainty of Archie\\'s parameters in relating rock conductivity to water saturation, which may vary in the reservoir and are generally poorly known. We present an Ensemble Kalman Filter framework for efficiently integrating electromagnetic data into the history matching process and for simultaneously estimating the Archie\\'s parameters and the variance of the observation error of the electromagnetic data. We apply the proposed framework to a compositional reservoir model. We aim at assessing the relevance of EM data for estimating the different hydrocarbon components of the reservoir. The experimental results demonstrate that the individual hydrocarbon components are generally well matched, with nitrogen exhibiting the strongest improvement. The estimated observation error standard deviations are also within expected levels (between 5 and 10%), significantly contributing to the robustness of the proposed EM history matching framework. Archie\\'s parameter estimates approximate well the reference profile and assist in the accurate description of the electrical conductivity properties of the reservoir formation, hence leading to estimation accuracy improvements of around

  16. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  17. Potential impact of soil microbial heterogeneity on the persistence of hydrocarbons in contaminated subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleer, Sam; Adetutu, Eric M; Weber, John; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2014-04-01

    In situ bioremediation is potentially a cost effective treatment strategy for subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, however, limited information is available regarding the impact of soil spatial heterogeneity on bioremediation efficacy. In this study, we assessed issues associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation and soil spatial heterogeneity (samples designated as FTF 1, 5 and 8) from a site in which in situ bioremediation was proposed for hydrocarbon removal. Test pit activities showed similarities in FTF soil profiles with elevated hydrocarbon concentrations detected in all soils at 2 m below ground surface. However, PCR-DGGE-based cluster analysis showed that the bacterial community in FTF 5 (at 2 m) was substantially different (53% dissimilar) and 2-3 fold more diverse than communities in FTF 1 and 8 (with 80% similarity). When hydrocarbon degrading potential was assessed, differences were observed in the extent of (14)C-benzene mineralisation under aerobic conditions with FTF 5 exhibiting the highest hydrocarbon removal potential compared to FTF 1 and 8. Further analysis indicated that the FTF 5 microbial community was substantially different from other FTF samples and dominated by putative hydrocarbon degraders belonging to Pseudomonads, Xanthomonads and Enterobacteria. However, hydrocarbon removal in FTF 5 under anaerobic conditions with nitrate and sulphate electron acceptors was limited suggesting that aerobic conditions were crucial for hydrocarbon removal. This study highlights the importance of assessing available microbial capacity prior to bioremediation and shows that the site's spatial heterogeneity can adversely affect the success of in situ bioremediation unless area-specific optimizations are performed.

  18. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the southern basin of Lake Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doskey, P.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Division; Andren, A.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Water Chemistry Program

    1991-10-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the southern basin of Lake Michigan have planktonic, terrigenous, and petroleum residue origins. Surficial sediments collected near the eastern shore in 60-80 m of water contained more petroleum residue and planktonic hydrocarbons and exhibited less terrigenous character than sediments collected from the deepest location in the basin. Petroleum residue inputs have increased since 1900 as evidenced by a change in the flux of an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons from 6 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr to a flux of approximately 100 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr in 1980. Sediment profiles of the UCM exhibited subsurface concentration maxima that may be due to reduced inputs of combustion products or feeding by oligochaetes. Profiles of n-C{sub l7} and pristane indicated that planktonic n-alkanes undergo degradation in the aerobic, mixed zone of the sediments.

  19. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  20. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  1. Infrared absorption of 3-propenonyl (⋅CH{sub 2}CHCO) radical generated upon photolysis of acryloyl chloride [CH{sub 2}CHC(O)Cl] in solid para-H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prasanta [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Pern [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-28

    Irradiation at 193 nm of a p-H{sub 2} matrix containing acryloyl chloride CH{sub 2}CHC(O)Cl at 3.2 K yielded infrared absorption lines at 3143.6 (ν{sub 1}), 3057.0 (ν{sub 2}), 3048.0 (ν{sub 3}), 2103.1 (ν{sub 4}), 1461.0 (ν{sub 5}), 1349.8 (ν{sub 6}), 1223.7 (ν{sub 11}+ν{sub 12} or 2ν{sub 12}), 1092.8 (ν{sub 8}), 918.1 (ν{sub 9}), 691.0 (ν{sub 10}), 624.3 (ν{sub 11}), and 597.1 (ν{sub 12}) cm{sup −1} that are assigned to the 3-propenonyl (⋅CH{sub 2}CHCO) radical. The assignments are based on the photolytic behavior and a comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and infrared intensities with those predicted with the B3PW91/aug-cc-pVDZ method. The observation is consistent with a major radical formation channel CH{sub 2}CHCO + Cl followed by escape of the Cl atom from the original p-H{sub 2} cage. The observation of 3-propenonyl (⋅CH{sub 2}CHCO) radical but not 3-propenalyl (s-cis- or s-trans-CH{sub 2}CHĊO) radical indicates that the former is the most stable isomer and that the barrier heights for conversion from s-cis- or s-trans-CH{sub 2}CHĊO to ⋅CH{sub 2}CHCO are small.

  2. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  3. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  4. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  5. Biological Activity Assessment in Mexican Tropical Soils with Different Hydrocarbon Contamination Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Riveroll-Larios, Jessica; Escalante-Espinosa, Erika; Fócil-Monterrubio, Reyna L.; Díaz-Ramírez, Ildefonso J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of soil health indicators linked to microbial activities, such as key enzymes and respirometric profiles, helps assess the natural attenuation potential of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons. In this study, the intrinsic physicochemical characteristics, biological activity and biodegradation potential were recorded for two soils with different contamination histories (>5 years and

  6. Desiccation tolerance in Anopheles coluzzii: the effects of spiracle size and cuticular hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaz, Arthur C; Huestis, Diana L; Dao, Adama; Yaro, Alpha S; Diallo, Moussa; Andersen, John; Blomquist, Gary J; Lehmann, Tovi

    2016-06-01

    The African malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii range over forests and arid areas, where they withstand dry spells and months-long dry seasons, suggesting variation in their desiccation tolerance. We subjected a laboratory colony (G3) and wild Sahelian mosquitoes during the rainy and dry seasons to desiccation assays. The thoracic spiracles and amount and composition of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of individual mosquitoes were measured to determine the effects of these traits on desiccation tolerance. The relative humidity of the assay, body water available, rate of water loss and water content at death accounted for 88% of the variation in desiccation tolerance. Spiracle size did not affect the rate of water loss or desiccation tolerance of the colony mosquitoes, as was the case for the total CHCs. However, six CHCs accounted for 71% of the variation in desiccation tolerance and three accounted for 72% of the variation in the rate of water loss. Wild A. coluzzii exhibited elevated desiccation tolerance during the dry season. During that time, relative thorax and spiracle sizes were smaller than during the rainy season. A smaller spiracle size appeared to increase A. coluzzii's desiccation tolerance, but was not statistically significant. Seasonal changes in CHC composition were detected in Sahelian A. coluzzii Stepwise regression models suggested the effect of particular CHCs on desiccation tolerance. In conclusion, the combination of particular CHCs along with the total amount of CHCs is a primary mechanism conferring desiccation tolerance in A. coluzzii, while variation in spiracle size might be a secondary mechanism. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  8. Correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and water-hydrocarbon ratio in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Zhou; Qingling Chen; Yuewu Tao; Huixin Weng

    2011-01-01

    In order to shorten the evaluation cycle of cobalt catalyst before the optimized catalyst is fixed on,a mathematical method is proposed to calculate weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons.Based on the carbide polymerization mechanism and the main hydrocarbons being linear alkanes and α-olefins,the correlation between hydrocarbon distribution and the molecular mass ratio of water to hydrocarbons is discussed.The result shows the ratio was within the range of 1.125-1.286 and the lower the ratio,the more gaseous hydrocarbons were obtained.Moreover,a linear equation between the weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons and the weight ratio of C5+ hydrocarbons to the total water is established.These results are validated by corresponding experiments.The weight percentage of C5+ hydrocarbons could be immediately calculated by this linear equation without detailed gas chromatography (GC) analysis of them.

  9. Inhalation of Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel Suppress Central Auditory Nervous System Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Wong, Brian A; McInturf, Shawn M; Reboulet, James E; Ortiz, Pedro A; Mattie, David R

    2015-01-01

    More than 800 million L/d of hydrocarbon fuels is used to power cars, boats, and jet airplanes. The weekly consumption of these fuels necessarily puts the public at risk for repeated inhalation exposure. Recent studies showed that exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel produces lethality in presynaptic sensory cells, leading to hearing loss, especially in the presence of noise. However, the effects of hydrocarbon jet fuel on the central auditory nervous system (CANS) have not received much attention. It is important to investigate the effects of hydrocarbons on the CANS in order to complete current knowledge regarding the ototoxic profile of such exposures. The objective of the current study was to determine whether inhalation exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel might affect the functions of the CANS. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into four groups (control, noise, fuel, and fuel + noise). The structural and functional integrity of presynaptic sensory cells was determined in each group. Neurotransmission in both peripheral and central auditory pathways was simultaneously evaluated in order to identify and differentiate between peripheral and central dysfunctions. There were no detectable effects on pre- and postsynaptic peripheral functions. However, the responsiveness of the brain was significantly depressed and neural transmission time was markedly delayed. The development of CANS dysfunctions in the general public and the military due to cumulative exposure to hydrocarbon fuels may represent a significant but currently unrecognized public health issue.

  10. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  11. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  12. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  13. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  14. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  15. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  16. Applied bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchee, R.E.; Kittel, J.A. [eds.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Reisinger, H.J. [ed.] [Integrated Science and Technology, Inc., Marietta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. The papers in this volume focus on petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation, with an emphasis on pilot-scale and field-scale applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  17. Bioaccumulation of petroleum hydrocarbons in arctic amphipods in the oil development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jerry M; Durell, Gregory S

    2012-04-01

    An objective of a multiyear monitoring program, sponsored by the US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management was to examine temporal and spatial changes in chemical and biological characteristics of the Arctic marine environment resulting from offshore oil exploration and development activities in the development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. To determine if petroleum hydrocarbons from offshore oil operations are entering the Beaufort Sea food web, we measured concentrations of hydrocarbons in tissues of amphipods, Anonyx nugax, sediments, Northstar crude oil, and coastal peat, collected between 1999 and 2006 throughout the development area. Mean concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), saturated hydrocarbons (SHC), and sterane and triterpane petroleum biomarkers (StTr) were not significantly different in amphipods near the Northstar oil production facility, before and after it came on line in 2001, and in amphipods from elsewhere in the study area. Forensic analysis of the profiles (relative composition and concentrations) of the 3 hydrocarbon classes revealed that hydrocarbon compositions were different in amphipods, surface sediments where the amphipods were collected, Northstar crude oil, and peat from the deltas of 4 North Slope rivers. Amphipods and sediments contained a mixture of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic PAH. The SHC in amphipods were dominated by pristane derived from zooplankton, indicating that the SHC were primarily from the amphipod diet of zooplankton detritus. The petroleum biomarker StTr profiles did not resemble those in Northstar crude oil. The forensic analysis revealed that hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were not from oil production at Northstar. Hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were primarily from their diet and from river runoff and coastal erosion of natural diagenic and fossil terrestrial materials, including seep oils, kerogens, and peat. Offshore oil and gas exploration and development

  18. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  19. The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphaltenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Morales, Y. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro (Mexico). Programa de Ingenieria Molecular; Ballard Andrews, A.; Mullins, O.C. [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in asphaltenes is a strong determinant for asphaltene physical properties. PAHs also provide the UV and visible absorption and emission profiles of asphaltenes. All PAHs absorb light in the UV-visible spectrum and many also emit light in this spectral range. This study combined a molecular orbital theory with an experimental approach to quantitatively link the UV-visible absorption and emission profiles to the asphaltene PAH distribution. Key features of the absorption and emission spectral data were found to be reproduced with PAH distributions centered at 7 fused rings. The study also identified other highly different distributions of PAHs in terms of plausibility to account for the measured optical data. The paper also described the affect that heteroatoms had on the analysis.

  20. Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

  1. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  2. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  3. Versatility of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms using solar energy, H2O, and CO2 as the primary inputs. Compared to plants and eukaryotic microalgae, cyanobacteria are easier to be genetically engineered and possess higher growth rate. Extensive genomic information and well-established genetic platform make cyanobacteria good candidates to build efficient biosynthetic pathways for biofuels and chemicals by genetic engineering. Hydrocarbons are a family of compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. Structural diversity of the hydrocarbon family is enabled by variation in chain length, degree of saturation, and rearrangements of the carbon skeleton. The diversified hydrocarbons can be used as valuable chemicals in the field of food, fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and cosmetics. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis is ubiquitous in bacteria, yeasts, fungi, plants, and insects. A wide variety of pathways for the hydrocarbon biosynthesis have been identified in recent years. Cyanobacteria may be superior chassis for hydrocabon production in a photosynthetic manner. A diversity of hydrocarbons including ethylene, alkanes, alkenes, and terpenes can be produced by cyanobacteria. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology strategies can be employed to improve hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria. This review mainly summarizes versatility and perspectives of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

  4. Primary biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.H.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Paumen, M.L.; Parkerton, T.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes primary biodegradation experiments performed to determine the persistence of higher molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater. Results from the biodegradation experiments show that the majority of tested petroleum hydrocarbons have half-lives in seawater less than 60 days.

  5. Reformation process of the neuronal template for nestmate-recognition cues in the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara Diana; Brandstaetter, Andreas Simon; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2007-09-01

    Ants use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC-profiles) as multicomponent recognition cues to identify colony members (nestmates). Recognition cues (label) are thought to be perceived during ant-ant encounters and compared to a neuronal template that represents the colony label. Over time, the CHC-profile may change, and the template is adjusted accordingly. A phenotype mismatch between label and template, as happens with CHC-profiles of foreign workers (non-nestmates), frequently leads to aggressive behavior. We investigated the template reformation in workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus by masking their antennae with postpharyngeal gland (PPG) extracts from nestmates or non-nestmates. The behavioral response of manipulated workers encountering unmanipulated workers was measured independently after 2 and after 15 h. After 2 h of incubation, workers treated with either of the two PPG-extracts showed low aggression towards nestmates and high aggression towards non-nestmates. In contrast, after 15 h of incubation, workers treated with non-nestmate PPG-extract showed low aggression towards both nestmates and non-nestmates. The slow (>2 h) adjustment of the template indicates a reformation localized in the central nervous system rather than in chemosensory neurons. In addition, our data show that template adjustment to a new CHC-profile does not impair the assessment of the old CHC-profile as nestmate label.

  6. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  7. Receptor modeling of C2─C7 hydrocarbon sources at an urban background site in Zurich, Switzerland: changes between 1993─1994 and 2005─2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reimann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hourly measurements of 13 volatile hydrocarbons (C2–C7 were performed at an urban background site in Zurich (Switzerland in the years 1993–1994 and again in 2005–2006. For the separation of the volatile organic compounds by gas-chromatography (GC, an identical chromatographic column was used in both campaigns. Changes in hydrocarbon profiles and source strengths were recovered by positive matrix factorization (PMF. Eight and six factors could be related to hydrocarbon sources in 1993–1994 and in 2005–2006, respectively. The modeled source profiles were verified by hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The source strengths were validated by independent measurements, such as inorganic trace gases (NOx, CO, SO2, methane (CH4, oxidized hydrocarbons (OVOCs and meteorological data (temperature, wind speed etc.. Our analysis suggests that the contribution of most hydrocarbon sources (i.e. road traffic, solvents use and wood burning decreased by a factor of about two to three between the early 1990s and 2005–2006. On the other hand, hydrocarbon losses from natural gas leakage remained at relatively constant levels (−20%. The estimated emission trends are in line with the results from different receptor-based approaches reported for other European cities. Their differences to national emission inventories are discussed.

  8. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  9. Method for producing diene hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaylingol' d, A.L.; Abayev, G.N.; Mikhaylov, R.K.; Stepanov, G.A.; Troitskiy, A.P.

    1980-04-28

    A method is claimed for producing diene hydrocarbons by oxidational dehydration of paraffin or olefin hydrocarbons in a fluidized bed of a concentrate with circulation of the latter between the zones of the reaction of regeneration with the help of circulation stand pipes. To increase the efectiveness of the process, it is proposed to circulate the concentrate between the zones of reaction and regeneration, sequentially disposed in a common apparatus with a difference in the concentration of the concentrate in the circulation stand pipes disposed in the same apparatus and the zone of the reaction equal to 20-700 kg/m/sup 3/. For example, the process of oxidational dehydration of butane through the proposed system is conducted in an apparatus with a diameter of 1,000 mm, a circulation stand pipe diameter of 500 mm, a linear gas speed in the reaction zone of 0.6 m/s, and in the circulation stand pipe of 0.15 m/s. The concentration of the concentrate in the dehydration zone is 640 kg/m/sup 3/ and in the stand pipe, 970 kg/m/sup 3/. The volumetric ratio of the n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/:air, air:vapor vapor in the form of a condensate is 1:7.2:4.5:5.5. The output of the butadiene is: in the passed butane, 32.9% and in the broken down butane, 52.5%. The butane conversion is 62.6%. The losses of the concentrate with the contact gas and with the regeneration gases is 1/3 as much for the supplied butane, than in a known method. The method makes it possible to reduce the air expenditure by 60%, to reduce the concentrate losses by 2-3 times and to simplify the industrial system.

  10. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  11. Hydrocarbon degradation abilities of psychrotolerant Bacillus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Kolsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation requires identification of hydrocarbon degrading microbes and the investigation of psychrotolerant hydrocarbon degrading microbes is essential for successful biodegradation in cold seawater. In the present study, a total of 597 Bacillus isolates were screened to select psychrotolerant strains and 134 isolates were established as psychrotolerant on the basis of their ability to grow at 7 °C. Hydrocarbon degradation capacities of these 134 psychrotolerant isolate were initially investigated on agar medium containing different hydrocarbons (naphthalene, n-hexadecane, mineral oil and 47 positive isolates were grown in broth medium containing hydrocarbons at 20 °C under static culture. Bacterial growth was estimated in terms of viable cell count (cfu ml–1. Isolates showing the best growth in static culture were further grown in presence of crude oil under shaking culture and viable cell count was observed between 8.3 × 105–7.4 × 108 cfu ml–1. In the final step, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH (chrysene and naphthalene degradation yield of two most potent isolates was determined by GC-MS along with the measurement of pH, biomass and emulsification activities. Results showed that isolates Ege B.6.2i and Ege B.1.4Ka have shown 60% and 36% chrysene degradation yield, respectively, while 33% and 55% naphthalene degradation yield, respectively, with emulsification activities ranges between 33–50%. These isolates can be used to remove hydrocarbon contamination from different environments, particularly in cold regions.

  12. Cuticular hydrocarbons corroborate the distinction between lowland and highland Natal fruit fly (Tephritidae, Ceratitis rosa) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Ekesi, Sunday; Meyer, Marc De

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) and morphology of two Ceratitis rosa Karsch (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations, putatively belonging to two cryptic taxa, were analysed. The chemical profiles were characterised by two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. CHs of Ceratitis rosa that originated from the lowlands and highlands of Kenya comprised of n-alkanes, monomethylalkanes, dimethylalkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons in the range of the carbon backbone from C14 to C37. Hydrocarbons containing C29, C31, C33 and C35 carbon atoms predominated in these two populations. 2-Methyltriacontane was the predominant compound in both populations. Quantitative differences in the distribution of hydrocarbons of different chain lengths, mainly the C22, C32, C33 and C34 compounds of these two populations, were observed despite indistinct qualitative differences in these hydrocarbons. Morphological analyses of male legs confirmed that the flies belong to different morphotypes of Ceratitis rosa previously labelled as R1 and R2 for lowland and highland populations, respectively. A statistical analysis of the CH compositions of the putative R1 and R2 species showed distinct interspecific identities, with several CHs specific for each of the lowland and highland populations. This study supports a hypothesis that the taxon Ceratitis rosa consists of at least two biological species. PMID:26798275

  13. Hydrocarbon phenotyping of algal species using pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari Shankar L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofuels derived from algae biomass and algae lipids might reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Existing analytical techniques need to facilitate rapid characterization of algal species by phenotyping hydrocarbon-related constituents. Results In this study, we compared the hydrocarbon rich algae Botryococcus braunii against the photoautotrophic model algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using pyrolysis-gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry (pyGC-MS. Sequences of up to 48 dried samples can be analyzed using pyGC-MS in an automated manner without any sample preparation. Chromatograms of 30-min run times are sufficient to profile pyrolysis products from C8 to C40 carbon chain length. The freely available software tools AMDIS and SpectConnect enables straightforward data processing. In Botryococcus samples, we identified fatty acids, vitamins, sterols and fatty acid esters and several long chain hydrocarbons. The algae species C. reinhardtii, B. braunii race A and B. braunii race B were readily discriminated using their hydrocarbon phenotypes. Substructure annotation and spectral clustering yielded network graphs of similar components for visual overviews of abundant and minor constituents. Conclusion Pyrolysis-GC-MS facilitates large scale screening of hydrocarbon phenotypes for comparisons of strain differences in algae or impact of altered growth and nutrient conditions.

  14. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  15. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  16. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  17. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  18. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been

  19. Hydrocarbons, PCBs and DDT in the NW Mediterranean deep-sea fish Mora moro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Montserrat; Porte, Cinta; Albaigés, Joan

    2001-02-01

    Data on aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and DDTs in the deep-sea fish Mora moro are reported in relation to the animal's weight/size and tissues (muscle, liver, digestive tube and gills). Fish samples were collected in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean) at an approximate depth of 1000 m. The concentrations of these organic pollutants followed the trend musclelipid content of the organs. No clear bioaccumulation dependence on fish weight/size was observed for gills, digestive tube and liver when the fat contents of these tissues were taken into account. However, the concentrations in muscle decreased with size, possibly implying a simple dilution effect by the increase of body weight. Hydrocarbons, and particularly PAHs, were strongly depleted in all tissues with respect to organochlorinated compounds if compared with the amounts present in bottom waters and sediment. Smaller specimens displayed for most pollutants qualitatively different patterns than larger fish, which could be attributed to their particular habitat/diet. The aliphatic hydrocarbon profiles suggested that Mora moro was exposed to a more predominant intake of biogenic rather than petrogenic hydrocarbons. The entrance and storage organs exhibited characteristic PAH and PCB distributions, reflecting different bioaccumulation and metabolic pathways. Compared with the profiles currently found in surface fish species, a relatively higher contribution of heavier components, namely hepta- and octochlorinated PCBs, and 4-6-ringed PAHs, was found in the deep-sea fish.

  20. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  1. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3530 - Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic... hydrocarbons, synthetic. Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic, may be safely used in the production... isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, produced by synthesis from petroleum gases consist of a mixture of...

  4. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons. 172... hydrocarbons. Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the... liquid hydrocarbons meeting the following specifications: Boiling point 93-260 °C as determined by...

  5. Occurrence, sources and transport pathways of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbons in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Parinos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface sediments collected from deep basins (1018–4087 m depth of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Ionian Sea, southern Aegean Sea and northwestern Levantine Sea were analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as tracers of natural and anthropogenic inputs. Concentrations of total aliphatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM of aliphatic hydrocarbons varied significantly, ranging from 1.34 to 49.2 μg g−1, 145 to 4810 ng g−1 and 0.73 to 36.7 μg g−1, respectively, while concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs ranged between 11.6 and 223 ng g−1. Molecular profiles of determined hydrocarbons reflect a mixed contribution from both natural and anthropogenic sources in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, i.e., terrestrial plant waxes, degraded petroleum products, unburned fossil fuels and combustion of grass, wood and coal. Hydrocarbon mixtures display significant variability amongst sub-regions, reflecting differences in the relative importance of inputs from various sources and phase associations/transport pathways of individual hydrocarbons that impact on their overall distribution and fate. Hydrocarbon concentrations correlated significantly with the organic carbon content of sediments, indicating that the latter exerts an important control on their transport and ultimate accumulation in deep basins. Additionally, water masses' circulation characteristics also seem to influence the regional features and distribution patterns of hydrocarbons. Our findings highlight the role of deep basins/canyons as repositories of both natural and anthropogenic chemical species.

  6. Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen H

    1992-01-01

    This "Informative document halogenated hydrocarbon-containing waste" forms part of a series of "Informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the instructions of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behal

  7. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  8. Compost bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was reduced by 17% in the .... Identification of bacterial isolates was done by biochemical tests. Atagana 1517 ..... control the prolonged thermophilic period in two-phase olive oil mill.

