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Sample records for hydrocarbon biodegradation rates

  1. Effects of oxygen supply on the biodegradation rate in oil hydrocarbons contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawierucha, I.; Malina, G.

    2011-04-01

    Respirometry studies using the 10-chamber Micro-Oxymax respirometer (Columbus, Ohio) were conducted to determine the effect of biostimulation (by diverse ways of O2 supply) on enhancing biodegradation in soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. Soil was collected from a former military airport in Kluczewo, Poland. Oxygen was supplied by means of aerated water, aqueous solutions of H2O2 and KMnO4. The biodegradation was evaluated on the basis of O2 uptake and CO2 production. The O2 consumption and CO2 production rates during hydrocarbons biodegradation were estimated from the slopes of cumulative curve linear regressions. The pertinent intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation rates were calculated on the basis of mass balance equation and O2 uptake and CO2 production rates. The biodegradation rates of 5-7 times higher as compared to a control were observed when the aqueous solution of KMnO4 in concentration of 20 g L-1 was applied. Permanganate is known to readily oxidize alkene carbon - carbon double bonds; so it can be successfully applied in remediation technology for soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. While hydrocarbons are not completely mineralized by permanganate oxidation reactions, their structure is altered by polar functional groups providing vast improvements in aqueous solubility and availability for biodegradation. The 3% aqueous solution of H2O2 caused significant improvement of the biodegradation rates as compared to a control (on average about 260%). Aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons can benefit from the presence of oxygen released during H2O2 decomposition. Adding of aerated water resulted in an increase of biodegradation rates (about 114 - 229%) as compared to a control. The aerated water can both be the source of oxygen for microorganisms and determine the transport of substrate to bacteria cells.

  2. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  3. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions.

  4. APPROXIMATION OF BIODEGRADATION RATE CONSTANTS FOR MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (BTEX) IN GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two methods were used to approximate site-specific biodegradation rates of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes [BTEX]) dissolved in ground water. Both use data from monitoring wells and the hydrologic properties of the quifer to estimate a biode...

  5. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, Matthew A.; Baehr, Arthur L.

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 gyr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 gm-2yr-1 (1.45×10-3 and 1.51×10-3 gal.ft.-2yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  6. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  7. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Warren, Ean; Essaid, Hedeff I.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C 3- and C 4-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene ≥ toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1 mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1 mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  8. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C3- and C4-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene ≥ toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1 mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1 mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  9. QSAR for Predicting Biodegradation Rates of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiang; LI Xian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between chemical structures and biodegradation rates (k b) of 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied using density functional theory (DFT) and stepwise multiple linear regression analysis (SMLR) method.The equilibrium geometries and vibration frequency have been investigated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level by thinking Solvent effects using a selfconsistent reaction field (SCRF) based on the polarizable continuum model (PCM).It was concluded that the biodegradation rate was closely related to its molecular structure,and there is one high correlation coefficient between the in-plane bending vibration frequency of the conjugated ring of PAHs (Freq) and k b.By means of regression analysis,the main factors affecting the biodegradation rate were obtained and the equation of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was successfully established kb =-0.653+0.001Freq+0.068CQ+0.049N1.Statistical evaluation of the developed QSAR showed that the relationships were statistically significant and the model had good predictive ability.The fact that a bending frequency is more important than the HOMO or LUMO energies in predicting k b suggests that the bending of benzene ring might play an important role in the enzymatic catalysis of the initial oxidation step.

  10. Quantification of aerobic biodegradation and volatilization rates of gasoline hydrocarbons near the water table under natural attenuation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.; Baker, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation and volatilization near the water table constitute a coupled pathway that contributes significantly to the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons at gasoline spill sites. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation and volatilization were quantified by analyzing vapor transport in the unsaturated zone at a gasoline spill site in Beaufort, South Carolina. Aerobic biodegradation rates decreased with distance above the water table, ranging from 0.20 to 1.5g m-3 d-1 for toluene, from 0.24 to 0.38 g m-3 d-1 for xylene, from 0.09 to 0.24 g m-3 d-1 for cyclohexene, from 0.05 to 0.22 g m-3 d-1 for ethylbenzene, and from 0.02 to 0.08 g m-3 d-1 for benzene. Rates were highest in the capillary zone, where 68% of the total hydrocarbon mass that volatilized from the water table was estimated to have been biodegraded. Hydrocarbons were nearly completely degraded within 1 m above the water table. This large loss underscores the importance of aerobic biodegradation in limiting the transport of hydrocarbon vapors in the unsaturated zone and implies that vapor-plume migration to basements and other points of contact may only be significant if a source of free product is present. Furthermore, because transport of the hydrocarbon in the unsaturated zone can be limited relative to that of oxygen and carbon dioxide, soil, gas surveys conducted at hydrocarbon-spill sites would benefit by the inclusion of oxygen- and carbon-dioxide-gas concentration measurements. Aerobic degradation kinetics in the unsaturated zone were approximately first-order. First-order rate constants near the water table were highest for cyctohexene (0.21-0.65 d-1) and nearly equivalent for ethylbenzene (0.11-20.31 d-1), xylenes (0.10-0.31 d-1), toluene (0.09-0.30 d-1), and benzene (0.07,0.31 d-1). Hydrocarbon mass loss rates at the water table resulting from the coupled aerobic biodegradation and volatilization process were determined by extrapolating gas transport rates through the capillary zone. Mass

  11. Influence of inocula with prior hydrocarbon exposure on biodegradation rates of diesel, synthetic diesel, and fish-biodiesel in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Schiewer, Silke

    2014-08-01

    To achieve effective bioremediation within short warm seasons of cold climates, microbial adaptation periods to the contaminant should be brief. The current study investigated growth phases for soil spiked with diesel, Syntroleum, or fish biodiesel, using microbial inocula adapted to the specific substrates. For modeling hydrocarbon degradation, multi-phase first order kinetics was assumed, comparing linear regression with nonlinear parameter optimization of rate constants and phase durations. Lag phase periods of 5 to >28d were followed by short and intense exponential growth phases with high rate constants (e.g. from kFish=0.0013±0.0002 to kSyntr=0.015±0.001d(-1)). Hydrocarbon mineralization was highest for Syntroleum contamination, where up to three times higher cumulative CO2 production was achieved than for diesel fuel, with fish biodiesel showing initially the slowest degradation. The amount of hydrocarbons recovered from the soil by GC-MS decreased in the order fish biodiesel>diesel>Syntroleum. During initial weeks, biodegradation was higher for microbial inocula adapted to a specific fuel type, whereby the main effect of the inoculum was to shorten the lag phase duration; however, the inoculum's importance diminished after daily respiration peaked. In conclusion, addition of an inoculum to increase biodegradation rates was not necessary.

  12. Intrinsic rates of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in Gulf of Mexico intertidal sandy sediments and its enhancement by organic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Behzad, E-mail: bmortazavi@ua.edu [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL, 36528 (United States); Horel, Agota [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL, 36528 (United States); Beazley, Melanie J.; Sobecky, Patricia A. [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The rates of crude oil degradation by the extant microorganisms in intertidal sediments from a northern Gulf of Mexico beach were determined. The enhancement in crude oil degradation by amending the microbial communities with marine organic matter was also examined. Replicate mesocosm treatments consisted of: (i) controls (intertidal sand), (ii) sand contaminated with crude oil, (iii) sand plus organic matter, and (iv) sand plus crude oil and organic matter. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production was measured daily for 42 days and the carbon isotopic ratio of CO{sub 2} (δ{sup 13}CO{sub 2}) was used to determine the fraction of CO{sub 2} derived from microbial respiration of crude oil. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone library analyses indicated members of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi occurred exclusively in control sediments whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes occurred in both control and oil contaminated sediments. Members of the hydrocarbon-degrading genera Hydrocarboniphaga, Pseudomonas, and Pseudoxanthomonas were found primarily in oil contaminated treatments. Hydrocarbon mineralization was 76% higher in the crude oil amended with organic matter treatment compared to the rate in the crude oil only treatment indicating that biodegradation of crude oil in the intertidal zone by an extant microbial community is enhanced by input of organic matter.

  13. Primary biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.H.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Paumen, M.L.; Parkerton, T.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes primary biodegradation experiments performed to determine the persistence of higher molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater. Results from the biodegradation experiments show that the majority of tested petroleum hydrocarbons have half-lives in seawater less than 60 days.

  14. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  16. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments: metal influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Raquel; Mucha, Ana P; Teixeira, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the potential effect of metals, such as Cd, Cu and Pb, on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments was investigated under laboratory conditions. Sandy and muddy non-vegetated sediments were collected in the Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) and spiked with crude oil and each of the metals. Spiked sediments were left in the dark under constant shaking for 15 days, after which crude oil biodegradation was evaluated. To estimate microbial abundance, total cell counts were obtained by DAPI staining and microbial community structure was characterized by ARISA. Culturable hydrocarbon degraders were determined using a modified most probable number protocol. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations were analysed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy after their extraction by sonication, and metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained showed that microbial communities had the potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with a maximum of 32 % degradation obtained for sandy sediments. Both crude oil and metals changed the microbial community structure, being the higher effect observed for Cu. Also, among the studied metals, only Cu displayed measurable deleterious effect on the hydrocarbons degradation process, as shown by a decrease in the hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance and in the hydrocarbon degradation rates. Both degradation potential and metal influence varied with sediment characteristics probably due to differences in contaminant bioavailability, a feature that should be taken into account in developing bioremediation strategies for co-contaminated estuarine sites.

  17. Microbial biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xue, Yong; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2008-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread in various ecosystems and are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because of their hydrophobic nature, most PAHs bind to particulates in soil and sediments, rendering them less available for biological uptake. Microbial degradation represents the major mechanism responsible for the ecological recovery of PAH-contaminated sites. The goal of this review is to provide an outline of the current knowledge of microbial PAH catabolism. In the past decade, the genetic regulation of the pathway involved in naphthalene degradation by different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria was studied in great detail. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, a deeper understanding of some high-molecular-weight PAH degradation pathways in bacteria was provided. The ability of nonligninolytic and ligninolytic fungi to transform or metabolize PAH pollutants has received considerable attention, and the biochemical principles underlying the degradation of PAHs were examined. In addition, this review summarizes the information known about the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted ecosystems. A deeper understanding of the microorganism-mediated mechanisms of catalysis of PAHs will facilitate the development of new methods to enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  18. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in intertidal wetland sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGenity, Terry J

    2014-06-01

    Intertidal wetlands, primarily salt marsh, mangrove and mudflats, which provide many essential ecosystem services, are under threat on numerous fronts; a situation that is made worse by crude-oil pollution. Microbes are the main vehicle for remediation of such sediments, and new discoveries, such as novel biodegradation pathways, means of accessing oil, multi-species interactions, and community-level responses to oil addition, are helping us to understand, predict and monitor the fate of oil. Despite this, there are many challenges, not least because of the heterogeneity of these ecosystems and the complexity of crude oil. For example, there is growing awareness about the toxicity of the oxygenated products that result from crude-oil weathering, which are difficult to degrade. This review highlights how developments in areas as diverse as systems biology, microbiology, ecology, biogeochemistry and analytical chemistry are enhancing our understanding of hydrocarbon biodegradation and thus bioremediation of oil-polluted intertidal wetlands.

  19. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Mehrasbi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenase activity which was assessed by TTC technique, correlated significantly positive with the numbers of microorganisms. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients(r in contaminated soils with gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture were 0.79, 0.80 and 0.69, respectively.

  20. Tracking hydrocarbon plume transport and biodegradation at Deepwater Horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilli, Richard; Reddy, Christopher M; Yoerger, Dana R; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Jakuba, Michael V; Kinsey, James C; McIntyre, Cameron P; Sylva, Sean P; Maloney, James V

    2010-10-08

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout is the largest offshore oil spill in history. We present results from a subsurface hydrocarbon survey using an autonomous underwater vehicle and a ship-cabled sampler. Our findings indicate the presence of a continuous plume of oil, more than 35 kilometers in length, at approximately 1100 meters depth that persisted for months without substantial biodegradation. Samples collected from within the plume reveal monoaromatic petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in excess of 50 micrograms per liter. These data indicate that monoaromatic input to this plume was at least 5500 kilograms per day, which is more than double the total source rate of all natural seeps of the monoaromatic petroleum hydrocarbons in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Dissolved oxygen concentrations suggest that microbial respiration rates within the plume were not appreciably more than 1 micromolar oxygen per day.

  1. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, R; Schinner, F

    2001-09-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure, Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited.

  2. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margesin, R.; Schinner, F. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie

    2001-07-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure. Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds, has been shown to occur in various extreme habitats. The biodegradation of many components of petroleum hydrocarbons has been reported in a variety of terrestrial and marine cold ecosystems. Cold-adapted hydrocarbon degraders are also useful for wastewater treatment. The use of thermophiles for biodegradation of hydrocarbons with low water solubility is of interest, as solubility and thus bioavailability, are enhanced at elevated temperatures. Thermophiles, predominantly bacilli, possess a substantial potential for the degradation of environmental pollutants, including all major classes. Indigenous thermophilic hydrocarbon degraders are of special significance for the bioremediation of oil-polluted desert soil. Some studies have investigated composting as a bioremediation process. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of high salt concentrations is of interest for the bioremediation of oil-polluted salt marshes and industrial wastewaters, contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons or with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Our knowledge of the biodegradation potential of acidophilic, alkaliphilic, or barophilic microorganisms is limited. (orig.)

  3. Influence of adhesion on aerobic biodegradation and bioremediation of liquid hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasnezhad, Hassan; Gray, Murray; Foght, Julia M

    2011-11-01

    Biodegradation of poorly water-soluble liquid hydrocarbons is often limited by low availability of the substrate to microbes. Adhesion of microorganisms to an oil-water interface can enhance this availability, whereas detaching cells from the interface can reduce the rate of biodegradation. The capability of microbes to adhere to the interface is not limited to hydrocarbon degraders, nor is it the only mechanism to enable rapid uptake of hydrocarbons, but it represents a common strategy. This review of the literature indicates that microbial adhesion can benefit growth on and biodegradation of very poorly water-soluble hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes and large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in a non-aqueous phase. Adhesion is particularly important when the hydrocarbons are not emulsified, giving limited interfacial area between the two liquid phases. When mixed communities are involved in biodegradation, the ability of cells to adhere to the interface can enable selective growth and enhance bioremediation with time. The critical challenge in understanding the relationship between growth rate and biodegradation rate for adherent bacteria is to accurately measure and observe the population that resides at the interface of the hydrocarbon phase.

  4. BIOB: a mathematical model for the biodegradation of low solubility hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Personna, Yves R; Lee, Ken; Tsao, David; Demicco, Erik D

    2014-06-15

    Modeling oil biodegradation is an important step in predicting the long term fate of oil on beaches. Unfortunately, existing models do not account mechanistically for environmental factors, such as pore water nutrient concentration, affecting oil biodegradation, rather in an empirical way. We present herein a numerical model, BIOB, to simulate the biodegradation of insoluble attached hydrocarbon. The model was used to simulate an experimental oil spill on a sand beach. The biodegradation kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting the model to the experimental data of alkanes and aromatics. It was found that parameter values are comparable to their counterparts for the biodegradation of dissolved organic matter. The biodegradation of aromatics was highly affected by the decay of aromatic biomass, probably due to its low growth rate. Numerical simulations revealed that the biodegradation rate increases by 3-4 folds when the nutrient concentration is increased from 0.2 to 2.0 mg N/L.

  5. Potential for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WiTT

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... Biodegradation of used motor oil by single and mixed cultures of ... microorganisms for bioremediation of hydrocarbon- contaminated ..... extreme thermophile, Synechococcus lividus (Cyanophyta). Arch. Mikrobiol. 78: 25-41.

  6. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in spent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femdot

    2015-02-16

    Feb 16, 2015 ... percentage total PAHs remaining in FCF soil ranged from 71.7 to 73.6% when inoculated with P. ... Key words: Biodegradation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), cutting fluids, .... E-mail: oyinpek@yahoo.com.

  7. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols, chlorophe......This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols...

  8. Anoxic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in saline media using denitrifier biogranules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-07-01

    The total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) biodegradation was examined using biogranules at different initial TPH concentration and contact time under anoxic condition in saline media. The circular compact biogranules having the average diameter between 2 and 3mm were composed of a dense population of Bacillus spp. capable of biodegrading TPH under anoxic condition in saline media were formed in first step of the study. The biogranules could biodegrade over 99% of the TPH at initial concentration up to 2g/L at the contact time of 22h under anoxic condition in saline media. The maximum TPH biodegradation rate of 2.6 gTPH/gbiomass.d could be obtained at initial TPH concentration of 10g/L. Accordingly, the anoxic biogranulation is a possible and promising technique for high-rate biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in saline media.

  9. Hydrocarbons biodegradation in unsaturated porous medium; Biodegradation des hydrocarbures en milieu poreux insature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C

    2007-12-15

    Biological processes are expected to play an important role in the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. However, factors influencing the kinetics of biodegradation are still not well known, especially in the unsaturated zone. To address these biodegradation questions in the unsaturated zone an innovative experimental set up based on a physical column model was developed. This experimental set up appeared to be an excellent tool for elaboration of a structured porous medium, with well defined porous network and adjusted water/oil saturations. Homogeneous repartition of both liquid phases (i.e., aqueous and non aqueous) in the soil pores, which also contain air, was achieved using ceramic membranes placed at the bottom of the soil column. Reproducible interfaces (and connectivity) are developed between gas, and both non mobile water and NAPL phases, depending on the above-defined characteristics of the porous media and on the partial saturations of these three phases (NAPL, water and gas). A respirometric apparatus was coupled to the column. Such experimental set up have been validated with hexadecane in dilution in an HMN phase. This approach allowed detailed information concerning n-hexadecane biodegradation, in aerobic condition, through the profile of the oxygen consumption rate. We have taken benefit of this technique, varying experimental conditions, to determine the main parameters influencing the biodegradation kinetics and compositional evolution of hydrocarbons, under steady state unsaturated conditions and with respect to aerobic metabolism. Impacts of the nitrogen quantity and of three different grain sizes have been examined. Biodegradation of petroleum cut, as diesel cut and middle distillate without aromatic fraction, were, also studied. (author)

  10. Assessing impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in weathered contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetutu, Eric; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Dandie, Catherine E; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2013-10-15

    In this study, impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils were assessed using chemical and molecular methodologies. Two long-term hydrocarbon contaminated soils were utilised which were similar in physico-chemical properties but differed in the extent of hydrocarbon (C10-C40) contamination (S1: 16.5 g kg(-1); S2: 68.9 g kg(-1)). Under enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) conditions, hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed in S1 microcosms (26.4% reduction in C10-C40 hydrocarbons), however, ENA was unable to stimulate degradation in S2. Although eubacterial communities (PCR-DGGE analysis) were similar for both soils, the alkB bacterial community was less diverse in S2 presumably due to impacts associated with elevated hydrocarbons. When hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed using HP-β-CD extraction, large residual concentrations remained in the soil following the extraction procedure. However, when linear regression models were used to predict the endpoints of hydrocarbon degradation, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between HP-β-CD predicted and microcosm measured biodegradation endpoints. This data suggested that the lack of hydrocarbon degradation in S2 resulted primarily from limited hydrocarbon bioavailability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MICROORGANISMS’ SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES ROLE IN HYDROCARBONS BIODEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оlga Vasylchenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Existing data and publications regarding oil, hydrocarbon biodegradation, metabolism, and bioremediation were analyzed. Search of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria which are producers of biosurfactants was provided, types of microbial surfactants and their physiological role were analyzed and ordered. The study of factors affecting the surface active properties of producers’ cultures was done.

  12. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon cuts used for diesel oil formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Sophie; Marchal, Rémy; Sghir, Abdelghani; Monot, Frédéric

    2004-11-01

    The biodegradability of various types of diesel oil (DO), such as straight-run DO, light-cycle DO, hydrocracking DO, Fischer-Tropsch DO and commercial DO, was investigated in biodegradation tests performed in closed-batch systems using two microflorae. The first microflora was an activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant as commonly used in biodegradability tests of commercial products and the second was a microflora from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil with possible specific capacities for hydrocarbon degradation. Kinetics of CO(2) production and extent of DO biodegradation were obtained by chromatographic procedures. Under optimised conditions, the polluted-soil microflora was found to extensively degrade all the DO types tested, the degradation efficiencies being higher than 88%. For all the DOs tested, the biodegradation capacities of the soil microflora were significantly higher than those of the activated sludge. Using both microflora, the extent of biodegradation was highly dependent upon the type of DO used, especially its hydrocarbon composition. Linear alkanes were completely degraded in each test, whereas identifiable branched alkanes such as farnesane, pristane or phytane were degraded to variable extents. Among the aromatics, substituted mono-aromatics were also variably biodegraded.

  13. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon cuts used for diesel oil formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, S.; Marchal, R.; Monot, F. [Departement de Biotechnologie et Chimie de la Biomasse, Institut Francais de Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Sghir, A. [Genoscope, CNRS UMR 8030, Structure et Evolution des Genomes, Evry (France)

    2004-11-01

    The biodegradability of various types of diesel oil (DO), such as straight-run DO, light-cycle DO, hydrocracking DO, Fischer-Tropsch DO and commercial DO, was investigated in biodegradation tests performed in closed-batch systems using two microflorae. The first microflora was an activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant as commonly used in biodegradability tests of commercial products and the second was a microflora from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil with possible specific capacities for hydrocarbon degradation. Kinetics of CO{sub 2} production and extent of DO biodegradation were obtained by chromatographic procedures. Under optimised conditions, the polluted-soil microflora was found to extensively degrade all the DO types tested, the degradation efficiencies being higher than 88%. For all the DOs tested, the biodegradation capacities of the soil microflora were significantly higher than those of the activated sludge. Using both microflora, the extent of biodegradation was highly dependent upon the type of DO used, especially its hydrocarbon composition. Linear alkanes were completely degraded in each test, whereas identifiable branched alkanes such as farnesane, pristane or phytane were degraded to variable extents. Among the aromatics, substituted mono-aromatics were also variably biodegraded. (orig.)

  14. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols, chlorophe......This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols......-reducing conditions, toluene was easily biodegraded. The xylenes and ethylbenzene were degraded cometabolically if toluene was used as a primary carbon source; their removal was influenced by competitive inhibition with toluene. These interaction phenomena are discussed in this paper and a kinetic model taking...

  15. Use of slow-release fertilizers and biopolymers for stimulating hydrocarbon biodegradation in oil-contaminated beach sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Xu; Li Ching Yong; Yong Giak Lim; Obbard, J.P. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Nutrient concentration and hydrocarbon bioavailability are key factors affecting biodegradation rates of oil in contaminated beach sediments. The effect of a slow-release fertilizer, Osmocote, as well as two biopolymers, chitin and chitosan, on the bioremediation of oil-spiked beach sediments was investigated using an open irrigation system over a 56-day period under laboratory conditions. Osmocote was effective in sustaining a high level of nutrients in leached sediments, as well as elevated levels of microbial activity and rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation. Chitin was more biodegradable than chitosan and gradually released nitrogen into the sediment. The addition of chitin or chitosan to the Osmocote amended sediments enhanced biodegradation rates of the alkanes relative to the presence of Osmocote alone, where chitosan was more effective than chitin due to its greater oil sorption capacity. Furthermore, chitosan significantly enhanced the biodegradation rates of all target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (author)

  16. Biodegradation Mechanism and Technology of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIAO Shuo; WANG Hong-qi; ZHENG Yi-nan; HUA Fei

    2016-01-01

    [Abstract]Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are a class of potentially hazardous chemicals of environmental and health concern.PAHs are one of the most prevalent groups of contaminants found in soil.Biodegradation of complex hydrocarbon usually requires the cooperation of more than single specie.This paper reviews the existing screening methods of PAH-degrading bacteria.It studied the mechanism and technical applications of the co-metabolism in PAHs.Author gives the suggestions and prospects in Biodegradable trend of PHAs.

  17. Biodegradation and dissolution of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by Stenotrophomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Bhagyashree; Manickam, N; Kumari, Smita; Tiwari, Akhilesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the biodegradation capabilities of a locally isolated bacterium, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain IITR87 to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and also check the preferential biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). From preferential substrate degradation studies, it was found that Stenotrophomonas sp. strain IITR87 first utilized phenanthrene (three membered ring), followed by pyrene (four membered ring), then benzo[α]pyrene (five membered ring). Dissolution study of PAHs with surfactants, rhamnolipid and tritonX-100 showed that the dissolution of PAHs increased in the presence of surfactants.

  18. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil by microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Whan; Kim, Young-Bum; Shin, Jae-Dong; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-03-01

    Effectiveness of a microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid, was evaluated in washing and biodegradation of model hydrocarbons and crude oil in soil. Thirty percent of 2-methylnaphthalene was effectively washed and solubilized with 10 g/L of sophorolipid with similar or higher efficiency than that of commercial surfactants. Addition of sophorolipid in soil increased biodegradation of model compounds: 2-methylnaphthalene (95% degradation in 2 days), hexadecane (97%, 6 days), and pristane (85%, 6 days). Also, effective biodegradation method of crude oil in soil was observed by the addition of sophorolipid, resulting in 80% biodegradation of saturates and 72% aromatics in 8 weeks. These results showed the potentials of the microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid, as an effective surfactant for soil washing and as an in situ biodegradation enhancer.

  19. Biodegradation aspects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritash, A K; Kaushik, C P

    2009-09-30

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H(2)O, CO(2) (aerobic) or CH(4) (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and the rate

  20. Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haritash, A.K., E-mail: akharitash@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India); Kaushik, C.P. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India)

    2009-09-30

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} (aerobic) or CH{sub 4} (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  1. In situ biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, D. W.; Barker, J. F.

    1992-04-01

    Three types of experiments were conducted to assess the potential for enhancing the in situ biodegradation of nine aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic, leachate-impacted aquifers at North Bay, Ontario, and at Canada Forces Base Borden. Laboratory micrososms containing authentic aquifer material and groundwater from the North Bay site were amended with nitrate and glucose. No significant losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed compared to unamended controls, over a period of 187 days. A total of eight in situ biodegradation columns were installed in the North Bay and Borden aquifers. Remedial additions included electron acceptors (nitrate and sulphate) and primary substrates (acetate, lactate and yeast extract). Six aromatic hydrocarbons [toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, cumene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene ( 1,2,4-TMB)] were completely degraded in at least one in situ column at the North Bay site. Only toluene was degraded in the Borden aquifer. In all cases, aromatic hydrocarbon attenuation was attributed to biodegradation by methanogenic and fermentative bacteria. No evidence of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation was observed in columns remediated with nitrate or primary substrates. A continuous forced gradient injection experiment with sulphate addition was conducted at the North Bay site over a period of 51 days. The concentration of six aromatic hydrocarbons was monitored over time in the injection wells and at piezometer fences located 2, 5 and 10 m downgradient. All compounds except toluene reached injection concentration between 14 and 26 days after pumping began, and showed some evidence of selective retardation. Toluene broke through at a subdued concentration (˜ 50% of injection levels), and eventually declined to undetectable levels on day 43. This attenuation was attributed to adaptation and biodegradation by anaerobic bacteria. The results from these experiments indicate that considerable anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in

  2. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  3. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  4. On the efficiency of the hybrid and the exact second-order sampling formulations of the EnKF: a reality-inspired 3-D test case for estimating biodegradation rates of chlorinated hydrocarbons at the port of Rotterdam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharamti, Mohamad E.; Valstar, Johan; Janssen, Gijs; Marsman, Annemieke; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    This study considers the assimilation problem of subsurface contaminants at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. It involves the estimation of solute concentrations and biodegradation rates of four different chlorinated solvents. We focus on assessing the efficiency of an adaptive hybrid ensemble Kalman filter and optimal interpolation (EnKF-OI) and the exact second-order sampling formulation (EnKFESOS) for mitigating the undersampling of the estimation and observation errors covariances, respectively. A multi-dimensional and multi-species reactive transport model is coupled to simulate the migration of contaminants within a Pleistocene aquifer layer located around 25 m below mean sea level. The biodegradation chain of chlorinated hydrocarbons starting from tetrachloroethene and ending with vinyl chloride is modeled under anaerobic environmental conditions for 5 decades. Yearly pseudo-concentration data are used to condition the forecast concentration and degradation rates in the presence of model and observational errors. Assimilation results demonstrate the robustness of the hybrid EnKF-OI, for accurately calibrating the uncertain biodegradation rates. When implemented serially, the adaptive hybrid EnKF-OI scheme efficiently adjusts the weights of the involved covariances for each individual measurement. The EnKFESOS is shown to maintain the parameter ensemble spread much better leading to more robust estimates of the states and parameters. On average, a well tuned hybrid EnKF-OI and the EnKFESOS respectively suggest around 48 and 21 % improved concentration estimates, as well as around 70 and 23 % improved anaerobic degradation rates, over the standard EnKF. Incorporating large uncertainties in the flow model degrades the accuracy of the estimates of all schemes. Given that the performance of the hybrid EnKF-OI depends on the quality of the background statistics, satisfactory results were obtained only when the uncertainty imposed on the background

  5. On the efficiency of the hybrid and the exact second-order sampling formulations of the EnKF: a reality-inspired 3-D test case for estimating biodegradation rates of chlorinated hydrocarbons at the port of Rotterdam

    KAUST Repository

    El Gharamti, Mohamad

    2016-11-15

    This study considers the assimilation problem of subsurface contaminants at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. It involves the estimation of solute concentrations and biodegradation rates of four different chlorinated solvents. We focus on assessing the efficiency of an adaptive hybrid ensemble Kalman filter and optimal interpolation (EnKF-OI) and the exact second-order sampling formulation (EnKFESOS) for mitigating the undersampling of the estimation and observation errors covariances, respectively. A multi-dimensional and multi-species reactive transport model is coupled to simulate the migration of contaminants within a Pleistocene aquifer layer located around 25 m below mean sea level. The biodegradation chain of chlorinated hydrocarbons starting from tetrachloroethene and ending with vinyl chloride is modeled under anaerobic environmental conditions for 5 decades. Yearly pseudo-concentration data are used to condition the forecast concentration and degradation rates in the presence of model and observational errors. Assimilation results demonstrate the robustness of the hybrid EnKF-OI, for accurately calibrating the uncertain biodegradation rates. When implemented serially, the adaptive hybrid EnKF-OI scheme efficiently adjusts the weights of the involved covariances for each individual measurement. The EnKFESOS is shown to maintain the parameter ensemble spread much better leading to more robust estimates of the states and parameters. On average, a well tuned hybrid EnKF-OI and the EnKFESOS respectively suggest around 48 and 21 % improved concentration estimates, as well as around 70 and 23 % improved anaerobic degradation rates, over the standard EnKF. Incorporating large uncertainties in the flow model degrades the accuracy of the estimates of all schemes. Given that the performance of the hybrid EnKF-OI depends on the quality of the background statistics, satisfactory results were obtained only when the uncertainty imposed on the background

  6. Comparing Migration Pathways of Biodegradation Products from Petroleum Hydrocarbon Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, E.; de Sieyes, N. R.; Mackay, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons contaminants frequently exist in both the vadose and saturated zones at contaminated fuel sites. Natural biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants occur in in situ reactive zones present in both the vadose and saturated zones. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons results in a mass discharge of gaseous biodegradation products through the vadose zone and transport of dissolved gases through the saturated zone. While previous studies have focused solely on transport of degradation products or geochemical parameters in groundwater or efflux of gaseous byproducts from the vadose zone, this study examines both pathways for discharge of degradation products. Quantifying the mass discharge of the biodegradation products through these zones is important to estimate the rates of natural source attenuation, assess the success of monitored natural attenuation, and quantify and document contaminant mass loss. In this study, surface efflux and groundwater mass discharge rates of biodegradation products (carbon dioxide, methane, and other intermediates) were quantified using field data. Field and analytical methodologies will be presented along with the results of the data analysis and a discussion of the uncertainties. Based on the data analysis, the surface efflux pathway through the vadose was found to be the dominant pathway for carbon loss at the monitored field site.

  7. Complications with remediation strategies involving the biodegradation and detoxification of recalcitrant contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Max; Scarlett, Alan; Rowland, Steven J; Galloway, Tamara S; Burton, Sara K; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Booth, Andy M

    2010-09-01

    Environmentally persistent aromatic hydrocarbons known as unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) derived from crude oil can be accumulated by, and elicit toxicological responses in, marine organisms (e.g. mussels, Mytilus edulis). Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (GCxGC-ToF-MS) previously revealed that these UCMs included highly branched alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, the effects of biodegradation on the toxicity and chemical composition of an aromatic UCM hydrocarbon fraction isolated from Tia Juana Pesado (TJP) crude oil were examined. 48h exposure of mussels to the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction (F2) resulted in tissue concentrations of 900microgg(-1) (dry wt.) and approximately 45% decrease in clearance rate. Over 90% of the hydrocarbon burden corresponded to an UCM. Following a 5day recovery period, GCxGC-ToF-MS analysis of the tissues indicated depuration of most accumulated hydrocarbons and clearance rates returned to those observed in controls. To assess the potential of biodegradation to reduce UCM toxicity, TJP F2 was exposed to bacteria isolated from Whitley Bay, UK, for 46days. Mussels exposed to the undegraded TJP F2 from the abiotic control exhibited a reduction in clearance rate comparable with values for the pure crude oil TJP F2. Clearance rates of mussels exposed to biodegraded TJP F2 were statistically similar to seawater controls, suggesting biodegradation had reduced the TJP F2 toxicity. GCxGC-ToF-MS analysis revealed the same compound groups in the tissue of mussels exposed to pure TJP F2, undegraded TJP F2 and biodegraded TJP F2 samples; however >300 fewer compounds were observed in the biodegraded (954 compounds) compared to the undegraded TJP F2 (1261). The compound distributions were markedly different, possibly accounting for the decrease in toxicity. Extraction and analysis of pelleted bacterial cell material revealed that a significant proportion of the TJP F2 had adsorbed onto the

  8. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-05

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater.

  9. Biodegradation studies of oil sludge containing high hydrocarbons concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin-Lora, P.; Munoz-Colunga, A.; Castorena-Cortes, G.; Roldan-Carrillo, T.; Quej Ake, L.; Reyes-Avila, J.; Zapata-Penasco, I.; Marin-Cruz, J.

    2009-07-01

    Oil industry has a significant impact on environment due to the emission of, dust, gases, waste water and solids generated during oil production all the way to basic petrochemical product manufacturing stages. the aim of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of sludge containing high hydrocarbon concentration originated by a petroleum facility. A sludge sampling was done at the oil residuals pool (ORP) on a gas processing center. (Author)

  10. Long-term evolution of biodegradation and volatilization rates in a crude oil-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, B.P.; Delin, G.N.; Baker, R.J.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Volatilization and subsequent biodegradation near the water Table make up a coupled natural attenuation pathway that results in significant mass loss of hydrocarbons. Rates of biodegradation and volatilization were documented twice 12 years apart at a crude-oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota. Biodegradation rates were determined by calibrating a gas transport model to O2, CO2, and CH4 gas-concentration data in the unsaturated zone. Reaction stoichiometry was assumed in converting O2 and CO2 gas-flux estimates to rates of aerobic biodegradation and CH4 gas-flux estimates to rates of methanogenesis. Model results indicate that the coupled pathway has resulted in significant hydrocarbon mass loss at the site, and it was estimated that approximately 10.52 kg/day were lost in 1985 and 1.99 kg/day in 1997. In 1985 3% of total volatile hydrocarbons diffusing from the floating oil were biodegraded in the lower 1 m of the unsaturated zone and increased to 52% by 1997. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation above the center of the floating oil were relatively stable from 1985 to 1997, as the primary metabolic pathway shifted from aerobic to methanogenic biodegradation. Model results indicate that in 1997 biodegradation under methanogenenic conditions represented approximately one-half of total hydrocarbon biodegradation in the lower 1 m of the unsaturated zone. Further downgradient, where substrate concentrations have greatly increased, total biodegradation rates increased by greater than an order of magnitude from 0.04 to 0.43 g/m2-day. It appears that volatilization is the primary mechanism for attenuation in early stages of plume evolution, while biodegradation dominates in later stages.

  11. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements as a Proxy for Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, F.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Werkema, D.; Revil, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Skold, M.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements have been commonly used in paleoclimate studies, as a proxy for environmental pollution such as heavy metal contamination, and for delineating zones of oil seeps related to hydrocarbon exploration. Few studies have assessed the use of MS measurements for mapping zones of oil pollution. In this study, we investigated the variation in magnetic susceptibility across a hydrocarbon contaminated site undergoing biodegradation. Our objective was to investigate if MS measurements could be used as a proxy indicator of intrinsic bioremediation linked to the activity of iron reducing bacteria. An improved understanding of the mechanisms generating geophysical signatures associated with microbial enzymatic activity could permit the development of geophysical imaging technologies for long-term, minimally invasive and sustainable monitoring of natural biodegradation at oil spill sites. We used a Bartington MS probe to measure MS data along fifteen boreholes within contaminated (both free phase and dissolved phase hydrocarbon plumes) and clean areas. Our results show the following: (1) an enhanced zone of MS straddling the water table at the contaminated locations, not observed at the clean locations; (2) MS values within the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; (3) the MS values within the vadoze zone above the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; 4) the zone of high MS is thicker within the free product plume compared to the dissolved product plume. We suggest that the zone of enhanced MS results from the precipitation of magnetite related to the oxidation of the hydrocarbons coupled to iron reduction. Our data documents a strong correlation between MS and hydrocarbon concentration. We conclude that recognition of these zones of enhanced magnetite formation allows for the application of MS measurements as a: (1) low cost, rapid monitoring

  12. Biosurfactant-producing strains in enhancing solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Hang; Chen, Xuehua; Liu, Na; Bao, Suriguge

    2014-07-01

    Three biosurfactant-producing strains designated as BS-1, BS-3, and BS-4 were screened out from crude oil-contaminated soil using a combination of surface tension measurement and oil spreading method. Thin layer chromatography and infrared analysis indicated that the biosurfactants produced by the three strains were lipopeptide, glycolipid, and phospholipid. The enhancement of solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater employing biosurfactant-producing strains was investigated. The three strain mixtures led to more solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater, and the solubilization rate was 10.5 mg l−1. The combination of biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains exhibited a higher biodegradation efficiency of 85.4 % than the petroleum-degrading strains (71.2 %). Biodegradation was enhanced the greatest with biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains in a ratio of 1:1. Fluorescence microscopy images illustrate that the oil dispersed into smaller droplets and emulsified in the presence of biosurfactant-producing strains, which attached to the oil. Thus, the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was enhanced.

  13. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a bacterial consortium enriched from mangrove sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shahriari Moghadam, Mohsen; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhossein; Abtahi, Behrooz; Ghassempour, Alireza; Hashtroudi, Mehri Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) biodegradation in contaminated sediment is an attractive remediation technique and its success depends on the optimal condition for the PAH-degrading isolates...

  14. Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Extremely Acidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Raymond D.; Savage, Dwayne C.; Sayler, Gary S.; Stacey, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in soil samples recovered along gradients of both contaminant levels and pH values existing downstream of a long-term coal pile storage basin. pH values for areas greatly impacted by runoff from the storage basin were 2.0. Even at such a reduced pH, the indigenous microbial community was metabolically active, showing the ability to oxidize more than 40% of the parent hydrocarbons, naphthalene and toluene, to carbon dioxide and water. Treatment of the soil samples with cycloheximide inhibited mineralization of the aromatic substrates. DNA hybridization analysis indicated that whole-community nucleic acids recovered from these samples did not hybridize with genes, such as nahA, nahG, nahH, todC1C2, and tomA, that encode common enzymes from neutrophilic bacteria. Since these data suggested that the degradation of aromatic compounds may involve a microbial consortium instead of individual acidophilic bacteria, experiments using microorganisms isolated from these samples were initiated. While no defined mixed cultures were able to evolve 14CO2 from labeled substrates in these mineralization experiments, an undefined mixed culture including a fungus, a yeast, and several bacteria successfully metabolized approximately 27% of supplied naphthalene after 1 week. This study shows that biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments with extremely low pH values. PMID:9797263

  15. Assessing Biodegradation Susceptibilities of Selected Petroleum Hydrocarbons at Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heryanto Langsa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility to biodegradation of selected saturated hydrocarbons (SHCs, polycyclic aromatichydrocarbons (PAHs and asphaltenes in a Barrow crude oil and extracts isolated from soils contaminated with theBarrow crude oil at day 0 and 39 was determined. Soil samples were contaminated with a Barrow crude oil across thesurface (5% w/w as part of a mesocosm experiment in order to mimic similar conditions in the environment. Theextent of biodegradation of the Barrow oil extracted from the contaminated soils at day 0 and day 39 was assessed byGC-MS analyses of SHCs and PAHs fractions. Changes in the relative abundances of n-alkanes (loss of low-molecularweighthydrocarbons and pristane relative to phytane (Pr/Ph and their diastereoisomers were determined. Changesin the diastereoisomer ratios of Pr and Ph relate to the decrease in abundance of the phytol-derived 6(R,10(Sisoprenoids with increasing biodegradation. The percentage change in abundances of each of selectedalkylnaphathalenes with time (day 0 to 39 was determined, enabling an order of susceptibility of their isomers tobiodegradation. It was established that the 2-methylnaphthalene isomers (2-MN is more susceptible to microbialattack than 1-MN isomer indicated by decreasing in percent abundance from day 0 to 39 for the 2-MN isomer. TheGC-MS analyses of the original Barrow oil indicated the oil had not undergone biodegradation. When this oil wasused in the soil mesocosm experiments the oil was shown to biodegrade to about a level 2 -3 based on the biodegradationsusceptibility of the various SHCs and PAHs described above

  16. The effects of biodegradation on the compositions of aromatic hydrocarbons and maturity indicators in biodegraded oils from Liaohe Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    By the aid of GC-MS technique,a series of sequentially biodegraded oils from Liaohe Basin have been analyzed. The results show that the concentrations and relative compositions of various aromatic compounds in the biodegraded crude oils will change with increasing biodegradation degree. The concentrations of alkyl naphthalenes,alkyl phenanthrenes,alkyl dibenzothiophene are decreased,and the concentration of triaromatic steroids will increase with increasing biodegradation degree in biodegraded oils. Those phenomena indicate that various aromatic compounds are more easily biodegraded by bacteria like other kinds of hydrocarbons such as alkanes,but different series of aromatic compounds have a varied ability to resistant to biodegradation. The ratios of dibenzothiophene to phenenthrene(DBTH/P) and methyl dibenzothiophene to methyl phenanthrene(MDBTH/MP) are related to the features of depositional environment for source rocks such as redox and ancient salinity. However,in biodegraded oils,the two ratios increase quickly with the increase of the biodegradation degree,indicating that they have lost their geochemical significance. In this case,they could not be used to evaluate the features of depositional environment. Methyl phenanthrene index,methyl phenanthrene ratio and methyl dibenzoyhiophene ratio are useful aromatic maturity indicators for the crude oils and the source rocks without vitrinite. But for biodegraded oils,those aromatic maturity indicators will be affected by biodegradation and decrease with the increase of the biodegradation degree. Therefore,those aromatic molecular maturity indicators could not be used for biodegraded oils.

  17. Biodegradation Rates Assessment For An In Situ Bioremediation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troquet, J.; Poutier, F.

    Bioremediation methods seem a promising way of dealing with soil and subsoil con- tamination by organic substances. The biodegradation process is supported by micro- organisms which use the organic carbon from the pollutants as energy source and cells building blocks. However, bioremediation is not yet universally understood and its success is still an intensively debated issue because all soils and groundwater are not able to sustain biological growth and, then, cannot be successfully bioremediated. The outcome of each degradation process depends on several factors, which, such as oxygen transfer and pollutant bio-availability, can be controlled and are therefore key variables of such bioremediation processes. Then, it is essential to carry out a fea- sibility study based on pilot-testing before starting a remediation project in order to determine the best formulation of nutrients and bacteria to use for the specific condi- tions encountered. The scope of this work is to study the main parameters of the process and its physi- cal limiting steps in order to determine the biodegradation rates in a specific case of contamination. Several ground samples from an actual petroleum hydrocarbon con- taminated site have been laboratory tested. Five fixed bed column reactors, enabling the study of the influence of the different op- erating variables on the biodegradation kinetics, are used. The stoichiometric equation for bacteria growth and pollutant degradation has been established, allowing the de- termination of mass balances. Biodegradation monitoring is achieved by continuously measuring the emissions of carbon dioxide production and intermittently by analysing residual hydrocarbons. Results lead to the knowledge of biodegradation rates which allow to determine the treatment duration and cost.

  18. Effect of interface fertilization on biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in nonaqueous-phase liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Agredano, M C; Gallego, S; Niqui-Arroyo, J L; Vila, J; Grifoll, M; Ortega-Calvo, J J

    2011-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to use an oleophilic biostimulant (S-200) to target possible nutritional limitations for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the interface between nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) and the water phase. Biodegradation of PAHs present in fuel-containing NAPLs was slow and followed zero-order kinetics, indicating bioavailability restrictions. The biostimulant enhanced the biodegradation, producing logistic (S-shaped) kinetics and 10-fold increases in the rate of mineralization of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Chemical analysis of residual fuel oil also evidenced an enhanced biodegradation of the alkyl-PAHs and n-alkanes. The enhancement was not the result of an increase in the rate of partitioning of PAHs into the aqueous phase, nor was it caused by the compensation of any nutritional deficiency in the medium. We suggest that biodegradation of PAH by bacteria attached to NAPLs can be limited by nutrient availability due to the simultaneous consumption of NAPL components, but this limitation can be overcome by interface fertilization.

  19. Effect of sediment particle size on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: importance of the sediment-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinghui; Wang, Ran

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms for the effects of sediment on the biodegradation of organic compounds in the aquatic environment are not clear. In this research, effects of sediment characteristics on biodegradation kinetics of chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene were studied by inoculating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria. Because water and PAHs can pass a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane yet bacteria and sediment cannot, a membrane experiment was performed to compare the biodegradation rates of PAHs in water and at the sediment-water interface, providing direct evidence that the PAH biodegradation rate is enhanced by the presence of sediment. Biodegradation of PAHs in water-sediment systems was fitted to zero-order kinetics; the order of biodegradation rate in water-sediment systems with different sediment was fine silt > clay > coarse silt. Biodegradation of PAHs in water-sediment systems occurred mainly at the sediment-water interface. According to membrane experiment results, when the biodegradation kinetics was fit to a zero-order equation, the maximum specific growth rates of bacteria (1/d) at the sediment-water interface were approximately three- to fourfold those in the water phase. Furthermore, the associated mechanisms regarding the effect of sediment characteristics were analyzed by investigating the process of bacterial growth and the distribution of bacteria and PAHs between water and sediment phases.

  20. Monitoring biodegradation of diesel fuel in bioventing processes using in situ respiration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Byun, I G; Kim, Y O; Hwang, I S; Park, T J

    2006-01-01

    An in situ measuring system of respiration rate was applied for monitoring biodegradation of diesel fuel in a bioventing process for bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil. Two laboratory-scale soil columns were packed with 5 kg of soil that was artificially contaminated by diesel fuel as final TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) concentration of 8,000 mg/kg soil. Nutrient was added to make a relative concentration of C:N:P = 100:10:1. One soil column was operated with continuous venting mode, and the other one with intermittent (6 h venting/6 h rest) venting mode. On-line O2 and CO2 gas measuring system was applied to measure O2 utilisation and CO2 production during biodegradation of diesel for 5 months. Biodegradation rate of TPH was calculated from respiration rate measured by the on-line gas measuring system. There were no apparent differences between calculated biodegradation rates from two columns with different venting modes. The variation of biodegradation rates corresponded well with trend of the remaining TPH concentrations comparing other biodegradation indicators, such as C17/pristane and C18/phytane ratio, dehydrogenase activity, and the ratio of hydrocarbon utilising bacteria to total heterotrophic bacteria. These results suggested that the on-line measuring system of respiration rate would be applied to monitoring biodegradation rate and to determine the potential applicability of bioventing process for bioremediation of oil contaminated soil.

  1. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law.

  2. Solubilization and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.W.C.; Zhao, Z.Y.; Yang, J.; Wong, S.Y. [Hong Kong Baptist Univ., Hong Kong (China). Sino-Forest Applied Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment, Dept. of Biology

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using microemulsions to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Microemulsions are commonly used in soil washing as a means of enhancing the solubility of hydrophobic pollutants. The microemulsions were composed of Tween-80, 1-pentanol and linseed oil. Phenanthrene (PHE) was dissolved in dichloromethane and added to a glass vial. Microemulsions were added separately to the vials. A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) was used to determine PHE concentrations. The vials were inoculated with an isolated PAH degradative bacterium Bacillus subtilis B-UM. Soil collected from abandoned shipyards in Hong Kong were then spiked with the mixtures and aged for 3 months. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses were conducted. Results of the study showed that a microemulsion composed of 0.4 Tween-80, 0.1 per cent 1-pentanol, and 0.05 linseed oil effectively enhanced the biodegradation of PHE in the aqueous phase. It was concluded that microemulsions can be used to remediate soils contaminated by PAHs. 26 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. Methanogenic biodegradation of two-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Dong, Xiaoli; Soh, Jung; Sensen, Christoph W; Gieg, Lisa M

    2012-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread in methane-rich subsurface environments, such as oil reservoirs and fuel-contaminated aquifers; however, little is known about the biodegradation of these compounds under methanogenic conditions. To assess the metabolism of PAH in the absence of electron acceptors, a crude oil-degrading methanogenic enrichment culture was tested for the ability to biodegrade naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN), 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MN), and 2, 6-dimethylnaphthalene (2, 6-diMN). When methane was measured as an indicator of metabolism, nearly 400 μmol of methane was produced in the 2-MN- and 2, 6-diMN-amended cultures relative to substrate-unamended controls, which is close to the amount of methane stoichiometrically predicted based on the amount of substrate added (51-56 μmol). In contrast, no substantial methane was produced in the naphthalene- and 1-MN-amended enrichments. In time course experiments, metabolite analysis of enrichments containing 2-MN and 2, 6-diMN revealed the formation of 2-naphthoic acid and 6-methyl-2-naphthoic acid, respectively. Microbial community analysis by 454 pyrosequencing revealed that these PAH-utilizing enrichments were dominated by archaeal members most closely affiliated with Methanosaeta and Methanoculleus species and bacterial members most closely related to the Clostridiaceae, suggesting that these organisms play an important role in the methanogenic metabolism of the substituted naphthalenes in these cultures.

  4. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32 ± 4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29 ± 2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2 × 10(-3) to 28.6 × 10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation.

  5. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part A-Monocyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-08-01

    Present study focused on the screening of bacterial consortium for biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (MAH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Target compounds in the present study were naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene (PAHs), and benzene (MAH). Microbial consortia enriched with the above target compounds were used in screening experiments. Naphthalene-enriched consortium was found to be the most efficient consortium, based on its substrate degradation rate and its ability to degrade other aromatic pollutants with significantly high efficiency. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order benzene > naphthalene > acenaphthene > phenanthrene. Chryseobacterium and Rhodobacter were discerned as the predominant species in naphthalene-enriched culture. They are closely associated to the type strain Chryseobacterium arthrosphaerae and Rhodobacter maris, respectively. Single substrate biodegradation studies with naphthalene (PAH) and benzene (MAH) were carried out using naphthalene-enriched microbial consortium (NAPH). Phenol and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde were identified as the predominant intermediates during benzene and naphthalene degradation, respectively. Biodegradation of toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, phenol, and indole by NAPH was also investigated. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for benzene, whereas multiple substrate biodegradation model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for naphthalene.

  6. Potential of fungal co-culturing for accelerated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto, Dede Heri Yuli; Tachibana, Sanro

    2014-08-15

    The potential of fungal co-culture of the filamentous Pestalotiopsis sp. NG007 with four different basidiomycetes--Trametes versicolor U97, Pleurotus ostreatus PL1, Cerena sp. F0607, and Polyporus sp. S133--for accelerating biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) was studied using three different physicochemical characteristic PHCs in soil. All the combinations showed a mutual intermingling mycelial interaction on the agar plates. However, only NG007/S133 (50/50) exhibited an optimum growth rate and enzymatic activities that supported the degradation of asphalt in soil. The co-culture also degraded all fractions at even higher concentrations of the different PHCs. In addition, asphaltene, which is a difficult fraction for a single microorganism to degrade, was markedly degraded by the co-culture, which indicated that the simultaneous biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene fractions had occurred in the co-culture. An examination of in-vitro degradation by the crude enzymes and the retrieval fungal culture from the soil after the experiment confirmed the accelerated biodegradation due to enhanced enzyme activities in the co-culture. The addition of piperonyl butoxide or AgNO3 inhibited biodegradation by 81-99%, which demonstrated the important role of P450 monooxygenases and/or dioxygenases in the initial degradation of the aliphatic and aromatic fractions in PHCs.

  7. A mesocasm study of enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X.; Guigard, S.; Biggar, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Foght, J.; Semple, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2005-07-01

    Under certain conditions, Natural Attenuation (NA) processes can act to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentrations of contaminants in soil or groundwater within a reasonable time frame. NA processes are considered to be a more cost-effective remediation approach than engineered processes. However, the rates of biodegradation in cold regions are slower and occasionally the processes are nutrient or Terminal Electron Acceptor (TEA) limited. These limitations may make NA less viable due to slower rates of biological activity. This paper discusses the results of a mesocasm study conducted in laboratory-controlled conditions to investigate the TEA and nutrient enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater from two sites in Alberta. Target compounds for the study were BTEX and the CCME F1 fraction. Samples taken from the site were used to set up 11 L mesocasms with a water to soil ratio of 10:1 under anaerobic conditions. The samples were amended with nitrate and sulfate and then incubated. Sub-sampling was carried out once a month to monitor substrate consumption, TEA depletion and evolution of biogenic gases. Microbial enumeration and metabolite analysis were also done. No final conclusions could be drawn from the study, which had only been carried out for 6 months at the time that this paper was written. However, results to date have indicated that the method of mesocasms and sub-sampling are applicable to anaerobic biodegradation studies. In addition, nutrient supplementation appears to enhance nitrate and sulfate reduction. However, the TEA depletion was greater than expected and could not be explained by the substrate consumption. Results also indicated that the groundwater from site 1 was sulfate-limited, suggesting that sulfate amendment could enhance anaerobic biodegradation of CCME F1 petroleum hydrocarbons. Data from the ongoing study may provide additional insight to clarify processes in the mesocasms. 9 refs

  8. Comparison of the fuel oil biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon-assimilating microorganisms isolated from a temperate agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaineau, C.H.; Dupont, J.; Bury, E.; Oudot, J. [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Laboratoire de Cryptogamie, 12 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris (France); Morel, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Agronomie et des Industries Alimentaires de Nancy, Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INRA, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, B.P. 172, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-03-09

    Strains of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) were isolated from an agricultural soil in France. In a field, a portion was treated with oily cuttings resulting from the drilling of an onshore well. The cuttings which were spread at the rate of 600 g HC m{sup -2} contained 10% of fuel oil hydrocarbons (HC). Another part of the field was left untreated. Three months after HC spreading, HC adapted bacteria and fungi were isolated at different soil depths in the two plots and identified. The biodegradation potential of the isolated strains was monitored by measuring the degradation rate of total HC, saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and resins of the fuel. Bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Sphingomonas, Acinetobacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium and fungi belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Beauveria, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Trichoderma were identified. The most active strains in the assimilation of saturates and aromatics were Arthrobacter sp., Sphingomonas spiritivorum, Acinetobacter baumanii, Beauveria alba and Penicillum simplicissimum. The biodegradation potential of the hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms isolated from polluted or unpolluted soils were similar. In laboratory pure cultures, saturated HC were more degraded than aromatic HC, whereas resins were resistant to microbial attack. On an average, individual bacterial strains were more active than fungi in HC biodegradation. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Comparison of the fuel oil biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon-assimilating microorganisms isolated from a temperate agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaineau, C.H.; Dupont, J.; Bury, E.; Oudot, J. [Museum National d`Histoire Naturelle, Laboratoire de Cryptogamie, 12 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris (France); Morel, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Agronomie et des Industries Alimentaires de Nancy, Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, INRA, 2 avenue de la Foret de Haye, B.P. 172, F-54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-03-09

    Strains of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) were isolated from an agricultural soil in France. In a field, a portion was treated with oily cuttings resulting from the drilling of an onshore well. The cuttings which were spread at the rate of 600 g HC m{sup -2} contained 10% of fuel oil hydrocarbons (HC). Another part of the field was left untreated. Three months after HC spreading, HC adapted bacteria and fungi were isolated at different soil depths in the two plots and identified. The biodegradation potential of the isolated strains was monitored by measuring the degradation rate of total HC, saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and resins of the fuel. Bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Sphingomonas, Acinetobacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium and fungi belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Beauveria, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Trichoderma were identified. The most active strains in the assimilation of saturates and aromatics were Arthrobacter sp., Sphingomonas spiritivorum, Acinetobacter baumanii, Beauveria alba and Penicillum simplicissimum. The biodegradation potential of the hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms isolated from polluted or unpolluted soils were similar. In laboratory pure cultures, saturated HC were more degraded than aromatic HC, whereas resins were resistant to microbial attack. On an average, individual bacterial strains were more active than fungi in HC biodegradation

  10. MULTISUBSTRATE BIODEGRADATION KINETICS FOR BINARY AND COMPLEX MIXTURES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodegradation kinetics were studied for binary and complex mixtures of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 2-ethylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, fluorene and fluoranthene. Discrepancies between the ...

  11. Characterization and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in radioactive wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikilili, Phumza V. [Water Utilisation Division, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Nkhalambayausi-Chirwa, Evans M., E-mail: Evans.Chirwa@up.ac.za [Water Utilisation Division, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Biodegradation of recalcitrant toxic organics under radioactive conditions. {yields} Biodegradation of PAHs of varying size and complexity in mixed waste streams. {yields} Validation of radiation-tolerance and performance of the isolated organisms. - Abstract: PAH degrading Pseudomonad and Alcaligenes species were isolated from landfill soil and mine drainage in South Africa. The isolated organisms were mildly radiation tolerant and were able to degrade PAHs in simulated nuclear wastewater. The radiation in the simulated wastewater, at 0.677 Bq/{mu}L, was compatible to measured values in wastewater from a local radioisotope manufacturing facility, and was enough to inhibit metabolic activity of known PAH degraders from soil such as Pseudomonas putida GMP-1. The organic constituents in the original radioactive waste stream consisted of the full range of PAHs except fluoranthene. Among the observed PAHs in the nuclear wastewater from the radioisotope manufacturing facility, acenaphthene and chrysene predominated-measured at 25.1 and 14.2 mg/L, respectively. Up to sixteen U.S.EPA priority PAHs were detected at levels higher than allowable limits in drinking water. The biodegradation of the PAHs was limited by the solubility of the compounds. This contributed to the observed faster degradation rates in low molecular weight (LMW) compounds than in high molecular weight compounds.

  12. Effects of Temperature Changes on Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soils from an Arctic Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Klemm, S.; Whyte, L.; Ghoshal, S.

    2009-05-01

    Bioremediation is being considered as a cost-effective and a minimally disruptive remedial option at remote sites in the Arctic and sub-Arctic impacted by petroleum NAPL contamination. The implementation of on-site bioremediation in cold environments has been generally limited in the short, non-freezing summer months since ground remains frozen for 8-9 months of the year. This study evaluates the effect of different temperature regimes on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation rates and extent, as well as on the microbial activity. A series of pilot-scale landfarming bioremediation experiments (1 m×0.6 m×0.35 m soil tank dimension) was performed using aged, petroleum fuel-contaminated soils shipped from Resolution Island, Nunavut, Canada. These experiments were conducted under the following temperature conditions: (1) variable daily average field temperatures (1 to 10°C) representative of summers at the site; (2) constant mean temperature-mode with 6°C, representing typical stable laboratory incubation; and (3) under seasonal freeze-thaw conditions (-8°C to 10°C). Data to be presented include changes with time of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration fractionated by C-lengths, soil moisture (unfrozen water) contents, O2 and CO2 concentrations in soil pore gas, microbial population size and community composition in nutrient- amended and untreated landfarms. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and heterotrophic respiration activity was more rapid under the variable temperature cycle (1 to 10°C) than at a constant average temperature of 6°C, and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations were reduced by 55% due to biodegradation over a 60 day test period under the variable temperature regime, compared to only 21% in soil tanks which were subjected to a constant temperature of 6°C. Shifts in microbial community were clearly observed in the both temperature modes using PCR-DGGE analyses and the emergence of a hydrocarbon-degrading population, Alkanindiges, was

  13. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with coal tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Tischler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are a group of serious contaminants of air, water soil and sediments. Persistence and accumulation of PAHs in the environment is due to their hydrophobicity and hence low solubility and bioavailability to microbial action. This work presents an evidence of biodegradation of PAHs in a soil sample taken from a coal gasification plant contaminated with coal tar. The degradation of the contaminant by indigenous microorganisms was studied under aerobic conditions at 15 ºC in a laboratory glass column. The oxidation kinetic of organic carbon was monitored by measuring the oxygen consumption rate and the carbon dioxide production rate. The biodegradation rates observed were in the range of 0.2 to 7 mg C kg-1 h-1. Approximately 14 000 mg kg-1 of the total organic carbon was completely mineralized to CO2 during 6 months. The sum of 16 EPA PAHs decreased from the initial concentration of 21 331 mg kg-1 to the value of 2 774 mg kg-1after 6 months of biodegradation. The thermogravimetric analysis revealed a 34 % weight decrease of organic mater content during the 6-month degradation period.

  14. Stimulated anoxic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons using Fe(III) ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing the bioavailability of Fe(III) by adding suitable ligands provides a potential alternative to oxygen addition for the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated aquifers.Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing

  15. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from the Daliao River watershed, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Xiangchun; TANG Qian; HE Mengchang; YANG Zhifeng; LIN Chunye; GUO Wei

    2009-01-01

    The Daliao River, as an important water system in Northeast China, was reported to be heavily polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Aerobic biodegradations of four selected PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and anthracene) alone or in their mixture in fiver sediments from the Daliao River water systems were studied in microcosm systems. Effects of additional carbon source, inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus, temperature variation on PAHs degradation were also investigated. Results showed that the degradation of phenanthrene in water alone system was faster than that in water-sediment combined system. Degradation of phenanthrene in sediment was enhanced by adding yeast extract and ammonium, but retarded by adding sodium acetate and not significantly influenced by adding phosphate. Although PAHs could also be biodegraded in sediment under low temperature (5℃), much lower degradation rate was observed. Sediments from the three main streams of the Daliao River water system (the Hun River, the Taizi River and the Daliao River) demonstrated different degradation capacities and patterns to four PAHs. Average removal rates (15 or 19 d) of naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and anthracene by sediment were in the range of 0.062-0.087, 0.005-0.066, 0.008-one. In multiple PAHs systems, the interactions between PAHs influenced each PAH biodegradation.

  16. Biodegradation kinetics of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures by Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Anuradha M; Autenrieth, Robin L; Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros; McDonald, Thomas J

    2008-04-01

    Many contaminated sites commonly have complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) whose individual microbial biodegradation may be altered in mixtures. Biodegradation kinetics for fluorene, naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene and 1-methylfluorene were evaluated in sole substrate, binary and ternary systems using Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505. The first order rate constants for fluorene, naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene, and 1-methylfluorene were comparable; yet Monod parameters were significantly different for the tested PAHs. S. paucimobilis completely degraded all the components in binary and ternary mixtures; however, the initial degradation rates of individual components decreased in the presence of competitive PAHs. Results from the mixture experiments indicate competitive interactions, demonstrated mathematically. The generated model appropriately predicted the biodegradation kinetics in mixtures using parameter estimates from the sole substrate experiments, validating the hypothesis of a common rate-determining step. Biodegradation kinetics in mixtures were affected by the affinity coefficients of the co-occurring PAHs and mixture composition. Experiments with equal concentrations of substrates demonstrated the effect of concentration on competitive inhibition. Ternary experiments with naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene and 1-methylfluorene revealed delayed degradation, where depletion of naphthalene and 1,5-dimethylnapthalene occurred rapidly only after the complete removal of 1-methylfluorene. The substrate interactions observed in mixtures require a multisubstrate model to account for simultaneous degradation of substrates. PAH contaminated sites are far more complex than even ternary mixtures; however these studies clearly demonstrate the effect that interactions can have on individual chemical kinetics. Consequently, predicting natural or enhanced degradation of PAHs cannot be based on single compound kinetics as this

  17. Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons within the Water Column and Marsh Sediments following the Deepwater Horizon Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, R.; Cook, L.; Murray, K.; Cerrito, K.; Faith, S.; Boehm, P.

    2012-12-01

    Physical and chemical dispersion of oil released from the Deepwater Horizon spill between April 20 and July 15, 2010 resulted in fine droplets and dissolved hydrocarbons moving away from the wellhead within the water column. Both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were rapidly biodegraded as evidenced by detailed chemistry measurements using GC and GC-MS analyses of over 10,000 water samples. During the release (April-July), concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) attenuated rapidly with distance from the release point (the wellhead) and were seen to reach biodegradation. Loss of total and high molecular weight alkanes and PAH relative to the conserved biomarker hopane also showed that there was extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. Shortly after the well was capped most of the hydrocarbons in the deepwater had been biodegraded to levels below analytical detection limits. Clearly microbial biodegradation of the oil within the water column removed many of the toxic components and reduced the overall impact of the oil released from the well. Oil that reached the water surface and formed slicks was less extensively biodegraded by microbes as it moved toward the shorelines. A study of impacted Louisiana coastal marshes 1 year later, however, showed that residual oil was very highly weathered with losses of alkanes and PAHs in the MC252 oiled sediment samples. Where sufficient oil was present for detailed chemical analyses changes in C17/pristine, C18/phytane, C2phenanthrene/C2dibenzothiophene, C3phenanthrene/C3dibenzothiophene, total polycyclic aromatics to hopane, and total heavy polycyclic aromatics (4-6 rings) to hopane showed evidence for extensive biodegradation. Molecular analyses performed with PhyloChip, GeoChip and whole metagenome sequencing confirmed that microbial populations in marsh sediments were capable of hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  18. Effect of salt on aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Ania C; Guigard, Selma E; Foght, Julia M; Semple, Kathleen M; Pooley, Kathryn; Armstrong, James E; Biggar, Kevin W

    2009-02-01

    Hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and groundwater at oil and gas production sites may be additionally impacted by salts due to release of produced waters. However, little is known about the effect of salt on the in-situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons by terrestrial microbes, especially at low temperatures. To study this effect, we prepared a groundwater-soil slurry from two sites in Canada: a former flare pit site contaminated with flare pit residue (Site A), and a natural gas processing facility contaminated with natural gas condensate (Site B). The slurry with its indigenous microbes was amended with radiolabeled hydrocarbons dissolved in free product plus nutrients and/or NaCl, and incubated in aerobic biometer flasks with gyrotory shaking at either 25 or 10 degrees C for up to 5 weeks. Cumulative production of (14)CO(2) was measured and the lag time, rate and extent of mineralization were calculated. For Site A, concentrations of NaCl >or=1% (w/v) delayed the onset of mineralization of both (14)C-hexadecane and (14)C-phenanthrene under nutrient-amended conditions, but once biodegradation began the degradation rates were similar over the range of salt concentrations tested (0-5% NaCl). For Site B, increasing concentrations of NaCl >or=1% (w/v) increased the lag time and decreased the rate and extent of mineralization of aliphatic and aromatic substrates. Of particular interest is the observation that low concentrations of salt (

  19. Biodegradation of different petroleum hydrocarbons by free and immobilized microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiantian; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Xu, Nana; Li, Yiming; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-01

    The efficiencies of free and immobilized microbial consortia in the degradation of different types of petroleum hydrocarbons were investigated. In this study, the biodegradation rates of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and crude oil reached about 80%, 30%, 56% and 48% under the optimum environmental conditions of free microbial consortia after 7 d. We evaluated five unique co-metabolic substances with petroleum hydrocarbons, α-lactose was the best co-metabolic substance among glucose, α-lactose, soluble starch, yeast powder and urea. The orthogonal biodegradation analysis results showed that semi-coke was the best immobilized carrier followed by walnut shell and activated carbon. Meanwhile, the significance of various factors that contribute to the biodegradation of semi-coke immobilized microbial consortia followed the order of: α-lactose > semi-coke > sodium alginate > CaCl2. Moreover, the degradation rate of the immobilized microbial consortium (47%) was higher than that of a free microbial consortium (26%) under environmental conditions such as the crude oil concentration of 3 g L(-1), NaCl concentration of 20 g L(-1), pH at 7.2-7.4 and temperature of 25 °C after 5 d. SEM and FTIR analyses revealed that the structure of semi-coke became more porous and easily adhered to the microbial consortium; the functional groups (e.g., hydroxy and phosphate) were identified in the microbial consortium and were changed by immobilization. This study demonstrated that the ability of microbial adaptation to the environment can be improved by immobilization which expands the application fields of microbial remediation.

  20. Study utilization of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrianie, Nuniek; Juliastuti, Sri Rachmania; Ar-rosyidah, Fanny Husna; Rochman, Hilal Abdur

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the existence of energy sources of oil and was limited. Therefore, it was important to searching for new innovations of renewable energy sources by utilizing the waste into a source of energy. On the other hand, the process of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation generated sludge that had calorific value and untapped. Because of the need for alternative sources of energy innovation with the concept of zero waste and the fuel potential from extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste, so it was necessary to study the use of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuel. In addition, sawdust is a waste that had a great quantities and also had a high calorific value to be mixed with extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste. The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of the extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and to determine the potential and a combination of a mixture of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and sawdust which has the best calorific value. The variables of this study was the composition of the waste and sawdust as follows 1:1; 1:3; and 3:1 (mass of sawdust : mass of waste) and time of sawdust carbonization was 10, 15 and 20 minutes. Sawdust was carbonized to get the high heating value. The characteristic of main material and fuel analysis performed with proximate analysis. While the calorific value analysis was performed with a bomb calorimeter. From the research, it was known that extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste had a moisture content of 3.06%; volatile matter 19.98%; ash content of 0.56%; fixed carbon content of 76.4% and a calorific value of 717 cal/gram. And a mixture that had the highest calorific value (4286.5 cal/gram) achieved in comparison sawdust : waste (3:1) by carbonization of sawdust for 20 minutes.

  1. Study on bioadsorption and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nana; Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Li, Yiming

    2013-12-01

    A microbial consortium isolated from Shengli oilfield polluted sludge was capable of degrading naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and crude oil. It performed high biodegradation activity and emulsifiability for petroleum hydrocarbons, and was tolerant to 6.2mM Cu(2+), 2.7 mM Zn(2+) and 9.5mM Pb(2+). Biodegradation rates of NAP, PHE, PYR and crude oil were 53%, 21%, 32% and 44% in the presence of heavy metal (Cu(2+), 1.7 mM and Zn(2+), 2mM), respectively. Exploration on the adsorption and uptake of petroleum hydrocarbons by microbe suggested the stability of surface adsorption and cell uptake by live microbial consortium followed a decreasing order of NAP > PHE ≈ PYR > crude oil. The adsorption by heat-killed microbial consortium was constant for PAHs, while decreased for crude oil. Experiments on enzymatic degradation indicated that the metabolic efficiency of periplasmic, cytoplasmic and extracellular enzymes secreted by the microbial consortium for diverse substrates was different.

  2. Cadmium and lead bioavailability and their effects on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation by spent mushroom substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, C; Jiménez-Ayuso, N; Frutos, I; Gárate, A; Eymar, E

    2013-12-01

    Bioremediation of mixed metal-organic soil pollution constitutes a difficult task in different ecosystems all around the world. The aims of this work are to determine the capacity of two spent mushroom substrates (Agaricus bisporus and Pleurotus ostreatus) to immobilize Cd and Pb, to assess the effect of these metals on laccase activity, and to determine the potential of spent A. bisporus substrate to biodegrade four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH): fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene, when those toxic heavy metals Cd and Pb are present. According to adsorption isotherms, spent P. ostreatus and A. bisporus substrates showed a high Pb and Cd adsorption capacity. Pb and Cd interactions with crude laccase enzyme extracts from spent P. ostreatus and A. bisporus substrates showed Cd and Pb enzyme inhibition; however, laccase activity of A. bisporus presented lower inhibition. Spent A. bisporus substrate polluted with PAH and Cd or Pb was able to biodegrade PAH, although both metals decrease the biodegradation rate. Spent A. bisporus substrate contained a microbiological consortium able to oxidize PAH with high ionization potential. Cd and Pb were immobilized during the bioremediation process by spent A. bisporus substrate. Consequently, spent A. bisporus substrate was adequate as a multi-polluted soil bioremediator.

  3. Biodegradation potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria strains enriched from Yangtze River sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Xi; Su, Pan; Fang, Fang; Hu, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Microbial degradation is an effective method for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compounds from polluted sediments. Surface sediments collected from Yangtze River in the downtown area of Chongqing were found to contain PAH concentrations to various different degrees. Two bacteria strains (termed PJ1 and PJ2) isolated from the sediment samples could use phenanthrene (Phe) and fluoranthene (Flu) as carbon sources for growth thereby degrading these two PAH compounds. Using 16S rDNA gene sequencing, the isolates were identified as Sphingomonas sp. and Klebsiella sp., respectively. Biodegradation assays showed that the PJ1 presented an efficient degradation capability compared to PJ2 in cultures with the initial Phe and Flu concentrations ranging from 20 to 200 mg/L. The highest rates of Phe and Flu biodegradation by PJ1 reached 74.32% and 58.18% after incubation for 15 and 30 days, respectively. This is the first report on the biodegradation potential of the bacterial from surface sediments of an industrial area upstream of the Gorge Reservoir.

  4. Sequential biodegradation of complex naphtha hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-02-01

    Methane emissions in oil sands tailings ponds are sustained by anaerobic biodegradation of unrecovered hydrocarbons. Naphtha (primarily C6-C10; n- iso- and cycloalkanes) is commonly used as a solvent during bitumen extraction process and its residue escapes to tailings ponds during tailings deposition. To investigate biodegradability of hydrocarbons in naphtha, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL tailings ponds were amended with CNRL naphtha at ∼0.2 wt% (∼2000 mg L(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ∼1600 d. Microbial communities in both MFTs started metabolizing naphtha after a lag phase of ∼100 d. Complete biodegradation/biotransformation of all n-alkanes (except partial biodegradation of n-octane in CNRL MFT) followed by major iso-alkanes (2-methylpentane, 3-methylhexane, 2- and 4-methylheptane, iso-nonanes and 2-methylnonane) and a few cycloalkanes (derivatives of cyclopentane and cyclohexane) was observed during the incubation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Peptococcaceae and Anaerolineaceae in Albian MFT and Anaerolineaceae and Syntrophaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial communities with co-domination of Methanosaetaceae and "Candidatus Methanoregula" in archaeal populations during active biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The findings extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments and help refine existing kinetic model to predict greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biodegradation pattern of hydrocarbons from a fuel oil-type complex residue by an emulsifier-producing microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, M L; Commendatore, M G; Esteves, J L; Bucalá, V

    2008-06-15

    The biodegradation of a hazardous waste (bilge waste), a fuel oil-type complex residue from normal ship operations, was studied in a batch bioreactor using a microbial consortium in seawater medium. Experiments with initial concentrations of 0.18 and 0.53% (v/v) of bilge waste were carried out. In order to study the biodegradation kinetics, the mass of n-alkanes, resolved hydrocarbons and unresolved complex mixture (UCM) hydrocarbons were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Emulsification was detected in both experiments, possibly linked to the n-alkanes depletion, with differences in emulsification start times and extents according to the initial hydrocarbon concentration. Both facts influenced the hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics. A sequential biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC was found for the higher hydrocarbon content. Being the former growth associated, while UCM biodegradation was a non-growing process showing enzymatic-type biodegradation kinetics. For the lower hydrocarbon concentration, simultaneous biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC were found before emulsification. Nevertheless, certain UCM biodegradation was observed after the medium emulsification. According to the observed kinetics, three main types of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, biodegradable UCM and recalcitrant UCM) were found adequate to represent the multicomponent substrate (bilge waste) for future modelling of the biodegradation process.

  6. Distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons and toluene biodegradation, Knox Street fire pits, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, S.L.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    ground-water toluene concentration data, a maximum rate constant for anaerobic biodegradation of toluene in the saturated zone was estimated to be as low as 0.002 d-1 or as high as 0.026 d-1. Based on analyses of ground-water/vapor samples, toluene was the prin- cipal TEX compound identified in ground water discharging to Beaver Creek. Observed decreases in ground-water/vapor toluene concentrations during the study period may reflect a decrease in source inputs, an increase in dilution caused by higher ground-water flow, and(or) removal by biological or other physical processes. Rate constants of toluene anaerobic biodegradation determined by laboratory measurements illustrate a typical acclimation response of micro-organisms to hydrocarbon contamination in sediments collected from the site. Toluene biodegradation rate constants derived from laboratory microcosm studies ranged from 0.001 to 0.027 d-1, which is similar to the range of 0.002 to 0.026 d-1 for toluene biodegradation rate constants derived from ground-water analytical data. The close agreement of toluene biodegradation rate constants reported using both approaches offer strong evidence that toluene can be degraded at environmentally significant rates at the study site.

  7. Assessing in situ rates of anaerobic hydrocarbon bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieg, Lisa M; Alumbaugh, Robert E; Field, Jennifer; Jones, Jesse; Istok, Jonathon D; Suflita, Joseph M

    2009-03-01

    Identifying metabolites associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation is a reliable way to garner evidence for the intrinsic bioremediation of problem contaminants. While such metabolites have been detected at numerous sites, the in situ rates of anaerobic hydrocarbon decay remain largely unknown. Yet, realistic rate information is critical for predicting how long individual contaminants will persist and remain environmental threats. Here, single-well push-pull tests were conducted at two fuel-contaminated aquifers to determine the in situ biotransformation rates of a suite of hydrocarbons added as deuterated surrogates, including toluene-d(8), o-xylene-d(10), m-xylene-d(10), ethylbenzene-d(5) (or -d(10)), 1, 2, 4-trimethylbenzene-d(12), 1, 3, 5-trimethylbenzene-d(12), methylcyclohexane-d(14) and n-hexane-d(14). The formation of deuterated fumarate addition and downstream metabolites was quantified and found to be somewhat variable among wells in each aquifer, but generally within an order of magnitude. Deuterated metabolites formed in one aquifer at rates that ranged from 3 to 50 µg l(-1) day(-1), while the comparable rates at another aquifer were slower and ranged from 0.03 to 15 µg l(-1) day(-1). An important observation was that the deuterated hydrocarbon surrogates were metabolized in situ within hours or days at both sites, in contrast to many laboratory findings suggesting that long lag periods of weeks to months before the onset of anaerobic biodegradation are typical. It seems clear that highly reduced conditions are not detrimental to the intrinsic bioremediation of fuel-contaminated aquifers.

  8. Biodegradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the presence of hydroxy cucurbit[6]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Rajesh; Kumar, Vikash; Chandrasekharan, Sivaraman; Ganguly, Anasuya; Banerjee, Mainak; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2014-11-15

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are one of the major environmental pollutants with reduced bioavailability. The present study focuses on the effect of hydroxy cucurbit[6]uril on the bioavailability of hydrocarbons. A bacterial consortium was used for biodegradation studies under saline and non-saline conditions. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results it was found that the consortium under saline conditions had two different strains. The experiment was conducted in microcosms with tetradecane, hexadecane, octadecane and mixture of the mentioned hydrocarbons as the sole carbon source. The residual hydrocarbon was quantified using gas chromatography every 24h. It was found that biodegradation of tetradecane and hexadecane, as individual carbon source increased in the presence of hydroxy CB[6], probably due to the increase in their bioavailability. In case of octadecane this did not happen. Bioavailability of all three aliphatic hydrocarbons was increased when provided as a mixture to the consortium under saline conditions.

  9. Extracellular polymeric substances govern the development of biofilm and mass transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for improved biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Fang; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Zeng, Jun; Zhao, Qiguo; Jiang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    The hypothesis that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affect the formation of biofilms for subsequent enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was tested. Controlled formation of biofilms on humin particles and biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene were performed with bacteria and EPS-extracted bacteria of Micrococcus sp. PHE9 and Mycobacterium sp. NJS-P. Bacteria without EPS extraction developed biofilms on humin, in contrast the EPS-extracted bacteria could not attach to humin particles. In the subsequent biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene, the biodegradation rates by biofilms were significantly higher than those of EPS-extracted bacteria. Although, both the biofilms and EPS-extracted bacteria showed increases in EPS contents, only the EPS contents in biofilms displayed significant correlations with the biodegradation efficiencies of phenanthrene and pyrene. It is proposed that the bacterial-produced EPS was a key factor to mediate bacterial attachment to other surfaces and develop biofilms, thereby increasing the bioavailability of poorly soluble PAH for enhanced biodegradation.

  10. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants:Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Guo-ping; ZHENG Chun-miao

    2004-01-01

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  11. Integrating spatial and temporal oxygen data to improve the quantification of in situ petroleum biodegradation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory B; Laslett, Dean; Patterson, Bradley M; Johnston, Colin D

    2013-03-15

    Accurate estimation of biodegradation rates during remediation of petroleum impacted soil and groundwater is critical to avoid excessive costs and to ensure remedial effectiveness. Oxygen depth profiles or oxygen consumption over time are often used separately to estimate the magnitude and timeframe for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and subsurface environments. Each method has limitations. Here we integrate spatial and temporal oxygen concentration data from a field experiment to develop better estimates and more reliably quantify biodegradation rates. During a nine-month bioremediation trial, 84 sets of respiration rate data (where aeration was halted and oxygen consumption was measured over time) were collected from in situ oxygen sensors at multiple locations and depths across a diesel non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated subsurface. Additionally, detailed vertical soil moisture (air-filled porosity) and NAPL content profiles were determined. The spatial and temporal oxygen concentration (respiration) data were modeled assuming one-dimensional diffusion of oxygen through the soil profile which was open to the atmosphere. Point and vertically averaged biodegradation rates were determined, and compared to modeled data from a previous field trial. Point estimates of biodegradation rates assuming no diffusion ranged up to 58 mg kg(-1) day(-1) while rates accounting for diffusion ranged up to 87 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Typically, accounting for diffusion increased point biodegradation rate estimates by 15-75% and vertically averaged rates by 60-80% depending on the averaging method adopted. Importantly, ignoring diffusion led to overestimation of biodegradation rates where the location of measurement was outside the zone of NAPL contamination. Over or underestimation of biodegradation rate estimates leads to cost implications for successful remediation of petroleum impacted sites.

  12. A Comprehensive Review of Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation by Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Firouz; Lockington, Robin; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-06-01

    Hydrocarbons are relatively recalcitrant compounds and are classified as high-priority pollutants. However, these compounds are slowly degraded by a large variety of microorganisms. Bacteria are able to degrade aliphatic saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons via both aerobic and anaerobic pathways. Branched hydrocarbons and cyclic hydrocarbons are also degraded by bacteria. The aerobic bacteria use different types of oxygenases, including monooxygenase, cytochrome-dependent oxygenase and dioxygenase, to insert one or two atoms of oxygen into their targets. Anaerobic bacteria, on the other hand, employ a variety of simple organic and inorganic molecules, including sulphate, nitrate, carbonate and metals, for hydrocarbon oxidation.

  13. Microbe-aliphatic hydrocarbon interactions in soil: implications for biodegradation and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, J L; Paton, G I; Semple, K T

    2007-05-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons make up a substantial portion of organic contamination in the terrestrial environment. However, most studies have focussed on the fate and behaviour of aromatic contaminants in soil. Despite structural differences between aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, both classes of contaminants are subject to physicochemical processes, which can affect the degree of loss, sequestration and interaction with soil microflora. Given the nature of hydrocarbon contamination of soils and the importance of bioremediation strategies, understanding the fate and behaviour of aliphatic hydrocarbons is imperative, particularly microbe-contaminant interactions. Biodegradation by microbes is the key removal process of hydrocarbons in soils, which is controlled by hydrocarbon physicochemistry, environmental conditions, bioavailability and the presence of catabolically active microbes. Therefore, the aims of this review are (i) to consider the physicochemical properties of aliphatic hydrocarbons and highlight mechanisms controlling their fate and behaviour in soil; (ii) to discuss the bioavailability and bioaccessibility of aliphatic hydrocarbons in soil, with particular attention being paid to biodegradation, and (iii) to briefly consider bioremediation techniques that may be applied to remove aliphatic hydrocarbons from soil.

  14. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Mortensen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial variability of factors affecting natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone is important to (i) performing a reliable risk assessment and (ii) evaluating the possibility for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites. Most studies to date have focused...... on the shallow unsaturated zone. Based on a data set comprising analysis of about 100 soil samples taken in a 16-m-deep unsaturated zone polluted with volatile petroleum compounds, we statistically and geostatistically analyzed values of essential soil properties. The subsurface of the site was highly layered......, resulting in an accumulation of pollution within coarse sandy lenses. Air-filled porosity, readily available phosphorous, and the first-order rate constant (k1) of benzene obtained from slurry biodegradation experiments were found to depend on geologic sample characterization (P

  15. Modification of cell surface properties of Pseudomonas alcaligenes S22 during hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Moszyńska, Sylwia; Olszanowski, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    Biodegradation of water insoluble hydrocarbons can be significantly increased by the addition of natural surfactants one. Very promising option is the use of saponins. The obtained results indicated that in this system, after 21 days, 92% biodegradation of diesel oil could be achieved using Pseudomonas alcaligenes. No positive effect on the biodegradation process was observed using synthetic surfactant Triton X-100. The kind of carbon source influences the cell surface properties of microorganisms. Modification of the surface cell could be observed by control of the sedimentation profile. This analytical method is a new approach in microbiological analysis.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal wheat inoculation promotes alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: Microcosm experiment on aged-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid, Lenoir; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Frédéric, Laruelle; Yolande, Dalpé; Joël, Fontaine

    2016-06-01

    Very few studies reported the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to dissipate hydrocarbons in aged polluted soils. The present work aims to study the efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonized wheat plants in the dissipation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our results demonstrated that the inoculation of wheat with Rhizophagus irregularis allowed a better dissipation of PAHs and alkanes after 16 weeks of culture by comparison to non-inoculated condition. These dissipations observed in the inoculated soil resulted from several processes: (i) a light adsorption on roots (0.5% for PAHs), (ii) a bioaccumulation in roots (5.7% for PAHs and 6.6% for alkanes), (iii) a transfer in shoots (0.4 for PAHs and 0.5% for alkanes) and mainly a biodegradation. Whereas PAHs and alkanes degradation rates were respectively estimated to 12 and 47% with non-inoculated wheat, their degradation rates reached 18 and 48% with inoculated wheat. The mycorrhizal inoculation induced an increase of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by 56 and 37% compared to the non-inoculated wheat. Moreover, an increase of peroxidase activity was assessed in mycorrhizal roots. Taken together, our findings suggested that mycorrhization led to a better hydrocarbon biodegradation in the aged-contaminated soil thanks to a stimulation of telluric bacteria and hydrocarbon metabolization in mycorrhizal roots.

  17. Monitoring aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by functional marker genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyyssoenen, Mari [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)], E-mail: mari.nyyssonen@vtt.fi; Piskonen, Reetta; Itaevaara, Merja [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2008-07-15

    The development of biological treatment technologies for contaminated environments requires tools for obtaining direct information about the biodegradation of specific contaminants. The potential of functional gene array analysis to monitor changes in the amount of functional marker genes as indicators of contaminant biodegradation was investigated. A prototype functional gene array was developed for targeting key functions in the biodegradation of naphthalene, toluene and xylenes. Internal standard probe based normalization was introduced to facilitate comparison across multiple samples. Coupled with one-colour hybridization, the signal normalization improved the consistency among replicate hybridizations resulting in better discrimination for the differences in the amount of target DNA. During the naphthalene biodegradation in a PAH-contaminated soil slurry microcosm, the normalized hybridization signals in naphthalene catabolic gene probes were in good agreement with the amount of naphthalene-degradation genes and the production of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Gene arrays provide efficient means for monitoring of contaminant biodegradation in the environment. - Functional gene array analysis coupled with one-colour hybridization and internal standard based signal normalization provides efficient tool for monitoring contaminant biodegradation processes.

  18. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Mortensen, Lars; Moldrup, Per

    2010-07-15

    Quantifying the spatial variability of factors affecting natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone is important to (i) performing a reliable risk assessment and (ii) evaluating the possibility for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites. Most studies to date have focused on the shallow unsaturated zone. Based on a data set comprising analysis of about 100 soil samples taken in a 16 m-deep unsaturated zone polluted with volatile petroleum compounds, we statistically and geostatistically analysed values of essential soil properties. The subsurface of the site was highly layered, resulting in an accumulation of pollution within coarse sandy lenses. Air-filled porosity, readily available phosphorous, and the first-order rate constant (k(1)) of benzene obtained from slurry biodegradation experiments were found to depend on geologic sample characterization (P<0.05), while inorganic nitrogen was homogenously distributed across the soil stratigraphy. Semivariogram analysis showed a spatial continuity of 4-8.6 m in the vertical direction, while it was 2-5 times greater in the horizontal direction. Values of k(1) displayed strong spatial autocorrelation. Even so, the soil potential for biodegradation was highly variable, which from autoregressive state-space modeling was partly explained by changes in soil air-filled porosity and gravimetric water content. The results suggest considering biological heterogeneity when evaluating the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.

  19. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by fungal enzymes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Tayssir; Rouissi, Tarek; Kaur Brar, Satinder; Cledon, Maximiliano; Sarma, Saurabhjyoti; Verma, Mausam

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of chemicals. They represent an important concern due to their widespread distribution in the environment, their resistance to biodegradation, their potential to bioaccumulate and their harmful effects. Several pilot treatments have been implemented to prevent economic consequences and deterioration of soil and water quality. As a promising option, fungal enzymes are regarded as a powerful choice for degradation of PAHs. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus and Bjerkandera adusta are most commonly used for the degradation of such compounds due to their production of ligninolytic enzymes such as lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase. The rate of biodegradation depends on many culture conditions, such as temperature, oxygen, accessibility of nutrients and agitated or shallow culture. Moreover, the addition of biosurfactants can strongly modify the enzyme activity. The removal of PAHs is dependent on the ionization potential. The study of the kinetics is not completely comprehended, and it becomes more challenging when fungi are applied for bioremediation. Degradation studies in soil are much more complicated than liquid cultures because of the heterogeneity of soil, thus, many factors should be considered when studying soil bioremediation, such as desorption and bioavailability of PAHs. Different degradation pathways can be suggested. The peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes having common catalytic cycles. One molecule of hydrogen peroxide oxidizes the resting enzyme withdrawing two electrons. Subsequently, the peroxidase is reduced back in two steps of one electron oxidation. Laccases are copper-containing oxidases. They reduce molecular oxygen to water and oxidize phenolic compounds.

  20. The "Oil-Spill Snorkel": an innovative bioelectrochemical approach to accelerate hydrocarbons biodegradation in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Viggi, Carolina; Presta, Enrica; Bellagamba, Marco; Kaciulis, Saulius; Balijepalli, Santosh K; Zanaroli, Giulio; Petrangeli Papini, Marco; Rossetti, Simona; Aulenta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the proof-of-concept of the "Oil-Spill Snorkel": a novel bioelectrochemical approach to stimulate the oxidative biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments. The "Oil-Spill Snorkel" consists of a single conductive material (the snorkel) positioned suitably to create an electrochemical connection between the anoxic zone (the contaminated sediment) and the oxic zone (the overlying O2-containing water). The segment of the electrode buried within the sediment plays a role of anode, accepting electrons deriving from the oxidation of contaminants. Electrons flow through the snorkel up to the part exposed to the aerobic environment (the cathode), where they reduce oxygen to form water. Here we report the results of lab-scale microcosms setup with marine sediments and spiked with crude oil. Microcosms containing one or three graphite snorkels and controls (snorkel-free and autoclaved) were monitored for over 400 days. Collectively, the results of this study confirmed that the snorkels accelerate oxidative reactions taking place within the sediment, as documented by a significant 1.7-fold increase (p = 0.023, two-tailed t-test) in the cumulative oxygen uptake and 1.4-fold increase (p = 0.040) in the cumulative CO2 evolution in the microcosms containing three snorkels compared to snorkel-free controls. Accordingly, the initial rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) degradation was also substantially enhanced. Indeed, while after 200 days of incubation a negligible degradation of TPH was noticed in snorkel-free controls, a significant reduction of 12 ± 1% (p = 0.004) and 21 ± 1% (p = 0.001) was observed in microcosms containing one and three snorkels, respectively. Although, the "Oil-Spill Snorkel" potentially represents a groundbreaking alternative to more expensive remediation options, further research efforts are needed to clarify factors and conditions affecting the snorkel-driven biodegradation processes and to identify suitable

  1. The Oil-Spill Snorkel: an innovative bioelectrochemical approach to accelerate hydrocarbons biodegradation in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eCruz Viggi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the proof-of-concept of the Oil-Spill Snorkel: a novel bioelectrochemical approach to stimulate the oxidative biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments. The Oil-Spill Snorkel consists of a single conductive material (the snorkel positioned suitably to create an electrochemical connection between the anoxic zone (the contaminated sediment and the oxic zone (the overlying O2-containing water. The segment of the electrode buried within the sediment plays a role of anode, accepting electrons deriving from the oxidation of contaminants. Electrons flow through the snorkel up to the part exposed to the aerobic environment (the cathode, where they reduce oxygen to form water. Here we report the results of lab-scale microcosms setup with marine sediments and spiked with crude oil. Microcosms containing 1 or 3 graphite snorkels and controls (snorkel-free and autoclaved were monitored for over 400 days. Collectively, the results of this study confirmed that the snorkels accelerate oxidative reactions taking place within the sediment, as documented by a significant 1.7-fold increase (p=0.023, two-tailed t-test in the cumulative oxygen uptake and 1.4-fold increase (p=0.040 in the cumulative CO2 evolution in the microcosms containing 3 snorkels compared to snorkel-free controls. Accordingly, the initial rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH degradation was also substantially enhanced. Indeed, while after 200 days of incubation a negligible degradation of TPH was noticed in snorkel-free controls, a significant reduction of 12±1% (p=0.004 and 21±1% (p=0.001 was observed in microcosms containing 1 and 3 snorkels, respectively. Although, the Oil-Spill Snorkel potentially represents a groundbreaking alternative to more expensive remediation options, further research efforts are needed to clarify factors and conditions affecting the snorkel-driven biodegradation processes and to identify suitable configurations for field

  2. BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The time-averaged concentration of hydrocarbon and oxygen vapors were measured in the unsaturated zone above the residually contaminated capillary fringe at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, Michigan. Total hydrocarbon and oxygen vapor concentrations were observe...

  3. [Biodegradability of the components of natural hydrocarbon mixtures previously submitted to landfarming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, G N; Pucci, O H

    2003-01-01

    The complex composition of the crude oil and the hydrocarbons that integrate the waste of the different stages of the oil industry turn this product a mixture that presents different difficulties for its elimination by biological methods. The objective of this paper was to study the biodegradation potential of autochthonous bacterial communities on hydrocarbons obtained from four polluted places and subjected to landfarming biorremediation system during a decade. The results showed a marked difference in biodegradability of the three main fractions of crude oil, aliphatic, aromatic, and polar fractions, obtained by column chromatography. All fractions were used as carbon source and energy. There were variations in the production of biomass among the different fractions as well as in the kinetics of biodegradation, according to the composition of each fraction.

  4. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  5. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  6. Hydrocarbon Biodegrading Potentials of a Proteus vulgaris Strain Isolated from Fish Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience O. Olajide

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A Proteus vulgaris bacterium SR-1 was isolated from a freshly killed fish sample collected close to the point of crude oil spill in the Niger Delta region, Nigeria. Problem statement: The application of native bacterial species in bioremediation processes has long been desired, because they would be cost effective and efficient in terms of acclimation time. The ability to isolate high numbers of certain oil-degrading microorganisms from oil-polluted environment is evidence that these microorganisms are the active degraders of that environment. In this study, we reported the potential of a candidate bacterium- Proteus vulgaris SR-1 in the biodegradation of Bonny light crude oil, diesel and kerosene. Approach: To screen for oil degrading capability, the bacterium was cultivated in Minimal Salts Medium (MSM supplemented with 1% (v/v sterile Bonny Light Crude Oil (BLCO. Oil degradation was monitored by measurement of turbidity using a spectrophotometer and the pH, total viable counts of the culture fluids were determined at time intervals as biodegradation indices. The ability of strain to degrade diesel and kerosene oils was also studied while the level of used hydrocarbon degradation was determined using the gravimetric analysis. The bacterium was screened for presence of Plasmid DNA and implication of plasmid in hydrocarbon degradation was investigated. Results: (1 The bacterium utilize hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and it biodegraded Bonny light crude oil, kerosene and diesel media by as much as 78, 79 and 73.8% respectively, in the presence of 1.0% NaCl (w/v after 96 h. The total viable count after 96, 120 and 168 h of biodegradation of the test hydrocarbons range between 6.2 and 9.1 log10 c.f.u mL-1, (2 The results showed that increasing NaCl concentration in water had decreasing effect on hydrocarbon degradation. (3 pH of media decreased from 7.0 to between 3.29 and 5.02 during the reaction period while growth increases. (4 Plasmid

  7. Petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation under seasonal freeze-thaw soil temperature regimes in contaminated soils from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wonjae; Klemm, Sara; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal; Whyte, Lyle; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2011-02-01

    Several studies have shown that biostimulation in ex situ systems such as landfarms and biopiles can facilitate remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils at sub-Arctic sites during summers when temperatures are above freezing. In this study, we examine the biodegradation of semivolatile (F2: C10-C16) and nonvolatile (F3: C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons and microbial respiration and population dynamics at post- and presummer temperatures ranging from -5 to 14 °C. The studies were conducted in pilot-scale tanks with soils obtained from a historically contaminated sub-Arctic site in Resolution Island (RI), Canada. In aerobic, nutrient-amended, unsaturated soils, the F2 hydrocarbons decreased by 32% during the seasonal freeze-thaw phase where soils were cooled from 2 to -5 °C at a freezing rate of -0.12 °C d(-1) and then thawed from -5 to 4 °C at a thawing rate of +0.16 °C d(-1). In the unamended (control) tank, the F2 fraction only decreased by 14% during the same period. Biodegradation of individual hydrocarbon compounds in the nutrient-amended soils was also confirmed by comparing their abundance over time to that of the conserved diesel biomarker, bicyclic sesquiterpanes (BS). During this period, microbial respiration was observed, even at subzero temperatures when unfrozen liquid water was detected during the freeze-thaw period. An increase in culturable heterotrophs and 16S rDNA copy numbers was noted during the freezing phase, and the (14)C-hexadecane mineralization in soil samples obtained from the nutrient-amended tank steadily increased. Hydrocarbon degrading bacterial populations identified as Corynebacterineae- and Alkanindiges-related strains emerged during the freezing and thawing phases, respectively, indicating there were temperature-based microbial community shifts.

  8. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by oleophilic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of an indigenous strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514, isolated from petroleum-polluted soil, for the biodegradation of crude petroleum oil. The isolate completely decolorized 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol in 120h when grown at (37±1°C), indicating its hydrocarbon utilizing nature. Ex situ biodegradation study was performed to find out quantitative utilization and biodegradation of paraffin(s) present in crude oil. When the culture was grown in Bushnell-Hass medium containing crude oil (3%,v/v) at 37°C, 180rpm for 60days, the viscosity of the oil was reduced from 1883cp to 1002cp. Gravimetric and gas chromatographic analysis showed 61.03% and 60.63% of biodegradation of C8-C36+ hydrocarbons, respectively. These results indicated that the isolate has potential to be used for ex-situ and in-situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants and could have promising applications in petrochemical industry.

  9. Potential of preliminary test methods to predict biodegradation performance of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichberger, H; Hasinger, Marion; Braun, Rudolf; Loibner, Andreas P

    2005-03-01

    Preliminary tests at different scales such as degradation experiments (laboratory) in shaking flasks, soil columns and lysimeters as well as in situ respiration tests (field) were performed with soil from two hydrocarbon contaminated sites. Tests have been evaluated in terms of their potential to provide information on feasibility, degradation rates and residual concentration of bioremediation in the vadose zone. Sample size, costs and duration increased with experimental scale in the order shaking flasks - soil columns - lysimeter - in situ respiration tests, only time demand of respiration tests was relatively low. First-order rate constants observed in degradation experiments exhibited significant differences between both, different experimental sizes and different soils. Rates were in line with type and history of contamination at the sites, but somewhat overestimated field rates particularly in small scale experiments. All laboratory experiments allowed an estimation of residual concentrations after remediation. In situ respiration tests were found to be an appropriate pre-testing and monitoring tool for bioventing although residual concentrations cannot be predicted from in situ respiration tests. Moreover, this method does not account for potential limitations that might hamper biodegradation in the longer term but only reflects the actual degradation potential when the test is performed.

  10. Biodegradation of aliphatic vs. aromatic hydrocarbons in fertilized arctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out to test a simple bioremediation treatment strategy in the Arctic and analyze the influence of fertilization the degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g., pristine, n-tetradecane, n-pentadecane, 2-methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, and acenaphthalene. The site was a coarse sand pad that once supported fuel storage tanks. Diesel-range organics concentrations were 250-860 mg/kg soil at the beginning of the study. Replicate field plots treated with fertilizer yielded final concentrations of 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg N/kg soil. Soil pH and soil-water potentials decreased due to fertilizer application. The addition of fertilizer considerably increased soil respiration potentials, but not the populations of microorganisms measured. Fertilizer addition also led to ??? 50% loss of measured aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in surface and subsurface soils. For fertilized plots, hydrocarbon loss was not associated with the quantity of fertilizer added. Losses of aliphatic hydrocarbons were ascribed to biotic processes, while losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were due to biotic and abiotic processes.

  11. Biodegradation testing of hydrophobic chemicals in mixtures at low concentrations – covering the chemical space of petroleum hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Hammershøj, Rikke Høst; Mayer, Philipp

    Petroleum products are complex mixtures of varying composition containing thousands of hydrocarbons each with their own physicochemical properties and degradation kinetics. One approach for risk assessment of these products is therefore to group the hydrocarbons by carbon number and chemical class...... i.e. hydrocarbon blocks. However, the biodegradation kinetic data varies in quantity and quality for the different hydrocarbon blocks, hampering the characterization of their fate properties. In this study, biodegradation kinetics of a large number of hydrocarbons aiming to cover the chemical space...... of petroleum hydrocarbons, were therefore determined at ng/L to µg/L concentrations in surface water, seawater and activated sludge filtrate. Two hydrocarbon mixtures were prepared, comprising a total of 53 chemicals including paraffins, naphthenics and aromatic hydrocarbons from C8 to C20. Passive dosing from...

  12. Biodegradation of selected UV-irradiated and non-irradiated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Kirsi-Maarit; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2003-08-01

    Biodegradation of UV-irradiated anthracene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene was compared to that of the non-irradiated samples, individually and in synthetic mixtures with enrichment cultures. Combined treatment was repeated for individual anthracene and for the PAH mixture with Sphingomonas sp. strain EPA 505 and Sphingomonas yanoikuyae. Enrichment culture studies were performed on the PAH mixtures in the presence of the main photoproduct of anthracene, pure 9,10-anthracenedione. Photochemically pretreated creosote solutions were also subjected to biodegradation and the results were compared to those of the non-irradiated solutions. The primary interest was on 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as priority pollutants by European Union (EU) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Irradiation accelerated the biodegradation onset for anthracene, pyrene, and benz[a]anthracene when they were treated individually. The biodegradation of irradiated pyrene started with no lag phase and was complete by 122 h whereas biodegradation of the non-irradiated sample had a lag of 280 h and resulted in complete degradation by 720 h. Biodegradation of PAHs was accelerated in synthetic mixtures, especially in the presence of pure 9,10-anthracenedione. In general, irradiation had no effect on the biodegradation of PAHs incubated in synthetic mixtures or with pure cultures. Under current experimental conditions, the UV-irradiation invariably reduced the biodegradation of PAHs in creosote. Based on the results of the present and previous photochemical-biological studies of PAHs, the influence of the photochemical pretreatment on the biodegradation is highly dependent on the compounds being treated and other process parameters.

  13. Quantification of in Situ Biodegradation Rate Constants Using a Novel Combined Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P.; Sültenfuß, J.; Martus, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the enormous potential of the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for studying the biodegradation of organic compounds such as monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated solvents and other organic contaminants and environmental transformation mechanisms in groundwater. In addition, two-dimensional isotope analysis such as carbon and hydrogen have been successfully studied indicating the potential to also investigate site-specific reaction mechanisms. The main objective of the current study however is to quantify real effective in situ biodegradation rate constants in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer by combining compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and tracer-based (3H-3He) ground-water dating (TGD). Hence, groundwater samples are used to determine groundwater residence times, and carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes are analyzed for selected BTEX and PAH. The results of the hydrogen stable isotopes surprisingly indicate no isotope fractionation and therefore no biodegradation. In contrast, for stable carbon isotopes of selected BTEX such as o-xylene and toluene, isotope shifts are detected indicating active biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions. These and previous results of stable carbon isotopes show that only for o-xylene a clear evidence for biodegradation is possible for the studied site. Nevertheless, in combining these results with the groundwater residence times, which range between 1 year for the shallow wells (20 m below surface) and 41 years for the deeper wells (40 m below surface), it is feasible to effectively determine in situ biodegradation rate constants for o-xylene. Conversely, the outcome also evidently demonstrate the major limitations of the novel combined isotope approach for a successful implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) at such field sites.

  14. Effect of salt on aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foght, J.; Semple, K.; Pooley, K.; Guigard, S.; Biggar, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Biodegradation can be limited by low concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other terminal electron acceptors, low nutrient concentrations, low temperatures and potentially by low numbers of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microbes in inhospitable environments. At flare pit sites, salt is a common co-contaminant in subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with crude oil. There are few published reports on the effects of salt on hydrocarbon degradation by soil or freshwater microbial communities. In this study, subsurface sediment and groundwater were collected and stored. Five grams of sediment and 50 ml of groundwater were added to flasks, providing replicate indigenous microbial populations. Nutrients were added to certain flasks as autoclaved solutions of ammonium nitrate and potassium phosphate. Positive and negative controls were included in each test series. Flasks were sealed with neoprene stoppers and unsealed briefly to introduce fresh oxygen to maintain aerobic conditions. Results indicate that nutrient addition is required for significant aliphatic but not aromatic hydrocarbon mineralization. Salt was found to be inhibitory to general metabolic activity. Salt concentrations above 1 per cent wt/vol resulted in increased lag times and a lower extent of mineralization. Inhibitory effects observed included increased lag times and decreased rates and extents of mineralization. Low levels of salt were sometimes stimulatory, which may be explained by the salt providing a more ionically balanced medium for the microbes, or by the dispersal of clays to provide a larger surface area for attachment of cells or for access to trace nutrients. It was noted that certain flasks within a replicate set experienced a long lag time before eventually and suddenly beginning to mineralize the substrate at a rate similar to that of less stressed flasks. The lag time may be considered as an adaptation period of the consortium to the stressors, during which there is

  15. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapors in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current state of practice to estimate the risk from intrusion of vapors of petroleum hydrocarbons from spills of gasoline is to measure the concentration of the chemical of concern in ground water under the spill, use Henry’s Law to estimate a concentration of the chemical ...