  9. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  10. Molecular characterization of autochthonous hydrocarbon utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria in water, soil and sediment samples collected from ... of the genomic DNA extracted from each bacterial isolate was amplified with ... that16S rRNA-gene-based techniques be used when studying the bacterial ...

  11. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The

  12. Determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cinthia

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... In this study, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with airborne particulate ... compounds from the heavily industrialized Vaal Triangle region. ... benzene ring as cluster, linear or angular (Maliszewska-.

  13. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  14. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  15. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  16. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Venkatram Prasad; Martin, Ivan; Langer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control ov...

  17. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  18. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  19. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  20. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  1. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  2. Electrokinetic Remediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Spiked Soils

    OpenAIRE

    , M. Bilgin; , G. Akıncı

    2011-01-01

    In the presented study, remediation studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of electrokinetic method on the treatment of natural soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, in laboratory scale reactors. Electokinetic remediation of agricultural soil with an initial TPHs (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) concentration of 10000 ppm was investigated under 20 V or 40 V direct current by using NaOH and acetic acid as electrolyte solution, treatment efficiencies were observed accordin...

  3. The future of oil and hydrocarbon man

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Colin

    1999-01-01

    Man appeared on the planet about four million years ago, and by 1850 numbered about one billion Ten came Hydrocarbon man. World population has since increased six-fold. After the oil price shocks of the 1970s, people asked "when will production peak?". It is not easy to answer this question because of the very poor database. Reserves and the many different hydrocarbon categories are poorly defined, reporting practices are ambiguous, revisions are not backdated...

  4. Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.E. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre; CSIRO Div of Marine Research, Hobart (Australia); University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Dept. of Agricultural Science; Nichols, P.D. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre; CSIRO Div. of Marine Research, Hobart (Australia); Franzmann, P.D. [CSIRO Land and Water, Wembley (Australia); McMeekin, T.A. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre

    1999-07-01

    Bacterial cultures obtained through selective enrichment of beach sand collected 60 days and one year after treatment of sites in a pilot oil spill trial conducted at Airport Beach, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica, were examined for the ability to degrade n-alkanes and phenanthrene. The effects of different hydrocarbon mixtures (Special Antarctic Blend [SAB] and BP-Visco), (fish oil [orange roughy]) and inoculation of replicate sites with water from Organic Lake, (previously shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria) on the indigenous microbial population, were examined. Of the cultures obtained, those from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco degraded n-alkanes most consistently and typically to the greatest extent. Two mixed cultures obtained from samples collected at 60 days and two isolates obtained from these cultures extensively degraded phenanthrene. 1-Hydroxy-naphthoic acid formed the major phenanthrene metabolite. Lower levels of salicyclic acid, 1-naphthol, 1,4-naphthaquinone and phenanthrene 9-10 dihydrodiol were detected in extracts of phenanthrene grown cultures. This study shows that under laboratory conditions indigenous Antarctica bacteria can degrade n-alkanes and the more recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, phenanthrene. The enrichment of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms in Antarctic ecosystems exposed to hydrocarbons, is relevant for the long term fate of hydrocarbon spills in this environment. (author)

  5. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Doney, Kirstin D; Mori, Tamami; Onaka, Takashi; Tielens, A G G M

    2016-01-01

    The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of HII regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Fifty-three HII regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 {\\mu}m), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 {\\mu}m, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case o...

  6. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  7. Microbial biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xue, Yong; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2008-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread in various ecosystems and are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because of their hydrophobic nature, most PAHs bind to particulates in soil and sediments, rendering them less available for biological uptake. Microbial degradation represents the major mechanism responsible for the ecological recovery of PAH-contaminated sites. The goal of this review is to provide an outline of the current knowledge of microbial PAH catabolism. In the past decade, the genetic regulation of the pathway involved in naphthalene degradation by different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria was studied in great detail. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, a deeper understanding of some high-molecular-weight PAH degradation pathways in bacteria was provided. The ability of nonligninolytic and ligninolytic fungi to transform or metabolize PAH pollutants has received considerable attention, and the biochemical principles underlying the degradation of PAHs were examined. In addition, this review summarizes the information known about the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted ecosystems. A deeper understanding of the microorganism-mediated mechanisms of catalysis of PAHs will facilitate the development of new methods to enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  8. Male-limited evolution suggests no extant intralocus sexual conflict over the sexually dimorphic cuticular hydrocarbons of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stéphanie Bedhomme; Adam K. Chippindale; N. G. Prasad; Matthieu Delcourt; Jessica K. Abbott; Martin A. Mallet; Howard D. Rundle

    2011-12-01

    Sexually dimorphic traits are likely to have evolved through sexually antagonistic selection. However, recent empirical data suggest that intralocus sexual conflict often persists, even when traits have diverged between males and females. This implies that evolved dimorphism is often incomplete in resolving intralocus conflict, providing a mechanism for the maintenance of genetic variance in fitness-related traits. We used experimental evolution in Drosophila melanogaster to directly test for ongoing conflict over a suite of sexually dimorphic cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) that are likely targets of sex-specific selection. Using a set of experimental populations in which the transmission of genetic material had been restricted to males for 82 generations, we show that CHCs did not evolve, providing experimental evidence for the absence of current intralocus sexual conflict over these traits. The absence of ongoing conflict could indicate that CHCs have never been the target of sexually antagonistic selection, although this would require the existing dimorphism to have evolved via completely sex-linked mutations or as a result of former, but now absent, pleiotropic effects of the underlying loci on another trait under sexually antagonistic selection. An alternative interpretation, and which we believe to be more likely, is that the extensive CHC sexual dimorphism is the result of past intralocus sexual conflict that has been fully resolved, implying that these traits have evolved genetic independence between the sexes and that genetic variation in them is therefore maintained by alternative mechanisms. This latter interpretation is consistent with the known roles of CHCs in sexual communication in this species and with previous studies suggesting the genetic independence of CHCs between males and females. Nevertheless, direct estimates of sexually antagonistic selection will be important to fully resolve these alternatives.

  9. Paternal signature in kin recognition cues of a social insect: concealed in juveniles, revealed in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Janine W Y; Meunier, Joël; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-10-22

    Kin recognition is a key mechanism to direct social behaviours towards related individuals or avoid inbreeding depression. In insects, recognition is generally mediated by cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) compounds, which are partly inherited from parents. However, in social insects, potential nepotistic conflicts between group members from different patrilines are predicted to select against the expression of patriline-specific signatures in CHC profiles. Whereas this key prediction in the evolution of insect signalling received empirical support in eusocial insects, it remains unclear whether it can be generalized beyond eusociality to less-derived forms of social life. Here, we addressed this issue by manipulating the number of fathers siring clutches tended by females of the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, analysing the CHC profiles of the resulting juvenile and adult offspring, and using discriminant analysis to estimate the information content of CHC with respect to the maternal and paternal origin of individuals. As predicted, if paternally inherited cues are concealed during family life, increases in mating number had no effect on information content of CHC profiles among earwig juveniles, but significantly decreased the one among adult offspring. We suggest that age-dependent expression of patriline-specific cues evolved to limit the risks of nepotism as family-living juveniles and favour sibling-mating avoidance as group-living adults. These results highlight the role of parental care and social life in the evolution of chemical communication and recognition cues.

  10. The Influence of Silica on the Reactivity of Iron Towards Chlorinated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, T.; Himmelheber, D. W.; Vikesland, P. J.; Fairbrother, D.; Roberts, A.

    2001-12-01

    Previous work has illustrated that dissolved silica present in groundwater can adsorb onto the iron media of a permeable reactive barrier. To date, little is known about the effect of adsorbed silica on the reactivity of iron towards chlorinated contaminants. Silica is a known corrosion inhibitor, and therefore silica sorption may affect the reactivity of cast iron towards redox-active species such as chlorinated ethanes. To determine the effect of silica sorption on iron reactivity towards chlorinated hydrocarbons, it is necessary to examine contaminant degradation rates under conditions where silica adsorption has been carefully accounted for. In this study we couple measurements of chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) (either trichloroethane (TCA) or trichloroethene) degradation rates with measurements of silica surface content. Both batch and columns studies were conducted as part of this effort. Batch studies were performed using electrolytic iron powder or iron coupons (1 cm2) in solutions containing sodium metasilicate and TCA. To evaluate the potential long-term effect of silica sorption, columns packed with untreated sieved Master Builder's iron were fed with simulated groundwater containing low levels of sodium metasilicate and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs). Batch studies showed that at pH 8.5 the rate of TCA degradation decreased significantly with increasing silica concentration. Silica concentrations of 50 mg/L or more led to a two-fold decrease in the reaction rate, and a shift in the distribution of the reaction products towards less chlorinated compounds was observed. This shift could also be discerned at pH 7.5, even though the overall reaction rates were unaffected by the presence of silica. We ascribe the loss of reactivity at pH 8.5 but not at pH 7.5 to the fact that silica adsorbs onto iron more readily at higher pH. A decrease in iron reactivity towards CHCs was also observed in column experiments. Addition of silica to the feed resulted in

  11. Measurements of hydrocarbons, oxygenated hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides in an urban basin in Colorado: Implications for Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, P. D.; Trainer, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Parrish, D. D.; Carpenter, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Yee, J. E.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1995-11-01

    Concentrations of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the C3 to C10 range, CO, NOy (total reactive oxidized nitrogen), SO2, and meteorological parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during February 1991. The measurement site, located some 150 m above the Boulder urban basin, receives air masses typifying averaged local sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations observed showed little effects of photochemical loss processes and reflect the pattern of the local emission sources. The observed ratios of CO and the VOCs to NOy are compared to those predicted by the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) inventory.These comparisons indicate (1) good agreement for CO/NOY, (2) significant overpredictions by the NAPAP inventory for many of the hydrocarbon to NOY ratios, (3) much more benzene from mobile sources (and less from area sources) than predicted by the NAPAP inventory, and (4) large underpredictions of the light alcohols and carbonyls by the NAPAP inventory. These first two results are in marked contrast to the conclusions of the recent tunnel study reported by Ingalls in 1989. Source profile reconciliation implies substantial input from both a local propane source and gasoline headspace venting.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lake sediments from the High Tatras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drooge, Barend L. van, E-mail: barend.vandrooge@idaea.csic.es [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lopez, Jordi; Fernandez, Pilar; Grimalt, Joan O. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Stuchlik, Evzen [Department of Hydrology, Charles University, Vinicna 7, 12044 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-15

    European alpine lake systems are used as indicators of air quality over the continent. Preliminary data showed high polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) loads in the High Tatras (Eastern Europe) in comparison to other mountain regions. Here, insight on the spatial distribution of PAH is provided from analysis of top-core sediments of 27 alpine lakes distributed along the High Tatras. Top-core sediment concentrations were higher than those in deep-cores, and they were higher than those observed in other European high mountain regions. The PAH profiles were uniform and comparable to those observed in aerosols and snow, indicating that atmospheric deposition was the predominant PAH input pathway to the lakes. Good agreement between estimated atmospheric deposition and sedimentation fluxes was observed. However, in several lakes in the western range higher sediment fluxes may correspond to higher PAH depositions levels. The higher concentrations may also reflect inputs from potential emission source areas. - Highlights: > Sedimentary PAH loads in alpine lakes from High Tatras (Eastern Europe) were higher than in other European mountain regions. > Sediments PAH profiles comparable to aerosol and snow deposition profiles. > Positive correlation between PAH atmospheric deposition and sedimentary fluxes. - High sedimentary PAH loads were observed in alpine lakes in the High Tatras (Eastern Europe) which are related to high PAH atmospheric deposition fluxes.

  13. Determination of the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Yoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Ogimoto, Mami

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants; a survey was also conducted of commercial lubricants. Hydrocarbons in lubricants were separated from the matrix components of lubricants using a silica gel solid phase extraction (SPE) column. Normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) coupled with an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) was used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with a diode array detector (DAD) and a refractive index detector (RID) was used to estimate carbon numbers and the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons, which supplemented the results obtained by NPLC/ELSD. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not detected in 12 lubricants specified for use for incidental food contact, but were detected in 13 out of 22 lubricants non-specified for incidental food contact at a ratio up to 18%. They were also detected in 10 out of 12 lubricants collected at food factories at a ratio up to 13%. The centre carbon numbers of hydrocarbons in commercial lubricants were estimated to be between C16 and C50.

  14. Magnetic properties changes due to hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater table fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Nawrass

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to understand the mechanisms and conditions which control the formation and transformation of ferro(i)magnetic minerals caused by hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater, in particular in the zone of fluctuating water levels. The work extends previous studies conducted at the same site. The study area is a former military air base at Hradčany, Czech Republic (50°37'22.71"N, 14°45'2.24"E). The site was heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, due to leaks in petroleum storage tanks and jet fuelling stations over years of active use by the Soviet Union, which closed the base in 1991. The site is one of the most important sources of high quality groundwater in the Czech Republic. In a previous study, Rijal et al. (2010) concluded that the contaminants could be flushed into the sediments as the water level rose due to remediation processes leading to new formation of magnetite. In this previous study three different locations were investigated; however, from each location only one core was obtained. In order to recognize significant magnetic signatures versus depth three cores from each of these three locations were drilled in early 2012, penetrating the unsaturated zone, the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone and extending to about one meter below the groundwater level (~2.3 m depth at the time of sampling). Magnetic susceptibility (MS) profiles combined with other magnetic properties were analyzed to obtain a significant depth distribution of the ferro(i)magnetic concentration. Sediment properties, hydrocarbon content and bacterial activity were additionally studied. The results show that the highest ferrimagnetic mineral concentrations exist between 1.4-1.9 m depth from the baseline which is interpreted as the top of the GWF zone. Spikes of MS detected in the previous studies turned out to represent small-scale isolated features, but the trend of increasing MS values from the lowermost position of the groundwater table upward was verified

  15. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  16. Stepwise synthesis of (=V@CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C=V@), (=V@CCH=CHC=V@), and (=V@CC=V@CC=V@) bridges between molybdenum or tungsten centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodworth, B.E.; White, P.S.; Templeton, J.L. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1997-01-29

    Transition metal carbide bridges (L{sub n}M(C){sub m}ML{sub n}) are an important subset of hydrocarbon bridges. In this paper, we report a family of dinuclear biscarbyne complexes displaying CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}, CH=CH, and C=VC linkages. We have been able to access the unusual M=V@CC=V@CC=V@M framework by stepwise proton removal and subsequent oxidation to effect net dihydrogen removal from the original -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}- linkage to form -CH=@CH- and -C=V@C- tethers between the two robust metal carbyne moieties. The role of the metal centers in housing the negative charges at the intermediate dianion stage is essential to the oxidation sequence that has been achieved. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Modulation of fatty acids and hydrocarbons in Anabaena 7120 and its ntcA mutant under calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Savita; Verma, Ekta; Tiwari, Balkrishna; Niveshika; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Calcium being a signaling molecule and mediator of cell response, we examined the modulation in fatty acid and hydrocarbon profiles of wild type cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its ntcA mutant under the influence of different calcium chloride concentrations (0-10 mM). Dynamic modifications in fatty acid and hydrocarbon profile were evident through GC-FID analysis of extracted lipids. In the wild type, increase in CaCl2 (10 mM) resulted in unsaturation of fatty acids (observed in terms of high MUFA/PUFA ratio) while hydrocarbon production was distinctly high in the mutant strain compared to wild type at all tested concentrations. The synthesis of short chain hydrocarbons (C5-C8) were dominated at inhibitory concentration (10 mM CaCl2) in mutant strain. Results suggest that the increase in MUFA/PUFA ratio at inhibitory concentration in wild type, and higher percentage of hydrocarbons in mutant strain, may be attributed to the survival and acclimation strategies under altered calcium environment. Our results also suggest the involvement of the ntcA gene (master regulator of N2 metabolism) in regulation of carbon metabolism; specifically fatty acid, hydrocarbon, and other metabolic compounds essential for maintenance and sustenance of growth under stress condition. Thus, our study outlines basic acclimation response along with possibilities of production of fatty acid and hydrocarbon derived biofuel and other bioactive compounds in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under altered calcium levels which could be of biotechnological interest.

  18. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  19. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  20. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the f......We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence...... in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer (case b) the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...

  1. Evaluation on occluded hydrocarbon in deep–ultra deep ancient source rocks and its cracked gas resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil-cracked gas, as the main type of high-over mature marine natural gas in China, is mainly derived from occluded hydrocarbon. So it is significant to carry out quantitative study on occluded hydrocarbon. In this paper, the occluded hydrocarbon volume of the main basins in China was calculated depending on their types, abundances and evolution stages by means of the forward method (experimental simulation and the inversion method (geologic profile dissection. And then, occluded hydrocarbon evolution models were established for five types of source rocks (sapropelic, sapropelic prone hybrid, humic prone hybrid, humic and coal. It is shown that the hydrocarbon expulsion efficiency of sapropelic and sapropelic prone hybrid excellent source rocks is lower than 30% at the low-maturity stage, 30%–60% at the principal oil generation stage, and 50%–80% at the high-maturity stage, which are all about 10% higher than that of humic prone hybrid and humic source rocks at the corresponding stages. The resource distribution and cracked gas expulsion of occluded hydrocarbon since the high-maturity stage of marine source rocks in the Sichuan Basin were preliminarily calculated on the basis of the evolution models. The cracked gas expulsion is 230.4 × 1012 m3 at the high evolution stage of occluded hydrocarbon of the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm in this basin, and 12.3 × 1012 m3 from the source rocks of Sinian Doushantuo Fm, indicating good potential for natural gas resources. It is indicated that the favorable areas of occluded hydrocarbon cracked gas in the Qiongzhusi Fm source rocks in the Sichuan Basin include Gaoshiti–Moxi, Ziyang and Weiyuan, covering a favorable area of 4.3 × 104 km2.

  2. Leadership Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  3. Paleozoic Hydrocarbon-Seep Limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, J.

    2007-12-01

    To date, five Paleozoic hydrocarbon-seep limestones have been recognized based on carbonate fabrics, associated fauna, and stable carbon isotopes. These are the Middle Devonian Hollard Mound from the Antiatlas of Morocco [1], Late Devonian limestone lenses with the dimerelloid brachiopod Dzieduszyckia from the Western Meseta of Morocco [2], Middle Mississippian limestones with the dimerelloid brachiopod Ibergirhynchia from the Harz Mountains of Germany [3], Early Pennsylvanian limestones from the Tantes Mound in the High Pyrenees of France [4], and Late Pennsylvanian limestone lenses from the Ganigobis Shale Member of southern Namibia [5]. Among these examples, the composition of seepage fluids varied substantially as inferred from delta C-13 values of early diagenetic carbonate phases. Delta C-13 values as low as -50 per mil from the Tantes Mound and -51 per mil from the Ganigobis limestones reveal seepage of biogenic methane, whereas values of -12 per mil from limestones with Dzieduszyckia associated with abundant pyrobitumen agree with oil seepage. Intermediate delta C-13 values of carbonate cements from the Hollard Mound and Ibergirhynchia deposits probably reflect seepage of thermogenic methane. It is presently very difficult to assess the faunal evolution at seeps in the Paleozoic based on the limited number of examples. Two of the known seeps were typified by extremely abundant rhynchonellide brachiopods of the superfamily Dimerelloidea. Bivalve mollusks and tubeworms were abundant at two of the known Paleozoic seep sites; one was dominated by bivalve mollusks (Hollard Mound, Middle Devonian), another was dominated by tubeworms (Ganigobis Shale Member, Late Pennsylvanian). The tubeworms from these two deposits are interpreted to represent vestimentiferan worms, based on studies of the taphonomy of modern vestimentiferans. However, this interpretation is in conflict with the estimated evolutionary age of vestimentiferans based on molecular clock methods

  4. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  5. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  6. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electro......The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future...... is electrolysis followed by conversion into synthetic hydrocarbons, alcohols or ethers. Several types of electrolysers exist. The various types are listed together with a short description of principle and status. It is argued that electrolysis will at least become part of large sustainable energy systems...

  7. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  8. EVALUATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS ELUTION FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Piekutin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents studies on oil removal from soil by means of water elution with a help of shaking out the contaminants from the soil. The tests were performed on simulated soil samples contaminated with a mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons. The study consisted in recording the time influence and the number of elution cycles to remove contaminants from the soil. The samples were then subject to the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene. Due to adding various concentrations of petroleum into particular soil samples and applying different shaking times, it was possible to find out the impact of petroleum content and sample shaking duration on the course and possibility of petroleum substances removal by means of elution process.

  9. Hydrocarbon Degrading Bacteria: Isolation and Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Indah Sutiknowati

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is little information how to identify hydrocarbon degrading bacteria for bioremediation of marine oil spills. We have used gravel which contaminated oil mousse from Beach Simulator Tank, in Marine Biotechnology Institute, Kamaishi, Japan, and grown on enrichment culture. Biostimulation with nutrients (N and P was done to analyze biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds: Naphthalene, Phenanthrene, Trichlorodibenzofuran and Benzo[a]pyrene. Community of bacteria from enrichment culture was determined by DGGE. Isolating and screening the bacteria on inorganic medium contain hydrocarbon compounds and determination of bacteria by DAPI (number of cells and CFU. DNA was extracted from colonies of bacteria and sequence determination of the 16S rDNA was amplified by primers U515f and U1492r. Twenty nine strains had been sequence and have similarity about 90-99% to their closest taxa by homology Blast search and few of them have suspected as new species.

  10. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  11. Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel fuzzy inference model based on artificial hydrocarbon networks, a computational algorithm for modeling problems based on chemical hydrocarbon compounds. In particular, the proposed fuzzy-molecular inference model (FIM-model uses molecular units of information to partition the output space in the defuzzification step. Moreover, these molecules are linguistic units that can be partially understandable due to the organized structure of the topology and metadata parameters involved in artificial hydrocarbon networks. In addition, a position controller for a direct current (DC motor was implemented using the proposed FIM-model in type-1 and type-2 fuzzy inference systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the fuzzy-molecular inference model can be applied as an alternative of type-2 Mamdani’s fuzzy control systems because the set of molecular units can deal with dynamic uncertainties mostly present in real-world control applications.

  12. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  13. Optimization of the OPLS-AA Force Field for Long Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Shirley W I; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2012-04-10

    The all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field is a popular force field for simulating biomolecules. However, the current OPLS parameters for hydrocarbons developed using short alkanes cannot reproduce the liquid properties of long alkanes in molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore, the extension of OPLS-AA to (phospho)lipid molecules required for the study of biological membranes was hampered in the past. Here, we optimized the OPLS-AA force field for both short and long hydrocarbons. Following the framework of the OPLS-AA parametrization, we refined the torsional parameters for hydrocarbons by fitting to the gas-phase ab initio energy profiles calculated at the accurate MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ theory level. Additionally, the depth of the Lennard-Jones potential for methylene hydrogen atoms was adjusted to reproduce the densities and the heats of vaporization of alkanes and alkenes of different lengths. Optimization of partial charges finally allowed to reproduce the gel-to-liquid-phase transition temperature for pentadecane and solvation free energies. It is shown that the optimized parameter set (L-OPLS) yields improved hydrocarbon diffusion coefficients, viscosities, and gauche-trans ratios. Moreover, its applicability for lipid bilayer simulations is shown for a GMO bilayer in its liquid-crystalline phase.

  14. The presence of hydrocarbons in southeast Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanken, Niels Martin; Hansen, Malene Dolberg; Kresten Nielsen, Jesper

    Hydrocarbons, mostly found as solid pyrobitumen, are known from more than 30 localities in southeast Norway. They occur as inclusions in a wide range of "reservoir rocks" spanning from Permo-Carboniferous breccias to veins (vein quartz and calcite veins) in Precambrian granites, gneisses and amph......Hydrocarbons, mostly found as solid pyrobitumen, are known from more than 30 localities in southeast Norway. They occur as inclusions in a wide range of "reservoir rocks" spanning from Permo-Carboniferous breccias to veins (vein quartz and calcite veins) in Precambrian granites, gneisses...

  15. Mathematics of Periodic Tables for Benzenoid Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2007-01-01

    The upper and lower bounds for invariants of polyhex systems based on the Harary and Harborth inequalities are studied. It is shown that these invariants are uniquely correlated by the Periodic Table for Benzenoid Hydrocarbons. A modified periodic table for total resonant sextet (TRS) benzenoids based on the invariants of Ds and r(empty) is presented; Ds is the number of disconnections among the empty rings for fused TRS benzenoid hydrocarbons. This work represents a contribution toward deciphering the topological information content of benzenoid formulas.