  16. Biodegradation of the low concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil by microbial consortium during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Lin, Xin; Li, Peijun; Liu, Wan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Chukwuka, K S

    2009-12-30

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (8.15 mg PAHs kg(-1) soil) in aged contaminated soil by isolated microbial consortium (five fungi and three bacteria) during the incubation of 64d is reported. The applied treatments were: (1) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in sterile soils (BM); (2) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in non-sterile soils (BMN); and (3) biodegradation by in situ "natural" microbes in non-sterile soils (BNN). The fungi in BM and BMN soils grew rapidly 0-4d during the incubation and then reached a relative equilibrium. In contrast the fungi in BNN soil remained at a constant level for the entire time. Comparison with the fungi, the bacteria in BNN soils grew rapidly during the incubation 0-2d and then reached a relative equilibrium, and those in BM and BMN soils grew slowly during the incubation of 64 d. After 64 d of incubation, the PAH biodegradations were 35%, 40.7% and 41.3% in BNN, BMN and BM, respectively. The significant release of sequestrated PAHs in aged contaminated soil was observed in this experiment, especially in the BM soil. Therefore, although bioaugmentation of introduced microbial consortium increased significantly the biodegradation of PAHs in aged contaminated soil with low PAH concentration, the creation of optimum of the environmental situation might be the best way to use bioremediation successfully in the field.

  17. The effect of humic acids on biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons depends on the exposure regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Agredano, Maria-Carmen; Mayer, Philipp; Ortega-Calvo, Jose-Julio

    2014-01-01

    Binding of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to dissolved organic matter (DOM) can reduce the freely dissolved concentration, increase apparent solubility or enhance diffusive mass transfer. To study the effects of DOM on biodegradation, we used phenanthrene and pyrene as model PAHs, soil humic acids as model DOM and a soil Mycobacterium strain as a representative degrader organism. Humic acids enhanced the biodegradation of pyrene when present as solid crystals but not when initially dissolved or provided by partitioning from a polymer. Synchronous fluorescence spectrophotometry, scintillation counting and a microscale diffusion technique were applied in order to determine the kinetics of dissolution and diffusive mass transfer of pyrene. We suggest that humic acids can enhance or inhibit biodegradation as a result of the balance of two opposite effects, namely, solubilization of the chemicals on the one hand and inhibition of cell adhesion to the pollutant source on the other.

  18. Effect of low concentrations of synthetic surfactants on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) biodegradation

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Rodrigues; Nogueira, R; Melo, L. F.; A. G. Brito

    2013-01-01

    The present study is focused on the effect of synthetic surfactants, at low concentration, on the kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17514 and addresses the specific issue of the effect of the surfactant on bacterial adhesion to PAH, which is believed to be an important mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic compounds. For that purpose, three surfactants were tested, namely, the nonionic Tween 20, the anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate (...

  19. Advances in the field of high‐molecular‐weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kanaly, Robert A.; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Summary Interest in understanding prokaryotic biotransformation of high‐molecular‐weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW PAHs) has continued to grow and the scientific literature shows that studies in this field are originating from research groups from many different locations throughout the world. In the last 10 years, research in regard to HMW PAH biodegradation by bacteria has been further advanced through the documentation of new isolates that represent diverse bacterial types that...

  20. Assessment of five bioaccessibility assays for predicting the efficacy of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in aged contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandie, Catherine E; Weber, John; Aleer, Samuel; Adetutu, Eric M; Ball, Andy S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the bioaccessibility of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged contaminated soils (1.6-67gkg(-1)) was assessed using four non-exhaustive extraction techniques (100% 1-butanol, 100% 1-propanol, 50% 1-propanol in water and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) and the persulfate oxidation method. Using linear regression analysis, residual hydrocarbon concentrations following bioaccessibility assessment were compared to residual hydrocarbon concentrations following biodegradation in laboratory-scale microcosms in order to determine whether bioaccessibility assays can predict the endpoint of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The relationship between residual hydrocarbon concentrations following microcosm biodegradation and bioaccessibility assessment was linear (r(2)=0.71-0.97) indicating that bioaccessibility assays have the potential to predict the extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation. However, the slope of best fit varied depending on the hydrocarbon fractional range assessed. For the C(10)-C(14) hydrocarbon fraction, the slope of best fit ranged from 0.12 to 0.27 indicating that the non-exhaustive or persulfate oxidation methods removed 3.5-8 times more hydrocarbons than biodegradation. Conversely, for the higher molecular weight hydrocarbon fractions (C(29)-C(36) and C(37)-C(40)), biodegradation removed up to 3.3 times more hydrocarbons compared to bioaccessibility assays with the resulting slope of best fit ranging from 1.0-1.9 to 2.0-3.3 respectively. For mid-range hydrocarbons (C(15)-C(28)), a slope of approximately one was obtained indicating that C(15)-C(28) hydrocarbon removal by these bioaccessibility assays may approximate the extent of biodegradation. While this study demonstrates the potential of predicting biodegradation endpoints using bioaccessibility assays, limitations of the study include a small data set and that all soils were collected from a single site, presumably resulting from a single contamination source. Further evaluation and validation is

  1. Enhancement of hydrocarbon waste biodegradation by addition of a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis O9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, A C; Olivera, N; Commendatore, M; Esteves, J L; Siñeriz, F

    2000-01-01

    A non-sterile biosurfactant preparation (surfactin) was obtained from a 24-h culture of Bacillus subtilis O9 grown on sucrose and used to study its effect on the biodegradation of hydrocarbon wastes by an indigenous microbial community at the Erlenmeyer-flask scale. Crude biosurfactant was added to the cultures to obtain concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Lower concentration affected neither biodegradation nor microbial growth. Higher concentration gave higher cell concentrations. Biodegradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons increased from 20.9 to 35.5% and in the case of aromatic hydrocarbons from nil to 41%, compared to the culture without biosurfactant. The enhancement effect of biosurfactant addition was more noticeable in the case of long chain alkanes. Pristane and phytane isoprenoids were degraded to the same extent as n-C17 and n-C18 alkanes and, consequently, no decrease in the ratios n-C17/pri and n-C18/phy was observed. Rapid production of surfactin crude preparation could make it practical for bioremediation of ship bilge wastes.

  2. Bioavailability of hydrocarbons to bacterial consortia during Triton X-100 mediated biodegradation in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pęziak, Daria; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Marecik, Roman; Lisiecki, Piotr; Woźniak, Marta; Szulc, Alicja; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Triton X-100 on the biodegradation efficiency of hexadecane and phenanthrene carried out by two bacterial consortia. It was established that the tested consortia were not able to directly uptake compounds closed in micelles. It was observed that in micellar systems the nonionic synthetic surfactant was preferentially degraded (the degradation efficiency of Triton X-100 after 21 days was 70% of the initial concentration - 500 mg/l), followed by a lesser decomposition of hydrocarbon released from the micelles (30% for hexadecane and 20% for phenanthrene). However, when hydrocarbons were used as the sole carbon source, 70% of hexadecane and 30% of phenanthrene were degraded. The degradation of the surfactant did not contribute to notable shifts in bacterial community dynamics, as determined by Real-Time PCR. The obtained results suggest that if surfactant-supplementation is to be used as an integral part of a bioremediation process, then possible bioavailability decrease due to entrapment of the contaminant into surfactant micelles should also be taken into consideration, as this phenomenon may have a negative impact on the biodegradation efficiency. Surfactant-induced mobilization of otherwise recalcitrant hydrocarbons may contribute to the spreading of contaminants in the environment and prevent their biodegradation.

  3. Alteration in cell surface properties of Burkholderia spp. during surfactant-aided biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Mukherji, Suparna [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Centre for Environmental Science and Engineering (CESE)

    2012-04-15

    Chemical surfactants may impact microbial cell surface properties, i.e., cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and cell surface charge, and may thus affect the uptake of components from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). This work explored the impact of Triton X-100, Igepal CA 630, and Tween 80 (at twice the critical micelle concentration, CMC) on the cell surface characteristics of Burkholderia cultures, Burkholderia cepacia (ES1, aliphatic degrader) and Burkholderia multivorans (NG1, aromatic degrader), when grown on a six-component model NAPL. In the presence of Triton X-100, NAPL biodegradation was enhanced from 21% to 60% in B. cepacia and from 18% to 53% in B. multivorans. CSH based on water contact angle (50-52 ) was in the same range for both strains while zeta potential at neutral pH was -38 and -31 mV for B. cepacia and B. multivorans, respectively. In the presence of Triton X-100, their CSH increased to greater than 75 and the zeta potential decreased. This induced a change in the mode of uptake and initiated aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation by B. multivorans and increased the rate of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation in B. cepacia. Igepal CA 630 and Tween 80 also altered the cell surface properties. For B. cepacia grown in the presence of Triton X-100 at two and five times its CMC, CSH increased significantly in the log growth phase. Growth in the presence of the chemical surfactants also affected the abundance of chemical functional groups on the cell surface. Cell surface changes had maximum impact on NAPL degradation in the presence of emulsifying surfactants, Triton X-100 and Igepal CA630.

  4. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by arbuscular mycorrhizal leek plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.; Dalpe, Y. [Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Grain and Oilseeds Branch

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), nutrient uptake, and leek growth under greenhouse conditions. This experiment included 3 mycorrhizal treatments, 2 microorganism treatments, 2 PAH chemicals, and 4 concentrations of PAHs. Plant growth was greatly reduced by the addition of anthracene or phenanthrene in soil, whereas mycorrhizal inoculation not only increased plant growth, but also enhanced uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus. PAH concentrations in soil was lowered through the inoculation of two different strains of the species G. intraradices and G. versiforme. In 12 weeks of pot cultures, anthracene and phenanthrene concentrations decreased for all 3 PAH levels tested. However, the reduced amount of phenanthrene in soil was greater than that of anthracene. The addition of a soil microorganism extract into pot cultures accelerated the PAH degradation. The inoculation of AMF in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil was shown to enhance PAHs soil decontamination. It was concluded that a soil colonized with AMF can not only improve plant growth but can also stimulate soil microflora abundance and diversity. AMF may therefore directly influence PAH soil decontamination through plant growth enhancement.

  5. Quantitative structure-biodegradability relationships for biokinetic parameter of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Hou, Baolin

    2015-04-01

    Prediction of the biodegradability of organic pollutants is an ecologically desirable and economically feasible tool for estimating the environmental fate of chemicals. In this paper, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis method was applied to establish quantitative structure biodegradability relationship (QSBR) between the chemical structure and a novel biodegradation activity index (qmax) of 20 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The frequency B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,p) calculations showed no imaginary values, implying that all the structures are minima on the potential energy surface. After eliminating the parameters which had low related coefficient with qmax, the major descriptors influencing the biodegradation activity were screened to be Freq, D, MR, EHOMO and ToIE. The evaluation of the developed QSBR mode, using a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, showed that the relationships are significant and the model had good robustness and predictive ability. The results would be helpful for understanding the mechanisms governing biodegradation at the molecular level.

  6. Rapid biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using effective Cronobacter sakazakii MM045 (KT933253).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Zubairu Darma; Aziz, Nor Azwady Abd; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Mustafa, Muskhazli

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are complex and widely distributed environmental pollutants that can affect living ecosystems. This study was conducted to rapidly degrade phenanthrene and pyrene representing low and high molecular weight of PAHs, respectively. Cronobacter sakazakii MM045 (KT933253) was identified from used engine oil of contaminated soil. PAHs biodegradation was carried out using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) assay. Biodegradation influencing factors including agitation, temperature, pH, inoculums volume and salinity were enhanced using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) by Central Composite Design (CCD). Phenanthrene and pyrene biodegrading metabolites were identified using gas chromatography mass spectrophotometer (GCMS). •Initial biodegradation indicated 75.2% and 54.3% phenanthrene and pyrene degraded by C. sakazakii MM045 within 24 h. After CCD optimisation, 100% degradation was achieved for each of the phenanthrene and pyrene, resulting in the formation of intermediate metabolites.•The identified phenanthrene metabolites were 3,4-dihydroxyphenathrene, phthalic acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid. Pyrene intermediates comprised pyrene cis-4,5-dihydrodiol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenanthrene, phthalic acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid.•Cronbacter sakazakii MM045 was proven to be rapid and effective in degrading PAHs within 24 h despite the unavailability of existing literatures on PAHs biodegradation.

  7. Evaluating the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons by monitoring of several functional genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskonen, Reetta; Nyyssönen, Mari; Itävaara, Merja

    2008-11-01

    Various microbial activities determine the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. In this work, we evaluated the feasibility of gene array hybridization for monitoring the efficiency of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of 14C-labelled naphthalene and toluene by the aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas putida F1, P. putida mt-2 and P. putida G7 was followed in mixed liquid culture microcosm by a preliminary, nylon membrane-based gene array. In the beginning of the study, toluene was degraded rapidly and increased amount of toluene degradation genes was detected by the preliminary gene array developed for the study. After toluene was degraded, naphthalene mineralization started and the amount of naphthalene degradation genes increased as biodegradation proceeded. The amount of toluene degradation genes decreased towards the end of the study. The hybridization signal intensities determined by preliminary gene array were in good agreement with mineralization of naphthalene and toluene and with the amount of naphthalene dioxygenase and toluene dioxygenase genes quantified by dot blot hybridization. The clear correlation between the results obtained by the preliminary array and the biodegradation process suggests that gene array methods can be considered as a promising tool for monitoring the efficiency of biodegradation processes.

  8. Cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols in contaminated soil slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian J. Allan; Kirk T. Semple; Rina Hare; Brian J. Reid [University of East Anglia (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences

    2007-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the relative contribution of soil catabolic activity, contaminant bioaccessibility, and nutrient levels on the biodegradation of field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds in three municipal gas plant site soils. Extents of biodegradation achieved, in 6 week-long soil slurry assays, under the following conditions were compared: (i) with inoculation of catabolically active PAH and phenol-degrading microorganisms, (ii) with and without hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin supplementation (HPCD; 100 g L{sup -1}), and finally (iii) with the provision of additional inorganic nutrients in combination with HPCD. Results indicated no significant (p {lt} 0.05) differences between biodegradation endpoints attained in treatments inoculated with catabolically active microorganisms as compared with the uninoculated control. Amendments with HPCD significantly (p {lt} 0.05) lowered biodegradation endpoints for most PAHs and phenolic compounds. Only in one soil did the combination of HPCD and nutrients consistently achieve better bioremediation endpoints with respect to the HPCD-only treatments. Thus, for most compounds, biodegradation was not limited by the catabolic activity of the indigenous microorganisms but rather by processes resulting in limited availability of contaminants to degraders. It is therefore suggested that the bioremediation of PAH and phenol impacted soils could be enhanced through HPCD amendments. In addition, the biodegradability of in situ and spiked (deuterated analogues) PAHs following 120 days aging of the soils suggested that this contact time was not sufficient to obtain similar partitions to that observed for field-aged contaminants; with the spiked compounds being significantly (p {lt} 0.05) more available for biodegradation. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Insights into the biodegradation of weathered hydrocarbons in contaminated soils by bioaugmentation and nutrient stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Brassington, Kirsty J; Prpich, George; Paton, Graeme I; Semple, Kirk T; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The potential for biotransformation of weathered hydrocarbon residues in soils collected from two commercial oil refinery sites (Soil A and B) was studied in microcosm experiments. Soil A has previously been subjected to on-site bioremediation and it was believed that no further degradation was possible while soil B has not been subjected to any treatment. A number of amendment strategies including bioaugmentation with hydrocarbon degrader, biostimulation with nutrients and soil grinding, were applied to the microcosms as putative biodegradation improvement strategies. The hydrocarbon concentrations in each amendment group were monitored throughout 112 days incubation. Microcosms treated with biostimulation (BS) and biostimulation/bioaugmentation (BS + BA) showed the most significant reductions in the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. However, soil grinding was shown to reduce the effectiveness of a nutrient treatment on the extent of biotransformation by up to 25% and 20% for the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions, respectively. This is likely due to the disruption to the indigenous microbial community in the soil caused by grinding. Further, ecotoxicological responses (mustard seed germination and Microtox assays) showed that a reduction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was not directly correlable to reduction in toxicity; thus monitoring TPH alone is not sufficient for assessing the environmental risk of a contaminated site after remediation.

  10. Anaerobic biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with amendment of iron(III) in mangrove sediment slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Hua; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2010-11-01

    Mangrove sediment, influenced by tidal cycles, switches between low-oxygen and non-oxygen conditions, and iron is abundant in it. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination often occurs in mangrove wetlands. In the present paper, the effects of iron [Fe(III)] amendment on the biodegradation of four mixed PAHs, namely fluorene (Fl), phenanthrene (Phe), fluoranthene (Flua) and pyrene (Pyr), in mangrove sediment slurries, with and without the inoculation of the enriched PAH-degrading bacterial consortia, under low-oxygen (2 + or - 0.3% O(2)) and non-oxygen (0% O(2)) conditions were investigated. Under both oxygen conditions and for all four PAHs, the highest PAHs biodegradation was observed in the groups with the inoculation of the enriched PAH-degrading consortia, while the groups without the inoculum and without Fe(III) amendment had the lowest biodegradation. However, the amendment of Fe(III) did not show any significant improvement on the biodegradation of all the four mixed PAHs.

  11. Advances in the field of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaly, Robert A; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-03-01

    Interest in understanding prokaryotic biotransformation of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW PAHs) has continued to grow and the scientific literature shows that studies in this field are originating from research groups from many different locations throughout the world. In the last 10 years, research in regard to HMW PAH biodegradation by bacteria has been further advanced through the documentation of new isolates that represent diverse bacterial types that have been isolated from different environments and that possess different metabolic capabilities. This has occurred in addition to the continuation of in-depth comprehensive characterizations of previously isolated organisms, such as Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1. New metabolites derived from prokaryotic biodegradation of four- and five-ring PAHs have been characterized, our knowledge of the enzymes involved in these transformations has been advanced and HMW PAH biodegradation pathways have been further developed, expanded upon and refined. At the same time, investigation of prokaryotic consortia has furthered our understanding of the capabilities of microorganisms functioning as communities during HMW PAH biodegradation.

  12. Methanogenic biodegradation of paraffinic solvent hydrocarbons in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-04-01

    Microbial communities drive many biogeochemical processes in oil sands tailings and cause greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Paraffinic solvent (primarily C5-C6; n- and iso-alkanes) is used by some oil sands companies to aid bitumen extraction from oil sands ores. Residues of unrecovered solvent escape to tailings ponds during tailings deposition and sustain microbial metabolism. To investigate biodegradation of hydrocarbons in paraffinic solvent, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL ponds were amended with paraffinic solvent at ~0.1wt% (final concentration: ~1000mgL(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ~1600d. Albian and CNRL MFTs exhibited ~400 and ~800d lag phases, respectively after which n-alkanes (n-pentane and n-hexane) in the solvent were preferentially metabolized to methane over iso-alkanes in both MFTs. Among iso-alkanes, only 2-methylpentane was completely biodegraded whereas 2-methylbutane and 3-methylpentane were partially biodegraded probably through cometabolism. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Anaerolineaceae and Methanosaetaceae in Albian MFT and Peptococcaceae and co-domination of "Candidatus Methanoregula" and Methanosaetaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively, during active biodegradation of paraffinic solvent. The results are important for developing future strategies for tailings reclamation and management of greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and dynamic laser speckle for detecting chemotactic responses at low bacterial concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melina Nisenbaum; Gonzalo Hernán Sendra; Gastón Alfredo Cerdá Gilbert; Marcelo Scagliola; Jorge Froilán González; Silvia Elena Murialdo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the biodegradation of pure hydrocarbons and chemotaxis towards these compounds by an isolated chlorophenol degrader,Pseudomonas strain H.The biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence identified Pseudomonas strain H as having 99.56% similarity with P.aeruginosa PA01.This strain was able to degrade n-hexadecane,1-undecene,1-nonene,1-decene,1-dodecene and kerosene.It grew in the presence of 1-octene,while this hydrocarbons is toxic to other hydrocarbons degraders.Pseudomonas strain H was also chemotactic towards n-hexadecane,kerosene,1-undecene and 1-dodecene.These results show that this Pseudomonas strain H is an attractive candidate for hydrocarbon-containing wastewater bioremediation in controlled environments.Since the classical standard techniques for detecting chemotaxis are not efficient at low bacterial concentrations,we demonstrate the use of the dynamic speckle laser method,which is simple and inexpensive,to confirm bacterial chemotaxis at low cell concentrations (less than 105 colony-forming unit per millilitre (CFU/mL)) when hydrocarbons are the attractants.

  14. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and dynamic laser speckle for detecting chemotactic responses at low bacterial concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenbaum, Melina; Sendra, Gonzalo Hernán; Gilbert, Gastón Alfredo Cerdá; Scagliola, Marcelo; González, Jorge Froilán; Murialdo, Silvia Elena

    2013-03-01

    We report on the biodegradation of pure hydrocarbons and chemotaxis towards these compounds by an isolated chlorophenol degrader, Pseudomonas strain H. The biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence identified Pseudomonas strain H as having 99.56% similarity with P. aeruginosa PA01. This strain was able to degrade n-hexadecane, 1-undecene, 1-nonene, 1-decene, 1-dodecene and kerosene. It grew in the presence of 1-octene, while this hydrocarbons is toxic to other hydrocarbons degraders. Pseudomonas strain H was also chemotactic towards n-hexadecane, kerosene, 1-undecene and 1-dodecene. These results show that this Pseudomonas strain H is an attractive candidate for hydrocarbon-containing wastewater bioremediation in controlled environments. Since the classical standard techniques for detecting chemotaxis are not efficient at low bacterial concentrations, we demonstrate the use of the dynamic speckle laser method, which is simple and inexpensive, to confirm bacterial chemotaxis at low cell concentrations (less than 10(5) colony-forming unit per millilitre (CFU/mL)) when hydrocarbons are the attractants.

  15. Problems Caused by Microbes and Treatment Strategies Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation and Biocorrosion: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suflita, Joseph M.; Duncan, Kathleen E.

    The anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons is important for the intrinsic remediation of spilt fuels (Gieg and Suflita, 2005), for the conversion of hydrocarbons to clean burning natural gas (Gieg et al., 2008; Jones et al., 2008) and for the fundamental cycling of carbon on the planet (Caldwell et al., 2008). However, the same process has also been implicated in a host of difficult problems including reservoir souring (Jack and Westlake, 1995), oil viscosity alteration (Head et al., 2003), compromised equipment performance and microbiologically influenced corrosion (Duncan et al., 2009). Herein, we will focus on the role of anaerobic microbial communities in catalysing biocorrosion activities in oilfield facilities. Biocorrosion is a costly problem that remains relatively poorly understood. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms requires reliable information on the carbon and energy sources supporting biofilm microorganisms capable of catalysing such activities.

  16. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater at low temperatures (0-5 degrees C) and bacterial communities associated with degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakstad, Odd G; Bonaunet, Kristin

    2006-02-01

    In this study biodegradation of hydrocarbons in thin oil films was investigated in seawater at low temperatures, 0 and 5 degrees C. Heterotrophic (HM) or oil-degrading (ODM) microorganisms enriched at the two temperatures showed 16S rRNA sequence similarities to several bacteria of Arctic or Antarctic origin. Biodegradation experiments were conducted with a crude mineral oil immobilized as thin films on hydrophobic Fluortex adsorbents in nutrient-enriched or sterile seawater. Chemical and respirometric analysis of hydrocarbon depletion showed that naphthalene and other small aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs) were primarily biodegraded after dissolution to the water phase, while biodegradation of larger polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and C(10)-C(36) n-alkanes, including n-hexadecane, was associated primarily with the oil films. Biodegradation of PAH and n-alkanes was significant at both 0 and 5 degrees C, but was decreased for several compounds at the lower temperature. n-Hexadecane biodegradation at the two temperatures was comparable at the end of the experiments, but was delayed at 0 degree C. Investigations of bacterial communities in seawater and on adsorbents by PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and DGGE analysis indicated that predominant bacteria in the seawater gradually adhered to the oil-coated adsorbents during biodegradation at both temperatures. Sequence analysis of most DGGE bands aligned to members of the phyla Proteobacteria (Gammaproteobacteria) or Bacteroidetes. Most sequences from experiments at 0 degree C revealed affiliations to members of Arctic or Antarctic consortia, while no such homology was detected for sequences from degradation experiment run at 5 degrees C. In conclusion, marine microbial communities from cold seawater have potentials for oil film HC degradation at temperatures bacteria may play an important role during oil HC biodegradation in seawater close to freezing point.

  17. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon mixtures in surface waters at environmentally relevant levels - Effect of inoculum origin on kinetics and sequence of degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Hammershøj, Rikke Høst; Comber, Mike

    2017-01-01

    potentially impacting the observed biodegradation kinetics. In this study we investigated the effect of inoculum origin on the biodegradation kinetics of hydrocarbons for five inocula from surface waters varying in urbanization and thus expected pre-exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. A new biodegradation......Biodegradation is a dominant removal process for many organic pollutants, and biodegradation tests serve as tools for assessing their environmental fate within regulatory risk assessment. In simulation tests, the inoculum is not standardized, varying in microbial quantity and quality, thereby...... in four of the five waters but lower in water from a rural lake. The sequence of degradation between the 9 hydrocarbons showed similar patterns in the five waters indicating the potential for using selected hydrocarbons for benchmarking between biodegradation tests. Degradation half-times were shorter...

  18. Optimisation research of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in weathered drilling wastes from waste pits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steliga, Teresa; Jakubowicz, Piotr; Kapusta, Piotr

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the problem of drilling waste remediation. Analyses and research showed that material stored in waste pits could be classified as soil with a high level of petroleum impurities (total petroleum hydrocarbons [TPH] = 102,417-132,472 mg kg(-1) dry mass). While preparing the complex technology of soil decontamination (which included primary reclamation, basic bioremediation and inoculation with biopreparations based on indigenous bacteria and fungi), laboratory tests indicated the use of an ex-situ method was fundamental. Remediation was controlled with a chromatographic method of qualitative and quantitative determination of petroleum hydrocarbons. Based on analytical data, there was the possibility to determine the effectiveness of consecutive purifying phases. Laboratory tests, following 135 days of basic bioremediation stimulated by optimum conditions to activate the growth of indigenous micro-organisms, resulted in a decrease in the TPH content, which was in the range of 52.3-72.5%. The next phase of soil decontamination lasted 135 days and involved the use of inoculation with biopreparations based on indigenous micro-organisms and fungi. This process enabled a TPH decrease of 93.8- 94.3%. Laboratory biodegradation research was done with the use of the biomarker C30-17α(H)21β(H)-hopane to normalize analyte (TPH, Σn-C8-n-C22 and Σn-C23-n-C36) concentrations. The calculated first-order biodegradation constants enable estimation of the purification stage dynamics and the effectiveness of the applied biopreparations. Furthermore, they represent the biodegradation degree of individual n-alkanes in subsequent stages of the soil purification process.

  19. Intrinsic biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in an alluvial aquifer--potentials and limits of signature metabolite analysis and two stable isotope-based techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasch, Barbara; Hunkeler, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Temime, Brice; Höhener, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Three independent techniques were used to assess the biodegradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and low-molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the alluvial aquifer at the site of a former cokery (Flémalle, Belgium). Firstly, a stable carbon isotope-based field method allowed quantifying biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds in situ and confirmed the degradation of naphthalene. No evidence could be deduced from stable isotope shifts for the intrinsic biodegradation of larger molecules such as methylnaphthalenes or acenaphthene. Secondly, using signature metabolite analysis, various intermediates of the anaerobic degradation of (poly-) aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were identified. The discovery of a novel metabolite of acenaphthene in groundwater samples permitted deeper insights into the anaerobic biodegradation of almost persistent environmental contaminants. A third method, microcosm incubations with 13C-labeled compounds under in situ-like conditions, complemented techniques one and two by providing quantitative information on contaminant biodegradation independent of molecule size and sorption properties. Thanks to stable isotope labels, the sensitivity of this method was much higher compared to classical microcosm studies. The 13C-microcosm approach allowed the determination of first-order rate constants for 13C-labeled benzene, naphthalene, or acenaphthene even in cases when degradation activities were only small. The plausibility of the third method was checked by comparing 13C-microcosm-derived rates to field-derived rates of the first approach. Further advantage of the use of 13C-labels in microcosms is that novel metabolites can be linked more easily to specific mother compounds even in complex systems. This was achieved using alluvial sediments where 13C-acenaphthyl methylsuccinate was identified as transformation product of the anaerobic degradation of acenaphthene.

  20. Combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation of polycylic armotic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-He; Xiao, Huining; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    This study systematically investigated the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) on the biodegradation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil-water systems. The degradations of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were fitted well with first order kinetic model and the degradation rates were in proportion to the concentration of biosurfactant. In addition, the degradation enhancement of PHE was higher than that of PYR. The addition of soil DOM itself at an environmental level would inhibit the biodegradation of PAHs. However, in the system with co-existence of DOM and biosurfactant, the degradation of PAHs was higher than that in only biosurfactant addition system, which may be attributed to the formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex micelles. Furthermore, under the combined conditions, the degradation of PAH increased with the biosurfactant concentration, and the soil DOM added system showed slightly higher degradation than the compost DOM added system, indicating that the chemical structure and composition of DOM would also affect the bioavailability of PAHs. The study result may broaden knowledge of biosurfactant enhanced bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soil and groundwater.

  1. Anaerobic biodegradation of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a facultative anaerobe Pseudomonas sp. JP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lei; Song, Xiaohui; Kong, Jing; Shen, Chenghui; Huang, Tongwang; Hu, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are harmful persistent organic pollutants, while the high-molecular-weight (HMW) PAHs are even more detrimental to the environment and human health. However, microbial anaerobic degradation of HMW PAHs has rarely been reported. One facultative anaerobe Pseudomonas sp. JP1 was isolated from Shantou Bay, Shantou, China, which could degrade a variety of HMW PAHs. After 40 days cultivation with strain JP1, anaerobic biodegradation rate of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), fluoranthene, and phenanthrene was 30, 47, and 5 %, respectively. Consumption of nitrate as the electron acceptor was confirmed by N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine spectrophotometry. Supplementation of sodium sulfite, maltose, or glycine, and in a salinity of 0-20 ‰ significantly stimulated anaerobic degradation of BaP. Lastly, the anaerobic degradation metabolites of BaP by strain JP1 were investigated using GC/MS, and the degradation pathway was proposed. This study is helpful for further studies on the mechanism of anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs.

  2. Experimental study of clay-hydrocarbon interactions relevant to the biodegradation of the Deepwater Horizon oil from the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2016-11-01

    Adding clay to marine oil pollution represents a promising approach to enhance bacterial hydrocarbon degradation in nutrient poor waters. In this study, three types of regionally available clays (Ca-bentonite, Fuller's Earth and kaolin) were tested to stimulate the biodegradation of source and weathered oil collected from the Deepwater Horizon spill. The weathered oil showed little biodegradation prior to experimentation and was extensively degraded by bacteria in the laboratory in a similar way as the alkane-rich source oil. For both oils, the addition of natural clay-flakes showed minor enhancement of oil biodegradation compared to the non-clay bearing control, but the clay-oil films did limit evaporation. Only alkanes of a molecular weight (MW) > 420 showed significant reduction by enhanced biodegradation following natural clay treatment. In contrast, all fertilized clay flakes showed major bacterial degradation of the oil, with a 6-10 times reduction in alkane content, and an up to 8 fold increase in the rate of O2 consumption. Compared to the control, such treatment showed particular reduction of longer chained alkanes (MW > 226). The application of natural and fertilized clay flakes also showed selective reduction of PAHs, mainly in the MW range of 200-300, but without significant change in the toxicity indices measured. These results imply that a large variety of clays may be used to boost oil biodegradation by aiding attachment of fertilizing nutrients to the oil.

  3. The “Oil-Spill Snorkel”: an innovative bioelectrochemical approach to accelerate hydrocarbons biodegradation in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Viggi, Carolina; Presta, Enrica; Bellagamba, Marco; Kaciulis, Saulius; Balijepalli, Santosh K.; Zanaroli, Giulio; Petrangeli Papini, Marco; Rossetti, Simona; Aulenta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the proof-of-concept of the “Oil-Spill Snorkel”: a novel bioelectrochemical approach to stimulate the oxidative biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments. The “Oil-Spill Snorkel” consists of a single conductive material (the snorkel) positioned suitably to create an electrochemical connection between the anoxic zone (the contaminated sediment) and the oxic zone (the overlying O2-containing water). The segment of the electrode buried within the sediment plays a role of anode, accepting electrons deriving from the oxidation of contaminants. Electrons flow through the snorkel up to the part exposed to the aerobic environment (the cathode), where they reduce oxygen to form water. Here we report the results of lab-scale microcosms setup with marine sediments and spiked with crude oil. Microcosms containing one or three graphite snorkels and controls (snorkel-free and autoclaved) were monitored for over 400 days. Collectively, the results of this study confirmed that the snorkels accelerate oxidative reactions taking place within the sediment, as documented by a significant 1.7-fold increase (p = 0.023, two-tailed t-test) in the cumulative oxygen uptake and 1.4-fold increase (p = 0.040) in the cumulative CO2 evolution in the microcosms containing three snorkels compared to snorkel-free controls. Accordingly, the initial rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) degradation was also substantially enhanced. Indeed, while after 200 days of incubation a negligible degradation of TPH was noticed in snorkel-free controls, a significant reduction of 12 ± 1% (p = 0.004) and 21 ± 1% (p = 0.001) was observed in microcosms containing one and three snorkels, respectively. Although, the “Oil-Spill Snorkel” potentially represents a groundbreaking alternative to more expensive remediation options, further research efforts are needed to clarify factors and conditions affecting the snorkel-driven biodegradation processes and to identify

  4. Biodegradation of complex hydrocarbons in spent engine oil by novel bacterial consortium isolated from deep sea sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, A; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Joshi, Gajendra; Magesh Peter, D; Dharani, G; Kirubagaran, R

    2014-10-01

    Complex hydrocarbon and aromatic compounds degrading marine bacterial strains were isolated from deep sea sediment after enrichment on spent engine (SE) oil. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the isolates were related to members of the Pseudoalteromonas sp., Ruegeria sp., Exiguobacterium sp. and Acinetobacter sp. Biodegradation using 1% (v/v) SE oil with individual and mixed strains showed the efficacy of SE oil utilization within a short retention time. The addition of non-ionic surfactant 0.05% (v/v) Tween 80 as emulsifying agent enhanced the solubility of hydrocarbons and renders them more accessible for biodegradation. The degradation of several compounds and the metabolites formed during the microbial oxidation process were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The potential of this consortium to biodegrade SE oil with and without emulsifying agent provides possible application in bioremediation of oil contaminated marine environment.

  5. Bioavailability and biodegradation kinetics protocol for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil to enhance bioremediation and to achieve environmentally acceptable endpoints during treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabak, H.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Govind, R.; Fu, C.; Gao, C. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation of polluted soil requires a fundamental understanding of biodegradation kinetics and the physicochemical factors that control the rate of biodegradation. A systematic multi-level indigenous microbiota, the transport and diffusivity parameters of soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants and oxygen limitation in freshly PAH spiked and PAH contaminated aged soil matrices. Abiotic adsorption and desorption experiments were conducted to obtain nonlinear isotherms described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Detailed mathematical models were developed for the four bioreactors and abiotic adsorption and desorption studies together with cumulative oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide evolution data are used to derive the PAH contaminant and oxygen diffusivities in the freshly PAH spiked and PAH contaminated aged soil matrices. Studies included the use of microcosms to qualitatively assess the biodegradation rates and testing with radiolabeled compounds to determine mineralization. Studies with PAH contaminated Reilly Tar soils were undertaken to determine the effect of soil properties on the sequestering process that leads to diminished bioavailability; to evaluate the effect of chemical inducers, surfactants, nutrients, cometabolites, inoculum amendments and moisture content on the rate and extent of PAH biodegradation; and to establish the best attainable environmental endpoints for PAH pollutants in aged soils.

  6. Surfactant-enhanced desorption and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Aitken, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated two nonionic surfactants, one hydrophobic (Brij 30) and one hydrophilic (C(12)E(8)), for their ability to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil after it had been treated in an aerobic bioreactor. The effects of each surfactant were evaluated at doses corresponding to equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations well above the surfactant's critical micelle concentration (CMC), slightly above the CMC, and below the CMC. The concentrations of all 3- and 4-ring PAHs were significantly lower in the soil amended with Brij 30 at the two lower doses compared to controls, whereas removal of only the 3-ring PAHs was significantly enhanced at the highest Brij 30 dose. In contrast, C(12)E(8) did not enhance PAH removal at any dose. In the absence of surfactant, PAH desorbed from the soil over an 18 day period. Brij 30 addition at the lowest dose significantly increased the desorption of most PAHs, whereas the addition of C(12)E(8) at the lowest dose actually decreased the desorption of all PAHs. These findings suggest that the effects of the two surfactants on PAH biodegradation could be explained by their effects on PAH bioavailability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the properties of the surfactant and its dose relative to the corresponding aqueous-phase concentration are important factors in designing systems for surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils in which PAH bioavailability is limited.

  7. Effects of enrichment with phthalate on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, David R; Richardson, Stephen D; Aitken, Michael D

    2008-07-01

    The effect of enrichment with phthalate on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was tested with bioreactor-treated and untreated contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. Soil samples that had been treated in a bioreactor and enriched with phthalate mineralized (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene to a greater extent than unenriched samples over a 22.5-h incubation, but did not stimulate benzo[a]pyrene mineralization. In contrast to the positive effects on (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene, no significant differences were found in the extent of biodegradation of native PAH when untreated contaminated soil was incubated with and without phthalate amendment. Denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from unenriched and phthalate-enriched soil samples were substantially different, and clonal sequences matched to prominent DGGE bands revealed that beta-Proteobacteria related to Ralstonia were most highly enriched by phthalate addition. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses confirmed that, of previously determined PAH-degraders in the bioreactor, only Ralstonia-type organisms increased in response to enrichment, accounting for 89% of the additional bacterial 16S rRNA genes resulting from phthalate enrichment. These findings indicate that phthalate amendment of this particular PAH-contaminated soil did not significantly enrich for organisms associated with high molecular weight PAH degradation or have any significant effect on overall degradation of native PAH in the soil.

  8. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons : model simulation for bioavailability and biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owabor, C.N.; Ogbeide, S.E. [Benin Univ. (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Susu, A.A. [Lagos Univ. (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-04-15

    Research has indicated that the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is influenced by the molecular size of the PAHs as well as by soil properties. This study presented a model for a 1-D convective-dispersive solute transport in a soil matrix. The model was designed to consider the gas-liquid interface film and the biofilm between the liquid and solid interface as well as to account for interparticle; intraparticle, and interphase mass transport. A soil microcosm reactor was used to evaluate substrate bioavailability and biodegradation in a contaminated aqueous solids system. The numerical model involved the discretization of depth, radial distance, and time into mesh or grid points with constant intervals. Dimensionless variables were defined using a backward finite difference (BFD) method. Results of the study suggested that PAH occlusion occurred in the micropores of the soil particle. The non-steady state model adequately predicted the concentration profiles of PAHs within the soil matrix. 26 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation and extracellular enzyme secretion in agitated and stationary cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular enzyme secretion and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in agitated and shallow stationary liquid cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Veratryl alcohol and Tween80 were added to cultures as lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) inducer, respectively. Shallow stationary cultures were suitable for the production of enzyme, whereas agitated cultures enhanced overall biodegradation by facilitating interphase mass transfer of PAH into aqueous phases. The use of a LiP stimulator, veratryl alcohol, did not increase PAH degradation but significantly enhanced LiP activity. In contrast, Tween80 increased both MnP secretion and PAH degradation in shallow stationary cultures. On the other hand, high PAH degradation was observed in agitated cultures in the absence of detectable LiP and MnP activities. The results suggested that extracellular peroxidase activities are not directly related to the PAH degradation, and the increased solubility rather than enzyme activity may be more important in the promotion of PAH degradation.

  10. Identification and biodegradation potential of tropical aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillan, Frédéric; Le Flèche, Anne; Bury, Edith; Phantavong, Y-Hui; Grimont, Patrick; Saliot, Alain; Oudot, Jean

    2004-09-01

    Screening of aerobic culturable hydrocarbon (HC)-degrading microorganisms isolated from petroleum-polluted soils and cyanobacterial mats from Indonesia resulted in the collection of 33 distinct species. Eight bacteria, 21 fungi and 4 yeasts were identified to the specific level by molecular and phenotypic techniques. Bacterial strains belonged to the genera Gordonia, Brevibacterium, Aeromicrobium, Dietzia, Burkholderia and Mycobacterium. Four species are new and not yet described. Fungi belonged to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Amorphoteca, Neosartorya, Paecilomyces, Talaromyces and Graphium. Yeasts were Candida, Yarrowia and Pichia. All strains were cultivated axenically in synthetic liquid media with crude oil as sole carbon and energy source. After incubation, the detailed chemical composition of the residual oil was studied by gravimetric and gas-chromatographic techniques. Thirteen parameters for assessing the biodegradation potential were defined and computed for each strain. Maximum degradation was observed on the saturated HCs (n- and isoalkanes, isoprenoids), whereas aromatic HC degradation was lower and was related to the structural composition of the molecules. A principal components analysis (PCA) permitted grouping and classifying the strains as a function of their degradative capacities. It was shown that the most active strains produced polar metabolites which accumulated in the resins and asphaltene fractions. These fractions are highly resistant to microbial metabolism. No taxonomic trend could be defined between microbial phyla in terms of HC biodegradation activity.

  11. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun, E-mail: o.adelaja@my.westminster.ac.uk; Keshavarz, Tajalli, E-mail: t.keshavarz@westminster.ac.uk; Kyazze, Godfrey, E-mail: g.kyazze@westminster.ac.uk

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Effective degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures was achieved using MFC. • Adapted anaerobic microbial consortium was used as inoculum. • Bio-electricity generation was enhanced by 30-fold when riboflavin, was added. • Optimum MFC performance was obtained at mesophilic and moderately saline conditions. • Stable MFC performance was obtained during prolonged fed-batch MFC operation. - Abstract: Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20–50 °C), salinity (0.5–2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40 °C compared to MFC performance at 30 °C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50 °C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40 °C was 1.15 mW/m{sup 2} maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m{sup 2}, 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents.

  12. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the presence of nickel and cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetibo, Ganiyu Oladunjoye; Ilori, Matthew Olusoji; Obayori, Oluwafemi Sunday; Amund, Olukayode Oladipo

    2013-11-01

    Bioremediation of environments co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy metals often pose a challenge as heavy metals exert toxicity to existing communities of hydrocarbon degraders. Multi-resistant bacterial strains were studied for ability to degrade hydrocarbons in chemically defined media amended with 5.0 mM Ni(2+), and Co(2+). The bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CA207Ni, Burkholderia cepacia AL96Co, and Corynebacterium kutscheri FL108Hg, utilized crude oil and anthracene without lag phase at specific growth rate spanning 0.3848-0.8259 per day. The bacterial populations grew in hydrocarbon media amended with nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) at 0.8393-1.801 days generation time (period of exponential growth, t = 15 days). The bacteria degraded 96.24-98.97, and 92.94-96.24% of crude oil, and anthracene, respectively, within 30 days without any impedance due to metal toxicity (at 5.0 mM). Rather, there was reduction of Ni and Co concentrations in the axenic culture 30 days post-inoculation to 0.08-0.12 and 0.11-0.15 mM, respectively. The metabolic functions of the bacteria are active in the presence of toxic metals (Ni and Co) while utilizing petroleum hydrocarbons for increase in biomass. These findings are useful to other baseline studies on decommissioning of sites co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and toxic metals.

  13. Comparison of the effects of variable site temperatures and constant incubation temperatures on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in pilot-scale experiments with field-aged contaminated soils from a cold regions site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wonjae; Whyte, Lyle; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2011-02-01

    Temporal atmospheric temperature changes during summers at sub-Arctic sites often cause periodic fluctuations in shallow landfarm and surface soil temperatures. However, little information is available on the effect of site-relevant variations on biodegradation performance in cold climates. This study compares the rate and extents of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at variable site temperatures (1-10 °C) representative of summers at a sub-Arctic site reported previously with those obtained under a constant average temperature of 6 °C. The biodegradation was evaluated in pilot-scale landfarming experiments with field-aged petroleum-contaminated soils shipped from Resolution Island (61°30'N, 65°00'W), Nunavut, Canada. Under the variable site temperature conditions biodegradation rate constants of semi- (F2) and non-volatile (F3) hydrocarbon fractions were enhanced by over a factor of two during the 60-d experiment, compared to the constant temperature mode. The decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) under the variable site temperature mode was 55% compared to only 19% under the constant average temperature mode. The enhanced biodegradation is attributable to the non-linear acceleration of microbial activity between 4.7 and 10°C and faster growth of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations. The first-order biodegradation rate constants of 0.018, 0.024 and 0.016 d(-1) for TPH, F2 and F3 fractions at the variable site temperature were in agreement with those determined by an on-site experiment at the same site.

  14. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Trichoderma species: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2015-12-01

    Fungi belonging to Trichoderma genus are ascomycetes found in soils worldwide. Trichoderma has been studied in relation to diverse biotechnological applications and are known as successful colonizers of their common habitats. Members of this genus have been well described as effective biocontrol organisms through the production of secondary metabolites with potential applications as new antibiotics. Even though members of Trichoderma are commonly used for the commercial production of lytic enzymes, as a biological control agent, and also in the food industry, their use in xenobiotic biodegradation is limited. Trichoderma stands out as a genus with a great range of substrate utilization, a high production of antimicrobial compounds, and its ability for environmental opportunism. In this review, we focused on the recent advances in the research of Trichoderma species as potent and efficient aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms, as well as aimed to provide insight into its potential role in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with heavy hydrocarbons. Several Trichoderma species are associated with the ability to metabolize a variety of both high and low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. PAH-degrading species include Trichoderma hamatum, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma reesei, Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma virens, and Trichoderma asperellum using alternate enzyme systems commonly seen in other organisms, such as multicooper laccases, peroxidases, and ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Within these species, T. asperellum stands out as a versatile organism with remarkable degrading abilities, high tolerance, and a remarkable potential to be used as a remediation agent in polluted soils.

  15. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  16. Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-21

    Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency.

  17. Modeling hydrocarbon biodegradation in tidal aquifers with water-saturation and heat inhibition effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, Aly I.

    2001-09-01

    A model is developed for hydrocarbon biodegradation, which includes saturated and unsaturated flow, multi-species transport, heat transport, and bacterial growth processes. Numerical accuracy of the model was tested against analytical solutions. The model was also verified against laboratory results for a saturated-flow problem and reasonable match was obtained. Expressions are proposed for inhibition due to water content and temperature fluctuations. Bioactivities under cyclic water content variation were studied under no-flow conditions. A quantitative approach was used to reconcile some of the apparent contradictory conclusions regarding the efficiency of biodegradation of soils under wetting and drying conditions. The efficiency depends on the nature of the oxygenation process. For cases involving the presence of dissolved oxygen and the absence of O 2 vapor, subjecting the soil to constant water content close to its optimal value for degradation is most efficient. However, wetting and drying can enhance degradation if O 2 is only provided through aeration or direct contact between air and the medium. Also presented are the results of a typical field application of the model and a discussion of the effects of tides, saturation inhibition, and heat inhibition. Other inhibition factors, such as pH or salinity, can be easily incorporated in the formulation. The quantitative approach developed here can be used in assessing bioremediation not only in tidal aquifers but also in areas where water-table or temperature effects are of significance. The approach can be useful in the design of remediation strategies under water-flow or no-flow conditions involving water content and temperature fluctuations.

  18. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Mandal, Asit [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Division of Soil Biology, Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh (India); Naidu, Ravi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel metal-immobilizing organoclay (MIOC) synthesized and characterized. • MIOC immobilizes toxic metals and reduces metal bioavailability. • It enhances PAH-bioavailability to soil bacteria. • It improves microbial growth and activities in mixed-contaminated soils. • MIOC facilitates PAH-biodegradation in metal co-contaminated soils. - Abstract: Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad{sup ®} 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC > unmodified bentonite > Arquad–bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10–43%) as well as activities (respiration 3–44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils.

  19. Impact of Irradiation and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Spiking on Microbial Populations in Marine Sediment for Future Aging and Biodegradability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Melcher, Rebecca J.; Apitz, Sabine E; Hemmingsen, Barbara B.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to develop methods to generate well-characterized, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-spiked, aged but minimally altered sediments for fate, biodegradation, and bioavailability experiments. Changes in indigenous bacterial populations were monitored in mesocosms constructed of relatively clean San Diego Bay sediments, with and without exposure to gamma radiation, and then spiked with five different PAHs and hexadecane. While phenanthrene and chrysene degraders w...

  20. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20-50°C), salinity (0.5-2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40°C compared to MFC performance at 30°C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50°C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40°C was 1.15 mW/m(2) maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m(2), 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents.

  1. Biodegradation of anthracene by a novel actinomycete, Microbacterium sp. isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Lateef B; Obayori, Oluwafemi S; Olatoye, Nojeem O

    2014-01-01

    A novel anthracene-degrading Gram-positive actinomycete, Microbacterium sp. strain SL10 was isolated from a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at a mechanical engineering workshop in Lagos, Nigeria. The polluted soil had an unusually high total hydrocarbon content of 157 g/kg and presence of various heavy metals. The isolate tolerated salt concentration of more than 4%. It resisted cefotaxime, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin, but susceptible to meropenem, linezolid and vancomycin. The isolate exhibited growth rate and doubling time of 0.82 days(-1) and 0.84 days, respectively on anthracene. It degraded 57.5 and 90.12% of anthracene within 12 and 21 days, respectively while the rate of anthracene utilization by the isolate was 4.79 mg l(-1) d(-1). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of anthracene-degrading Microbacterium sp.

  2. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Mandal, Asit; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-11-15

    Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad(®) 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC>unmodified bentonite>Arquad-bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10-43%) as well as activities (respiration 3-44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils.

  3. Contamination and potential biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mangrove sediments of Xiamen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun; Luo, Yuan-rong; Zheng, Tian-ling; Cai, Li-zhe; Cao, Xiao-xing; Yan, Chong-ling

    2008-06-01

    Five stations were established in the Fenglin mangrove area of Xiamen, China to determine the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the numbers of PAH-degrading bacteria in surface sediments. Assessing the biodegradation potential of indigenous microorganisms and isolating the high molecule weight (HMW)-PAH degrading bacteria was also one of the aims of this work. The results showed that the total PAH concentration of sediments was 222.59 ng g(-1) dry weight, whereas the HMW-PAH benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) had the highest concentration among 16 individual PAH compounds. The variation in the numbers of PAH-degrading bacteria was 2.62 x 10(2)-5.67 x 10(4)CFU g(-1) dry weight. The addition of PAHs showed a great influence in increasing the microbial activity in mangrove sediments. A bacterial consortium, which could utilize BaP as the sole source of carbon and energy, and which was isolated from mangrove sediments and enriched in liquid medium for nearly one year degraded 32.8% of BaP after 63 days incubation.

  4. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by laccase from Trametes versicolor covalently immobilized on amino-functionalized SBA-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Luis Fernando; Morales, Gabriel; Sanz, Raquel

    2015-10-01

    A covalent immobilization method based on glutaraldehyde and amino-functionalized SBA-15 supports has been successfully applied to covalently and stably immobilize laccase from Trametes versicolor. The resultant biocatalysts displayed high incorporation yields of enzyme and led to excellent biodegradation rates of selected HPAs models, i.e. naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene, in water. The nature of the hydrocarbon chain accompanying the amino group has been shown as determinant for the immobilization as well as for the activity and reusability of the materials. Thus, alkyl moieties displayed higher enzyme loadings than phenyl moieties, being more adequate the larger n-butyl tethering residue likely due to its higher mobility. Using the aminobutyl-based laccase-SBA-15, 82%, 73%, and 55% conversion of naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene, respectively, were achieved after 48 h, very close to the values obtained with free laccase under the same reaction conditions. On the other hand, aminopropyl-based laccase-SBA-15 biocatalysts displayed the best reusability properties, retaining higher activity after four repeated uses than the corresponding aminobutyl-based materials.

  5. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biosurfactant produced by novel Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 with biodegradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenjie; Du, Zhifeng; Cui, Qingfeng; Dong, Hao; Wang, Fuyi; He, Panqing; Tang, YongChun

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have threatened the environment due to toxicity and poor bioavailability. Interest in degradation of these hazardous materials by biosurfactant-producing bacteria has been steadily increasing in recent years. In this work, a novel biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 was isolated to degrade a wide range of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Production of lipopeptide biosurfactant was observed in all biodegradable studies. These lipopeptides were purified and identified by C18 RP-HPLC system and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results of structural analysis showed that these lipopeptides generated from different hydrocarbons were classified to be surfactin, fengycin and lichenysin. Heavy-oil sludge washing experiments demonstrated that lipopeptides produced by Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 have 92.46% of heavy-oil washing efficiency. The obtained results indicate that this novel bacterial strain and its lipopeptides have great potentials in the environmental remediation and petroleum recovery.

  7. Biodegradation of diesel/biodiesel blends by a consortium of hydrocarbon degraders: effect of the type of blend and the addition of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Szulc, Alicja; Staniewski, Jacek; Olszanowski, Andrzej; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2009-02-01

    Biodegradation experiments for diesel/biodiesel blends in liquid cultures by-petroleum degrading microbial consortium showed that for low amendments of biodiesel (10%) the overall biodegradation efficiency of the mixture after seven days was lower than for petroleum diesel fuel. Preferential usage of methyl esters in the broad biodiesel concentration range and diminished biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons for 10% biodiesel blend was confirmed. Rhamnolipids improved biodegradation efficiency only for blends with low content of biodiesel. Emulsion formation experiments showed that biodiesel amendments significantly affected dispersion of fuel mixtures in water. The presence of rhamnolipids biosurfactant affected stability of such emulsions and altered cell surface properties of tested consortium.

  8. A conservative vapour intrusion screening model of oxygen-limited hydrocarbon vapour biodegradation accounting for building footprint size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John H.; Davis, Gregory B.

    2013-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon vapours pose a reduced risk to indoor air due to biodegradation processes where oxygen is available in the subsurface or below built structures. However, no previous assessment has been available to show the effects of a building footprint (slab size) on oxygen-limited hydrocarbon vapour biodegradation and the potential for oxygen to be present beneath the entire sub-slab region of a building. Here we provide a new, conservative and conceptually simple vapour screening model which links oxygen and hydrocarbon vapour transport and biodegradation in the vicinity and beneath an impervious slab. This defines when vapour risk is insignificant, or conversely when there is potential for vapour to contact the sub-slab of a building. The solution involves complex mathematics to determine the position of an unknown boundary interface between oxygen diffusing in from the ground surface and vapours diffusing upwards from a subsurface vapour source, but the mathematics reduces to a simple relationship between the vapour source concentration and the ratio of the half slab width and depth to the vapour source. Data from known field investigations are shown to be consistent with the model predictions. Examples of 'acceptable' slab sizes for vapour source depths and strengths are given. The predictions are conservative as an estimator of when petroleum hydrocarbon vapours might come in contact with a slab-on-ground building since additional sources of oxygen due to advective flow or diffusion through the slab are ignored. As such the model can be used for screening sites for further investigation.

  9. Mathematical modeling of the biodegradation of residual hydrocarbon in a variably-saturated sand column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Wrenn, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The biodegradation of heptadecane in five sand columns was modeled using a multiplicative Monod approach. Each column contained 1.0 kg of sand and 2 g of heptadecane, and was supplied with an artificial seawater solution containing nutrients at a flow rate that resulted in unsaturated flow through the column. All nutrients were provided in excess with the exception of nitrate whose influent concentration was 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg N/L. The experiment was run around 912 h until no measurable oxygen consumption or CO2 production was observed. The residual mass of heptadecane was measured at the end of the experiments and the biodegradation was monitored based on oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Biodegradation kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting the model to experimental data of oxygen, CO2, and residual mass of heptadecane obtained from the two columns having influent nitrate-N concentration of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/L. Noting that the oxygen and CO2 measurements leveled off at around 450 h, we fitted the model to these data for that range. The estimated parameters fell in within the range reported in the literature. In particular, the half-saturation constant for nitrate utilization, [Formula: see text], was estimated to be 0.45 mg N/L, and the yield coefficient was found to be 0.15 mg biomass/mg heptadecane. Using these values, the rest of experimental data from the five columns was predicted, and the model agreed with the observations. There were some consistent discrepancies at large times between the model simulation and observed data in the cases with higher nitrate concentration. One plausible explanation for these differences could be limitation of biodegradation by reduction of the heptadecane-water interfacial area in these columns while the model uses a constant interfacial area.

  10. Approach for estimating microbial growth and the biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in subsoil based on field measurements: 1. Model development and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dejun; Katayama, Arata

    2010-01-15

    An approach was developed to represent the microbial growth and corresponding biodegradation of hydrocarbons (HCs) during the natural attenuation process based on field measurements of in situ microbial biomass and residual HC concentrations in unsaturated subsurface soil. A kinetic model combining Monod and logistic kinetics represents microbial growth under the limitation of HCs as substrates and environmental factors at actual contaminated sites by the introduction of two new kinetic parameters, the effective rate and the self-limiting coefficient of microbial growth. The correspondence between microbial growth and the biodegradation of HCs in the soil is obtained by dividing the amount of HC and the corresponding degrading microbial groups into two classes: saturated HCs as inert components and aromatic HCs that form a contamination plume as dissolved components. The respiratory quinones were used as indicators of microbial biomass. The biodegradation capacity of contaminated sites was evaluated by the maximum microbial biomass obtained by field measurements, which is considered as the integrated results from measurements of HCs, degrading kinetics, and environmental factors at the site. The feasibility of the proposed approach was verified at two hypothetical contaminated sites. The results suggested that the proposed approach is feasible for application at actual HC-contaminated sites.

  11. Assessment of the potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the Railroad Industrial Area, Fairbanks, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Joan F.; Catterall, Peter H.; Richmond, Sharon A.

    1998-01-01

    Many technologies for the clean-up of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated sites depend on microbial degradation of the pollutant. In these technologies the site may be modified to enhance microbial activity, or may simply be monitored for naturally occurring microbial activity. In either case, an important aspect of site assessment for these technologies is to determine if the microorganisms present at the site have the potential to break down contaminants under the prevailing environmental conditions. We examined the numbers and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in ground water collected from petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated and uncontaminated wells at the Railroad Industrial Area near Fairbanks, Alaska. We found that the population of gasoline-degrading microorganisms in ground water was correlated to the degree of contamination by benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). We also found that these organisms could actively mineralize these types of compounds in laboratory mineralization assays. Increasing temperature and adding nutrients both enhanced the rate of mineralization in the laboratory, but measurable degradation still occurred under conditions similar to those found in the field. Dissolved oxygen in ground water at this site ranged from 0 to 3.6 milligrams per liter. Therefore, oxygen may not always be available to microorganisms as a terminal electron acceptor. Preliminary geochemical evidence from the field indicates that alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III), sulfate, or nitrate may be used, contributing to degradation of contaminants at this site.

  12. Biosorption and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions by a consortium of white-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoliang; Wang, Yinshan; Hu, Dingfei

    2010-07-15

    Bioremediation is a popular approach used to abate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. A consortium of white-rot fungi (CW-1) isolated from wood pieces was used for studying their potential of bioremediation of PAHs. Biosorption and biodegradation of PAHs by live and heat-killed white-rot fungi (CW-1) were investigated to elucidate the bio-dissipation mechanisms of PAHs. Sorption isotherms of naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene to heat-killed fungal biomass were linear and non-competitive, indicating the primary mechanism of biosorption to be by partition. The carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K(oc)) were linearly correlated with octanol-water partition coefficients (K(ow)), i.e., log K(oc)=1.13 log K(ow)-0.84 (n=5, r(2)=0.996). Biosorption and biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by live white-rot fungi were quantified. In 1 week, the removal efficiency of phenanthrene (70-80%) and pyrene (90%) by live fungi from aqueous solution were comparable to those by heat-killed fungi. However, approximately 40-65% of phenanthrene and 60-85% of pyrene were still stored in organismal bodies. Biosorption might restrict biodegradation while nutrient limitation and presence of a PAH mixture might stimulate biodegradation. The apparent partition coefficients (K(d)(*)) in live fungal systems and the K(d) of heat-killed fungi without biodegradation were compared, and then the K(d)(*)/K(d) ratios were employed to illustrate the relative contributions of biosorption and biodegradation under different nutrient conditions.

  13. The potential for hydrocarbon biodegradation and production of extracellular polymeric substances by aerobic bacteria isolated from a Brazilian petroleum reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, S P; Dellagnezze, B M; Wieland, A; Klock, J-H; Santos Neto, E V; Marsaioli, A J; Oliveira, V M; Michaelis, W

    2011-06-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) can contribute to the cellular degradation of hydrocarbons and have a huge potential for application in biotechnological processes, such as bioremediation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Four bacterial strains from a Brazilian petroleum reservoir were investigated for EPS production, emulsification ability and biodegradation activity when hydrocarbons were supplied as substrates for microbial growth. Two strains of Bacillus species had the highest EPS production when phenanthrene and n-octadecane were offered as carbon sources, either individually or in a mixture. While Pseudomonas sp. and Dietzia sp., the other two evaluated strains, had the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation indices, EPS production was not detected. Low EPS production may not necessarily be indicative of an absence of emulsifier activity, as indicated by the results of a surface tension reduction assay and emulsification indices for the strain of Dietzia sp. The combined results gathered in this work suggest that a microbial consortium consisting of bacteria with interdependent metabolisms could thrive in petroleum reservoirs, thus overcoming the limitations imposed on each individual species by the harsh conditions found in such environments.

  14. Extracellular polymeric substances enhanced mass transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the two-liquid-phase system for biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xinglun; Gu, Chenggang; Kengara, Fredrick Orori; Hong, Qing; Lv, Zhengyong; Jiang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    The objective was to elucidate the role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two-liquid-phase system (TLPs). Therefore, biodegradation of phenanthrene (PHE) was conducted in a typical TLPs--silicone oil-water--with PHE-degrading bacteria capable of producing EPS, Sphingobium sp. PHE3 and Micrococcus sp. PHE9. The results showed that the presence of both strains enhanced mass transfer of PHE from silicone oil to water, and that biodegradation of PHE mainly occurred at the interfaces. The ratios of tightly bound (TB) proteins to TB polysaccharides kept almost constant, whereas the ratios of loosely bound (LB) proteins to LB polysaccharides increased during the biodegradation. Furthermore, polysaccharides led to increased PHE solubility in the bulk water, which resulted in an increased PHE mass transfer. Both LB-EPS and TB-EPS (proteins and polysaccharides) correlated with PHE mass transfer in silicone oil, indicating that both proteins and polysaccharides favored bacterial uptake of PHE at the interfaces. It could be concluded that EPS could facilitate microbial degradation of PHE in the TLPs.

  15. Evidence of Multi-Stage Hydrocarbon Charging and Biodegradation of the Silurian Asphaltic Sandstones in the Tarim Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洛夫

    2002-01-01

    Asphalts distributed widely in the Silurian sandstones of the Tarim Basin include dry asphalt, soft asphalt and heavy oil. These asphaltic sandstones underwent multi-episodic sedimentary and tectonic events, and their occurrence is diverse and complex, being mixed with normal oil usually. So far, very little work has been done on the asphaltic sandstone origin and hydrocarbon charging ages. After detailed study on the Silurian sandstones, the following highlights were obtained from the analytical results: distribution of the mixed asphalt, heavy oil and normal oil in the Silurian sandstones is the result of multi-stage hydrocarbon charging from the Lower Paleozoic marine source rocks; the characters of asphalts formed from oils of different charging ages are of difference; the most important process constraining.the asphaltic sandstone origin is thought to be biodegradation.

  16. Assessment of molecular marker compounds as an index of the biodegradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voos, G.; Mills, G.; O`Neill, J.; Jones, W. [Savannah River Ecology Labortory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The weathering of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil environment is the sum of biological, physical and chemical processes. It is often difficult to clearly discern microbial from abiotic contributions to the overall process. This is especially important in assessing the effectiveness of various in-situ bioremediation technologies. We examined molecular marker compounds, including pristane, phytane, diterpenoid hydrocarbons, farnesane and norpristane, and the ratios n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane to evaluate their use as an index of biodegradation of diesel fuel in contaminated soil. The study was conducted using microcosms containing 200 g of contaminated soil. Microcosms were destructively sampled on days 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 33 and 64 of the experiment. The soil was analyzed for straight-chained, branched-chained, and alicyclic petroleum hydrocarbons using high-resolution gas chromatography. Results indicate that by day 33 of the experiment, pristane and phytane were present at significantly greater concentrations than their corresponding n-alkanes and the other marker compounds analyzed. There is a strong correlation between the amount of pristane and phytane present in the soil and the amount of total extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (TEPH) measured during the course of the experiment.

  17. Hydrocarbon Specificity During Aerobic oil Biodegradation Revealed in Marine Microcosms With the use of Comprehensive, Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, G. D.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    In 2003 the National Research Council reported more than 380 million gallons of oil is emitted into the ocean each year from natural seepage and as a result of anthropogenic activities. Many of the hydrocarbons making up this oil are persistent and toxic to marine life. Petroleum emitted into biologically sensitive areas can lead to environmental stress and ecosystem collapse. As a result many studies and a substantial amount of resources have been devoted to creating efficient and effective remediation tools and developing a better understanding of natural hydrocarbon weathering processes occurring in marine environments. The goal of this study is to elucidate patterns and extent of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments. In order to assess the specific molecular transformations occurring in petroleum emitted into oxic marine environments, we prepared microcosm experiments using sediments and seawater collected from the natural oil seeps offshore Coal Oil Point, California. Petroleum recovered from Platform Holly in the Santa Barbara Channel, was added to a sediment-seawater mixture and the microcosm bottles were allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions for slightly more than 100 days. Comprehensive, two-dimensional gas chromatography was employed in this study to quantify changes in the concentrations of individual hydrocarbon compounds because of the increased resolution and resolving power provided with this robust analytical method. We show significant hydrocarbon mass loss due to aerobic biodegradation for hundreds of tracked compounds in the microcosm bottles. The results shown here provide quantitative evidence for broad-scale metabolic specificity during aerobic hydrocarbon degradation in surface and shallow subsurface marine sediments.

  18. Hydrocarbon biodegradation by Arctic sea-ice and sub-ice microbial communities during microcosm experiments, Northwest Passage (Nunavut, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Marie-Ève; Michel, Christine; Meisterhans, Guillaume; Fortin, Nathalie; King, Thomas L; Greer, Charles W; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    The increasing accessibility to navigation and offshore oil exploration brings risks of hydrocarbon releases in Arctic waters. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons is a promising mitigation strategy but challenges remain, particularly due to low microbial metabolic rates in cold, ice-covered seas. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of ice-associated microbes collected from the Northwest Passage was investigated. Microcosm incubations were run for 15 days at -1.7°C with and without oil to determine the effects of hydrocarbon exposure on microbial abundance, diversity and activity, and to estimate component-specific hydrocarbon loss. Diversity was assessed with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial activity was measured by (3)H-leucine uptake rates. After incubation, sub-ice and sea-ice communities degraded 94% and 48% of the initial hydrocarbons, respectively. Hydrocarbon exposure changed the composition of sea-ice and sub-ice communities; in sea-ice microcosms, Bacteroidetes (mainly Polaribacter) dominated whereas in sub-ice microcosms, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria increased, and that of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Sequencing data revealed a decline in diversity and increases in Colwellia and Moritella in oil-treated microcosms. Low concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sub-ice seawater may explain higher hydrocarbon degradation when compared to sea ice, where DOM was abundant and composed of labile exopolysaccharides.

  19. Variation in toxicity during the biodegradation of various heterocyclic and homocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in single and multi-substrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the variation in the toxicity during the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in single and multi-substrate system. The bacterial bioassay based on the inhibition of dehydrogenase enzyme activity of two different bacterial sp. E.coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens was used for toxicity assessment. Amongst the chosen pollutants, the highest acute toxicity was observed for benzothiophene followed by benzofuran having EC50 value of 16.60mg/L and 19.30mg/L respectively. Maximum residual toxicity of 30.8% was observed at the end during the degradation of benzothiophene. Due to the accumulation of transitory metabolites in both single and multisubstrate systems, reduction in toxicity was not proportional to the decrease in pollutant concentration. In multi-substrate system involving mixture of heterocyclic hydrocarbons, maximum residual toxicity of 39.5% was observed at the end of biodegradation. Enhanced degradation of benzofuran, benzothiophene and their metabolic intermediates were observed in the presence of naphthalene resulting in significant reduction in residual toxicity. 2 (1H) - quinolinone, an intermediate metabolite of quinoline was observed having significant eco-toxicity amongst all other intermediates investigated.

  20. In situ detection of alkB2 gene involved in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Frascadore, Emanuela; Cappello, Simone; Genovese, Mariella; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to develop a new assay based on the whole cell hybridization in order to monitor alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB system) of the marine bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) commonly reported as the predominant microorganism responsible for the biodegradation of n-alkanes which are the major fraction of petroleum hydrocarbons. The assay based on the whole cell hybridization targeting alkB2 gene was successfully developed and calibrated on a pure culture of Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) with a detection efficiency up to 80%. The approach was further successfully validated on hydrocarbon-contaminated seawater and provided cells abundance (6.74E+04alkB2-carryingcellsmL(-1)) higher of about one order of magnitude than those obtained by qPCR (4.96E+03alkB2genecopiesmL(-1)). This study highlights the validity of the assay for the detection at single cell level of key-functional genes involved in the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

  1. Sapindus saponins' impact on hydrocarbon biodegradation by bacteria strains after short- and long-term contact with pollutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smułek, Wojciech; Zdarta, Agata; Łuczak, Marta; Krawczyk, Piotr; Jesionowski, Teofil; Kaczorek, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of high toxicity petroleum contaminants to the natural environment causes damage to ecosystems and the aesthetics of the surroundings. Therefore it is critical to enhance microbial community performance to manage the degradation process. This paper analyses the effect of natural surfactants from the tree Sapindus mukorossi on biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Analysis of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential confirmed effective modifications of the cell surface parameters essential for the bioavailability of contaminants to microorganisms. Interestingly, favorable differences were observed only for microorganisms from non-contaminated soil. There was also recorded an increase in diesel oil biodegradation to 41% for Sphingomonas sp. and 56% for Pseudomonas alcaligenes on addition of 100mgL(-1) of Sapindus saponins. The addition of natural surfactants has no significant impact on bacterial strains isolated from long-term contaminated soil. This research demonstrates that the addition of Sapindus extract could be a useful tool to improve the effectiveness of microbial degradation of hydrocarbon pollutants by environmental strains in recently contaminated.

  2. Biodegradation of gasoline in environment: from total assessment to the case of recalcitrant hydrocarbons; Biodegradabilite de l'essence dans l'environnement: de l'evaluation globale au cas des hydrocarbures recalcitrants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano-Serena, F.

    1999-11-26

    Because of their massive utilisation, hydrocarbons are major pollutants of soils and aquifers. Biodegradation is a key aspect of the fate of pollutants in the environment. Such knowledge, concerns in particular the intrinsic biodegradability of the products and the distribution in the environment of competent degradative microflora. In this study, a methodology has been developed to assess the aerobic biodegradability of gasoline. It is based on the direct gas chromatographic analysis of all hydrocarbons, after incubation in optimal conditions, of gasoline fractions and of model mixtures. The results demonstrated first the quasi-total biodegradability of gasoline ({>=} 94%). Concerning the distribution in the environment of degradative capacities, even microflora from non polluted sites exhibited a high performance (total degradation rates at least 85%) but were limited concerning the degradation of trimethyl-alkanes, such as 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane) and 2,3,4-trimethyl-pentane, and of cyclohexane. Samples of polluted sites exhibited more extensive degradative capacities with total degradation in half of the cases studied. Cyclohexane was always degraded by mutualism and/or co-metabolism. Trimethyl-alkanes with quaternary carbons such as iso-octane and/or alkyl groups on consecutive carbons were degraded by co-metabolism but could also support growth of specialized strains. A strain of Mycobacterium austroafricanum (strain IFP 2173) growing on iso-octane was isolated from a gasoline polluted sample. This strain exhibited the capacity to co-metabolize various hydrocarbons (cyclic and branched alkanes, aromatics) and in particular cyclohexane. M austroafricanum lFP 2173 was also able to use a large spectrum of hydrocarbons (n- and iso-alkanes, aromatics) as sole carbon and energy source. (author)

  3. COMPARISON OF FIELD AEROBIC BIODEGRADATION RATES TO LABORATORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is common to use bioventing as a polishing step for soil vapor extraction. It was originally planned to use soil vapor extraction and bioventing at a former landfill site in Delaware but laboratory scale biodegradation studies indicated that most of the volatile organic compou...

  4. Evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by combined application of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled target compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Arne; Fischer, Anko; Vogt, Carsten; Bombach, Petra

    2015-02-01

    The number of approaches to evaluate the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within contaminated aquifers is limited. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of a novel method based on the combination of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled PAHs as tracer compounds. The biodegradation of four PAHs (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene) was investigated in an oxic aquifer at the site of a former gas plant. In situ biodegradation of naphthalene and fluorene was demonstrated using in situ microcosms (BACTRAP(®)s). BACTRAP(®)s amended with either [(13)C6]-naphthalene or [(13)C5/(13)C6]-fluorene (50:50) were incubated for a period of over two months in two groundwater wells located at the contaminant source and plume fringe, respectively. Amino acids extracted from BACTRAP(®)-grown cells showed significant (13)C-enrichments with (13)C-fractions of up to 30.4% for naphthalene and 3.8% for fluorene, thus providing evidence for the in situ biodegradation and assimilation of those PAHs at the field site. To quantify the mineralisation of PAHs, laboratory microcosms were set up with BACTRAP(®)-grown cells and groundwater. Naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, or acenaphthene were added as (13)C-labelled substrates. (13)C-enrichment of the produced CO2 revealed mineralisation of between 5.9% and 19.7% for fluorene, between 11.1% and 35.1% for acenaphthene, between 14.2% and 33.1% for phenanthrene, and up to 37.0% for naphthalene over a period of 62 days. Observed PAH mineralisation rates ranged between 17 μg L(-1) d(-1) and 1639 μg L(-1) d(-1). The novel approach combining in situ and laboratory microcosms allowed a comprehensive evaluation of PAH biodegradation at the investigated field site, revealing the method's potential for the assessment of PAH degradation within contaminated aquifers.

  5. Multiple lines of evidence to demonstrate vinyl chloride aerobic biodegradation in the vadose zone, and factors controlling rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B. M.; Aravena, R.; Davis, G. B.; Furness, A. J.; Bastow, T. P.; Bouchard, D.

    2013-10-01

    A field-based investigation was conducted at a contaminated site where the vadose zone was contaminated with a range of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The investigation consisted of groundwater and multilevel soil-gas monitoring of a range of contaminants and gases, along with isotope measurements and microbiology studies. The investigation provided multiple lines of evidence that demonstrated aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was occurring in the vadose zone (i) above the on-site source zone, and (ii) above the downgradient off-site groundwater plume location. Data from both the on-site and off-site locations were consistent in showing substantially greater (an order of magnitude greater) rates of VC removal from the aerobic vadose zone compared to more recalcitrant contaminants trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Soil gas VC isotope analysis showed substantial isotopic enrichment of VC (δ13C - 5.2 to - 10.9‰) compared to groundwater (δ13C - 39.5‰) at the on-site location. Soil gas CO2 isotope analysis at both locations showed that CO2 was highly isotopically depleted (δ13C - 28.8 to - 33.3‰), compared to soil gas CO2 data originating from natural sediment organic matter (δ13C = - 14.7 to - 21.3‰). The soil gas CO2 δ13C values were consistent with near-water table VC groundwater δ13C values (- 36.8 to - 39.5‰), suggesting CO2 originating from aerobic biodegradation of VC. Bacteria that had functional genes (ethene monooxygenase (etnC) and epoxyalkane transferase (etnE) involved in ethene metabolism and VC oxidation were more abundant at the source zone where oxygen co-existed with VC. The distribution of VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, together with long-term changes in soil gas CO2 concentrations and temperature, provided information to elucidate the factors controlling aerobic biodegradation of VC in the vadose zone. Based on the overlapping VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, aerobic vapour biodegradation

  6. Multiple lines of evidence to demonstrate vinyl chloride aerobic biodegradation in the vadose zone, and factors controlling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B M; Aravena, R; Davis, G B; Furness, A J; Bastow, T P; Bouchard, D

    2013-10-01

    A field-based investigation was conducted at a contaminated site where the vadose zone was contaminated with a range of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The investigation consisted of groundwater and multilevel soil-gas monitoring of a range of contaminants and gases, along with isotope measurements and microbiology studies. The investigation provided multiple lines of evidence that demonstrated aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was occurring in the vadose zone (i) above the on-site source zone, and (ii) above the downgradient off-site groundwater plume location. Data from both the on-site and off-site locations were consistent in showing substantially greater (an order of magnitude greater) rates of VC removal from the aerobic vadose zone compared to more recalcitrant contaminants trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Soil gas VC isotope analysis showed substantial isotopic enrichment of VC (δ¹³C -5.2 to -10.9‰) compared to groundwater (δ¹³C -39.5‰) at the on-site location. Soil gas CO₂ isotope analysis at both locations showed that CO₂ was highly isotopically depleted (δ¹³C -28.8 to -33.3‰), compared to soil gas CO₂ data originating from natural sediment organic matter (δ¹³C= -14.7 to -21.3‰). The soil gas CO2 δ¹³C values were consistent with near-water table VC groundwater δ¹³C values (-36.8 to -39.5‰), suggesting CO₂ originating from aerobic biodegradation of VC. Bacteria that had functional genes (ethene monooxygenase (etnC) and epoxyalkane transferase (etnE)) involved in ethene metabolism and VC oxidation were more abundant at the source zone where oxygen co-existed with VC. The distribution of VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, together with long-term changes in soil gas CO₂ concentrations and temperature, provided information to elucidate the factors controlling aerobic biodegradation of VC in the vadose zone. Based on the overlapping VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, aerobic vapour

  7. Partially oxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons show an increased bioavailability and biodegradability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, R.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Doddema, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have a low water solubility and tend to adsorb on soil particles, which both result in slow bioremediation processes. Many microorganisms, known for their ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, only partially oxidize these compounds. White rot fungi, fo

  8. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in industrial wastewater: A review%生物法降解工业废水中石油烃研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张攀; 尤朝阳; 陈纪赛; 孙永军; 张路广; 夏钱华

    2016-01-01

    介绍了微生物降解石油烃的机理,探讨了生物可利用性、营养物质、pH、温度等因素对微生物降解石油烃的影响.综述了生物法在工业废水降解石油烃应用方面的研究进展.提出了当前存在的微生物降解机理、降解污染物酶系统及构建降解石油烃基因工程菌研究不足问题,对未来的研究趋势进行了展望.%This review highlights the mechanism of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon and discusses the influencing factors (biodegradability,nutrients,pH value,temperature and biosurfactants) on the microbial degradation.The recent development of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon in industrial wastewater has also been summarized.Insufficient aspects of recent research,including the mechanism of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon,the enzyme systems that degrade pollutants and applications for genetically engineered microorganisms,have also been mentioned.Additionally,further development on the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon in industrial wastewater has been prospected.

  9. Role of desorption kinetics in the rhamnolipid-enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiu, Eleonora; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2014-09-16

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a rhamnolipid biosurfactant on biodegradation of (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene under desorption-limiting conditions. The rhamnolipid caused a significant solubilization and enhanced biodegradation of PAHs sorbed to soils. The enhancement was, however, negatively influenced by experimental conditions that caused an enrichment of slow desorption fractions. These conditions included aging, a higher organic matter content in soil, and previous extraction with Tenax to remove the labile-desorbing chemical. The decline in bioavailability caused by aging on sorbed (14)C-pyrene was partially reversed by rhamnolipids, which enhanced mineralization of the aged compound, although not so efficiently like with the unaged chemical. This loss in biosurfactant efficiency in promoting biodegradation can be explained by intra-aggregate diffusion of the pollutant during aging. We suggest that rhamnolipid can enhance biodegradation of soil-sorbed PAHs by micellar solubilization, which increase the cell exposure to the chemicals in the aqueous phase, and partitioning into soil organic matter, thus enhancing the kinetics of slow desorption. Our study show that rhamnolipid can constitute a valid alternative to chemical surfactants in promoting the biodegradation of slow desorption PAHs, which constitutes a major bottleneck in bioremediation.

  10. High Magnetic Susceptibility in a Highly Saline Sulfate-Rich Aquifer Undergoing Biodegradation of Hydrocarbon Results from Sulfate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Enright, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Bernier, R.; Beaver, C. L.; Rossbach, S.

    2016-12-01

    hydrocarbon, dominance of sulfate reduction as the TEA is responsible for iron cycling and therefore the high MS associated with biodegradation. [AE1]What about sulfate concentrations? And the range in salinity? You need to add these values to the bastrcat

  11. Comparative evaluation of anaerobic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and fatty derivatives currently used as drilling fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steber, J; Herold, C P; limia, J M

    1995-08-01

    The examination of a number of potential and currently used carrier fluids for invert emulsion drilling fluids in the ECETOC screening test revealed clear differences with respect to their easy anaerobic biodegradability. Fatty acid- and alcohol-based ester oils exhibited excellent anaerobic degradation to the gaseous final end products of the methanogenic degradation pathway, methane and carbon dioxide. Mineral oils, dialkyl ethers, alpha-olefins, polyalphaolefins, linear alkylbenzenes and an acetal-derivative were not or only slowly degraded. Although the poor degradation results obtained in the stringent ECETOC screening test may not be regarded as final proof of anaerobic recalcitrance, nevertheless, these results were found to be in line with the present understanding of the structural requirements for anaerobic biodegradability of chemicals. The validity of the conclusions drawn is corroborated by published results on the anaerobic biodegradation behaviour of ester oils, mineral oils and alkylbenzenes in marine sediments.

  12. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  13. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  14. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyu, Yihua; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling; Tian, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1, a marine bacterium isolated from muddy sediments of Ulsan Bay, Republic of Korea, was previously shown to be capable of degrading multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs...

  15. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  16. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  17. Effects of diurnal temperature variation on microbial community and petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-12-01

    Contaminated soils are subject to diurnal and seasonal temperature variations during on-site ex-situ bioremediation processes. We assessed how diurnal temperature variations similar to that in summer at the site from which petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was collected affect the soil microbial community and the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons compared with constant temperature regimes. Microbial community analyses for 16S rRNA and alkB genes by pyrosequencing indicated that the microbial community for soils incubated under diurnal temperature variation from 5°C to 15°C (VART5-15) evolved similarly to that for soils incubated at constant temperature of 15°C (CST15). In contrast, under a constant temperature of 5°C (CST5), the community evolved significantly different. The extent of biodegradation of C10-C16 hydrocarbons in the VART5-15 systems was 48%, comparable with the 41% biodegradation in CST15 systems, but significantly higher than CST5 systems at 11%. The enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria was observed in the alkB gene-harbouring communities in VART5-15 and CST15 but not in CST5 systems. However, the Actinobacteria was abundant at all temperature regimes. The results suggest that changes in microbial community composition as a result of diurnal temperature variations can significantly influence petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation performance in cold regions.

  18. Determination of the biodegradation rate of asphalt for the Hanford grout vaults. Hanford Grout Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luey, J.; Li, S.W.

    1993-04-01

    Testing was initiated in March 1991 and completed in November 1992 to determine the rate at which asphalt is biodegraded by microorganisms native to the Hanford Site soils. The asphalt tested (AR-6000, US Oil, Tacoma, Washington) is to be used in the construction of a diffusion barrier for the Hanford grout vaults. Experiments to determine asphalt biodegradation rates were conducted using three separate test sets. These test sets were initiated in March 1991, January 1992, and June 1992 and ran for periods of 6 months, 11 months, and 6 months, respectively. The experimental method used was one originally developed by Bartha and Pramer (1965), and further refined by Bowerman et al. (1985), that determined the asphalt biodegradation rate through the measurement of carbon dioxide evolved.

  19. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  20. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry’s constants – separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Comber, Mike

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects biodegradation test results and (2) it can be accounted for by combining mass balance and dynamic biodegradation...... Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relative to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Water phase biodegradation rate constants, kwater, were up to 72 times higher than test system...... biodegradation rate constants, ksystem. True water phase degradation rate constants facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and are more suitable input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models. As such, they should be considered more appropriate for risk assessments than test system rate...

  1. Bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil--effect of poultry droppings and natural rubber processing sludge application on biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okieimen, C O; Okieimen, F E

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory bioremediation experiments were carried out on crude oil-polluted soil samples by applying various amounts of poultry droppings and natural rubber processing sludge as nutrient supplements at 29 degrees and using slurry-phase and solid-phase biodegradation techniques. Changes in the total hydrocarbon content of the soil were determined using a spectrophotometric technique as a function of time. It was found that the extent of crude oil degradation in untreated soil samples was markedly lower (by up to 100%) than in the soil samples treated with nutrient supplements. Hydrocarbon degradation efficiency was higher in the slurry-phase than in the soil-phase technique.

  2. Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Kwon, Joseph; Leem, Sun Hee; Chung, Young Ho; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Kim, Sang Jin; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.

  3. Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ho Yun

    Full Text Available Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.

  4. A quest for the right order : biodegradation rates in the scope of environmental risk assessment of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The biodegradation of chemicals in sewage treatment plants is a key issue of environmental risk assessment. To predict the residual concentration the rate of the biodegradation process has to be estimated. This rate is the result of microbial adaptation of the micro-flora in the system. Therefore

  5. A quest for the right order : biodegradation rates in the scope of environmental risk assessment of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The biodegradation of chemicals in sewage treatment plants is a key issue of environmental risk assessment. To predict the residual concentration the rate of the biodegradation process has to be estimated. This rate is the result of microbial adaptation of the micro-flora in the system. Therefore th

  6. Toluene biodegradation rates in unsaturated soil systems versus liquid batches and their relevance to field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picone, S.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Gaans, van P.; Valstar, J.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    Contaminant biodegradation in unsaturated soils may reduce the risks of vapor intrusion. However, the reported rates show large variability and are often derived from slurry experiments that are not representative of unsaturated conditions. Here, different laboratory setups are used to derive the

  7. Toluene biodegradation rates in unsaturated soil systems versus liquid batches and their relevance to field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picone, S.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Gaans, van P.; Valstar, J.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    Contaminant biodegradation in unsaturated soils may reduce the risks of vapor intrusion. However, the reported rates show large variability and are often derived from slurry experiments that are not representative of unsaturated conditions. Here, different laboratory setups are used to derive the bi

  8. Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-07-01

    High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of sulfide is a limiting factor to BTEX biodegradation at this site, and that treating the groundwater with FeCl{sub 2} is an effective remedy to facilitate and enhance BTEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population. On another site in Moore, OK, studies were conducted to investigate barium in the groundwater. BTEX biodegradation by SRB is suspected to mobilize barium from its precipitants in groundwater. Data from microcosms demonstrated instantaneous precipitation of barium when sulfate was added; however, barium was detected redissolving for a short period and precipitating eventually, when active sulfate reduction was occurring and BTEX was degraded through the process. SEM elemental spectra of the evolved show that sulfur was not present, which may exclude BaSO{sub 4} and BaS as a possible precipitates. The XRD analysis suggests that barium probably ended in BaS complexing with other amorphous species. Results from this study suggest that SRB may be able to use the sulfate from barite (BaSO{sub 4}) as an electron acceptor, resulting in the release of free barium ions (Ba{sup 2+}), and re-precipitate it in BaS, which exposes more toxicity to human and ecological health.

  9. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Mortensen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial variability of factors affecting natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone is important to (i) performing a reliable risk assessment and (ii) evaluating the possibility for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites. Most studies to date have focused...... on the shallow unsaturated zone. Based on a data set comprising analysis of about 100 soil samples taken in a 16-m-deep unsaturated zone polluted with volatile petroleum compounds, we statistically and geostatistically analyzed values of essential soil properties. The subsurface of the site was highly layered...

  10. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided.

  11. The impact of biochars on sorption and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyika, Chinedum; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zahara; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Yahya, Adibah

    2015-03-01

    Amending polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils with biochar may be cheaper and environmentally friendly than other forms of organic materials. This has led to numerous studies on the use of biochar to either bind or stimulate the microbial degradation of organic compounds in soils. However, very little or no attention have been paid to the fact that biochars can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes, such as volatilization, sorption and biodegradation. In this review, we raised and considered the following questions: How does biochar affect microbes and microbial activities in the soil? What are the effects of adding biochar on sorption of PAHs? What are the effects of adding biochar on degradation of PAHs? What are the factors that we can manipulate in the laboratory to enhance the capability of biochars to degrade PAHs? A triphasic concept of how biochar can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes in soils was proposed, which involves rapid PAH sorption into biochar, subsequent desorption and modification of soil physicochemical properties by biochar, which in turn stimulates microbial degradation of the desorbed PAHs. It is anticipated that biochar can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes in soils.

  12. Forecasting rates of hydrocarbon discoveries in a changing economic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Attanasi, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for the estimation of undiscovered oil and gas resources in partially explored areas where economic truncation has caused some discoveries to go unreported; therefore distorting the relationship between the observed discovery size distribution and the parent or ultimate field size distribution. The method is applied to the UK's northern and central North Sea provinces. A discovery process model is developed to estimate the number and size distribution of undiscovered fields in this area as of 1983. The model is also used to forecast the rate at which fields will be discovered in the future. The appraisal and forecasts pertain to fields in size classes as small as 24 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOE). Estimated undiscovered hydrocarbon resources of 11.79 billion BOE are expected to be contained in 170 remaining fields. Over the first 500 wildcat wells after 1 January 1983, the discovery rate in this areas is expected to decline by 60% from 15 million BOE per wildcat well to six million BOE per wildcat well. ?? 1984.

  13. Self Potential as an indicator of biogeochemical transformations during active hydrocarbon biodegradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Heenan, J. W.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Revil, A.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Self potential (SP) signals, collected from borehole installation at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site at Bemidji (MN), show a strong bipolar anomaly centered around the smear zone where intense bioremediation is known to occur. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) and geochemical analysis of soil cores confirmed the presence of a magnetite layer at the smear zone. The observed anomaly is consistent with the operation of a bio-geobattery centered on the conductive magnetite. This bio-geobattery is not permanent, but instead periodically shuts down, while at other times it reaches a maximum potential difference of ~ 70mV. The transient operation of the bio-geobattery appears to be associated with changes in the gradient of the redox species in the vicinity of the magnetite layer. Microbiological analysis of the soil cores identified microbial species that can support the operation of a bio-geobattery with the anode located below the magnetite, and the cathode above the magnetite layer. Environmental conditions local to the smear zone (e.g. water table change, rain water infiltration) seem to change the microbial dynamics around the magnetite layer resulting in redox gradient changes, essentially turning 'on' and 'off' the bio-geobattery. This work provides strong field-scale evidence for the functioning of a biogeobattery resulting from long-term biodegradation of a crude oil spill.

  14. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated clayey soils from a sub-arctic site: the role of aggregate size and microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wonjae; Akbari, Ali; Snelgrove, Jessica; Frigon, Dominic; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of non-volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (C16-C34) and the associated microbial activity in predominant aggregate sizes during a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. The in situ aggregate microstructure was characterized by N2 adsorption and X-ray CT scanning. The soils in the nutrient (N)-amended and unamended biopile tanks were comprised of macroaggregates (>2 mm) and mesoaggregates (0.25-2 mm). Nutrient addition significantly enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in macroaggregates, but not in mesoaggregates. At the end of 65-d biopile experiment, 42% of the C16-C34 hydrocarbons were degraded in the nutrient-amended macroaggregates, compared to 13% in the mesoaggregates. Higher microbial activity in the macroaggregates of the nutrient amended biopile was inferred from a larger increase in extractable protein concentrations, compared to the other aggregates. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes showed that there was no selection of bacterial populations in any of the aggregates during biopile treatment, suggesting that the enhanced biodegradation in nutrient-amended macroaggregates was likely due to metabolic stimulation. X-ray micro CT scanning revealed that the number of pores wider than 4 μm, which would be easily accessible by bacteria, were an order of magnitude higher in macroaggregates. Also, N2 adsorption analyses showed that pore surface areas and pore volumes per unit weight were four to five-times larger, compared to the mesoaggregates. Thus the higher porosity microstructure in macroaggregates allowed greater hydrocarbon degradation upon biostimulation by nutrient addition and aeration.

  16. Physicochemical soil parameters affecting sequestration and mycobacterial biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Bill W; Sullivan, Wendy R

    2003-09-01

    Six soils, obtained from grasslands and wooded areas in Northeastern Illinois, were physicochemically characterized. Measured parameters included total organic carbon (TOC) content, contents of humic acid, fulvic acid and humin, pore volume and pore size distribution, and chemical makeup of soil organic matter (determined using solid-state 13C-NMR). Moistened, gamma-sterilized soils were spiked with 200 ppm of either phenanthrene or pyrene (including 14C label); following 0, 40, or 120 days of aging, the contaminant-spiked soils were then inoculated with Mycobacterium austroafricanum strain GTI-23, and evolution of 14CO2 was assessed over a 28-day period. Results for both phenanthrene and pyrene indicated that increased contact time led to increased sequestration and reduced biodegradation, and that TOC content was the most important parameter governing these processes. One soil, although only tested with phenanthrene, showed significantly lower-than-expected sequestration (higher-than-expected mineralization) after 40 days of aging, despite a very high TOC value (>24%). Because the level of sequestration in this soil was proportional to the others after 120 days of aging, this implies some difference in the temporal progression of sequestration in this soil, although not in its final result. The primary distinguishing feature of this soil was its considerably elevated fulvic acid content. Further experiments showed that addition of exogenous fulvic acid to a soil with very low endogenous humic acids/fulvic acids content greatly enhanced pyrene mineralization by M. austroafricanum. Extractabilities of 13 three- to six-ring coal tar PAHs in n-butanol from the six soils after 120 days of sequestration were strongly TOC-dependent; however, there was no discernible correlation between n-butanol extractability and mycobacterial PAH mineralization.

  17. Vertical distribution and anaerobic biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mangrove sediments in Hong Kong, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun-Hua [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhou, Hong-Wei [Department of Environmental Health Science, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Wong, Yuk-Shan [Department of Biology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Tam, Nora Fung-Yee, E-mail: bhntam@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The vertical distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at different sediment depths, namely 0-2 cm, 2-4 cm, 4-6 cm, 6-10 cm, 10-15 cm and 15-20 cm, in one of the most contaminated mangrove swamps, Ma Wan, Hong Kong was investigated. It was the first time to study the intrinsic potential of deep sediment to biodegrade PAHs under anaerobic conditions and the abundance of electron acceptors in sediment for anaerobic degradation. Results showed that the total PAHs concentrations (summation of 16 US EPA priority PAHs) increased with sediment depth. The lowest concentration (about 1300 ng g{sup -1} freeze-dried sediment) and the highest value (around 5000 ng g{sup -1} freeze-dried sediment) were found in the surface layer (0-2 cm) and deeper layer (10-15 cm), respectively. The percentage of high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs (4 to 6 rings) to total PAHs was more than 89% at all sediment depths. The ratio of phenanthrene to anthracene was less than 10 while fluoranthene to pyrene was around 1. Negative redox potentials (Eh) were recorded in all of the sediment samples, ranging from - 170 to - 200 mv, with a sharp decrease at a depth of 6 cm then declined slowly to 20 cm. The results suggested that HMW PAHs originated from diesel-powered fishing vessels and were mainly accumulated in deep anaerobic sediments. Among the electron acceptors commonly used by anaerobic bacteria, sulfate was the most dominant, followed by iron(III), nitrate and manganese(IV) was the least. Their concentrations also decreased with sediment depth. The population size of total anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria increased with sediment depth, reaching the peak number in the middle layer (4-6 cm). In contrast, the aerobic heterotrophic bacterial count decreased with sediment depth. It was the first time to apply a modified electron transport system (ETS) method to evaluate the bacterial activities in the fresh sediment under PAH stress. The vertical drop of the ETS activity suggested that

  18. Simultaneous biodegradation of creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Z.; Vila, J.; Grifoll, M. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Microbiologia; Ortega-Calvo, J.J. [C.S.I.C., Seville (Spain). Inst. de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia

    2008-02-15

    When incubated with a creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixture, the pyrene-degrading strain Mycobacterium sp. AP1 acted on three- and four-ring components, causing the simultaneous depletion of 25% of the total PAHs in 30 days. The kinetics of disappearance of individual PAHs was consistent with differences in aqueous solubility. During the incubation, a number of acid metabolites indicative of distinctive reactions carried out by high-molecular-weight PAH-degrading mycobacteria accumulated in the medium. Most of these metabolites were dicarboxylic aromatic acids formed as a result of the utilization of growth substrates (phenanthrene, pyrene, or fluoranthene) by multibranched pathways including meta- and ortho-ring-cleavage reactions: phthalic acid, naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, diphenic acid, Z-9-carboxymethylenefluorene-1-carboxylic acid, and 6,6'-dihydroxy-2,2'-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid. Others were dead-end products resulting from cometabolic oxidations on nongrowth substrates (fluorene meta-cleavage product). These results contribute to the general knowledge of the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted soils. The identification of the partially oxidized compounds will facilitate to develop analytical methods to determine their potential formation and accumulation in contaminated sites. (orig.)

  19. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihua Lyu

    Full Text Available Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1, a marine bacterium isolated from muddy sediments of Ulsan Bay, Republic of Korea, was previously shown to be capable of degrading multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. In order to gain insight into the characteristics of PAHs degradation, a proteome analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 exposed to phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene was conducted. Several enzymes associated with PAHs degradation were identified, including 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-monooxygenase, salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase, and PAH ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase alpha subunit. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR was used to compare RHDα and 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-monooxygenase gene expression, and showed that the genes involved in the production of these two enzymes were upregulated to varying degrees after exposing the bacterium to PAHs. These results suggested that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 degraded PAHs via the metabolic route initiated by ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, and further degradation occurred via the o-phthalate pathway or salicylate pathway. Both pathways subsequently entered the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and were mineralized to CO2.

  20. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yihua; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling; Tian, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1, a marine bacterium isolated from muddy sediments of Ulsan Bay, Republic of Korea, was previously shown to be capable of degrading multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to gain insight into the characteristics of PAHs degradation, a proteome analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 exposed to phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene was conducted. Several enzymes associated with PAHs degradation were identified, including 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-monooxygenase, salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase, and PAH ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase alpha subunit. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR was used to compare RHDα and 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-monooxygenase gene expression, and showed that the genes involved in the production of these two enzymes were upregulated to varying degrees after exposing the bacterium to PAHs. These results suggested that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 degraded PAHs via the metabolic route initiated by ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, and further degradation occurred via the o-phthalate pathway or salicylate pathway. Both pathways subsequently entered the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and were mineralized to CO2.

  1. A rotating disk apparatus for assessing the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons transferring from a non-aqueous phase liquid to solutions of surfactant Brij 35

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardez, Letícia Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p. 415-424 A rotating disk apparatus was used to investigate the biodegradation of PAHs from non-aqueous phase liquids to solutions of Brij 35. The mass transfer of PAHs in absence of surfactant solution was not large enough to replenish the degraded PAHs. The addition of surfactant resulted in an overall enhancement of biodegradation rates compared to that observed in pure aqueous solution. This is because surfactant partition significant amount of PAHs in...

  2. Simultaneous drug release at different rates from biodegradable polyurethane foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, Wesley N; Zhang, Jianying; Petoud, Stephané; Beckman, Eric J

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we present an approach for the simultaneous release of multiple drug compounds at different rates from single-phase polyurethane foams constructed from lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and glycerol. The anti-cancer compounds DB-67 and doxorubicin were covalently incorporated into polyurethane foams, whereby drug release can then occur in concert with material degradation. To begin, the reactions of DB-67 and doxorubicin with LDI in the presence of a tertiary amine catalyst were monitored with infrared spectroscopy; each compound formed urethane linkages with LDI. Fluorescent spectra of DB-67 and doxorubicin were then recorded in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4 (PBS), to ensure that each anti-cancer compound could be quantitatively detected alone and in combination. Doxorubicin and DB-67 were then incorporated into a series of degradable LDI-glycerol polyurethane foams alone and in combination with one another. The sol content, average porosity and drug distribution throughout each foam sample was measured and found to be similar amongst all foam samples. The stability of DB-67 and doxorubicin's fluorescent signal was then assessed over a 2-week period at 70 degrees C. Release rates of the compounds from the foams were assessed over a 10-week period at 4, 22, 37 and 70 degrees C by way of fluorescence spectroscopy. Release was found to be temperature-dependent, with rates related to the chemical structure of the incorporated drug. This study demonstrates that differential release of covalently bound drugs is possible from simple single-phase, degradable polyurethane foams.

  3. Biodegradation, bioaccessibility, and genotoxicity of diffuse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution at a motorway site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Anders R; De Lipthay, Julia R; Reichenberg, Fredrik; Sørensen, Søren J; Andersen, Ole; Christensen, Peter; Binderup, Mona-lise; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2006-05-15

    Diffuse pollution of surface soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is problematic in terms of the large areas and volumes of polluted soil. The levels and effects of diffuse PAH pollution at a motorway site were investigated. Surface soil was sampled with increasing distance from the asphalt pavement and tested for total amounts of PAHs, amounts of bioaccessible PAHs, total bacterial populations, PAH degrader populations, the potential for mineralization of 14C-PAHs, and mutagenicity. Elevated PAH concentrations were found in the samples taken 1-8 m from the pavement. Soil sampled at greater distances (12-24 m) contained only background levels of PAHs. The total bacterial populations (CFU and numbers of 16S rDNA genes) were similar for all soil samples, whereas the microbial degrader populations (culturable PAH degraders and numbers of PAH dioxygenase genes) were most abundant in the most polluted samples close to the pavement. Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin extraction of soil PAHs, as a direct estimate of the bioaccessibility, indicated that only 1-5% of the PAHs were accessible to soil bacteria. This low bioaccessibility is suggested to be due to sorption to traffic soot particles. The increased PAH level close to the pavement was reflected in slightly increased mutagenic activity (1 m, 0.32 +/- 0.08 revertants g(-1) soil; background/ 24 m: 0.08 +/- 0.04), determined by the Salmonella/ microsome assay of total extractable PAHs activated by liver enzymes. The potential for lighter molecular weight PAH degradation in combination with low bioaccessibility of heavier PAHs is proposed to lead to a likely increase in concentration of heavier PAHs over time. These residues are, however, likely to be of low biological significance.

  4. Improving Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Contaminated Soil Through Low-Level Surfactant Addition After Conventional Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrion, Alden C; Singleton, David R; Nakamura, Jun; Shea, Damian; Aitken, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of bioremediation for soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be limited by the fractions of soil-bound PAHs that are less accessible to PAH-degrading microorganisms. In previous test-tube-scale work, submicellar doses of nonionic surfactants were screened for their ability to enhance the desorption and biodegradation of residual PAHs in soil after conventional bioremediation in a laboratory-scale, slurry-phase bioreactor. Polyoxyethylene sorbitol hexaoleate (POESH) was the optimum surfactant for enhancing PAH removal, especially the high-molecular weight PAHs. This work extends that concept by treating the effluent from the slurry-phase bioreactor in a second-stage batch reactor, to which POESH was added, for an additional 7 or 12 days. Surfactant amendment removed substantial amounts of the PAHs and oxy-PAHs remaining after conventional slurry-phase bioremediation, including more than 80% of residual 4-ring PAHs. Surfactant-amended treatment decreased soil cytotoxicity, but often increased the genotoxicity of the soil as measured using the DT-40 chicken lymphocyte DNA damage response assay. Potential ecotoxicity, measured using a seed germination assay, was reduced by bioreactor treatment and was reduced further after second-stage treatment with POESH. Of bacteria previously implicated as potential PAH degraders under POESH-amended conditions in a prior study, members of the Terrimonas genus were associated with differences in high-molecular weight PAH removal in the current study. Research using submicellar doses of surfactant as a second-stage treatment step is limited and these findings can inform the design of bioremediation systems at field sites treating soil contaminated with PAHs and other hydrophobic contaminants that have low bioaccessibility.

  5. Diversity, distribution and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities of microbial communities in oil-contaminated cyanobacterial mats from a constructed wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeid M M Abed

    Full Text Available Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was 90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences, Cyanobacteria (31%, Bacteriodetes (11.5%, Planctomycetes (7% and Chloroflexi (3%. Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53-100% of C12-C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats' microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters.

  6. Use of silica-encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 in biodegradation of novel hydrocarbon ring structures found in hydraulic fracturing waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Kelly G; Kasinkas, Lisa; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2014-08-01

    The most problematic hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) wastewaters consist of fused, isolated, bridged, and spiro ring systems, and ring systems have been poorly studied with respect to biodegradation, prompting the testing here of six major ring structural subclasses using a well-characterized bacterium and a silica encapsulation system previously shown to enhance biodegradation. The direct biological oxygenation of spiro ring compounds was demonstrated here. These and other hydrocarbon ring compounds have previously been shown to be present in flow-back waters and waters produced from hydraulic fracturing operations. Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4, containing naphthalene dioxygenase, was selected for its broad substrate specificity, and it was demonstrated here to oxidize fundamental ring structures that are common in shale-derived waters but not previously investigated with this or related enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 was tested here in the presence of a silica encasement, a protocol that has previously been shown to protect bacteria against the extremes of salinity present in fracking wastewaters. These studies demonstrate the degradation of highly hydrophobic compounds by a silica-encapsulated model bacterium, demonstrate what it may not degrade, and contribute to knowledge of the full range of hydrocarbon ring compounds that can be oxidized using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4.

  7. Use of Silica-Encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIB 9816-4 in Biodegradation of Novel Hydrocarbon Ring Structures Found in Hydraulic Fracturing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Kelly G.; Kasinkas, Lisa; Aksan, Alptekin

    2014-01-01

    The most problematic hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) wastewaters consist of fused, isolated, bridged, and spiro ring systems, and ring systems have been poorly studied with respect to biodegradation, prompting the testing here of six major ring structural subclasses using a well-characterized bacterium and a silica encapsulation system previously shown to enhance biodegradation. The direct biological oxygenation of spiro ring compounds was demonstrated here. These and other hydrocarbon ring compounds have previously been shown to be present in flow-back waters and waters produced from hydraulic fracturing operations. Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4, containing naphthalene dioxygenase, was selected for its broad substrate specificity, and it was demonstrated here to oxidize fundamental ring structures that are common in shale-derived waters but not previously investigated with this or related enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 was tested here in the presence of a silica encasement, a protocol that has previously been shown to protect bacteria against the extremes of salinity present in fracking wastewaters. These studies demonstrate the degradation of highly hydrophobic compounds by a silica-encapsulated model bacterium, demonstrate what it may not degrade, and contribute to knowledge of the full range of hydrocarbon ring compounds that can be oxidized using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4. PMID:24907321

  8. Biodegradation and kinetics of aerobic granules under high organic loading rates in sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Liang, David Tee; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2008-05-01

    Biodegradation, kinetics, and microbial diversity of aerobic granules were investigated under a high range of organic loading rate 6.0 to 12.0 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-3) day(-1) in a sequencing batch reactor. The selection and enriching of different bacterial species under different organic loading rates had an important effect on the characteristics and performance of the mature aerobic granules and caused the difference on granular biodegradation and kinetic behaviors. Good granular characteristics and performance were presented at steady state under various organic loading rates. Larger and denser aerobic granules were developed and stabilized at relatively higher organic loading rates with decreased bioactivity in terms of specific oxygen utilization rate and specific growth rate (muoverall) or solid retention time. The decrease of bioactivity was helpful to maintain granule stability under high organic loading rates and improve reactor operation. The corresponding biokinetic coefficients of endogenous decay rate (kd), observed yield (Yobs), and theoretical yield (Y) were measured and calculated in this study. As the increase of organic loading rate, a decreased net sludge production (Yobs) is associated with an increased solid retention time, while kd and Y changed insignificantly and can be regarded as constants under different organic loading rates.

  9. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-06

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion.