  16. Electrochemical removal of NOx and hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Anja Zarah

    on the electrodes during polarisation, probably because of strong adsorption of the hydrocarbon relative to NO. On LSF/CGO electrode the impregnation of ionic conducting material increased the oxidation of NO to NO2 which is an important step before nitrogen formation. The propene inhibited this reaction because....... This could only be done if the electrode was impregnated with BaO. The nitrate formation did not seem to be inhibited by the presence of the hydrocarbon. However, the oxidation of propene was inhibited by the BaO because the active sites for oxidations were partially covered by the BaO nanoparticles...

  17. Transferable Tight-Binding Potential for Hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Wang, Yang

    1994-01-01

    A transferable tight-binding potential has been constructed for heteroatomic systems containing carbon and hydrogen. The electronic degree of freedom is treated explicitly in this potential using a small set of transferable parameters which has been fitted to small hydrocarbons and radicals. Transferability to other higher hydrocarbons were tested by comparison with ab initio calculations and experimental data. The potential can correctly reproduce changes in the electronic configuration as a function of the local bonding geometry around each carbon atom. This type of potential is well suited for computer simulations of covalently bonded systems in both gas-phase and condensed-phase systems.

  18. Biogenic nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions estimated from tethered balloon observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. J.; Lenschow, D. H.; Zimmerman, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for estimating surface fluxes of trace gases, the mixed-layer gradient technique, is used to calculate isoprene and terpene emissions from forests. The technique is applied to tethered balloon measurements made over the Amazon forest and a pine-oak forest in Alabama at altitudes up to 300 m. The observations were made during the dry season Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2A) and the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment 1990 experiment (ROSE I). Results from large eddy simulations of scalar transport in the clear convective boundary layer are used to infer fluxes from the balloon profiles. Profiles from the Amazon give a mean daytime emission of 3630 +/- 1400 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, where the uncertainty represents the standard deviation of the mean of eight flux estimates. Twenty profiles from Alabama give emissions of 4470 +/- 3300 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, 1740 +/- 1060 micrograms alpha-pinene sq m/h, and 790 +/- 560 micrograms beta-pinene sq m/h, respectively. These results are in agreement with emissions derived from chemical budgets. The emissions may be overestimated because of uncertainty about how to incorporate the effects of the canopy on the mixed-layer gradients. The large variability in these emission estimates is probably due to the relatively short sampling times of the balloon profiles, though spatially heterogeneous emissions may also play a role. Fluxes derived using this technique are representative of an upwind footprint of several kilometers and are independent of hydrocarbon oxidation rate and mean advection.

  19. Cuticular hydrocarbons and aggression in the termite Macrotermes subhyalinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaib, Manfred; Jmhasly, Patrick; Wilfert, Lena; Durka, Walter; Franke, Stephan; Francke, Wittko; Leuthold, Reinhard H; Brandl, Roland

    2004-02-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons are among the prime candidates for nestmate recognition in social insects. We analyzed the variation of cuticular hydrocarbons in the termite species M. subhyalinus in West Africa (Comoë National Park) on a small spatial scale (recognition.

  20. Kinetic simulating experiment on the secondary hydrocarbon generation of kerogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of generation have been obtained for different hydrocarbon classes, including methane, C2-C5 gas hydrocarbons, C6-C13 light hydrocarbons and C13+ heavy hydrocarbons, and vitrinite reflectance (Ro) by the kinetic simulating experiment of kerogen cracking. Then, combined with the detailed geology of Sichuan Basin, the effective gas-generating intensity of the Lower Cambrian source rock is approximately estimated by applying these parameters.

  1. Use of soluble humic substances as solubilisers in the in situ rehabilitation of sites contaminated with PAH or longchain hydrocarbons from crude oil. Final report; Einsatz von loeslichen Huminstoffen als Loesungsvermittler bei der In-situ-Sanierung von PAK- und laengerkettigen Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoff-Schadensfaellen. Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerdel, W.; Kloeppel, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Umweltchemie und Oekotoxikologie, Schmallenberg (Germany); Gohlke, U. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Polymerforschung, Teltow (Germany); Schulz-Berendt, V.; Koopmann [Umweltschutz Nord GmbH, Ganderkesee (Germany)

    1999-12-14

    The purpose of the present project was to demonstrate in example model experiments the suitability of DOM solutions, which can easily be derived from composts, for in situ rehabilitation and to compare the success achieved with remediation results obtained using surfactants and coffeein. The model experiments were carried out according to the DECHEMA guide to ''Laboratory methods for assessing biological soil rehabilitation'' using glass columns (of 14 cm dia. and 60 cm length) containing one of two different PAH-contaminated soils (PAH I and PAH II) or a soil contaminated with crude oil hydrocarbons (CHC). Altogether a markedly enhanced leaching of pollutants (PAH and CHC) from the soils as well as an increased degradation of contaminants was observed during the experiments, and there were no negative accompanying processes such as excessive bacterial growth, occlusion of soil pores or excessive accumulation of DOM in the soil. In terms of posing a hazard to groundwater natural humic substances are certainly to be viewed as less critical than synthetic detergents. [German] Ziel des Vorhabens war es, die Eignung von DOM-Loesungen, die aus Komposten leicht gewonnen werden koennen, in der In-situ-Sanierung exemplarisch anhand von Modellversuchen aufzuzeigen und den erzielten Sanierungserfolg mit dem von Tensiden und Coffein zu vergleichen. Die Modelluntersuchungen erfolgten gemaess DECHEMA-Leitfaden 'Labormethoden zur Beurteilung der biologischen Bodensanierung' unter Verwendung von Glassaeulen (14 cm diameter, 60 cm Laenge) mit zwei PAK-belasteten Boeden (PAK I und PAK II) sowie einem mit Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffen belasteten Boden (MKW-Boden). Insgesamt konnte mit natuerlichen DOM-Loesungen eine deutlich gesteigerte Auswaschung der Schadstoffe (PAK und MKW) aus den Boeden waehrend des Versuchs als auch ein gesteigerter Abbau der Kontaminanten erreicht werden, ohne dass negative Begleitprozesse wie zu starkes Bakterienwachstum und

  2. 40 CFR 86.1221-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86...-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1221-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and periodic calibrations. (a) Initial and...

  3. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1202 - Liquid hydrocarbon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liquid hydrocarbon measurement. 250.1202..., Surface Commingling, and Security § 250.1202 Liquid hydrocarbon measurement. (a) What are the requirements for measuring liquid hydrocarbons? You must: (1) Submit a written application to, and obtain...

  5. 40 CFR 86.331-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86....331-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The following steps are followed in sequence to calibrate the hydrocarbon analyzer. It is suggested, but not required, that efforts be made to minimize relative...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical... as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 86.521-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.521-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and periodic calibration....

  8. Cuticular hydrocarbons from the bed bug Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentane extracts of male and female bed bugs were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in an effort to identify cuticular hydrocarbons. Seventeen hydrocarbons accounting for nearly 99% of the compounds eluting in the cuticular hydrocarbon region were identified. The sample contained ...

  9. 21 CFR 573.740 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 573.740... ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.740 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons complying with § 172.884(a) and (b) of this chapter may be safely used in an amount not in...

  10. 21 CFR 172.884 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 172.884... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.884 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the following prescribed...

  11. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 503.44 - Operational standard-total hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 503.44 Section 503.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... standard—total hydrocarbons. (a) The total hydrocarbons concentration in the exit gas from a sewage sludge incinerator shall be corrected for zero percent moisture by multiplying the measured total...

  13. 21 CFR 178.3650 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 178.3650... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3650 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used, as a component of nonfood articles intended for use...

  14. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  15. Profile summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.

  16. Contamination of rivers in Tianjin, China by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Tao, S.; Pan, B.; Fan, W.; He, X.C.; Zuo, Q.; Wu, S.P.; Li, B.G.; Cao, J.; Liu, W.X.; Xu, F.L.; Wang, X.J.; Shen, W.R.; Wong, P.K. [Peking University, Beijing (China). College of Environmental Science

    2005-03-01

    Abstract: Tianjin urban/industrial complex is highly polluted by some persistent organic pollutants. In this study, the levels of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested in sediment, water, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) samples in 10 rivers in Tianjin. The total concentration of 16 PAHs varied from 0.787 to 1943 {mu}g/g dry weight in sediment, from 45.81 to 1272 ng/L in water, and from 0.938 to 64.2 {mu}g/g dry weight in SPM. The levels of PAHs in these media are high in comparison with values reported from other river and marine systems. Variability of total concentrations of PAHs in sediment, water, and SPM from nine different rivers is consistent with each other. No obvious trends of total PAHs concentration variations were found between upstream and downstream sediment, water, and SPM samples for most rivers, which indicate local inputs and disturbances along these rivers. The spatial distributions of three-phase PAHs are very similar to each other, and they are also similar to those found in topsoil. However, their chemical profiles are significantly different from that of topsoil. The change of profiles is consistent with the different aqueous transport capability of 16 PAHs. Low molecular weight PAHs predomination suggests a relatively recent local source and coal combustion source of PAHs in the study area.

  17. A model-based analysis of chemical and temporal patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons in male Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Kent

    Full Text Available Drosophila Cuticular Hydrocarbons (CH influence courtship behaviour, mating, aggregation, oviposition, and resistance to desiccation. We measured levels of 24 different CH compounds of individual male D. melanogaster hourly under a variety of environmental (LD/DD conditions. Using a model-based analysis of CH variation, we developed an improved normalization method for CH data, and show that CH compounds have reproducible cyclic within-day temporal patterns of expression which differ between LD and DD conditions. Multivariate clustering of expression patterns identified 5 clusters of co-expressed compounds with common chemical characteristics. Turnover rate estimates suggest CH production may be a significant metabolic cost. Male cuticular hydrocarbon expression is a dynamic trait influenced by light and time of day; since abundant hydrocarbons affect male sexual behavior, males may present different pheromonal profiles at different times and under different conditions.

  18. Energy additivity in branched and cyclic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.; Bader, R.F.W. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Cortes-Guzman, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica

    2009-11-15

    This paper reported on a study of the energetic relationships between hydrocarbon molecules and the heats of formation. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was used to investigate the degree to which branched hydrocarbons obey a group additivity scheme for energy and populations. The QTAIM defined the properties of the chemical groups. The experimental and theoretical transferability of the methyl and methylene groups of the linear hydrocarbons was also explored. The calculations were performed using a large basis set at the restricted Hartree-Fock and MP2(full) levels of theory. The study also investigated the deviations from additivity, noted for small ring hydrocarbons leading to the definition of strain energy. The QTAIM energies recovered the experimental values. The paper included details regarding the delocalization of the electron density over the surface of the cyclopropane ring, responsible for its homoaromatic properties. The calculations presented in this study satisfied the virial theorem for the atomic definition of energy. The paper discussed the problems associated with the use of the density functional theory (DFT) resulting from its failure to satisfy the virial theorem. 44 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs.

  19. Taxation on mining and hydrocarbon investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz De La Vega Rengifo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article comments the most important aspects of the tax treatment applicable to investments of mining and oil and gas industry. The document highlights the relevant tax topics of the general tax legislation(Income Tax Law and the special legislation of both industries (General Mining Law and Hydrocarbons Organic Law.

  20. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, K. [Harding Lawson Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  1. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupka Daniel

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The abilities of microorganisms to mineralize a wide range of pollutants are well known. Biological processes for the removal of crude oil hydrocarbons from environment are attractive because they consume less energy than conventional physico-chemical processes and offer possibilities for recycling chemicals in the framework of integrated system.

  2. Air Pollution: Where Do Hydrocarbons Come From?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1975-01-01

    Describes the controversy surrounding a report which concluded that, in certain areas and under certain conditions, hydrocarbons released from trees and other vegetation may be more important in the initiation of smog than those released from automobiles. Discusses relevant research which has not been able to support or refute this conclusion.…

  3. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  4. Radiation Chemistry of Organic Liquids: Saturated Hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Trifunac, A D

    2004-01-01

    In this review (124 refs), several problems in radiolysis of saturated hydrocarbons are examined. Special attention is paid to the chemistry of radical cations, high-mobility holes, excited state and spur dynamics, magnetic field and spin effects, and optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  5. Dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons in the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Topgi, R.S.; Noronha, R.J.; Fondekar, S.P.

    Mean dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons, measured using UV-spectrophotometry, at 0 and 10m were 51 plus or minus 1 and 55 plus or minus 1.2 mu g/litre respectively; range of variation being between 28 and 83 mu g/litre. Very little difference...

  6. Growth of fungi on volatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenafeta Boldú, F.X.

    2002-01-01

    The present study aimed the better understanding of the catabolism of monoaromatic hydrocarbons by fungi. This knowledge can be used to enhance the biodegradation of BTEX pollutants. Fungi with the capacity of using toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated by enriching environme

  7. Antioxidant Functions of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM family. It is activated by a variety of ligands, such as environmental contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or dioxins, but also by naturally occurring compounds and endogenous ligands. Binding of the ligand leads to dimerization of the AhR with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT and transcriptional activation of several xenobiotic phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes. It is generally accepted that the toxic responses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and structurally related compounds are mediated by activation of the AhR. A multitude of studies indicate that the AhR operates beyond xenobiotic metabolism and exerts pleiotropic functions. Increasing evidence points to a protective role of the AhR against carcinogenesis and oxidative stress. Herein, I will highlight data demonstrating a causal role of the AhR in the antioxidant response and present novel findings on potential AhR-mediated antioxidative mechanisms.

  8. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  9. Molecular characterization of autochthonous hydrocarbon utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria in water, soil and sediment samples collected from ... oil spills to both terrestrial and aquatic environments in the past 5 decades of crude ... One of the major reasons for prolonged negative impact of oil spill on the .... in Gulf of Mexico beach sands impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  10. Occurrence and growth potentials of hydrocarbon degrading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence and growth potentials of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria on the phylloplane ... The surface of leaf samples from ten tropical plants, Anthocleista, Sarcophrynium, Canna, Colocassia, Musa, Cola, Citrus, Mangifera, Terminalia and Annona were cultured for the estimation of total heterotrophic and ... Article Metrics.

  11. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The ad

  12. MECHANISMS OF MEMBRANE TOXICITY OF HYDROCARBONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, Jan; Poolman, Bert; de Bont, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Microbial transformations of cyclic hydrocarbons have received much attention during the past three decades. Interest in the degradation of environmental pollutants as well as in applications of microorganisms in the catalysis of chemical reactions has stimulated research in this nl ea. The metaboli

  13. Task 8: Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Our studies focus on the stratigraphy of Late Devonian to early Pennsylvanian rocks at the NTS, because these are the best potential hydrocarbon source rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. In the last year, our stratigraphic studies have broadened to include the regional context for both the Chainman and the Eleana formations. New age data based on biostratigraphy constrain the age ranges of both Chainman and Eleana; accurate and reliable ages are essential for regional correlation and for regional paleogeographic reconstructions. Source rock analyses throughout the Chainman establish whether these rocks contained adequate organic material to generate hydrocarbons. Maturation analyses of samples from the Chainman determine whether the temperature history has been suitable for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Structural studies are aimed at defining the deformation histories and present position of the different packages of Devonian - Pennsylvanian rocks. This report summarizes new results of our structural, stratigraphic and hydrocarbon source rock potential studies at the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. Stratigraphy is considered first, with the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation discussed separately. New biostratigraphic results are included in this section. New results from our structural studies are summarized next, followed by source rock and maturation analyses of the Chainman Shale. Directions for future work are included where appropriate.

  14. Green Methodologies to Test Hydrocarbon Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The definition and the economic viability of the best development strategy of a hydrocarbon reservoir mainly depend on the quantity and type of fluids and on the well productivity. Well testing, consisting in producing hydrocarbon to the surface while measuring the pressure variations induced in the reservoir, has been used for decades to determine the fluid nature and well potential. In exploration and appraisal scenarios the hydrocarbons produced during a test are flared, contributing to the emissions of greenhouse gases. Approach: Due to more stringent environmental regulations and a general need for reduced operating expenses, the current industry drivers in today’s formation evaluation methodologies demand short, safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly test procedures, especially when conventional tests are prohibitively expensive, logistically not feasible or no surface emissions are allowed. Different methods have been proposed or resuscitated in the last years, such as wireline formation tests, closed chamber tests, production/reinjection tests and injection tests, as viable alternatives to conventional well testing. Results: While various short-term tests, test procedures and interpretation methods are apparently available for conducting successful tests without hydrocarbon production at the surface, clarity is lacking for specific applications of these techniques. An attempt to clarify advantages and limitations of each methodology, particularly with respect to the main testing target is pursued in this study. Specific insight is provided on injection testing, which is one of the most promising methodology to replace traditional well testing in reservoir characterization, except for the possibility to sample the formation fluids. Conclusion/Recommendations: Not a single one method but a combination of more methodologies, in particular injection testing and wireline formation testing, is the most promising

  15. Hydrocarbon geochemistry of the Puget Sound region. II. Sedimentary diterpenoid, steroid and triterpenoid hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrick, R.C.; Hedges, J.I.

    1981-03-01

    Cyclic components of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mixtures extracted from Puget Sound sediment cores include a suite of C/sub 19/ and C/sub 20/ diterpenoid hydrocarbons of which fichtelite, sandaracopimaradiene, and isopimaradiene have been identified. Although apparently also derived from vascular plants, these diterpenoid hydrocarbons have relative abundances distinctly different from the co-existing plant wax n-alkane suite. Five C/sub 27/, C/sub 28/ and C/sub 29/ diasteranes and four C/sub 29/, C/sub 30/ and C/sub 31/ 17..cap alpha..(H), 21..beta..(H) hopanes occur in relatively constant proportion as components of a highly weathered fossil hydrocarbon assemblage. These chromatographically resolved cycloalkanes, along with the strongly covarying unresolved complex mixture, have been introduced to Puget Sound sediments from adjacent urban centres at increasing levels over the last 100 yr in the absence of any major oil spill. Naturally-occurring triterpenoid hydrocarbons, including hop-22(29)-ene (diploptene), are also present. A new group of C/sub 30/ polyenes has been detected which contains compounds apparently structurally related to a co-existing bicyclic C/sub 25/ diene and to C/sub 20/ and C/sub 25/ acyclic multibranched hydrocarbons described in a previous paper (Barrick et al., 1980).

  16. Hydrocarbon geochemistry of the Puget Sound region - II. Sedimentary diterpenoid, steroid and triterpenoid hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Robert C.; Hedges, John I.

    1981-03-01

    Cyclic components of the 'aliphatic' hydrocarbon mixtures extracted from Puget Sound sediment cores include a suite of C 19 and C 20 diterpenoid hydrocarbons of which fichtelite. sandaracopimaradiene, and isopimaradiene have been identified. Although apparently also derived from vascular plants, these diterpenoid hydrocarbons have relative abundances distinctly different from the co-existing plant wax n-alkane suite. Five C 27, C 28 and C 29 diasteranes and four C 29, C 30 and C 31 17α(H), 21β(H) hopanes occur in relatively constant proportion as components of a highly weathered fossil hydrocarbon assemblage. These chromatographically resolved cycloalkanes. along with the strongly covarying unresolved complex mixture, have been introduced to Puget Sound sediments from adjacent urban centres at increasing levels over the last 100 yr in the absence of any major oil spill. Naturally-occurring triterpenoid hydrocarbons, including hop-22(29)-ene (diploptene), are also present. A new group of C 30 polyenes has been detected which contains compounds apparently structurally related to a co-existing bicyclic C 25 diene and to C 20 and C 25 acyclic multibranched hydrocarbons described in a previous paper ( BARRICK et al., 1980).

  17. Wetting and superhydrophobic properties of PECVD grown hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, D.K., E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca [Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) and Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi UQAC, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Farzaneh, M. [Canada Research Chair on Atmospheric Icing Engineering of Power Networks (INGIVRE) and Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi UQAC, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Paynter, R.W. [INRS-EMT, 1650 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Wetting characteristics of micro-nanorough substrates of aluminum and smooth silicon substrates have been studied and compared by depositing hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique using a mixture of Ar, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} gases. The water contact angles on the hydrocarbon and fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings deposited on silicon substrates were found to be 72 deg. and 105 deg., respectively. However, the micro-nanorough aluminum substrates demonstrated superhydrophobic properties upon coatings with fluorinated-hydrocarbon providing a water contact angle of {approx}165 deg. and contact angle hysteresis below 2 deg. with water drops rolling off from those surfaces while the same substrates showed contact angle of 135 deg. with water drops sticking on those surfaces. The superhydrophobic properties is due to the high fluorine content in the fluorinated-hydrocarbon coatings of {approx}36 at.%, as investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by lowering the surface energy of the micro-nanorough aluminum substrates.

  18. Blochmannia endosymbionts and their host, the ant Camponotus fellah: cuticular hydrocarbons and melanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José de Souza, Danival; Devers, Séverine; Lenoir, Alain

    2011-10-01

    Carpenter ants (genus Camponotus) have mutualistic, endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Blochmannia whose main contribution to their hosts is alimentary. It was also recently demonstrated that they play a role in improving immune function as well. In this study, we show that treatment with an antibiotic produces a physiological response inducing an increase in both the quantity of cuticular hydrocarbons and in the melanization of the cuticle probably due to a nutritive and immunological deficit. We suggest that this is because it enhances the protection the cuticle provides from desiccation and also from invasions by pathogens and parasites. Nevertheless, the cuticular hydrocarbon profile is not modified by the antibiotic treatment, which indicates that nestmate recognition is not modified.

  19. [Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil by bioaugmentation products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Lin; Xu, Jin-Lan; Tang, Zhi-Xin; Xiao, Zhou-Qiang

    2009-06-15

    In an experimental investigation of bioaugmentation products affected on the petroleum contaminated soil. The influence of the bioaugmentation products dose, injections and temperature on bioremediation were studied. The results showed that the degradation rate was related positively to the amount of inoculation, when the dose was increased to 0.6 mg x kg(-1), total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation rate was 87% in 48 days. The results of GC-MS indicated that the dominant petroleum constituents in oil-contaminated raw soil were 82.1% n-alkane, 16% alkene and little of others hydrocarbons, such as carotane, alkylnaphthalenes, hopanes, and steranes. The peaks amount of GC profile decreased from 32 to 14 after 40 days of bioremediation, this result indicated that branched alkanes, alkene, and alkylnaphthalenes were thoroughly degraded, then line alkanes, hopanes, and steranes were left in soil. In addition, the longer part of n-alkane were degraded with rate relatively higher, while the residual fraction at the end of the test is shorter part of n-alkane because bacteria degraded the longer n-alkane to shorter. The shorter n-alkane concentration decreased with increasing inoculation. One time injection of bioaugmentation products into soil clearly improved the biodegradation efficiency higher than injection of bioaugmentation products in turn. Soil temperature also affected TPH degradation rate when it was 30 degrees C, TPH rate reached 80%, where as when it was 20 degrees C, the TPH rate was lower to 60%, which indicated higher temperature improved TPH degradation and accelerated bioremediation.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: from metabolism to lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Chu, Chun; Carlin, Danielle J

    2015-05-01

    Excessive exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) often results in lung cancer, a disease with the highest cancer mortality in the United States. After entry into the lung, PAHs induce phase I metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases, i.e. CYP1A1/2 and 1B1, and phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases, UDP glucuronyl transferases, NADPH quinone oxidoreductases (NQOs), aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), and epoxide hydrolases (EHs), via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent and independent pathways. Humans can also be exposed to PAHs through diet, via consumption of charcoal broiled foods. Metabolism of PAHs through the CYP1A1/1B1/EH pathway, CYP peroxidase pathway, and AKR pathway leads to the formation of the active carcinogens diol-epoxides, radical cations, and o-quinones. These reactive metabolites produce DNA adducts, resulting in DNA mutations, alteration of gene expression profiles, and tumorigenesis. Mutations in xenobiotic metabolic enzymes, as well as polymorphisms of tumor suppressor genes (e.g. p53) and/or genes involved in gene expression (e.g. X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins), are associated with lung cancer susceptibility in human populations from different ethnicities, gender, and age groups. Although various metabolic activation/inactivation pathways, AhR signaling, and genetic susceptibilities contribute to lung cancer, the precise points at which PAHs induce tumor initiation remain unknown. The goal of this review is to provide a current state-of-the-science of the mechanisms of human lung carcinogenesis mediated by PAHs, the experimental approaches used to study this complex class of compounds, and future directions for research of these compounds.