  10. Biodegradation rates of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin through sand filters and in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lionel; Hoefel, Daniel; Bock, Franziska; Saint, Christopher P; Newcombe, Gayle

    2007-02-01

    Taste and odour (T&O) causing compounds, in particular, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, are a problem for water authorities as they are recalcitrant to conventional water treatment. In this study, biological sand filtration was shown to be an effective process for the complete removal of MIB and geosmin, with removal shown to be predominantly through biodegradation. In addition, MIB and geosmin were also effectively degraded in batch bioreactor experiments using biofilm sourced from one of the sand filters as the microbial inoculum. The biodegradation of MIB and geosmin was determined to be a pseudo-first-order reaction with rate constants ranging between 0.10 and 0.58 d(-1) in the bioreactor experiments. Rate constants were shown to be dependent upon the initial concentration of the microbial inoculum but not the initial concentration of MIB and geosmin when target concentrations of 200 and 50 ng l(-1) were used. Furthermore, rate constants were shown to increase upon re-exposure of the biofilm to both T&O compounds. Enrichment cultures with subsequent community profile analysis using 16S rRNA-directed PCR-DGGE identified four bacteria most likely involved in the biodegradation of geosmin within the sand filters and bioreactors. These included a Pseudomonas sp., Alphaproteobacterium, Sphingomonas sp. and an Acidobacteriaceae member.

  11. Lubricant Biodegradation Enhancers:Designed Chemistry and Engineered Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Boshui; Gao Lingyue; Fang Jianhua; Zhang Nan; Wu Jiang; Wang Jiu

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, a growing worldwide trend of developing the biodegradable lubricants has been prevailing to form a speciifc ifeld of green chemistry and green engineering. Enhancement of biodegradability of unreadily biodegradable petroleum-based lubricants has as such become an urgent must. For over a decade the authors have been focusing on the im-provement of biodegradability of unreadily biodegradable lubricants such as petroleum-based lubricating oils and greases. A new idea of lubricant biodegradation enhancer was put forward by the authors with the aim to stimulate the biodegradation of unreadily biodegradable lubricants by incorporating the enhancer into the lubricants in order to turn the lubricants into greener biodegradable ones and to help in situ bioremediation of lubricant-contaminated environment. This manuscript sum-marizes our recent efforts relating to the chemistry and technology of biodegradation enhancers for lubricants. Firstly, the chemistry of lubricant biodegradation enhancers was designed based on the principles of bioremediation for the treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Secondly, the ability of the designed biodegradation enhancers for increasing the biodegradability of unreadily biodegradable industrial lubricants was investigated through biodegradability evaluation tests, microbial population analysis, and biodegradation kinetics modeling. Finally, the impact of biodegradation enhancers on some crucial performance characteristics of lubricants such as lubricity and oxidation stability was tested via tribological evaluation and oxidation determinations. Our results have shown that the designed chemistry of nitrogenous and/or phos-phorous compounds such as lauroyl glutamine, oleoyl glycine, oleic diethanolamide phosphate and lauric diethanolamide borate was outstanding in boosting biodegradation of petroleum-based lubricants which was ascribed to increase the micro-bial population and decrease the oil-water interfacial

  12. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.;

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  13. THE RATES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM INCENSE BURNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents the results of experiments performed to determine the amounts of gas- and particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in incense smoke. Ten brands of incense, 3 of stick, 2 of joss stick, and one each of cone, smudge bundle, rope, powder, and rock, w...

  14. Effect of Mn(IV) on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under low-oxygen condition in mangrove sediment slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Hua; Ye, Chun; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2011-06-15

    This study investigated the effect of manganese [Mn(IV)] amendment on the anaerobic biodegradation of four mixed PAHs, namely fluorene (Fl), phenanthrene (Phe), fluoranthene (Flua) and pyrene (Pyr) under low-oxygen condition, with and without the inoculation of enriched PAH-degrading bacterial consortia, in mangrove sediment slurries. The results revealed that the addition of Mn(IV) significantly inhibited PAH biodegradation, the rate of which was about 31-70% lower than the one of the groups without Mn(IV) addition. The amendment of Mn(IV) also showed adverse effect on the population size of enriched PAH-degrading bacteria and bacterial activity. The analysis results on the concentrations of Mn(II) and Mn(IV) indicated that Mn(IV) was converted to Mn(II) fast, the latter was the predominate manganese form in the mangrove sediment slurries through the whole experimental period. The Mn(II) toxicity to microorganisms was considered the main reason for inhibition of the PAH-biodegradation. On the other hand, the inoculation of the enriched PAH-degrading consortia significantly enhanced the biodegradation rates of all four PAHs, and the biodegradation rates of 3-rings (Fl, Phe) and 4-rings (Flua, Pyr) PAHs were enhanced by 14-15% and 21-34%, respectively.

  15. Marine Oil-Degrading Microorganisms and Biodegradation Process of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Marine Environments: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianliang; Yu, Yang; Bai, Yu; Wang, Liping; Wu, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Due to the toxicity of petroleum compounds, the increasing accidents of marine oil spills/leakages have had a significant impact on our environment. Recently, different remedial techniques for the treatment of marine petroleum pollution have been proposed, such as bioremediation, controlled burning, skimming, and solidifying. (Hedlund and Staley in Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 51:61-66, 2001). This review introduces an important remedial method for marine oil pollution treatment-bioremediation technique-which is considered as a reliable, efficient, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method. First, the necessity of bioremediation for marine oil pollution was discussed. Second, this paper discussed the species of oil-degrading microorganisms, degradation pathways and mechanisms, the degradation rate and reaction model, and the factors affecting the degradation. Last, several suggestions for the further research in the field of marine oil spill bioremediation were proposed.

  16. Biodegradation of the Oil Hydrocarbons in Wastewater with Immobilized Microbiological Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟光; 朱文芳; 何华; 吕炳南

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of laboratory-scale-tests, the method of using immobilized biological activated carbon (IBAC) was found to be an efficient method to treat oil wastewater. In this research, pilot-scale studies were conducted to investigate the optimal range of factors, such as oil concentration, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). 39 strains of bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant. After being acclimated and identified, these bacteria were immobilized on granular activated carbon. The degradation of organic compounds was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectromtry (GC-MS). As the results show that when the oil concentration is lower than 50 mg/L and corresponding values of HRT are longer than 1.0 h, the removal rate of immobilized biological activated carbon column can stably reach at least 70%. In the field studies, electron microscope analyses show that the predominant bacteria have been changed from Pseudomonas and Bacillus at the beginning to Bacillus only after 60 days of continuous operation, which suggests that the method with immobilized biological activated carbon column is the one with higher efficiency than that of the secondary floatation tank traditionally used in oil wastewater treatment.

  17. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  18. Effect of intermediate compounds and products on wet oxidation and biodegradation rates of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Kinetics of pure compounds in batch agitated reactors are useful data to clarify the characteristics of a given reaction, but they frequently do not provide the required information to design industrial mixed continuous processes because in this case the final and intermediate products interact with the reaction of interest, due to backmixing effects. Simultaneously, the presence and transformations of other compounds, frequent in industrial wastewater treatments, adds more complexity to these types of interactions, whose effect can be different, favorable or unfavorable, for chemical or biological reactions. In this work, batch laboratory reactor data were obtained for the wet oxidation and biodegradation of four phenolic compounds present in a pharmaceutical wastewater and then compared with those collected from industrial continuous stirred tank reactors. For wet oxidation, batch laboratory degradation rates were significantly lower than those found in industrial continuous stirred operation. This behavior was explained by a different distribution of intermediate compounds in lab and industrial treatments, caused by the degree of backmixing and the synergistic effects between phenolic compounds (matrix effects). On the other hand, the specific utilization rates during aerobic biodegradation in the continuous industrial operation were lower than those measured in the laboratory, due to the simultaneous presence of the four pollutants in the industrial process (matrix effects) increasing the inhibitory effects of these compounds and its intermediates.

  19. Soil Physical Constraints on Intrinsic Biodegradation of Petroleum Vapors in a Layered Subsurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Henriksen, Kaj; Mortensen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic biodegradation of organic contaminants in the soil vadose zone depends on site-specific soil properties controlling biophysical and geochemical interactions within the soil pore space. In this study we evaluated the effect of soil texture and moisture conditions on aerobic biodegradation...... in a deep and highly layered vadose zone contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Soil slurry experiments on benzene biodegradation were used for determining the relative potential for hydrocarbon biodegradation in 100 soil samples collected from 2-16 m below ground surface. Regardless of nutrient......-poor and calcareous subsoil conditions, the results showed a significant aerobic biodegradation potential. Average first-order rate constants (k1) ranged from 0 to 5 d-1 and varied significantly across soil types in the order sandy loam > fine sand > limestone. Within samples with high biodegradation potential, soil...

  20. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  1. Comparison of indigenous and exogenous microbial populations during slurry phase biodegradation of long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Adetutu, Eric M; Aleer, Sam; Weber, John; Patil, Sayali S; Sheppard, Petra J; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a number of slurry-phase strategies were trialled over a 42 day period in order to determine the efficacy of bioremediation for long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (145 g kg(-1) C(10)-C(40)). The addition of activated sludge and nutrients to slurries (bioaugmentation) resulted in enhanced hydrocarbon removal (51.6 ± 8.5 %) compared to treatments receiving only nutrients (enhanced natural attenuation [ENA]; 41.3 ± 6.4 %) or no amendments (natural attenuation; no significant hydrocarbon removal, P hydrocarbons in ENA slurries. Microbial diversity in slurries was monitored using DGGE with dominant bands excised and sequenced for identification. Applying the different bioremediation strategies resulted in the formation of four distinct community clusters associated with the activated sludge (inoculum), bioaugmentation strategy at day 0, bioaugmentation strategy at weeks 2-6 and slurries with autoclaved sludge and nutrient additions (bioaugmentation negative control). While hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria genera (e.g. Aquabacterium and Haliscomenobacter) were associated with the hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, bioaugmentation of soil slurries with activated sludge resulted in the introduction of bacteria associated with hydrocarbon degradation (Burkholderiales order and Klebsiella genera) which presumably contributed to the enhanced efficacy for this slurry strategy.

  2. STUDY ON BIODEGRADATION TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN BULK IN THE REMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Ramona PECINGINĂ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodecontaminare methods are based on biodegradation in the subsurface presence of microorganisms capable of degrading most of carbonaceous organic pollutants and much of inorganic pollutants. Biodegradation in bulk meet that principle biological decontamination several ways. These methods are intended solely for solids, and is often used for on-site remediation of soils contaminated with organic products. Station bioremediation ensure reducing the harmfulness of residues from oil exploitation activities considered hazardous, using a bioremediation process. Bioremediation process will lead to reduction of oil content and thus reducing the hazard of waste.

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAHs) by marine halotolerant Achromobacter xylosoxidans using Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin--a microcosm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bharti P; Ghevariya, Chirag M; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Dudhagara, Dushyant R; Rajpara, Rahul K

    2014-02-15

    Ability of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, a chrysene degrading marine halotolerant bacterium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using a cost effective laboratory microcosm approach, was investigated. Effect of variables as chrysene, glucose as a co-substrate, Triton X-100 as a non-ionic surfactant and β-cyclodextrin as a PAHs solubilizer was examined on degradation of low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs. A total of eleven PAHs detected from polluted saline soil were found to be degraded. Glucose, in combination with Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin resulted in 2.8 and 1.4-fold increase in degradation of LMW PAHs and 7.59 and 2.23-fold increase in degradation of HMW PAHs, respectively. Enhanced biodegradation of total PAHs (TPAHs) by amendments with Triton X-100 and β-cyclodextrin using Achromobacter xylosoxidans can prove to be promising approach for in situ bioremediation of marine sites contaminated with PAHs.

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS USING OXYGEN, NITRATE, OR NITROUS OXIDE AS THE TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcosms were prepared from aquifer material, spiked with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and amended with oxygen, nitrate, and nitrous oxide. Benzene and alkylbenzenes were degraded to concentrations below 5 µg/liter within 7 days under aerobic conditions, whereas only the alkylbe...

  5. 红球菌在石油烃类物质降解中的作用%Progress in Petroleum Hydrocarbon Biodegradation by Rhodococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光军; 方萍

    2013-01-01

    红球菌属是有机污染物降解的重要微生物之一.由于红球菌能够适应各种各样的底物环境,具有极强的有机溶剂耐受性和很宽的降解谱,同时它们还能通过产生表面活性剂和改变细胞表面组成结构来提升自身对于疏水性环境的适应能力,因此,红球菌在石油污染物降解及石油污染的生物修复等领域有着极其重要的应用价值.文章基于近年来在红球菌降解石油烃方面的研究进展,从红球菌适应疏水性环境的机制、石油烃中烷烃、环烷烃、芳香烃的降解途径等几个方面进行综述,同时对今后研究的方向进行了展望.%Rhodococcus as a sort of microbial for organic compounds biodegradation with strong organic solvent tolerance and wide degradation spectrum, can adapt to various substrates, as well as promoting its adaption to hydrophobic surroundings by producing surfactants or changing cell surface composition and structure.Due to the characteristics, Rhodococcus acts extremely important roles in oil pollution bioremediation.Based on progress in petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation by Rhodococcus, the adaption mechanism to hydrophobic environment, the degradation process of alkane, cycloparafin hydrocarbon and aromatics were reviewed.The prospect related to Rhodococcus in bioremediation in future was also proposed.

  6. Uptake and trans-membrane transport of petroleum hydrocarbons by microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Fei; Wang, Hong Qi

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum-based products are a primary energy source in the industry and daily life. During the exploration, processing, transport and storage of petroleum and petroleum products, water or soil pollution occurs regularly. Biodegradation of the hydrocarbon pollutants by indigenous microorganisms is one of the primary mechanisms of removal of petroleum compounds from the environment. However, the physical contact between microorganisms and hydrophobic hydrocarbons limits the biodegradation rate...

  7. Assessment of microbial communities associated with fermentative-methanogenic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater contaminated with a biodiesel blend (B20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Débora Toledo; da Silva, Márcio Luís Busi; Nossa, Carlos Wolfgang; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Corseuil, Henry Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A controlled field experiment was conducted to assess the potential for fermentative-methanogenic biostimulation (by ammonium-acetate injection) to enhance biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in groundwater contaminated with biodiesel B20 (20:80 v/v soybean biodiesel and diesel). Changes in microbial community structure were assessed by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA analyses. BTEX and PAH removal began 0.7 year following the release, concomitantly with the increase in the relative abundance of Desulfitobacterium and Geobacter spp. (from 5 to 52.7 % and 15.8 to 37.3 % of total Bacteria 16S rRNA, respectively), which are known to anaerobically degrade hydrocarbons. The accumulation of anaerobic metabolites acetate and hydrogen that could hinder the thermodynamic feasibility of BTEX and PAH biotransformations under fermentative/methanogenic conditions was apparently alleviated by the growing predominance of Methanosarcina. This suggests the importance of microbial population shifts that enrich microorganisms capable of interacting syntrophically to enhance the feasibility of fermentative-methanogenic bioremediation of biodiesel blend releases.

  8. Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil in a large-scale field simulated experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinping; Wang, Lina; Cao, Lixin; Li, Fujuan

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil with hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients was carried out by a large-scale field simulated experiment in this paper. After a 103 day experiment, for n-alkanes, the maximum biodegradation rate reached 71% and the results showed hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients have a comprehensive effect. It also showed that rhamnolipid biosurfactants could shorten the biodegradation time through an emulsifying function; the nutrients could greatly increase the biodegradation rate by promoting HDB production. For PAHs, the chrysene series had higher weathering resistance. For the same series, the weathering resistance ability is C1- biodegradation was found for different n-alkanes in two pools which only had added rhamnolipid biosurfactants or nutrients, respectively. Except for C14, C15 and C16 sesquiterpanes, most of the steranes and terpanes had high antibiodegradability.

  9. Screening Nonionic Surfactants for Enhanced Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Remaining in Soil After Conventional Biological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrion, Alden C; Nakamura, Jun; Shea, Damian; Aitken, Michael D

    2016-04-05

    A total of five nonionic surfactants (Brij 30, Span 20, Ecosurf EH-3, polyoxyethylene sorbitol hexaoleate, and R-95 rhamnolipid) were evaluated for their ability to enhance PAH desorption and biodegradation in contaminated soil after treatment in an aerobic bioreactor. Surfactant doses corresponded to aqueous-phase concentrations below the critical micelle concentration in the soil-slurry system. The effect of surfactant amendment on soil (geno)toxicity was also evaluated for Brij 30, Span 20, and POESH using the DT40 B-lymphocyte cell line and two of its DNA-repair-deficient mutants. Compared to the results from no-surfactant controls, incubation of the bioreactor-treated soil with all surfactants increased PAH desorption, and all except R-95 substantially increased PAH biodegradation. POESH had the greatest effect, removing 50% of total measured PAHs. Brij 30, Span 20, and POESH were particularly effective at enhancing biodegradation of four- and five-ring PAHs, including five of the seven carcinogenic PAHs, with removals up to 80%. Surfactant amendment also significantly enhanced the removal of alkyl-PAHs. Most treatments significantly increased soil toxicity. Only the no-surfactant control and Brij 30 at the optimum dose significantly decreased soil genotoxicity, as evaluated with either mutant cell line. Overall, these findings have implications for the feasibility of bioremediation to achieve cleanup levels for PAHs in soil.

  10. Rates of solubilization and biodegradation of PAH compounds in porous media. [Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthy, R.G.

    1991-11-01

    Microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in soils and aquifer media is dependent on rates of desorption of these compounds from solids and rates of solubilization from residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The couples processes involving microbial degradation and hydrophobic compound availability are not well understood. The proposed research effort explores certain physicochemical phenomena that may have a significant affect on the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in porous media. The investigation will examine rates of biomineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds that are leached from a residual saturation of coal tar. Batch and continuously-stirred reactor studies will be used to measure solute equilibrium concentrations and rates of solubilization of PAH compounds from coal tar imbided into microporous silica media. These rates will be compared with rates of mineralization of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds in similar systems inoculated with a culture of PAH degrading microorganisms. Column experiments will also be conducted to assess the rates of solubilization and mass transfer coefficients from coal tar entrapped in a sandy aquifer material by capillary forces.

  11. Rates of solubilization and biodegradation of PAH compounds in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthy, R.G.

    1991-11-01

    Microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in soils and aquifer media is dependent on rates of desorption of these compounds from solids and rates of solubilization from residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The couples processes involving microbial degradation and hydrophobic compound availability are not well understood. The proposed research effort explores certain physicochemical phenomena that may have a significant affect on the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in porous media. The investigation will examine rates of biomineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds that are leached from a residual saturation of coal tar. Batch and continuously-stirred reactor studies will be used to measure solute equilibrium concentrations and rates of solubilization of PAH compounds from coal tar imbided into microporous silica media. These rates will be compared with rates of mineralization of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds in similar systems inoculated with a culture of PAH degrading microorganisms. Column experiments will also be conducted to assess the rates of solubilization and mass transfer coefficients from coal tar entrapped in a sandy aquifer material by capillary forces.

  12. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Heterogeneous Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin; Paul Fallgren; Terry Brown

    2006-03-02

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with the University of Wyoming, Department of Renewable Resources and the U.S. Department of Energy, under Task 35, conducted a laboratory-scale study of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates versus a variety of physical and chemical parameters to develop a base model. By using this model, biodegradation of Petroleum hydrocarbons in heterogeneous soils can be predicted. The base model, as developed in this study, have been tested by both field and laboratory data. Temperature, pH, and nutrients appear to be the key parameters that can be incorporate into the model to predict biodegradation rates. Results to date show the effect of soil texture and source on the role of each parameter in the rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation. Derived from the existing study, an alternative approach of using CO{sub 2} accumulation data has been attempted by our collaborators at the University of Wyoming. The model has been modified and fine tuned by incorporating these data to provide more information on biodegradation.

  13. Bioremediation of marine sediments contaminated by hydrocarbons: experimental analysis and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Regoli, Francesco; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2010-10-15

    This work deals with bioremediation experiments on harbor sediments contaminated by aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), investigating the effects of a continuous supply of inorganic nutrients and sand amendments on the kinetics of microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. Inorganic nutrients stimulated microbial growth and enhanced the biodegradation of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons, whereas sand amendment increased only the removal of high molecular weight compounds. The simultaneous addition of inorganic nutrients and sand provided the highest biodegradation (>70% for aliphatic hydrocarbons and 40% for PAHs). A semi-empirical kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental temporal changes of hydrocarbon residual concentrations and microbial abundances. The estimated values for parameters allowed to calculate a doubling time of 2.9 d and a yield coefficient biomass/hydrocarbons 0.39 g C biomass g-1C hydrocarbons, for the treatment with the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation yield. A comparison between the organic carbon demand and temporal profiles of hydrocarbons residual concentration allowed also to calculate the relative contribution of contaminants to carbon supply, in the range 5-32%. This suggests that C availability in the sediments, influencing prokaryotic metabolism, may have cascade effects on biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons. Even if these findings do not represent a general rule and site-specific studies are needed, the approach used here can be a relevant support tool when designing bioremediation strategies on site.

  14. Data on biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons using co-composting of cow manure/oily drill wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ahmadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil drill cuttings are challenging wastes in oil sites especially in Khuzestan province, a major oil producing region in Iran. As co- composting is a simple and eco- friendly technique for bioremediation of oil base drill cutting, this data article designed to describe co- composting of oil base drill cutting with cow manure. The data suggest that with optimized mixture of cow manure/oily drill wastes (here, 20:1 could engender more effective treatment of the wastes (with final total petroleum hydrocarbon of 0.01 g/Kg. The data will be informative for oil drilling companies and environmental agencies for choosing it as a practical bioremediation process of soil/wastes polluted by petroleum hydrocarbons.

  15. Screening selectively harnessed environmental microbial communities for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joseph A; Mercer, Sean M; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria are often found tolerating polluted environments. Such bacteria may be exploited to bioremediate contaminants in controlled ex situ reactor systems. One potential strategic goal of such systems is to harness microbes directly from the environment such that they exhibit the capacity to markedly degrade organic pollutants of interest. Here, the use of biofilm cultivation techniques to inoculate and activate moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was explored. Biofilms were cultivated from 4 different hydrocarbon contaminated sites using a minimal medium spiked with the 16 EPA identified PAHs. Overall, all 4 inoculant sources resulted in biofilm communities capable of tolerating the presence of PAHs, but only 2 of these exhibited enhanced PAH catabolic gene prevalence coupled with significant degradation of select PAH compounds. Comparisons between inoculant sources highlighted the dependence of this method on appropriate inoculant screening and biostimulation efforts.

  16. Biodegradation of Medium Chain Hydrocarbons by Acinetobacter venetianus 2AW Immobilized to Hair-Based Adsorbent Mats (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    McDonagh M. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation . Microbiol Rev. 1996;60:342–365. 12. Reisfeld A, Rosenberg E, Gutnick D. Microbial...adsorbent, for in situ degradation of hydrocarbons, has practical application in the bioremediation of oil in water emulsions. acinetobacter...the rest comes from human activ- ities.1 Oil spills that occur as a result of accidents or envi- ronmental disturbances create significant economic

  17. Numerical simulation of in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons using a coupled model for bio-geochemical reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, I. S.; Molson, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) are a major source of groundwater contamination, being a worldwide and well-known problem. Formed by a complex mixture of hundreds of organic compounds (including BTEX - benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), many of which are toxic and persistent in the subsurface and are capable of creating a serious risk to human health. Several remediation technologies can be used to clean-up PHC contamination. In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and intrinsic bioremediation (IBR) are two promising techniques that can be applied in this case. However, the interaction of these processes with the background aquifer geochemistry and the design of an efficient treatment presents a challenge. Here we show the development and application of BIONAPL/Phreeqc, a modeling tool capable of simulating groundwater flow, contaminant transport with coupled biological and geochemical processes in porous or fractured porous media. BIONAPL/Phreeqc is based on the well-tested BIONAPL/3D model, using a powerful finite element simulation engine, capable of simulating non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution, density-dependent advective-dispersive transport, and solving the geochemical and kinetic processes with the library Phreeqc. To validate the model, we compared BIONAPL/Phreeqc with results from the literature for different biodegradation processes and different geometries, with good agreement. We then used the model to simulate the behavior of sodium persulfate (NaS2O8) as an oxidant for BTEX degradation, coupled with sequential biodegradation in a 2D case and to evaluate the effect of inorganic geochemistry reactions. The results show the advantages of a treatment train remediation scheme based on ISCO and IBR. The numerical performance and stability of the integrated BIONAPL/Phreeqc model was also verified.

  18. Efficiency of Indigenous Filamentous Fungi for Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Medium and Soil: Laboratory Study from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddela, N R; Scalvenzi, L; Pérez, M; Montero, C; Gooty, J M

    2015-09-01

    The competence of two fungal isolates for degrading petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated. The filamentous fungi were isolated from a crude oil-contaminated soil in northeastern Ecuador, and were 99 %-100 % similar in 18S rDNA sequence to the genus Geomyces. Their efficiencies of degradation were tested in vitro for 30 days, using medium and soil microcosm. Residual hydrocarbons were tracked by gas liquid chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The maximum removal percentages of total petroleum hydrocarbons were 77.3 % and 79.9 % for experiments in the medium and soil microcosm, respectively. The percent germination of cow pea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds was increased from 20 % to 100 % upon bioremediation. Isolates sporulated optimally on minimal salts agar medium at pH 5, 25°C temperature, 1 %-1.5 % substrate (crude oil) and 4-6 g L(-1) N-P-K. These findings suggest that these fungal isolates are potential degraders for bioremediation in crude oil-contaminated areas in Ecuador.

  19. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  20. Bioremediation of severely weathered hydrocarbons: is it possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J. R.; Villa, R.; Sierra, C.; Sotres, A.; Pelaez, A. I.; Sanchez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Weathering processes of spilled hydrocarbons promote a reduced biodegradability of petroleum compounds mixtures, and consequently bioremediation techniques are often ruled out within the selection of suitable remediation approaches. This is truly relevant wherever old spills at abandoned industrial sites have to be remediated. However it is well known most of the remaining fractions and individual compounds of weathered oil are still biodegradable, although at slow rates than alkanes or no and two-ring aromatics. (Author)

  1. Monitoring the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a co-contaminated soil using stable isotope labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawra, Anna; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Watzinger, Andrea; Soja, Gerhard; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Conventional remediation techniques like "dig and dump" are costly and limited in scale. Plant- and microbe-based alternatives, e.g. phytoremediation options, offer a cheap and environmentally friendly approach that can be applied on larger areas. However, the application of phytoremediation techniques to co-contaminated sites may be hindered due to a potential inhibition of biodegradation processes by the presence of heavy metals in soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the degradation of organic pollutants can be enhanced by immobilising potentially toxic heavy metals. This study aims to identify the influence of heavy metal immobilisation on the degradation of organic pollutants, and to determine chemical, physical and biological measures further accelerating these processes. The influence of heavy metals on organic pollutant degradation dynamics is assessed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (13C-PLFA). Application of 13C-labeled phenanthrene allows the identification of microbial groups responsible for the degradation process. For metal immobilisation and enhanced biodegradation, distinct mineral and organic soil amendments (iron oxides, gravel sludge, biochar) are deployed, partly in combination with fast-growing and pollution-tolerant woody plants (willow, black locust and alder). Results of an incubation batch experiment show a fast degradation of the phenanthrene label within the first two weeks by various microbial groups (gram negative bacteria as indicated by the cy17:0 peak) resulting in a decrease by up to 80% of the total PAH concentration (Σ 16 EPA PAHs) measured in soil. A similar trend was observed in the greenhouse pot experiment, whereby heavy metal accumulation in the woody plants growing on the co-contaminated soil significantly varied with plant species (willow > black locust, alder).

  2. Biodegradation of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a wood-degrading consortium at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarro, Raquel; González, Natalia; Bautista, Luis Fernando; Molina, Maria Carmen

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluates the ability of two bacterial consortia (C2PL05 and BOS08), extracted from very different environments, to degrade low- (naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene) and high- (pyrene, perylene) molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at high (15-25 °C) and low (5-15 °C) temperature ranges. C2PL05 was isolated from a soil in an area chronically and heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and BOS08 from decomposing wood in an unpolluted forest, free of PAHs. Bacterial consortia were described by cultivable and noncultivable techniques (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Fungal DNA was not observed within the wood-decomposing consortium and fungal activity was therefore negligible during most of the PAH degradation process. PAH-degrading bacterial populations, measured by most probable number enumeration, increased during the exponential phase. Toxicity estimated by the Microtox method was reduced to low levels and final PAH depletion, determined by HPLC, confirmed the high degree (54% and 99%, respectively) of low- and high-molecular-weight PAH degradation capacity of the two consortia. PAH-degrading capacity was also confirmed at low temperatures, and especially by consortium BOS08 not previously exposed to those toxic compounds, where strains of Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., Ralstonia sp. and Microbacterium sp. were identified.

  3. Biodegradation of high concentrations of mixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by indigenous bacteria from a river sediment: a microcosm study and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchinda, Chanokporn; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Polrit, Duangporn; Thoetkiattikul, Honglada; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Champreda, Verawat; Pinyakong, Onruthai

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the biodegradation of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by indigenous bacteria in river sediment. Microcosms were constructed from sediment from the Chao Phraya River (the main river in Thailand) by supplementation with high concentrations of fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene (300 mg kg(-1) of each PAH), and acenaphthene (600 mg kg(-1)). Fluorene and phenanthrene were completely degraded, whereas 50% of the pyrene and acenaphthene were removed at the end of the incubation period (70 days). Community analyses revealed the dynamics of the bacterial profiles in the PAH-degrading microcosms after PAH exposure. Actinobacteria predominated and became significantly more abundant in the microcosms after 14 days of incubation at room temperature under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, the remaining PAHs and alpha diversity were positively correlated. The sequencing of clone libraries of the PAH-RHDα genes also revealed that the dioxygenase genes of Mycobacterium sp. comprised 100% of the PAH-RHDα library at the end of the microcosm setup. Moreover, two PAH-degrading Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter sp. and Rhodococcus ruber) were isolated from the original sediment sample and showed high activity in the degradation of phenanthrene and fluorene in liquid cultivation. This study reveals that indigenous bacteria had the ability to degrade high concentrations of mixed PAHs and provide clear evidence that Actinobacteria may be potential candidates to play a major role in PAH degradation in the river sediment.

  4. Biodegradable Sonobuoy Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Standard Specification for Non-Floating Biodegradable Plastics in the Marine Environment. Results showed that no PHA grades were toxic to the marine...accordance with ASTM D6691 “Standard Test Method for Determining Aerobic Biodegradation of Plastics Materials in the Marine Environment by a Defined...the biodegradation of a polymer vs. a stand- alone weight loss test. Biodegradation rates as high as these are rare for plastics in the marine

  5. 土壤多环芳烃污染的植物根际降解研究%Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Rhizosphere Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林爱军; 李晓亮; 王凤花; 谢文娟

    2011-01-01

    人类活动引起的土壤多环芳烃(PAHs)累积已经引起了土壤污染,并已经成为影响人体健康和农业生产的重要环境问题之一.在土壤环境中,植物根际过程是土壤多环芳烃消除的关键环节之一.为此,对土壤中多环芳烃污染的来源和危害进行了叙述,并对土壤多环芳烃污染生物降解的机制和影响因素进行了分析.说明了土壤根际降解在土壤多环芳烃污染修复中的作用和多环芳烃在根际降解中的限制因素,指出提高土壤多环芳烃修复的关键因素之一是提高土壤多环芳烃的生物可利用性,最后对环芳烃在根际降解研究的发展趋势进行了展望.%Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to a variety of anthropogenic activities were one class of toxic environmental pollutants that had accumulated in the soil environment and induced risk to human health and agriculture production. In the bioremediation of soil contaminated by PAHs, rhizosphere process played an important role. In the paper, the status of PAHs in soil and the toxicity induced by the accumulation of PAHs was reviewed. The effects of soil environment on the rhizosphere biodegradation and the mechanism of PAHs degradation were introduced in details and the bioremediation could be enhanced by increased the bioavailability of PAHs in soil. Finally, it was forecasted the trends of PAHs biodegradation in rhizosphere soil.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) biodegradation potential and diversity of microbial consortia enriched from tsunami sediments in Miyagi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, Hernando Pactao; Inoue, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake caused tsunamis and resulted in widespread damage to human life and infrastructure. The disaster also resulted in contamination of the environment by chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study was conducted to investigate the degradation potential and describe the PAH-degrading microbial communities from tsunami sediments in Miyagi, Japan. PAH-degrading bacteria were cultured by enrichment using PAH mixture or pyrene alone as carbon and energy sources. Among the ten consortia tested for PAH mixture, seven completely degraded fluorene and more than 95% of phenanthrene in 10 days, while only four consortia partially degraded pyrene. Six consortia partially degraded pyrene as a single substrate. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) revealed that each sample was dominated by unique microbial populations, regardless of sampling location. The consortia were dominated by known PAHs degraders including Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, and Sphingobium; and previously unknown degraders such as Dokdonella and Luteimonas. A potentially novel and PAH-degrading Dokdonella was detected for the first time. PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHDα) gene was shown to be more effective than nidA in estimating pyrene-degrading bacteria in the enriched consortia. The consortia obtained in this study are potential candidates for remediation of PAHs contaminated soils.

  7. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao; Teng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern. The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bioavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil. When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2, the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%. Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil. This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p PAH-contaminated soil. The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  8. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Sun; Yongming Luo; Peter Christie; Zhongjun Jia; Zhengao Li; Ying Teng

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern.The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bipavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil.When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2,the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%.Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil.This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in the average well color development (AWCD) obtained by the BIOLOG Eco plate assay,Shannon-Weaver index (H) and Simpson index (λ) compared with the controls,implying that this strategy at least partially restored the microbiological functioning of the PAH-contaminated soil.The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  9. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis, E-mail: subhasis.ghoshal@mcgill.ca

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Aeration and moisture addition alone caused extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. • 30-day slurry reactor remediation endpoints attained in 385 days in biopiles. • High nitrogen concentrations inhibited hydrocarbon degradation. • Inhibition of biodegradation linked to lack of shifts in soil microbial community. - Abstract: Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16–C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16–C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day{sup −1} in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day{sup −1} in slurry bioreactors for C16–C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction

  10. Hydrophobic-modified nano-cellulose fiber/PLA biodegradable composites for lowering water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoping; Xiao, Huining; Zhao, Yi

    2014-10-13

    New biodegradable nanocomposites have been successfully prepared by incorporating modified nano-cellulose fibers (NCF) in a biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) matrix in this work. The hydrophobic-modified NCF was obtained by grafting hydrophobic monomers on NCF to improve the compatibility between NCF and PLA during blending. The resulting NCF/PLA composites were then applied on paper surface via a cast-coating process in an attempt to reduce the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of paper. The WVTR tests, conducted under various testing conditions and with different coating weights, demonstrated that the modified NCF/PLA composites coating played a critical role in lowering WVTR of paper. The lowest WVTR value was 34 g/m(2)/d, which was obtained with an addition of 1% of modified NCF to PLA and the composites coating weight at 40 g/m(2) and substantially lower than the control value at 1315 g/m(2)/d. The paper coated with the modified biodegradable composite is promising as green-based packaging materials.

  11. Co-Metabolism Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons With High Relative Molecular Mass%高相对分子质量多环芳烃的生物共代谢降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李政; 顾贵洲; 赵朝成; 赵东风; 杨磊

    2015-01-01

    为了研究高相对分子质量多环芳烃(PAHs)芘的生物共代谢降解,考察了低相对分子质量PAHs芴和菲的加入对芘产生的影响,并采用GC-MS测定了生物降解后代谢产物的组成。结果表明,单一PAHs的生物降解中,芴在培养的第5 d已被完全降解,生成5种代谢产物,菲在第7 d降解率达到98.93%,生成10种代谢产物,芘在第9 d时降解率仅为65.73%,生成较多代谢产物,其中6种可基本定性;3种PAHs混合降解时,芴、菲和芘分别在第3d、5d和8d完全被除去,共产生8种代谢产物,其中芘在第8d时只产生了3种代谢产物。芴和菲的存在不仅促进了芘的完全快速降解,而且能够促进芘代谢产物的去除,芘的存在也促进了芴和菲的降解和代谢产物的去除。%In order to study the co-metabolism biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with high relative molecular mass ,an influence of the addition of fluorene and phenanthrene ,the PAHs with low relative molecular mass ,on pyrene biodegradation was investigated and the composition of the biodegradation metabolites was determined by GC-MS .The results showed that in the biodegradation of single PAHs , fluorene was completely degraded throughout 5 d incubation to generate five metabolites , the degradation rate of phenanthrene reached 98.93% to generate ten metainbolites after 7 d incubation and only 65.73% of pyrene was degraded throughout 9 d incubation to generate more metabolites ,six of w hich could be qualitative . In the degradation of mixture of fluorene ,phenanthrene and pyrene ,they were completely removed after 3 d ,5 d and 8 d incubation ,respectively ,and a total of eight metabolites were produced ,and only three metabolites were produced from pyrene after 8 d incubation .Therefore ,fluorene and phenanthrene not only promoted the degradation of pyrene rapidly and completely , but also promoted the removal of the

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) biodegradation potential and diversity of microbial consortia enriched from tsunami sediments in Miyagi, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacosa, Hernando Pactao, E-mail: hernando.bacosa@utexas.edu [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-20, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Marine Science Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, 750 Channel View Drive, Port Aransas, TX 78373 (United States); Inoue, Chihiro [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-20, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Most bacterial consortia from tsunami sediment degraded PAH mixture and pyrene. • The consortia were dominated by known and unknown PAHs-degrading bacteria. • Dokdonella clone is a potential new species and PAH degrader from tsunami sediment. • PAH-RHDα is better than nidA gene for estimating pyrene-degraders in the consortia. • First report on the PAH degradation and PAH-degrading bacteria from tsunami sediment. - Abstract: The Great East Japan Earthquake caused tsunamis and resulted in widespread damage to human life and infrastructure. The disaster also resulted in contamination of the environment by chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study was conducted to investigate the degradation potential and describe the PAH-degrading microbial communities from tsunami sediments in Miyagi, Japan. PAH-degrading bacteria were cultured by enrichment using PAH mixture or pyrene alone as carbon and energy sources. Among the ten consortia tested for PAH mixture, seven completely degraded fluorene and more than 95% of phenanthrene in 10 days, while only four consortia partially degraded pyrene. Six consortia partially degraded pyrene as a single substrate. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) revealed that each sample was dominated by unique microbial populations, regardless of sampling location. The consortia were dominated by known PAHs degraders including Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, and Sphingobium; and previously unknown degraders such as Dokdonella and Luteimonas. A potentially novel and PAH-degrading Dokdonella was detected for the first time. PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHDα) gene was shown to be more effective than nidA in estimating pyrene-degrading bacteria in the enriched consortia. The consortia obtained in this study are potential candidates for remediation of PAHs contaminated soils.

  13. Alteromonas as a key agent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in crude oil-contaminated coastal sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Lee, Hyo Jung; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-07-17

    Following the 2007 oil spill in South Korean tidal flats, we sought to identify microbial players influencing the environmental fate of released polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two years of monitoring showed that PAH concentrations in sediments declined substantially. Enrichment cultures were established using seawater and modified minimal media containing naphthalene as sole carbon source. The enriched microbial community was characterized by 16S rRNA-based DGGE profiling; sequencing selected bands indicated Alteromonas (among others) were active. Alteromonas sp. SN2 was isolated and was able to degrade naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene in laboratory-incubated microcosm assays. PCR-based analysis of DNA extracted from the sediments revealed naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) genes of only two bacterial groups: Alteromonas and Cycloclasticus, having gentisate and catechol metabolic pathways, respectively. However, reverse transcriptase PCR-based analysis of field-fixed mRNA revealed in situ expression of only the Alteromonas-associated NDO genes; in laboratory microcosms these NDO genes were markedly induced by naphthalene addition. Analysis by GC/MS showed that naphthalene in tidal-flat samples was metabolized predominantly via the gentisate pathway; this signature metabolite was detected (0.04 μM) in contaminated field sediment. A quantitative PCR-based two-year data set monitoring Alteromonas-specific 16S rRNA genes and NDO transcripts in sea-tidal flat field samples showed that the abundance of bacteria related to strain SN2 during the winter season was 20-fold higher than in the summer season. Based on the above data, we conclude that strain SN2 and its relatives are site natives--key players in PAH degradation and adapted to winter conditions in these contaminated sea-tidal-flat sediments.

  14. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: catabolic genes, microbial communities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Méndez, Valentina; Aguila, Patricia; Seeger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Bioremediation is an environmental sustainable and cost-effective technology for the cleanup of hydrocarbon-polluted soils and coasts. In spite of that longer times are usually required compared with physicochemical strategies, complete degradation of the pollutant can be achieved, and no further confinement of polluted matrix is needed. Microbial aerobic degradation is achieved by the incorporation of molecular oxygen into the inert hydrocarbon molecule and funneling intermediates into central catabolic pathways. Several families of alkane monooxygenases and ring hydroxylating dioxygenases are distributed mainly among Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi strains. Catabolic routes, regulatory networks, and tolerance/resistance mechanisms have been characterized in model hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to understand and optimize their metabolic capabilities, providing the basis to enhance microbial fitness in order to improve hydrocarbon removal. However, microbial communities taken as a whole play a key role in hydrocarbon pollution events. Microbial community dynamics during biodegradation is crucial for understanding how they respond and adapt to pollution and remediation. Several strategies have been applied worldwide for the recovery of sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. Common strategies include controlling environmental variables (e.g., oxygen availability, hydrocarbon solubility, nutrient balance) and managing hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, in order to overcome the rate-limiting factors that slow down hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  15. Review on the Biodegradation and Conversion Mechanisms of Typical Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons%典型多环芳烃生物降解及转化机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岩; 杨颖; 张贤明

    2014-01-01

    多环芳烃(PAHs)作为重要的难降解环境污染物,因其突出的危害性,对其进行生物降解已受到越来越多的关注。针对不同相对分子质量的典型PAHs ,概述了细菌、真菌、藻类等PAHs生物降解菌种的研究进展;以萘、蒽、菲和苯并[a]芘4种常见环境污染物为模型化合物,论述了 PAHs的生物转化机制;从PAHs的生物可利用性、微生物的活性,以及环境因子方面,分析了PAHs生物降解过程中的关键影响因素。鉴于环境中 PAHs具有组分多样性的特点,指出构建高效菌群,进行多菌种联合降解将成为开展 PA H s生物降解的重要方法,既具有很强的针对性又可提高现有资源的利用率,可以有效地避免当前以菌种开发为主要研究方向的偶然性和随机性。%Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) ,a class of crucially persistent pollutants with two or more fused benzene rings , have attracted growing concern due to their carcinogenic , teratogenic and mutagenic effects . The biodegradation progress of typical PAHs with different molecular masses by microorganisms including bacteria , fungi and algae isolated from contaminated soil or sediments is reviewed . The biotransformation mechanisms , key enzymes and metabolic pathways of four representative pollutants of naphthalene ,anthracene ,phenanthrene and benzo[a] pyrene were discussed . Still , the crucial impacting factors , such as bioavailability of PAHs , microbial activity and environmental factors , to increase biodegradation rate are introduced . Finally ,it is advanced that studies on a high‐effective microbial consortium and synergetic degradation will be considered as the important means aiming at the diversity of PAHs in the environment , w hich can effectively avoid the contingency and randomness in the development of PA H‐degrading microbes as main direction , and is niche targeting and effective to improve the utilization of

  16. Enhanced kinetics of solid-phase microextraction and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of dissolved organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.; Ortega-Calvo, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The uptake kinetics of fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[e]pyrene by solid-phase microextraction fibers was studied in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from sediment pore water and resulted in increased fiber absorption and desorption rate coefficients. C

  17. PEROMBAKAN SENYAWA HIDROKARBON AROMATIS POLISIKLIK (NAFTALEN PADA KADAR TINGGI OLEH Pseudomonas NY-I (Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (Naphthalene at High Concentration by Pseudomonas NY-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanisworo Wijayaratih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Naftalen merupakan salah satu senyawa hidrokarbon aromatis polisiklik (HAP yang banyak dijumpai dalam minyak bumi, batu bara dan hasil alam lainnya. Meskipun bukan senyawa xenobiotik, naftalen dapat menjadi persoalan yang serius karena penggunaannya yang luas dan penanganan yang tidak hati-hati. Naftalen diketahui bersifat mutagenik. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mendapatkan isolat bakteri yang dapat merombak naftalen dan mempelajari kemampuannya merombak naftalen kadar tinggi dalam medium mineral (MM cair. Tanah yang tercemari minyak bumi dan sumber isolat diperoleh dari unit pengolah minyak Pertamina, Cilacap. Isolat dipreroleh melalui kultur diperkaya menggunakan naftalen. Jumlah naftalen yang ditambahkan ke dalam MM cair sebesar 907, 1362 dan 1813 ppm. Inkubasi dilakukan selama 28 hari dalam keadaan gelap. Parameter yang diamati meliputi: jumlah sel hidup dengan metode drop plate dan kadar naftalen sisa dengan menggunakan GC. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa isolat bakteri yang dipilih, teridentifikasi sebagai Pseudomonas NY-l. Dalam MM cair, naftalen pada semua konsentrasi terombak pada kecepatan yang mirip. Jumlah naftalen yang terombak adalah 777,3 ppm, 728,6 ppm dan 837,2 ppm dari konsentrasi awal berturut-turut sebesar 907, 1362, dan 1813 ppm.   ABSTRACT Naphthalene is one of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs, found in petroleum, coal and other natural products. although, it is nonxenobiotic, it could cause a serious problem when improperly used and handled. It is considered as a mutagenic compound. This study is primarily concerned with the isolation of bacteria that could utilize naphthalene and the investigation of its biodegradation ability of naphthalene in high concentration in liquid mineral media (MM. The contaminated soil and isolates were obtained from oil treatment unit, Pertamina, Cilacap. Bacterial isolation was conducted through enriched culture. Naphthalene was added to the liquid MM at the

  18. Tenax extraction for exploring rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs under denitrifying conditions in a red paddy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mingming, E-mail: sunmingming@njau.edu.cn [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Key Laboratory of Soil Environmental and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ye, Mao [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Hu, Feng, E-mail: fenghu@njau.edu.cn [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Li, Huixin [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Teng, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Luo, Yongming [Yantai Institute of Costal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Jiang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Kengara, Fredrick Orori [Department of Chemistry, Maseno University, Private Bag, Maseno 40105 (Kenya)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Enhanced anaerobic bioremediation of a red paddy soil polluted with PAHs. • 1% (w/w) methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and 20 mM nitrate addition acted as solubility-enhancing agent and electron acceptor respectively. • Tenax extraction and a first-three-compartment modeling were applicable to explore the rate-limiting factors in the biodegradation. • Lack of PAH-degraders hindered biodegradation in control and MCD addition treatments. • Inadequate bioaccessible PAHs was vital rate-limiting factor in nitrate addition treatments. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of anaerobic bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminants bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility and lack of suitable electron acceptors. Information on what is the rate-limiting factor in bioremediation process is of vital importance in the decision in what measures can be taken to assist the biodegradation efficacy. In the present study, four different microcosms were set to study the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and nitrate addition (N) on PAHs biodegradation under anaerobic conditions in a red paddy soil. Meanwhile, sequential Tenax extraction combined with a first-three-compartment model was employed to evaluate the rate-limiting factors in MCD enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs. Microcosms with both 1% (w/w) MCD and 20 mM N addition produced maximum biodegradation of total PAHs of up to 61.7%. It appears rate-limiting factors vary with microcosms: low activity of degrading microorganisms is the vital rate-limiting factor for control and MCD addition treatments (CK and M treatments); and lack of bioaccessible PAHs is the main rate-limiting factor for nitrate addition treatments (N and MN treatments). These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  19. BIODEGRADATION OF A PAH MIXTURE BY NATIVE SUBSURFACE MICROBIOTA. (R828770C004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory microcosm studies were conducted to estimate biodegradation rates for a mixture of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). Static microcosms were assembled using soil samples from two locations collected at a No. 2 fuel oil-contaminated site in the At...

  20. BIODEGRADATION OF A PAH MIXTURE BY NATIVE SUBSURFACE MICROBIOTA. (R828770)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory microcosm studies were conducted to estimate biodegradation rates for a mixture of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). Static microcosms were assembled using soil samples from two locations collected at a No. 2 fuel oil-contaminated site in the At...

  1. Characterization of arene di-oxygenases involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1; Caracterisation d'arene dioxygenases impliquees dans la biodegradation des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques chez Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuony, S.

    2005-06-15

    This thesis deals with the bacterial biodegradation of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The bacterium Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 was isolated from a polluted soil for its ability to use pyrene, a 4-ring PAH, as sole source of carbon and energy. To learn about the pyrene metabolic pathway, the identification of the enzymes involved in this process has been undertaken using a proteomic approach. This approach revealed the occurrence of two ring-hydroxylating di-oxygenases in strain 6PY1, which could catalyze the initial attack of pyrene. The goal of this study was to clone the genes encoding the di-oxygenases identified in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1, over-express these genes in an heterologous system in order to facilitate the purification of the corresponding enzymes, and determine the biochemical and catalytic properties of these enzymes. The pdoA1B1 genes encoding the terminal component of a di-oxygenase were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The catalytic properties of this enzyme, called Pdo1, were determined in vivo by measuring the oxidation products of 2- to 4-ring PAHs by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Analysis of the selectivity of the enzyme, as determined using GC-MS, showed that Pdo1 preferentially oxidized 3- or 4-ring PAHs, including phenanthrene and pyrene, but was inactive on di-aromatic compounds such as naphthalene and biphenyl. Pdo1 was unstable and was therefore purified in inactive form. The genes encoding a second di-oxygenase component were found in a locus containing two other catabolic genes. The pdoA2B2 genes encoded an enzyme called Pdo2 showing a narrow specificity towards 2- to 3-ring PAHs, and a high preference for phenanthrene. Pdo2 is an a3{beta}3 hexamer, containing [2Fe-2S] Rieske clusters which confer it a characteristic absorbance spectrum. A third set of genes possibly encoding another di-oxygenase was discovered in the genome of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1. This set is closely

  2. Urban rivers as conveyors of hydrocarbons to sediments of estuarine areas: source characterization, flow rates and mass accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauad, Cristiane R; Wagener, Angela de L R; Massone, Carlos G; Aniceto, Mayara da S; Lazzari, Letícia; Carreira, Renato S; Farias, Cássia de O

    2015-02-15

    Aliphatic (n-C12-n-C40, unresolved complex mixture, resolved peaks) and aromatic hydrocarbons (46 PAH) were investigated in suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled over eleven months in six of the major rivers and two channels of the Guanabara Bay Basin. PAH flow rates of the most contaminated rivers, the contribution to the PAH sediment load of the receiving bay, and the main sources of hydrocarbons were determined. PAH (38) ranged from 28 ng L(-1) to 11,514 ng L(-1). Hydrocarbon typology and statistical evaluation demonstrated contribution of distinct sources in different regions and allowed quantification of these contributions. Total flow rate for the five major rivers amounts to 3 t year(-1) and responds for 30% of the total PAH annual input into the northern area of the Guanabara Bay. For the first time PAH mass deposited in the bay sediments has been estimated and shall serve as base for decision making and source abatement.

  3. Determination of the hydrocarbon-degrading metabolic capabilities of tropical bacterial isolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez-Rocha, F.J.; Olmos-Soto, J. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, San Diego, CA (United States). Departamento de Biotecnologia Marina; Rosano-Hernandez, M.A.; Muriel-Garcia, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, CD Carmen Camp (Mexico). Zona Marina/Tecnologia Ambiental

    2005-01-01

    Of more than 20 bacteria isolated from a tropical soil using minimal medium supplemented with hydrocarbons, 11 grew well on diesel as sole carbon source, and another 11 grew in the presence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ten isolates were identified phenotypically as Pseudomonas sp. and eight as Bacillus sp. Gene sequences representing the catabolic genes (alkM, todM, ndoM, and xylM) and 16S rRNA gene sequences characteristic for Pseudomona and Bacillus were amplified by PCR, using DNA recovered from the supernatant of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil suspensions. Based on their rapid growth characteristics in the presence of hydrocarbons and the formation of PCR products for the catabolic genes alkM and ndoM six isolates were selected for biodegradation assays. After 30 days a mixed culture of two isolates achieved close to 70% hydrocarbon removal and apparent mineralization of 16% of the hydrocarbons present in the soil. Biodegradation rates varied from 275 to 387 mg hydrocarbon kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Several bacterial isolates obtained in this study have catabolic capabilities for the biodegradation of alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons including PAHs. (author)

  4. Impact of amino acid on biodegradability of lubricating oil and simulation of biodegradation rate equation%含氨基酸的润滑油生物降解性及降解速率方程模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波水; 黄伟九; 方建华; 孙霞; 王九; 余瑛

    2009-01-01

    Small amount of lauroyl glycine was incorporated into HVI 350 mineral oil and the biodegradabilities of HVI 350 mineral oil and the formulated oil in soils were evaluated. Thereafter, the biodegradation kinetics of the two lubricating oils was regressed based on the exponential rate model. The results indicated that lauroyl glycine obviously promoted biodegradation of HVI 350 min-eral oil. Under given test conditions, the biodegradation rate equation for HVI 350 mineral oil could be described as S_t = 50.4e~(-0.0155t), while that for lauroyl glycine formulated oil as S_t= 51.6e~(-0.0224t). The biodegradation half-lives of HVI 350 min-eral oil and the formulated oil were 44.72 days and 30.94 days, respectively.%在HVI 350矿物润滑油中加入少量月桂酰基甘氨酸,对比研究了加入月桂酰基甘氨酸前后矿物润滑油在土壤中的生物降解特性,并采用指数速率模型对润滑油生物降解动力学进行了模拟.结果表明,月桂酰基甘氨酸可促进HVI 350矿物润滑油生物降解,试验条件下HVI 350矿物润滑油生物降解速率方程为S_t=50.4e~(-0.0155t),半衰期为44.72 d;含月桂酰基甘氨酸的HVI 350矿物润滑油生物降解速率方程为S_t=51.6e~(-0.0224t),半衰期为30.94d.

  5. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, F S; Jacqueline DESTAIN; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, P.; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegrada...

  6. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, F. S.; Destain, Jacqueline; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, P.; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegrada...

  7. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1

    OpenAIRE

    Semboung Lang, Firmin; Destain, Jacqueline; Delvigne, Frank; Druart, Philippe; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons.With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biolo...

  8. Hydrocarbon Observations and Ozone Production Rates in Western Houston During the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Spicer, Chet W.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of total non-methane hydrocarbon in whole air canisters collected from the top of a skyscraper on the western edge of Houston, Texas are summarized with an emphasis on samples collected during the passage of plumes of O{sub 3} and the associated rapid increase in the mixing ratio of this species. The back-trajectories associated with these events showed a pronounced deceleration of air parcels over central and western Houston and were not necessarily associated with direct passage over the petrochemical plants located in the heavily industrialized eastern part of Houston. As a result of the time these air parcels spent over the central and western parts of Houston, their VOC mix and associated chemical production rates were expected to differ from similar observations made over eastern Houston from aircraft sampling at low altitudes. Although periods of high O{sub 3} in the western part of the city were closely associated with light alkenes, these same observations show isoprene to make a significant contribution to the total VOC reactivity in the early afternoon (the start of peak photochemical activity) in contrast to observations made east of our sampling site that found the reactivity to be dominated by anthropogenic species. By initializing a 0-dimensional chemical kinetic model with observations made at the Williams Tower, we find that the ozone production efficiency scaled linearly to the ratio of total hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}, with an average OPE of 7.2, ranging from 2.3 to 16.9; these values are smaller than those reported in eastern Houston, suggesting a strong gradient in photochemical productivity across the city.

  9. A Field Scale Investigation of Enhanced Petroleum Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in the Vadose Zone Combining Soil Venting as an Oxygen Source with Moisture and Nutrient Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons has been extensively studied and well documented in the literature. A review of one computer database...Report AMXTH-TE-TR- 85026. U. S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. Edgewood, MD. Atlas, R. M. 1981. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons : An

  10. Tenax extraction for exploring rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs under denitrifying conditions in a red paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Jiang, Xin; Kengara, Fredrick Orori

    2014-01-15

    The effectiveness of anaerobic bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminants bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility and lack of suitable electron acceptors. Information on what is the rate-limiting factor in bioremediation process is of vital importance in the decision in what measures can be taken to assist the biodegradation efficacy. In the present study, four different microcosms were set to study the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and nitrate addition (N) on PAHs biodegradation under anaerobic conditions in a red paddy soil. Meanwhile, sequential Tenax extraction combined with a first-three-compartment model was employed to evaluate the rate-limiting factors in MCD enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs. Microcosms with both 1% (w/w) MCD and 20mM N addition produced maximum biodegradation of total PAHs of up to 61.7%. It appears rate-limiting factors vary with microcosms: low activity of degrading microorganisms is the vital rate-limiting factor for control and MCD addition treatments (CK and M treatments); and lack of bioaccessible PAHs is the main rate-limiting factor for nitrate addition treatments (N and MN treatments). These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  11. Atmospheric emissions from the Deepwater Horizon spill constrain air-water partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Aikin, K. C.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.-S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Lueb, R. A.; Meinardi, S.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Stark, H.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.

    2011-04-01

    The fate of deepwater releases of gas and oil mixtures is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual hydrocarbon species; these attributes determine partitioning between air and water. Quantifying this partitioning is necessary to constrain simulations of gas and oil transport, to predict marine bioavailability of different fractions of the gas-oil mixture, and to develop a comprehensive picture of the fate of leaked hydrocarbons in the marine environment. Analysis of airborne atmospheric data shows massive amounts (˜258,000 kg/day) of hydrocarbons evaporating promptly from the Deepwater Horizon spill; these data collected during two research flights constrain air-water partitioning, thus bioavailability and fate, of the leaked fluid. This analysis quantifies the fraction of surfacing hydrocarbons that dissolves in the water column (˜33% by mass), the fraction that does not dissolve, and the fraction that evaporates promptly after surfacing (˜14% by mass). We do not quantify the leaked fraction lacking a surface expression; therefore, calculation of atmospheric mass fluxes provides a lower limit to the total hydrocarbon leak rate of 32,600 to 47,700 barrels of fluid per day, depending on reservoir fluid composition information. This study demonstrates a new approach for rapid-response airborne assessment of future oil spills.

  12. Simultaneous treatment of raw palm oil mill effluent and biodegradation of palm fiber in a high-rate CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemkhao, Maneerat; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

    2015-02-01

    A high-rate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used to produce biogas from raw palm oil mill effluent (POME) at 55°C at a highest organic loading rate (OLR) of 19 g COD/ld. Physical and chemical pretreatments were not performed on the raw POME. In order to promote retention of suspended solids, the CSTR was installed with a deflector at its upper section. The average methane yield was 0.27 l/g COD, and the biogas production rate per reactor volume was 6.23 l/l d, and the tCOD removal efficiency was 82%. The hydrolysis rate of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin was 6.7, 3.0 and 1.9 g/d, respectively. The results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) suggested that the dominant hydrolytic bacteria responsible for the biodegradation of the palm fiber and residual oil were Clostridium sp., while the dominant methanogens were Methanothermobacter sp.

  13. Depletion and biodegradation of hydrocarbons in dispersions and emulsions of the Macondo 252 oil generated in an oil-on-seawater mesocosm flume basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakstad, Odd G; Daling, Per S; Faksness, Liv-G; Almås, Inger K; Vang, Siv-H; Syslak, Line; Leirvik, Frode

    2014-07-15

    Physically and chemically (Corexit 9500) generated Macondo 252 oil dispersions, or emulsions (no Corexit), were prepared in an oil-on-seawater mesocosm flume basin at 30-32 °C, and studies of oil compound depletion performed for up to 15 days. The use of Corexit 9500 resulted in smaller median droplet size than in a physically generated dispersion. Rapid evaporation of low boiling point oil compounds (C⩽15) appeared in all the experiments. Biodegradation appeared to be an important depletion process for compounds with higher boiling points in the dispersions, but was negligible in the surface emulsions. While n-alkane biodegradation was faster in chemically than in physically dispersed oil no such differences were determined for 3- and 4-ring PAH compounds. In the oil dispersions prepared by Corexit 9500, increased cell concentrations, reduction in bacterial diversity, and a temporary abundance of bacteria containing an alkB gene were associated with oil biodegradation.

  14. The influence of droplet size and biodegradation on the transport of subsurface oil droplets during the Deepwater Horizon spill: a model sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Elizabeth W.; Adams, E. Eric; Thessen, Anne E.; Schlag, Zachary; He, Ruoying; Socolofsky, Scott A.; Masutani, Stephen M.; Peckham, Scott D.

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of oil droplet formation, degradation, and dispersal in deep waters is needed to enhance prediction of the fate and transport of subsurface oil spills. This research evaluates the influence of initial droplet size and rates of biodegradation on the subsurface transport of oil droplets, specifically those from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. A three-dimensional coupled model was employed with components that included analytical multiphase plume, hydrodynamic and Lagrangian models. Oil droplet biodegradation was simulated based on first order decay rates of alkanes. The initial diameter of droplets (10-300 μm) spanned a range of sizes expected from dispersant-treated oil. Results indicate that model predictions are sensitive to biodegradation processes, with depth distributions deepening by hundreds of meters, horizontal distributions decreasing by hundreds to thousands of kilometers, and mass decreasing by 92-99% when biodegradation is applied compared to simulations without biodegradation. In addition, there are two- to four-fold changes in the area of the seafloor contacted by oil droplets among scenarios with different biodegradation rates. The spatial distributions of hydrocarbons predicted by the model with biodegradation are similar to those observed in the sediment and water column, although the model predicts hydrocarbons to the northeast and east of the well where no observations were made. This study indicates that improvement in knowledge of droplet sizes and biodegradation processes is important for accurate prediction of subsurface oil spills.

  15. Taguchi Method for Development of Mass Flow Rate Correlation using Hydrocarbon Refrigerant Mixture in Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The capillary tube is an important control device used in small vapor compression refrigeration systems such as window air-conditioners, household refrigerators and freezers. This paper develops a non-dimensional correlation based on the test results of the adiabatic capillary tube for the mass flow rate through the tube using a hydrocarbon refrigerant mixture of 89.3% propane and 10.7% butane (HCM. The Taguchi method, a statistical experimental design approach, was employed. This approach explores the economic benefit that lies in studies of this nature, where only a small number of experiments are required and yet valid results are obtained. Considering the effects of the capillary tube geometry and the inlet condition of the tube, dimensionless parameters were chosen. The new correlation was also based on the Buckingham Pi theorem. This correlation predicts 86.67% of the present experimental data within a relative deviation of -10% to +10%. The predictions by this correlation were also compared with results in published literature.

  16. Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Plasma Cytokines, and Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Binyao; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Wangzhen; Feng, Yingying; Dai, Xiayun; Feng, Wei; He, Xiaosheng; Huang, Suli; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xiaohai; Lin, Dafeng; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Sun, Huizhen; Yuan, Jing; Lu, Jiachun; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-01-13

    Epidemiological studies have suggested associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heart rate variability (HRV). However, the roles of plasma cytokines in these associations are limited. In discovery stage of this study, we used Human Cytokine Antibody Arrays to examine differences in the concentrations of 280 plasma cytokines between 8 coke-oven workers and 16 community residents. We identified 19 cytokines with significant different expression (fold change ≥2 or ≤-2, and q-value cytokines were selected to validate in 489 coke-oven workers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in validation stage. We found OH-PAHs were inversely associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p 16% BDNF decreases. Additionally, OH-PAHs were positively associated with activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p 20% increases in CRP. We also found significant associations between these cytokines and HRV (p 8% decreases in HRV. Our results indicated PAH exposure was associated with plasma cytokines, and higher cytokines were associated with decreased HRV, but additional human and potential mechanistic studies are needed.

  17. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by an acidophilic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain AJH1 isolated from a mineral mining site in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulazhagan, P; Al-Shekri, K; Huda, Q; Godon, J J; Basahi, J M; Jeyakumar, D

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at acidic conditions (pH = 2) by acidophilic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain AJH1 (KU664513). The strain AJH1 was obtained from an enrichment culture obtained from soil samples of mining area in the presence of PAH as sole sources of carbon and energy. Strain AJH1was able to degrade low (anthracene, phenanthrene, naphthalene, fluorene) and high (pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene and benzo(k)fluoranthene) molecular weight PAHs in acidophilic mineral salt medium at pH 2, with removal rates of up to 95% (LMW PAH) and 80% (HMW PAH), respectively. In addition, strain AJH1 treated petroleum wastewater with 89 ± 1.1% COD removal under acidic condition (pH 2) in a continuously stirred reactor. Acidophilic S. maltophilia strain AJH1, hence holds the promise as an effective degrader for biological treatment of PAHs contaminated wastewater at acidic pH.

  18. BIODEGRADASI RESIDU TOTAL PETROLEUM HIDROKARBON DI BAWAH KONSENTRASI 1% (W/W HASIL PROSES BIOREMEDIASI (Biodegradation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons Residues below 1% Concentration (W/W Using Bioremediation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    bawah 1%, dengan efisiensi sebesar 87,4% dalam jangka waktu satu bulan. ABSTRACT The mining sector of oil and gas are likely to generate waste wbich is perceived as a source of environmental pollution. According to “Keputusan Menteri Lingkungan Hidup No. 128/2003” (Environmental Ministry Decree, the process of bioremediation is an alternative technology to minimize and recover land which polluted by microorganism activities until the final requirements of petroleum waste concentration is less than 1%. Indigenous microorganisms elected on small substrate concentrations are expected to get the smallest saturation value of the substrate so the highest affinity level can be obtained. The purpose of the research sought and identified petrofilic microorganisms isolated by bioremediation process resulted of 1% Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons concentration, determined the value of biodegradation kinetic parameters, and applied the microorganisms selected on bioremediation process of landfarming. The isolation and identification of indigenous bacteria process produced Pseudomonas putida AK.A and Pseudomonas diminuta AK.B. Determination of biodegradation kinetics was performed on each isolate and mixed culture. The value of specific growth rate (μ, maximum specific growth rate (μmax, the concentration of half saturation (KS, the synthesis of cell production coefficient (Y, specific substrate utilization rate (q, maximum specific substrate utilization rate (qmax, and endogenous decay coefficient (kd for P. putida AK.A are 0.0679-0.0788/hour; 0.078/hour; 0.0152%; 0.1011; 0.6716-0.7794/hour; 0.76/hour; 0.0085/hour; P. diminuta AK.B are 0.0754-0.0874/hour; 0.0873/hour; 0.0182%; 0.1246; 0.7458-0.8645/hour; 0.701/hour; 0.0058/hour; meanwhile for mix culture are 0.0825-0.0948/hour; 0.0945/hour; 0.016%; 0.2257; 0.8160-0.9377/hour; 0.419/hour; 0.0035/hour. The mixed culture bacteria was used on landfarming reactor. Based on the results, isolates of Pseudomonas bacteria in mixed

  19. Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degradation Potential of Soil Bacteria Native to the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-Yu; GAO Dong-Mei; LI Feng-Min; ZHAO Jian; XIN Yuan-Zheng; S.SIMKINS; XING Bao-Shan

    2008-01-01

    The bioremediation potential of bacteria indigenous to soils of the Yellow River Delta in China was evaluated as a treatment option for soil remediation. Petroleum hydrocarbon degraders were isolated from contaminated soil samples from the Yellow River Delta. Four microbial communities and eight isolates were obtained. The optimal temperature, salinity, pH, and the ratios of C, N, and P (C:N:P) for the maximum biodegradation of diesel oil, crude oil, n-alkanes, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons by ndigenous bacteria were determined, and the kinetics changes in microbial communities were monitored. In general, the mixed microbial consortia demonstrated wider catabolic versatility and faster overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation than individual isolates. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon by indigenous bacteria for oil remediation in the Yellow River Delta.

  20. Effect of Pore Size on the Biodegradation Rate of Silk Fibroin Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuwei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the degradation rate of silk fibroin-based biomaterial is an important capability for the fabrication of silk-based tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, scaffolds with different pore sizes were prepared by controlling the freezing temperature and the silk fibroin concentration. In vitro degradation results showed that the internal pore walls of the scaffolds with a larger pore size collapsed upon exposure to collagenase IA for times ranging from 6 to 12 days, and the silk scaffolds exhibited a faster rate of weight loss. The morphological and structural features of the silk scaffolds with a smaller pore size maintained structural integrity after incubation in the protease solution for 18 days, and the rate of weight loss was relatively slow. Scaffolds with a smaller pore size or a higher pore density degraded more slowly than scaffolds with a larger pore size or lower pore density. These results demonstrate that the pore size of silk biomaterials is crucial in controlling the degradation rate of tissue engineering scaffolds.

  1. [Bioremediation of oil-polluted soils: using the [13C]/[12C] ratio to characterize microbial products of oil hydrocarbon biodegradation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziakun, A M; Brodskiĭ, E S; Baskunov, B P; Zakharchenko, V N; Peshenko, V P; Filonov, A E; Vetrova, A A; Ivanova, A A; Boronin, A M

    2014-01-01

    We compared data on the extent of bioremediation in soils polluted with oil. The data were obtained using conventional methods of hydrocarbon determination: extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, extraction IR spectroscopy, and extraction gravimetry. Due to differences in the relative abundances of the stable carbon isotopes (13C/12C) in oil and in soil organic matter, these ratios could be used as natural isotopic labels of either substance. Extraction gravimetry in combination with characteristics of the carbon isotope composition of organic products in the soil before and after bioremediation was shown to be the most informative approach to an evaluation of soil bioremediation. At present, it is the only method enabling quantification of the total petroleum hydrocarbons in oil-polluted soil, as well as of the amounts of hydrocarbons remaining after bioremediation and those microbially transformed into organic products and biomass.

  2. Naphthalene biodegradation in temperate and arctic marine microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, Andrea; Pampanin, Daniela M; Lanzén, Anders; Bilstad, Torleiv; Kommedal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Naphthalene, the smallest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is found in abundance in crude oil, its major source in marine environments. PAH removal occurs via biodegradation, a key process determining their fate in the sea. Adequate estimation of PAH biodegradation rates is essential for environmental risk assessment and response planning using numerical models such as the oil spill contingency and response (OSCAR) model. Using naphthalene as a model compound, biodegradation rate, temperature response and bacterial community composition of seawaters from two climatically different areas (North Sea and Arctic Ocean) were studied and compared. Naphthalene degradation was followed by measuring oxygen consumption in closed bottles using the OxiTop(®) system. Microbial communities of untreated and naphthalene exposed samples were analysed by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and pyrosequencing. Three times higher naphthalene degradation rate coefficients were observed in arctic seawater samples compared to temperate, at all incubation temperatures. Rate coefficients at in situ temperatures were however, similar (0.048 day(-1) for temperate and 0.068 day(-1) for arctic). Naphthalene biodegradation rates decreased with similar Q10 ratios (3.3 and 3.5) in both seawaters. Using the temperature compensation method implemented in the OSCAR model, Q10 = 2, biodegradation in arctic seawater was underestimated when calculated from the measured temperate k1 value, showing that temperature difference alone could not predict biodegradation rates adequately. Temperate and arctic untreated seawater communities were different as revealed by pyrosequencing. Geographic origin of seawater affected the community composition of exposed samples.

  3. Biodegradation of Used Motor Oil in Soil Using Organic Waste Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abioye, O. P.; Agamuthu, P.; Abdul Aziz, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Soil and surface water contamination by used lubricating oil is a common occurrence in most developing countries. This has been shown to have harmful effects on the environment and human beings at large. Bioremediation can be an alternative green technology for remediation of such hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. Bioremediation of soil contaminated with 5% and 15% (w/w) used lubricating oil and amended with 10% brewery spent grain (BSG), banana skin (BS), and spent mushroom compost (SMC) was studied for a period of 84 days, under laboratory condition. At the end of 84 days, the highest percentage of oil biodegradation (92%) was recorded in soil contaminated with 5% used lubricating oil and amended with BSG, while only 55% of oil biodegradation was recorded in soil contaminated with 15% used lubricating oil and amended with BSG. Results of first-order kinetic model to determine the rate of biodegradation of used lubricating oil revealed that soil amended with BSG recorded the highest rate of oil biodegradation (0.4361 day−1) in 5% oil pollution, while BS amended soil recorded the highest rate of oil biodegradation (0.0556 day−1) in 15% oil pollution. The results of this study demonstrated the potential of BSG as a good substrate for enhanced remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil at low pollution concentration. PMID:22919502

  4. Biodegradation of Used Motor Oil in Soil Using Organic Waste Amendments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Abioye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil and surface water contamination by used lubricating oil is a common occurrence in most developing countries. This has been shown to have harmful effects on the environment and human beings at large. Bioremediation can be an alternative green technology for remediation of such hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. Bioremediation of soil contaminated with 5% and 15% (w/w used lubricating oil and amended with 10% brewery spent grain (BSG, banana skin (BS, and spent mushroom compost (SMC was studied for a period of 84 days, under laboratory condition. At the end of 84 days, the highest percentage of oil biodegradation (92% was recorded in soil contaminated with 5% used lubricating oil and amended with BSG, while only 55% of oil biodegradation was recorded in soil contaminated with 15% used lubricating oil and amended with BSG. Results of first-order kinetic model to determine the rate of biodegradation of used lubricating oil revealed that soil amended with BSG recorded the highest rate of oil biodegradation (0.4361 day−1 in 5% oil pollution, while BS amended soil recorded the highest rate of oil biodegradation (0.0556 day−1 in 15% oil pollution. The results of this study demonstrated the potential of BSG as a good substrate for enhanced remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil at low pollution concentration.

  5. Biodegradation of Spilled Diesel Fuel in Agricultural Soil: Effect of Humates, Zeolite, and Bioaugmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kuráň

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible enhancement of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in agricultural soil after tank truck accident (~5000 mg/kg dry soil initial concentration by bioaugmentation of diesel degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens strain and addition of abiotic additives (humates, zeolite was studied in a 9-month pot experiment. The biodegradation process was followed by means of analytical parameters (hydrocarbon index expressed as content of C10–C40 aliphatic hydrocarbons, ratio pristane/C17, and total organic carbon content and characterization of soil microbial community (content of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA as an indicator of living microbial biomass, respiration, and dehydrogenase activity. The concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons (C10–C40 was successfully reduced by ~60% in all 15 experiment variants. The bioaugmentation resulted in faster hydrocarbon elimination. On the contrary, the addition of humates and zeolite caused only a negligible increase in the degradation rate. These factors, however, affected significantly the amount of PLFA. The humates caused significantly faster increase of the total PLFA suggesting improvement of the soil microenvironment. Zeolite caused significantly slower increase of the total PLFA; nevertheless it aided in homogenization of the soil. Comparison of microbial activities and total PLFA revealed that only a small fraction of autochthonous microbes took part in the biodegradation which confirms that bioaugmentation was the most important treatment.

  6. Biodegradation of oil refinery wastes under OPA and CERCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamblin, W.W.; Banipal, B.S.; Myers, J.M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Land treatment of oil refinery wastes has been used as a disposal method for decades. More recently, numerous laboratory studies have been performed attempting to quantify degradation rates of more toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This paper discusses the results of the fullscale aerobic biodegradation operations using land treatment at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil refining facility. The tiered feasibility approach of evaluating biodegradation as a treatment method to achieve site-specific cleanup criteria, including pilot biodegradation operations, is discussed in an earlier paper. Analytical results of biodegradation indicate that degradation rates observed in the laboratory can be met and exceeded under field conditions and that site-specific cleanup criteria can be attained within a proposed project time. Also prevented are degradation rates and half-lives for PAHs for which cleanup criteria have been established. PAH degradation rates and half-life values are determined and compared with the laboratory degradation rates and half-life values which used similar oil refinery wastes by other in investigators (API 1987).

  7. Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) demonstrate potential for use in soil bioremediation by increasing the degradation rates of heavy crude oil hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkosky, Luke; Barkley, Jaimie; Sabadell, Gabriel; Gough, Heidi; Davidson, Seana

    2017-02-15

    Crude oil contamination widely impacts soil as a result of release during oil and gas exploration and production activities. The success of bioremediation methods to meet remediation goals often depends on the composition of the crude oil, the soil, and microbial community. Earthworms may enhance bioremediation by mixing and aerating the soil, and exposing soil microorganisms to conditions in the earthworm gut that lead to increased activity. In this study, the common composting earthworm Eisenia fetida was tested for utility to improve remediation of oil-impacted soil. E. fetida survival in soil contaminated with two distinct crude oils was tested in an artificial (lab-mixed) sandy loam soil, and survival compared to that in the clean soil. Crude oil with a high fraction of light-weight hydrocarbons was more toxic to earthworms than the crude oil with a high proportion of heavy polyaromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The heavier crude oil was added to soil to create a 30,000mg/kg crude oil impacted soil, and degradation in the presence of added earthworms and feed, feed alone, or no additions was monitored over time and compared. Earthworm feed was spread on top to test effectiveness of no mixing. TPH degradation rate for the earthworm treatments was ~90mg/day slowing by 200days to ~20mg/day, producing two phases of degradation. With feed alone, the rate was ~40mg/day, with signs of slowing after 500days. Both treatments reached the same end point concentrations, and exhibited faster degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons C21, decreased. During these experiments, soils were moderately toxic during the first three months, then earthworms survived well, were active and reproduced with petroleum hydrocarbons present. This study demonstrated that earthworms accelerate bioremediation of crude oil in soils, including the degradation of the heaviest polyaromatic fractions.

  8. On the structure and oxygen transmission rate of biodegradable cellulose nanobarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Syverud, Kristin

    2012-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils have been proposed for novel barrier concepts, based on their capability to form smooth, strong and transparent films, with high oxygen barrier properties. A series of cellulose-based films were manufactured and tested with respect to their oxygen transmission rate (OTR) capabilities. The obtained OTR levels were considerably better than the levels recommended for packaging applications. Part of the nanofibrillated material applied in this study was produced with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO) mediated oxidation as pretreatment. Films made of TEMPO-pretreated samples yielded lower OTR values. The minimum obtained OTR value was 3.0 mL m-2 day-1 atm-1 with a corresponding oxygen permeability of 0.04 mL mm m-2 day-1 atm-1, tested at 50% relative humidity. The good barrier properties are due to the compact and dense structure of the films, as revealed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. A relationship between OTR and the structure of the corresponding nanofibril-based films was confirmed.

  9. Dual partitioning and attachment effects of rhamnolipid on pyrene biodegradation under bioavailability restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Congiu, E.; Parsons, J.R.; Ortega-Calvo, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different bioavailability scenarios on the rhamnolipid-enhanced biodegradation of pyrene by the representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degrader Mycobacterium gilvum VM552. This biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation when pyrene was provided in the form of solid

  10. Dual partitioning and attachment effects of rhamnolipid on pyrene biodegradation under bioavailability restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Congiu, E.; Parsons, J.R.; Ortega-Calvo, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different bioavailability scenarios on the rhamnolipid-enhanced biodegradation of pyrene by the representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degrader Mycobacterium gilvum VM552. This biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation when pyrene was provided in the form of solid

  11. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2014-09-15

    Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15°C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day(-1) in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day(-1) in slurry bioreactors for C16-C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction were comparable in these two systems.

  12. Impact of oxidation and biodegradation on the most commonly used polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) diagnostic ratios: Implications for the source identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Faure, Pierre

    2014-02-28

    Based on the isomer stability during their formation, PAH diagnostic ratios have been extensively used to determine PAH contamination origin. Nevertheless, it is known that these isomers do not present the same physicochemical properties and that reactions occurring during the transport from an atmospheric source induce changes in the diagnostic ratios. Yet, little is known about reactions occurring in soils contaminated by other sources such as coal tar and coal. Innovative batch experiments of abiotic oxidation and microbial incubations were performed to discriminate independently the influence of these two major processes occurring in soils on the diagnostic ratios of major PAH sources. Three samples were studied, a coking plant soil and two major PAH sources in this soil, namely coal and coal tar. The combustion signature of the coking plant soil showed the major influence of coal tar in the soil sample composition. Some of these ratios were drastically affected by oxidation and biodegradation processes inducing a change in the source signature. The coal tar signature changed to petrogenic source after oxidation with the anthracene/(anthracene+phenanthrene) ratio. According to this ratio, the initial petrogenic signature of the coal changed to a combustion signature after the biodegradation experiment.

  13. Shake-flask test for determination of biodegradation rates of 14C-labelled chemicals at low concentrations in surface water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, F.; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A simple shake-flask surface water biodegradability die away test with C-14-labeled chemicals added to microgram per liter concentrations (usually 1-100 mu g/L) is described and evaluated. The aim was to provide information on biodegradation behavior and kinetic rates at environmental (low......) concentrations in surface water systems. The basic principle of measurement was to determine evolved CO2 indirectly from measurements of total organic activity in subsamples after stripping off their content of CO2, Used with surface water alone the test simulates a pelagic environment and amended with sediments...... regular reinoculation with freshly collected surface water could, however, overcome the problems of false-negative results. (C) 2000 Academic Press....

  14. Biodegradable Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Isabelle Vroman; Lan Tighzert

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. ...

  15. Mineralisation of target hydrocarbons in three contaminated soils from former refinery facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towell, Marcie G. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Bellarby, Jessica; Paton, Graeme I. [Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Coulon, Frederic; Pollard, Simon J.T. [School of Applied Sciences, Sustainable Systems Department, Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.u [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    This study investigated the microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-labelled hexadecane, octacosane, phenanthrene and pyrene and considered how degradation might be optimised in three genuinely hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from former petroleum refinery sites. Hydrocarbon mineralisation by the indigenous microbial community was monitored over 23 d. Hydrocarbon mineralisation enhancement by nutrient amendment (biostimulation), hydrocarbon degrader addition (bioaugmentation) and combined nutrient and degrader amendment, was also explored. The ability of indigenous soil microflora to mineralise {sup 14}C-target hydrocarbons was appreciable; {>=}16% mineralised in all soils. Generally, addition of nutrients or degraders increased the rates and extents of mineralisation of {sup 14}C-hydrocarbons. However, the addition of nutrients and degraders in combination had a negative effect upon {sup 14}C-octacosane mineralisation and resulted in lower extents of mineralisation in the three soils. In general, the rates and extents of mineralisation will be dependent upon treatment type, nature of the contamination and adaptation of the ingenious microbial community. - Research highlights: Indigenous microbes actively degrade {sup 14}C-hydrocarbons in field contaminated soils. Addition of nutrients or degraders enhance mineralisation in contaminated soils. Biodegradation is related to the presence of hydrocarbons and microbial activity. - Bioremediation strategy, native hydrocarbon concentrations and prior exposure histories of the microbial community influence hydrocarbon degradation in soil.

  16. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  17. Biodegradable Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vroman

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources or from biological resources (renewable resources. In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.

  18. Effects of Different Co-substrates on the Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Coking Sewage Sludge under Anaerobic Condition%厌氧条件下不同共基质对焦化污泥降解多环芳烃的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸣; 吴海珍; 刘雷; 韦朝海

    2016-01-01

    Coking wastewater contains various organic matter including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenolics, benzene and other substances. Phenol is the main component of COD in coking wastewater and the main carbon source for the microbial utilization in biological treatment process. In order to enhanced the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking wastewater treatment process, activated sludge was collected from an anaerobic tank of a coking wastewater treatment plant to studied the enhanced biodegradation and kinetics of benzo [a] pyrene (BaP) with phenol, glucose, sodium acetate, TritonX-100, and their combinations as cometabolic substrates, respectively. Moreover, the effects of the mentioned four substrates on the degradation processes of the mixtures of naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene and BaP were also investigated. The results showed that the addition of enhanced substrates promote the degradation of BaP and there were significant differences occurred in the degradation rates in the presence of different co-substrates. Sodium acetate demonstrated the highest enhancement of degradation for BaP while 39.9% of BaP can be degraded in 30 days. However, 27.1% of BaP were removed by phenol which was the slowest among the four different substrates; Compared to single substrate group, the combination of phenol and sodium acetate group had the best performance on the biodegradation of BaP and the degradation rate is 50.0%. In different systems, the biodegradation of BaP are followed the first order reaction kinetics model. In the presence of the six PAHs, sodium acetate still had the best enhancement effect, Within 20 days, the biodegradation rates of naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene and BaP are 66.1%, 60.7%, 43.2%, 22.0%, 15.5% and 14.7%, respectively. Coking sludge prefer to biodegrade low molecular weight PAHs, such as naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene. For high molecular

  19. Investigation of evaporation and biodegradation of fuel spills in Antarctica. I. A chemical approach using GC-FID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, Ian; Harvey, Paul McA; Ferguson, Susan H; Rayner, John L; Revill, Andrew T

    2005-12-01

    Little effort has been devoted to differentiating between hydrocarbon losses through evaporation and biodegradation in treatability studies of fuel-contaminated Antarctic soils. When natural attenuation is being considered as a treatment option, it is important to be able to identify the mechanism of hydrocarbon loss and demonstrate that rates of degradation are sufficient to prevent off-site migration. Similarly, where complex thermally enhanced bioremediation schemes involve nutrient addition, water management, air stripping and active heating, it is important to appreciate the relative roles of these mechanisms for cost minimisation. Following the loss of hydrocarbons by documenting changes in total petroleum hydrocarbons offers little insight into the relative contribution of evaporation and biodegradation. We present a methodology here that allows identification and quantification of evaporative losses of diesel range organics at a range of temperatures using successively less volatile compounds as fractionation markers. We also present data that supports the general utility of so-called biodegradation indices for tracking biodegradation progress. We are also able to show that at 4 degrees C indigenous Antarctic soil bacteria degrade Special Antarctic Blend fuel components in the following order: naphthalene and methyl-napthalenes, light n-alkanes, then progressively heavier n-alkanes; whereas isoprenoids and the unresolved complex mixture are relatively recalcitrant.

  20. Biofiltration of gasoline and diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halecky, Martin; Rousova, Jana; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii; Seames, Wayne; Jones, Kim

    2015-02-01

    The ability of a biofilm to switch between the mixtures of mostly aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons was investigated to assess biofiltration efficiency and potential substrate interactions. A switch from gasoline, which consisted of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, to a mixture of volatile diesel n-alkanes resulted in a significant increase in biofiltration efficiency, despite the lack of readily biodegradable aromatic hydrocarbons in the diesel mixture. This improved biofilter performance was shown to be the result of the presence of larger size (C₉-C(12)) linear alkanes in diesel, which turned out to be more degradable than their shorter-chain (C₆-C₈) homologues in gasoline. The evidence obtained from both biofiltration-based and independent microbiological tests indicated that the rate was limited by biochemical reactions, with the inhibition of shorter chain alkane biodegradation by their larger size homologues as corroborated by a significant substrate specialization along the biofilter bed. These observations were explained by the lack of specific enzymes designed for the oxidation of short-chain alkanes as opposed to their longer carbon chain homologues.

  1. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediment of Tama River in Tokyo urban area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Akiko; Hosomi, Masaaki; Murakami, Akihiko [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Chemical Engineering Dept., Tokyo (Japan); Sakakibara, Koji [Hitachi Zosen Co., Konohana, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons, i.e., hexadecane (HEX), phenanthrene (PHE), and anthracene (ANT), were determined in estuarine sediment of the Tama River in urban Tokyo, followed by estimating their respective degradation potential. While in a sediment slurry, the aerobic biodegradation rates of these petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 40 to 70 {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment:day{sup -1}. The anaerobic biodegradation rate of HEX was found to be 5 -8 {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment.day{sup -1}, whereas that of PHE and ANT could not be detected following a 2-month incubation. Aerobic degradation of HEX was not affected by coexistence with either PHE or ANT, nor by the salinity level. The number of HEX-, PHE-, or ANT-utilizing bacteria ranged from 5 - 10% of the total number of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. We calculated their biodegradation potentials using the biomass of naturally existing petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria present in the sampled sediment, with results for HEX, PHE, and ANT being 1.0 -3.5, 4.2 x 10{sup -2}, and 1.2 x 10{sup -2} -9.4 x 10{sup -1} {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment day{sup -1}, respectively. In the aerobic tidal sediment of the Tama River, the purification potentials of HEX, PHE, and ANT were assessed to be approximately equal to their accumulation potentials occurring at the normal water level. (Author)

  2. Biodegradable intestinal stents:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanhui Wang; Nan Li; Rui Li; Yawei Li; Liqun Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents are an attractive alternative to self-expanding metal stents in the treatment of intestinal strictures. Biodegradable stent can be made of biodegradable polymers and biodegradable metals (magnesium alloys). An overview on current biodegradable intestinal stents is presented. The future trends and perspectives in the development of biodegradable intestinal stents are proposed. For the biodegradable polymer intestinal stents, the clinical trials have shown promising results, although improved design of stents and reduced migration rate are expected. For the biodegradable magnesium intestinal stents, results of preliminary studies indicate magnesium alloys to have good biocompatibility. With many of the key fundamental and practical issues resolved and better methods for adjusting corrosion resistance and progressing biocompatibilities of magnesium alloys, it is possible to use biodegradable intestinal stents made of magnesium alloys in hospital in the not too distant future.

  3. Toxicity of Fluoranthene and Its Biodegradation by Cyclotella caspia Alga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Fluoranthene is one of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with four benzene rings. Because of its toxicity,mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity, fluoranthene is on the black lists of 129 and 68 priority pollutants established by US Environmental Protection Agency and the People's Republic of China, respectively. In recent years, the amount of fluoranthene in the aquatic environment has been increasing with increases in anthropogenic discharge. Based on the biological investigation of tidal water in the Futian mangrove, Cyclotella caspia was selected as the dominant algal species to determine the toxicity of fluoranthene towards C. caspia alga and to investigate the biodegradation of fluoranthene by C. caspia under pure culture. The toxicity experiment showed that the 96-h EC50 vaiue for fluoranthene was 0.2 mg/mL. Four parameters, namely C. caspia algal growth rate,chlorophyll (Chi) a content, cell morphology, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, were chosen as indices of toxicity and were measured at 6 d (144 h). The results showed that: (i) the toxicity of fluoranthene towards C.caspia alga was obvious; (ii) C. caspia algal growth rate and Chi a content decreased with increasing concentrations of fluoranthene; and (iii) the rate of cell deformation and SOD activity increased with increasing concentrations of fluoranthene. The biodegradation experiment showed that: (i) the rate of physical degradation of fluoranthene was only 5.86%; (ii) the rate of biodegradation of fluoranthene on the 1st and 6th days (i.e. at 24 and 144 h) was approximately 35% and 85%, respectively; and (iii) the biodegradation capability of C. caspia alga towards fluoranthene was high. It is suggested that further investigations on the toxicity of fluoranthene towards algae, as well as on algal biodegradation mechanisms, are of great importance to use C. caspia as a biological treatment species in an organic wastewater treatment system.

  4. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by native microflora and combinations of white-rot fungi in a coal-tar contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canet, R.; Birnstingl, J.G.; Malcolm, D.G.; Lopez-Real, J.M.; Beck, A.J. [Inst. of Valenciano Invest. Agency, Valencia (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Four white-rot fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium IMI 232175, Pleurotus ostreatus from the University of Alberta Microfungus Collection IMI 341687, Coriolus versicolor IMI210866 and Wye isolate No. 7) and all possible combinations of two or more of these fungi, were incubated in microcosms containing wheat straw and non-sterile coal-tar contaminated soil to determine their potential to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biotic and abiotic controls were prepared similarly and PAH concentrations remaining in each microcosm were determined after 8, 16 and 32 weeks by GC-MS following extraction with dichloromethane. The greatest PAH losses were in the biotic control. Soil cultures prepared at the end of the experiment showed that though introduced fungi were still alive, they were unable to thrive and degrade PAH in such a highly contaminated soil and remained in a metabolically inactive form.

  5. Methylobacterium populi VP2: plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from a highly polluted environment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventorino, Valeria; Sannino, Filomena; Piccolo, Alessandro; Cafaro, Valeria; Carotenuto, Rita; Pepe, Olimpia

    2014-01-01

    The use of microorganisms to accelerate the natural detoxification processes of toxic substances in the soil represents an alternative ecofriendly and low-cost method of environmental remediation compared to harmful incineration and chemical treatments. Fourteen strains able to grow on minimal selective medium with a complex mixture of different classes of xenobiotic compounds as the sole carbon source were isolated from the soil of the ex-industrial site ACNA (Aziende Chimiche Nazionali Associate) in Cengio (Savona, Italy). The best putative degrading isolate, Methylobacterium populi VP2, was identified using a polyphasic approach on the basis of its phenotypic, biochemical, and molecular characterisation. Moreover, this strain also showed multiple plant growth promotion activities: it was able to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and siderophores, solubilise phosphate, and produce a biofilm in the presence of phenanthrene and alleviate phenanthrene stress in tomato seeds. This is the first report on the simultaneous occurrence of the PAH-degrading ability by Methylobacterium populi and its multiple plant growth-promoting activities. Therefore, the selected indigenous strain, which is naturally present in highly contaminated soils, is good candidate for plant growth promotion and is capable of biodegrading xenobiotic organic compounds to remediate contaminated soil alone and/or soil associated with plants.

  6. Methylobacterium populi VP2: Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from a Highly Polluted Environment for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Ventorino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of microorganisms to accelerate the natural detoxification processes of toxic substances in the soil represents an alternative ecofriendly and low-cost method of environmental remediation compared to harmful incineration and chemical treatments. Fourteen strains able to grow on minimal selective medium with a complex mixture of different classes of xenobiotic compounds as the sole carbon source were isolated from the soil of the ex-industrial site ACNA (Aziende Chimiche Nazionali Associate in Cengio (Savona, Italy. The best putative degrading isolate, Methylobacterium populi VP2, was identified using a polyphasic approach on the basis of its phenotypic, biochemical, and molecular characterisation. Moreover, this strain also showed multiple plant growth promotion activities: it was able to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and siderophores, solubilise phosphate, and produce a biofilm in the presence of phenanthrene and alleviate phenanthrene stress in tomato seeds. This is the first report on the simultaneous occurrence of the PAH-degrading ability by Methylobacterium populi and its multiple plant growth-promoting activities. Therefore, the selected indigenous strain, which is naturally present in highly contaminated soils, is good candidate for plant growth promotion and is capable of biodegrading xenobiotic organic compounds to remediate contaminated soil alone and/or soil associated with plants.

  7. Survey of Phenantherene Biodegradation's Model inContaminated Soils by Acinetobacter SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Farzadkia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Objectives: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are a group of hazardous pollutants which have carcinogenic and mutagenic properties and accumulated in environment by different actions, therefore treatment of them is important. Biological treatments are simple and cheep technologies. This technology was recommended as a cost- effective method for treatment of these pollutants. In order to investigate the trend of pollution reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons in bioremediation, the phenanthrene biodegradation's model in contaminated soils was studied."nMaterials and Methods: Firstly, PAHs capable degrading bacteria was isolated from petroleum contaminated soils and then their ability for biodegradation of phenanthrene was assessed in slurry phase. After that by using Acinetobacter which have the most potential of removing phenanthrene from soil, the biodegradation model was investigated in bench scale."nResults: Phenantherene removal efficiency was obtained 99.4% for 100 mg/kg and 96 % for 500 mg/kg concentrations in 33 and 60 days biodegradation period respectively. Phenantherene reduction rate varied from 2.99 to 8.86 and 1.4 to 11.09 mg/kg/day for 100 and 500 mg/kg concentrations, respectively."nConclusion: Rate of phenantherene removal is depended on primary concentration of contamination and by increasing of primary concentration, phenantherene removal rate was increased. Also removal efficiency followed zero and first order kinetic model with good correlation.

  8. Unravelling the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the fumarate addition mechanism--a gas-phase ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Vyas, Shubham; Villano, Stephanie M; Maupin, C Mark; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-02-14

    The fumarate addition reaction mechanism is central to the anaerobic biodegradation pathway of various hydrocarbons, both aromatic (e.g., toluene, ethyl benzene) and aliphatic (e.g., n-hexane, dodecane). Succinate synthase enzymes, which belong to the glycyl radical enzyme family, are the main facilitators of these biochemical reactions. The overall catalytic mechanism that converts hydrocarbons to a succinate molecule involves three steps: (1) initial H-abstraction from the hydrocarbon by the radical enzyme, (2) addition of the resulting hydrocarbon radical to fumarate, and (3) hydrogen abstraction by the addition product to regenerate the radical enzyme. Since the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels via the fumarate addition mechanism is linked to bio-corrosion, an improved understanding of this reaction is imperative to our efforts of predicting the susceptibility of proposed alternative fuels to biodegradation. An improved understanding of the fuel biodegradation process also has the potential to benefit bioremediation. In this study, we consider model aromatic (toluene) and aliphatic (butane) compounds to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the energetics and kinetics of the fumarate addition mechanism by means of high level ab initio gas-phase calculations. We predict that the rate of toluene degradation is ∼100 times faster than butane at 298 K, and that the first abstraction step is kinetically significant for both hydrocarbons, which is consistent with deuterium isotope effect studies on toluene degradation. The detailed computations also show that the predicted stereo-chemical preference of the succinate products for both toluene and butane are due to the differences in the radical addition rate constants for the various isomers. The computational and kinetic modeling work presented here demonstrates the importance of considering pre-reaction and product complexes in order to accurately treat gas phase systems that involve intra and inter

  9. When Groundwater Meets DNA:Petroleum Hydrocarbon Stress vs Biodegradation%当地下水邂逅DNA:石油类有机污染及其生物降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨悦锁; 雷玉德; 杜新强; 韩建超; 曹玉清

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater sciences and engineering developed so far has become a comprehensive discipline involving multiple subjects. Control and remediation of contaminated groundwater need technical and knowledge support from inter-disciplinary effort. Bacterium has been a focus for sustainable remediation of organic contaminated sites. A concise review on groundwater contamination and its remediation, interactions between organic contaminant and microorganisms, bioremediation mechanism, and then bacteria was undertaken. As a case study, a microbial study was carried out at a petroleum contaminated groundwater site to have successfully isolated dominant strains for oil degradation from the oil contaminated groundwater samples. The results showed that the Prokaryotic actinomycetes possessed the best degradation rate, followed by other bacteria and fungi. Pairwise combinations showed obvious better degradation than single bacterium, indicating the presence of synergies. Mixed strains expressed poorer degradation, revealing the antagonistic effect. Dynamicsdegradation experiment demonstrated TPH degradation follows the 1st order kinetics equation, the degradation rate and half-life of petroleum contamination were obtained. For specific compounds, alkane exhibited the similar degradation to TPH; refractory non-hydrocarbon compounds showed lower degradation rate, it was concentrated later since the transformation of alkanes, little change in benzene. The microbial activity experimental results showed that the biomass and dehydrogenase activity correlated with the biodegradation positively. The specific species of the bacteria were determined by physio-biochemical and molecular biological techniques.%地下水科学与工程研究发展到今日,已经成为一门涉及多个领域的综合性学科.地下水污染的控制和修复研究更需要跨学科的技术和知识支持,而生物修复作为一种高效低耗修复的技术成为环境领域的研究热点.微生物因

  10. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  11. Use of the Complex Conductivity Method to Monitor Hydrocarbon Degradation in Brackish Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Beaver, C. L.; Kimak, C.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of the subsurface is a global environmental problem. The size, location and recurrence rate of contamination very often inhibits active remediation strategies. When there is no direct threat to humans, and direct/invasive remediation methods are prohibited, monitored natural attenuation is often the remediation method of choice. Consequently, long-term monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation is needed to validate remediation. Geophysical methods, frequently utilized to characterize subsurface contamination, have the potential to be adopted for long term monitoring of contaminant degradation. Over the last decade, the complex conductivity method has shown promise as a method for monitoring hydrocarbon degradation processes in freshwater environments. We investigated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to natural attenuation of oil in a brackish setting, being more representative of the conditions where most oil spills occur such as in coastal environments. We performed a series of laboratory hydrocarbon biodegradation experiments whilst continuously monitoring complex conductivity. Sediments from a beach impacted by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill were used to provide the hydrocarbon degraders, while fluids with three different salinities, ranging from fresh water to brackish water, were used as the supporting media. All experimental columns, including two abiotic controls, were run in duplicate. Early results show a dependence of the complex conductivity parameters (both electrolytic and interfacial) on biodegradation processes. Despite the small signals relative to freshwater conditions, the imaginary part of the complex conductivity appears to be sensitive to biodegradation processes. The columns with highest salinity fluids - similar to the salinites for the site where the sediments were collected - showed distinctive complex conductivity responses similar to microbial growth curves. Geochemical monitoring confirmed elevated rates

  12. Implications of polluted soil biostimulation and bioaugmentation with spent mushroom substrate (Agaricus bisporus) on the microbial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Pesciaroli, Lorena; Yunta, Felipe; Crognale, Silvia; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    Different applications of spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS), a widespread agro-industrial waste, were investigated with respect to the remediation of a historically polluted soil with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH). In one treatment, the waste was sterilized (SSAS) prior to its application in order to assess its ability to biostimulate, as an organic amendment, the resident soil microbiota and ensuing contaminant degradation. For the other treatments, two bioaugmentation approaches were investigated; the first involved the use of the waste itself and thus implied the application of A. bisporus and the inherent microbiota of the waste. In the second treatment, SAS was sterilized and inoculated again with the fungus to assess its ability to act as a fungal carrier. All these treatments were compared with natural attenuation in terms of their impact on soil heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacteria, fungal growth, biodiversity of soil microbiota and ability to affect PAH bioavailability and ensuing degradation and detoxification. Results clearly showed that historically PAH contaminated soil was not amenable to natural attenuation. Conversely, the addition of sterilized spent A. bisporus substrate to the soil stimulated resident soil bacteria with ensuing high removals of 3-ring PAH. Both augmentation treatments were more effective in removing highly condensed PAH, some of which known to possess a significant carcinogenic activity. Regardless of the mode of application, the present results strongly support the adequacy of SAS for environmental remediation purposes and open the way to an attractive recycling option of this waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

    2003-10-06

    Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

  14. Biotransformation of the high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[k]fluoranthene by Sphingobium sp. strain KK22 and identification of new products of non-alternant PAH biodegradation by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Allyn H; Nishi, Shinro; Hatada, Yuji; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    A pathway for the biotransformation of the environmental pollutant and high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[k]fluoranthene by a soil bacterium was constructed through analyses of results from liquid chromatography negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI(-)-MS/MS). Exposure of Sphingobium sp. strain KK22 to benzo[k]fluoranthene resulted in transformation to four-, three- and two-aromatic ring products. The structurally similar four- and three-ring non-alternant PAHs fluoranthene and acenaphthylene were also biotransformed by strain KK22, and LC/ESI(-)-MS/MS analyses of these products confirmed the lower biotransformation pathway proposed for benzo[k]fluoranthene. In all, seven products from benzo[k]fluoranthene and seven products from fluoranthene were revealed and included previously unreported products from both PAHs. Benzo[k]fluoranthene biotransformation proceeded through ortho-cleavage of 8,9-dihydroxy-benzo[k]fluoranthene to 8-carboxyfluoranthenyl-9-propenic acid and 9-hydroxy-fluoranthene-8-carboxylic acid, and was followed by meta-cleavage to produce 3-(2-formylacenaphthylen-1-yl)-2-hydroxy-prop-2-enoic acid. The fluoranthene pathway converged with the benzo[k]fluoranthene pathway through detection of the three-ring product, 2-formylacenaphthylene-1-carboxylic acid. Production of key downstream metabolites, 1,8-naphthalic anhydride and 1-naphthoic acid from benzo[k]fluoranthene, fluoranthene and acenaphthylene biotransformations provided evidence for a common pathway by strain KK22 for all three PAHs through acenaphthoquinone. Quantitative analysis of benzo[k]fluoranthene biotransformation by strain KK22 confirmed biodegradation. This is the first pathway proposed for the biotransformation of benzo[k]fluoranthene by a bacterium.

  15. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by soil fungi Biodegradação de hidrocarbonetos aromáticos policíclicos por fungos do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Clemente

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen deuteromycete ligninolytic fungal strains were grown in media containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, for 6 and 10 days. The PAHs were added directly with the inocula or on the third day of cultivation. A selection of the best strains was carried out based on the levels of degradation of the PAHs and also on the ligninolytic activities produced by the fungi. The selected strains were cultivated for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days in the PAHs-containing media. Degradation of PAHs, as measured by reversed-phase HPLC on a C18 column, varied with each strain as did the ligninolytic enzymes present in the culture supernatants. Highest degradation of naphthalene (69% was produced by the strain 984, having Mn-peroxidase activity, followed by strain 870 (17% showing lignin peroxidase and laccase activities. The greatest degradation of phenanthrene (12% was observed with strain 870 containing Mn-peroxidase and laccase activities. When anthracene was used, the strain 710 produced a good level of degradation (65%.Treze fungos deuteromicetos ligninolíticos foram cultivados em meio contendo hidrocarbonetos aromáticos policíclicos (HAPs por 6 e 10 dias. Os HAPs foram adicionados diretamente com o inóculo ou no terceiro dia de cultivo. A seleção das melhores linhagens foi baseada nos níveis de degradação dos HAPs e também nas atividades ligninolíticas produzidas pelas linhagens fúngicas. Essas melhores linhagens foram então cultivadas por 3, 6, 9, 12 e 15 dias. A degradação dos HAPs foi monitorada por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE em uma coluna C18, variando para cada linhagem assim como as enzimas ligninolíticas presentes nos sobrenadantes das culturas. Alta degradação de naftaleno (69% foi obtida pela linhagem 984, tendo atividade de Mn-peroxidase, seguida pela linhagem 870 (17% a qual apresentou atividades de lignina peroxidase e lacase. A melhor porcentagem de degradação de fenantreno (12% foi observada

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization. PMID:28071745

  18. SCREENING OF BACTERIAL PRODUCTS FOR THEIR CRUDE OIL BIODEGRADATION EFFECTIVENESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although petroleum hydrocarbons have been known to be biodegradable for decades (1-5), use of microbial cultures to enhance natural biodegradation (bioaugmentation) has met with limited success (6-10). Despite the paucity of controlled field studies demonstrating the effectivene...

  19. Process of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Tamagawa karyuiki ni okeru sekiyukei tanka suiso no biseibutsu bunkai katei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morito, M. (Sumitomo 3M Co., Kanagawa (Japan)); Okada, M.; Murakami, A. (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-12-10

    The process of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Petroleum hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane, octylbenzene, and 1-methylnaphtalene were observed to be rapidly degraded by microorganisms in the water sampled from the surface of the river after a period of lag time. The longer lag time was observed in order of hexadecane hydrocarbons, but the rates was not be promoted by physical and chemical emulsification. It was suggested that petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded not in physical and chemical process in which the hydrocarbons were emulsified by microbial extracellular products, microfinded and enhanced contact area or frequency to microbes, but in biochemical process in which the microorganisms gained the ability of petroleum hydrocarbons degradation, that is, induction of production of a degrading enzyme. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOPLUME 4 MODEL FOR FUELS AND CHLORINATED SOLVENT BIODEGRADATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bioplume model has been in development and use for modeling biodegradation and natural attenuation since the late 1980s. Bioplume 1 focused on aerobic biodegradation of BTEX. Bioplume II simulated oxygen and hydrocarbons and simulated biodegradation using an instantaneous r...