  1. Near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of interstellar hydrocarbon grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sellgren, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present new 3600 - 2700/cm (2.8 - 3.7 micrometer) spectra of objects whose extinction is dominated by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The observations presented here augment an ongoing study of the organic component of the diffuse interstellar medium. These spectra contain a broad feature centered near 3300/cm (3.0 micrometers) and/or a feature with a more complex profile near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers), the latter of which is attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in interstellar grains and is the primary interest of this paper. As in our earlier work, the similarity of the absorption bands near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers) along different lines of sight and the correlation of these features with interstellar extinction reveal that the carrier of this band lies in the dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). At least 2.5% of the cosmic carbon in the local interstellar medium and 4% toward the Galactic center is tied up in the carrier of the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) band. The spectral structure of the diffuse dust hydrocarbon C-H stretch absorption features is reasonably similar to UV photolyzed laboratory ice residues and is quite similar to the carbonaceous component of the Murchison meteorite. The similarity between the DISM and the meteoritic spectrum suggests that some of the interstellar material originally incorporated into the solar nebula may have survived relatively untouched in primitive solar system bodies. Comparisons of the DISM spectrum to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and quenched carbonaceous composite are also presented. The A(sub V)/tau ratio for the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) feature is lower toward the Galactic center than toward sources in the local solar neighborhood (approximately 150 for the Galactic center sources vs. approximately 250 for the local ISM sources). A similar trend has been observed previously for silicates in the diffuse medium by Roche & Aitken, suggesting that (1) the silicate and carbonaceous

  2. A Comprehensive Review of Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation by Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Firouz; Lockington, Robin; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-06-01

    Hydrocarbons are relatively recalcitrant compounds and are classified as high-priority pollutants. However, these compounds are slowly degraded by a large variety of microorganisms. Bacteria are able to degrade aliphatic saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons via both aerobic and anaerobic pathways. Branched hydrocarbons and cyclic hydrocarbons are also degraded by bacteria. The aerobic bacteria use different types of oxygenases, including monooxygenase, cytochrome-dependent oxygenase and dioxygenase, to insert one or two atoms of oxygen into their targets. Anaerobic bacteria, on the other hand, employ a variety of simple organic and inorganic molecules, including sulphate, nitrate, carbonate and metals, for hydrocarbon oxidation.

  3. Mechanism of Silurian Hydrocarbon Pool Formation in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Luofu; Guo Yongqiang; Zhao Yande; Li Yan; Chen Yuanzhuang; Chen Lixin; Pang Xiongqi; Xie Qilai; Huo Hong; Zhao Suping; Li Chao; Li Shuangwen

    2007-01-01

    There are three formation stages of Silurian hydrocarbon pools in the Tarim Basin. The widely distributed asphaltic sandstones in the Tazhong (central Tarim) and Tabei (northern Tarim) areas are the results of destruction of hydrocarbon pools formed in the first-stage, and the asphaltic sandstones around the Awati Sag were formed in the second-stage. The hydrocarbon migration characteristics reflected by the residual dry asphalts could represent the migration characteristics of hydrocarbons in the Silurian paleo-pools, while the present movable oil in the Silurian reservoirs is related to the later-stage (the third-stage) hydrocarbon accumulation.

  4. Current Situation and Application in Coal- Generated Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guang; XU Hongdong

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics and research methods of terrigenous organic hydrocarbon - generated source rock in coal measures are studied in this thesis. After abundance of organic matters, pyrolysis parameter of rocks and hydrocarbon generated capacity of macerals are basically discussed in coal measures of the Cretaceous Muleng- Chengzihe formation in Suibin depression in Sanjang basin, the hydrocarbon generated grade in coal- generated source rock is ascertained in this depression. At last, we think that it is a main attack prospect in coal - generated hydrocarbons study in the future to research the macerals of coal measures organic source rock and to build a criterion to classify the coal- generated hydrocarbons in Northeast region.

  5. Characterization of the transcriptome of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 with the outstanding hydrocarbon-degrading ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yue-Hui; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Chou-Fei; Xiao, Xi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Xian-Xian; Zhou, Qian-Zhi; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2016-06-15

    Microbial remediation has become one of the most important strategies for eliminating petroleum pollutants. Revealing the transcript maps of microorganisms with the hydrocarbon-degrading ability contributes to enhance the degradation of hydrocarbons and further improve the effectiveness of bioremediation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of hydrocarbon-degrading Achromobacter sp. HZ01 after petroleum treatment for 16h. A total of 38,706,280 and 38,954,413 clean reads were obtained by RNA-seq for the petroleum-treated group and control, respectively. By an effective de novo assembly, 3597 unigenes were obtained, including 3485 annotated transcripts. Petroleum treatment had significantly influenced the transcriptional profile of strain HZ01, involving 742 differentially expressed genes. A part of genes were activated to exert specific physiological functions, whereas more genes were down-regulated including specific genes related to cell motility, genes associated with glycometabolism, and genes coding for ribosomal proteins. Identification of genes related to petroleum degradation revealed that the fatty acid metabolic pathway and a part of monooxygenases and dehydrogenases were activated, whereas the TCA cycle was inactive. Additionally, terminal oxidation might be a major aerobic pathway for the degradation of n-alkanes in strain HZ01. The newly obtained data contribute to better understand the gene expression profiles of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms after petroleum treatment, to further investigate the genetic characteristics of strain HZ01 and other related species and to develop cost-effective and eco-friendly strategies for remediation of crude oil-polluted environments.

  6. Receptor Model Source Apportionment of Nonmethane Hydrocarbons in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mugica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of estimating the source contributions of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC to the atmosphere at three different sites in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, 92 ambient air samples were measured from February 23 to March 22 of 1997. Light- and heavy-duty vehicular profiles were determined to differentiate the NMHC contribution of diesel and gasoline to the atmosphere. Food cooking source profiles were also determined for chemical mass balance receptor model application. Initial source contribution estimates were carried out to determine the adequate combination of source profiles and fitting species. Ambient samples of NMHC were apportioned to motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapor, handling and distribution of liquefied petroleum gas (LP gas, asphalt operations, painting operations, landfills, and food cooking. Both gasoline and diesel motor vehicle exhaust were the major NMHC contributors for all sites and times, with a percentage of up to 75%. The average motor vehicle exhaust contributions increased during the day. In contrast, LP gas contribution was higher during the morning than in the afternoon. Apportionment for the most abundant individual NMHC showed that the vehicular source is the major contributor to acetylene, ethylene, pentanes, n-hexane, toluene, and xylenes, while handling and distribution of LP gas was the major source contributor to propane and butanes. Comparison between CMB estimates of NMHC and the emission inventory showed a good agreement for vehicles, handling and distribution of LP gas, and painting operations; nevertheless, emissions from diesel exhaust and asphalt operations showed differences, and the results suggest that these emissions could be underestimated.

  7. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  8. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  9. Sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Nadine V; Cailleaud, Kevin; Bassères, Anne; Liess, Matthias; Beketov, Mikhail A

    2017-09-06

    Hydrocarbons have an utmost economical importance but may also cause substantial ecological impacts due to accidents or inadequate transportation and use. Currently, freshwater biomonitoring methods lack an indicator that can unequivocally reflect the impacts caused by hydrocarbons while being independent from effects of other stressors. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants, which can be used in hydrocarbon-specific bioindicators. We employed the Relative Sensitivity method and developed the sensitivity ranking S hydrocarbons based on literature ecotoxicological data supplemented with rapid and mesocosm test results. A first validation of the sensitivity ranking based on an earlier field study has been conducted and revealed the S hydrocarbons ranking to be promising for application in sensitivity based indicators. Thus, the first results indicate that the ranking can serve as the core component of future hydrocarbon-specific and sensitivity trait based bioindicators.

  10. Hydrocarbon-degradation by Isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline, S. Y. Ting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the potential of isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2 as a hydrocarbon degrader was established. Their biodegradation activity was first detected with the formation of clearing zones on Bushnell-Hass agar plates, with the largest diameter observed on plates supplemented with paraffin, followed by mineral oil and petrol. Utilization of hydrocarbon sources were again detected in broth cultures supplemented with similar hydrocarbon substrates, where the mean viable cell count recovered from hydrocarbon-supplemented broth cultures were higher than the initial inoculum except for napthalene. In both tests, the isolate showed higher degradability towards aliphatic hydrocarbon sources, and the least activity towards the aromatic hydrocarbon naphthalene. The isolate P. lundensis UTAR FPE2 (8 log10 cfu/mL also degraded crude diesel sample, with 69% degradation during the first three days. To conclude, this study suggests the potential use of this isolate for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environments.

  11. Production of hydrocarbons by Aspergillus carbonarius ITEM 5010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Malavika; Sørensen, Annette; Ahamed, Aftab; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2015-04-01

    The filamentous fungus, Asperigillus carbonarius, is able to produce a series of hydrocarbons in liquid culture using lignocellulosic biomasses, such as corn stover and switch grass as carbon source. The hydrocarbons produced by the fungus show similarity to jet fuel composition and might have industrial application. The production of hydrocarbons was found to be dependent on type of media used. Therefore, ten different carbon sources (oat meal, wheat bran, glucose, carboxymethyl cellulose, avicel, xylan, corn stover, switch grass, pretreated corn stover, and pretreated switch grass) were tested to identify the maximum number and quantity of hydrocarbons produced. Several hydrocarbons were produced include undecane, dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane 2,4-dimethylhexane, 4-methylheptane, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl benzene, o-xylene. Oatmeal was found to be the carbon source resulting in the largest amounts of hydrocarbon products. The production of fungal hydrocarbons, especially from lignocellulosic biomasses, holds a great potential for future biofuel production whenever our knowledge on regulators and pathways increases.

  12. Vol. 4 in the series: Site profiles of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons - cause-oriented monitoring in aquatic media; Pestizide aus der Reihe der persistenten chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffe in Gewaessern der Rhein-Region - Ergebnisse nachhaltiger Steuerungen von Wirtschaft und Politik. Bd. 4 der Reihe: Standortprofile persistenter chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2003-07-01

    Evaluating the analytical data of DDT and its metabolites, the isomers of HCH as well as (sometimes) of aldrin and dieldrin in surface water, suspended matter, eels, breams and roaches from the rivers Rhine, Neckar, Kocher, Enz, Main (upto km 360), Weschnitz, Modau, Schwarzbach, Hengstbach, Grundbach, Nidda, Rodau, Kinzig, Werra, Diemel, Lahn, Nahe, Mosel, Sauer, Saar, Ahr, Kyll, Sieg and Laacher See distance profiles (partly from Konstanz till Markermeer) and time series (partly from 1984-2001) were elaborated. The primary data come from about 15 mainly regional investigation departments, the IKSR and the Environmental Specimen Bank. The chemical enterprises in Rheinfelden, Grenzach, Ludwigshafen, Lampertheim, Gernsheim, Darmstadt, Hoechst, Kelsterbach, Offenbach, Ingelheim, Loelsdorf, Leverkusen, Elberfeld, Krefeld-Uerdingen and Huels could partly be made transparent by the course of the sDDT and sHCH values and the profiles of the constituents and isomers, resp., in the distance profiles (especially from the river Rhine) mainly from 1990/92. The corresponding graph for the year 2000 shows that there is no longer a human and ecotoxicological relevance of the compounds to be expected. (orig.)

  13. Changes in serum lipid profiles caused by three regimens of interferon-free direct-acting antivirals for patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takako; Goto, Takaaki; Iio, Etsuko; Matsunami, Kayoko; Fujiwara, Kei; Shinkai, Noboru; Matsuura, Kentaro; Matsui, Takeshi; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-08-19

    As described previously, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) increases during treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with interferon-free direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). We sought to compare the changes of serum lipid profiles caused by three regimens. A total of 216 CHC patients were enrolled. Among 170 patients infected with HCV genotype 1b, 85 received daclatasvir plus asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) and 85 received sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir (SOF/LDV). Forty-six infected with HCV genotype 2 received sofosbuvir plus ribavirin (SOF/RBV). Serum total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) were measured at baseline, 4, 8, 12 (for all regimens) and 24 weeks (for DCV/ASV) during treatment (4w, 8w, 12w and 24w, respectively) and 12 and 24 weeks after treatment (p12w and p24w, respectively). In 69 (81.2%) patients receiving DCV/ASV and achieved a sustained virological response 24 (SVR24), TC and LDL-C increased significantly from baseline to p24w. In 84 (98.8%) receiving SOF/LDV and achieved SVR24, TC and LDL-C increased significantly from baseline to 8w, and TC decreased significantly from 8w to p12w. The 45 (97.8%) receiving SOF/RBV and achieved SVR24 showed no significant changes. At 12w, TC and LDL-C increased to a greater degree in patients receiving SOF/LDV, than those receiving DCV/ASV or SOF/RBV. During treatment with DAAs, the serum lipid profile may reflect not only recovery from the disruption of lipid metabolism induced by HCV, but also the pharmacological effects of DAAs. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the effect of DAAs on serum lipid profiles. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  15. Hydrocarbon contamination in Cartagena Bay, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parga-Lozano, C H; Marrugo-González, A J; Fernández-Maestre, R

    2002-01-01

    This study deals with the levels of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon quantification in sediments and organisms in Cartagena Bay (Colombia), 1996-1997. Sediments (14 stations) and bivalves (2 stations) were monitored at different times of the year. Areas with high values were in the north with concentrations above 100 microg/g with a maximum of 1415 microg/g. Areas with low values were located toward the south, near the outlet of the Canal del Dique and Barú Island, with values below 10 microg/g. In other areas concentrations were between 50 and 100 microg/g. A decrease in sediment concentrations of hydrocarbons has occurred since 1983, but levels in some sectors are still similar to those in polluted areas. Organisms have relatively low values (8-30 microg/g for bivalves, and 10-40 microg/g for fish).

  16. Density functional calculations on hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Selmi, Massimo

    1994-06-01

    Hartree—Fock, Hartree—Fock-plus-correlation and self-consistent Kohn—Sham calculations are performed on a set of hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions, i.e. reactions among hydrocarbons in which the number and type of carbon—carbon and carbon—hydrogen bonds is conserved. It is found that neither Hartree—Fock nor Kohn—Sham methods correctly predict standard enthalpies, Δ Hr(298 K), of these reactions, even though — for reactions involving molecules containing strained double bonds — the agreement between the theoretical estimates and the experimental values of Δ Hr seems to be improved by the self-consistent solution of the Kohn—Sham equations. The remaining discrepancies are attributed to intramolecular dispersion effects, that are not described by ordinary exchange—correlation functionals, and are eliminated by introducing corrections based on a simple semi-empirical model.

  17. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Mehrasbi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenase activity which was assessed by TTC technique, correlated significantly positive with the numbers of microorganisms. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients(r in contaminated soils with gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture were 0.79, 0.80 and 0.69, respectively.

  18. Hydrocarbon potential of the Trinidad area - 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, K.M.

    1978-06-01

    It is recognized that deltaic and associated sands, together with porous marine limestones, form the vast majority of the reservoirs in the major accumulations of hydrocarbons throughout the world. The source of the hydrocarbons is now thought to be kerogen which is generated from the organic content of principally marine shales which are formed in or near the continental shelves. The Trinidad area contains several sedimentary subbasins, most of which consist largely of deltaic and associated sediments. These sediments, like most of the ancient deltas of the world, contain major reserves of oil and gas. Other less important reserves should occur in sporadic (time-wise) porous limestones. The total proven and probable reserves of the Trinidad area are around 5 billion bbl of oil, of which 1.6 billion bbl already have been produced, and over 47 TCF of gas.

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF HYDROCARBON EXPLOITATION IN ARCTIC CIRCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lež

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of large quantities of hydrocarbons is supposed within the Arctic Circle. Assumed quantities are 25% of the total undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves on Earth, mostly natural gas. Over 500 major and minor gas accumulations within the Arctic Circle were discovered so far, but apart from Snøhvit gas field, there is no commercial exploitation of natural gas from these fields. Arctic gas projects are complicated, technically hard to accomplish, and pose a great threat to the return of investment, safety of people and equipment and for the ecosystem. Russia is a country that is closest to the realization of the Arctic gas projects that are based on the giant gas fields. The most extreme weather conditions in the seas around Greenland are the reason why this Arctic region is the least explored and furthest from the realization of any gas project (the paper is published in Croatian .

  20. Behavioral toxicology, risk assessment, and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista de Duffard, A.M.; Duffard, R. [Laboratorio de Toxicologia Experimental, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    Behavioral end points are being used with greater frequency in neurotoxicology to detect and characterize the adverse effects of chemicals on the nervous system. Behavioral measures are particularly important for neurotoxicity risk assessment since many known neurotoxicants do not result in neuropathology. The chlorinated hydrocarbon class consists of a wide variety of chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, clioquinol, trichloroethylene, hexachlorophene, organochlorine insecticides (DDT, dicofol, chlordecone, dieldrin, and lindane), and phenoxyherbicides. Each of these chemicals has effects on motor, sensory, or cognitive function that are detectable using functional measures such as behavior. Furthermore, there is evidence that if exposure occurs during critical periods of development, many of the chlorinated hydrocarbons are developmental neurotoxicants. Developmental neurotoxicity is frequently expressed as alterations in motor function or cognitive abilities or charges in the ontogeny of sensorimotor reflexes. Neurotoxicity risk assessment should include assessments of the full range of possible neurotoxicological effects, including both structural and functional indicators of neurotoxicity. 121 refs., 1 tab.

  1. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  2. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  3. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ghorbanzadeh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  5. Geophysical monitoring in a hydrocarbon reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of hydrocarbons from reservoirs demands ever-increasing technological effort, and there is need for geophysical monitoring to better understand phenomena occurring within the reservoir. Significant deformation processes happen when man-made stimulation is performed, in combination with effects deriving from the existing natural conditions such as stress regime in situ or pre-existing fracturing. Keeping track of such changes in the reservoir is important, on one hand for improving recovery of hydrocarbons, and on the other hand to assure a safe and proper mode of operation. Monitoring becomes particularly important when hydraulic-fracturing (HF) is used, especially in the form of the much-discussed "fracking". HF is a sophisticated technique that is widely applied in low-porosity geological formations to enhance the production of natural hydrocarbons. In principle, similar HF techniques have been applied in Europe for a long time in conventional reservoirs, and they will probably be intensified in the near future; this suggests an increasing demand in technological development, also for updating and adapting the existing monitoring techniques in applied geophysics. We review currently available geophysical techniques for reservoir monitoring, which appear in the different fields of analysis in reservoirs. First, the properties of the hydrocarbon reservoir are identified; here we consider geophysical monitoring exclusively. The second step is to define the quantities that can be monitored, associated to the properties. We then describe the geophysical monitoring techniques including the oldest ones, namely those in practical usage from 40-50 years ago, and the most recent developments in technology, within distinct groups, according to the application field of analysis in reservoir. This work is performed as part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu); this project, funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, aims at helping minimize the

  6. Terpene hydrocarbons in Pimpinella anisum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, G; Reichling, J; Martin, R; Becker, H

    1986-06-20

    The essential oil of anise (fruits and shoots) was investigated focusing on the composition of the hydrocarbon fraction. Several sesquiterpenes were identified by GC-MS and the relative composition of the fractions was established by GC analysis. gamma-Himachalene and the diterpene neophytadiene were isolated by TLC and column chromatography at low temperatures. Their structures were determined by MS and NMR including 1H-1H correlated COSY and NOE experiments.

  7. Supercritical Hydrocarbon Impinging Injector Simulation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    PC Beowulf cluster that was purchased under a previous AFOSR Grant (F49620-01-1-0432) managed by Dr. Mitat Birkan. The cluster consists of 22 Intel...computing cluster allows simulations to be conducted in a sufficiently short time period to allow investigation of the effects of operating conditions...hydrocarbon propellants are of interest to the next generation of liquid propellant rocket engines. The procured high performance computing cluster allows

  8. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Separations Using Functionalized Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The functionalization of the side chains on the cation or the anion of an ionic liquid is a common approach to tailor its properties for different processes including the separation of gases. In this paper, we present the current state of the art concerning the usage of ionic liquids for hydrocarbon separations. We also show how the functionalization of ionic liquids or the appropriate anion/cation combinations can contribute to the increase of the performance of the ionic liquids for the sep...

  9. NEW TRENDS IN ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR BIOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M.; Sonia eMulero-Navarro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally considered as a critical intermediate in the toxic and carcinogenic response to dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), the Aryl hydrocarbon/Dioxin receptor (AhR) has proven to be also an important regulator of cell physiology and organ homeostasis. AhR has become an interesting and actual area of research mainly boosted by a significant number of recent studies analyzing its contribution to the proper functioning of the immune, hepatic, cardiovascular, vascular and ...

  10. New Trends in Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Mulero-navarro, Sonia; Fernandez-Salguero, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally considered as a critical intermediate in the toxic and carcinogenic response to dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), the Aryl hydrocarbon/Dioxin receptor (AhR) has proven to be also an important regulator of cell physiology and organ homeostasis. AhR has become an interesting and actual area of research mainly boosted by a significant number of recent studies analyzing its contribution to the proper functioning of the immune, hepatic, cardiovascular, vascular and ...

  11. Selfish strategies and honest signalling: reproductive conflicts in ant queen associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Dreier, Stephanie; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Social insects offer unique opportunities to test predictions regarding the evolution of cooperation, life histories and communication. Colony founding by groups of unrelated queens, some of which are later killed, may select for selfish reproductive strategies, honest signalling and punishment....... Here, we use a brood transfer experiment to test whether cofounding queens of the ant Lasius niger 'selfishly' adjust their productivity when sharing the nest with future competitors. We simultaneously analysed queen cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles to investigate whether queens honestly signal...

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils of Beijing and Tianjin region: vertical distribution, correlation with TOC and transport mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fengpeng; ZHANG Zhihuan; WAN Yunyang; LU Song; WANG Liang; BU Qingwei

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations and compositions of 20 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) were investigated in 16 soil profiles of Beijing and Tianjin region. Transport of high molecular weight PAHs (HMWPAHs) and correlation between total organic carbon (TOC) and the concentrations were also discussed. The results indicated that highly contaminated sites were located at urban or wastewater irrigation areas and pollutants mainly accumulated in topsoil (<40 cm), with a sharp content decrease at the vertical boundary of 30--40 cm. Total PAHs/HAHs concentrations in soils from Tianjin were markedly greater than those from Beijing. Even the contents at bottoms of soil profiles in Tianjin were higher than those in topsoils of Beijing soil profile. HMWPAHs (4-6 rings PAHs) dominated the PAH profiles, exhibiting a uniform distribution of pyrogenic origin between topsoils and deep layers. Furthermore, the percentages of HMWPAHs remained relative constant with the depth of soil profiles, which were consistent with the distribution of particulate matter-associated PAHs in the local atmospheric environments. Therefore, HMWPAHs transport with particulates might be the predominant source found in soil profiles.

  13. Statistical Method of Estimating Nigerian Hydrocarbon Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey O. Oseh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon reserves are basic to planning and investment decisions in Petroleum Industry. Therefore its proper estimation is of considerable importance in oil and gas production. The estimation of hydrocarbon reserves in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria has been very popular, and very successful, in the Nigerian oil and gas industry for the past 50 years. In order to fully estimate the hydrocarbon potentials in Nigerian Niger Delta Region, a clear understanding of the reserve geology and production history should be acknowledged. Reserves estimation of most fields is often performed through Material Balance and Volumetric methods. Alternatively a simple Estimation Model and Least Squares Regression may be useful or appropriate. This model is based on extrapolation of additional reserve due to exploratory drilling trend and the additional reserve factor which is due to revision of the existing fields. This Estimation model used alongside with Linear Regression Analysis in this study gives improved estimates of the fields considered, hence can be used in other Nigerian Fields with recent production history

  14. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  15. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Heterogeneous Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin; Paul Fallgren; Terry Brown

    2006-03-02

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with the University of Wyoming, Department of Renewable Resources and the U.S. Department of Energy, under Task 35, conducted a laboratory-scale study of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates versus a variety of physical and chemical parameters to develop a base model. By using this model, biodegradation of Petroleum hydrocarbons in heterogeneous soils can be predicted. The base model, as developed in this study, have been tested by both field and laboratory data. Temperature, pH, and nutrients appear to be the key parameters that can be incorporate into the model to predict biodegradation rates. Results to date show the effect of soil texture and source on the role of each parameter in the rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation. Derived from the existing study, an alternative approach of using CO{sub 2} accumulation data has been attempted by our collaborators at the University of Wyoming. The model has been modified and fine tuned by incorporating these data to provide more information on biodegradation.

  16. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in chalk reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, L.

    1996-12-31

    The present work is a study on the wettability of hydrocarbon bearing chalk reservoirs. Wettability is a major factor that influences flow, location and distribution of oil and water in the reservoir. The wettability of the hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. Organic compounds such as carboxylic acids are found in formation waters from various hydrocarbon reservoirs and in crude oils. In the present investigation the wetting behaviour of chalk is studied by the adsorption of the carboxylic acids onto synthetic calcite, kaolinite, quartz, {alpha}-alumina, and chalk dispersed in an aqueous phase and an organic phase. In the aqueous phase the results clearly demonstrate the differences between the adsorption behaviour of benzoic acid and hexanoic acid onto the surfaces of oxide minerals and carbonates. With NaCl concentration of 0.1 M and with pH {approx_equal} 6 the maximum adsorption of benzoic acid decreases in the order: quartz, {alpha}-alumina, kaolinite. For synthetic calcite and chalk no detectable adsorption was obtaind. In the organic phase the order is reversed. The maximum adsorption of benzoic acid onto the different surfaces decreases in the order: synthetic calcite, chalk, kaolinite and quartz. Also a marked difference in adsorption behaviour between probes with different functional groups onto synthetic calcite from organic phase is observed. The maximum adsorption decreases in the order: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine. (au) 54 refs.

  17. Biofiltration of gasoline and diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halecky, Martin; Rousova, Jana; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii; Seames, Wayne; Jones, Kim

    2015-02-01

    The ability of a biofilm to switch between the mixtures of mostly aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons was investigated to assess biofiltration efficiency and potential substrate interactions. A switch from gasoline, which consisted of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, to a mixture of volatile diesel n-alkanes resulted in a significant increase in biofiltration efficiency, despite the lack of readily biodegradable aromatic hydrocarbons in the diesel mixture. This improved biofilter performance was shown to be the result of the presence of larger size (C₉-C(12)) linear alkanes in diesel, which turned out to be more degradable than their shorter-chain (C₆-C₈) homologues in gasoline. The evidence obtained from both biofiltration-based and independent microbiological tests indicated that the rate was limited by biochemical reactions, with the inhibition of shorter chain alkane biodegradation by their larger size homologues as corroborated by a significant substrate specialization along the biofilter bed. These observations were explained by the lack of specific enzymes designed for the oxidation of short-chain alkanes as opposed to their longer carbon chain homologues.

  18. Initial microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are very hazardous environmental pollutants because of their mutagenic, carcinogenic and toxic effects on living systems. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the ability and efficiency of selected bacterial isolates obtained from oil-contaminated areas to biodegrade PAHs. The potential of the bacteria to biodegrade various aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed using the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol assay. Further biodegradation of PAHs was monitored by gravimetric and gas-chromatographic analysis. Among the eight bacterial isolates, identified on the basis of 16S rDNA sequences, two isolates, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, had the ability to grow on and utilize almost all examined hydrocarbons. Those isolates were further examined for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene, as single substrates, and as a mixture, in vitro for ten days. After three days, both isolates degraded a significant amount phenanthrene, which has a simpler chemical structure than pyrene. Planomicrobium sp.RNP01 commenced biodegradation of pyrene in the PAH mixture only after it had almost completly degraded phenanthrene. The isolated and characterized bacteria, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, have shown high bioremediation potential and are likely candidates to be used for degradation of highly toxic PAHs in contaminated areas. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43004

  19. Light color, low softening point hydrocarbon resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.L.; Hentges, S.G.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon resin having a softening point of from 0{degrees} C to about 40{degrees} C, a Gardner color of about 7 or less, a number average molecular weight (Mn) of from about 100 to about 600, and a M{sub {ital w}}/M{sub {ital n}} ratio of from about 1.1 to about 2.7, prepared by Friedel Crafts polymerization of a hydrocarbon feed. It comprises: from about 5% to about 75% by weight of a C{sub 8} to C{sub 10} vinyl aromatic hydrocarbon stream; up to about 35% by weight of a piperylene stream; and from about 25% to about 70% by weight of a stream containing C{sub 4} to C{sub 8} monoolefin chain transfer agent of the formula RR{prime}C {double bond} CR{double prime}R triple{prime} where R and R{prime} are C{sub 1} to C{sub 5} alkyl, R{double prime} and R triple{prime} are independently selected from H and a C{sub 1} to C{sub 4} alkyl group.

  20. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Separations Using Functionalized Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura Leila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functionalization of the side chains on the cation or the anion of an ionic liquid is a common approach to tailor its properties for different processes including the separation of gases. In this paper, we present the current state of the art concerning the usage of ionic liquids for hydrocarbon separations. We also show how the functionalization of ionic liquids or the appropriate anion/cation combinations can contribute to the increase of the performance of the ionic liquids for the separation of gaseous hydrocarbons – either by improving the capacity of the ionic liquid to absorb a given gas or by increasing the selectivity towards a particular hydrocarbon. Original results concerning the usage of olefin-complexing metal salts of lithium (I, nickel (II and copper (II dissolved in ionic liquids for selectively absorbing light olefins are presented. It is observed that the absorption capacity of an imidazolium-based ionic liquid is doubled by the addition of a copper (II salt. This result is compared with the effect of the functionalization of the ionic liquid and the advantages and difficulties of the two approaches are analyzed.

  1. Thermal Adsorption Processing Of Hydrocarbon Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudad H. Al.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The raw materials of secondary catalytic processes must be pre-refined. Among these refining processes are the deasphalting and demetallization including their thermo adsorption or thermo-contact adsorption variety. In oil processing four main processes of thermo-adsorption refining of hydrocarbon residues are used ART Asphalt Residual Treating - residues deasphaltizing 3D Discriminatory Destructive Distillation developed in the US ACT Adsorption-Contact Treatment and ETCC Express Thermo-Contact Cracking developed in Russia. ART and ACT are processes with absorbers of lift type reactor while 3D and ETCC processes are with an adsorbing reactor having ultra-short contact time of the raw material with the adsorbent. In all these processes refining of hydrocarbon residues is achieved by partial Thermo-destructive transformations of hydrocarbons and hetero-atomic compounds with simultaneous adsorption of the formed on the surface of the adsorbents resins asphaltene and carboids as well as metal- sulphur - and nitro-organic compounds. Demetallized and deasphalted light and heavy gas oils or their mixtures are a quality raw material for secondary deepening refining processes catalytic and hydrogenation cracking etc. since they are characterized by low coking ability and low content of organometallic compounds that lead to irreversible deactivation of the catalysts of these deepening processes.

  2. An apparatus for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-03-23

    The installation for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv) with the formation of a mixture of H2 and C02 is a catalyst chamber (KK) filled with longitudinally disposed thin pipes (with thin walls) or with pipe units made of dolomite, MgO or potassium aluminate. These pipes have a multilayered coating (Pk) on their internal and external surfaces (Pv), which contain catalytically active components. Such pipes or pipe units form a honeycombed structure with through longitudinal channels. The catalyst chamber itself is made of a ceramic material and has a heating winding outside for heating the catalyst. To save fuel and to increase the efficiency (KPD) of the heating device, the catalyst chamber is in turn enclosed by two additional shells filled with heat conducting packings which are easily penetrated by the gases being processed. The hydrocarbon vapors or gaseous fuel from the natural gas or methane and the steam are fed through the above cited heat exchange layers with packings into the facial part of the catalytic chamber, in which the conversion of the hydrocarbons occurs with the production of H2 and C02. From the catalyzer layer the mixture of gases and steam goes through a refrigerator into a trap for the steam excess and when it is necessary, into a C02 absorber and then, pure H2 is discharged from the latter. Such a catalytic installation is convenient to use for producing pure H2 from natural gas, methane, propane or kerosene.

  3. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-03

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  4. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, R; Schinner, F

    2001-09-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure, Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited.

  5. Assessing impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in weathered contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetutu, Eric; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Dandie, Catherine E; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2013-10-15

    In this study, impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils were assessed using chemical and molecular methodologies. Two long-term hydrocarbon contaminated soils were utilised which were similar in physico-chemical properties but differed in the extent of hydrocarbon (C10-C40) contamination (S1: 16.5 g kg(-1); S2: 68.9 g kg(-1)). Under enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) conditions, hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed in S1 microcosms (26.4% reduction in C10-C40 hydrocarbons), however, ENA was unable to stimulate degradation in S2. Although eubacterial communities (PCR-DGGE analysis) were similar for both soils, the alkB bacterial community was less diverse in S2 presumably due to impacts associated with elevated hydrocarbons. When hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed using HP-β-CD extraction, large residual concentrations remained in the soil following the extraction procedure. However, when linear regression models were used to predict the endpoints of hydrocarbon degradation, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between HP-β-CD predicted and microcosm measured biodegradation endpoints. This data suggested that the lack of hydrocarbon degradation in S2 resulted primarily from limited hydrocarbon bioavailability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margesin, R.; Schinner, F. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie

    2001-07-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure. Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited. (orig.)

  7. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  8. Quantum profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    For the prominent science writer Jeremy Bernstein, the profile is the most congenial way of communicating science. Here, in what he labels a "series of conversations carried on in the reader's behalf and my own," he evokes the tremendous intellectual excitement of the world of modern physics, especially the quantum revolution. Drawing on his well-known talent for explaining the most complex scientific ideas for the layperson, Bernstein gives us a lively sense of what the issues of quantum mechanics are and of various ways in which individual physicists approached them.The author begins this se

  9. Societies drifting apart? Behavioural, genetic and chemical differentiation between supercolonies in the yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Drescher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In populations of most social insects, gene flow is maintained through mating between reproductive individuals from different colonies in periodic nuptial flights followed by dispersal of the fertilized foundresses. Some ant species, however, form large polygynous supercolonies, in which mating takes place within the maternal nest (intranidal mating and fertilized queens disperse within or along the boundary of the supercolony, leading to supercolony growth (colony budding. As a consequence, gene flow is largely confined within supercolonies. Over time, such supercolonies may diverge genetically and, thus, also in recognition cues (cuticular hydrocarbons, CHC's by a combination of genetic drift and accumulation of colony-specific, neutral mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested this hypothesis for six supercolonies of the invasive ant Anoplolepis gracilipes in north-east Borneo. Within supercolonies, workers from different nests tolerated each other, were closely related and showed highly similar CHC profiles. Between supercolonies, aggression ranged from tolerance to mortal encounters and was negatively correlated with relatedness and CHC profile similarity. Supercolonies were genetically and chemically distinct, with mutually aggressive supercolony pairs sharing only 33.1%±17.5% (mean ± SD of their alleles across six microsatellite loci and 73.8%±11.6% of the compounds in their CHC profile. Moreover, the proportion of alleles that differed between supercolony pairs was positively correlated to the proportion of qualitatively different CHC compounds. These qualitatively differing CHC compounds were found across various substance classes including alkanes, alkenes and mono-, di- and trimethyl-branched alkanes. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that positive feedback between genetic, chemical and behavioural traits may further enhance supercolony differentiation through genetic drift and neutral evolution, and may drive

  10. Hydrocarbons in surface sediments from a Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylinski, D.A.; Farrington, J.W.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    Petroleum-like materials found at the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site (Gulf of California) are derived from pyrolysis of organic matter. Two characteristics surface sediment cores differing in temperature profiles and other parameters were collected by DSV ALVIN, sectioned, and analyzed for hydrocarbons. The quantitative and qualitative composition of alkanes, steranes, diasteranes, and triterpanes differed between these cores as well as within sections of the same core. These differences, apparent for scales of tens of centimeters, are related to interactive physical, chemical, and microbial processes as well as the influence of multiple sources for the petroleum.

  11. Hydrocarbons in surface sediments from a Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylinski, D.A.; Farrington, J.W.; Jannasch, H.W. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Petroleum-like materials found at the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site (Gulf of California) are derived from pyrolysis of organic matter. Two characteristic surface sediment cores differing in temperature profiles and other parameters were collected by DSV ALVIN, sectioned and analyzed for hydrocarbons. The quantitative and qualitative composition of alkanes, steranes, diasteranes, and triterpanes differed between these cores as well as within sections of the same core. These differences, apparent for scales of tens of centimeters, are related to interactive physical, chemical, and microbial processes as well as the influence of multiple sources for the petroleum.

  12. Modification of cell surface properties of Pseudomonas alcaligenes S22 during hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Moszyńska, Sylwia; Olszanowski, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    Biodegradation of water insoluble hydrocarbons can be significantly increased by the addition of natural surfactants one. Very promising option is the use of saponins. The obtained results indicated that in this system, after 21 days, 92% biodegradation of diesel oil could be achieved using Pseudomonas alcaligenes. No positive effect on the biodegradation process was observed using synthetic surfactant Triton X-100. The kind of carbon source influences the cell surface properties of microorganisms. Modification of the surface cell could be observed by control of the sedimentation profile. This analytical method is a new approach in microbiological analysis.

  13. Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Primerano, Roberto; Zannetti, Paolo

    2006-03-01

    A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory.

  14. Detection of new hydrocarbon reservoir using hydrocarbon microtremor combined attribute analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Dimmas; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Afnimar, Akbar, Muhammad Fadhillah; Mulyanagara, Guntur

    2013-09-01

    An increasing demand for oil and gas production undoubtedly triggered innovation in exploration studies to find new hydrocarbon reservoir. Low-frequency passive seismic method named Hy MAS (Hydrocarbon Microtremor Analysis) is a new method invented and developed recently by Spectraseis which provide a quick look to find new hydrocarbon reservoir prospect area. This method based on empirical study which investigated an increasing of spectra anomaly between 2 - 4 Hz above reservoir but missing from the measurement distant from the reservoir. This method is quite promising because it has been used as another DHI (Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator) instead of active seismic survey which has some problem when applied in sensitive biomes. Another advantage is this method is completely passive and does not require seismic artificial excitation sources. In this study, by utilizing many attributes mentioned in the latest publication of this method, we try to localize new hydrocarbon prospect area outside from the proven production field. We deployed 63 stations of measurement with two of them are located above the known reservoir production site. We measured every single attribute for each data acquired from all station and mapped it spatially for better understanding and interpretation. The analysis has been made by considering noise identification from the measurement location and controlled by the attribute values from the data acquired by two stations above the reservoir. As the result, we combined each attribute analysis and mapped it in weighted-scoring map which provide the level of consistency for every single attribute calculated in each station. Finally, the new reservoir location can be suggested by the station which has a weighted-score around the values from the two production reservoir stations. We successfully identified 5 new stations which expected to have good prospect of hydrocarbon reservoir.

  15. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  16. Novel Photocatalytic Reactor Development for Removal of Hydrocarbons from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Adams

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons contamination of the marine environment generated by the offshore oil and gas industry is generated from a number of sources including oil contaminated drill cuttings and produced waters. The removal of hydrocarbons from both these sources is one of the most significant challenges facing this sector as it moves towards zero emissions. The application of a number of techniques which have been used to successfully destroy hydrocarbons in produced water and waste water effluents has previously been reported. This paper reports the application of semiconductor photocatalysis as a final polishing step for the removal of hydrocarbons from two waste effluent sources. Two reactor concepts were considered: a simple flat plate immobilised film unit, and a new rotating drum photocatalytic reactor. Both units proved to be effective in removing residual hydrocarbons from the effluent with the drum reactor reducing the hydrocarbon content by 90% under 10 minutes.

  17. Geochemical markers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvent extracts from diesel engine particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiańska, Monika; Kozielska, Barbara; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Woodburn, Joseph; Konieczyński, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exhaust particulate from compression ignition (CI) engines running on engine and chassis dynamometers was studied. Particulate dichloromethane extracts were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomarkers by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). PAH group profiles were made and the PAH group shares according to the number of rings (2 or 3; 4; 5 or more) as well as diagnostic indices were calculated. Values of geochemical ratios of selected biomarkers and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons were compared with literature values. A geochemical interpretation was carried out using these values and biomarker and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbon distributions. It has been shown that geochemical features are unequivocally connected to the emission of fossil fuels and biofuels burned in CI engines. The effect of the exothermic combustion process is limited to low-molecular-weight compounds, which shows that the applied methodology permits source identification of PAHs coexisting in the particulate emitted.

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid regulates gene expression in HUVEC cells treated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna; Czepiel, Jacek; Totoń-Żurańska, Justyna; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Perucki, William; Wołkow, Paweł

    2015-07-16

    The molecular mechanism of inflammation and carcinogenesis induced by exposure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not clearly understood. Our study was undertaken due to the strong pro-carcinogenic potential and reactivity of PAH-metabolites, as well as the susceptibility of polyunsaturated fatty acids to oxidation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pro- or anti-inflammatory impact of n-3 docosahexaenoic acid on human primary umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We analysed the influence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or PAHs supplementation on the fatty acid profile of cell membranes, on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and glutathione S transferase Mu1 (GSTM1) protein expression as well as on the prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2), AHR, GSTM1, PLA2G4A, and cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 gene expression. We observed that COX-2 and AHR protein expression was increased while GSTM1 expression was decreased in cells exposed to DHA and PAHs. Docosahexaenoic acid down-regulated CYP1A1 and up-regulated the AHR and PTGS2 genes. Our findings suggested that DHA contributes significantly to alleviate the harmful effects caused by PAHs in endothelial cells. Moreover, these results suggest that a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids is helpful to reduce the harmful effects of PAHs exposure on human living in heavily polluted areas.

  19. Comprehensive analytical methodology to determine hydrocarbons in marine waters using extraction disks coupled to glass fiber filters and compound-specific isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternon, Eva; Tolosa, Imma

    2015-07-24

    Solid-phase extraction of both aliphatic (AHs) and aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from seawater samples was evaluated using a GFF filter stacked upon an octadecyl bonded silica (C18) disk. Stable-isotope measurements were developed on hydrocarbons extracted from both GFF and C18-disks in order to characterize the source of hydrocarbons. A clear partition of hydrocarbon compounds between the dissolved and the particulate phase was highlighted. PAHs showed a higher affinity with the dissolved phase (recoveries efficiency of 48-71%) whereas AHs presented strong affinity with the particulate phase (up to 76% of extraction efficiency). Medium volumes of seawater samples were tested and no breakthrough was observed for a 5L sample. Isotopic fractionation was investigated within all analytical steps but none was evidenced. This method has been applied to harbor seawater samples and very low AH and PAH concentrations were achieved. Due to the low concentration levels of hydrocarbons in the samples, the source of hydrocarbons was determined by molecular indices rather than isotopic measurements and a pyrolytic origin was evidenced. The aliphatic profile also revealed the presence of long-chain linear alkylbenzenes (LABs). The methodology presented here would better fit to polluted coastal environments affected by recent oil spills.

  20. In vitro toxicological characterisation of three arsenic-containing hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Francesconi, Kevin; Meyer, S. de; Matissek, M.; Müller, S. M.; Taleshi, M. S.; Ebert, F.; Schwerdtle, T. (Tanja)

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic-containing hydrocarbons are one group of fat-soluble organic arsenic compounds (arsenolipids) found in marine fish and other seafood. A risk assessment of arsenolipids is urgently needed, but has not been possible because of the total lack of toxicological data. In this study the cellular toxicity of three arsenic-containing hydrocarbons was investigated in cultured human bladder (UROtsa) and liver (HepG2) cells. Cytotoxicity of the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons was comparable to th...

  1. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons Using Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong

    2007-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H', CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The process of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was investigated. The experiment showed that the time and conditions of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation were different. Methane conversion rate increased with the increase in the current and decrease in the amount of methane. Furthermore, an examination of the reaction mechanisms revealed that free radicals played an important role in the chain reaction.

  2. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  3. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  4. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons From Voyager and Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Romani, Paul N; Allen, Mark; Zhang, Xi; Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Flasar, F Michael; 10.1016/j.pss2010.05.08

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes. We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on the other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibi...

  5. Alternative Hydrocarbon Propulsion for Nano / Micro Launch Vehicle Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical innovation proposed here is the application of an alternative hydrocarbon fuel – densified propylene, in combination with liquid oxygen (LOX)...

  6. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  7. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: catabolic genes, microbial communities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Méndez, Valentina; Aguila, Patricia; Seeger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Bioremediation is an environmental sustainable and cost-effective technology for the cleanup of hydrocarbon-polluted soils and coasts. In spite of that longer times are usually required compared with physicochemical strategies, complete degradation of the pollutant can be achieved, and no further confinement of polluted matrix is needed. Microbial aerobic degradation is achieved by the incorporation of molecular oxygen into the inert hydrocarbon molecule and funneling intermediates into central catabolic pathways. Several families of alkane monooxygenases and ring hydroxylating dioxygenases are distributed mainly among Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi strains. Catabolic routes, regulatory networks, and tolerance/resistance mechanisms have been characterized in model hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to understand and optimize their metabolic capabilities, providing the basis to enhance microbial fitness in order to improve hydrocarbon removal. However, microbial communities taken as a whole play a key role in hydrocarbon pollution events. Microbial community dynamics during biodegradation is crucial for understanding how they respond and adapt to pollution and remediation. Several strategies have been applied worldwide for the recovery of sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. Common strategies include controlling environmental variables (e.g., oxygen availability, hydrocarbon solubility, nutrient balance) and managing hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, in order to overcome the rate-limiting factors that slow down hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  8. Enzymes for fatty acid-based hydrocarbon biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Nicolaus A; Zhang, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    Surging energy consumption and environmental concerns have stimulated interest in the production of chemicals and fuels through sustainable and renewable approaches. Fatty acid-based hydrocarbons, such as alkanes and alkenes, are of particular interest to directly replace fossil fuels. Towards this effort, understanding of hydrocarbon-producing enzymes is the first indispensable step to bio-production of hydrocarbons. Here, we review recent advances in the discovery and mechanistic study of enzymes capable of converting fatty acid precursors into hydrocarbons, and provide perspectives on the future of this rapidly growing field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Process for making unsaturated hydrocarbons using microchannel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Yuschak, Thomas; LaPlante, Timothy J.; Rankin, Scott; Perry, Steven T.; Fitzgerald, Sean Patrick; Simmons, Wayne W.; Mazanec, Terry Daymo, Eric

    2011-04-12

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for converting a feed composition comprising one or more hydrocarbons to a product comprising one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons, the process comprising: flowing the feed composition and steam in contact with each other in a microchannel reactor at a temperature in the range from about 200.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to convert the feed composition to the product, the process being characterized by the absence of catalyst for converting the one or more hydrocarbons to one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons. Hydrogen and/or oxygen may be combined with the feed composition and steam.

  10. GC estimation of organic hydrocarbons that threaten shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawrah, M F; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; El-Sayed, E; Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Tantawy, M A

    2014-11-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination is one of the important environmental problems at petroleum-related sites, which causes critical environmental and health defects. Severe petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from coastal refinery plant was detected in a shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer is bordered by Gulf in the Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The overall objective of this investigation is to estimate the organic hydrocarbons in shallow sandy aquifers, released from continuous major point-source of pollution over a long period of time (91 years ago). This oil refinery contamination resulted mainly in the improper disposal of hydrocarbons and produced water releases caused by equipment failures, vandalism, and accidents that caused direct groundwater pollution or discharge into the gulf. In order to determine the fate of hydrocarbons, detailed field investigations were made to provide intensive deep profile information. Eight composite randomly sediment samples from a test plot were selected for demonstration. The tested plot was 50 m long × 50 m wide × 70 cm deep. Sediment samples were collected using an American auger around the point 29° 57' 33″ N and 32° 30' 40″ E in 2012 and covered an area of 2,500 m(2) which represents nearly 1/15 of total plant area (the total area of the plant is approximately 3.250 km(2)). The detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were 2.44, 2.62, 4.54, 4.78, 2.83, 3.22, 2.56, and 3.13 wt%, respectively. TPH was calculated by differences in weight and subjected to gas chromatography (GC). Hydrocarbons were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard (HP-7890 plus) gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The percentage of paraffine of the investigated TPH samples was 7.33, 7.24, 7.58, 8.25, 10.25, 9.89, 14.77, and 17.53 wt%, respectively.

  11. A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential established based on dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A large number of oilfield water samples were analyzed in this work. Research on the relationship between the concentrations and distribution of dissolved hydrocarbons sug gested that the contents and composition of dissolved hydrocarbons varied with the hydrocar bon-generating potential of reservoirs. The concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbons were low in dry layers, water layers and gas-water layers, but high in gas reservoirs and oil reservoirs, especially in gas reservoirs with condensed oil. Series of carbon-number alkanes were usually absent in oilfield water from dry layers, water layers and gas-water layers but abundant in oil field water from oil-water reservoirs, gas reservoirs and oil reservoirs, whose carbon numbers varied most widely in oil reservoirs and least in gas reservoirs. A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential was established based on the characteristics of dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water to assist hydrocarbon exploration.

  12. Kinetic study of the hydrocarbon generation from marine carbonate source rocks characterization of products of gas and liquid hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Xinhua; GENG Ansong; XIONG Yongqiang; LIU Jinzhong; ZHANG Haizu; ZHAO Qingfang

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation from the marine carbonate source rocks were determined and calibrated through kinetic simulating experiment. The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation then were extrapolated to geological condition by using the relative software.The result shows that gaseous hydrocarbons (C1, C2,C3, C4-5) were generated in condition of 150℃<T<220℃(1.0%<Ro <3.0% ). Light hydrocarbons (C6-13)and heavy hydrocarbons ( C13+) were generated in condition of 100 ℃<T<170 ℃ (0.5%<Ro<1.5%). A quantitative reference to examine the natural evolution of hydrocarbon of marine carbonate source rocks can be established through the results. It also provides a new method for evaluating the highly mature marine carbonate source rock more reasonably.

  13. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  14. Hydrocarbons on Saturn's satellites Iapetus and Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Wegryn, E.; Dalle, Ore C.M.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Pendleton, Y.J.; Owen, T.C.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Capaccioni, F.; Jaumann, R.; Nelson, R.M.; Baines, K.H.; Sotin, C.; Bellucci, G.; Combes, M.; Langevin, Y.; Sicardy, B.; Matson, D.L.; Formisano, V.; Drossart, P.; Mennella, V.

    2008-01-01

    Material of low geometric albedo (pV ??? 0.1) is found on many objects in the outer Solar System, but its distribution in the saturnian satellite system is of special interest because of its juxtaposition with high-albedo ice. In the absence of clear, diagnostic spectral features, the composition of this low-albedo (or "dark") material is generally inferred to be carbon-rich, but the form(s) of the carbon is unknown. Near-infrared spectra of the low-albedo hemisphere of Saturn's satellite Iapetus were obtained with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at the fly-by of that satellite of 31 December 2004, yielding a maximum spatial resolution on the satellite's surface of ???65 km. The spectral region 3-3.6 ??m reveals a broad absorption band, centered at 3.29 ??m, and concentrated in a region comprising about 15% of the low-albedo surface area. This is identified as the C{single bond}H stretching mode vibration in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Two weaker bands attributed to {single bond}CH2{single bond} stretching modes in aliphatic hydrocarbons are found in association with the aromatic band. The bands most likely arise from aromatic and aliphatic units in complex macromolecular carbonaceous material with a kerogen- or coal-like structure, similar to that in carbonaceous meteorites. VIMS spectra of Phoebe, encountered by Cassini on 11 June 2004, also show the aromatic hydrocarbon band, although somewhat weaker than on Iapetus. The origin of the PAH molecular material on these two satellites is unknown, but PAHs are found in carbonaceous meteorites, cometary dust particles, circumstellar dust, and interstellar dust. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of seismic monitoring in hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing (HF) is widely considered as one of the most significant enablers of the successful exploitation of hydrocarbons in North America. Massive usage of HF is currently adopted to increase the permeability in shale and tight-sand deep reservoirs, despite the economical downturn. The exploitation success is less due to the subsurface geology, but in technology that improves exploration, production, and decision-making. This includes monitoring of the reservoir, which is vital. Indeed, the general mindset in the industry is to keep enhancing seismic monitoring. It allows understanding and tracking processes in hydrocarbon reservoirs, which serves two purposes, a) to optimize recovery, and b) to help minimize environmental impact. This raises the question of how monitoring, and especially seismic techniques could be more efficient. There is a pressing demand from seismic service industry to evolve quickly and to meet the oil-gas industry's changing needs. Nonetheless, the innovative monitoring techniques, to achieve the purpose, must enhance the characterization or the visualization of a superior-quality images of the reservoir. We discuss recent applications of seismic monitoring in hydrocarbon reservoirs, detailing potential enhancement and eventual limitations. The aim is to test the validity of these seismic monitoring techniques, qualitatively discuss their potential application to energy fields that are not only limited to HF. Outcomes from our investigation may benefit operators and regulators in case of future massive HF applications in Europe, as well. This work is part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu), funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, whose aims is to help minimize the environmental footprint of the shale-gas exploration and exploitation.

  16. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  17. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  18. Hydrogen Abstraction from Hydrocarbons by NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Kamal; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Gore, Jeff; Westmoreland, Phillip R; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2017-03-23

    This contribution investigates thermokinetic parameters of bimolecular gas-phase reactions involving the amine (NH2) radical and a large number of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. These reactions play an important role in combustion and pyrolysis of nitrogen-rich fuels, most notably biomass. Computations performed at the CBS-QB3 level and based on the conventional transition-state theory yield potential-energy surfaces and reaction rate constants, accounting for tunnelling effects and the presence of hindered rotors. In an analogy to other H abstraction systems, we demonstrate only a small influence of variational effects on the rate constants for selected reaction. The studied reactions cover the abstraction of hydrogen atoms by the NH2 radical from the C-H bonds in C1-C4 species, and four C5 hydrocarbons of 2-methylbutane, 2-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-2-butene, and 3-methyl-1-butyne. For the abstraction of H from methane, in the temperature windows 300-500 and 1600-2000 K, the calculated reaction rate constants concur with the available experimental measurements, i.e., kcalculated/kexperimetal = 0.3-2.5 and 1.1-1.4, and the previous theoretical estimates. Abstraction of H atom from ethane attains the ratio of kcalculated/kexperimetal equal to 0.10-1.2 and 1.3-1.5 over the temperature windows of available experimental measurements, i.e., 300-900 K and 1500-2000 K, respectively. For the remaining alkanes (propane and n-butane), the average kexperimental/kcalculated ratio remains 2.6 and 1.3 over the temperature range of experimental data. Also, comparing the calculated standard enthalpy of reaction (ΔrH°298) with the available experimental measurements for alkanes, we found the mean unsigned error of computations as 3.7 kJ mol(-1). This agreement provides an accuracy benchmark of our methodology, affording the estimation of the unreported kinetic parameters for H abstractions from alkenes and alkynes. On the basis of the Evans

  19. Determining Heats of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Puster, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Enrichment-oxygen flow rate-ratio related to heat of combustion. Technique developed for determining heats of combustion of natural-gas samples. Based on measuring ratio m/n, where m is (volmetric) flow rate of oxygen required to enrich carrier air in which test gas flowing at rate n is burned, such that mole fraction of oxygen in combustion-product gases equals that in carrier air. The m/n ratio directly related to heats of combustion of saturated hydrocarbons present in natural gas.

  20. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi

  1. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  2. Retrievals of the Abundances of Acetylene and other Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Siteng; Shemansky, D. E.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Acetylene abundance in the Titan upper atmosphere has been extracted from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) stellar occultations. The data reduction process is based on simulation of the discrete spectral absorption in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region between 110 and 190 nm. Pointing drift is corrected by instrument simulation of the stellar image location on the instrument detector. Latitude and seasonal dependence of the vertical profiles has been examined. The observed spectra have been compared to atmospheric chemical model calculations (KINETICS) by predicting the occultation spectra, allowing the imposition of constraints on the model, and directly establishing the level of uncertainty in the extraction process. Hydrocarbon and nitrile vertical profiles have been extracted, with limits set on the precursors to aerosols. Aerosol continuum spectral structure is recognized in the extinction spectra, but physical chemistry modeling of aerosol precursors to date indicate higher abundances than the upper limits set by observation.

  3. Source identification of hydrocarbons following spill events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholz, D.A. [ALS Centre of Excellence (Canada)], email: eib.birkholz@alsglobal.com

    2011-07-01

    This study deals with revealing the sources of hydrocarbon contamination as a part of the forensic effort in reclamation and remediation. The goal is to show the importance of such information for assessing oil contamination levels and cleanup costs. This study deals with three particular cases where hydrocarbon levels were exceeded in soil samples. As part of the investigation process, a report on the source, age, and nature of the contamination was generated. The chemical investigation consisted of many steps, including mixing and equilibrating the samples with other chemicals, and scanning for oil biomarkers. After the analysis was finished, it was concluded that the fuels in the soil samples were from 14.7 to 15.6 years old, with a 2 year margin of error; however, a different methodology yielded a higher range, 20 to 24 years. Regarding the type of fuel, due to traces of alkylated benzenes and sesquiterpanes that were found, it was believed that the source of the oil was western Canada.

  4. Recent developments in hydrocarbon separator interface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertaker, Bjorn T.; Johansen, Geir A.; Jackson, Peter

    2001-02-01

    Level monitoring instrumentation is an essential part of hydrocarbon processing facilities, and has together with separator technology been widely addressed over the last decade. Key issues are production capacity, product enhancement and well-flow control. The reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation, and its ability to monitor the thickness of the foam and the oil-water emulsion, are particularly important when considering the level instrumentation as the main sensing element in the automatic control of the separation vessel. Lately industry focus has been placed on optimal automatic control to improve the quality of the production output, and to minimize the use of expensive and environmentally undesirable separation enhancing chemicals. Recent developments in hydrocarbon production includes subsea separation stations, where the constraints placed on the reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation are especially severe. This paper discuss the most common existing level monitoring technologies, and present some recent level monitoring developments for three-phase separators. In order to clarify the issue of cross sectional metering the notion tomometry is introduced in this paper. Tomometry denotes multipoint cross sectional metering aiming to acquire cross sectional information on the distribution of the substances in the process vessel for control purposes, not mainly to create a cross sectional reconstructed image of the process in question.

  5. Comprehensive management of hydrocarbon storage tanks ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesueur, V.; Riethmuller, M.; Chauveau, D. [IS Services, Villepinte (France)

    2006-07-01

    Corrosion generates considerable material losses in industry and can result in irreversible damages to the environment and some times in losses in human lives. Hydrocarbon storage tanks are subject to various corrosion types like generalised corrosion resulting in large areas thickness reduction, or potentially dangerous local damage (pitting, crevice or craters). To keep safe storage conditions and save service life, it is essential: - to identify the risks by taking into account the stored products, the storage type, the environmental factors, the type of coating and the storage history, - to select the most appropriate NDT technique (acoustic emission, thickness ultrasonic measurement, TOFD, ACFM, visual inspection, remote UT..) depending on the part to be inspected and on the expected type of damage, - to propose the best solution for storage tank restoration (repair, improved protection..) - to modify the operating conditions - to define the NDT periodicity and the appropriate technique to apply according to the type of risks, to the former inspection results and to the regulation context, - to determine the remaining life of storage tank. This approach is named Comprehensive Management of hydrocarbon storage tank ageing. IS Services has developed a software called ''AGIR'' aiming at providing guidance and support to apply this approach. (orig.)

  6. Neutron scattering applications in hydrocarbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Min Y.; Peiffer, Dennis G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States); Zhang, Yimin; Rafailovich, Miriam [Dept. of Materials Sci. and Eng., State University of New York, NY (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Neutron scattering methods are a powerful probe to complex fluids, soft matters as well as solid materials of nano- and micro-structures and their related dynamic properties. They complement other microstructural probing tools, such as microscopes, x-ray and light scattering techniques. Because neutron does not carry charges, it interacts only with nuclei of the matter, therefore not only can it penetrate a longer length into matters, it can also see' many features other methods can't due to their lack of proper contrast or heavy absorption. One of the largest contrasts in neutron methods is from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) difference. Therefore, hydrocarbons can be easily studied by neutrons when H/D isotope substitution is applied. Here at National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, one of the USA's premier neutron scattering facilities, we have been using neutron scattering techniques to study microstructures of asphaltenes, waxes, gas hydrates, porous media, surfactant solutions, engine oils, polymers, nanocomposites, fuel cell element and other hydrocarbon materials. With the completion of a new Neutron Spin Echo instrument, we can also look at the dynamics of the above mentioned systems. (author)

  7. Membranous nephropathy following exposure to volatile hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenreich, T.; Yunis, S.L.; Churg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solvents has long been known to cause renal tubular disease in man. Recently, the occurrence of glomerular disease such as Goodpasture's syndrome with proliferative and extracapillary glomerulonephritis has been related to hydrocarbon exposure. This report concerns four patients with membranous nephropathy who had a history of prolonged exposure to a number of volatile hydrocarbons. Membranous nephropathy is a chronic renal disease involving glomeruli and occurring principally in adults. Its clinical onset is insidious and is manifested by proteinuria or edema. Proteinuria is the hallmark of the disease and may be present for many years without symptoms. It is often a slowly progressive disease. About one-fourth of the patients improve clinically and lose their proteinuria, while up to one-fourth develop renal failure. The glomerular capillary wall lesions are distinctive, contain deposits of immunoglobulin and complement considered to represent immune-complexes, and show a morphological progression from early Stage I to late Stage IV. While in most cases there is no known etiology, in some patients the disease has been deemed to be secondary to specific diseases or agents such as infections, neoplasms, or chemicals. The four cases described fall into this last category.

  8. Substrate marking by an invasive ladybeetle: seasonal changes in hydrocarbon composition and behavioral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Durieux

    Full Text Available The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, aggregates inside dwellings during the winter to survive the cold. Recent published reports have highlighted that overwintering individuals use hydrocarbon markings deposited on surfaces by conspecifics to orient toward aggregation sites. In the current study, monthly GC-MS analyses revealed seasonal modifications in the chemical profile of substrate markings deposited by moving individuals. The markings of overwintering ladybeetles contained larger proportions of heptacosadiene, nonacosadiene, hentriacontadienes, and methyl-nonacosanes, along with a lower proportion of heptacosene and nonacosene. This finding suggests the importance of the unsaturated and/or branched hydrocarbons in the H. axyridis aggregation process. Subsequently, we conducted behavioral assays to test whether (1 there is seasonal variation in the behavioral response of H. axyridis individuals toward substrate markings deposited by conspecifics in the same physiological state and (2 the observed behavioral modification is due to a change in ladybeetle sensitivity and/or a change in the chemical composition of the substrate marking. The results indicate that overwintering individuals exhibit a stronger "following" response toward conspecific substrate markings. This behavior is linked to both the physiological state of ladybeetles and the specific chemical profile of the marking biomolecules deposited under overwintering conditions.

  9. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  10. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, Kent M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  11. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes can eithe

  12. Graph theory for alternating hydrocarbons with attached ports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of molecules of certain hydrocarbons give rise to difficult questions in graph theory. This paper is primarily devoted to the graph theory, but the physico-chemical motivation, which is somewhat speculative, is also presented. Molecules of unsaturated hydrocarbons exhibit alternating path

  13. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silks, Louis A.; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2016-10-18

    The present invention is directed to the one step selective conversion of starch, cellulose, or glucose to molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. The invention is also directed to the conversion of those intermediates to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  14. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  15. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosynthetic terpene production[ED1] represents an energy and carbon-efficient route for hydrocarbon fuel production. Diverse terpene structures also provide the potential to produce next-generation 'drop-in' hydrocarbon fuel molecules. However, it is highly challenging to achieve efficient redire...

  16. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon...

  17. Trace Metals and Volatile Aromatic Hydrocarbon Content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    done with a view to assessing the level of attenuation of this particular group of crude hydrocarbons and the changes. /effects of some trace metals in the impacted soils. The aromatic hydrocarbon ... Nigeria has had its fair share of crude oil pollution. This problem is ... disintegration of natural organometalic plant metabolites.

  18. MICROORGANISMS’ SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES ROLE IN HYDROCARBONS BIODEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оlga Vasylchenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Existing data and publications regarding oil, hydrocarbon biodegradation, metabolism, and bioremediation were analyzed. Search of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria which are producers of biosurfactants was provided, types of microbial surfactants and their physiological role were analyzed and ordered. The study of factors affecting the surface active properties of producers’ cultures was done.

  19. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  20. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  1. Geothermal and hydrocarbon esploration - The double play synergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Kramers, L.; Mijnlieff, H.F.; Jong, S. de; Scheffers, B.

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear synergy possible in geothermal and hydrocarbon exploration if wells are targeted in a double play concept. In the Netherlands, clastic aquifers which have been explored extensively by the hydrocarbon industry and are now targeted for geothermal energy qualify well for a double play.

  2. Learning and perceptual similarity among cuticular hydrocarbons in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nick; Dreier, Stephanie; Jørgensen, Charlotte G; Nielsen, John; Guerrieri, Fernando J; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Nestmate recognition in ants is based on perceived differences in a multi-component blend of hydrocarbons that are present on the insect cuticle. Although supplementation experiments have shown that some classes of hydrocarbons, such as methyl branched alkanes and alkenes, have a salient role in nestmate recognition, there was basically no information available on how ants detect and perceive these molecules. We used a new conditioning procedure to investigate whether individual carpenter ants could associate a given hydrocarbon (linear or methyl-branched alkane) to sugar reward. We then studied perceptual similarity between a hydrocarbon previously associated with sugar and a novel hydrocarbon. Ants learnt all hydrocarbon-reward associations rapidly and with the same efficiency, regardless of the structure of the molecules. Ants could discriminate among a large number of pairs of hydrocarbons, but also generalised. Generalisation depended both on the structure of the molecule and the animal's experience. For linear alkanes, generalisation was observed when the novel molecule was smaller than the conditioned one. Generalisation between pairs of methyl-alkanes was high, while generalisation between hydrocarbons that differed in the presence or absence of a methyl group was low, suggesting that chain length and functional group might be coded independently by the ant olfactory system. Understanding variations in perception of recognition cues in ants is necessary for the general understanding of the mechanisms involved in social recognition processes based on chemical cues.

  3. Phenomenology of tremor-like signals observed over hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Stoll, E.P.; Carniel, R.; Barzandji, O.; Rode, E.D.; Singer, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We have observed narrow-band, low-frequency (1.5-4 Hz, amplitude 0.01-10 mum/s) tremor signals on the surface over hydrocarbon reservoirs (oil, gas and water multiphase fluid systems in porous media) at currently 15 sites worldwide. These 'hydrocarbon tremors' possess remarkably similar spectral and

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The time-averaged concentration of hydrocarbon and oxygen vapors were measured in the unsaturated zone above the residually contaminated capillary fringe at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, Michigan. Total hydrocarbon and oxygen vapor concentrations were observe...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since...

  6. Relationship between petroleum hydrocarbon and plankton in a mesocosm experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was carried out from May 26 to June 1, 1998 at the location of bon to the ecosystem, furthermore, to estimate the environmental capacity. In the experiment, it is found that the petroleum hydrocarbon can, in some degree, enhance the growth of diatom, but inhibit the growth of dinoflagellate. In general, the petroleum hydrocarbon can inhibit the growth of both phytoplankton and zooplankton, and can also inhibit the growth of total plankton (including phytoplankton and zooplankton) as well. A kinetic model was presented to estimate the uptake/release rate constants of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton, and thereafter, the uptake and release rate constants ( k1, k2),bioconcentration factor (BCF) as well as the petroleum hydrocarbon influenced uptake and release rate constants of nutrients by phytoplankton (kup, krel) were obtained. The results imply that the bioconcentration of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton is fairly large and petroleum hydrocarbon caused no significant influence on the uptake of N- NO3, but significant influence on that of P- PO4. In addition,the application of kinetic model for the bioconcentration of volatile organic toxic compound by organism suggests that the uptake of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton was an important process for the environmental capacity of petroleum hydrocarbon.

  7. Conversion of oligomeric starch, cellulose, hydrolysates or sugars to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silks, Louis A; Sutton, Andrew; Kim, Jin Kyung; Gordon, John Cameron; Wu, Ruilian; Kimball, David B.

    2017-09-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to the conversion of a source material (e.g., a depolymerized oligosaccharide mixture, a monomeric sugar, a hydrolysate, or a mixture of monomeric sugars) to intermediate molecules containing 7 to 26 contiguous carbon atoms. These intermediates may also be converted to saturated hydrocarbons. Such saturated hydrocarbons are useful as, for example, fuels.

  8. Hydrocarbons in the land snail Cepaea nemoralis (L.) (gastropoda, pulmonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.J. van der; Oudejans, R.C.H.M.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. The biosynthesis of hydrocarbons in the snail Cepaea nemoralis was studied after injection of the 14C-labelled precursors acetate, valine, isoleucine and palmitic acid. 2. 2. The highest incorporation was achieved with palmitic acid, although with the other precursors the hydrocarbons were al

  9. Molecular carbon isotopic evidence for the origin of geothermal hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Donchin, J. H.; Nehring, N. L.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Isotopic measurements of individual geothermal hydrocarbons that are, as a group, of higher molecular weight than methane are reported. It is believed in light of this data that the principal source of hydrocarbons in four geothermal areas in western North America is the thermal decomposition of sedimentary or groundwater organic matter.

  10. Phenomenology of tremor-like signals observed over hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Stoll, E.P.; Carniel, R.; Barzandji, O.; Rode, E.D.; Singer, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We have observed narrow-band, low-frequency (1.5-4 Hz, amplitude 0.01-10 mum/s) tremor signals on the surface over hydrocarbon reservoirs (oil, gas and water multiphase fluid systems in porous media) at currently 15 sites worldwide. These 'hydrocarbon tremors' possess remarkably similar spectral and

  11. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  12. Investigation Status of Heat Exchange while Boiling Hydrocarbon Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Obukhov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of heat exchange investigations while boiling hydrocarbon fuel. The obtained data are within the limits of the S.S. Kutateladze dependence proposed in 1939. Heat exchange at non-stationary heat release has not been investigated. The data for hydrocarbon fuel with respect to critical density of heat flow are not available even for stationary conditions.

  13. Metabolic engineering for the production of hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Hye Mi; Cheon, Seungwoo

    2015-06-01

    Biofuels have been attracting increasing attention to provide a solution to the problems of climate change and our dependence on limited fossil oil. During the last decade, metabolic engineering has been performed to develop superior microorganisms for the production of so called advanced biofuels. Among the advanced biofuels, hydrocarbons possess high-energy content and superior fuel properties to other biofuels, and thus have recently been attracting much research interest. Here we review the recent advances in the microbial production of hydrocarbon fuels together with the metabolic engineering strategies employed to develop their production strains. Strategies employed for the production of long-chain and short-chain hydrocarbons derived from fatty acid metabolism along with the isoprenoid-derived hydrocarbons are reviewed. Also, the current limitations and future prospects in hydrocarbon-based biofuel production are discussed.

  14. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  15. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  16. Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. The device is capable of determining hydrocarbon gases in water to the concentration of less than 5 x 10{sup -4} ml/l of water. According to the results of microbiological studies, the plate count technique can be a useful supplementary method for hydrocarbon exploration. This is based on the facts that the average survival rate to hydrocarbons (pentane, hexane) for heterotrophs is higher in the area known as containing considerable hydrocarbon gases than other areas in the Pohang region. However, it is still necessary to develop techniques to treat the bacteria with gaseous hydrocarbons. (author). 2 figs., 41 tabs.

  17. Maturity Control on the Patterns of Hydrocarbon Regeneration from Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Rock-Eval pyrolysis and Py-GC experiments on naturally and artificially matured coal samples were carried out. The results suggest that both depolymerization and defuctionalization exist during the maturation and evolution of coal. The patterns of hydrocarbon regeneration are diverse at different stages of the maturation and evolution. When the vitrinite reflectance (R0) is 0.7%- 0.9%, bitumen is the richest in coal while activation energy is the minimum, and the temperature of peak yield is lower than that of primary hydrocarbon generation. However, if reflectance is greater than 0.9%, defunctionalization predominates and the temperature of peak regeneration is shown in lagging compared with the primary hydrocarbon generation. When reflectance is out of the "oil window", the peak temperature of hydrocarbon regeneration and that of the primary hydrocarbon generation seems to be continuous.

  18. Hydrocarbon Source Rocks in the Deep River and Dan River Triassic Basins, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jeffrey C.; Milici, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an interpretation of the hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Triassic sedimentary rocks of the Deep River and Dan River basins, North Carolina, based on previously unpublished organic geochemistry data. The organic geochemical data, 87 samples from 28 drill holes, are from the Sanford sub-basin (Cumnock Formation) of the Deep River basin, and from the Dan River basin (Cow Branch Formation). The available organic geochemical data are biased, however, because many of the samples collected for analyses by industry were from drill holes that contained intrusive diabase dikes, sills, and sheets of early Mesozoic age. These intrusive rocks heated and metamorphosed the surrounding sediments and organic matter in the black shale and coal bed source rocks and, thus, masked the source rock potential that they would have had in an unaltered state. In places, heat from the intrusives generated over-mature vitrinite reflectance (%Ro) profiles and metamorphosed the coals to semi-anthracite, anthracite, and coke. The maximum burial depth of these coal beds is unknown, and depth of burial may also have contributed to elevated thermal maturation profiles. The organic geochemistry data show that potential source rocks exist in the Sanford sub-basin and Dan River basin and that the sediments are gas prone rather than oil prone, although both types of hydrocarbons were generated. Total organic carbon (TOC) data for 56 of the samples are greater than the conservative 1.4% TOC threshold necessary for hydrocarbon expulsion. Both the Cow Branch Formation (Dan River basin) and the Cumnock Formation (Deep River basin, Sanford sub-basin) contain potential source rocks for oil, but they are more likely to have yielded natural gas. The organic material in these formations was derived primarily from terrestrial Type III woody (coaly) material and secondarily from lacustrine Type I (algal) material. Both the thermal alteration index (TAI) and vitrinite reflectance data

  19. Geothermal Regime, Thermal History and Hydrocarbon Generation Types of Sedimentary Basins in the Continental Area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuNansheng; JamesPuckette; JinZhijun; WangJiyang

    2005-01-01

    The thermal regimes in sedimentary basins in the continental area of China are varied and reflect differences in geological settings. As a result of these variable thermal regimes, the history of hydrocarbon generation in each basin is also different. An east-west profile of the thermal threshold across the continental basins of China, like the Liaohe Basin, the North China Basin, the Ordos Basin, the Qaidam Basin and the Tarim Basin, was constructed using large numbers of heat flow measurements, temperature data and rock thermophysical parameters. Isotherms, surface heat flow, mantle heat flow and Moho temperature beneath the basins are shown in the profile, which illustrates changes in some thermal characteristics between basins in east China and those in west China. Thermal evolution histories in basins were reconstructed using Easy%Ro method, apatite fission track annealing and other paleothermometers. Typical hydrocarbon generation histories of the primary source rocks were modeled by referring to the thermal evolution data. Thermal stages controlled source rocks maturation and oil and gas generation, and influenced the type of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) production in the basins.

  20. Simplified Modeling of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    A method of simplified computational modeling of oxidation of hydrocarbons is undergoing development. This is one of several developments needed to enable accurate computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. At present, accurate computational simulation of such flows is difficult or impossible in most cases because (1) the numbers of grid points needed for adequate spatial resolution of turbulent flows in realistically complex geometries are beyond the capabilities of typical supercomputers now in use and (2) the combustion of typical hydrocarbons proceeds through decomposition into hundreds of molecular species interacting through thousands of reactions. Hence, the combination of detailed reaction- rate models with the fundamental flow equations yields flow models that are computationally prohibitive. Hence, further, a reduction of at least an order of magnitude in the dimension of reaction kinetics is one of the prerequisites for feasibility of computational simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows. In the present method of simplified modeling, all molecular species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons are classified as either light or heavy; heavy molecules are those having 3 or more carbon atoms. The light molecules are not subject to meaningful decomposition, and the heavy molecules are considered to decompose into only 13 specified constituent radicals, a few of which are listed in the table. One constructs a reduced-order model, suitable for use in estimating the release of heat and the evolution of temperature in combustion, from a base comprising the 13 constituent radicals plus a total of 26 other species that include the light molecules and related light free radicals. Then rather than following all possible species through their reaction coordinates, one follows only the reduced set of reaction coordinates of the base. The behavior of the base was examined in test computational simulations of the combustion of

  1. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species: e0140103

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noemí Araceli Rivera Casado; del Carmen Montes Horcasitas; Refugio Rodríguez Vázquez; Fernando José Esparza García; Josefina Pérez Vargas; Armando Ariza Castolo; Ronald Ferrera-Cerrato; Octavio Gómez Guzmán; Graciano Calva Calva

    2015-01-01

      The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil...

  2. Insulin signaling mediates sexual attractiveness in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Han Kuo

    Full Text Available Sexually attractive characteristics are often thought to reflect an individual's condition or reproductive potential, but the underlying molecular mechanisms through which they do so are generally unknown. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS is known to modulate aging, reproduction, and stress resistance in several species and to contribute to variability of these traits in natural populations. Here we show that IIS determines sexual attractiveness in Drosophila through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the production of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC, many of which function as pheromones. Using traditional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS together with newly introduced laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-MS we establish that CHC profiles are significantly affected by genetic manipulations that target IIS. Manipulations that reduce IIS also reduce attractiveness, while females with increased IIS are significantly more attractive than wild-type animals. IIS effects on attractiveness are mediated by changes in CHC profiles. Insulin signaling influences CHC through pathways that are likely independent of dFOXO and that may involve the nutrient-sensing Target of Rapamycin (TOR pathway. These results suggest that the activity of conserved molecular regulators of longevity and reproductive output may manifest in different species as external characteristics that are perceived as honest indicators of fitness potential.

  3. The hydrocarbon generation mechanism and the threestage type model of hydrocarbon generation for carbonate source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆云; 程克明

    1997-01-01

    The diagenetic mechanism and process of carbonate rocks, which is different to that of clastic rocks, decides the existence of different existing state organic matters in carbonate rocks. This has been verified by both the microscopic observation of organic petrology and the analysis of organic geochemistry of many samples. Based on the hydrous pyrolysis simulation experiment of the low-mature carbonate rocks, the contrasting study on the yield and their geochemistry characteristics of different existing state soluble organic matters of a series of various maturity samples shows that the different existing state organic matters make different contributions to hydrocarbon generation during every evolution state. So that, the hydrocarbon generation process of carbonate rocks can be summarized as the following three stages; the first is the direct degradation of biogenic bitumen macromolecules during the immature stage, the second is the thermal degradation of a large amount of kerogen at the mature stage,

  4. Airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons trigger human skin cells aging through aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Du, Hong-Yang; Wang, Qiao-Wei; Huang, Ye; Liu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which adsorbed on the surface of ambient air particulate matters (PM), are the major toxic compound to cause cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, even cancer. However, its detrimental effects on human skin cell remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that SRM1649b, a reference urban dust material of PAH, triggers human skin cells aging through cell cycle arrest, cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Principally, SRM1649b facilitated Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) translocated into nucleus, subsequently activated ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, and upregulated aging-related genes expression. Most important, we found that AhR antagonist efficiently revert the aging of skin cells. Thus our novel findings firstly revealed the mechanism of skin aging under PAH contamination and provided potential strategy for clinical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  6. Unsaturated hydrocarbons with fruity and floral odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, C; Centini, M; Fedeli, P; Paoli, M L; Sega, A; Scesa, C; Pelosi, P

    2000-04-01

    Hydrocarbons usually do not exhibit odors of interest or well-defined character. However, certain cyclic alkenes have been associated with typical and pleasant notes, such as fruity, green, and floral. One of the best known examples is represented by the isomeric megastigmatrienes, endowed with a pleasant smell of tropical fruits. From the structures of these odorants, 24 analogues and homologues, most of them cyclic alkenes, but including also some open-chain alkenes, have been synthesized to define structural parameters related to the characteristic odors of these compounds. The number and position of double bonds, the substitution on the ring, and the size of the ring are the variables taken into account. Most of the new compounds present a mainly fruity character, associated in several cases with floral and green notes, producing an overall sensation described as "tropical fruit".

  7. Microwave plasma torch for processing hydrocarbon gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Zherlitsyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We designed and developed an ultrahigh-frequency (microwave plasma torch with a combined (nitrogen, methane plasma-forming environment, and microwave output of up to 2 kW, continuously. We demonstrate the possibility of using it in order to process natural and associated petroleum (APG gas into valuable products (hydrogen and carbon nanomaterial CNM with up to 70% efficiency. Based on the developed microwave plasma torch, we developed an apparatus capable of converting hydrocarbon feedstock at a capacity of 50 g/h yielding CNM and hydrogen of up to 70 vol. %. In its mobile small-tonnage version, this technology can be used on gas-condensate fields.

  8. Adsorption of hydrocarbons on modified nanoclays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafimasooleh, M [Department of Materials Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazgir, S [Department of Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tamizifar, M [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nemati, A, E-mail: m.sharafimasooleh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    In this study organically modified nanoclay were prepared by exchanging of the cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB), with inorganic/metal ions/cations in montmorillonite structure. To investigate the influence of the amount of modifier on basal spacing and subsequent removal efficiency of hydrocarbon, different amount of modifier was used. The modified and unmodified nanoclays characterized by XRD, CHN and FTIR techniques. The X-ray diffraction results showed that the interlayer spacing of CTAB-modified clays increased from 12 to 22A. The effectiveness of the sorbent materials for sorption of a range of products was investigated using crude oil, kerosene, gasoline and toluene. The process parameters such as sorbent dosage and contact time were reported. The results showed that the adsorption capacity was in the range of 2 to 8 gram per gram of adsorbent. Results also showed that adsorption capacity of the organoclay was clearly higher than of the unmodified clay. These results were confirmed by CHN analysis.

  9. Enhanced Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Polluted Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C. Wokoma and C.C.Wokocha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use NPKs, saw dust and poultry manure as enhanced remediation techniques of a crude oil polluted soil, using a 42-day study period, time length. Polluted soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth from different polluted sites of the same area. Physicochemical parametres such as pottasium concentration and total hydrocarbon recorded a decrease at the 6th week, after application and lab testing. Total organic carbon recorded an increase on the 6th week, for treatments containing; PS+SD, PS+NPK and PS+PM. pH ranged between 5.21-10.1. The results suggest that a combination of ammendments in the right proportion w ould be effective in the remediation of crude oil polluted soil.

  10. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    O2 C2H6 C2H4 CH3OH iso‐propane CO2 C3H8 C3H6 C2H5OH neo‐pentane H2O C4H10 CH3OCH3  DME O3 C5H12 Ar H2 N2O PAC  Kinetic  Mechanism  O(-)+N(+)=N+O... Kinetic  Model:  Previous Versions D.V.Zatsepin, S.M.Starikovskaia, A.Yu.Starikovskii Hydrogen oxidation in a  stoichiometric hydrogen‐air mixtures in the... Kinetics  of ignition of saturated hydrocarbons by nonequilibrium plasma: C2H6‐ to C5H12‐containing mixtures. Combustion and Flame 156  (2009) 221–233

  11. Detection of polyaromatic hydrocarbons using DNA intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weetall, H.H.; Pandey, P.; Horuath, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`S) have be monitored using intercalation of double stranded DNA. Three approaches have been examined. The first, an electrochemical method uses an electroactive intercalating agent. When intercalated into DNA it cannot transfer electrons to an electrode. When displaced by a PAH, it can be detected electrochemically. The second method utilizes fluorescence polarization. A fluorescent intercalating agent, when intercalated into DNA will show increased polarization. When displaced by a competing PAH, a decrease in polarization is observed. The third technique involves evanescent wave technology. Double stranded DNA in close proximity to the wave guide will show a decreased fluorescence when a fluorescent intercalator is displaced by a PAH. Each of these techniques will be described and examples of results presented.

  12. Structural Evolution of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Mark; Candian, Alessandra; Mori, Tamami; Usui, Fumihiko; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important reservoir for molecular carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and investigations into their chemistry and behaviour may be important to the understanding of how carbon is processed from simple forms into complex prebiotic molecules such as those detected in chondritic meteorites. In this study, infrared astronomical data from AKARI and other observatories are used together with laboratory and theoretical data to study variations in the structure of emitting PAHs in interstellar environments using spectroscopic decomposition techniques and bands arising from carbon-hydrogen bond vibrations at wavelengths from 3 - 14 microns. Results and inferences are discussed in terms of the processing of large carbonaceous molecules in astrophysical environments.

  13. Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1985-04-16

    A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

  14. Microbial hydrocarbons: back to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Work, Victoria H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2012-03-01

    The defining challenge of energy research in the 21st century is the development and deployment of technologies for large-scale reconfiguration of global energy infrastructure. Modern society is built upon a concentrated yet finite reservoir of diverse hydrocarbons formed through the photosynthetic transformation of several hundred million years of solar energy. In human history, the fossil energy era will be short lived and never repeated. Although the timing of peak oil is extensively debated, it is an eventuality. It is, therefore, imperative that projections for both when it will occur and the degree to which supply will fall short of demand be taken into serious consideration, especially in the sectors of energy technology development, political and economic decision making, and societal energy usage. The requirement for renewable energy systems is no longer a point for discussion, and swift advances on many fronts are vital to counteract current and impending crises in both energy and the environment.

  15. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in intertidal wetland sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGenity, Terry J

    2014-06-01

    Intertidal wetlands, primarily salt marsh, mangrove and mudflats, which provide many essential ecosystem services, are under threat on numerous fronts; a situation that is made worse by crude-oil pollution. Microbes are the main vehicle for remediation of such sediments, and new discoveries, such as novel biodegradation pathways, means of accessing oil, multi-species interactions, and community-level responses to oil addition, are helping us to understand, predict and monitor the fate of oil. Despite this, there are many challenges, not least because of the heterogeneity of these ecosystems and the complexity of crude oil. For example, there is growing awareness about the toxicity of the oxygenated products that result from crude-oil weathering, which are difficult to degrade. This review highlights how developments in areas as diverse as systems biology, microbiology, ecology, biogeochemistry and analytical chemistry are enhancing our understanding of hydrocarbon biodegradation and thus bioremediation of oil-polluted intertidal wetlands.

  16. Hydrocarbons on the Icy Satellites of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2010-01-01

    The Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Cassini Spacecraft has obtained spectral reflectance maps of the satellites of Saturn in the wavelength region 0.4-5.1 micrometers since its insertion into Saturn orbit in late 2004. We have detected the spectral signature of the C-H stretching molecular mode of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in the low albedo material covering parts of several of Saturn's satellites, notably Iapetus and Phoebe (Cruikshank et al. 2008). The distribution of this material is complex, and in the case of Iapetus we are seeking to determine if it is related to the native grey-colored materials left as lag deposits upon evaporation of the ices, or represents in-fall from an external source, notably the newly discovered large dust ring originating at Phoebe. This report covers our latest exploration of the nature and source of this organic material.

  17. System and process for upgrading hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Smith, Joseph D.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-08-25

    In one embodiment, a system for upgrading a hydrocarbon material may include a black wax upgrade subsystem and a molten salt gasification (MSG) subsystem. The black wax upgrade subsystem and the MSG subsystem may be located within a common pressure boundary, such as within a pressure vessel. Gaseous materials produced by the MSG subsystem may be used in the process carried out within the black wax upgrade subsystem. For example, hydrogen may pass through a gaseous transfer interface to interact with black wax feed material to hydrogenate such material during a cracking process. In one embodiment, the gaseous transfer interface may include one or more openings in a tube or conduit which is carrying the black wax material. A pressure differential may control the flow of hydrogen within the tube or conduit. Related methods are also disclosed.

  18. Uses of Lotem for Indonesian hydrocarbon applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftartu, R.; Strack, K.

    2017-07-01

    While magnetotellurics has been used extensively in Indonesia, the percentage of good quality data is limited due to the high population density and often the geologic condition. We investigate application of controlled source electromagnetics (CSEM) in the time domain, sometimes also known as long-offset transient electromagnetics (Lotem) because it overcomes the noise issue by using a high-power transmitter. Among many applications for Indonesia we have selected sub-basalt where we can demonstrate the benefit of the technology with successful Lotem case histories of the past and illustrate its new use with 3D modeling. Either diffuse reflection of the seismic wave or high seismic velocities hinder it. EM sees transparently through them. Targets are resistive (hydrocarbon) and conductive (sediments). We are illustrating the success of Lotem with results from Europe and India for similar situations including joint inversion with magnetotellurics.

  19. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  20. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-05-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide data for the development and validation of models for the fuel regression rates in liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. The experiments will be performed on fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool will be investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface will be measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel will be assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets will provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  1. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  2. Effects of unsaturated hydrocarbons on crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.C.; Heck, W.W.

    1960-01-01

    Damage to cotton and other crops in the vicinity of a Gulf Coast polyethylene plant has led to studies on the causative agent or agents responsible for crop losses. Responses exhibited by both native and cultivated plants of the area led to an initial diagnosis that the symptoms were caused by ethylene present in relatively high amounts in the atmosphere. Analysis of the stack gas showed 1.5% ethylene, 0.3% ethane, 8.7% carbon dioxide, 0.3% ethylene oxide and minute amounts of methane. Field analyses have shown concentrations of ethylene aging from 0.04 to 3 ppm depending upon atmospheric conditions (wind direction and velocity) as well as distance from the polyethylene plant. Various mixtures of hydrocarbon gases have been tested using cotton, coleus, tomato and other plant species. Ethylene has been found to be the most biologically active of the hydrocarbon gases studied. Controlled experiments have confirmed field observations that monocotyledonous plants such as sorghum and corn are relatively insensitive to ethylene, whereas dicotyledonous plants such as cotton, coleus, corn pea and tomato are extremely sensitive. Flower petal abscission in periwinkle and flower bud abscission in cotton have been found to be excellent indicators of extremely low levels of ethylene air pollution in both the field and in controlled experiments. Typical responses of cotton to low levels of ethylene include: lost of apical dominance with the resulting prostrate growth habit, flattening of upper stem and growing point, forcing of lateral buds, weakening of main stem, compacting of internodes, earlier and more profuse flowering with the abscission of squares, total loss of yield. 2 references.

  3. Source apportionment of sediment-associated aliphatic hydrocarbon in a eutrophicated shallow lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Zhong; Yang, Ze-Yu; Chen, Tian-Hu

    2012-11-01

    Chaohu Lake, one of the most eutrophicated lakes in China, has been suffering from long-term outside pollution, urban sewage, river outflows, and agricultural runoff which expectedly have been the main contributors of hydrocarbons. However, the contributions from these various sources have not been specified. The present study is aimed at identifying the potential sources of hydrocarbons in surface sediment around the whole lake and assessing the relative contributions using principal components analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR). Sixty-one surface sediments covering the whole Chaohu Lake and three main estuaries of inflowing rivers were collected, dried, extracted, and analyzed for 27 normal alkanes (n-alkanes, from C(12) to C(38), defined Σ(27)AH) and unresolved complex mixture (UCM) by GC/MS. Diagnostic ratios and PCA-MLR were utilized to apportion their sources. The concentrations of Σ(27)AH and UCM ranged from 434 to 3,870 ng/g and 11.9 to 325 μg/g dry weight, respectively, for all samples. The concentrations of Σ(27)AH in western region and estuary of Nanfei River were slightly higher but without statistical significance than those from eastern region and estuaries of Yuxi River and Hangbu River. The concentration of UCM from western region was significantly higher than that obtained from eastern region. These results reflect the importance of input of urban runoff by Nanfei River and serious eutrophication in western region. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in Chaohu Lake were mainly derived from high plant wax with mixed sources of phytoplankton and petroleum. Weak microbial decomposition of n-alkanes would be expected to occur from the low ratios of isoprenoid hydrocarbons pristine (pri) and phytane (phy) to n-C(17) and n-C(18), respectively. Higher plant, fossil combustion, petroleum residue, and phytoplankton were proposed as the main origines of aliphatic hydrocarbons by PCA while the contributions of individual n-alkane homologues, pri and phy

  4. COMPENDEX Profiling Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standera, Oldrich

    This manual provides instructions for completing the COMPENDEX (Computerized Engineering Index) Profile Submission Form used to prepare Current Information Selection (CIS) profiles. An annotated bibliography lists nine items useful in searching for proper profile words. (AB)

  5. Activity and functional diversity of microbial communities in long-term hydrocarbon and heavy metal contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markowicz Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heavy metal pollution on soil microbial communities functioning were studied in soils taken from an old coke plant. The concentrations of PAHs in the tested soils ranged from 171 to 2137 mg kg-1. From the group of tested heavy metals, concentrations of lead were found to be the highest, ranging from 57 to 3478 mg kg-1, while zinc concentrations varied from 247 to 704 mg kg-1 and nickel from 10 to 666 mg kg-1. High dehydrogenase, acid and alkaline phosphatase activities were observed in the most contaminated soil. This may indicate bacterial adaptation to long-term heavy metal and hydrocarbon contamination. However, the Community Level Physiological Profiles (CLPPs analysis showed that the microbial functional diversity was reduced and influenced to a higher extent by some metals (Pb, Ni, moisture and conductivity than by PAHs.

  6. Emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons from cars in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the exhaust emission of non-methane hydrocarbons(NMHCs) from cars in China at the Beijing driving cycle on the chassis dynamometer.The emission factor average of NMHCs was 0.9 g/km,which was over twice that from the Australian car fleet and 2-4 times that of the American car emission in the 1990s-2000s.The emission profile of Beijing cars showed higher fractions of aromatics and C4?C7 HCs,and lower percentages of C2?C3 HCs,compared with those of the US car fleet.The average ratio of benzene/toluene for cars tested was 0.5,the average benzene/toluene/ethyl benzene/xylenes(BTEX) ratios were 1/2.2/0.1/1.8,which were consistent with those of the Tanyugou tunnel located in the suburb of Beijing.α-pinene and β-pinene were detected from the exhaust gas on dynamometer for the first time,and had likely similar exhaust emission characteristics with C2?C3 HCs and styrene,giving an evidence that air pinenes may be related to human activities.Isoprene was also detected directly.These observations suggest that the procedure regarding pinenes and isoprene as coming from biologic sources of VOCs in the atmosphere should be applied with great care,especially in the core of the big city like Beijing.The specific reactivity of NMHCs was higher than that of cars of US,and the specific reactivity of volatile aromatic compounds was higher than that of the US SPECIATE database.

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon and Metal Concentrations in Imported Canned Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embbey K Ossai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations and profile of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs and metals (Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Fe and Mn were determined in selected brands of canned maize in the Nigeria market with a view to providing information on the hazards associated with the consumption of these products. The measurement of the concentrations of PAHs was carried out by using a gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detector (GC-FID after extraction by ultra-sonication with acetone/dichloromethane and clean-up. The 16 PAH concentrations varied between 45.1 and 335.7 µg/kg. The concentrations of the indicators for occurrence and effects of PAHs in food varied from 3.6 to 114.5 µg/kg for BaP, 6.4 to 168.2 µg/kg for PAH2, 11.8 to 232.7 µg/kg for PAH4 and 19.4 to 327.3 µg/kg for PAH8. The concentrations of metals were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion. The concentrations of metals in these samples ranged from <0.05 to 0.9 µg/g for Cd; 5.0 to 8.0 µg/g for Pb, 0.8 to 1.7 µg/g for Fe while Cr and Mn were less than the limits of quantification (<0.05 µg/g. The concentrations of Cd and Pb in these canned maize samples were above their permissible limits for foods.

  8. Thermal Stability of RP-2 for Hydrocarbon Boost Regenerative Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Deans, Matthew C.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.; Psaras, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests were performed in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Heated Tube Facility to study the heat transfer and thermal stability behavior of RP-2 under conditions similar to those found in rocket engine cooling channels. It has long been known that hydrocarbon fuels, such as RP-2, can decompose at high temperature to form deposits (coke) which can adversely impact rocket engine cooling channel performance. The heated tube facility provides a simple means to study these effects. Using resistively heated copper tubes in a vacuum chamber, flowing RP-2 was heated to explore thermal effects at a range of test conditions. Wall temperature (850-1050F) and bulk fluid temperature (300-500F) were varied to define thermal decomposition and stability at each condition. Flow velocity and pressure were fixed at 75 fts and 1000 psia, respectively. Additionally, five different batches of RP-2 were tested at identical conditions to examine any thermal stability differences resulting from batch to batch compositional variation. Among these tests was one with a potential coke reducing additive known as 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinoline (THQ). While copper tubes were used for the majority of tests, two exploratory tests were performed with a copper alloy known as GRCop-42. Each tube was instrumented with 15 thermocouples to examine the temperature profile, and carbon deposition at each thermocouple location was determined post-test in an oxidation furnace. In many tests, intermittent local temperature increases were observed visually and in the thermocouple data. These hot spots did not appear to correspond with a higher carbon deposition.

  9. Depletion of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Choi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid uptake of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs by a forest canopy was observed at Borden in Southern Ontario, Canada during bud break in early spring 2003. High volume air samples were taken on 12 individual days at three different heights (44.4, 29.1, and 16.7 m on a scaffolding tower and on the forest floor below the canopy (1.5 m. Concentrations of PAHs were positively correlated to ambient temperature, resulting from relatively warm and polluted air masses passing over the Eastern United States and Toronto prior to arriving at the sampling site. An analysis of vertical profiles and gas/particle partitioning of the PAHs showed that gaseous PAHs established a concentration gradient with height, whereas levels of particulate PAHs were relatively uniform, implying that only the uptake of gaseous PAHs by the forest canopy was sufficiently rapid to be observed. Specifically, the gaseous concentrations of intermediate PAHs, such as phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene, during budburst and leaf emergence were reduced within and above the canopy. When a gradient was observed, the percentage of PAHs on particles increased at the elevations experiencing a decrease in gas phase concentrations. The uptake of intermediate PAHs by the canopy also led to significant differences in gaseous PAH composition with height. These results are the most direct evidence yet of the filter effect of forest canopies for gaseous PAHs in early spring. PAH deposition fluxes and dry gaseous deposition velocities to the forest canopy were estimated from the concentration gradients.

  10. Estimation of Chronic Personal Exposure to Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunok; Zdeb, Michael; Perera, Frederica; Spengler, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exposure from solid fuel burning represents an important public health issue for the majority of the global population. Yet, understanding of individual-level exposures remains limited. Objectives To develop regionally adaptable chronic personal exposure model to pro-carcinogenic PAH (c-PAH) for the population in Kraków, Poland. Methods We checked the assumption of spatial uniformity in eight c-PAH using the coefficients of divergence (COD), a marker of absolute concentration differences. Upon successful validation, we developed personal exposure models for eight pro-carcinogenic PAH by integrating individual-level data with area-level meteorological or pollutant data. We checked the resulting model for accuracy and precision against home outdoor monitoring data. Results During winter, COD of 0.1 for Kraków suggest overall spatial uniformity in the ambient concentration of the eight c-PAH. The three models that we developed were associated with index of agreement approximately equal to 0.9, root mean square error < 2.6 ng/m3, and 90th percentile of absolute difference ≤ 4 ng/m3 for the predicted and the observed concentrations for eight pro-carcinogenic PAH. Conclusions Inexpensive and logistically feasible information could be used to estimate chronic personal exposure to PAH profiles, in lieu of costly and labor-intensive personal air monitoring at wide scale. At the same time, thorough validation through direct personal monitoring and assumption checking are critical for successful model development. PMID:25965038

  11. Aeromagnetics of southern Alberta within areas of hydrocarbon accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, G. E.; Morris, W. A. [McMaster Univ., School of Geography and Geology, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1999-12-01

    The relationship between the observed geomagnetic field and hydrocarbon pools is investigated by reviewing the sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary basins and the methods for isolating individual contributions, with specific reference to noise suppression. A recent high resolution aeromagnetic survey acquired by the Geological Survey of Canada in southern Alberta is used as the test case to demonstrate the method and the potential of aeromagnetic surveys to resolve structural controls on hydrocarbon emplacement. The investigation was undertaken in an effort to account for the fact that several features of the residual magnetic field appear to be common to a majority of hydrocarbon pools. Some of these commonalities are: (1) the long axis of the pool appears to be coincident with the strike of the basement-sourced magnetic signal, (2) hydrocarbon pools encompass areas of broad low amplitude magnetic anomalies, (3) cross-cutting fractures or faulting systems are located within areas of a majority of hydrocarbon pools, and (4) pools are associated with linear and/or curvilinear magnetic lineaments, of which a great number have topographic expression. These associations may arise as a result of eH/pH conditions of the hydrocarbons and the surrounding sediments, or they may arise purely as a result of the trapping structures. The physical extent of the interaction area of the pool with the surrounding sediment may be another factor in explaining the association of hydrocarbons and magnetics. 48 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivasigamani eUmadevi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  13. Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missallati, A.A. (Agip (N.A.M.E.)Ltd., Tripoli (Libya))

    1988-08-01

    According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

  14. Saturated vs. unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs) have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs toward these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons toward CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity toward the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favorable when compared with CNTs. Bader's theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights toward the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs. PMID:25232539

  15. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-09-01

    The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs) have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  16. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments: metal influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Raquel; Mucha, Ana P; Teixeira, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the potential effect of metals, such as Cd, Cu and Pb, on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments was investigated under laboratory conditions. Sandy and muddy non-vegetated sediments were collected in the Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) and spiked with crude oil and each of the metals. Spiked sediments were left in the dark under constant shaking for 15 days, after which crude oil biodegradation was evaluated. To estimate microbial abundance, total cell counts were obtained by DAPI staining and microbial community structure was characterized by ARISA. Culturable hydrocarbon degraders were determined using a modified most probable number protocol. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations were analysed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy after their extraction by sonication, and metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained showed that microbial communities had the potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with a maximum of 32 % degradation obtained for sandy sediments. Both crude oil and metals changed the microbial community structure, being the higher effect observed for Cu. Also, among the studied metals, only Cu displayed measurable deleterious effect on the hydrocarbons degradation process, as shown by a decrease in the hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance and in the hydrocarbon degradation rates. Both degradation potential and metal influence varied with sediment characteristics probably due to differences in contaminant bioavailability, a feature that should be taken into account in developing bioremediation strategies for co-contaminated estuarine sites.

  17. Microbial degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons on organoclay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-11-01

    The role of organoclays in hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clays used for this study were Na-montmorillonite and saponite. These two clays were treated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce organoclays which were used in this study. The study indicated that clays with high cation exchange capacity (CEC) such as Na-montmorillonite produced an organomontmorillonite that was inhibitory to biodegradation of the crude oil hydrocarbons. Extensive hydrophobic interaction between the organic phase of the organoclay and the crude oil hydrocarbons is suggested to render the hydrocarbons unavailable for biodegradation. However, untreated Na-montmorillonite was stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbons and is believed to have done so because of its high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients making it easy for the microbes to access the nutrients. This study indicates that unlike unmodified montmorillonites, organomontmorillonite may not serve any useful purpose in the bioremediation of crude oil spill sites where hydrocarbon removal by biodegradation is desired within a rapid time period.

  18. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Victoria A; Brubaker, Gaylen R; Zenker, Matthew J; Prince, Roger C; Gieg, Lisa M; Da Silva, Marcio L B; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2009-03-01

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4- and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n-alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO(4) day(-1)). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non-COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m- and o-xylene, as well as several alkanes (C(6)-C(12)). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non-COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules.

  19. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum‐contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Victoria A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Zenker, Matthew J.; Prince, Roger C.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Da Silva, Marcio L.B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2‐methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4‐ and 1,3,5‐trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n‐alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO4 day−1). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non‐COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m‐ and o‐xylene, as well as several alkanes (C6–C12). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non‐COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules. PMID:21261914

  20. Geochemical characteristics and origin of light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The light hydrocarbon geochemical characteristics of biogenic gases from Sebei 1 gas field in the Qaidam Basin, Baoshan gas field in the Baoshan Basin and Alaxin gas field, Puqian gas pool, Aonan gas pool in the Songliao Basin are studied and the origin is discussed based on the composition and isotope data of gases. The isoalkane contents among light hydrocarbons in natural gas show a negative relationship with δ13C1 values. The isoalkane contents of the gases with δ13C1 values of less than ?60‰ are also high with more than 40% among light hydrocarbons in Sebei 1 gas field and Puqian gas pool. Moreover, the 2,2-dimethylbutane and 2-methylpentane, mainly sourced from bacteria, have predominance among isoalkanes, which suggests that light hydrocarbons in biogenic gases from these gas fields or pools were probably generated by microbial action. However, the cycloalkane contents among light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas are related to δ13C1 values positively. In Alaxin gas field and Aonan gas pool, where δ13C1 values of biogenic gases are less than ?60‰, the average contents of cycloalkane are higher than 44%. Light hydrocarbons among biogenic gases from these gas fields were probably generated by catalysis. The isoalkane and cycloalkane contents among light hydrocarbons from biogenic gases in the Baoshan gas field are both high, which might be generated by these two actions. The results show that the data of light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas can provide important information for understanding the generation mechanisms of light hydrocarbons during geological evolution and identifying biogenic gas and low mature gas.

  1. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  2. Hydrocarbon composition products of the catalytic recycling plastics waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the IR spectroscopy results of the hydrocarbon composition of products, which is obtained from catalytic processing of plastic wastes. The optimal conditions for the hydrogenation with to producny liquid of products are identified.  These liquid products are enriched with aromatics, paraffinic- naphthenic and unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main characteristics of the distillates received by hydrogenation of plastics (as density, refractive index, iodine number, pour point, cloud point, filtering, sulfur content,  fractional and composition of the hydrocarbon group.

  3. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  4. Catalysts for converting syngas into liquid hydrocarbons and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Yan, Qiangu; Batchelor, William

    2016-03-15

    The presently-disclosed subject matter includes methods for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas. In some embodiments the syngas is obtained from biomass and/or comprises a relatively high amount of nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide. In some embodiments the present methods can convert syngas into liquid hydrocarbons through a one-stage process. Also provided are catalysts for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas, wherein the catalysts include a base material, a transition metal, and a promoter. In some embodiments the base material includes a zeolite-iron material or a cobalt-molybdenum carbide material. In still further embodiments the promoter can include an alkali metal.

  5. Organic geochemistry of the Vindhyan sediments: Implications for hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, A. M.; Mani, Devleena; Madhavi, T.; Kavitha, S.; Kalpana, M. S.; Patil, D. J.; Sharma, Mukund

    2014-09-01

    The organic geochemical methods of hydrocarbon prospecting involve the characterization of sedimentary organic matter in terms of its abundance, source and thermal maturity, which are essential prerequisites for a hydrocarbon source rock. In the present study, evaluation of organic matter in the outcrop shale samples from the Semri and Kaimur Groups of Vindhyan basin was carried out using Rock Eval pyrolysis. Also, the adsorbed low molecular weight hydrocarbons, methane, ethane, propane and butane, were investigated in the near surface soils to infer the generation of hydrocarbons in the Vindhyan basin. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content in shales ranges between 0.04% and 1.43%. The S1 (thermally liberated free hydrocarbons) values range between 0.01-0.09 mgHC/gRock (milligram hydrocarbon per gram of rock sample), whereas the S2 (hydrocarbons from cracking of kerogen) show the values between 0.01 and 0.14 mgHC/gRock. Based on the Tmax (temperature at highest yield of S2) and the hydrogen index (HI) correlations, the organic matter is characterized by Type III kerogen. The adsorbed soil gas, CH4 (C1), C2H6 (C2), C3H8 (C3) and nC4H10, (nC4), concentrations measured in the soil samples from the eastern part of Vindhyan basin (Son Valley) vary from 0 to 186 ppb, 0 to 4 ppb, 0 to 5 ppb, and 0 to 1 ppb, respectively. The stable carbon isotope values for the desorbed methane (δ13C1) and ethane (δ13C2) range between -45.7‰ to -25.2‰ and -35.3‰ to -20.19‰ (VPDB), respectively suggesting a thermogenic source for these hydrocarbons. High concentrations of thermogenic hydrocarbons are characteristic of areas around Sagar, Narsinghpur, Katni and Satna in the Son Valley. The light hydrocarbon concentrations (C1-C4) in near surface soils of the western Vindhyan basin around Chambal Valley have been reported to vary between 1-2547 ppb, 1-558 ppb, 1-181 ppb, 1-37 ppb and 1-32 ppb, respectively with high concentrations around Baran-Jhalawar-Bhanpur-Garot regions (Kumar

  6. Experimental Probing on Formation Mechanism of Hydrocarbon in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weng Kenan; Xiao Wansheng; Zhang Huizi; Wang Benshan

    1997-01-01

    @@ In order to study the formation mechanism of hydrocarbon in the earth's interior, preliminary experiments on chemical reactions of wax, graphite, siderite with supercritical water have been carried out respectively under the conditions of temperature about 800~1500℃ and pressure approximately above 1 GPa. These reactions can produce a large amount of methane, together with some CO2 and a little other hydrocarbons, indicating that the reactions of carbon-bearing materials with supercritical water is possibly a new formation mechanism of hydrocarbon under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure in deep earth.

  7. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  8. An Emission Inventory of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xilong; Zhu, Xianlei; Wang, Xuesong

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most dangerous compounds due to their high carcinogenic and mutagenic character. Emission inventory provides the primary data to account for the sources of ambient PAHs and server as a necessary database for effective PAHs pollution control. China is experiencing fast economic growth and large energy consumption, which might result in a large amount of PAHs anthropogenic emissions. Therefore, based on the previous studies and combined recently field emission measurements as well as socio-economic activity data, the development of a nationwide PAHs emission inventory is needed. In this work, the emission inventory of 16 PAHs listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants in China in the year 2012 is compiled. The emission amounts of PAHs were estimated as annual rates of emission-related activities multiplied by respective emission factors. The activities such as fuel consumption, including fossil fuel and biofuel, and socio-economic statistics were obtained from yearbook released by Chinese central government and/or provincial governments, as well as related industry reports. Emission factors were derived from the related literature. Recently reported emission factors from local measurements were used. The total emissions of PAHs were 120611 ton in 2012. In China, PAHs were emitted predominantly from domestic combustion of coal and biofuel, coking industry and motor vehicles, accounting for 72% of the total amount. PAHs emission profiles were significantly different between China and the other countries. The emission profile in China featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic combustion and coking industry. Domestic combustion of straw, coal and firewood emitted 19464 ton, 8831 ton, and 5062 ton of PAHs, respectively, which were much higher than those in other countries. Emission per capita showed

  9. Disjoint nonclassical hydrocarbons have very unstable lowest-lying singlet states: a PM3 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Francis Langler

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier workers have suggested that disjoint hydrocarbons have nearly-degenerate lowest-lying singlet and triplet states while non-disjoint (or joint hydrocarbons should be ground-state triplets. PM3 results for an appropriate selection of alternant hydrocarbons are inconsistent with that generalization: disjoint, nonclassical, alternant hydrocarbons show the strongest predilection for triplet ground states.

  10. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using 1H NMR spectroscopy [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    OpenAIRE

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Gerd Mildau; Anke Krause; Gerhard Marx; Walch, Stephan G.; Andrea Hartwig; Thomas Kuballa

    2017-01-01

    Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH). MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products). Quantitative ...

  11. Evaluation of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) in pure mineral hydrocarbon-based cosmetics and cosmetic raw materials using 1H NMR spectroscopy [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Gerd Mildau; Anke Rullmann; Gerhard Marx; Walch, Stephan G.; Andrea Hartwig; Thomas Kuballa

    2017-01-01

    Mineral hydrocarbons consist of two fractions, mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH). MOAH is a potential public health hazard because it may include carcinogenic polycyclic compounds. In the present study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was introduced, in the context of official controls, to measure MOSH and MOAH in raw materials or pure mineral hydrocarbon final products (cosmetics and medicinal products). Quantitative ...

  12. Dicty_cDB: CHC746 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AGKPTQNDVESFFNWIL-- - ---QLIXQLLYELFMQFGY*pynkdiaaaysgxglvanlvqlvktvakekivrlslstlr nllnngksneemidngfvrmlniln...GY*pynkdiaaaysgxglvanlvqlvktvakekivrlslstlr nllnngksneemidngfvrmlnilnikkwgdddipadievlinglakdidnmssfnkykt eii

  13. Dicty_cDB: CHC369 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G06 5', mRNA sequence. 58 5e-19 3 CV033767 |CV033767.1 RTNACL1_36_B08.g1_A029 Roots plus added NaCl Pinus ta...43.1 RTK1_29_F12.g1_A029 Roots minus potassium Pinus taeda cDNA clone RTK1_29_F12_A029 5', mRNA sequence. 58

  14. Dicty_cDB: CHC469 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mRNA sequence. 54 1e-16 3 CV033767 |CV033767.1 RTNACL1_36_B08.g1_A029 Roots plus... added NaCl Pinus taeda cDNA clone RTNACL1_36_B08_A029 5', mRNA sequence. 54 2e-16 3 CO366743 |CO366743.1 RTK1_29_F12.g1_A029 Roots

  15. Dicty_cDB: CHC156 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cds. 56 1e-26 5 BD183626 |BD183626.1 Material for diagnosing malaria and immune antigen for suppressing growth of plasmodium... and immune antigen for suppressing growth of plasmodium. 58 8e-19 6 U00152 |U00152.1 Plasmodium falciparum

  16. Dicty_cDB: CHC115 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available en for suppressing growth of plasmodium. 76 1e-49 9 BD183625 |BD183625.1 Material... for diagnosing malaria and immune antigen for suppressing growth of plasmodium. 76 1e-49 9 AB026051 |AB0260

  17. Dicty_cDB: CHC316 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available malaria and immune antigen for suppressing growth of plasmodium. 58 9e-19 6 BD183...625 |BD183625.1 Material for diagnosing malaria and immune antigen for suppressing growth of plasmodium. 58

  18. Dicty_cDB: CHC266 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ---RILINKEIQNF*xq*hlgqfqxnglyfxtkxfg*xgxhyqskgc*w*kxhsigxccw ccnxix*qxkrxqxtxikiftsexnl*slxrsxkxxltrxgxfgne...gsnltnctk*nske*ifkqrntiyqqivypf--- ---RILINKEIQNF*xq*hlgqfqxnglyfxtkxfg*xgxhyqskgc*w*kxhsigxccw ccnxix*qxkrx

  19. Dicty_cDB: CHC227 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GGTA TCCCACCAGATCT sequence update 2002. 9.10 Translated Amino Acid sequence ---xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi*xxx...LTGKTITLE VEGSDNIENVKTKIQDKEGIPPD Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ---xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi*xxx...ENVKTKIQDKEGIPPD Frame B: ---xxmxxxxxxxxxixxxfsxxxkxwyxxfcxnpxw*xynxxklkvlxxlrmlk...pkxkt kkvfhqinxvsfspvxnwrmvvlslittfkrnplsi*fsd*evvckfl*klslvkplhxk lkvvttlrm*kqkfktkkvshqi Frame C: ---xxxxxxxxxkxxsxxxlvxxxxggxxx

  20. Dicty_cDB: CHC420 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Zea mays genomic, genomic survey sequence. 48 1e-07 2 CG807137 |CG807137.1 1118078B02.y1 1118 - RescueMu Gri...d S Zea mays genomic, genomic survey sequence. 44 7e-07 2 CG730972 |CG730972.1 1119131F09.y1 1119 - RescueMu... Grid AA Zea mays genomic, genomic survey sequence. 44 1e-06 2 CG801640 |CG801640.1 1118023C02.y1 1118 - Res...cueMu Grid S Zea mays genomic, genomic survey sequence. 48 3e-06 2 CG731648 |CG73...1648.1 1119142E09.y1 1119 - RescueMu Grid AA Zea mays genomic, genomic survey sequence. 48 3e-06 2 CG807211

  1. Dicty_cDB: CHC281 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Malus x domestica cDNA clone ABCA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB...004877HT (AASB) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequ

  2. Dicty_cDB: CHC749 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ping fruit mesocarp Prunus persica cDNA clone PP_LEa0014A23f, mRNA sequence. 68 2e-10 2 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB...) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence.

  3. Dicty_cDB: CHC526 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available or 24 hours Malus x domestica cDNA clone ABCA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB...) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08

  4. Dicty_cDB: CHC140 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available apple fruit development, complete cds. 72 2e-08 2 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB) Royal Gala ...10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence. 72 2e-08 1 CN875989 |CN875989.1 020813

  5. Dicty_cDB: CHC118 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available for 24 hours Malus x domestica cDNA clone ABCA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB...) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB0048

  6. Dicty_cDB: CHC564 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SSED DURING APPLE FRUIT DEVELOPMENT. ;, mRNA sequence. 50 0.009 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB...) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence. 50 0.009 1 CN875989 |C

  7. Dicty_cDB: CHC616 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available x domestica cDNA clone ABCA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB)... Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence.

  8. Dicty_cDB: CHC309 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available or 24 hours Malus x domestica cDNA clone ABCA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB...) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence. 72 1e-08

  9. Dicty_cDB: CHC634 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CA005552, mRNA sequence. 72 2e-08 1 CN883223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit ...Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877, mRNA sequence. 72 2e-08 1 CN895049 |CN89

  10. Dicty_cDB: CHC111 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3223 |CN883223.1 010813AASB004877HT (AASB) Royal Gala 10 DAFB fruit Malus x domestica cDNA clone AASB004877,...omestica mRNA for protein abundantly expressed during apple fruit development, complete cds. 72 1e-08 1 CN88

  11. Dicty_cDB: CHC126 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |BZ278821.1 CH230-451E6.TV CHORI-230 Segment 2 Rattus norvegicus genomic clone CH...terica serovar Typhi Ty2, section 14 of 16 of the complete genome. 44 2.3 1 BZ135439 |BZ135439.1 CH230-386C21.TV CHORI-230 Segment

  12. Dicty_cDB: CHC452 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AAAGGAATCCNCTC sequence update 2002.10.25 Translated Amino Acid sequence llaywnyanfc*nshw*nhhigs*r**qh*kcqg*...rrwpysl*lqhxkrihspfssqikrwyanlcknxdw*dhhigsxrx**h*kcqsq nsrqrrystrstkinfrw*tirrwsysl*lqyskgihspfssqikrwyanlc...*nfxr*nx hlgsrr***h*kc*sqnprqrrystrsttshfrw*tirrwsysxlittfkrnpl Frame C: llaywnyanfc*nshw*nhhigs

  13. Dicty_cDB: CHC779 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 73593.1 EST719671 potato abiotic stress cDNA library Solanum tuberosum cDNA clone...ssed sequence tag database for abiotic stressed leaves of Vitis vinifera var. Cha...52 An expressed sequence tag database for abiotic stressed leaves of Vitis vinifera var. Chardonnay Vitis vi...158G03_410335 An expressed sequence tag database for abiotic stressed leaves of Vitis vinifera var. Chardonn

  14. Dicty_cDB: CHC340 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available , complete sequence. 1065 0.0 9 CO013595 |CO013595.1 EST801930 Coccidioides posadasii spherule cDNA library,... 0.4 to 2.3 kb Coccidioides posadasii cDNA clone CIEBZ67 5' end, mRNA sequence. 5...2 3e-09 3 CO009511 |CO009511.1 EST797846 Coccidioides posadasii spherule cDNA library, 0.4 to 2.3 kb Coccidioides posadas...CO005677 |CO005677.1 EST794012 Coccidioides posadasii spherule cDNA library, 0.4 to 2.3 kb Coccidioides posadas...CAEEL Q22633 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE ;, mRNA sequence. 36 1e-07 5 CO006156 |CO006156.1 EST794491 Coccidioides posadas

  15. Dicty_cDB: CHC463 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value...Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N D13973 |D13973.1 Dicty...ogy vs Protein Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value ( Q04503 ) RecName: Full=Pre

  16. Dicty_cDB: CHC160 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available kgfxgvikrwgvrklprkthkglrkvacigawhpsrvsttvpragqlgyhhr vernkkiyrigqaqpedgkqistgktefdltektinpmggfahygmvkheflmlkgcvag prkraltlrksittqtgra...alekitlkfidtsskfghglhqtaedktkyfgvkksr Frame C: kqq*qyess*i*sstsr*srfqtkkesrqtsr*sqv

  17. Dicty_cDB: CHC843 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available enomic DNA, ... 152 1e-35 EU968184_1( EU968184 |pid:none) Zea mays clone 316348 unknown mRNA. 151 3e-35 (Q6DEL2) RecName: Full=Cleft...te a... 147 4e-34 (Q5ZKJ0) RecName: Full=Cleft lip and palate transmembrane prote

  18. Dicty_cDB: CHC176 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CA813481 |CA813481.1 CA48LN10IF-E8 Cabernet Sauvignon Leaf - CA48LN Vitis vinifera cDNA clone CA48LN10IF-E8... 5', mRNA sequence. 64 5e-07 2 CB341828 |CB341828.2 CA32EN0002_IIIbF_E01 Cabernet

  19. Dicty_cDB: CHC782 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10.25 Translated Amino Acid sequence iftthsivcv*YKFCNSRMLKKHRVLIIVIVMTLVVMISYSSILNINTAQTSINNQKNGV GNKNEEMDID...ALNHKGEIYSANDLWSKE PIIDFKMKDKTIKLTQNQAN*sficrfrfxwdivk Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: iftth

  20. Dicty_cDB: CHC539 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nw*c*infkir*fiiiiklvifftinefnsmrwlwkwrit rcsrwsrwwcsywywcncwfcftwswfhfnwrfkqlwl*lklqklnynlyikppiiyyl* m**ych...wkw ritrcsrwsrwwcsywywcncwfcftwswfhfnwrfkqlwl*lklqklnynlyikppiiy yl*m**ychkxtxylk Frame B: yqtnkn*tnikmtilas