  1. Biodegradation of MC252 oil in oil:sand aggregates in a coastal headland beach environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Vijaikrishnah; Urbano, Marilany; Lemelle, Kendall R; Pardue, John H

    2014-01-01

    Unique oil:sand aggregates, termed surface residue balls (SRBs), were formed on coastal headland beaches along the northern Gulf of Mexico as emulsified MC252 crude oil mixed with sand following the Deepwater Horizon spill event. The objective of this study is to assess the biodegradation potential of crude oil components in these aggregates using multiple lines of evidence on a heavily-impacted coastal headland beach in Louisiana, USA. SRBs were sampled over a 19-month period on the supratidal beach environment with reasonable control over and knowledge of the residence time of the aggregates on the beach surface. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkane concentration ratios were measured including PAH/C30-hopane, C2/C3 phenanthrenes, C2/C3 dibenzothiophenes and alkane/C30-hopane and demonstrated that biodegradation was occurring in SRBs in the supratidal. These biodegradation reactions occurred over time frames relevant to the coastal processes moving SRBs off the beach. In contrast, submerged oil mat samples from the intertidal did not demonstrate chemical changes consistent with biodegradation. Review and analysis of additional biogeochemical parameters suggested the existence of a moisture and nutrient-limited biodegradation regime on the supratidal beach environment. At this location, SRBs possess moisture contents biodegradation in the literature. Despite these limitations, biodegradation of PAHs and alkanes proceeded at relevant rates (2-8 year(-1)) due in part to the presence of degrading populations, i.e., Mycobacterium sp., adapted to these conditions. For submerged oil mat samples in the intertidal, an oxygen and salinity-impacted regime is proposed that severely limits biodegradation of alkanes and PAHs in this environment. These results support the hypothesis that SRBs deposited at different locations on the beach have different biogeochemical characteristics (e.g., moisture, salinity, terminal electron acceptors, nutrient, and oil

  2. Biodegradation of crude oil saturated fraction supported on clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Jones, Martin D; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-02-01

    The role of clay minerals in crude oil saturated hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/saturated hydrocarbon microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clay minerals used for this study were montmorillonite, palygorskite, saponite and kaolinite. The clay mineral samples were treated with hydrochloric acid and didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce acid activated- and organoclays respectively which were used in this study. The production of organoclay was restricted to only montmorillonite and saponite because of their relative high CEC. The study indicated that acid activated clays, organoclays and unmodified kaolinite, were inhibitory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. Unmodified saponite was neutral to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. However, unmodified palygorskite and montmorillonite were stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturated fraction and appears to do so as a result of the clays' ability to provide high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients such that the nutrients were within the 'vicinity' of the microbes. Adsorption of the saturated hydrocarbons was not significant during biodegradation.

  3. Effects of Oxygen on Biodegradation of Fuels in a Corroding Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    known to be more labile than hydrocarbons to anaerobic biodegradation (Aktas, et al, 2010), so the preferential loss of these peaks from the...the contention that hydrocarbon removal was due at least in part to biodegradation by seawater microorganisms. Benzoate, cresols and alkanoic acids...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) · Oxygen Effects on Biodegradation of Fuels in a Corroding Environment Deniz F. Aktas

  4. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of synthetic surfactants.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiehm, A

    1994-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) often is limited by low water solubility and dissolution rate. Nonionic surfactants and sodium dodecyl sulfate increased the concentration of PAH in the water phase because of solubilization. The degradation of PAH was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate because this surfactant was preferred as a growth substrate. Growth of mixed cultures with phenanthrene and fluoranthene solubilized by a nonionic surfactant prior to inoculation wa...

  5. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part B--Nitrogen-, Sulfur-, and Oxygen-Containing Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-07-01

    Present study focused on the biodegradation of various heterocyclic nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (NSO) compounds using naphthalene-enriched culture. Target compounds in the study were pyridine, quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran. Screening studies were carried out using different microbial consortia enriched with specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and NSO compounds. Among different microbial consortia, naphthalene-enriched culture was the most efficient consortium based on high substrate degradation rate. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order pyridine > quinoline > benzofuran > benzothiophene. Benzothiophene and benzofuran were found to be highly recalcitrant pollutants. Benzothiophene could not be biodegraded when concentration was above 50 mg/l. It was observed that 2-(1H)-quinolinone, benzothiophene-2-one, and benzofuran-2,3-dione were formed as metabolic intermediates during biodegradation of quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran, respectively. Quinoline-N and pyridine-N were transformed into free ammonium ions during the biodegradation process. Biodegradation pathways for various NSO compounds are proposed. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate single substrate biodegradation kinetics satisfactorily. Benzothiophene and benzofuran biodegradation kinetics, in presence of acetone, was simulated using a generalized multi-substrate model.

  6. Distributions and accumulation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northern Gulf of Mexico sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Puspa L; Maiti, Kanchan; Overton, Edward B; Rosenheim, Brad E; Marx, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Sediment samples collected from shelf, slope and interior basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico during 2011-2013, 1-3 years after the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, were utilized to characterize PAH pollution history, in this region. Results indicate that the concentrations of surface ΣPAH43 and their accumulation rates vary between 44 and 160 ng g(-1) and 6-55 ng cm(-2) y(-1), respectively. ΣPAH43 concentration profiles, accumulation rates and Δ(14)C values are significantly altered only for the sediments in the immediate vicinity of the DWH wellhead. This shows that the impact of DWH oil input on deep-sea sediments was generally limited to the area close to the spill site. Further, the PAHs source diagnostic analyses suggest a noticeable change in PAHs composition from higher to lower molecular weight dominance which reflects a change in source of PAHs in the past three years, back to the background composition. Results indicate low to moderate levels of PAH pollution in this region at present, which are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic communities.

  7. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  8. A bootstrapped neural network model applied to prediction of the biodegradation rate of reactive Black 5 dye - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.16210

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Rogério Moreira Prado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current essay forwards a biodegradation model of a dye, used in the textile industry, based on a neural network propped by bootstrap remodeling. Bootstrapped neural network is set to generate estimates that are close to results obtained in an intrinsic experience in which a chemical process is applied. Pseudomonas oleovorans was used in the biodegradation of reactive Black 5. Results show a brief comparison between the information estimated by the proposed approach and the experimental data, with a coefficient of correlation between real and predicted values for a more than 0.99 biodegradation rate. Dye concentration and the solution’s pH failed to interfere in biodegradation index rates. A value above 90% of dye biodegradation was achieved between 1.000 and 1.841 mL 10 mL-1 of microorganism concentration and between 1.000 and 2.000 g 100 mL-1 of glucose concentration within the experimental conditions under analysis.   

  9. Oil biodegradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Eenennaam, van Justine S.; Murk, Tinka; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.

    2017-01-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon (DwH) oil spill, interactions between oil, clay particles and marine snow lead to the formation of aggregates. Interactions between these components play an important, but yet not well understood, role in biodegradation of oil in the ocean water. The aim of this study

  10. Environmental biodegradability of diesel oil: composition and performances of degradative micro-floras; Biodegradabilite du gazole dans l'environnement: composition et performances des microflores degradatrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, S.

    2004-09-01

    The large use of petroleum products makes them a significant source of pollutants in ground water and soils. Biodegradation studies are therefore relevant either to evaluate possibilities of natural attenuation or define bio-remediation strategies. In this study, the possible relationship between the environmental microflora structures and their capabilities for diesel oil biodegradation was investigated. The degradation capacities, i.e. kinetics and extent of biodegradation, were evaluated in closed batch systems by hydrocarbon consumption and CO{sub 2} production, both determined by gas chromatography. The intrinsic biodegradability of different types of diesel oils and the degradation capacities of microflora from ten polluted and ten unpolluted soils samples were determined. The data showed that: i) diesel oil was biodegradable, ii) n-alkanes were totally degraded by each microflora, the final amount of residual hydrocarbons being variable, iii) polluted-soil samples exhibited a slightly higher degradation rate (80%) that polluted-soil samples (67%) or activated sludge (64%). In order to define the contribution of various bacterial groups to diesel oil degradation, enrichment cultures were performed on hydrocarbons representative from the structural classes of diesel oil: hexadecane for n-alkanes, pristane for iso-alkanes, decalin for cyclo-alkanes, phenanthrene for aromatics. By using a 16S rDNA-sequencing method, the bacterial structures of the adapted microflora were determined and compared to that of the native microflora. A marked effect of the selection pressure was observed on the diversity of the microflora, each microflora harboring a major and specific bacterial group. The degradation capacities of the adapted microflora and the occurrence of genes coding for initial hydrocarbon oxidation (alkB, nahAc, cypP450) were also studied. No clear relationship between microflora genes and degradation performances was noted. This seemed to indicate that

  11. A New Star-Formation Rate Calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features and Application to High Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shipley, Heath V; Rieke, George H; Brown, Michael J I; Moustakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We calibrate the integrated luminosity from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 6.2\\micron, 7.7\\micron\\ and 11.3\\micron\\ in galaxies as a measure of the star-formation rate (SFR). These features are strong (containing as much as 5-10\\% of the total infrared luminosity) and suffer minimal extinction. Our calibration uses \\spitzer\\ Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) measurements of 105 galaxies at $0 < z < 0.4$, infrared (IR) luminosities of $10^9 - 10^{12} \\lsol$, combined with other well-calibrated SFR indicators. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the extinction-corrected \\ha\\ luminosity over the range of luminosities in our calibration sample. The scatter is 0.14 dex comparable to that between SFRs derived from the \\paa\\ and extinction-corrected \\ha\\ emission lines, implying the PAH features may be as accurate a SFR indicator as hydrogen recombination lines. The PAH SFR relation depends on gas-phase metallicity, for which we supply an empirical correction for...

  12. Residue pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during green tea manufacturing and their transfer rates during tea brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guanwei; Chen, Hongping; Liu, Pingxiang; Hao, Zhenxia; Ma, Guicen; Chai, Yunfeng; Wang, Chen; Lu, Chengyin

    2017-06-01

    Residues of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in green tea and tea infusion were determined using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to study their dissipation pattern during green tea processing and infusion. Concentration and evaporation of PAHs during tea processing were the key factors affecting PAH residue content in product intermediates and in green tea. PAH residues in tea leaves increased by 2.4-3.1 times during the manufacture of green tea using the electric heating model. After correction to dry weight, PAH residue concentrations decreased by 33.5-48.4% during green tea processing because of PAH evaporation. Moreover, spreading and drying reduced PAH concentrations. The transfer rates of PAH residues from green tea to infusion varied from 4.6% to 7.2%, and PAH leaching was higher in the first infusion than in the second infusion. These results are useful for assessing exposure to PAHs from green tea and in formulating controls for the maximum residue level of PAHs in green tea.

  13. Aerobic biodegradation of a nonylphenol polyethoxylate and toxicity of the biodegradation metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Encarnación; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Núñez-Olea, Josefa; Lechuga, Manuela

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a study was made of the biodegradation of a non-ionic surfactant, a nonylphenol polyethoxylate, in biodegradability tests by monitoring the residual surfactant matter. The influence of the concentration on the extent of primary biodegradation, the toxicity of biodegradation metabolites, and the kinetics of degradation were also determined. The primary biodegradation was studied at different initial concentrations: 5, 25 and 50 mg/L, (at sub-and supra-critical micelle concentration). The NPEO used in this study can be considered biodegradable since the primary biodegradation had already taken place (a biodegradation greater than 80% was found for the different initial concentration tested). The initial concentration affected the shape of the resulting curve, the mean biodegradation rate and the percentage of biodegradation reached (99% in less than 8 days at 5 mg/L, 98% in less than 13 days at 25 mg/L and 95% in 14 days at 50 mg/L). The kinetic model of Quiroga and Sales (1991) was applied to predict the biodegradation of the NPEO. The toxicity value was measured as EC(20) and EC(50). In addition, during the biodegradation process of the surfactant a toxicity analysis was made of the evolution of metabolites generated, confirming that the subproducts of the biodegradation process were more toxic than the original.

  14. Fungal/bacterial interactions during the biodegradation of TEX hydrocarbons (toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene) in gas biofilters operated under xerophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenafeta-Boldú, Francesc X; Guivernau, Miriam; Gallastegui, Gorka; Viñas, Marc; de Hoog, G Sybren; Elías, Ana

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of air contaminated with toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene was assayed in three laboratory-scale biofilters, each consisting of two modules connected in series, packed with a pelletized organic fertilizer and inoculated with a toluene-degrading liquid enrichment culture. Biofilters were operated in parallel for 185 days in which the volumetric organic loading rate was progressively increased. The operation regime was subjected to drying out, so that packing humidity generally remained below 40%. Significant process failure occurred with ethylbenzene and p-xylene, but the toluene biofilter comparatively sustained a significant elimination capacity. Microbial community characterization by quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed substantial fungal enrichment in the toluene biofilter. Ribotypes identical to the well-known toluene-degrading black yeast Exophiala oligosperma (Chaetotyriales) were found among the dominant species. The microbial community structure was similar in the biofilters loaded with toluene and ethylbenzene but with p-xylene was quite specific and encompassed other chaetothyrialean fungi. Several species of Actinomycetales were found in the packing while the inoculum was dominated by representatives of the Burkholderiales and Xanthomonadales. One single fungal ribotype homologous to Acremonium kiliense was detected in the inoculum. The implications of xerophilic biofilter operation on process biosafety and efficiency are discussed.

  15. Effects of prokaryotic diversity changes on hydrocarbon degradation rates and metal partitioning during bioremediation of contaminated anoxic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Beolchini, Francesca; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    We investigated changes of prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on anoxic marine sediments characterized by high hydrocarbon and metal content. Microcosms containing contaminated sediments were amended with lactose and acetate and incubated in anaerobic conditions up to 60 d at 20 or 35 °C. Microcosms displaying higher degradation efficiency of hydrocarbons were characterized by the dominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Methanosarcinales and the lack of gene sequences belonging to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Multivariate analyses support the hypothesis that Alphaproteobacteria are important for hydrocarbon degradation and highlight a potential synergistic effect of archaea and bacteria in changes of metal partitioning. Overall, these results point out that the identification of changes in the prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation of contaminated marine sediments is not only important for the improvement of bio-treatment performance towards hydrocarbons, but also for a better comprehension of changes occurring in metal partitioning which affect their mobility and toxicity.

  16. Experiments and modelling of phenanthrene biodegradation in the aqueous phase by a mixed culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; MAO Xiao-min; YANG Jian-gang; D.A. Barry; LI Ling

    2006-01-01

    Pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) is widespread due to unsuitable disposal of industrial waste. They are mostly defined as priority pollutants by environmental protection authorities worldwide. Phenanthrene, a typical PAH, was selected as the target in this paper. The PAH-degrading mixed culture, named ZM, was collected from a petroleum contaminated river bed. This culture was injected into phenanthrene solutions at different concentrations to quantify the biodegradation process. Results show near-complete removal of phenanthrene in three days of biodegradation if the initial phenanthrene concentration is low. When the initial concentration is high, the removal rate is increased but 20%-40% of the phenanthrene remains at the end of the experiment.The biomass shows a peak on the third day due to the combined effects of microbial growth and decay. Another peak is evident for cases with a high initial concentration, possibly due to production of an intermediate metabolite. The pH generally decreased during biodegradation because of the production of organic acid. Two phenomenological models were designed to simulate the phenanthrene biodegradation and biomass growth. A relatively simple model that does not consider the intermediate metabolite and its inhibition of phenanthrene biodegradation cannot fit the observed data. A modified Monod model that considered an intermediate metabolite (organic acid) and its inhibiting reversal effect reasonably depicts the experimental results.

  17. The heat-compression technique for the conversion of platelet-rich fibrin preparation to a barrier membrane with a reduced rate of biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tomoyuki; Kamiya, Mana; Kobayashi, Mito; Tanaka, Takaaki; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-05-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) was developed as an advanced form of platelet-rich plasma to eliminate xenofactors, such as bovine thrombin, and it is mainly used as a source of growth factor for tissue regeneration. Furthermore, although a minor application, PRF in a compressed membrane-like form has also been used as a substitute for commercially available barrier membranes in guided-tissue regeneration (GTR) treatment. However, the PRF membrane is resorbed within 2 weeks or less at implantation sites; therefore, it can barely maintain sufficient space for bone regeneration. In this study, we developed and optimized a heat-compression technique and tested the feasibility of the resulting PRF membrane. Freshly prepared human PRF was first compressed with dry gauze and subsequently with a hot iron. Biodegradability was microscopically examined in vitro by treatment with plasmin at 37°C or in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Compared with the control gauze-compressed PRF, the heat-compressed PRF appeared plasmin-resistant and remained stable for longer than 10 days in vitro. Additionally, in animal implantation studies, the heat-compressed PRF was observed at least for 3 weeks postimplantation in vivo whereas the control PRF was completely resorbed within 2 weeks. Therefore, these findings suggest that the heat-compression technique reduces the rate of biodegradation of the PRF membrane without sacrificing its biocompatibility and that the heat-compressed PRF membrane easily could be prepared at chair-side and applied as a barrier membrane in the GTR treatment.

  18. A kinetic model for predicting biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, S; Pavlov, T; Nedelcheva, D; Reuschenbach, P; Silvani, M; Bias, R; Comber, M; Low, L; Lee, C; Parkerton, T; Mekenyan, O

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradation plays a key role in the environmental risk assessment of organic chemicals. The need to assess biodegradability of a chemical for regulatory purposes supports the development of a model for predicting the extent of biodegradation at different time frames, in particular the extent of ultimate biodegradation within a '10 day window' criterion as well as estimating biodegradation half-lives. Conceptually this implies expressing the rate of catabolic transformations as a function of time. An attempt to correlate the kinetics of biodegradation with molecular structure of chemicals is presented. A simplified biodegradation kinetic model was formulated by combining the probabilistic approach of the original formulation of the CATABOL model with the assumption of first order kinetics of catabolic transformations. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to fit the model parameters to OECD 301F biodegradation kinetic data for a set of 208 chemicals. The new model allows the prediction of biodegradation multi-pathways, primary and ultimate half-lives and simulation of related kinetic biodegradation parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD), carbon dioxide production, and the nature and amount of metabolites as a function of time. The model may also be used for evaluating the OECD ready biodegradability potential of a chemical within the '10-day window' criterion.

  19. Asparagus stem as a new lignocellulosic biomass feedstock for anaerobic digestion: increasing hydrolysis rate, methane production and biodegradability by alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohua; Gu, Yu; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-07-01

    Recently, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass for methane production has attracted considerable attention. However, there is little information regarding methane production from asparagus stem, a typical lignocellulosic biomass, by anaerobic digestion. In this study, alkaline pretreatment of asparagus stem was investigated for its ability to increase hydrolysis rate and methane production and to improve biodegradability (BD). The hydrolysis rate increased with increasing NaOH dose, due to higher removal rates of lignin and hemicelluloses. However, the optimal NaOH dose was 6% (w/w) according to the specific methane production (SMP). Under this condition, the SMP and the technical digestion time of the NaOH-treated asparagus stem were 242.3 mL/g VS and 18 days, which were 38.4% higher and 51.4% shorter than those of the untreated sample, respectively. The BD was improved from 40.1% to 55.4%. These results indicate that alkaline pretreatment could be an efficient method for increasing methane production from asparagus stem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons exploiting spent substrate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of edible mushrooms generates spent mushroom substrate that ... specific enzymatic lacasses, manganese peroxidases, versatile peroxidases, ... nitrogen and 0.3% phosphorus) and bioaugmentation of the microorganisms of ...

  1. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons exploiting spent substrate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-08-13

    Aug 13, 2014 ... Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution ... and readily available (Singh et al., 2011), and its reuse .... Initial and residual diesel was quantified based on the EPA method ..... water system by the SMS of P. pulmonarius (5%) after.

  2. Bioavailability and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkering, F.

    1996-01-01

    One of the main problems in biological soil remediation is the slow or incomplete degradation of hydrophobic organic pollutants. The principal reason for this problem is the fact that these compounds bind strongly to the soil matrix or occur as a separate non- aqueous phase in the soil. As most micr

  3. Bioavailability and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkering, F.

    1996-01-01

    One of the main problems in biological soil remediation is the slow or incomplete degradation of hydrophobic organic pollutants. The principal reason for this problem is the fact that these compounds bind strongly to the soil matrix or occur as a separate non- aqueous phase in the soil. As most

  4. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors...

  5. UV photolysis for accelerating pyridine biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Chang, Ling; Yan, Ning; Tang, Yingxia; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Pyridine, a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compound, is slowly biodegradable, and coupling biodegradation with UV photolysis is a potential means to accelerate its biotransformation and mineralization. The initial steps of pyridine biodegradation involve mono-oxygenation reactions that have molecular oxygen and an intracellular electron carrier as cosubstrates. We employed an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor for pyridine biodegradation following three protocols: direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis (P+B), and biodegradation with succinic acid added (B+S). Succinic acid was the main UV-photolysis product from pyridine, and its catabolic oxidation generates internal electron carriers that may accelerate the initial steps of pyridine biodegradation. Compared with direct biodegradation of pyridine (B), the removal rate for the same concentration of photolyzed pyridine (P+B) was higher by 15 to 43%, depending on the initial pyridine concentrations (increasing through the range of 130 to 310 mg/L). Adding succinic acid alone (B+S) gave results similar to P+B, which supports that succinic acid was the main agent for accelerating the pyridine biodegradation rate. In addition, protocols P+B and B+S were similar in terms of increasing pyridine mineralization over 10 h: 84% and 87%, respectively, which were higher than with protocol B (72%). The positive impact of succinic acid-whether added directly or produced via UV photolysis-confirms that its catabolism, which produced intracellular electron carriers, accelerated the initial steps of pyridine biotransformation.

  6. Generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of incense sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Hu, Shu-Chuan

    2003-02-01

    The generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incense burning were assessed in a laboratory setting. The differences among different segments of the same stick, among different sticks of the same kind of incense, and between two kinds of manually made Chih-Chen incense sticks (A and B) were evaluated. Joss sticks were burned inside a 44 cm long elutriator; personal environmental monitors fitted into the top of the elutriator were used to take PM2.5 and PM10 samples of incense smoke. Samples were analyzed for PAHs by gas chromatography-flame ionization Detector. It was found that particle and associated PAHs were generated approximately at 561 microg/min (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.1) and 0.56 microg/min (GSD = 1.1) from Incense A, and at 661 microg/min (GSD = 1.7) and 0.46 microg/min (GSD = 1.3) from Incense B, respectively. One gram of Incense A emitted about 19.8 mg (GSD = 1.1) particulate matter and 17.1 microg (GSD = 1.2) particulate-phase PAHs, while one gram of Incense B produced around 43.6 mg (GSD = 1.1) of particles and 25.2 microg (GSD = 1.2) of particle-bound PAHs. There were significant differences in emissions between Incenses A and B, although they belong to the same class of incense. A 10-20% variability in emissions was observed in the main part of the manually produced stick, and a larger variation was found at both tips of the combustible part.

  7. Total Phosphate Influences the Rate of Hydrocarbon Degradation but Phosphate Mineralogy Shapes Microbial Community Composition in Cold-Region Calcareous Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Steven D; Chen, Tingting; Phillips, Courtney; Hamilton, Jordan; Hilger, David; Chartrand, Blaine; Grosskleg, Jay; Bradshaw, Kris; Carlson, Trevor; Peak, Derek

    2016-05-17

    Managing phosphorus bioaccessibility is critical for the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in calcareous soils. This paper explores how soil mineralogy interacts with a novel biostimulatory solution to both control phosphorus bioavailability and influence bioremediation. Two large bore infiltrators (1 m diameter) were installed at a PHC contaminated site and continuously supplied with a solution containing nutrients and an electron acceptor. Soils from eight contaminated sites were prepared and pretreated, analyzed pretrial, spiked with diesel, placed into nylon bags into the infiltrators, and removed after 3 months. From XAS, we learned that three principal phosphate phases had formed: adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. All measures of biodegradation in the samples (in situ degradation estimates, mineralization assays, culturable bacteria, catabolic genes) varied depending upon the soil's phosphate speciation. Notably, adsorbed phosphate increased anaerobic phenanthrene degradation and bzdN catabolic gene prevalence. The dominant mineralogical constraints on community composition were the relative amounts of adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. Overall, this study finds that total phosphate influences microbial community phenotypes whereas relative percentages of phosphate minerals influences microbial community genotype composition.

  8. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  9. Biodegradation and bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, H.-J.

    1996-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Alexander,M.: Biodegradation and bioremediation. Academic Press, Sandiego, USA, 1994......Anmeldelse af Alexander,M.: Biodegradation and bioremediation. Academic Press, Sandiego, USA, 1994...

  10. Impact of heavy metals on the oil products biodegradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukauskaite, Audrone; Jakubauskaite, Viktorija; Belous, Olga; Ambrazaitiene, Dalia; Stasiskiene, Zaneta

    2008-12-01

    Oil products continue to be used as a principal source of energy. Wide-scale production, transport, global use and disposal of petroleum have made them major contaminants in prevalence and quantity in the environment. In accidental spills, actions are taken to remove or remediate or recover the contaminants immediately, especially if they occur in environmentally sensitive areas, for example, in coastal zones. Traditional methods to cope with oil spills are confined to physical containment. Biological methods can have an advantage over the physical-chemical treatment regimes in removing spills in situ as they offer biodegradation of oil fractions by the micro-organisms. Recently, biological methods have been known to play a significant role in bioremediation of oil-polluted coastal areas. Such systems are likely to be of significance in the effective management of sensitive coastal ecosystems chronically subjected to oil spillage. For this reason the aim of this paper is to present an impact of Mn, Cu, Co and Mo quantities on oil biodegradation effectiveness in coastal soil and to determine the relationship between metal concentrations and degradation of two oil products (black oil and diesel fuel). Soil was collected in the Baltic Sea coastal zone oil products degradation area (Klaipeda, Lithuania). The experiment consisted of two parts: study on the influence of micro-elements on the oil product biodegradation process; and analysis of the influence of metal concentration on the number of HDMs. The analysis performed and results obtained address the following areas: impact of metal on a population of hydrocarbon degrading micro-organisms, impact of metals on residual concentrations of oil products, influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, inter-relation of metal concentrations with degradation rates. Statistical analysis was made using ;Statgraphics plus' software. The influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, the biodegradation process

  11. Stimulating in situ surfactant production to increase contaminant bioavailability and augment bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, N. W.; Bentley, H. W.; Yiannakakis, A.; Bentley, A. J.; Cassidy, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    The effectiveness of a bioremediation strategy is largely dependent on relationships between contaminant sequestration (geochemical limitations) and microbial degradation potential (biological limitations). As contaminant bioavailability becomes mass transfer limited, contaminant removal will show less sensitivity to biodegradation enhancements without concurrent enhancements to rates of mass transfer into the bioavailable phase. Implementing a strategy that can simultaneously address geochemical and biological limitations is motivated by a subsurface zone of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons (LPH) contamination that is in excess of 10 acres (40,000 sq. meters). Biodegradation potential at the site is high; however, observed biodegradation rates are generally low, indicative of bioavailability limitations (e.g., low aqueous solubilities, nutrient deficiencies, and/or mass transfer limitations), and estimates indicate that bioremediation (i.e., biosparging/bioventing) with unaugmented biodegradation may be unable to achieve the remedial objectives within an acceptable time. Bench-scale experiments using soils native to the site provide evidence that, in addition to nutrient additions, a pulsed oxygen delivery can increase biodegradation rates by stimulating the microbial production of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), leading to a reduction in surface tension and an increase in contaminant bioavailability. Pilot-scale tests at the field site are evaluating the effectiveness of stimulating in situ biosurfactant production using cyclic biosparging. The cyclic sparging creates extended periods of alternating aerobic and oxygen-depleted conditions in the submerged smear zone. The increased bioavailability of LPH and the resulting biodegradation enhancements during the test are evaluated using measurements of surface tension (as confirmation of biosurfactant accumulation) and nitrate concentrations (as substantiation of anaerobic biodegradation during shut-off periods). The

  12. Monitoring of the aerobe biodegradation of chlorinated organic solvents by stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Anikó; Futó, István; Palcsu, László

    2014-05-01

    Our chemical-biological basic research aims to eliminate chlorinated environmental contaminants from aquifers around industrial areas in the frame of research program supported by the European Social Fund (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0043). The most careful and simplest way includes the in situ biodegradation with the help of cultured and compound specific strains. Numerous members of Pseudomonas bacteria are famous about function of bioremediation. They can metabolism the environmental hazardous chemicals like gas oils, dyes, and organic solvents. Our research based on the Pseudomonas putida F1 strain, because its ability to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene. Several methods were investigated to estimate the rate of biodegradation, such as the measurement of the concentration of the pollutant along the contamination pathway, the microcosm's studies or the compound specific stable isotope analysis. In this area in the Transcarpathian basin we are pioneers in the stable isotope monitoring of biodegradation. The main goal is to find stable isotope fractionation factors by stable isotope analysis, which can help us to estimate the rate and effectiveness of the biodegradation. The subsequent research period includes the investigation of the method, testing its feasibility and adaptation in the environment. Last but not least, the research gives an opportunity to identify the producer of the contaminant based on the stable isotope composition of the contaminant.

  13. Measuring Star-Formation Rates of AGNs and QSOs using a new calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papovich, Casey

    Understanding the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion is one of the key questions in galaxy formation theory. This relation is important for understanding why at present the mass in galaxy bulges (on scales of kpc) correlates so tightly with the mass of galaxy central supermassive blackholes (on scales of AU). Feedback from supermassive black hole accretion may also be responsible for heating or expelling cold gas from galaxies, shutting off the fuel for star-formation and additional black hole growth. Did bulges proceed the formation of black holes, or vice versa, or are they contemporaneous? Therefore, understanding the exact rates of star-formation and supermassive black hole growth, and how they evolve with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. It has previously been nearly impossible to study simultaneously both star-formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies because the emission from black hole accretion contaminates nearly all diagnostics of star-formation. The "standard" diagnostics for the star-formation rate (the emission from hydrogen, UV emission, midIR emission, far-IR emission, etc) are not suitable for measuring star-formation rates in galaxies with actively accreting supermassive blackholes. In this proposal, the researchers request NASA/ADP funding for an archival study using spectroscopy with the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure simultaneously the star-formation rate (SFR) and bolometric emission from accreting supermassive blackholes to understand the complex relation between both processes. The key to this study is that they will develop a new calibrator for SFRs in galaxies with active supermassive black holes based on the molecular emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which emit strongly in the mid-IR (3 - 20 micron) and are very strong in spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The PAH molecules exist near photo-dissociation regions, and

  14. Microbial degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons on organoclay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-11-01

    The role of organoclays in hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clays used for this study were Na-montmorillonite and saponite. These two clays were treated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce organoclays which were used in this study. The study indicated that clays with high cation exchange capacity (CEC) such as Na-montmorillonite produced an organomontmorillonite that was inhibitory to biodegradation of the crude oil hydrocarbons. Extensive hydrophobic interaction between the organic phase of the organoclay and the crude oil hydrocarbons is suggested to render the hydrocarbons unavailable for biodegradation. However, untreated Na-montmorillonite was stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbons and is believed to have done so because of its high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients making it easy for the microbes to access the nutrients. This study indicates that unlike unmodified montmorillonites, organomontmorillonite may not serve any useful purpose in the bioremediation of crude oil spill sites where hydrocarbon removal by biodegradation is desired within a rapid time period.

  15. Evaluation of the biodegradation of Alaska North Slope oil in microcosms using the biodegradation model BIOB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish eTorlapati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the details of a numerical model, BIOB that is capable of simulating the biodegradation of oil entrapped in the sediment. The model uses Monod kinetics to simulate the growth of bacteria in the presence of nutrients and the subsequent consumption of hydrocarbons. The model was used to simulate experimental results of Exxon Valdez oil biodegradation in laboratory columns (Venosa et al. (2010. In that study, samples were collected from three different islands: Eleanor Island (EL107, Knight Island (KN114A, and Smith Island (SM006B, and placed in laboratory microcosms for a duration of 168 days to investigate oil bioremediation through natural attenuation and nutrient amendment. The kinetic parameters of the BIOB model were estimated by fitting to the experimental data using a parameter estimation tool based on Genetic Algorithms (GA. The parameter values of EL107 and KN114A were similar whereas those of SM006B were different from the two other sites; in particular biomass growth at SM006B was four times slower than at the other two islands. Grain size analysis from each site revealed that the specific surface area per unit mass of sediment was considerably lower at SM006B, which suggest that the surface area of sediments is a key control parameter for microbial growth in sediments. Comparison of the BIOB results with exponential decay curves fitted to the data indicated that BIOB provided better fit for KN114A and SM006B in nutrient amended treatments, and for EL107 and KN114A in natural attenuation. In particular, BIOB was able to capture the initial slow biodegradation due to the lag phase in microbial growth. Sensitivity analyses revealed that oil biodegradation at all three locations were sensitive to nutrient concentration whereas SM006B was sensitive to initial biomass concentration due to its slow growth rate. Analyses were also performed to compare the half-lives of individual compounds with the decay rate of the overall PAH.

  16. Biodegradation of geosmin by a novel Gram-negative bacterium; isolation, phylogenetic characterisation and degradation rate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefel, Daniel; Ho, Lionel; Monis, Paul T; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P

    2009-06-01

    Biologically active sand filters within water treatment plants (WTPs) are now recognised as an effective barrier for the removal of geosmin. However, little is known regarding the actual microbiological processes occurring or the bacteria capable of degrading geosmin. This study reports the enrichment and isolation of a Gram-negative bacterium, Geo48, from the biofilm of a WTP sand filter where the isolate was shown to effectively degrade geosmin individually. Experiments revealed that Geo48 degraded geosmin in a planktonic state by a pseudo-first-order mechanism. Initial geosmin concentrations ranging from 100 to 1000ng/l were shown to directly influence geosmin degradation in reservoir water by Geo48, with rate constants increasing from 0.010h(-1) (R(2)=0.93) to 0.029h(-1) (R(2)=0.97) respectively. Water temperature also influenced degradation of geosmin by Geo48 where temperatures of 11, 22 and 30 degrees C resulted in rate constants of 0.017h(-1) (R(2)=0.98), 0.023h(-1) (R(2)=0.91) and 0.019h(-1) (R(2)=0.85) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene of Geo48 revealed it was a member of the Alphaproteobacteria and clustered with 99% bootstrap support with an isolate designated Geo24, a Sphingopyxis sp. previously described as degrading geosmin but only as a member of a bacterial consortium. Of the previously described bacteria, Geo48 was most similar to Sphingopyxis alaskensis (97.2% sequence similarity to a 1454bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene). To date, this is the only study to report the isolation and characterisation of a Gram-negative bacterium from a biologically active sand filter capable of the sole degradation of geosmin.

  17. Study on biodegradation of Mazut by newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC10061: improving and kinetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorasani Alireza Chackoshian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mazut as a source content of various hydrocarbons is hard to be degraded and its cracking could turn mazut into useful materials. Nevertheless degradation of mazut by routine methods is too expensive but application of indigenous microorganisms as biocatalysts could be effective and important to lower the costs and expand its consumption. Mazut biodegradation can be improved using various strategies; Therefore in this study newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC 10061 was used in a method of gradual addition of mazut into medium and its results were compared with simple addition method. To investigate degradation of mazut by BBRC 10061, influence of increase of mazut concentration was assayed based on gradual addition method. Also different kinetic models were used to evaluate kinetics of the process. Results showed that gradual addition method has been a beneficial technique for improvement of mazut degradation because bacterial induction to produce biosurfactant and essential enzymes for cracking mazut was higher during process. Although addition of more mazut increased the rate of biodegradation but percentage of degradation decreased. pH of medium decreased during biodegradation period while electric potential increased. Also the biodegradation kinetics was not fitted with the biokinetic models; therefore kinetics of biodegradation of mazut has to be studied by new models.

  18. Study on Biodegradation of Mazut by Newly Isolated strain Enterobacter Cloacae BBRC10061: Improving and Kinetic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Chackoshian Khorasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mazut as a source content of various hydrocarbons is hard to be degraded and its cracking could turn mazut into useful materials. Nevertheless degradation of mazut by routine methods is too expensive but application of indigenous microorganisms as biocatalysts could be effective and important to lower the costs and expand its consumption. Mazut biodegradation can be improved using various strategies; Therefore in this study newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC 10061 was used in a method of gradual addition of mazut into medium and its results were compared with simple addition method. To investigate degradation of mazut by BBRC 10061, influence of increase of mazut concentration was assayed based on gradual addition method. Also different kinetic models were used to evaluate kinetics of the process. Results showed that gradual addition method has been a beneficial technique for improvement of mazut degradation because bacterial induction to produce biosurfactant and essential enzymes for cracking mazut was higher during process. Although addition of more mazut increased the rate of biodegradation but percentage of degradation decreased. pH of medium decreased during biodegradation period while electric potential increased. Also the biodegradation kinetics was not fitted with the biokinetic models; therefore kinetics of biodegradation of mazut has to be studied by new models.

  19. Effect of a commercial alcohol ethoxylate surfactant (C11-15E7) on biodegradation of phenanthrene in a saline water medium by Neptunomonas naphthovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Liang; Bai, Renbi

    2005-02-01

    Biodegradation of poorly soluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been a challenge in bioremediation. In recent years, surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH contaminants has attracted great attention in research. In this study, biodegradation of phenanthrene as a model PAHs solubilized in saline micellar solutions of a biodegradable commercial alcohol ethoxylate nonionic surfactant was investigated. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant and its solubilization capacity for phenanthrene were examined in an artificial saline water medium, and a type of marine bacteria, Neptunomonas naphthovorans, was studied for the biodegradation of phenanthrene solubilized in the surfactant micellar solutions of the saline medium. It is found that the solubility of phenanthrene in the surfactant micellar solutions increased linearly with the surfactant concentrations, but, at a fixed phenanthrene concentration, the biodegradability of phenanthrene in the micellar solutions decreased with the increase of the surfactant concentrations. This was attributed to the reduced bioavailability of phenanthrene, due to its increased solubilization extent in the micellar phase and possibly lowered mass transfer rate from the micellar phase into the aqueous phase or into the bacterial cells. In addition, an inhibitory effect of the surfactant on the bacterial growth at high surfactant concentrations may also play a role. It is concluded that the surfactant largely enhanced the solubilization of phenanthrene in the saline water medium, but excess existence of the surfactant in the medium should be minimized or avoided for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by Neptunomonas naphthovorans.

  20. Biological Activity Assessment in Mexican Tropical Soils with Different Hydrocarbon Contamination Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveroll-Larios, Jessica; Escalante-Espinosa, Erika; Fócil-Monterrubio, Reyna L; Díaz-Ramírez, Ildefonso J

    The use of soil health indicators linked to microbial activities, such as key enzymes and respirometric profiles, helps assess the natural attenuation potential of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons. In this study, the intrinsic physicochemical characteristics, biological activity and biodegradation potential were recorded for two soils with different contamination histories (>5 years and contaminated soil samples. Soil suspensions were tested as microbial inocula in biodegradation potential assays using contaminated perlite as an inert support. The basal respiratory rate of the recently contaminated soil was 15-38 mg C-CO2 kg(-1) h(-1), while the weathered soil presented a greater basal mineralisation capacity of 55-70 mg C-CO2 kg(-1) h(-1). The basal levels of lipase and dehydrogenase were significantly greater than those recorded in non-contaminated soils (551 ± 21 μg pNP g(-1)). Regarding the biodegradation potential assessment, the lipase (1000-3000 μg pNP g(-1) of perlite) and dehydrogenase (~3000 μg INF g(-1) of perlite) activities in the inoculum of the recently contaminated soil were greater than those recorded in the inoculum of the weathered soil. This was correlated with a high mineralisation rate (~30 mg C-CO2 kg(-1) h(-1)) in the recently contaminated soil and a reduction in hydrocarbon concentration (~30 %). The combination of an inert support and enzymatic and respirometric analyses made it possible to detect the different biodegradation capacities of the studied inocula and the natural attenuation potential of a recently contaminated soil at high hydrocarbon concentrations.

  1. Biodegradation capacities of diesel soil and microbial composition of a microflora from a contaminated-soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, S.; Marchal, R.; Monot, F. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), Dept. de Biotechnologie et Chimie de la Biomasse, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Penet, S.; Sghir, A.; Le Paslier, D. [Genoscope, UMR CNRS 8030 Structure et Evolution des Genomes, 91 - Evry (France)

    2005-07-01

    In hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, efficiency of natural attenuation depends on the biodegradation capacities of local micro-florae. In this study, degradation capacity of a microflora from a soil contaminated by diesel oil was investigated. The degradation rate and mineralisation yield were assessed in closed-flask system by gas chromatography (GC-FID) after a 4-week incubation period. The bacterial composition of the soil microflora was then determined through phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The contaminated-soil microflora extensively degraded commercial diesel oil (DO). At the end of incubation period, all n-alkanes and identifiable iso-alkanes such as farnesane, pristane and phytane were totally consumed. The so-called 'unresolved complex hydrocarbon mixture' (UCM), describing the raised baseline hump of petroleum gas chromatograms, was degraded to a large extent, highlighting the remarkable biodegradation capacity of the soil microflora. The biodegradation rate representing the relative amount of substrate biodegraded was 93%; the mineralisation yield standing for the relative amount of substrate transformed into CO{sub 2} was 54%. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to study prokaryotic diversity in the soil sample. A 16S rRNA gene library was constructed using the total genomic DNA amplified by PCR with primers specific for bacterial domain. Phylogenetic analysis of almost full-length 16S rRNA genes was performed using the ARB software package. Results show that among 328 sequences analysed, 91 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be detected. They were affiliated to 9 phylogenetic divisions among which Proteobacteria (73%) was the predominant group. In addition, 56% of the OTUs belonged to novel putative phylo-types never described before. (authors)

  2. Intimately coupling of photolysis accelerates nitrobenzene biodegradation, but sequential coupling slows biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lihui [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Zhang, Yongming, E-mail: zhym@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Bai, Qi; Yan, Ning; Xu, Hua [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Rittmann, Bruce E. [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5701 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Intimately coupled UV photolysis accelerated nitrobenzene biodegradation. • NB biodegradation was slowed by accumulation of nitrophenol. • Oxalic acid was a key product of UV photolysis. • Oxalic acid accelerated biodegradation of nitrobenzene and nitrophenol by a co-substrate effect. • Intimate coupling of UV and biodegradation accentuated the benefits of oxalic acid. - Abstract: Photo(cata)lysis coupled with biodegradation is superior to photo(cata)lysis or biodegradation alone for removal of recalcitrant organic compounds. The two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously via intimate coupling. We studied nitrobenzene (NB) removal and mineralization to evaluate why intimate coupling of photolysis with biodegradation was superior to sequential coupling. Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor, we compared direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis (P + B), simultaneous photolysis and biodegradation (P&B), and biodegradation with nitrophenol (NP) and oxalic acid (OA) added individually and simultaneously (B + NP, B + OA, and B + NP + OA); NP and OA were NB’s main UV-photolysis products. Compared with B, the biodegradation rate P + B was lower by 13–29%, but intimately coupling (P&B) had a removal rate that was 10–13% higher; mineralization showed similar trends. B + OA gave results similar to P&B, B + NP gave results similar to P + B, and B + OA + NP gave results between P + B and P&B, depending on the amount of OA and NP added. The photolysis product OA accelerated NB biodegradation through a co-substrate effect, but NP was inhibitory. Although decreasing the UV photolysis time could minimize the inhibition impact of NP in P + B, P&B gave the fastest removal of NB by accentuating the co-substrate effect of OA.

  3. BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL OIL IN SOIL AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF BIOVENTING AND AMENDMENT WITH BREWERY WASTE EFFLUENTS AS BIOSTIMULATION-BIOAUGMENTATION AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the effects of natural bioattenuation, bioventing, and brewery waste effluents amendment as biostimulation-bioaugmentation agent on biodegradation of diesel oil in unsaturated soil. A microcosm system was constructed consisting of five plastic buckets containing 1 kg of soil, artificially contaminated or spiked with 10% w/w of diesel oil. Biodegradation was monitored over 28 days by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of the soil and total hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The results showed that combination of brewery waste effluents amendment and bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 91.5% of diesel removal from contaminated soil; with the brewery waste effluents amendment (biostimulation-bioaugmentation, the percentage of diesel oil removal was 78.7%; with bioventing, diesel oil percentage degradation was 61.7% and the natural bioattenuation technique resulted in diesel oil removal percentage be not higher than 40%. Also, the total hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (THDB count in all the treatments increased throughout the remediation period. The highest bacterial growth was observed for combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy. A first-order kinetic model was fitted to the biodegradation data to evaluate the biodegradation rate and the corresponding half-life time was estimated. The model revealed that diesel oil contaminated-soil microcosms under combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy had higher biodegradation rate constants, k as well as lower half-life times, t1/2 than other remediation systems. This study showed that the microbial consortium, organic solids, nitrogen and phosphorus present in the brewery waste effluents proved to be efficient as potential biostimulation-bioaugmentation agents for bioremediation processes of soils contaminated with diesel oil

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND PAHS IN FIELD-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been reported to occur under aerobic, sulfate reducing, and denitrifying conditions. PAHs present in contaminated sites, however, are known for their persistence. Most published studies were conducted in systems wh...

  5. Use of two-surfactants mixtures to attain specific HLB values for assisted TPH-diesel biodegradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis G. Torres; Neftalí Rojas; Rosario Iturbe

    2004-01-01

    In a surfactant assisted biodegradation process, the choice of surfactant(s) is of crucial importance. The question is: does the type of surfactant (i.e. chemical family) affect the biodegradation process at fixed hidrophillic-lypofillic balance HLB values? Microcosm assessments were developed using contaminated soil, with around of 5000 mg/kg of hydrocarbons as TPH-diesel. Mixtures of three nonionic surfactants were employed to get a wide range of specific HLB values. Tween20 and Span20 were mixed in the appropriate proportions to get HLB values between 8.6 and 16.7. Tween/Span60 mixtures reached HLB values between 4.7 and 14.9. Finally, Tween/Span80 combinations yielded HLB values between 4.3 and 15. TPH-diesel biodegradation was measured at the beginning, and after 8 weeks, as well as the FCU/grsoil, as a measure of microorganisms′ development during the biodegradation period. A second aim of this work was to assess the use of guar gum as a biodegradation enhancer instead of synthetic products. The conclusions of this work are that surfactant chemical family, and not only the HLB value clearly affects the assisted biodegradation rate. Surfactant's synergism was clearly observed. Regarding the use of guar gum, no biodegradation enhancement was observed for the three assessed concentrations i.e., 2, 20, and 200 mg/kg, respectively. On the contrary, TPH-diesel removal was lower as the gum concentration increased. It is quite possible that guar gum was used as a microbial substrate.

  6. Biodegradable thermogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hee; Joo, Min Kyung; Choi, Bo Gyu; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2012-03-20

    All living creatures respond to external stimuli. Similarly, some polymers undergo conformational changes in response to changes in temperature, pH, magnetic field, electrical field, or the wavelength of light. In one type of stimuli-responsive polymer, thermogel polymers, the polymer aqueous solution undergoes sol-to-gel transition as the temperature increases. Drugs or cells can be mixed into the polymer aqueous solution when it is in its lower viscosity solution state. After injection of the solution into a target site, heating prompts the formation of a hydrogel depot in situ, which can then act as a drug releasing system or a cell growing matrix. In this Account, we describe key materials developed in our laboratory for the construction of biodegradable thermogels. We particularly emphasize recently developed polypeptide-based materials where the secondary structure and nanoassembly play an important role in the determining the material properties. This Account will provide insights for controlling parameters, such as the sol-gel transition temperature, gel modulus, critical gel concentration, and degradability of the polymer, when designing a new thermogel system for a specific biomedical application. By varying the stereochemistry of amino acids in polypeptides, the molecular weight of hydrophobic/hydrophilic blocks, the composition of the polypeptides, the hydrophobic end-capping of the polypeptides, and the microsequences of a block copolymer, we have controlled the thermosensitivity and nanoassembly patterns of the polymers. We have investigated a series of thermogel biodegradable polymers. Polymers such as poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid), polycaprolactone, poly(trimethylene carbonate), polycyanoacrylate, sebacic ester, polypeptide were used as hydrophobic blocks, and poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) were used as hydrophilic blocks. To prepare a polymer sensitive to pH and temperature, carboxylic acid or amine groups were introduced

  7. Initial microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are very hazardous environmental pollutants because of their mutagenic, carcinogenic and toxic effects on living systems. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the ability and efficiency of selected bacterial isolates obtained from oil-contaminated areas to biodegrade PAHs. The potential of the bacteria to biodegrade various aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed using the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol assay. Further biodegradation of PAHs was monitored by gravimetric and gas-chromatographic analysis. Among the eight bacterial isolates, identified on the basis of 16S rDNA sequences, two isolates, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, had the ability to grow on and utilize almost all examined hydrocarbons. Those isolates were further examined for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene, as single substrates, and as a mixture, in vitro for ten days. After three days, both isolates degraded a significant amount phenanthrene, which has a simpler chemical structure than pyrene. Planomicrobium sp.RNP01 commenced biodegradation of pyrene in the PAH mixture only after it had almost completly degraded phenanthrene. The isolated and characterized bacteria, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, have shown high bioremediation potential and are likely candidates to be used for degradation of highly toxic PAHs in contaminated areas. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43004

  8. Best conditions for biodegradation of diesel oil by chemometric tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kaczorek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel oil biodegradation by different bacteria-yeast-rhamnolipids consortia was tested. Chromatographic analysis of post-biodegradation residue was completed with chemometric tools (ANOVA, and a novel ranking procedure based on the sum of ranking differences. These tools were used in the selection of the most effective systems. The best results of aliphatic fractions of diesel oil biodegradation were observed for a yeast consortia with Aeromonas hydrophila KR4. For these systems the positive effect of rhamnolipids on hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed. However, rhamnolipids addition did not always have a positive influence on the biodegradation process (e.g. in case of yeast consortia with Stenotrophomonas maltophila KR7. Moreover, particular differences in the degradation pattern were observed for lower and higher alkanes than in the case with C22. Normally, the best conditions for "lower" alkanes are Aeromonas hydrophila KR4 + emulsifier independently from yeasts and e.g. Pseudomonas stutzeri KR7 for C24 alkane.

  9. Growth of fungi on volatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenafeta Boldú, F.X.

    2002-01-01

    The present study aimed the better understanding of the catabolism of monoaromatic hydrocarbons by fungi. This knowledge can be used to enhance the biodegradation of BTEX pollutants. Fungi with the capacity of using toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated by enriching environme

  10. Relative quantitative PCR to assess bacterial community dynamics during biodegradation of diesel and biodiesel fuels under various aeration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyplik, Paweł; Schmidt, Marcin; Szulc, Alicja; Marecik, Roman; Lisiecki, Piotr; Heipieper, Hermann J; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Vainshtein, Mikhail; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2011-03-01

    The degradation of diesel fuel, B20 blend and biodiesel in liquid cultures by a seven-member bacterial consortium was compared under conditions with full aeration or with limited aeration with nitrate added as main electron acceptor. Community dynamics was assessed employing real-time PCR and the ddCt method for relative quantification. Biodegradation rates increased with increasing biodiesel content, but were significantly reduced under conditions with nitrate. Despite large variations in biodegradation rates, magnitude changes in population numbers were typically observed only from zero to one order, regardless the type of fuel and electron acceptor. Only Comamonadaceae and Variovorax sp. distinctly preferred aerobic conditions, and during aerobic growth showed suppression as fuel contained more biodiesel. Thus, the consortium is relatively stable and most of the degraders can shift their metabolism from hydrocarbons to biodiesel. The stability of the consortium is of interest in the context of biodiesel-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining HPLC-GCXGC, GCXGC/ToF-MS, and selected ecotoxicity assays for detailed monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in soil and leaching water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Debin; Lookman, Richard; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Weltens, Reinhilde; Vanermen, Guido; De Brucker, Nicole; Diels, Ludo

    2009-10-15

    HPLC-GCXGC/FID (high-performance liquid chromatography followed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection) and GCXGC/ToF-MS (comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry) were used to study the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil microcosms during 20 weeks. Two soils were studied: one spiked with fresh diesel and one field sample containing weathered diesel-like oil. Nutrient amended and unamended samples were included. Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) levels in spiked soil decreased from 15,000 to 7,500 mg/kg d.m. and from 12,0O0 to 4,000 mg/kg d.m. in the field soil. Linear alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were better biodegradable (>60% degraded) than iso-alkanes; cycloalkanes were least degradable (water showed that initially various oxygenated hydrocarbons were produced. Compound peaks seemed to move up and rightward in the GCXGC chromatograms, indicating that more polar and heavier compounds were formed as biodegradation proceeded. Nutrient amendment can increase TPH removal rates, but had adverse effects on ecotoxicity and leaching potential in our experiment This was explained by observed shifts in the soil microbial community. Ecotoxicity assays showed that residual TPH still inhibited cress (Lepidium sativum) seed germination, but the leaching water was no longer toxic toward luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri).

  12. Pyrene biodegradation with layer-by-layer assembly bio-microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fucai; Zhang, Zhengfang; Yang, Chen; Guo, Chuling; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    Biotechnology is considered as a promising technology for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the environment. Free bacteria are often sensitive to some biotic and abiotic factors in the environment to the extent that their ability to effect biodegradation of organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, is hampered. Consequently, it is imperative to carry out investigations into biological systems that will obviate or aid tolerance of bacteria to harsh environmental conditions. Chitosan/alginate bio-microcapsules produced using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method were tested for pyrene (PYR) biodegradation under harsh environmental conditions. Morphology observation indicated that the flake bio-microcapsules could be successfully prepared through LBL assembly method. Surface analysis showed that the bio-microcapsules had large fractions of mesopores. The results of the biodegradation experiments revealed that the 95% of 10mgL(-1) PYR could be removed by the bacteria encapsulated chitosan/alginate bio-microcapsules in 3 days, which was higher than that of the free bacteria (59%). Compared to the free cells, the bacteria encapsulated chitosan/alginate bio-microcapsules produced 1-6 times higher PYR biodegradation rates at a high initial PYR concentration (50mgL(-1)) and extremely low pH values (pH =3) or temperatures (10°C or 40°C), as well as high salt stress. The results indicated that bacteria in microcapsules treatment gained a much higher tolerance to environmental stress and LBL bio-microcapsule could be promising candidate for remediating the organic pollutants.

  13. Effect of surfactant and oil additions in the biodegradation of hexane and toluene vapours in batch tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, H; Revah, S; Cervantes, F J; Arriaga, S

    2011-01-01

    The biological treatment of gaseous emissions of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) results in low rates of elimination partially because of the low solubility of VOCs in water. Recently, the use of two-phase partition bioreactors (TPPBs) was proposed to increase the bioavailability and consequently the elimination capacities of this kind of VOC. In the present study, TPPBs operating in a batch feed mode were tested for biodegradation of hexane and toluene vapours with a microbial consortium. The results obtained were compared with single-phase systems (control experiments). The liquid phase used was silicone oil (organic phase) with the surfactant Pluronic F-68. Experiments were named F1 and F2 for one and two phases, respectively, and F(1S) and F(2S) when the surfactant was included. The maximum specific rates (S(rates)) of hydrocarbon consumption for hexane and toluene were 539 and 773 mg(hydrocarbon)/(g(protein) x h), respectively. For both substrates, the systems that showed the highest S(rates) of hydrocarbon consumption were F2 and F(2S). In experiment F(1S) the surfactant Pluronic F-68 increased the solubility of hydrocarbons in the liquid phase, but did not increase the S(rates). The maximum percentages of mineralization were 51% and 72% for hexane and toluene, respectively. The results showed that simultaneous addition of silicone oil and surfactant favours the mineralization, but not the rate ofbiodegradation, of toluene and hexane vapours.

  14. Biodegradable polymers for electrospinning: towards biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Dan; Liow, Sing Shy; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-12-01

    Electrospinning has received much attention recently due to the growing interest in nano-technologies and the unique material properties. This review focuses on recent progress in applying electrospinning technique in production of biodegradable nanofibers to the emerging field of biomedical. It first introduces the basic theory and parameters of nanofibers fabrication, with focus on factors affecting the morphology and fiber diameter of biodegradable nanofibers. Next, commonly electrospun biodegradable nanofibers are discussed, and the comparison of the degradation rate of nanoscale materials with macroscale materials are highlighted. The article also assesses the recent advancement of biodegradable nanofibers in different biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensor and immunoassay. Future perspectives of biodegradable nanofibers are discussed in the last section, which emphasizes on the innovation and development in electrospinning of hydrogels nanofibers, pore size control and scale-up productions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrocarbon degradation abilities of psychrotolerant Bacillus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Kolsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation requires identification of hydrocarbon degrading microbes and the investigation of psychrotolerant hydrocarbon degrading microbes is essential for successful biodegradation in cold seawater. In the present study, a total of 597 Bacillus isolates were screened to select psychrotolerant strains and 134 isolates were established as psychrotolerant on the basis of their ability to grow at 7 °C. Hydrocarbon degradation capacities of these 134 psychrotolerant isolate were initially investigated on agar medium containing different hydrocarbons (naphthalene, n-hexadecane, mineral oil and 47 positive isolates were grown in broth medium containing hydrocarbons at 20 °C under static culture. Bacterial growth was estimated in terms of viable cell count (cfu ml–1. Isolates showing the best growth in static culture were further grown in presence of crude oil under shaking culture and viable cell count was observed between 8.3 × 105–7.4 × 108 cfu ml–1. In the final step, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH (chrysene and naphthalene degradation yield of two most potent isolates was determined by GC-MS along with the measurement of pH, biomass and emulsification activities. Results showed that isolates Ege B.6.2i and Ege B.1.4Ka have shown 60% and 36% chrysene degradation yield, respectively, while 33% and 55% naphthalene degradation yield, respectively, with emulsification activities ranges between 33–50%. These isolates can be used to remove hydrocarbon contamination from different environments, particularly in cold regions.

  16. Phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons by using a freshwater fern species Azolla filiculoides Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösesakal, Taylan; Ünal, Muammer; Kulen, Oktay; Memon, Abdülrezzak; Yüksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the phytoremediation capacity of Azolla filiculoides Lam. for the water resources contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated. The plants were grown in nitrogen-free Hoagland nutrient solution containing 0.005%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 0.5% crude oil under greenhouse conditions for 15 days. Although the growth rate of the plants were not negatively influenced by the presence of crude oil in the media for the concentration of 0.005% and 0.01% v/v, a gradual impeding effect of crude oil in the growth media has been observed at concentrations 0.05-0.1%. More than 0.1% crude oil in the growth medium ostensibly retarded the growth. For example, 0.2% oil in the media reduced growth approximately 50% relative to the control, and the presence of crude oil at concentrations 0.3% or more were lethal. The data about the percentage of plant growth, fresh weight increase and root growth clearly indicated that the tolerance level of A. filiculoides plants to crude oil ranges between 0.1% and 0.2%. In comparison to control samples, the biodegradation rate of total aliphatic and aromatic (phenathrene) hydrocarbons at 0.05-0.2% oil concentrations, was 94-73% and 81-77%, respectively. On the other hand, in case of further increases in oil concentration in media, i.e.; 0.3-0.5%, the biodegradation rate was still higher in the experimental samples, respectively 71-63% and 75-71%. The high biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons in the experimental samples suggested that A. filiculoides plants could be a promising candidate to be used for the phytoremediation of low crude oil contaminated precious freshwater resources.

  17. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  18. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Victoria A; Brubaker, Gaylen R; Zenker, Matthew J; Prince, Roger C; Gieg, Lisa M; Da Silva, Marcio L B; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2009-03-01

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4- and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n-alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO(4) day(-1)). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non-COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m- and o-xylene, as well as several alkanes (C(6)-C(12)). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non-COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules.

  19. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum‐contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Victoria A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Zenker, Matthew J.; Prince, Roger C.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Da Silva, Marcio L.B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2‐methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4‐ and 1,3,5‐trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n‐alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO4 day−1). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non‐COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m‐ and o‐xylene, as well as several alkanes (C6–C12). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non‐COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules. PMID:21261914

  20. Spatial uncoupling of biodegradation, soil respiration, and PAH concentration in a creosote contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Göran; Törneman, Niklas; Yang, Xiuhong

    2010-09-01

    Hotspots and coldspots of concentration and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) marginally overlapped at the 0.5-100 m scale in a creosote contaminated soil in southern Sweden, suggesting that concentration and biodegradation had little spatial co-variation. Biodegradation was substantial and its spatial variability considerable and highly irregular, but it had no spatial autocorrelation. The soil concentration of PAHs explained only 20-30% of the variance of their biodegradation. Soil respiration was spatially autocorrelated. The spatial uncoupling between biodegradation and soil respiration seemed to be governed by the aging of PAHs in the soil, since biodegradation of added 13C phenanthrene covaried with both soil respiration and microbial biomass. The latter two were also correlated with high concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that are common in gram-negative bacteria. However, several of the hotspots of biodegradation coincided with hotspots for the distribution of a PLFA indicative of fungal biomass.

  1. Assessment of crude oil biodegradation in arctic seashore sediments: effects of temperature, salinity, and crude oil concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Schiewer, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The expected increase in offshore oil exploration and production in the Arctic may lead to crude oil spills along arctic shorelines. To evaluate the potential effectiveness of bioremediation to treat such spills, oil spill bioremediation in arctic sediments was simulated in laboratory microcosms containing beach sediments from Barrow (Alaska), spiked with North Slope Crude, and incubated at varying temperatures and salinities. Biodegradation was measured via respiration rates (CO2 production); volatilization was quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS) analysis of hydrocarbons sorbed to activated carbon, and hydrocarbons remaining in the sediment were quantified by GC/flame ionization detector (FID). Higher temperature leads to increased biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms, while the release of volatile organic compounds was similar at both temperatures. Increased salinity had a small positive impact on crude oil removal. At higher crude oil dosages, volatilization increased, however CO2 production did not. While only a small percentage of crude oil was completely biodegraded, a larger percentage was volatilized within 6-9 weeks.

  2. [Biodegradation of polyethylene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Song, Yi-ling; Qin, Xiao-yan

    2007-05-01

    Plastic material is one of the most serious solid wastes pollution. More than 40 million tons of plastics produced each year are discarded into environment. Plastics accumulated in the environment is highly resistant to biodegradation and not be able to take part in substance recycle. To increase the biodegradation efficiency of plastics by different means is the main research direction. This article reviewed the recent research works of polyethylene biodegradation that included the modification and pretreatment of polyethylene, biodegradation pathway, the relevant microbes and enzymes and the changes of physical, chemical and biological properties after biodegradation. The study directions of exploiting the kinds of life-forms of biodegradation polyethylene except the microorganisms, isolating and cloning the key enzymes and gene that could produce active groups, and enhancing the study on polyethylene biodegradation without additive were proposed.

  3. The use of ecocores to evaluate biodegradation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nielsen, Jef

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory sediment microcosm called the ecocore is described. It has been used to test the biodegradability of substances which predominantly enter the sediment. A new method for introducing hydrophobic test substances such as hydrocarbons to the test system is also described. In a series...

  4. 盐碱土壤多环芳烃降解菌群筛选及其降解特性%Screening and Biodegradation Characteristics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons-Degrading Consortium From Saline-Alkali Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋立超; 刘灵芝; 李培军; 刘宛; 张玉龙

    2012-01-01

    为了强化多环芳烃(PAHs)污染盐碱土壤原位微生物修复的应用,并提供高效的菌种资源,从天津大港油田盐碱化的油污土壤中富集分离出1组高效降解菲、芘的耐盐碱菌群,分离获得可培养优势细菌5株、真菌3株,考察了该菌群对菲、芘的降解效果,并进行了其对菲、芘降解特性分析.结果表明,该菌群在菲、芘质量浓度分别为25、50和75 mg/L的液体无机盐培养基中培养15 d,菲、芘的降解率分别达到75.3%和53.6%、56.6%和52.0%、25.2%和13.6%;该菌群对菲、芘降解具有较广泛的盐质量分数和pH值范围,在菲、芘初始质量浓度各为50 mg/L,最适盐质量分数0~2%,最适pH值8.6条件下,添加质量分数0.4%葡萄糖培养15d后,菲、芘的降解率显著提高,达到92.1%和65.8%.细菌16S rDNA和真菌18S rDNA测序结果表明,该菌群由叶杆菌属(Phyllobacterium)、假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)、盐单胞属(Halomonas)、泛菌属(Pantoea)和青霉属(Penicillium)、双曲孢属(Sigmoidea)、胶孢炭疽属(Colletotrichum)组成.%The salt and alkaline endurable microbial consortium of degrading phenanthrene and pyrene effectively was developed from oil-contaminated saline-alkali soil of Tianjin Dagang oil field to intensify the application of situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in saline-alkaline soil and to provide highly effective microorganisms resources. Five cultivable dominate bacterium strains and three fungi strains through separation were obtained, and their degradation characteristics for phenanthrene and pyrene were analyzed. The degradation rates of phenanthrene and pyrene with 25, 50 and 75 mg/L initial concentration by the microbial consortium in liquid mineral medium after 15 d cultivation were 75. 3% and 53. 6%, 56. 6% and 52. 0%, 25. 2% and 13.6% respectively, meanwhile, when the initial concentration of phenanthrene and pyrene was 50 mg/L, respectively, the most

  5. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: similar...... to 5 mg 1(-1): high: similar to 60 mg 1(-1), and very high: similar to 600 mg 1(-1)) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms...... biodegradation of phenol, cresols, 3,4-xylenol and 3,5-xylenol was observed after short lag-phases in the anaerobic microcosms. 2,5-xylenol was partially degraded after a longer lag-phase and 2,6-xylenol persisted throughout the 3 month long experiments. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation...

  6. Effective sensing approach for assessment and monitoring of in-situ biodegradation in a subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong X.

    1999-02-01

    Rapid assessment and monitoring of biological conditions in a subsurface environment is becoming more and more important as bioremediation approaches become widely used in environmental cleanup. Remediation monitoring is also more challenging for in-situ remedial approaches, such as bioventing, biosparging, or passive bioremediation, where conventional 'inlet' and 'outlet' monitoring can no longer be applied. A sensing approach using subsurface chemical sensors offers a cost- effective alternative for remediation monitoring. Additional benefits of deploying subsurface sensors include continuous and unattended measurement with minimum disturbance to the subsurface condition. In a series of field studies, an electrochemical oxygen sensor, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide sensor, and two hydrocarbons sensors were employed for monitoring in-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Biodegradation rates were effectively measured through an in-situ respiration measurement using subsurface oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. The high sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor to small change in the concentration enables rapid respiration measurements. Subsurface hydrocarbon sensors offer a means to monitor the progress of remediation and the migration of contaminant vapors during the remediation. The chemical sensors tested are clearly cost effective for remediation monitoring. The strengths of oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors are complimentary to each other. Strengths and limitations of different hydrocarbon sensors were also noted. Balancing cost and performance of sensors is crucial for environmental remediation application.

  7. Development of biodegradable materials; balancing degradability and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J.M.; Allen, A.L.; Dell, P.A.; McCassie, J.E.; Shupe, A.E.; Stenhouse, P.J. Stenhouse, Welch, E.A.; Kaplan, D.L. [Army Natick Research Development, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The development of biodegradable materials suitable for packaging must take into consideration various performance criteria such as mechanical and barrier properties, as well as rate of biodegradability in given environments. Individual or blended biopolymer films were obtained commercially or blown into film in the laboratory and tested for tensile strength, ultimate elongation and oxygen barrier. These films were then subjected to accelerated marine biodegradation tests as well as simulated marine respirometry. Starch/ethylene vinyl alcohol films exhibited good mechanical and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were very slow to biodegrade in the simulated and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were very slow to biodegrade in the simulated marine environment. Polyhydroxyalkanoates had good mechanical properties, average oxygen barrier and good biodegradability. Data indicate that performance and biodegradability of packaging can be tailored to needs by combining individual biopolymers in different proportions in blends and laminates.

  8. The biodegradation of crude oil in the deep ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Roger C; Nash, Gordon W; Hill, Stephen J

    2016-10-15

    Oil biodegradation at a simulated depth of 1500m was studied in a high-pressure apparatus at 5°C, using natural seawater with its indigenous microbes, and 3ppm of an oil with dispersant added at a dispersant:oil ratio of 1:15. Biodegradation of the detectable hydrocarbons was prompt and extensive (>70% in 35days), although slower by about a third than under otherwise identical conditions equivalent to the surface. The apparent half-life of biodegradation of the total detectable hydrocarbons at 15MPa was 16days (compared to 13days at atmospheric pressure), although some compounds, such as the four-ring aromatic chrysene, were degraded rather more slowly.

  9. Biodegradation of diesel/biodiesel blends in saturated sand microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisiecki, Piotr; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Szulc, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the biodegradation extent of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions in saturated sandy microcosm spiked with diesel/biodiesel blends (D, B10, B20, B30, B40, B50, B60, B70, B80, B90 and B100, where D is commercial petroleum diesel fuel and B...... is commercial biodiesel blend) augmented with a bacterial consortium of petroleum degraders. The biodegradation kinetics for blends were evaluated based on measuring the amount of emitted CO2 after 578 days. Subsequently, the residual aromatic and aliphatic fractions were separated and determined by employing...... GC-FID and GC _ GC–TOF-MS. Additionally, the influence of biodiesel-amendment on the community dynamics was assessed based on the results of real-time PCR analyzes. Our results suggest that the biodegradation extents of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon were uninfluenced by the addition...

  10. Loss of volatile hydrocarbons from an LNAPL oil source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, M.J.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.

    2011-01-01

    The light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) oil pool in an aquifer that resulted from a pipeline spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was analyzed for volatile hydrocarbons (VHCs) to determine if the composition of the oil remains constant over time. Oil samples were obtained from wells at five locations in the oil pool in an anaerobic part of the glacial outwash aquifer. Samples covering a 21-year period were analyzed for 25 VHCs. Compared to the composition of oil from the pipeline source, VHCs identified in oil from wells sampled in 2008 were 13 to 64% depleted. The magnitude of loss for the VHCs analyzed was toluene ≫ o-xylene, benzene, C6 and C10–12n-alkanes > C7–C9n-alkanes > m-xylene, cyclohexane, and 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene > 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene. Other VHCs including p-xylene, 1,3,5- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenes, the tetramethylbenzenes, methyl- and ethyl-cyclohexane, and naphthalene were not depleted during the time of the study. Water–oil and air–water batch equilibration simulations indicate that volatilization and biodegradation is most important for the C6–C9n-alkanes and cyclohexanes; dissolution and biodegradation is important for most of the other hydrocarbons. Depletion of the hydrocarbons in the oil pool is controlled by: the lack of oxygen and nutrients, differing rates of recharge, and the spatial distribution of oil in the aquifer. The mass loss of these VHCs in the 5 wells is between 1.6 and 7.4% in 29 years or an average annual loss of 0.06–0.26%/year. The present study shows that the composition of LNAPL changes over time and that these changes are spatially variable. This highlights the importance of characterizing the temporal and spatial variabilities of the source term in solute-transport models.

  11. Loss of volatile hydrocarbons from an LNAPL oil source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, Mary Jo; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2011-11-01

    The light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) oil pool in an aquifer that resulted from a pipeline spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was analyzed for volatile hydrocarbons (VHCs) to determine if the composition of the oil remains constant over time. Oil samples were obtained from wells at five locations in the oil pool in an anaerobic part of the glacial outwash aquifer. Samples covering a 21-year period were analyzed for 25 VHCs. Compared to the composition of oil from the pipeline source, VHCs identified in oil from wells sampled in 2008 were 13 to 64% depleted. The magnitude of loss for the VHCs analyzed was toluene ≫ o-xylene, benzene, C 6 and C 10-12n-alkanes > C 7-C 9n-alkanes > m-xylene, cyclohexane, and 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene > 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene. Other VHCs including p-xylene, 1,3,5- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenes, the tetramethylbenzenes, methyl- and ethyl-cyclohexane, and naphthalene were not depleted during the time of the study. Water-oil and air-water batch equilibration simulations indicate that volatilization and biodegradation is most important for the C 6-C 9n-alkanes and cyclohexanes; dissolution and biodegradation is important for most of the other hydrocarbons. Depletion of the hydrocarbons in the oil pool is controlled by: the lack of oxygen and nutrients, differing rates of recharge, and the spatial distribution of oil in the aquifer. The mass loss of these VHCs in the 5 wells is between 1.6 and 7.4% in 29 years or an average annual loss of 0.06-0.26%/year. The present study shows that the composition of LNAPL changes over time and that these changes are spatially variable. This highlights the importance of characterizing the temporal and spatial variabilities of the source term in solute-transport models.

  12. Horizontal arrangement of anodes of microbial fuel cells enhances remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueyong; Wang, Xin; Li, Xiaojing; Cheng, Lijuan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-02-01

    With the aim of in situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons, anodes arranged with two different ways (horizontal or vertical) were compared in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Charge outputs as high as 833 and 762C were achieved in reactors with anodes horizontally arranged (HA) and vertically arranged (VA). Up to 12.5 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was removed in HA after 135 days, which was 50.6 % higher than that in VA (8.3 %) and 95.3 % higher than that in the disconnected control (6.4 %). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rates of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in HA were higher than those in VA. Lower mass transport resistance in the HA than that of the VA seems to result in more power and more TPH degradation. Soil pH was increased from 8.26 to 9.12 in HA and from 8.26 to 8.64 in VA, whereas the conductivity was decreased from 1.99 to 1.54 mS/cm in HA and from 1.99 to 1.46 mS/cm in VA accompanied with the removal of TPH. Considering both enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon and generation of charge in HA, the MFC with anodes horizontally arranged is a promising configuration for future applications.

  13. Biodegradation of crude oil and origin of thick oil in Liaohe Depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S.; Gao, J.; Chen, Y.; Song, S.

    1986-01-01

    The saturated hydrocarbon of crude oil in the Western Depression, Liaohe Basin have been analyzed by computerized GC-MS. The hopanes, regular steranes, diasteranes, specifically, 25-norhopanes were identified. Heavy biodegradation results in destruction of regular steranes and transformation of regular hopanes to 25-norhopanes. Diasteranes and 25-norhopanes survive heavy biodegradation and they can be used as source fingerprints for biodegraded crudes. The existence of the diasteranes and 25-norhopanes in the thick oil shows that the biodegradation plays important part in origin of the thick oil

  14. Biodegradability of commercial and weathered diesel oils Biodegradabilidade de óleos diesel comercial e intemperizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Pinto Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the capability of different microorganisms to degrade commercial diesel oil in comparison to a weathered diesel oil collected from the groundwater at a petrol station. Two microbiological methods were used for the biodegradability assessment: the technique based on the redox indicator 2,6 - dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP and soil respirometric experiments using biometer flasks. In the former we tested the bacterial cultures Staphylococcus hominis, Kocuria palustris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBI, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Bacillus cereus, a commercial inoculum, consortia obtained from soil and groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons and a consortium from an uncontaminated area. In the respirometric experiments it was evaluated the capability of the native microorganisms present in the soil from a petrol station to biodegrade the diesel oils. The redox indicator experiments showed that only the consortia, even that from an uncontaminated area, were able to biodegrade the weathered diesel. In 48 days, the removal of the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH in the respirometric experiments was approximately 2.5 times greater when the commercial diesel oil was used. This difference was caused by the consumption of labile hydrocarbons, present in greater quantities in the commercial diesel oil, as demonstrated by gas chromatographic analyses. Thus, results indicate that biodegradability studies that do not consider the weathering effect of the pollutants may over estimate biodegradation rates and when the bioaugmentation is necessary, the best strategy would be that one based on injection of consortia, because even cultures with recognised capability of biodegrading hydrocarbons may fail when applied isolated.Este trabalho objetivou avaliar a capacidade de diferentes microrganismos em degradar óleo diesel comercial em comparação com um óleo diesel intemperizado coletado da água subterrânea em um posto de combust

  15. Immersed multilayer biodegradable ureteral stent with reformed biodegradation: An in vitro experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ganggang; Xie, Hua; Huang, Yichen; Lv, Yiqing; Zhang, Mingqing; Shang, Yafeng; Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jin-Ye; Chen, Fang

    2017-03-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop a novel immersed multilayer biodegradable ureteral stent with reformed biodegradation and evaluate it in vitro. Methods Poly(glycolic-co-lactic acid) (PGLA), microsphere zein and BaSO4 were employed to produce a multilayer biodegradable stent using immersion technology. Tests of the biodegradable stents and conventional control stents were conducted in human urine in vitro to evaluate the biodegradable properties. The biocompatibility was assessed by the morphology and proliferation of urine-derived cells cultured with extracted media from the biodegradable stent and a latex material positive control. Results An immersed multilayer biodegradable stent was successfully produced. It began to degrade in week 2 and was fully degraded by week 4. The mass loss ratio in the first 2 weeks was low (approximately 10.0% at 1 week, 20.0% at 2 weeks) and increased after 3 weeks (approximately 70%) to the end of testing. During the first 2 weeks, the radial compression load performances of the biodegradable stents were better than those of the control stents with statistically significant differences ( p = 0.00, p = 0.01) and the tensile strengths were lower in the biodegradable stents than those in the control stents throughout the experiment. SEM showed that the stents degraded layer by layer from the outer to the inner wall. The influences on the cells of extracted medium from the biodegradable stents were morphologically slight and lower than 10% in relative growth rates. Conclusions This preliminary study demonstrates that the immersed multilayer biodegradable ureteral stent has good radial compression and biocompatible performance and can be degraded in vitro within 4 weeks in a moderate manner.

  16. Effect of strain rate on sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels: Sooting temperature index and sooting sensitivity index

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The effect of the strain rate on the sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames was investigated in various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels by varying the nitrogen dilution in the fuel and oxidizer streams. The sooting limit was defined as the critical fuel and oxygen mole fraction at which soot started to appear in the elastic light scattering signal. The sooting region for normal alkane fuels at a specified strain rate, in terms of the fuel and oxygen mole fraction, expanded as the number of carbon atoms increased. The alkene fuels (ethylene, propene) tested had a higher propensity for sooting as compared with alkane fuels with the same carbon numbers (ethane, propane). Branched iso-butane had a higher propensity for sooting than did n-butane. An increase in the strain rate reduced the tendency for sooting in all the fuels tested. The sensitivity of the sooting limit to the strain rate was more pronounced for less sooting fuels. When plotted in terms of calculated flame temperature, the critical oxygen mole fraction exhibited an Arrhenius form under sooting limit conditions, which can be utilized to significantly reduce the effort required to determine sooting limits at different strain rates. We found that the limiting temperatures of soot formation flames are viable sooting metrics for quantitatively rating the sooting tendency of various fuels, based on comparisons with threshold soot index and normalized smoke point data. We also introduce a sooting temperature index and a sooting sensitivity index, two quantitative measures to describe sooting propensity and its dependence on strain rate. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Crude-oil biodegradation via methanogenesis in subsurface petroleum reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D M; Head, I M; Gray, N D; Adams, J J; Rowan, A K; Aitken, C M; Bennett, B; Huang, H; Brown, A; Bowler, B F J; Oldenburg, T; Erdmann, M; Larter, S R

    2008-01-10

    Biodegradation of crude oil in subsurface petroleum reservoirs has adversely affected the majority of the world's oil, making recovery and refining of that oil more costly. The prevalent occurrence of biodegradation in shallow subsurface petroleum reservoirs has been attributed to aerobic bacterial hydrocarbon degradation stimulated by surface recharge of oxygen-bearing meteoric waters. This hypothesis is empirically supported by the likelihood of encountering biodegraded oils at higher levels of degradation in reservoirs near the surface. More recent findings, however, suggest that anaerobic degradation processes dominate subsurface sedimentary environments, despite slow reaction kinetics and uncertainty as to the actual degradation pathways occurring in oil reservoirs. Here we use laboratory experiments in microcosms monitoring the hydrocarbon composition of degraded oils and generated gases, together with the carbon isotopic compositions of gas and oil samples taken at wellheads and a Rayleigh isotope fractionation box model, to elucidate the probable mechanisms of hydrocarbon degradation in reservoirs. We find that crude-oil hydrocarbon degradation under methanogenic conditions in the laboratory mimics the characteristic sequential removal of compound classes seen in reservoir-degraded petroleum. The initial preferential removal of n-alkanes generates close to stoichiometric amounts of methane, principally by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Our data imply a common methanogenic biodegradation mechanism in subsurface degraded oil reservoirs, resulting in consistent patterns of hydrocarbon alteration, and the common association of dry gas with severely degraded oils observed worldwide. Energy recovery from oilfields in the form of methane, based on accelerating natural methanogenic biodegradation, may offer a route to economic production of difficult-to-recover energy from oilfields.

  18. Biodegradation of aged diesel in diverse soil matrixes: impact of environmental conditions and bioavailability on microbial remediation capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, N.B.; Gaans, van P.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Maphosa, F.; Smidt, H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    While bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) is in general a robust technique, heterogeneity in terms of contaminant and environmental characteristics can impact the extent of biodegradation. The current study investigates the implications of different soil matrix types (anthropogenic

  19. EFFECT OF AMOUNT OF CRUDE OIL ON EXTENT OF ITS BIODEGRADATION IN OPEN WATER- AND SANDY BEACH-LABORATORY SIMULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioremediation of marine oil spills, a technology using hydrocarbon-degrading and emulsifying capabilities of microorganisms, has many unexplored limitations, and among them is degree of environmental oil contamination. We examined the biodegradation of varying amounts of artifi...

  20. Biodegradation of aged diesel in diverse soil matrixes: impact of environmental conditions and bioavailability on microbial remediation capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, N.B.; Gaans, van P.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Maphosa, F.; Smidt, H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    While bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) is in general a robust technique, heterogeneity in terms of contaminant and environmental characteristics can impact the extent of biodegradation. The current study investigates the implications of different soil matrix types (anthropogenic

  1. Hydrocarbon-degradation by Isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline, S. Y. Ting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the potential of isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2 as a hydrocarbon degrader was established. Their biodegradation activity was first detected with the formation of clearing zones on Bushnell-Hass agar plates, with the largest diameter observed on plates supplemented with paraffin, followed by mineral oil and petrol. Utilization of hydrocarbon sources were again detected in broth cultures supplemented with similar hydrocarbon substrates, where the mean viable cell count recovered from hydrocarbon-supplemented broth cultures were higher than the initial inoculum except for napthalene. In both tests, the isolate showed higher degradability towards aliphatic hydrocarbon sources, and the least activity towards the aromatic hydrocarbon naphthalene. The isolate P. lundensis UTAR FPE2 (8 log10 cfu/mL also degraded crude diesel sample, with 69% degradation during the first three days. To conclude, this study suggests the potential use of this isolate for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environments.

  2. Determination of uptake kinetics (sampling rates) by lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Lebo, J.A.; Clark, R.C.; Gibson, V.L.; Gala, W.R.; Echols, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (R(s)s; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery- corrected R(s) values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by significant changes (relative to this study) in water temperature, degree of biofouling, and current velocity- turbulence. Included in this paper is a discussion of the effects of temperature and octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)); the impacts of biofouling and hydrodynamics are reported separately. Overall, SPMDs responded proportionally to aqueous PAH concentrations; i.e., SPMD R(s) values and SPMD-water concentration factors were independent of aqueous concentrations. Temperature effects (10, 18, and 26 ??C) on Rs values appeared to be complex but were relatively small.The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (Rss; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery-corrected Rs values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by

  3. Efficacy of commercial products in enhancing oil biodegradation in closed laboratory reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venosa, A.D.; Haines, J.R.; Nisamaneepong, W.; Govind, R.; Pradhan, S.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory screening protocol was designed and conducted to test the efficacy of 8 commercial allochthonous bacterial cultures and 2 non-bacterial products in enhancing the biodegradation of weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil in closed flasks. Three lines of evidence were used to support the decision to progress to field testing in Prince William Sound: rapid onset and high rate of oxygen uptake, substantial growth of oil degraders, and significant degradation of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of the weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil. A product had to enhance biodegradation greater than that achieved with excess mineral nutrients. Experiments were conducted in closed respirometer flasks and shake flasks, using actual seawater from Prince William Sound and weathered crude oil from a contaminated beach. Analysis of the data resulted in the selection of 2 of the 10 products for field testing. Both were bacterial products. Findings suggested that the indigenous Alaskan microorganisms were primarily responsible for the biodegradation in the closed flasks and respirometer vessels.

  4. Kinetics of nonstationary chemiluminescence during the inhibited oxidation of hydrocarbons and determination of the rate constants for peroxy radical decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusina, I.F.; Emanuel, N.M.; Gagarina, A.B.

    1986-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical analysis of the kinetics of the nonstationary inhibited chemiluminescence and suggests a method for determining the absolute value of the rate constants for the recombination of peroxy radicals and for their removal by reaction with an inhibitor. From the rate curve for the chemiluminescence in the nonstationary regime following the introduction of an inhibitor it is possible simultaneously and independently to determine the absolute values of the rate constants for recombination of the peroxy radicals and their destruction by the inhibitor. Equations are obtained for calculating the time to establish the quasistationary concentration of peroxy radicals and of radicals formed from the inhibitor, using known values of the constants.

  5. Biodegradability of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  6. Polymer material biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grabowska

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from literature was used to discuss the impact of external factors (stress, radiation, temperature, ultrasounds, biological organisms on the course of polymer material degradation. Polymer materials, in widespread use for over a dozen years, constitute a serious environmental problem. This is why their susceptibility to biodegradation is researched. Work on biodegradable polymers concernsmodifying their structure to bring their physical and chemical properties closer to plastics in practical use or using biodegradable polymers as an alternative for the current conventional materials. In addition, the publication also presents the first results of work on the biodegradation of polymer foundry binders.

  7. Biodegradability of Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tokiwa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.. In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  8. Biodegradation of Maya crude oil fractions by bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture isolated from Cyperus laxus rhizosphere soil in a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Ramirez, I. J.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M.; Favela-Torres, E. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)- Iztapalapa, Dept. of Biotechnology, Federal District (Mexico); Ramirez-Sada, H. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)-Xochimilco, Dept. of Biological Systems, Federal District (Mexico)

    2003-12-01

    Biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar constituents of Maya crude oil by a set of isolated bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture made up with all isolated strains, was evaluated. The bacterial strains were obtained from the rhizosphere of Cyperus laxus, a native plant on a highly hydrocarbon-polluted site. Oxygen uptake rate was used to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment culture. Results showed that five of the isolated strains were able to degrade 50 per cent of the aliphatic fractions of Maya crude oil. With the defined mixed culture the level of biodegradation was 47 per cent for aliphatics and 6 per cent of the aromatic-polar mixture. When grown in the presence of total hydrocarbons, the defined mixed culture was able to degrade 40 per cent of the aliphatic fraction and 26 per cent of the aromatic fraction. By combining enrichment cultures with oxygen uptake rate to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment cultures allowed the isolation of bacterial strains that are able to degrade specific hydrocarbon fractions at high consumption rates. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  9. Correlating biodegradation to magnetization in oil bearing sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Stacey; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Sephton, Mark A.; Aldana, Milagrosa; Costanzo-Alvarez, Vincenzo; Bayona, German; Williams, Wyn

    2013-07-01

    A relationship between hydrocarbons and their magnetic signatures has previously been alluded to but this is the first study to combine extensive geochemical and magnetic data of hydrocarbon-associated samples. We report a detailed study that identifies a connection between magnetic mineralogy and oil biodegradation within oil-bearing sedimentary units from Colombia, Canada Indonesia and the UK. Geochemical data reveal that all the oil samples are derived from mature type-II kerogens deposited in oxygen-poor environments. Biodegradation is evident to some extent in all samples and leads to a decrease in oil quality through the bacterially mediated conversion of aliphatic hydrocarbons to polar constituents. The percentage of oil components and the biodegradation state of the samples were compared to the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic mineralogy. A distinct decrease in magnetic susceptibility is correlated to decreasing oil quality and the amount of extractable organic matter present. Further magnetic characterization revealed that the high quality oils are dominated by pseudo-single domain grains of magnetite and the lower quality oils by larger pseudo-single domain to multidomain grains of magnetite and hematite. Hence, with decreasing oil quality there is a progressive dominance of multidomain magnetite as well as the appearance of hematite. It is concluded that biodegradation is a dual process, firstly, aliphatic hydrocarbons are removed thereby reducing oil quality and secondly, magnetic signatures are both created and destroyed. This complex relationship may explain why controversy has plagued previous attempts to resolve the connection between magnetics and hydrocarbon deposits. These findings reinforce the importance of bacteria within petroleum systems as well as providing a platform for the use of magnetization as a possible exploration tool to identify subsurface reservoirs and a novel proxy of hydrocarbon migration.

  10. Introduction of environmentally degradable parameters to evaluate the biodegradability of biodegradable polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Guo

    Full Text Available Environmentally Degradable Parameter ((EdK is of importance in the describing of biodegradability of environmentally biodegradable polymers (BDPs. In this study, a concept (EdK was introduced. A test procedure of using the ISO 14852 method and detecting the evolved carbon dioxide as an analytical parameter was developed, and the calculated (EdK was used as an indicator for the ultimate biodegradability of materials. Starch and polyethylene used as reference materials were defined as the (EdK values of 100 and 0, respectively. Natural soil samples were inoculated into bioreactors, followed by determining the rates of biodegradation of the reference materials and 15 commercial BDPs over a 2-week test period. Finally, a formula was deduced to calculate the value of (EdK for each material. The (EdK values of the tested materials have a positive correlation to their biodegradation rates in the simulated soil environment, and they indicated the relative biodegradation rate of each material among all the tested materials. Therefore, the (EdK was shown to be a reliable indicator for quantitatively evaluating the potential biodegradability of BDPs in the natural environment.

  11. Introduction of environmentally degradable parameters to evaluate the biodegradability of biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Tao, Jian; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Geng, Weitao; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Kong, Meimei; Wang, Shufang

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally Degradable Parameter ((Ed)K) is of importance in the describing of biodegradability of environmentally biodegradable polymers (BDPs). In this study, a concept (Ed)K was introduced. A test procedure of using the ISO 14852 method and detecting the evolved carbon dioxide as an analytical parameter was developed, and the calculated (Ed)K was used as an indicator for the ultimate biodegradability of materials. Starch and polyethylene used as reference materials were defined as the (Ed)K values of 100 and 0, respectively. Natural soil samples were inoculated into bioreactors, followed by determining the rates of biodegradation of the reference materials and 15 commercial BDPs over a 2-week test period. Finally, a formula was deduced to calculate the value of (Ed)K for each material. The (Ed)K values of the tested materials have a positive correlation to their biodegradation rates in the simulated soil environment, and they indicated the relative biodegradation rate of each material among all the tested materials. Therefore, the (Ed)K was shown to be a reliable indicator for quantitatively evaluating the potential biodegradability of BDPs in the natural environment.

  12. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, J.M.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Molenaar, I.; Olijslager, J.; Potman, W.; Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Biodegradable hollow fibres of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) filled with a suspension of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel in castor oil were implanted subcutaneously in rats to study the rate of drug release, rate of biodegradation and tissue reaction caused by the implant. The in vivo drug

  13. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, J.M.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Molenaar, I.; Olijslager, J.; Potman, W.; Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, J.

    1988-01-01

    Biodegradable hollow fibres of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) filled with a suspension of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel in castor oil were implanted subcutaneously in rats to study the rate of drug release, rate of biodegradation and tissue reaction caused by the implant. The in vivo drug rele

  14. Studies on the biodegradation of ordnance-related hazardous waste: Phase 1. Final report, 11 December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.

    1992-12-11

    Bioprocessing or biodegradation often provides a low-technology, permanent, inexpensive, effective, nonpolluting alternative for land reclamation and treatment of industrial effluents. Microbes have evolved or can be adapted to degrade virtually any toxic organic chemical. Hydrocarbons, a major class of military wastes, are particularly susceptible to biodegradation. Biodegradation is effective over a range of environmental conditions, and for a wide variety of contaminants. Often, bioprocesses can be integrated with conventional technologies, resulting in efficient, multicomponent systems.

  15. Functional genes reveal the intrinsic PAH biodegradation potential in creosote-contaminated groundwater following in situ biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Kapanen, Anu; Piskonen, Reetta; Lukkari, Tuomas; Itävaara, Merja

    2009-08-01

    A small-scale functional gene array containing 15 functional gene probes targeting aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways was used to investigate the effect of a pilot-scale air sparging and nutrient infiltration treatment on hydrocarbon biodegradation in creosote-contaminated groundwater. Genes involved in the different phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation were detected with the functional gene array in the contaminant plume, thus indicating the presence of intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, the low aerobic fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes closely similar to sulphate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria and the negligible decrease in contaminant concentrations showed that aerobic PAH biodegradation was limited in the anoxic groundwater. Increased abundance of PAH biodegradation genes was detected by functional gene array in the monitoring well located at the rear end of the biostimulated area, which indicated that air sparging and nutrient infiltration enhanced the intrinsic, aerobic PAH biodegradation. Furthermore, ten times higher naphthalene dioxygenase gene copy numbers were detected by real-time PCR in the biostimulated area, which was in good agreement with the functional gene array data. As a result, functional gene array analysis was demonstrated to provide a potential tool for evaluating the efficiency of the bioremediation treatment for enhancing hydrocarbon biodegradation in field-scale applications.

  16. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Tago, Kanako; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Tsushima, Seiya

    2011-11-29

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily isolated from plant surfaces, displayed strong degradation activity on films made from poly-butylene succinate or poly-butylene succinate-co-adipate. Strains of P. antarctica isolated from leaves and husks of paddy rice displayed strong degradation activity on these films at 30°C. The type strain, P. antarctica JCM 10317, and Pseudozyma spp. strains from phyllosphere secreted a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme with a molecular mass of about 22 kDa. Reliable source of biodegradable plastic-degrading microorganisms are now in our hands.

  17. Effect of surfactants on PAH biodegradation by a bacterial consortium and on the dynamics of the bacterial community during the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, N; Simarro, R; Molina, M C; Bautista, L F; Delgado, L; Villa, J A

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of a non-biodegradable (Tergitol NP-10) and a biodegradable (Tween-80) surfactant on growth, degradation rate and microbial dynamics of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) degrading consortium (C2PL05) from a petroleum polluted soil, applying cultivable and non cultivable techniques. Growth and degradation rate were significantly lower with Tergitol NP-10 than that with Tween-80. Toxicity did not show any significant reduction with Tergitol NP-10 whereas with Tween-80 toxicity was almost depleted (30%) after 40 days. Regarding to the cultured bacteria, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas groups were dominant during PAH degradation with Tergitol NP-10, whereas Enterobacter and Stenotrophomonas were dominant with Tween-80. DGGE analyses (PRIMER and MDS) showed that bacteria composition was more similar between treatments when PAHs were consumed than when PAHs concentration was still high. Community changes between treatments were a consequence of Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., Sphingobium sp. and Agromonas sp.

  18. In situ microbial metabolism of aromatic-hydrocarbon environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Che Ok; Madsen, Eugene L

    2013-06-01

    Microbial processes that eliminate organic environmental contamination are important. Progress in the biotechnology of biodegradation relies upon the underlying sciences of environmental microbiology and analytical geochemistry. Recent key discoveries advancing knowledge of biodegradation (in general) and the aromatic-hydrocarbon biodegradation (in particular) have relied upon characterization of microorganisms: pure-culture isolates, laboratory enrichment cultures, and in contaminated field sites. New analytical and molecular tools (ranging from sequencing the DNA of biodegrading microorganisms to assessing changes in the isotopic ratios of 13C to 12C and 2H to 1H in contaminant pools in field sites) have deepened our insights into the mechanisms (how), the occurrence (what), and the identity (who) of active players that effect biodegradation of organic environmental pollutants.

  19. Biodegradable fiksasyon malzemeleri

    OpenAIRE

    Seber, Sinan

    2004-01-01

    Problems related to metallic implant had increased the interest to biodegradables. In this paper, the physical and chemical properties, degradation modalities, implant design, clinical studies with techniques, and complications of biodegradable implants, especially polylactic and polyglycolic acid, were reviewed. Also our studies, on the antibiotic delivery capacities of these implants; and the prediction of immunological reactions with our clinical experiences were presented.

  20. Biodegradation of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimao, M

    2001-06-01

    Widespread studies on the biodegradation of plastics have been carried out in order to overcome the environmental problems associated with synthetic plastic waste. Recent work has included studies of the distribution of synthetic polymer-degrading microorganisms in the environment, the isolation of new microorganisms for biodegradation, the discovery of new degradation enzymes, and the cloning of genes for synthetic polymer-degrading enzymes.

  1. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environment through bioremediation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kriti; Chandra, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation play key role in the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Exposure of petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment occurs either due to human activities or accidentally and cause environmental pollution. Petroleum hydrocarbon cause many toxic compounds which are potent immunotoxicants and carcinogenic to human being. Remedial methods for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment include various physiochemical and biological methods. Due to the negative consequences caused by the physiochemical methods, the bioremediation technology is widely adapted and considered as one of the best technology for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment. Bioremediation utilizes the natural ability of microorganism to degrade the hazardous compound into simpler and non hazardous form. This paper provides a review on the role of bioremediation in the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment, discuss various hazardous effects of petroleum hydrocarbon, various factors influencing biodegradation, role of various enzymes in biodegradation and genetic engineering in bioremediation.

  2. Determination of microbial carbon sources and cycling during remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soil using natural abundance (14)C analysis of PLFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Benjamin R; Greenberg, Bruce M; Slater, Gregory F

    2010-04-01

    In a petroleum impacted land-farm soil in Sarnia, Ontario, compound-specific natural abundance radiocarbon analysis identified biodegradation by the soil microbial community as a major pathway for hydrocarbon removal in a novel remediation system. During remediation of contaminated soils by a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria enhanced phytoremediation system (PEPS), the measured Delta(14)C of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers ranged from -793 per thousand to -897 per thousand, directly demonstrating microbial uptake and utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons (Delta(14)C(PHC) = -1000 per thousand). Isotopic mass balance indicated that more than 80% of microbial PLFA carbon was derived from petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and a maximum of 20% was obtained from metabolism of more modern carbon sources. These PLFA from the contaminated soils were the most (14)C-depleted biomarkers ever measured for an in situ environmental system, and this study demonstrated that the microbial community in this soil was subsisting primarily on petroleum hydrocarbons. In contrast, the microbial community in a nearby uncontaminated control soil maintained a more modern Delta(14)C signature than total organic carbon (Delta(14)C(PLFA) = +36 per thousand to -147 per thousand, Delta(14)C(TOC) = -148 per thousand), indicating preferential consumption of the most modern plant-derived fraction of soil organic carbon. Measurements of delta(13)C and Delta(14)C of soil CO(2) additionally demonstrated that mineralization of PHC contributed to soil CO(2) at the contaminated site. The CO(2) in the uncontaminated control soil exhibited substantially more modern Delta(14)C values, and lower soil CO(2) concentrations than the contaminated soils, suggesting increased rates of soil respiration in the contaminated soils. In combination, these results demonstrated that biodegradation in the soil microbial community was a primary pathway of petroleum hydrocarbon removal in the PEPS system. This study

  3. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    hydrocarbon polluted sediments and water .... ecosystem may result in selective increase or decrease in microbial population (Okpokwasili ... been implicated in degradation of hydrocarbons such as crude oil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and.

  4. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Biodegradability of Chlorinated Anilines in Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO WANG; GUAN-GHUA LU; YAN-JIE ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the bacteria tolerating chlorinated anilines and to study the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline and its coexistent compounds. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicant. Biodegradability of chlorinated anilines was determined using domesticated complex bacteria as an inoculum by shaking-flask test. Results The complex bacteria were identified, consisting of Xanthomonas, Bacillus alcaligenes,Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetaceae nocardia. The obtained complex bacteria were more tolerant to o-chloroaniline than mixture bacteria in natural river waters. The effects of exposure concentration and inoculum size on the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline were analyzed, and the biodegradation characteristics of single o-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloroaniline were compared with the coexistent compounds. Conclusion The biodegradation rates can be improved by decreasing concentration of compounds and increasing inoculum size of complex bacteria. When o-chloroaniline coexists with aniline, the latter is biodegraded prior to the former, and as a consequence the metabolic efficiency of o-chloroaniline is improved with the increase of aniline concentration. Meanwhile, when o-chloroaniline coexists with 2,4-dichloroaniline, the metabolic efficiency of 2,4-dichloroaniline is markedly improved.

  6. Effects of Biodegradation on Crude Oils from Karamay Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌; 杨坚强; 等

    1989-01-01

    Studies of biological marker compou nds in five oil samples from a profile wherenormal crude oil,low condensate oil and heavy oil are produced in the Karamay Oilfield have been carried out with great empha-sis on the biodegradation-resisting capability of 13,17 secosteranes,8,14 secohopanes,gammacerane and carotenes.Based on these studies,a sequence of biodegradation-resisting intensities has been established for saturated hydrocarbon biomarkers in crude oils from the Karamay Oilfield.

  7. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  8. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  9. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huafang Li; Yufeng Zheng; Ling Qin

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable metals (BMs) are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompat-ibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  10. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable metals (BMs are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompatibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  11. Biodegradation of polyethoxylated nonylphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yassellis; Medina, Luis; Borusiak, Margarita; Ramos, Nairalith; Pinto, Gilberto; Valbuena, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Polyethoxylated nonylphenols, with different ethoxylation degrees (NPEO x ), are incorporated into many commercial and industrial products such as detergents, domestic disinfectants, emulsifiers, cosmetics, and pesticides. However, the toxic effects exerted by their degradation products, which are persistent in natural environments, have been demonstrated in several animal and invertebrate aquatic species. Therefore, it seems appropriate to look for indigenous bacteria capable of degrading native NPEO x and its derivatives. In this paper, the isolation of five bacterial strains, capable of using NPEO 15 , as unique carbon source, is described. The most efficient NPEO 15 degrader bacterial strains were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain Yas2) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain Yas1). Maximal growth rates were reached at pH 8, 27°C in a 5% NPEO 15 medium. The NPEO 15 degradation extension, followed by viscometry assays, reached 65% after 54.5 h and 134 h incubation times, while the COD values decreased by 95% and 85% after 24 h for the Yas1 and Yas2 systems, respectively. The BOD was reduced by 99% and 99.9% levels in 24 h and 48 h incubations. The viscosity data indicated that the NPEO 15 biodegradation by Yas2 follows first-order kinetics. Kinetic rate constant (k) and half life time (τ) for this biotransformation were estimated to be 0.0072 h(-1) and 96.3 h, respectively.

  12. Biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in compost-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaw Y; Su, Lai M; Chang, Bea V

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) phenanthrene and pyrene in compost and compost-amended soil. The degradation rates of the two PAHs were phenanthrene>pyrene. The degradation of PAH was enhanced when the two PAHs were present simultaneously in the soil. The addition of either of the two types of compost (straw and animal manure) individually enhanced PAH degradation. Compost samples were separated into fractions with various particle size ranges, which spanned 2-50 microm, 50-105 microm, 105-500 microm, and 500-2000 microm. We observed that the compost fractions with smaller particle sizes demonstrated higher PAH degradation rates. However, when the different compost fractions were added to soil, compost particle size had no significant effect on the rate of PAH degradation. Of the micro-organisms isolated from the soil-compost mixtures, strains S1, S2, and S8, which were identified as Arthrobacter nicotianae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bordetella Petrii, respectively, demonstrated the best degradation ability.

  13. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined

  14. A polyphasic approach for assessing the suitability of bioremediation for the treatment of hydrocarbon-impacted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetutu, Eric M; Smith, Renee J; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Mitchell, James G; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2013-04-15

    Bioremediation strategies, though widely used for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, suffer from lack of biodegradation endpoint accountability. To address this limitation, molecular approaches of alkB gene analysis and pyrosequencing were combined with chemical approaches of bioaccessibility and nutrient assays to assess contaminant degrading capacity and develop a strategy for endpoint biodegradation predictions. In long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil containing 10.3 g C10-C36 hydrocarbons kg(-1), 454 pyrosequencing detected the overrepresentation of potential hydrocarbon degrading genera such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Mycobacterium and Gordonia whilst amplicons for PCR-DGGE were detected only with alkB primers targeting Pseudomonas. This indicated the presence of potential microbial hydrocarbon degradation capacity in the soil. Using non-exhaustive extraction methods of 1-propanol and HP-β-CD for hydrocarbon bioaccessibility assessment combined with biodegradation endpoint predictions with linear regression models, we estimated 33.7% and 46.7% hydrocarbon removal respectively. These predictions were validated in pilot scale studies using an enhanced natural attenuation strategy which resulted in a 46.4% reduction in soil hydrocarbon content after 320 days. When predicted biodegradation endpoints were compared to measured values, there was no significant difference (P=0.80) when hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed with HP-β-CD. These results indicate that a combination of molecular and chemical techniques that inform microbial diversity, functionality and chemical bioaccessibility can be valuable tools for assessing the suitability of bioremediation strategies for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum products in experimental plots in Antarctic marine sediments is location dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Shane M; Harvey, Paul McA; Stark, Jonathan S; Snape, Ian; Riddle, Martin J

    2007-04-01

    Clean sediment collected from O'Brien Bay, East Antarctica, was artificially contaminated with a mix of Special Antarctic Blend diesel fuel and lubricating oil and deployed in two uncontaminated locations (O'Brien and Sparkes Bays) and a previously contaminated bay (Brown Bay) to evaluate whether a history of prior contamination would influence the biodegradation process. Detailed analysis of the hydrocarbon composition in the sediment after 11 weeks revealed different patterns of degradation in each bay. Biodegradation indices showed that hydrocarbon biodegradation occurred in all three bays but was most extensive in Brown Bay. This study shows that even within a relatively small geographical area, the longevity of hydrocarbons in Antarctic marine sediments can be variable. Our results are consistent with faster natural attenuation of spilt oil at sites with previous exposure to oil but further work is needed to confirm this. Such information would be useful when evaluating the true risk and longevity of oils spills.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP OF TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS MEASUREMENTS TO BULK ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH HYDROCARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recent conceptual model links high bulk electrical conductivities at hydrocarbon impacted sites to higher total dissolved solids (TDS) resulting from enhanced mineral weathering due to acids produced during biodegradation. In this study, we investigated the vertical distributio...

  17. Biodegradation: Updating the Concepts of Control for Microbial Cleanup in Contaminated Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Elsner, Martin; Griebler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation is one of the most favored and sustainable means of removing organic pollutants from contaminated aquifers but the major steering factors are still surprisingly poorly understood. Growing evidence questions some of the established concepts for control of biodegradation. Here, we...... critically discuss classical concepts such as the thermodynamic redox zonation, or the use of steady state transport scenarios for assessing biodegradation rates. Furthermore, we discuss if the absence of specific degrader populations can explain poor biodegradation. We propose updated perspectives...

  18. Microcalorimetric investigation of the effect of non-ionic surfactant on biodegradation of pyrene by PAH-degrading bacteria Burkholderia cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Zhu, Qing; Qian, Yiguang; Song, Ying; Yao, Jun; Choi, Martin M F

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread in various ecosystems and are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Surfactant has become a hot topic for its wide application in the bioremediation of PAHs. The aim of this work is to explore a microcalorimetric method to determine the toxic effect of pyrene on Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and the PAH-degrading bacteria Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) and to evaluate the effect of Tween 80 on biodegradation of pyrene. Power-time curves were studied and calorimetric parameters including the growth rate constant (k), half inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀), and total thermal effect (Q(T)) were determined. B. subtilis, B. cepacia and B. cepacia with Tween 80 were completely inhibited when the concentration of pyrene were 200, 800 and 1600 µg mL⁻¹, respectively. B. cepacia shows better tolerance to pyrene than B. subtilis. Tween 80 significantly improves the biodegradation of pyrene by increasing the bioavailability of pyrene. In addition, the expression of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) in B. cepacia is responsible for the degradation of pyrene and plays an important role in improving the biodegradation of pyrene. Moreover, the activity of C23O increases with the application of Tween 80. The enhanced bioavailability and biodegradation of pyrene by Tween 80 shows the potential use of Tween 80 in the PAHs bioremediation.

  19. Measuring biodegradation of oil products by means of environmental forensic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J. R.; Garcia-Mtnez, M. J.; Ortiz, J. E.; Ortega, M.; Torres, T. de; Llamas, J. F.

    2009-07-01

    Bioremediation technologies are focused to the biodegradation of organic pollutants. This approach is particularly helpful when soils and/or groundwater are affected by oil products spills, given the satisfactory biodegradability of most hydrocarbons. However, during a bio-treatment the decreasing in pollutants concentration may be due to both biotic and biotic processes, whose distinction is very important, albeit difficult, in order to evaluate if bioremediation is being properly applied. (Author)

  20. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei Guo; Sheng He; Shukui Zhu; Derong Chai; Shiyan Yin; Wei Dai; Wanfeng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil ...