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Sample records for hydride systems thin

  1. In-situ study of hydriding kinetics in Pd-based thin film systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Proost, Joris [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Div. of Materials and Process Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films has been investigated in detail. The key experimental technique used in this work consists of a high resolution curvature measurement setup, which continuously monitors the reflections of multiple laser beams coming off a cantilevered sample. After mounting the sample inside a vacuum chamber, a H-containing gas mixture is introduced to instantaneously generate a given hydrogen partial pressure (p{sub H2}) inside the chamber. The resulting interaction of H with the Pd layer then leads to a volume expansion of the thin film system. This induces in turn changes in the sample curvature as a result of internal stresses developing in the Pd film during a hydriding cycle. Based on such curvature date obtained in-situ at different p{sub H2}, a two-step model for the kinetics of Pd-hydride formation has been proposed and expressions for the hydrogen adsorption and absorption velocities have been derived. The rate-limiting steps have been identified by studying the p{sub H2}-dependence of these velocities. Furthermore, from our in-situ experimental data, relevant kinetic parameters have been calculated. The effect of dry air exposure of the Pd films on the hydriding kinetics has been considered as well. (orig.)

  2. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  3. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

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    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions

  4. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  5. Research on Metal Hydride Compressor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ti-Zr series Laves phase hydrogen storage alloys with good hydrogen storage properties, such as large hydrogen capacity, rapid hydriding and dehydriding rate, high compression ratio, gentle plateau, small hysteresis, easily being activated and long cyclic stability etc. for metal hydride compressor have been investigated. In addition, a hydride compressor with special characteristics, namely, advanced filling method, good heat transfer effect and reasonable structural design etc. has also been constructed. A hydride compressor cryogenic system has been assembled coupling the compressor with a J-T micro-throttling refrigeration device and its cooling capacity can reach 0.4 W at 25 K.

  6. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner—A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters, Spring 2014), p. 50–51] describes various methods for producing oxides, nitrides, carbides, and some compounds, but hydrides were not mentioned. A study was performed in the mid-1970s at the General Electric Company Neutron Devices Department in Largo, FL, by the author to study preparation of thin film hydrides using reactive evaporation and to determine their unique characteristics and properties. Films were produced of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and the rare earth praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), gadolinium (Gd), dysprosium (Dy), and erbium (Er) hydrides by hot crucible filament and electron beam evaporation in atmospheres of deuterium and tritium gases. All-metal vacuum systems were used and those used with tritium were dedicated for this processing. Thin film test samples 1000 nm thick were prepared on 1.27 cm diameter molybdenum disk substrates for each occluder (i.e., an element that can react with hydrogen to form a hydride) material. Loading characteristics as determined by gas-to-metal atomic ratios, oxidation characteristics as determined by argon–sputter Auger analysis, film structure as determined by scanning electron microscope analysis, and film stress properties as determined by a double resonator technique were used to define properties of interest. Results showed hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratios varied from 1.5 to 2.0 with near maximum loading for all but Pr and Nd occluders which correlated with the oxidation levels observed, with all occluder oxidation levels being variable due to vacuum system internal processing conditions and the materials used. Surface oxide levels varied from ∼80 Å to over 1000 Å. For most films studied, results showed that a maximum loading ratio of near 2.0 and a minimum surface oxide level of ∼80 Å could be

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oguchi@nanosys.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Micro System Integration Center (muSIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Isobe, Shigehito [Creative Research Institution, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kuwano, Hiroki [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  8. Crack growth in the through-thickness direction of hydrided thin-wall Zircaloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    In a reactivity-initiated accident, cladding failure may occur by crack initiation within a defect such as a hydride rim or blister and subsequent crack propagation through the thickness of the thin-wall cladding. In such a circumstance, determining the cladding resistance to crack propagation in the through-thickness direction is crucial to predicting cladding failure. To address this issue, through-thickness crack propagation in hydrided Zircaloy-4 sheet was analyzed at 25 °C, 300 °C, and 375 °C. At 25 °C, the fracture toughness decreased with increasing hydrogen content and with an increasing fraction of radial hydrides. Hydride particles fractured ahead of the crack tip, creating a path for crack growth. At both 300 °C and 375 °C, the resistance to crack-growth initiation was sufficiently high that crack extension was often caused by crack-tip blunting. There was no evidence of hydride particles fracturing near the crack tip, and no significant effect of hydrogen content on fracture toughness was observed at these elevated temperatures.

  9. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul, E-mail: smagulk@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2014-07-21

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  10. Crack growth through the thickness of thin-sheet Hydrided Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.

    In recent years, the limits on fuel burnup have been increased to allow an increase in the amount of energy produced by a nuclear fuel assembly thus reducing waste volume and allowing greater capacity factors. As a result, it is paramount to ensure safety after longer reactor exposure times in the case of design-basis accidents, such as reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA). Previously proposed failure criteria do not directly address the particular cladding failure mechanism during a RIA, in which crack initiation in brittle outer-layers is immediately followed by crack growth through the thickness of the thin-wall tubing. In such a case, the fracture toughness of hydrided thin-wall cladding material must be known for the conditions of through-thickness crack growth in order to predict the failure of high-burnup cladding. The fracture toughness of hydrided Zircaloy-4 in the form of thin-sheet has been examined for the condition of through-thickness crack growth as a function of hydride content and distribution at 25°C, 300°C, and 375°C. To achieve this goal, an experimental procedure was developed in which a linear hydride blister formed across the width of a four-point bend specimen was used to inject a sharp crack that was subsequently extended by fatigue pre-cracking. The electrical potential drop method was used to monitor the crack length during fracture toughness testing, thus allowing for correlation of the load-displacement record with the crack length. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were used to interpret the experimental test results in terms of fracture toughness, and J-R crack growth resistance curves were generated. Finite element modeling was performed to adapt the classic theories of fracture mechanics applicable to thick-plate specimens to the case of through-thickness crack growth in thin-sheet materials, and to account for non-uniform crack fronts. Finally, the hydride microstructure was characterized in the vicinity of the crack tip by

  11. Room temperature and thermal decomposition of magnesium hydride/deuteride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares, J.R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Macia, M.D.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Ferrer, I.J.; Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Lab. de Materiales de Interes en Energias Renovables

    2010-07-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) can be considered an interesting material to store hydrogen as long as two main drawbacks were solved: (i) its high stability and (ii) slow (de)hydriding kinetics. In that context, magnesium hydride films are an excellent model system to investigate the influence of structure, morphology and dimensionality on kinetic and thermodynamic properties. In the present work, we show that desorption mechanism of Pd-capped MgH{sub 2} at room temperature is controlled by a bidimensional interphase mechanism and a similar rate step limiting mechanism is observed during thermal decomposition of MgH{sub 2}. This mechanism is different to that occurring in bulk MgH{sub 2} (nucleation and growth) and obtained activation energies are lower than those reported in bulk MgH{sub 2}. We also investigated the Pd-capping properties upon H-absorption/desorption by means of RBS and isotope experiments. (orig.)

  12. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hardy, B. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Corgnale, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Motyka, Ted [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-31

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate a metal hydride-based TES system for use with a CSP system. A unique approach has been applied to this project that combines our modeling experience with the extensive material knowledge and expertise at both SRNL and Curtin University (CU). Because of their high energy capacity and reasonable kinetics many metal hydride systems can be charged rapidly. Metal hydrides for vehicle applications have demonstrated charging rates in minutes and tens of minutes as opposed to hours. This coupled with high heat of reaction allows metal hydride TES systems to produce very high thermal power rates (approx. 1kW per 6-8 kg of material). A major objective of this work is to evaluate some of the new metal hydride materials that have recently become available. A problem with metal hydride TES systems in the past has been selecting a suitable high capacity low temperature metal hydride material to pair with the high temperature material. A unique aspect of metal hydride TES systems is that many of these systems can be located on or near dish/engine collectors due to their high thermal capacity and small size. The primary objective of this work is to develop a high enthalpy metal hydride that is capable of reversibly storing hydrogen at high temperatures (> 650 °C) and that can be paired with a suitable low enthalpy metal hydride with low cost materials. Furthermore, a demonstration of hydrogen cycling between the two hydride beds is desired.

  13. Initial step of hydride formation in single crystalline gadolinium thin films and islands studied on the nm-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanjelik, Sara, E-mail: Sara.Wanjelik@hhu.de [Institute of Applied Physics, Universitätsstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Stolboushkina, Oxana [Institute of Applied Physics, Universitätsstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Sibirian State University of Industry, Novokuznetsk 654007 (Russian Federation); Königshofen, Samuel; Getzlaff, Mathias [Institute of Applied Physics, Universitätsstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hydride formation in Gd films depends on hydrogen pressure and annealing conditions. • Chain formation of disclike islands (diameter about 4 nm) in 1 0 1 0 direction appears. • A triangular shaped structure is observed together with discs. • Transformation to hydride in islands starts from the edges. • All hydrogen induced structures can be removed stepwise by annealing up to 350 °C. - Abstract: The initial steps of hydrogen absorption in gadolinium systems are investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultra high vacuum conditions. Gadolinium is grown on a W(1 1 0) substrate. Smooth films or islands can be obtained depending on the preparation conditions. Exposure to hydrogen leads to modifications of the Gd surface. Small discs with a diameter of a few nm and a height of one atomic step appear. The discs form chains with distinct directions. A triangular shaped structure is observed together with the discs. Areas that are completely transformed to GdH{sub 2} appear, too. The absorption process in islands was also investigated and compared to the behaviour of thin films. All measurements are performed at room temperature. By increasing the temperature, changes of the different modifications can be observed up to the point at which they vanish.

  14. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  15. Structural and kinetic studies of metal hydride hydrogen storage materials using thin film deposition and characterization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephen Thomas

    Hydrogen makes an attractive energy carrier for many reasons. It is an abundant chemical fuel that can be produced from a wide variety of sources and stored for very long periods of time. When used in a fuel cell, hydrogen emits only water at the point of use, making it very attractive for mobile applications such as in an automobile. Metal hydrides are promising candidates for on-board reversible hydrogen storage in mobile applications due to their very high volumetric storage capacities---in most cases exceeding even that of liquid hydrogen. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has set fuel system targets for an automotive hydrogen storage system, but as of yet no single material meets all the requirements. In particular, slow reaction kinetics and/or inappropriate thermodynamics plague many metal hydride hydrogen storage materials. In order to engineer a practical material that meets the DOE targets, we need a detailed understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of these materials during the phase change. In this work I employed sputter deposited thin films as a platform to study materials with highly controlled chemistry, microstructure and catalyst placement using thin film characterization techniques such as in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron reflectivity. I observed kinetic limitations in the destabilized Mg2Si system due to the slow diffusion of the host Mg and Si atoms while forming separate MgH2 and Si phases. Conversely, I observed that the presence of Al in the Mg/Al system inhibits hydrogen diffusion while the host Mg and Al atoms interdiffuse readily, allowing the material to fall into a kinetic and/or thermodynamic trap by forming intermetallic compounds such as Mg17Al 12. By using in situ XRD to analyze epitaxial Mg films grown on (001) oriented Al2O3 substrates I observed hydride growth consistent with a model of a planar hydride layer growing into an existing metal layer. Subsequent film cycling changes the hydrogen

  16. Metal hydride-based thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J.; Fang, Zhigang

    2017-10-03

    The invention provides a thermal energy storage system comprising a metal-containing first material with a thermal energy storage density of about 1300 kJ/kg to about 2200 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; a metal-containing second material with a thermal energy storage density of about 200 kJ/kg to about 1000 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; and a hydrogen conduit for reversibly transporting hydrogen between the first material and the second material. At a temperature of 20.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal is converted to the hydride. At a temperature of 0.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal hydride is converted to the metal and hydrogen. The disclosed metal hydride materials have a combination of thermodynamic energy storage densities and kinetic power capabilities that previously have not been demonstrated. This performance enables practical use of thermal energy storage systems for electric vehicle heating and cooling.

  17. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Blaine Kermit [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  18. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  19. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Mooij, L.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the thermodynamics of hydrogenation of nanoconfined magnesium within a thin film multilayer model system. Magnesium hydride is a potential material for hydrogen storage, which is a key component in a renewable energy system based on hydrogen. In bulk form, magnesium hydride is very stable, which means that hydrogen is released only at elevated temperature. Furthermore, the kinetics of hydrogen sorption is slow, which further hampers the practical use of this...

  20. Electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell system for seasonal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Lund, P.D.; Tolonen, J.S. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Engineering Physics and Mathematics Dept., Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    A small-scale seasonal energy storage system, comprising an electrolyser, metal hydride hydrogen store and fuel cell, has been studied. According to the feasibility study, solid polymer electrolysers and fuel cells are the best options for the electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell energy storage systems. A round-trip efficiency of 30% has already been demonstrated, and the next target is to reach a round-trip efficiency close to 40%. The electyrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell systems are suitable for small-scale self-sufficient applications in which high volumetric capacity is needed and safety aspects are appreciated. (Author)

  1. DETERMINATION OF METAL HYDRIDE SYSTEMS CHARACTERISTICS WHILE HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Kluchka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental dependence of the pressure of hydrogen in the hydride cartridge when it is heated is obtained. Experimental data prove the theoretical values with an accuracy of ≈ 6%.

  2. Method of forming metal hydride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  3. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  4. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, L.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the thermodynamics of hydrogenation of nanoconfined magnesium within a thin film multilayer model system. Magnesium hydride is a potential material for hydrogen storage, which is a key component in a renewable energy system based on hydrogen. In bulk form,

  5. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, L.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the thermodynamics of hydrogenation of nanoconfined magnesium within a thin film multilayer model system. Magnesium hydride is a potential material for hydrogen storage, which is a key component in a renewable energy system based on hydrogen. In bulk form, magnesiu

  6. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, L.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the thermodynamics of hydrogenation of nanoconfined magnesium within a thin film multilayer model system. Magnesium hydride is a potential material for hydrogen storage, which is a key component in a renewable energy system based on hydrogen. In bulk form, magnesiu

  7. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  8. Hydride heat pump. Volume I. Users manual for HYCSOS system design program. [HYCSOS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Moritz, P.

    1978-05-01

    A method for the design and costing of a metal hydride heat pump for residential use and a computer program, HYCSOS, which automates that method are described. The system analyzed is one in which a metal hydride heat pump can provide space heating and space cooling powered by energy from solar collectors and electric power generated from solar energy. The principles and basic design of the system are presented, and the computer program is described giving detailed design and performance equations used in the program. The operation of the program is explained, and a sample run is presented. This computer program is part of an effort to design, cost, and evaluate a hydride heat pump for residential use. The computer program is written in standard Fortran IV and was run on a CDC Cyber 74 and Cyber 174 computer. A listing of the program is included as an appendix. This report is Volume 1 of a two-volume document.

  9. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  10. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  11. Non-Precious Bimetallic Catalysts for Selective Dehydrogenation of an Organic Chemical Hydride System

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2015-07-06

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-Toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as a hydrogen carrier system is successful with the selective dehydrogenation reaction of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  12. Development of a metal hydride refrigeration system as an exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Feng; Chen, Jiangping; Chen, Zhijiu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Lu, Manqi; Yang, Ke [Engineering Center, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Zhou, Yimin [Research Center, Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co. Ltd., Tiantai County, Zhejiang Province 317200 (China)

    2007-10-15

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioners, two types of systems varying in heat carriers were preliminarily designed. A new hydride pair LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} was developed working at 120-200 C/20-50 C/-10-0 C. P-C isotherms and reaction kinetics were tested. Reaction enthalpy, entropy and theoretical cycling coefficient of performance (COP) were deducted from Van't-Hoff diagram. Test results showed that the hydride pair has flat plateau slopes, fast reaction dynamics and small hystereses; the reaction enthalpy of the refrigeration hydride is -27.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2} and system theoretical COP is 0.711. Mean particle sizes during cycles were verified to be an intrinsic property affected by constitution, heat treatment and cycle numbers rather than initial grain sizes. Based on this work pair, cylindrical reactors were designed and a function proving metal hydride intermittent refrigeration system was constructed with heat conducting oil as heat source and water as heat sink. The reactor equivalent thermal conductivity is merely 1.3 W/(m K), which still has not meet practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power is 84.6 W at 150 C/30 C/0 C with COP being 0.26. The regulations of cycling performance and minimum refrigeration temperature (MRT) were determined by altering heat source temperature. Results showed that cooling power and system COP increase while MRT decreases with the growth of heat source temperature. This study develops a new hydride pair and confirms its application in automobile refrigeration systems, while their heat transfer properties still need to be improved for better performance. (author)

  13. Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kai-yu; HUANG Bai-yun; ZHANG Ping-min; HE Yue-hui; ZHOU Ke-chao; SU Geng

    2006-01-01

    Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system was investigated, and the influence of state of charge on the thermal electrochemical performance of hydrogen storage materials was studied. The results show that both the absolute value of the molar enthalpy change and the internal resistance of evolution hydrogen reaction are less than that of absorption hydrogen reaction at the same state of charge. The molar reaction enthalpy change of absorption and evolution of hydride electrode change contrarily with the enhancement of filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode. The relation curve of molar reaction enthalpy change to state of charge, both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction, is close to a constant when the state of charge is 10%-60%, and during state of charge below 10% or state of charge above 60%, the molar reaction enthalpy change varies sharply. Meanwhile, the internal resistance of electrode reaction has an ascending trend with the enhancement on filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode in both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction.

  14. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  15. Bed geometries, fueling strategies and optimization of heat exchanger designs in metal hydride storage systems for automotive applications: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Dornheim, Martin; Sloth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    given to metal hydride storage tanks for light duty vehicles, since this application is the most promising one for such storage materials and has been widely studied in the literature. Enhancing cooling/heating during hydrogen uptake and discharge has found to be essential to improve storage systems......This review presents recent developments for effective heat management systems to be integrated in metal hydride storage tanks, and investigates the performance improvements and limitations of each particular solution. High pressures and high temperatures metal hydrides can lead to different design...

  16. Technical challenges and future direction for high-efficiency metal hydride thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick A.; Corgnale, Claudio; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore; Hardy, Bruce; Sheppard, Drew; Buckley, Craig; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in thermal energy storage (TES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, which allow for continuous operation when sunlight is unavailable. Thermochemical energy storage materials have the advantage of much higher energy densities than latent or sensible heat materials. Furthermore, thermochemical energy storage systems based on metal hydrides have been gaining great interest for having the advantage of higher energy densities, better reversibility, and high enthalpies. However, in order to achieve higher efficiencies desired of a thermal storage system by the US Department of Energy, the system is required to operate at temperatures >600 °C. Operation at temperatures >600 °C presents challenges including material selection, hydrogen embrittlement and permeation of containment vessels, appropriate selection of heat transfer fluids, and cost. Herein, the technical difficulties and proposed solutions associated with the use of metal hydrides as TES materials in CSP applications are discussed and evaluated.

  17. Hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride: from laboratory tests to fuel cell integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Marty, P.; Fruchart, D.

    2016-02-01

    The paper reviews the state of the art of hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride, emphasizing the role of thermal management, whose effectiveness depends on the effective thermal conductivity of the hydride, but also depends of other limiting factors such as wall contact resistance and convective exchanges with the heat transfer fluid. For daily cycles, the use of phase change material to store the heat of reaction appears to be the most effective solution. The integration with fuel cells (1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell) highlights the dynamic behaviour of these systems, which is related to the thermodynamic properties of MgH2. This allows for "self-adaptive" systems that do not require control of the hydrogen flow rate at the inlet of the fuel cell.

  18. Optical properties of d.c. magneto sputtered tantalum and titanium nanostructure thin film metal hydrides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Singh; S Srivastava; S Agarwal; S Kumar; Y K Vijay

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured thin films of tantalum and titanium were deposited on glass substrate using d.c. magnetron sputtering technique under the argon gas environment at a pressure of 0.1 mbar. Optical transmission and absorption studies were carried out for these samples with pressure of hydrogen. Large changes in both transmission and absorption on loading these films with hydrogen are accompanied by significant phase changes and electronic transformation. Optical photograph shows the colour variation after hydrogenation in case of tantalum film which may be used as decorative mirrors and hydrogen sensors. The hydrogen storage capability of thin films was confirmed by variation in optical properties.

  19. Metal hydride work pair development and its application on automobile air conditioning systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Feng; CHEN Jiang-ping; ZHANG Wen-feng; CHEN Zhi-jiu

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas driving automobile air conditioning systems, a hydride pair LaNi4.61Mn0.26A10.13/La0.6Y0.4Ni4.8Mn0.2 was developed working at 393~473 K/293~323 K/263~273 K. Property tests showed that both alloys have flat plateau slopes and small hystereses; system theoretical coefficient of performance (COP) is 0.711. Based on this work pair, a function proving automobile metal hydride refrigeration system was constructed. The equivalent thermal conductivities of the activated reaction beds were merely 1.1~1.6 W/(m·K), which had not met practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power was 84.6 W at 423 K/303 K/273 K with COP being 0.26. By altering cycling parameters, experiment data showed that cooling power and system COP increase with the growth of heat source temperature as well as pre-heating and regeneration time while decrease with heat sink temperature increment. This study confirms the feasibility of automobile metal hydride refrigeration systems, while heat transfer properties of reaction beds still need to be improved for better performance.

  20. Development of a modular room-temperature hydride storage system for vehicular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Giovanni; Schiavo, Benedetto; Jepsen, Julian; Lozano, Gustavo; Metz, Oliver; Saccone, Adriana; De Negri, Serena; Bellosta von Colbe, José M.; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The subject of this paper concerns the development of a vehicular hydrogen tank system, using a commercial interstitial metal hydride as storage material. The design of the tank was intended to feed a fuel cell in a light prototype vehicle, and the chosen hydride material, Hydralloy C5 by GfE, was expected to be able to absorb and desorb hydrogen in a range of pressure suitable for this purpose. A systematic analysis of the material in laboratory scale allows an extrapolation of the thermodynamic and reaction kinetics data. The following development of the modular tank was done according to the requirements of the prototype vehicle propulsion system and led to promising intermediate results. The modular approach granted flexibility in the design, allowing both to reach carefully the design goals and to learn the limiting factors in the sorption process. Proper heat management and suitable equipment remain key factors in order to achieve the best performances.

  1. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  2. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  3. Kinetic Modification on Hydrogen Desorption of Lithium Hydride and Magnesium Amide System

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki Miyaoka; Yongming Wang,; Satoshi Hino; Shigehito Isobe; Kazuhiko Tokoyoda; Takayuki Ichikawa; Yoshitsugu Kojima

    2015-01-01

    Various synthesis and rehydrogenation processes of lithium hydride (LiH) and magnesium amide (Mg(NH2)2) system with 8:3 molar ratio are investigated to understand the kinetic factors and effectively utilize the essential hydrogen desorption properties. For the hydrogen desorption with a solid-solid reaction, it is expected that the kinetic properties become worse by the sintering and phase separation. In fact, it is experimentally found that the low crystalline size and the close contact of L...

  4. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  5. On the optical absorption coefficient of Gd hydride thin films: coexistence of the Gd (GdH{sub 2}) and GdH{sub x} (GdH{sub 2+y}) phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, W E; Azofeifa, D E; Clark, N [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias e IngenierIa de Materiales and Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Jose (Costa Rica)], E-mail: william.vargascastro@ucr.ac.cr

    2009-01-07

    Electron beam evaporated Pd-capped Gd thin films were deposited on quartz substrates and subsequently hydrided. Transmittance spectra of these bilayer systems, under unpolarized normal illumination, were obtained and used in an inversion approach from which the spectral dependence of the effective optical constants is obtained. The optical absorption coefficient of the {beta}-phase GdH{sub x} (with 1 < x {<=} 2) is reported. The semiconductor GdH{sub 2+y} state (with 0 < y {<=} 1) is characterized in terms of the optical absorption coefficient and the optical gap. By assuming a granular morphology of the films, with some of the grains in the metal GdH{sub 2} phase and other grains covered with a transition layer containing the semiconducting GdH{sub 2+y} phase, the hydrogen concentration dependence of the optical gap is shown and the optical absorption edge of the stoichiometric {gamma}-phase GdH{sub 3} is reported.

  6. Calibration of Thermal Desorption System (TDS) Response to Hydrogen for Analysis of Titanium Subhydride and Titanium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Bernice E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The equipment and method for and results of calibration of the Sandia/CA TDS system for hydrogen quantification is presented. This technique for calibration can be used to quantify the hydrogen content titanium subhydride, titanium hydride, and any other hydrogen-containing material that desorbs its hydrogen in the form of molecular hydrogen below 1450°C.

  7. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  8. Recent advances in improving performances of the lightweight complex hydrides Li-Mg-N-H system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of state-of-the art advances in improving performances of the lightweight complex hydrides Li-Mg-N-H system is reported. Among the hydrogen storage materials, Li-Mg-N-H combination systems are regarded as one of the most potential candidates for the vehicular applications owing to their high hydrogen storage capacity (>5 wt% H and a more appropriate thermodynamic properties of hydrogen absorption and desorption. In the Li-Mg-N-H systems, tremendous efforts have been devoted to improving the hydrogen storage properties by adjusting composition, revealing reaction mechanisms, adding catalysts and refining the microstructures, etc. During the studies, different mechanisms, such as the coordinated two-molecule or multimolecule reaction mechanism and the ammonia-mediated mechanism, are proposed and applied under some certain conditions. Catalysis and nanosizing are very effective in enhancing the kinetic properties and thermodynamic destabilization of Li-Mg-N-H systems. Due to nano effects, the space-confinement and nanoconfinement seems to be more effective for improving the hydrogen storage performance, and it is great significant to develop hydrogen storage materials by studying the nanoconfined effects on the Li-Mg-N-H systems.

  9. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  10. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  11. Monitoring and control of a hydrogen production and storage system consisting of water electrolysis and metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Herranz, V.; Perez-Page, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. Universidad Politecnica de Valencia. Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Beneito, R. [Area de Energia. Departamento de Gestion e Innovacion. Instituto Tecnologico del Juguete (AIJU). Avda. Industria 23, 03440 Ibi, Alicante (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Renewable energy sources such as wind turbines and solar photovoltaic are energy sources that cannot generate continuous electric power. The seasonal storage of solar or wind energy in the form of hydrogen can provide the basis for a completely renewable energy system. In this way, water electrolysis is a convenient method for converting electrical energy into a chemical form. The power required for hydrogen generation can be supplied through a photovoltaic array. Hydrogen can be stored as metal hydrides and can be converted back into electricity using a fuel cell. The elements of these systems, i.e. the photovoltaic array, electrolyzer, fuel cell and hydrogen storage system in the form of metal hydrides, need a control and monitoring system for optimal operation. This work has been performed within a Research and Development contract on Hydrogen Production granted by Solar Iniciativas Tecnologicas, S.L. (SITEC), to the Politechnic University of Valencia and to the AIJU, and deals with the development of a system to control and monitor the operation parameters of an electrolyzer and a metal hydride storage system that allow to get a continuous production of hydrogen. (author)

  12. Conventional superconductivity at 203 kelvin at high pressures in the sulfur hydride system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A P; Eremets, M I; Troyan, I A; Ksenofontov, V; Shylin, S I

    2015-09-03

    A superconductor is a material that can conduct electricity without resistance below a superconducting transition temperature, Tc. The highest Tc that has been achieved to date is in the copper oxide system: 133 kelvin at ambient pressure and 164 kelvin at high pressures. As the nature of superconductivity in these materials is still not fully understood (they are not conventional superconductors), the prospects for achieving still higher transition temperatures by this route are not clear. In contrast, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of conventional superconductivity gives a guide for achieving high Tc with no theoretical upper bound--all that is needed is a favourable combination of high-frequency phonons, strong electron-phonon coupling, and a high density of states. These conditions can in principle be fulfilled for metallic hydrogen and covalent compounds dominated by hydrogen, as hydrogen atoms provide the necessary high-frequency phonon modes as well as the strong electron-phonon coupling. Numerous calculations support this idea and have predicted transition temperatures in the range 50-235 kelvin for many hydrides, but only a moderate Tc of 17 kelvin has been observed experimentally. Here we investigate sulfur hydride, where a Tc of 80 kelvin has been predicted. We find that this system transforms to a metal at a pressure of approximately 90 gigapascals. On cooling, we see signatures of superconductivity: a sharp drop of the resistivity to zero and a decrease of the transition temperature with magnetic field, with magnetic susceptibility measurements confirming a Tc of 203 kelvin. Moreover, a pronounced isotope shift of Tc in sulfur deuteride is suggestive of an electron-phonon mechanism of superconductivity that is consistent with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer scenario. We argue that the phase responsible for high-Tc superconductivity in this system is likely to be H3S, formed from H2S by decomposition under pressure. These findings raise hope for the

  13. Kinetic Modification on Hydrogen Desorption of Lithium Hydride and Magnesium Amide System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Miyaoka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Various synthesis and rehydrogenation processes of lithium hydride (LiH and magnesium amide (Mg(NH22 system with 8:3 molar ratio are investigated to understand the kinetic factors and effectively utilize the essential hydrogen desorption properties. For the hydrogen desorption with a solid-solid reaction, it is expected that the kinetic properties become worse by the sintering and phase separation. In fact, it is experimentally found that the low crystalline size and the close contact of LiH and Mg(NH22 lead to the fast hydrogen desorption. To preserve the potential hydrogen desorption properties, thermochemical and mechanochemical rehydrogenation processes are investigated. Although the only thermochemical process results in slowing the reaction rate due to the crystallization, the ball-milling can recover the original hydrogen desorption properties. Furthermore, the mechanochemical process at 150 °C is useful as the rehydrogenation technique to preserve the suitable crystalline size and mixing state of the reactants. As a result, it is demonstrated that the 8LiH and 3Mg(NH22 system is recognized as the potential hydrogen storage material to desorb more than 5.5 mass% of H2 at 150 °C.

  14. Kinetic Modification on Hydrogen Desorption of Lithium Hydride and Magnesium Amide System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Hiroki; Wang, Yongming; Hino, Satoshi; Isobe, Shigehito; Tokoyoda, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2015-06-29

    Various synthesis and rehydrogenation processes of lithium hydride (LiH) and magnesium amide (Mg(NH₂)₂) system with 8:3 molar ratio are investigated to understand the kinetic factors and effectively utilize the essential hydrogen desorption properties. For the hydrogen desorption with a solid-solid reaction, it is expected that the kinetic properties become worse by the sintering and phase separation. In fact, it is experimentally found that the low crystalline size and the close contact of LiH and Mg(NH₂)₂ lead to the fast hydrogen desorption. To preserve the potential hydrogen desorption properties, thermochemical and mechanochemical rehydrogenation processes are investigated. Although the only thermochemical process results in slowing the reaction rate due to the crystallization, the ball-milling can recover the original hydrogen desorption properties. Furthermore, the mechanochemical process at 150 °C is useful as the rehydrogenation technique to preserve the suitable crystalline size and mixing state of the reactants. As a result, it is demonstrated that the 8LiH and 3Mg(NH₂)₂ system is recognized as the potential hydrogen storage material to desorb more than 5.5 mass% of H₂ at 150 °C.

  15. Development of battery management system for nickel-metal hydride batteries in electric vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Do Yang; Lee, Baek Haeng; Kim, Sun Wook

    Electric vehicle (EV) performance is very dependent on traction batteries. For developing electric vehicles with high performance and good reliability, the traction batteries have to be managed to obtain maximum performance under various operating conditions. Enhancement of battery performance can be accomplished by implementing a battery management system (BMS) that plays an important role in optimizing the control mechanism of charge and discharge of the batteries as well as monitoring the battery status. In this study, a BMS has been developed for maximizing the use of Ni-MH batteries in electric vehicles. This system performs several tasks: the control of charging and discharging, overcharge and over-discharge protection, the calculation and display of state-of-charge (SOC), safety, and thermal management. The BMS is installed in and tested in a DEV5-5 electric vehicle developed by Daewoo Motor Co. and the Institute for Advanced Engineering in Korea. Eighteen modules of a Panasonic nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery, 12 V, 95 A h, are used in the DEV5-5. High accuracy within a range of 3% and good reliability are obtained. The BMS can also improve the performance and cycle-life of the Ni-MH battery peak, as well as the reliability and the safety of the electric vehicles.

  16. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  17. Application of metal hydride paper to simple pressure generator for use in soft actuator systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Shuichi; Sakaki, Kouji; Hosono, Minako; Doi, Kouki; Shimada, Shigenobu; Chikai, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) actuators have a simple structure and a number of features that make them attractive for use in rehabilitation engineering and assistive technology. The MH actuator provides a high power-to-weight ratio, high-strain actuation, human-compatible softness, and noiseless operation, while being environmentally benign. On the other hand, there remain technical challenges to be overcome to improve the MH actuator regarding its speed of operation and energy efficiency, given the low heat conductivity of the MH powder that is used as the pressure generator for soft actuation. To overcome the issues of low heat conductivity and the handling of MH powder, we developed an MH paper, which is a special paper incorporating MH powder and carbon fiber, for use as a new pressure-generating element for a soft MH actuator system. In addition, the basic properties and structure of the proposed MH paper were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and several thermodynamic experiments. The results of these experiments showed that the hydrogen absorption and desorption rates of the MH paper were significantly higher than those of the MH powder around room temperature.

  18. Increased Oxygen Recovery from Sabatier Systems Using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology and Metal Hydride Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Miller, Lee A.; Dahl, Roger W.; Hadley, Neal M.; Wambolt, Spencer R.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is based on the Sabatier reaction where less than 50% of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic CO2. The reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. This is further exacerbated when Sabatier methane (CH4) is vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover hydrogen has the potential to dramatically increase oxygen recovery and thus drastically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. Due to the highly unstable nature of acetylene, a separation system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of a full-scale Third Generation PPA is reported and investigations into metal hydride hydrogen separation technology is discussed.

  19. High level theoretical study of binding and of the potential energy surface in benzene-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coletti, Cecilia, E-mail: ccoletti@unich.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Re, Nazzareno [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: In-plane minimum geometries for benzene-H{sup -} non-covalent adducts: linear adduct (left) with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to one aromatic hydrogen; bifurcated adduct (right), with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to two adjacent aromatic hydrogens. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical study on covalent and non-covalent binding in benzene-hydride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two non-covalent stable adducts were characterized in the in-plane geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant sections of the potential energy surface were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of a very stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion upon covalent binding to carbon. - Abstract: High level ab initio calculations were performed on the interaction of the hydride anion with benzene, a system of potential interest for modelling the interactions occurring in hydrogen rich planetary atmospheres. We investigated both non-covalent and covalent binding, exploring the complete basis set limit using highly correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Two non-covalent minima on the potential energy surface have been characterized, and found to correspond to moderately strong hydrogen bonding interactions. To gain further insight on the nature of binding, the total interaction energy was decomposed into its physically meaningful components and selected sections of the potential energy surface were calculated. Moreover, we found that H{sup -} can easily covalently bind to one of the carbon atoms of benzene to form a stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion, a global minimum on the potential energy surface, characterized by a puckered geometry, with a carbon atom bending out of the benzene plane. A slightly less stable planar C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} structure was also identified, corresponding to the transition state for the flipping motion of the puckered species.

  20. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of metal hydride based hydrogen storage systems using in-situ Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bellosta von Colbe, J. M.; Bücherl, T.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2016-10-01

    For the storage of hydrogen, complex metal hydrides are considered as highly promising with respect to capacity, reversibility and safety. The optimization of corresponding storage tanks demands a precise and time-resolved investigation of the hydrogen distribution in scaled-up metal hydride beds. In this study it is shown that in situ fission Neutron Radiography provides unique insights into the spatial distribution of hydrogen even for scaled-up compacts and therewith enables a direct study of hydrogen storage tanks. A technique is introduced for the precise quantification of both time-resolved data and a priori material distribution, allowing inter alia for an optimization of compacts manufacturing process. For the first time, several macroscopic fields are combined which elucidates the great potential of Neutron Imaging for investigations of metal hydrides by going further than solely 'imaging' the system: A combination of in-situ Neutron Radiography, IR-Thermography and thermodynamic quantities can reveal the interdependency of different driving forces for a scaled-up sodium alanate pellet by means of a multi-correlation analysis. A decisive and time-resolved, complex influence of material packing density is derived. The results of this study enable a variety of new investigation possibilities that provide essential information on the optimization of future hydrogen storage tanks.

  1. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  2. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  3. Destabilization of Mg Hydride by Self-Organized Nanoclusters in the Immiscible Mg-Ti System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, Kohta; Westerwaal, Ruud J.; Anastasopol, Anca; Mooij, Lennard P A; Boelsma, Christiaan; Ngene, Peter; Schreuders, Herman; Eijt, Stephan W H; Dam, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Mg is an attractive hydrogen storage material not only because of its high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen capacities but also because of it low material costs. However, the hydride of MgH2 is too stable to release hydrogen under moderate conditions. We demonstrate that the formation of

  4. Destabilization of Mg Hydride by Self-Organized Nanoclusters in the Immiscible Mg-Ti System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, Kohta; Westerwaal, Ruud J.; Anastasopol, Anca; Mooij, Lennard P A; Boelsma, Christiaan; Ngene, Peter; Schreuders, Herman; Eijt, Stephan W H; Dam, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Mg is an attractive hydrogen storage material not only because of its high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen capacities but also because of it low material costs. However, the hydride of MgH2 is too stable to release hydrogen under moderate conditions. We demonstrate that the formation of nanomete

  5. Effect of lanthanum hydride on microstructures and hydrogen storage performances of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱惜林; 韩树民; 赵鑫; 李媛; 刘宝忠

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen storage properties of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system were improved by adding lanthanum hydride (LaH3), and the role of LaH3 in hydrogen sorption process of Li-Mg-N-H system was investigated. Temperature programmed sorption results showed that the addition of lanthanum hydride reduced the dehydriding/hydriding onset temperature of 2LiNH2-MgH2 system by at least 15 K. Moreover, A 0.053 wt.%/min average rate was determined for the hydrogen desorption of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, while it was only 0.035 wt.%/min for 2LiNH2-MgH2 system. Hydrogen absorption capacity increased from 1.62 wt.% to 2.12 wt.% within 200 min by adding LaH3 into 2LiNH2-MgH2 system at 383 K. In the dehydrogenation of 2LiNH2-MgH2-0.05LaH3 composite, LaH2 transferred to LaN phase, which reversed to LaH2 in the following hydrogen adsorption process. The reversible reaction of LaH2 ef-fectively promoted the hydrogen sorption of Li-Mg-N-H system. Moreover, the homogenous distribution of fine La hydride was fa-vorable to improving effect of lanthanum hydride.

  6. Thin Film Inorganic Electrochemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    determined that thin film cathodes of LiCoO2 can be readily performed by either spray pyrolysis or spin coating . These cathodes are electrochemically...active. We have also determined that thin film anodes of Li4Ti5O12 can be prepared by spray pyrolysis or spin coating . These anodes are also

  7. Boron Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-07-01

    of direct interest could be b.P.4d. ’Thus the discovory of a now proj.ect, since silano is probably too readily infla-zmablo for practical usc’ this...devoted, ho specc4fie compounds vhitih a’-ould be tocdte at prescnt arc: nron tiy * silano , %;2.SiFi3 , diothyl sila~no, (C2 115 )2 Si112, mono r.-rop; ! (n...Bcrohydrido or Li h.... I .A-4A- The prepuation of Silano med of Stannane by the interaction or lithium aluzirun hydride v-ithl silicon tetrtchiorido and

  8. An experimental system to investigate kinetics and isotopic properties of the electrolytic metal hydride formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leardini, F. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: fabrice.leardini@uam.es; Bodega, J. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.F. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, C. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-12-08

    We present in this paper an experimental set-up based in a mass spectrometer connected to a closed electrolytic cell. Calibrations accomplished with a Pt cathode and H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O mixtures have shown new kinetics in galvanostatic electrolysis. These findings may be relevant in some important processes such as the hydrogen evolution reaction, isotopic separation factors or the electrolytic formation of metal hydrides.

  9. Hydrides in Young Stellar Objects: Radiation tracers in a protostar-disk-outflow system

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2010-01-01

    Context: Hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements are fundamental molecules in cosmic chemistry. Some of them trace gas irradiated by UV or X-rays. Aims: We explore the abundances of major hydrides in W3 IRS5, a prototypical region of high-mass star formation. Methods: W3 IRS5 was observed by HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory with deep integration (about 2500 s) in 8 spectral regions. Results: The target lines including CH, NH, H3O+, and the new molecules SH+, H2O+, and OH+ are detected. The H2O+ and OH+ J=1-0 lines are found mostly in absorption, but also appear to exhibit weak emission (P-Cyg-like). Emission requires high density, thus originates most likely near the protostar. This is corroborated by the absence of line shifts relative to the young stellar object (YSO). In addition, H2O+ and OH+ also contain strong absorption components at a velocity shifted relative to W3 IRS5, which are attributed to foreground clouds. Conclusions: The molecular column densities derived from observations corre...

  10. First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Karl Johnson

    2011-05-20

    The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

  11. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  12. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  13. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  14. Influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase on thin epitaxial AlN layers grown on (0001) sapphire by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudel, A., E-mail: arnaud.claudel@grenoble-inp.org [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Fellmann, V. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Gélard, I. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Coudurier, N. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Sauvage, D. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Balaji, M. [ACERDE, 354 Voie Magellan — Alpespace, 73800 Ste Hélène du Lac (France); Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés, Grenoble INP-CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Crystal Growth Center, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); and others

    2014-12-31

    Thin (0001) epitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) layers were grown on c-plane sapphire using high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical cold-wall quartz reactor working at low pressure in which the reactions take place on a susceptor heated by induction. The reactants used are ammonia and aluminum chlorides in situ formed via hydrogen chloride reaction with high purity aluminum pellets. As-grown AlN layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies. The influence of the V/III ratio in the gas phase, from 1.5 to 15, on growth rate, surface morphology, roughness and crystalline quality is investigated in order to increase the quality of thin epitaxial AlN layers grown at high temperature. Typical growth rates of around 0.45 μm/h were obtained for such thin epitaxial AlN layers. The growth rate was unaffected by the V/III ratio. An optimum for roughness, crystalline quality and optical properties seems to exist at V/III = 7.5. As a matter of fact, for a V/III ratio of 7.5, best root mean square roughness and crystalline quality — measured on 0002 symmetric reflection — as low as 6.9 nm and 898 arcsec were obtained, respectively. - Highlights: • Growth of thin epitaxial AlN layers by high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy • Influence of V/III ratio on growth rate, morphology and crystalline quality • The effect of surface morphology on strain state and crystal quality is established.

  15. Crystal structure of 200 K-superconducting phase in sulfur hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einaga, Mari; Sakata, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shimizu, Katsuya [KYOKUGEN, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Eremets, Mikhail; Drozdov, Alexander; Troyan, Ivan [Max Planck Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo [JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Superconductivity with the critical temperature T{sub c} above 200 K has been recently discovered by compression of H{sub 2}S (or D{sub 2}S) under extreme pressure. It was proposed that these materials decompose under high pressure to elemental sulfur and hydride with higher content of hydrogen which is responsible for the high temperature superconductivity. In this study, we have investigated that the crystal structure of the superconducting compressed H{sub 2}S and D{sub 2}S by synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements combined with electrical resistance measurements at room and low temperatures. We found that the superconducting phase is in good agreement with theoretically predicted body-centered cubic structure, and coexists with elemental sulfur, which claims that the formation of 3H{sub 2}S → 2H{sub 3}S + S is occured under high pressure.

  16. Heat exchanger selection and design analyses for metal hydride heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Voskuilen, Tyler G.; Waters, Essene L.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a design analysis for the development of highly efficient heat exchangers within stationary metal hydride heat pumps. The design constraints and selected performance criteria are applied to three representative heat exchangers. The proposed thermal model can be applied to select...... the most efficient heat exchanger design and provides outcomes generally valid in a pre-design stage. Heat transfer effectiveness is the principal performance parameter guiding the selection analysis, the results of which appear to be mildly (up to 13%) affected by the specific Nusselt correlation used....... The thermo-physical properties of the heat transfer medium and geometrical parameters are varied in the sensitivity analysis, suggesting that the length of independent tubes is the physical parameter that influences the performance of the heat exchangers the most. The practical operative regions for each...

  17. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  18. Hydride stability and band structure of the components in the Pdsub(1-x)Msub(x) and LaNisub(5-x)Msub(x) systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucur, R.V.; Lupu, D.

    1983-04-01

    The stability of the metal hydrides of Pdsub(1-x)Msub(x) (MidenticalAu, Ag, Pt, Ir, Rh, V, Cu and Ni) and LaNisub(5-x)Msub(x) (MidenticalPt, Pd, Ag, Fe, Cu, Co and Cr) systems depends strongly on the nature of the substituent M. The change ..delta..G in free energy on the formation or decomposition of the metal hydrides depends linearly on the average energy of the lowest band of the substituent (transition metal) and on its concentration x. This linear correlation can be expressed by the empirical equation ..delta..G=..delta..Gsub(A)+a(-)x where ..delta..Gsub(A) is the change in free energy on hydride formation (decomposition) in the pure metal or the intermetallic compound, a is a constant and is the average energy of the lowest band of the component able to bond hydrogen. The dependence of ..delta..G on the band structure of the components (transition metals) is discussed within the framework of the metal-hydrogen bonding mechanism in metal hydrides.

  19. Lattice contraction in photochromic yttrium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehlen, Jan Petter, E-mail: jepe@ife.no; Mongstad, Trygve T.; You, Chang Chuan; Karazhanov, Smagul

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Photochromic yttrium hydride films (YH:O) were prepared by reactive sputtering. •Black and transparent YH:O films were studied by time-resolved synchrotron XRD. •Both YH:O samples showed a lattice contraction upon illumination. •Also exposure to the X-ray beam itself results in a lattice contraction. -- Abstract: A strong photochromic effect was recently discovered in thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride taking place at room temperature and reacting to ultraviolet and visible light. In this paper, we report on a lattice contraction upon illumination observed for thin-film samples of photochromic yttrium hydride, recorded by time-resolved X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The time dependence of the lattice contraction is consistent with the observed photochromic response of the samples.

  20. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  1. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  2. Thermal coupling potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with metal hydride tanks: Thermodynamic and design considerations towards integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Kosmidis, Lefteris I.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2014-12-01

    We study the thermal coupling potential between a high temperature metal hydride (MH) tank and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) aiming towards the design of an efficient integrated system, where the thermal power produced during normal SOFC operation is redirected towards the MH tank in order to maintain H2 desorption without the use of external heating sources. Based on principles of thermodynamics, we calculate the energy balance in the SOFC/MH system and derive analytical expressions for both the thermal power produced during SOFC operation and the corresponding thermal power required for H2 desorption, as a function of the operating temperature, efficiency and fuel utilization ratio in the SOFC, and the MH enthalpy of desorption in the tank. Based on these calculations, we propose an integrated SOFC/MH design where heat is transferred primarily by radiation to the tank in order to maintain steady-state desorption conditions. We develop a mathematical model for this particular design that accounts for heat/mass transfer and desorption kinetics in the tank, and solve for the dynamics of the system assuming MgH2 as a storage material. Our results focus primarily on tank operating conditions, such as pressure, temperature and H2 saturation profiles vs operation time.

  3. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  4. Flexible Thin Metal Film Thermal Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Donald Laurence (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system is provided. A thermally-conductive film made from a thermally-insulating material is doped with thermally-conductive material. At least one layer of electrically-conductive metal is deposited directly onto a surface of the thermally-conductive film. One or more devices are coupled to the layer(s) to measure an electrical characteristic associated therewith as an indication of temperature.

  5. The reactivity of sodium alanates with O[2], H[2]O, and CO[2] : an investigation of complex metal hydride contamination in the context of automotive systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedrick, Daniel E.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    Safe and efficient hydrogen storage is a significant challenge inhibiting the use of hydrogen as a primary energy carrier. Although energy storage performance properties are critical to the success of solid-state hydrogen storage systems, operator and user safety is of highest importance when designing and implementing consumer products. As researchers are now integrating high energy density solid materials into hydrogen storage systems, quantification of the hazards associated with the operation and handling of these materials becomes imperative. The experimental effort presented in this paper focuses on identifying the hazards associated with producing, storing, and handling sodium alanates, and thus allowing for the development and implementation of hazard mitigation procedures. The chemical changes of sodium alanates associated with exposure to oxygen and water vapor have been characterized by thermal decomposition analysis using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) and X-ray diffraction methods. Partial oxidation of sodium alanates, an alkali metal complex hydride, results in destabilization of the remaining hydrogen-containing material. At temperatures below 70 C, reaction of sodium alanate with water generates potentially combustible mixtures of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In addition to identifying the reaction hazards associated with the oxidation of alkali-metal containing complex hydrides, potential treatment methods are identified that chemically stabilize the oxidized material and reduce the hazard associated with handling the contaminated metal hydrides.

  6. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium......-hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Photochromism of rare-earth metal-oxy-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafezarefi, F.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Cornelius, S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, thin films of yttrium oxy-hydride (YOxHy) were reported to show an unusual color-neutral photochromic effect promising for application in smart windows. Our present work demonstrates that also oxy-hydrides based on Gd, Dy, and Er have photochromic properties and crystal structures similar to YOxHy. Compared to YOxHy, the optical bandgaps of the lanthanide based oxy-hydrides are smaller while photochromic contrast and kinetics show large variation among different cations. Based on these findings, we propose that cation alloying is a viable pathway to tailor the photochromic properties of oxy-hydride materials. Furthermore, we predict that the oxy-hydrides of the other lanthanides are also potentially photochromic.

  8. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  9. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  10. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  11. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  12. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  13. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  14. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  15. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  16. An enhanced microfluidic control system for improving power density of a hydride-based micro fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Shannon, Mark [Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green St., University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 213 Roger Adams Lab, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pengwang, Eakkachai [Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green St., University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Masel, Richard I. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 213 Roger Adams Lab, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-04-02

    Microfuel cells (MFCs) can potentially power emerging technologies that require power sources in the microliter size range. The recent development of a microfluidic mechanism for self-regulated generation of hydrogen has enabled fabrication of MFCs orders of magnitude smaller than previously possible. In this study, we report an order of magnitude enhancement in the power density of a microliter-scale fuel cell incorporating a new microfluidic design. The microfluidic mechanism is part of an on-board hydrogen generator that uses a reaction between a metal hydride, LiAlH{sub 4}, and water vapor to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen generated exits the hydride reactor through a porous silicon wall to reach a Nafion-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The microfluidic design increased the water vapor release rate to the hydride reactor by one order of magnitude over a previous design. A 9 {mu}L device incorporating the enhanced microfluidic design delivered a power density of 92 W L{sup -1}. Details of a parametric study conducted to improve the water vapor release rate of the microfluidic mechanism and performance analysis of the integrated device are presented in this paper. (author)

  17. An enhanced microfluidic control system for improving power density of a hydride-based micro fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Pengwang, Eakkachai; Masel, Richard I.; Shannon, Mark

    Microfuel cells (MFCs) can potentially power emerging technologies that require power sources in the microliter size range. The recent development of a microfluidic mechanism for self-regulated generation of hydrogen has enabled fabrication of MFCs orders of magnitude smaller than previously possible. In this study, we report an order of magnitude enhancement in the power density of a microliter-scale fuel cell incorporating a new microfluidic design. The microfluidic mechanism is part of an on-board hydrogen generator that uses a reaction between a metal hydride, LiAlH 4, and water vapor to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen generated exits the hydride reactor through a porous silicon wall to reach a Nafion-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The microfluidic design increased the water vapor release rate to the hydride reactor by one order of magnitude over a previous design. A 9 μL device incorporating the enhanced microfluidic design delivered a power density of 92 W L -1. Details of a parametric study conducted to improve the water vapor release rate of the microfluidic mechanism and performance analysis of the integrated device are presented in this paper.

  18. Destabilisation of magnesium hydride by germanium as a new potential multicomponent hydrogen storage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gavin S; Abbas, Marwa; Grant, David M; Udeh, Chima

    2011-07-28

    MgH(2) has too high an operating temperature for many hydrogen storage applications. However, MgH(2) ball-milled with Ge leads to a thermodynamic destabilisation of >50 kJ mol(-1)(H(2)). This has dramatically reduced the temperature of dehydrogenation to 130 °C, opening up the potential for Mg-based multicomponent systems as hydrogen stores for a range of applications.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were

  20. A thin film hydroponic system for plant studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Robert; Prince, Ralph; Muller, Eldon; Schuerger, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    The Land Pavillion, EPCOT Center, houses a hydroponic, thin film growing system identical to that residing in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber at Kennedy Space Center. The system is targeted for plant disease and nutrition studies. The system is described.

  1. Microstructure-Property Correlation in Magnesium-based Hydrogen Storage Systems: The Case for Ball-milled Magnesium Hydride Powder and Magnesium-based Multilayered Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaie, Mohsen

    The main focus of this thesis is the characterization of defects and microstructure in high-energy ball milled magnesium hydride powder and magnesium-based multilayered composites. Enhancement in kinetics of hydrogen cycling in magnesium can be achieved by applying severe plastic deformation. A literature survey reveals that, due to extreme instability of alpha-MgH 2 in transmission electron microscope (TEM), the physical parameters that researchers have studied are limited to particle size and grain size. By utilizing a cryogenic TEM sample holder, we extended the stability time of the hydride phase during TEM characterization. Milling for only 30 minutes resulted in a significant enhancement in desorption kinetics. A subsequent annealing cycle under pressurized hydrogen reverted the kinetics to its initial sluggish state. Cryo-TEM analysis of the milled hydride revealed that mechanical milling induces deformation twinning in the hydride microstructure. Milling did not alter the thermodynamics of desorption. Twins can enhance the kinetics by acting as preferential locations for the heterogeneous nucleation of metallic magnesium. We also looked at the phase transformation characteristics of desorption in MgH2. By using energy-filtered TEM, we investigated the morphology of the phases in a partially desorbed state. Our observations prove that desorption phase transformation in MgH2 is of "nucleation and growth" type, with a substantial energy barrier for nucleation. This is contrary to the generally assumed "core-shell" structure in most of the simulation models for this system. We also tested the hydrogen storage cycling behavior of bulk centimeter-scale Mg-Ti and Mg-SS multilayer composites synthesized by accumulative roll-bonding. Addition of either phase (Ti or SS) allows the reversible hydrogen sorption at 350°C, whereas identically roll-bonded pure magnesium cannot be absorbed. In the composites the first cycle of absorption (also called "activation

  2. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  3. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  4. Subdiffusion in a system with thin membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Dworecki, Kazimierz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2012-08-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally a process of subdiffusion in a system with two thin membranes. The theoretical model uses Green's functions obtained for the membrane system by means of the generalized method of images. These Green's functions are combinations of the fundamental solutions to a fractional subdiffusion equation describing subdiffusion in a homogenous, unbounded system. Using Green's functions we find analytical formulas describing the time evolution of concentration profiles and the time evolution of the amount of substance that remains in the region between the membranes. The concentration profiles fulfill a new boundary condition at the membrane, in which the membrane permeability is assumed to change over time according to the special formula presented in the paper. These concentration profiles fulfill a standard subdiffusion equation with fractional Riemann-Liouville time derivative only approximately, but they coincide very well with the experimental data. Fitting the theoretical functions in with the experimental results, we also estimate the subdiffusion coefficient of polyethylene glycol 2000 in agarose hydrogel.

  5. Filiform-mode hydride corrosion of uranium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. A.; Schulze, R. K.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.; McCabe, R. J.; Papin, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    Hydride nucleation and growth has previously been studied in uranium with an air-formed oxide. Preferred directional growth of uranium hydride has not been observed, presumably due to the constraint of the oxide layer and/or the presence of a surface layer distorted by mechanical grinding and polishing. Instead, hydrides typically first form as subsurface blisters that do not exhibit preferred growth directionality. By eliminating the strained surface layer through electropolishing, removing the natural oxide through ion sputtering, avoiding exposure of the uranium to air, and then exposing uranium to high purity hydrogen in an environmental cell, hydride growth patterns emerge that correspond to defect structures within the microstructure. These hydride growth patterns are similar to filiform corrosion, a type of corrosion that frequently forms under thin protective films. This work describes the first reported observation of filiform-like corrosion in uranium. The uranium hydride initiates at defects, but grows into filaments up to 20 μm wide, and tends to form in straight lines, largely propagating along twin boundaries. Propagation is driven by hydrogen reaction at the filament head, promoted by more efficient delivery of reactant. However, this phenomenon does not involve an electrochemical process associated with conventional filiform corrosion and is therefore described as filiform-like. Hydride growth was observed using optical microscopy for a period of nearly three years. Sample characterization included automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements to determine growth directions. Observation of this anomalous hydride growth provides clues as to the mechanisms operating in uranium hydriding for more conventionally prepared sample surfaces.

  6. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Biyang; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb(II)-NaBH4-K3Fe(CN)6 system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH4 in the presence of K3Fe(CN)6 were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH4; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K3Fe(CN)6 to form Pb2[Fe(CN)6], which further reacts with NaBH4 to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K3Fe(CN)6 to form more Pb2[Fe(CN)6] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb2[Fe(CN)6] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb(II)-NaBH4-K3Fe(CN)6 system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L(-1). The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L(-1) with correlation coefficient of 0.9993. The recovery of lead was determined as 97.6% (n=5) for adding 10 μg L(-1) lead into the milk sample.

  7. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  8. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  9. Comparison of metallization systems for thin film hybrid microcircuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, R.A.; Raut, M.K.

    1980-08-01

    Five metallization systems were evaluated for fabricating thin film hybrid microcircuits. The titanium/palladium/electroplated gold system proved superior in terms of thermocompression bondability, corrosion resistance, and solderability.

  10. A renewed search for short-lived 126Sn in the early Solar System: Hydride generation MC-ICPMS for high sensitivity Te isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecka, Gregory A.; Borg, Lars E.; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Souders, Amanda K.; Shollenberger, Quinn R.; Marks, Naomi E.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2017-03-01

    Although there is limited direct evidence for supernova input into the nascent Solar System, many models suggest it formed by the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud that was triggered by a nearby supernova. Existing lines of evidence, mostly in the form of short-lived radionuclides present in the early Solar System, are potentially consistent with this hypothesis, but still allow for alternative explanations. Since the natural production of 126Sn is thought to occur only in supernovae and this isotope has a short half-life (126Sn→126Te, t1/2 = 235 ky), the discovery of extant 126Sn would provide unequivocal proof of supernova input to the early Solar System. Previous attempts to quantify the initial abundance of 126Sn by examining Sn-Te systematics in early solids have been hampered by difficulties in precisely measuring Te isotope ratios in these materials. Thus, here we describe a novel technique that uses hydride generation to dramatically increase the ionization efficiency of Te-an approximately 30-fold increase over previous work. This introduction system, when coupled to a MC-ICPMS, enables high-precision Te isotopic analyses on samples with expected concentrations of Sn and Te, as well as the lack of nucleosynthetic anomalies in other isotopes of Te suggest that the bulk of the Sn and Te recovered from these particular refractory inclusions is not of primary origin and thus does not represent a primary signature of Sn-Te systematics of the protosolar nebula during condensation of CAIs or their precursors. Although no evidence of supernova input was found based on Sn-Te systematics in this sample set, hydride generation represents a powerful tool that can now be used to further explore Te isotope systematics in less altered materials.

  11. Investigation of the anhydrous molten Na-B-O-H system and the concept: Electrolytic hydriding of sodium boron oxide species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabretta, Daniel L.; Davis, Boyd R. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, Ont. (Canada); Kingston Process Metallurgy, Inc., 1102 Lancaster Dr., Kingston, Ont. (Canada); Department of Mining Engineering, Queen' s University, 25 Union Ave., Kingston, Ont. (Canada)

    2007-02-10

    Although sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) can act as an excellent hydrogen storage material, its cost renders it impractical for automotive applications. In this paper the concept of electrolytic production of NaBH{sub 4} from sodium metaborate (NaBO{sub 2}) is introduced following a literature review of NaBH{sub 4} synthesis. By deduction, we assert that only by employing dense solid oxide ion electrolytes and a molten salt solution containing the two constituents would such a process be possible. We investigated the molten anhydrous Na-B-O-H system by pressure differential thermal analysis (PDTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and gas evolution analysis (GEA) using the starting reagents sodium hydride (NaH), NaBO{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4}. We found that molten NaBH{sub 4} is not stable with NaBO{sub 2} above 600 C due to the formation of sodium orthoborate (Na{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 5}), hydrogen and boron. However, the quasi-reciprocal ternary system, (4/5)NaH-NaBO{sub 2}-(1/5)NaBH{sub 4}-(2/5)Na{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 5}, that was discovered, proves that molten Na{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 5} is miscible and stable with molten NaBH{sub 4} to at least 650 C under the hydrogen pressures used in this study. As well, the compound Na{sub 6}B{sub 2}O{sub 5}H{sub 2} was discovered and a substantial portion of the anhydrous Na-B-O-H phase diagram has been experimentally deduced. There is a large ionic liquid composition domain within the system that would allow for the electrolytic hydriding of sodium boron oxide species to be tested. (author)

  12. Investigation of the anhydrous molten Na-B-O-H system and the concept: Electrolytic hydriding of sodium boron oxide species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabretta, Daniel L.; Davis, Boyd R.

    Although sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) can act as an excellent hydrogen storage material, its cost renders it impractical for automotive applications. In this paper the concept of electrolytic production of NaBH 4 from sodium metaborate (NaBO 2) is introduced following a literature review of NaBH 4 synthesis. By deduction, we assert that only by employing dense solid oxide ion electrolytes and a molten salt solution containing the two constituents would such a process be possible. We investigated the molten anhydrous Na-B-O-H system by pressure differential thermal analysis (PDTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and gas evolution analysis (GEA) using the starting reagents sodium hydride (NaH), NaBO 2 and NaBH 4. We found that molten NaBH 4 is not stable with NaBO 2 above 600 °C due to the formation of sodium orthoborate (Na 4B 2O 5), hydrogen and boron. However, the quasi-reciprocal ternary system, (4/5)NaH-NaBO 2-(1/5)NaBH 4-(2/5)Na 4B 2O 5, that was discovered, proves that molten Na 4B 2O 5 is miscible and stable with molten NaBH 4 to at least 650 °C under the hydrogen pressures used in this study. As well, the compound Na 6B 2O 5H 2 was discovered and a substantial portion of the anhydrous Na-B-O-H phase diagram has been experimentally deduced. There is a large ionic liquid composition domain within the system that would allow for the electrolytic hydriding of sodium boron oxide species to be tested.

  13. Copolymerization of 1-hexene and 1-dodecene with 1,3-butadiene by a versatate/diisobutylaluminum hydride/t-butyl chloride catalyst system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Monteiro da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to incorporate an alpha-olefin (1-hexene or 1-dodecene in a high cis polybutadiene chain, using a neodymium versatate/diisobutylaluminum hydride/t-butyl chloride catalyst system. The influence of alpha-olefin on polymerization reaction and polymer characteristics, using different weight ratios of butadiene/α-olefin, was evaluated. The copolymers were characterized by SEC, FTIR, NMR, TGA and viscosimetric analysis. The thermal stability of the polymer tended to increase with incorporation of alpha-olefins, while its microstructure was not affected. The weight average molecular mass (Mw tended to increase and the polymerization conversion tended to decrease with increasing alpha-olefins content. The copolymers showed a lower intrinsic viscosity than for the homopolymer. The results indicated that the alpha-olefins were incorporated in the polybutadiene chain.

  14. A new battery capacity indicator for nickel-metal hydride battery powered electric vehicles using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    CERN Document Server

    Chau, K T; Chan, C C; Shen, W X

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to estimate accurately the battery residual capacity (BRC) of the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery for modern electric vehicles (EVs). The key to this approach is to model the Ni-MH battery in EVs by using the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) with newly defined inputs and output. The inputs are the temperature and the discharged capacity distribution describing the discharge current profile, while the output is the state of available capacity (SOAC) representing the BRC. The estimated SOAC from ANFIS model and the measured SOAC from experiments are compared, and the results confirm that the proposed approach can provide an accurate estimation of the SOAC under variable discharge currents.

  15. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  16. Nanometer-scale hydrogen 'portals' for the control of magnesium hydride formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chia-Jung; Nivargi, Chinmay; Clemens, Bruce

    2015-11-21

    Magnesium and Mg-based material systems are attractive candidates for hydrogen storage but limited by unsuitable thermodynamic and kinetic properties. In particular, the kinetics are too slow at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To study the hydride formation kinetics in a controlled way, we have designed a unique 'nanoportal' structure of Pd nanoparticles deposited on epitaxial Mg thin films, through which the hydride will nucleate only under Pd nanoparticles. We propose a growth mechanism for the hydrogenation reaction in the nanoportal structure, which is supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of hydrogenated samples exhibiting consistent results. Interestingly, the grain boundaries of Mg films play an important role in hydride nucleation and growth processes. Kinetic modeling based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) formalism seems to agree with the two-dimensional nucleation and growth mechanism hypothesized and the overall reaction rate is limited by hydrogen flux through the interface between the Pd nanoparticle and the underlying Mg film. The fact that in our structure Mg can be transformed completely into MgH2 with only a small percentage of Pd nanoparticles offers possibilities for future on-board storage applications.

  17. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  18. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  19. Materials science of Mg-Ni-based new hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orimo, S.; Fujii, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences

    2001-02-01

    One of the advantageous functional properties of Mg alloys (or compounds) is to exhibit the reversible hydriding reaction. In this paper, we present our systematic studies regarding the relationship between nanometer- or atomistic-scale structures and the specific hydriding properties of the Mg-Ni binary system, such as(1) nanostructured (n)-Mg{sub 2}Ni, (2) a mixture of n-Mg{sub 2}Ni and amorphous (a)-MgNi,(3) pure a-MgNi, and(4) n-MgNi{sub 2}. Further studies on(5) an a-MgNi-based system for clarifying the effect of the short-range ordering on the structural and hydriding properties and(6) a MgNi{sub 2}-based system for synthesizing the new Laves phase structure are also presented. The materials science of Mg-Ni-based new hydrides will provide indispensable knowledge for practically developing the Mg alloys as hydrogen-storage materials. (orig.)

  20. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

  1. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Biyang, E-mail: dengby16@163.com; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a novel explanation for plumbane generation. • Expounded the role of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} in plumbane generation. • Clarified the controversial aspects in the mechanism of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} enhancement. • Used X-ray diffractometry to analyze the intermediates. • Developed a method to analyze lead in milk using K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} as new additives. - Absract: To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4}; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}], which further reacts with NaBH{sub 4} to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form more Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L{sup −1}. The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L{sup −1} with correlation coefficient of 0

  2. Electronic structure of ternary hydrides based on light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgaz, E. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: orgaz@eros.pquim.unam.mx; Membrillo, A. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castaneda, R. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Aburto, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-12-08

    Ternary hydrides based on light elements are interesting owing to the high available energy density. In this work we focused into the electronic structure of a series of known systems having the general formula AMH{sub 4}(A=Li,Na,M=B,Al). We computed the energy bands and the total and partial density of states using the linear-augmented plane waves method. In this report, we discuss the chemical bonding in this series of complex hydrides.

  3. The use of metal hydrides in fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo V. Lototskyy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews state-of-the-art developments in hydrogen energy systems which integrate fuel cells with metal hydride-based hydrogen storage. The 187 reference papers included in this review provide an overview of all major publications in the field, as well as recent work by several of the authors of the review. The review contains four parts. The first part gives an overview of the existing types of fuel cells and outlines the potential of using metal hydride stores as a source of hydrogen fuel. The second part of the review considers the suitability and optimisation of different metal hydrides based on their energy efficient thermal integration with fuel cells. The performances of metal hydrides are considered from the viewpoint of the reversible heat driven interaction of the metal hydrides with gaseous H2. Efficiencies of hydrogen and heat exchange in hydrogen stores to control H2 charge/discharge flow rates are the focus of the third section of the review and are considered together with metal hydride – fuel cell system integration issues and the corresponding engineering solutions. Finally, the last section of the review describes specific hydrogen-fuelled systems presented in the available reference data.

  4. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications--metal hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bédard, Stéphane

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software.

  5. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  6. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured chemical hydrides in hydrogen alloying mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronski, Z. [CANMET' s Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: zwronski@nrcan.gc.ca; Varin, R.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chiu, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Czujko, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Calka, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2518 (Australia)

    2007-05-31

    Mechanical alloying of magnesium metal powders with hydrogen in specialized hydrogen ball mills can be used as a direct route for mechanochemical synthesis of emerging chemical hydrides and hydride mixtures for advanced solid-state hydrogen storage. In the 2Mg-Fe system, we have successfully synthesized the ternary complex hydride Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 6} in a mixture with nanometric Fe particles. The mixture of complex magnesium-iron hydride and nano-iron released 3-4 wt.%H{sub 2} in a thermally programmed desorption experiment at the range 285-295 {sup o}C. Milling of the Mg-2Al powder mixture revealed a strong competition between formation of the Al(Mg) solid solution and the {beta}-MgH{sub 2} hydride. The former decomposes upon longer milling as the Mg atoms react with hydrogen to form the hydride phase, and drive the Al out of the solid solution. The mixture of magnesium dihydride and nano-aluminum released 2.1 wt.%H{sub 2} in the temperature range 329-340 {sup o}C in the differential scanning calorimetry experiment. The formation of MgH{sub 2} was suppressed in the Mg-B system; instead, a hydrogenated amorphous phase (Mg,B)H {sub x}, was formed in a mixture with nanometric MgB{sub 2}. Annealing of the hydrogen-stabilized amorphous mixture produced crystalline MgB{sub 2}.

  7. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  8. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  9. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications.

  10. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  11. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  12. 21 CFR 862.2270 - Thin-layer chromatography system for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thin-layer chromatography system for clinical use... Instruments § 862.2270 Thin-layer chromatography system for clinical use. (a) Identification. A thin-layer... a mixture. The mixture of compounds is absorbed onto a stationary phase or thin layer of...

  13. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zhihua [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); PolyU Base (Shenzhen) Limited, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Hao, Mingjun [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Guo, Xianghua [State Key Laboratory of Explosion and Safety Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Tang, Guoyi [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Shi, San-Qiang, E-mail: mmsqshi@polyu.edu.hk [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); PolyU Base (Shenzhen) Limited, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-15

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented.

  14. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  15. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  16. A PC based thin film dosimeter system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Hargittai, P.; Kovacs, A.

    2000-01-01

    A dosimeter system based on the Riso B3 dosimeter film, an office scanner for use with PC and the associated software is presented. The scanned image is analyzed either with standard software (Paint Shop Pro 5 or Excel) functions or with the computer code "Scanalizer" that allows presentation...

  17. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  18. Metal Hydrides as hot carrier cell absorber materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Wen, Xiaoming; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2016-09-01

    The hot Carrier Solar Cell (HCSC) allows the photon-induced hot carriers (the carriers with energy larger than the band gap) to be collected before they completely thermalise. The absorber of the HCSC should have a large phononic band gap to supress Klemens Decay, which results in a slow carrier cooling speed. In fact, a large phononic band gap likely exists in a binary compound whose constituent elements have a large mass ratio between each other. Binary hydrides with their overwhelming mass ratio of the constituent elements are important absorber candidates. Study on different types of binary hydrides as potential absorber candidates is presented in this paper. Many binary transition metal hydrides have reported theoretical or experimental phonon dispersion charts which show large phononic band gaps. Among these hydrides, the titanium hydride (TiHX) is outstanding because of its low cost, easy fabrication process and is relatively inert to air and water. A TiHX thin film is fabricated by directly hydrogenating an evaporated titanium thin film. Characterisation shows good crystal quality and the hydrogenation process is believed to be successful. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy is used to study the electron cooling time of TiHX. The result is very noisy due to the low absorption and transmission of the sample. The evolution of the TA curves has been explained by band to band transition using the calculated band structure of TiH2. Though not reliable due to the high noise, decay time fitting at 700nm and 600nm shows a considerably slow carrier cooling speed of the sample.

  19. Simultaneous determination of hydride (Se) and non-hydride-forming (Ca, Mg, K, P, S and Zn) elements in various beverages (beer, coffee, and milk), with minimum sample preparation, by ICP-AES and use of a dual-mode sample-introduction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Blindern (Norway)

    2005-05-01

    A method has been developed enabling direct analysis (i.e. after dilution only) of beer, instant coffee, milk, and milk powder by ICP-AES. Analysis of the beverages after dilution with a low concentration of HNO{sub 3} was used for accurate determination of essential minor and trace elements (Ca, Mg, K, P, S, and Zn). Selenium, introduced as the hydride, was determined simultaneously with the other non-hydride-forming elements using the commercial multi-mode sample-introduction system (MSIS). To obtain accurate results, however, some simple pre-treatment was needed. Analysis was also performed after microwave-assisted decomposition of the samples. Three different modes of sample-preparation, i.e. dilution only, partial decomposition (aqua regia treatment), and complete decomposition were compared. The results obtained by use of the three different sample-preparation methods were in very good agreement. Results from analysis of certified reference material (SRM 1459 non-fat milk powder) also verified the accuracy of the methods. The limit of detection obtained for Se using dual-mode sample introduction was 0.5 ng mL{sup -1}, which corresponds to approximately 2 ng g{sup -1} in beer and approximately 4 ng g{sup -1} in coffee and milk when using the recommended procedure. (orig.)

  20. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  1. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  2. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus

  3. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus

  4. Photoacoustic elastic bending in thin film—Substrate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorović, D. M., E-mail: dmtodor@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 33, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade-Zemun (Serbia)

    2013-12-07

    Theoretical model for optically excited two-layer elastic plate, which includes plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms, is given in order to study the dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending signal on the optical, thermal, and elastic properties of thin film—substrate system. Thin film-semiconductor sample (in our case Silicon) is modeled by simultaneous analysis of the plasma, thermal, and elastic wave equations. Multireflection effects in thin film are included in theoretical model and analyzed. Relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic bending in the optically excited two-layer mechanically-supported circular plate are derived. Theoretical analysis of the thermodiffusion, plasmaelastic, and thermoelastic effects in a sample-gas-microphone photoacoustic detection configuration is given. Two normalization procedures of the photoacoustic elastic bending signal in function of the modulation frequency of the optical excitation are established. Given theoretical model can be used for various photoacoustic detection configurations, for example, in the study of optical, thermal, and elastic properties of the dielectric-semiconductor or metal-semiconductor structure, etc., Theoretical analysis shows that it is possible to develop new noncontact and nondestructive experimental method—PA elastic bending method for thin film study, with possibility to obtain the optical, thermal, and elastic parameters of the film thinner than 1 μm.

  5. Retinal thinning correlates with clinical severity in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeeyun; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Tae Wan

    2016-10-01

    To analyze retinal thickness changes in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and correlate changes with disease severity and subtypes of MSA. A total of 36 MSA (27 MSA-P and 9 MSA-C) patients and 71 healthy control subjects underwent general ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and perifoveal retinal thickness were analyzed separately. The generalized estimating equation model was used with age as a covariate to adjust for within-patient inter-eye correlations and the effect of age on retinal or RNFL thickness. Correlation analysis between RNFL, perifoveal thickness, and clinical parameters, the Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS) and Global Disability Score (GDS), was also done. MSA patients showed significantly decreased peripapillary RNFL thickness in the inferior (P = 0.047) and inferotemporal (P = 0.017) sectors and significant perifoveal thinning in the superior outer sector (P = 0.042) compared to healthy controls. Both RNFL and perifoveal thinning were more marked and widespread in MSA-P than MSA-C patients. The UMSARS and GDS showed significant negative correlation with center and total macular perifoveal thickness and also the inferior and nasal outer sectors. Peripapillary RNFL and perifoveal retinal thinning were observed in MSA patients and retinal thinning correlated with the clinical severity of MSA. Structural changes in the retina may reflect the degree and pattern of neurodegeneration occurring in MSA.

  6. Simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzo, Z. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Altos de Pipe, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Matos-Reyes, M.N.; Cervera, M.L.; Guardia, M. de la, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The operating characteristics of a dual nebulization system were studied including instrumental and chemical conditions for the hydride generation and analytical figures of merit for both, hydride and non hydride forming elements. Analytical performance of the nebulization system was characterized by detection limits from 0.002 to 0.0026 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the hydride forming elements and between 0.0034 and 0.0121 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the non-hydride forming elements, relative standard deviation for 10 replicate measurements at 0.25 mg L{sup -1} level and recovery percentages between 97 and 103%. The feasibility of the system was demonstrated in the simultaneous determination of Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Zn, As, Bi, Sb, Se, and Te in the NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder), NIST 1570a (spinach leaves), DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) certified samples for trace elements. Results found were in good agreement with the certified ones. (author)

  7. A novel analytical system involving hydride generation and gold-coated W-coil trapping atomic absorption spectrometry for selenium determination at ng l{sup -1} level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, I. [Department of Chemistry, Mugla University, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Arslan, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Bakirdere, S. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey); Ataman, O.Y. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    A novel analytical technique was developed where gaseous hydrogen selenide formed by sodium tetrahydroborate reduction is transported to and trapped on a resistively heated gold-coated W-coil atom trap for in situ preconcentration. Gold coating on W-coil was prepared by using an organic solution of Au. The atom trap is held at 165 {sup o}C during the collection stage and is heated up to 675 deg. C for revolatilization; analyte species formed are transported to an externally heated quartz T-tube where the atomization takes place and the transient signal is obtained. The carrier gas consisted of 112.5 ml min{sup -1} Ar with 75 ml min{sup -1} H{sub 2} during the collection step and 112.5 ml min{sup -1} Ar with 450 ml min{sup -1} H{sub 2} in the revolatilization step. The half width of the transient signal obtained is less than 0.5 s. The RSD for the measurements was found to be 3.9% (n = 11) for 0.10 {mu}g l{sup -1} Se using peak height measurements. The calibration plot for 27.0 ml of sample collected in 4.0 min using a flow rate of 6.75 ml min{sup -1} was linear between 0.13 and 2.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Se. The limit of detection (3 s) is 39 ng l{sup -1}. The enhancement factor for the characteristic concentration (C{sub o}) was found to be 20.1 when compared to conventional hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry system without trap. In order to check the accuracy of the method, standard reference material, natural water NIST 1640 was employed; the result was found to be in good agreement with the certified value at the 95% confidence level.

  8. A novel analytical system involving hydride generation and gold-coated W-coil trapping atomic absorption spectrometry for selenium determination at ng l - 1 level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, İ.; Arslan, Y.; Bakırdere, S.; Ataman, O. Y.

    2008-08-01

    A novel analytical technique was developed where gaseous hydrogen selenide formed by sodium tetrahydroborate reduction is transported to and trapped on a resistively heated gold-coated W-coil atom trap for in situ preconcentration. Gold coating on W-coil was prepared by using an organic solution of Au. The atom trap is held at 165 °C during the collection stage and is heated up to 675 °C for revolatilization; analyte species formed are transported to an externally heated quartz T-tube where the atomization takes place and the transient signal is obtained. The carrier gas consisted of 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 75 ml min - 1 H 2 during the collection step and 112.5 ml min - 1 Ar with 450 ml min - 1 H 2 in the revolatilization step. The half width of the transient signal obtained is less than 0.5 s. The RSD for the measurements was found to be 3.9% ( n = 11) for 0.10 µg l - 1 Se using peak height measurements. The calibration plot for 27.0 ml of sample collected in 4.0 min using a flow rate of 6.75 ml min - 1 was linear between 0.13 and 2.0 µg l - 1 of Se. The limit of detection (3 s) is 39 ng l - 1 . The enhancement factor for the characteristic concentration ( Co) was found to be 20.1 when compared to conventional hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry system without trap. In order to check the accuracy of the method, standard reference material, natural water NIST 1640 was employed; the result was found to be in good agreement with the certified value at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Experimental comparison on heat transfer-enhancing component of metal hydride bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun-goo, E-mail: hgkang@nfri.re.kr; Chung, Dong-you; Oh, Yun Hee; Chang, Min Ho; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Two small ZrCo metal hydride beds were developed. • Copper foam or fin as heat transfer-enhancing component are experimentally compared. • Copper foam bed is more efficient for uniform and rapid heating of metal hydride. • Copper foam bed is more efficient in removal of reaction heat during absorption. - Abstract: Metal hydride bed will be one of the key components for safe handling of tritium in fusion fuel cycle. In case of normal or emergency shutdown of fuel cycle, metal hydride bed installed in storage and delivery system (SDS) of tritium plant will absorb tritium gas in the system as soon as possible. Supply of hydrogen isotope gas to fueling system of fusion reactor will start from the metal hydride beds. Rapid delivery, rapid recovery including rapid heating and cooling are key issues. For better performance of metal hydride bed, various forms of heat transfer enhancing component or design can be applied. This study aims to help the selection of heat transfer enhancing component. Two small ZrCo beds with copper foam and copper fin were developed and experimented with hydrogen gas. Recovery and delivery performance, heating and cooling performance are compared. Experimental results show metal hydride bed with copper foam has improved performance. Uniform heating of metal hydride during desorption and removal of reaction heat during absorption are more efficient with copper foam bed than copper fin bed.

  10. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  11. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  12. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-03-10

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was imitated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized and the knowledge on the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant part of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides are collaborators in the IEA task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of the complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides and their thermodynamic properties, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  13. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  14. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  15. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  16. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  17. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  18. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  19. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  20. Magnetic coupling mechanisms in particle/thin film composite systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni A. Badini Confalonieri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 20 nm and size distribution of 7% were chemically synthesized and spin-coated on top of a Si-substrate. As a result, the particles self-assembled into a monolayer with hexagonal close-packed order. Subsequently, the nanoparticle array was coated with a Co layer of 20 nm thickness. The magnetic properties of this composite nanoparticle/thin film system were investigated by magnetometry and related to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies. Herein three systems were compared: i.e. a reference sample with only the particle monolayer, a composite system where the particle array was ion-milled prior to the deposition of a thin Co film on top, and a similar composite system but without ion-milling. The nanoparticle array showed a collective super-spin behavior due to dipolar interparticle coupling. In the composite system, we observed a decoupling into two nanoparticle subsystems. In the ion-milled system, the nanoparticle layer served as a magnetic flux guide as observed by magnetic force microscopy. Moreover, an exchange bias effect was found, which is likely to be due to oxygen exchange between the iron oxide and the Co layer, and thus forming of an antiferromagnetic CoO layer at the γ-Fe2O3/Co interface.

  1. A measurement system for thin elastohydrodynamic lubrication films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuefeng; GUO Feng; YANG Peiran

    2007-01-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication(EHL)film measurement system using multi-beam interferometry is introduced in this paper.The measurement principle and the instrumentation are discussed.A simple and efficient method is suggested to obtain the fringe order of measured points.It is demonstrated that the presented measurement system can provide continuous measurement of lubricating films from nano to micro scales at a nano-level resolution,and can be used to investigate ultra-thin EHL films and tiny variations in EHL films.

  2. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today......’s hydride batteries, but a much poorer stability towards repeated charge/discharge cycling. The aim was to see if the cycleability of CaNi5 could be enhanced enough by modifications to make the compound a suitable electrode material. An alloying method based on mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill...... by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated...

  3. First-principles study of superabundant vacancy formation in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjun; Alavi, Ali

    2005-07-13

    Recent experiments have established the generality of superabundant vacancies (SAV) formation in metal hydrides. Aiming to elucidate this intriguing phenomenon and to clarify previous interpretations, we employ density-functional theory to investigate atomic mechanisms of SAV formation in fcc hydrides of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au. We have found that upon H insertion, vacancy formation energies reduce substantially. This is consistent with experimental suggestions. We demonstrate that the entropy effect, which has been proposed to explain SAV formation, is not the main cause. Instead, it is the drastic change of electronic structure induced by the H in the SAV hydrides, which is to a large extent responsible. Interesting trends in systems investigated are also found: ideal hydrides of 5d metals and noble metals are unstable compared to the corresponding pure metals, but the SAV hydrides are more stable than the corresponding ideal hydrides, whereas opposite results exist in the cases of Ni, Rh, and Pd. These trends of stabilities of the SAV hydrides are discussed in detail and a general understanding for SAV formation is provided. Finally, we propose an alternative reaction pathway to generate a SAV hydride from a metal alloy.

  4. Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen Storage Capacity Hydride by weight (%) [1) by volume (g/ml) [2] MgH2 7.00 0.101 Mg2NiH4 3.84 0,081 Mg2CuH4 2.04 - - 27 ...Include Security Classification) Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) DelaRosa, Mark J. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...objective of this program was to develop an economical process for pr-ducing a lightweight hydrogen storage medium by the chemical vapor infiltration

  5. Strategies for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of metal hydride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui

    2008-10-24

    Metal hydrides are an important family of materials that can potentially be used for safe, efficient and reversible on-board hydrogen storage. Light-weight metal hydrides in particular have attracted intense interest due to their high hydrogen density. However, most of these hydrides have rather slow absorption kinetics, relatively high thermal stability, and/or problems with the reversibility of hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. This paper discusses a number of different approaches for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of these materials, with emphasis on recent research on tuning the ionic mobility in mixed hydrides. This concept opens a promising pathway to accelerate hydrogenation kinetics, reduce the activation energy for hydrogen release, and minimize deleterious possible by-products often associated with complex hydride systems.

  6. Getting metal-hydrides to do what you want them to

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the discovery of AB/sub 5/ compounds, intermetallic hydrides with unusual properties began to be developed (H dissociation pressures of one to several atmospheres, extremely rapid and reversible adsorption/desorption very large amounts of H adsorbed). This paper reviews the factors that must be controlled in order to modify these hydrides to make them useful. The system LaNi/sub 5/ + H/sub 2/ is used as example. Use of AB/sub 5/ hydrides to construct a chemical heat pumps is discussed. Results of a systematic study substituting Al for Ni are reported; the HYCSOS pump is described briefly. Use of hydrides as hydrogen getters (substituted ZrV/sub 2/) is also discussed. Finally, possible developments in intermetallic hydride research in the 1980's and the hydrogen economy are discussed. 10 figures. (DLC)

  7. Crystallography of shear transformations in zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Michael Philip [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The crystallography and substructure of the transformations which have been hypothesized as involving a martensitic shear, and which occur between zirconium hydrides were investigated. Specifically, the formation of gamma zirconium hydride from delta hydride and the delta hydride to epsilon hydride transformation were studied. The habit planes, orientation relationships, lattice invariant shears, and interface structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. Surface tilts were observed and measured with an interference microscope. The direction and magnitude of the shape strain produced by the formation of gamma were determined by the measurement of fiducial scratch displacements. These results were compared with the phenomenological crystallographic theory of martensitic transformations.

  8. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  9. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  10. Review of magnesium hydride-based materials: development and optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivello, J.-C.; Dam, B.; Denys, R. V.; Dornheim, M.; Grant, D. M.; Huot, J.; Jensen, T. R.; de Jongh, P.; Latroche, M.; Milanese, C.; Milčius, D.; Walker, G. S.; Webb, C. J.; Zlotea, C.; Yartys, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium hydride has been studied extensively for applications as a hydrogen storage material owing to the favourable cost and high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. However, its high enthalpy of decomposition necessitates high working temperatures for hydrogen desorption while the slow rates for some processes such as hydrogen diffusion through the bulk create challenges for large-scale implementation. The present paper reviews fundamentals of the Mg-H system and looks at the recent advances in the optimisation of magnesium hydride as a hydrogen storage material through the use of catalytic additives, incorporation of defects and an understanding of the rate-limiting processes during absorption and desorption.

  11. Design and Fabricate a Metallic Hydride Heat Pump with a Cooling Capacity of 9000 BTU/H

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-07

    I ERGENICS, INC. N 681 Lawl Ins Road Wyckoff. NJ 07481 DESIGN AND FABRICATE A METALLIC HYDRIDE HEAT PUMP WITH A COOLING CAPACITY OF 9000 BTU/H...air conditioning unit employing a metal hydride heat pump and a silicone heat transfer fluid. The contract was subsequently modified on 29 September 3...for thermally driven ECE systems. Metal hydride heat pumps were proposed as for this application.. However, only laboratory bench experiments have

  12. Characterization of hydrides and delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiang

    This thesis tries to fill some of the missing gaps in the study of zirconium hydrides with state-of-art experiments, cutting edge tomographical technique, and a novel numerical algorithm. A new hydriding procedure is proposed. The new anode material and solution combination overcomes many drawbacks of the AECLRTM hydriding method and leads to superior hydriding result compared to the AECL RTM hydriding procedure. The DHC crack growth velocity of as-received Excel alloy and Zr-2.5Nb alloy together with several different heat treated Excel alloy samples are measured. While it already known that the DHC crack growth velocity increases with the increase of base metal strength, the finding that the transverse plane is the weaker plane for fatigue crack growth despite having higher resistance to DHC crack growth was unexpected. The morphologies of hydrides in a coarse grained Zircally-2 sample have been studied using synchrotron x-rays at ESRF with a new technique called Diffraction Contrast Tomography that uses simultaneous collection of tomographic data and diffraction data to determine the crystallographic orientation of crystallites (grains) in 3D. It has been previously limited to light metals such as Al or Mg (due to the use of low energy x-rays). Here we show the first DCT measurements using high energy x-rays (60 keV), allowing measurements in zirconium. A new algorithm of a computationally effcient way to characterize distributions of hydrides - in particular their orientation and/or connectivity - has been proposed. It is a modification of the standard Hough transform, which is an extension of the Hough transform widely used in the line detection of EBSD patterns. Finally, a basic model of hydrogen migration is built using ABAQUS RTM, which is a mature finite element package with tested modeling modules of a variety of physical laws. The coupling of hydrogen diffusion, lattice expansion, matrix deformation and phase transformation is investigated under

  13. Molecular tailoring of interfaces for thin film on substrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha Elizabeth

    Thin film on substrate systems appear most prevalently within the microelectronics industry, which demands that devices operate in smaller and smaller packages with greater reliability. The reliability of these multilayer film systems is strongly influenced by the adhesion of each of the bimaterial interfaces. During use, microelectronic components undergo thermo-mechanical cycling, which induces interfacial delaminations leading to failure of the overall device. The ability to tailor interfacial properties at the molecular level provides a mechanism to improve thin film adhesion, reliability and performance. This dissertation presents the investigation of molecular level control of interface properties in three thin film-substrate systems: photodefinable polyimide films on passivated silicon substrates, self-assembled monolayers at the interface of Au films and dielectric substrates, and mechanochemically active materials on rigid substrates. For all three materials systems, the effect of interfacial modifications on adhesion is assessed using a laser-spallation technique. Laser-induced stress waves are chosen because they dynamically load the thin film interface in a precise, noncontacting manner at high strain rates and are suitable for both weak and strong interfaces. Photodefinable polyimide films are used as dielectrics in flip chip integrated circuit packages to reduce the stress between silicon passivation layers and mold compound. The influence of processing parameters on adhesion is examined for photodefinable polyimide films on silicon (Si) substrates with three different passivation layers: silicon nitride (SiNx), silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), and the native silicon oxide (SiO2). Interfacial strength increases when films are processed with an exposure step as well as a longer cure cycle. Additionally, the interfacial fracture energy is assessed using a dynamic delamination protocol. The high toughness of this interface (ca. 100 J/m2) makes it difficult

  14. Novel tribological systems using shape memory alloys and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijun

    Shape memory alloys and thin films are shown to have robust indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. Loading conditions that are similar to indentations are very common in tribological systems. Therefore novel tribological systems that have better wear resistance and stronger coating to substrate adhesion can be engineered using indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. By incorporating superelastic NiTi thin films as interlayers between chromium nitride (CrN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) hard coatings and aluminum substrates, it is shown that the superelasticity can improve tribological performance and increase interfacial adhesion. The NiTi interlayers were sputter deposited onto 6061 T6 aluminum and M2 steel substrates. CrN and DLC coatings were deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Temperature scanning X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation were used to characterize NiTi interlayers. Temperature scanning wear and scratch tests showed that superelastic NiTi interlayers improved tribological performance on aluminum substrates significantly. The two-way shape memory effect under contact loading conditions is demonstrated for the first time, which could be used to make novel tribological systems. Spherical indents in NiTi shape memory alloys and thin films had reversible depth changes that were driven by temperature cycling, after thermomechanical cycling, or one-cycle slip-plasticity deformation training. Reversible surface topography was realized after the indents were planarized. Micro- and nano- scale circular surface protrusions arose from planarized spherical indents in bulk and thin film NiTi alloy; line surface protrusions appeared from planarized scratch tracks. Functional surfaces with reversible surface topography can potentially result in novel tribological systems with reversible friction coefficient. A three dimensional constitutive model was developed to describe shape memory effects with slip

  15. Contamination Effects on Improving the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Binary Magnesium Hydride/Titanium Carbide Systems Prepared by Reactive Ball Milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eskandarany, M Sherif; Shaban, Ehab

    2015-10-10

    Ultrafine MgH₂ nanocrystalline powders were prepared by reactive ball milling of elemental Mg powders after 200 h of high-energy ball milling under a hydrogen gas pressure of 50 bar. The as-prepared metal hydride powders were contaminated with 2.2 wt. % of FeCr-stainless steel that was introduced to the powders upon using stainless steel milling tools made of the same alloy. The as-synthesized MgH₂ was doped with previously prepared TiC nanopowders, which were contaminated with 2.4 wt. % FeCr (materials of the milling media), and then ball milled under hydrogen gas atmosphere for 50 h. The results related to the morphological examinations of the fabricated nanocomposite powders beyond the micro-and nano-levels showed excellent distributions of 5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr dispersoids embedded into the fine host matrix of MgH₂ powders. The as-fabricated nanocomposite MgH₂/5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr powders possessed superior hydrogenation/dehydrogenation characteristics, suggested by the low value of the activation energy (97.74 kJ/mol), and the short time required for achieving a complete absorption (6.6 min) and desorption (8.4 min) of 5.51 wt. % H₂ at a moderate temperature of 275 °C under a hydrogen gas pressure ranging from 100 mbar to 8 bar. van't Hoff approach was used to calculate the enthalpy (DH) and entropy (DS) of hydrogenation for MgH₂, which was found to be -72.74 kJ/mol and 112.79 J/mol H₂/K, respectively. Moreover, van't Hoff method was employed to calculate the DH and DS of dehydrogenation, which was found to be 76.76 kJ/mol and 119.15 J/mol H₂/K, respectively. This new nanocomposite system possessed excellent absorption/desorption cyclability of 696 complete cycles, achieved in a cyclic-life-time of 682 h.

  16. Contamination Effects on Improving the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Binary Magnesium Hydride/Titanium Carbide Systems Prepared by Reactive Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eskandarany, M. Sherif; Shaban, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafine MgH2 nanocrystalline powders were prepared by reactive ball milling of elemental Mg powders after 200 h of high-energy ball milling under a hydrogen gas pressure of 50 bar. The as-prepared metal hydride powders were contaminated with 2.2 wt. % of FeCr-stainless steel that was introduced to the powders upon using stainless steel milling tools made of the same alloy. The as-synthesized MgH2 was doped with previously prepared TiC nanopowders, which were contaminated with 2.4 wt. % FeCr (materials of the milling media), and then ball milled under hydrogen gas atmosphere for 50 h. The results related to the morphological examinations of the fabricated nanocomposite powders beyond the micro-and nano-levels showed excellent distributions of 5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr dispersoids embedded into the fine host matrix of MgH2 powders. The as-fabricated nanocomposite MgH2/5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr powders possessed superior hydrogenation/dehydrogenation characteristics, suggested by the low value of the activation energy (97.74 kJ/mol), and the short time required for achieving a complete absorption (6.6 min) and desorption (8.4 min) of 5.51 wt. % H2 at a moderate temperature of 275 °C under a hydrogen gas pressure ranging from 100 mbar to 8 bar. van’t Hoff approach was used to calculate the enthalpy (∆H) and entropy (∆S) of hydrogenation for MgH2, which was found to be −72.74 kJ/mol and 112.79 J/mol H2/K, respectively. Moreover, van’t Hoff method was employed to calculate the ΔH and ΔS of dehydrogenation, which was found to be 76.76 kJ/mol and 119.15 J/mol H2/K, respectively. This new nanocomposite system possessed excellent absorption/desorption cyclability of 696 complete cycles, achieved in a cyclic-life-time of 682 h. PMID:28793606

  17. Contamination Effects on Improving the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Binary Magnesium Hydride/Titanium Carbide Systems Prepared by Reactive Ball Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sherif El-Eskandarany

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine MgH2 nanocrystalline powders were prepared by reactive ball milling of elemental Mg powders after 200 h of high-energy ball milling under a hydrogen gas pressure of 50 bar. The as-prepared metal hydride powders were contaminated with 2.2 wt. % of FeCr-stainless steel that was introduced to the powders upon using stainless steel milling tools made of the same alloy. The as-synthesized MgH2 was doped with previously prepared TiC nanopowders, which were contaminated with 2.4 wt. % FeCr (materials of the milling media, and then ball milled under hydrogen gas atmosphere for 50 h. The results related to the morphological examinations of the fabricated nanocomposite powders beyond the micro-and nano-levels showed excellent distributions of 5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr dispersoids embedded into the fine host matrix of MgH2 powders. The as-fabricated nanocomposite MgH2/5.2 wt. % TiC/4.6 wt. % FeCr powders possessed superior hydrogenation/dehydrogenation characteristics, suggested by the low value of the activation energy (97.74 kJ/mol, and the short time required for achieving a complete absorption (6.6 min and desorption (8.4 min of 5.51 wt. % H2 at a moderate temperature of 275 C under a hydrogen gas pressure ranging from 100 mbar to 8 bar. van’t Hoff approach was used to calculate the enthalpy (DH and entropy (DS of hydrogenation for MgH2, which was found to be 72.74 kJ/mol and 112.79 J/mol H2/K, respectively. Moreover, van’t Hoff method was employed to calculate the DH and DS of dehydrogenation, which was found to be 76.76 kJ/mol and 119.15 J/mol H2/K, respectively. This new nanocomposite system possessed excellent absorption/desorption cyclability of 696 complete cycles, achieved in a cyclic-life-time of 682 h.

  18. Characterization of titanium hydride film after long-term air interaction: SEM, ARXPS and AES depth profile studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.

    1998-01-01

    Thin titanium hydride (TiHy) films are compared with thin titanium films after analysis using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). The TiHy films were prepared under ultrahigh vacuum condit

  19. Structural and kinetic investigation of the hydride composite Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 system doped with NbF5 for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Fahim; Pranzas, P Klaus; Pistidda, Claudio; Puszkiel, Julián A; Milanese, Chiara; Vainio, Ulla; Paskevicius, Mark; Emmler, Thomas; Santoru, Antonio; Utke, Rapee; Tolkiehn, Martin; Minella, Christian B; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Boerries, Stefan; Buckley, Craig E; Enzo, Stefano; Schreyer, Andreas; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-07

    Designing safe, compact and high capacity hydrogen storage systems is the key step towards introducing a pollutant free hydrogen technology into a broad field of applications. Due to the chemical bonds of hydrogen-metal atoms, metal hydrides provide high energy density in safe hydrogen storage media. Reactive hydride composites (RHCs) are a promising class of high capacity solid state hydrogen storage systems. Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 with a hydrogen content of 8.4 wt% is one of the most promising members of the RHCs. However, its relatively high desorption temperature of ∼350 °C is a major drawback to meeting the requirements for practical application. In this work, by using NbF5 as an additive, the dehydrogenation temperature of this RHC was significantly decreased. To elucidate the role of NbF5 in enhancing the desorption properties of the Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 (Ca-RHC), a comprehensive investigation was carried out via manometric measurements, mass spectrometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), in situ Synchrotron Radiation-Powder X-ray Diffraction (SR-PXD), X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques.

  20. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Wagner, Lucas (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO)

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  1. Low Energy Neutron Production by Inverse-beta decay in Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuchi, S; Polosa, A D; Riquer, V; Ruocco, G; Vignati, M

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently argued that inverse-beta nuclear transmutations might occur at an impressively high rate in a thin layer at the metallic hydride surface under specific conditions. In this note we present a calculation of the transmutation rate which shows that there is little room for such a remarkable effect.

  2. Development of Dual-light Path Monitoring System of Optical Thin-film Thickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-jun

    2005-01-01

    The accurate monitoring of optical thin-film thickness is a key technique for depositing optical thin-film. For existing coating equipments, which are low precision and automation level on monitoring thin-film thickness, a new photoelectric control and analysis system has been developed. In the new system, main techniques include a photoelectric system with dual-light path, a dual-lock-phase circuit system and a comprehensive digital processing-control-analysis system.The test results of new system show that the static and dynamic stabilities and the control precision of thin-film thickness are extremely increased. The standard deviation of thin-film thickness, which indicates the duplication of thin-film thickness monitoring, is equal to or less than 0.72%. The display resolution limit on reflectivity is 0.02 %. In the system, the linearity of drift is very high, and the static drift ratio approaches zero.

  3. Transparent thin film polarizing and optical control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson V. Tabiryan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We show that a diffractive waveplate can be combined with a phase retardation film for fully converting light of arbitrary polarization state into a polarized light. Incorporating a photonic bandgap layer into a system of such polarizers that unify different polarization states in the input light into a single polarization state at its output, rather than absorbing or reflecting half of it, we developed and demonstrated a polarization-independent optical controller capable of switching between transmittive and reflective states. The transition between those states is smoothly controlled with low-voltage and low-power sources. Using versatile fabrication methods, this “universally polarizing optical controller” can be integrated into a thin package compatible with a variety of display, spatial light modulation, optical communication, imaging and other photonics systems.

  4. Innovative Detection System of Ochratoxin A by Thin Film Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Domenico; de Cesare, Giampiero; Fanelli, Corrado; Nascetti, Augusto; Ricelli, Alessandra; Scipinotti, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present, for the first time, a rapid, compact and innovative method for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) sensors. 2 μl of acidified toluene containing OTA at different concentrations were spotted on the silica side of a High Performance Thin Layer Cromatography plate and aligned with a a-Si:H p-i-n photodiode deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition on a different glass substrate. As an UV radiation excites the mycotoxin, the re-emitted light is detected by the a-Si:H sensor. Results show a very good linearity between OTA concentration and the sensor photocurrent over almost three orders of magnitude. The minimum detected OTA concentration is equal to 0.1ng, showing that the presented system has the potential for a low cost system suitable for the early detection of toxins in foods.

  5. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  6. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  7. SOLID STATE HYDRIDE SYSTEM ENGINEERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, D; Mark Jones, M; Bruce Hardy, B

    2007-10-31

    A typical hydrogen refueling station was designed based on DOE targets and existing gasoline filling station operations. The purpose of this design was to determine typical heat loads, how these heat loads will be handled, and approximate equipment sizes. For the station model, two DOE targets that had the most impact on the design were vehicle driving range and refueling time. The target that hydrogen fueled vehicles should have the equivalent driving range as present automobiles, requires 5 kg hydrogen storage. Assuming refueling occurs when the tank is 80% empty yields a refueling quantity of 4 kg. The DOE target for 2010 of a refueling time of 3 minutes was used in this design. There is additional time needed for payment of the fuel, and connecting and disconnecting hoses and grounds. It was assumed that this could be accomplished in 5 minutes. Using 8 minutes for each vehicle refueling gives a maximum hourly refueling rate of 7.5 cars per hour per fueling point.

  8. Electrical Transport in Thin Film Systems for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingyuan

    Many energy conversion technologies rely on the function and properties of thin films. In many cases, the fundamental physics underlying the structure-property-performance interrelationship is not completely understood. So it is not possible to fully exploit the true capabilities of these systems. Therefore, investigating and understanding such interrelationships in different systems is of both scientific and technological importance. In this dissertation, both conjugated polymer systems for photovoltaic application and strained silicon system for thermoelectric application are investigated in order to develop a clearer understanding of the effect of film thickness and microstructural features on electrical transport. Morphological features such as domain size, phase purity are investigated in the polymers in order to understand the effects on charge mobility, recombination and further on device performance. With regard to silicon, the effects of lattice strain on electrical conductivity and thermopower are studied. The out-of-plane hole mobility was investigated in regioregular P3HT thin films. It was shown that the hole mobilities monotonically increased an order of magnitude when film thickness increased from 80 nm to 700 nm. Based on X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry and simulations, this thickness-dependent mobility is associated with substrate induced anisotropies of the P3HT film structure. The role of microstructural features on the performance characteristics of the archetypal P3HT:PCBM (1:1) bulk heterojunction solar cell was investigated. It is demonstrated that small domain sizes and correspondingly large interfacial areas accommodated a high initial carrier density. However in these materials, non-geminate recombination of carriers could be significant, leading to low open circuit voltages and low fill factors. The purity of the domains also influenced the charge carrier mobilities and non-germinate recombination. One important finding from

  9. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  10. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  11. Thin Thermoelectric Generator System for Body Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settaluri, Krishna T.; Lo, Hsinyi; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2012-06-01

    Wearable thermoelectric generators (TEGs) harvest thermal energy generated by the body to generate useful electricity. The performance of these systems is limited by (1) the small working temperature differential between the body and ambient, (2) the desire to use natural air convection cooling on the cold side of the generator, and (3) the requirement for thin, lightweight systems that are comfortable for long-term use. Our work has focused on the design of the heat transfer system as part of the overall thermoelectric (TE) system. In particular, the small heat transfer coefficient for natural air convection results in a module thermal impedance that is smaller than that of the heat sink. In this heat-sink-limited regime, the thermal resistance of the generator should be optimized to match that of the heat sink to achieve the best performance. In addition, we have designed flat (1 mm thickness) copper heat spreaders to realize performance surpassing splayed pin heat sinks. Two-dimensional (2-D) heat spreading exploits the large surface area available in a wristband and allows patterned copper to efficiently cool the TE. A direct current (DC)/DC converter is integrated on the wristband. The system generates up to 28.5 μW/cm2 before the converter and 8.6 μW/cm2 after the converter, with 30% efficiency. It generates output of 4.15 V with overall thickness under 5 mm.

  12. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs; Hidruros solidos como acumuladores de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Friedrichs, O.; Ares, J. R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2010-07-01

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH{sub 2} as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH{sub 2} are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  13. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  14. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure...... and hydrogen content, respectively, are accounted for by interpolating experimental data. The effect of variable parameters on the critical metal hydride thickness is investigated and compared to results obtained from a constant-parameter analysis. Finally, the discrepancy in the metal hydride thickness value...

  15. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  16. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  17. Development of a used fuel cladding damage model incorporating circumferential and radial hydride responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiushi; Ostien, Jakob T.; Hansen, Glen

    2014-04-01

    At the completion of the fuel drying process, used fuel Zry4 cladding typically exhibits a significant population of δ-hydride inclusions. These inclusions are in the form of small platelets that are generally oriented both circumferentially and radially within the cladding material. There is concern that radially-oriented hydride inclusions may weaken the cladding material and lead to issues during used fuel storage and transportation processes. A high fidelity model of the mechanical behavior of hydrides has utility in both designing fuel cladding to be more resistant to this hydride-induced weakening and also in suggesting modifications to drying, storage, and transport operations to reduce the impact of hydride formation and/or the avoidance of loading scenarios that could overly stress the radial inclusions. We develop a mechanical model for the Zry4-hydride system that, given a particular morphology of hydride inclusions, allows the calculation of the response of the hydrided cladding under various loading scenarios. The model treats the Zry4 matrix material as J2 elastoplastic, and treats the hydrides as platelets oriented in predefined directions (e.g., circumferentially and radially). The model is hosted by the Albany analysis framework, where a finite element approximation of the weak form of the cladding boundary value problem is solved using a preconditioned Newton-Krylov approach. Instead of forming the required system Jacobian operator directly or approximating its action with a differencing operation, Albany leverages the Trilinos Sacado package to form the Jacobian via automatic differentiation. We present results that describe the performance of the model in comparison with as-fabricated Zry4 as well as HB Robinson fuel cladding. Further, we also present performance results that demonstrate the efficacy of the overall solution method employed to host the model.

  18. Development of a used fuel cladding damage model incorporating circumferential and radial hydride responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiushi, E-mail: qiushi@clemson.edu [Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Ostien, Jakob T., E-mail: jtostie@sandia.gov [Mechanics of Materials Dept. 8256, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Hansen, Glen, E-mail: gahanse@sandia.gov [Computational Multiphysics Dept. 1443, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1321 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    At the completion of the fuel drying process, used fuel Zry4 cladding typically exhibits a significant population of δ-hydride inclusions. These inclusions are in the form of small platelets that are generally oriented both circumferentially and radially within the cladding material. There is concern that radially-oriented hydride inclusions may weaken the cladding material and lead to issues during used fuel storage and transportation processes. A high fidelity model of the mechanical behavior of hydrides has utility in both designing fuel cladding to be more resistant to this hydride-induced weakening and also in suggesting modifications to drying, storage, and transport operations to reduce the impact of hydride formation and/or the avoidance of loading scenarios that could overly stress the radial inclusions. We develop a mechanical model for the Zry4-hydride system that, given a particular morphology of hydride inclusions, allows the calculation of the response of the hydrided cladding under various loading scenarios. The model treats the Zry4 matrix material as J{sub 2} elastoplastic, and treats the hydrides as platelets oriented in predefined directions (e.g., circumferentially and radially). The model is hosted by the Albany analysis framework, where a finite element approximation of the weak form of the cladding boundary value problem is solved using a preconditioned Newton–Krylov approach. Instead of forming the required system Jacobian operator directly or approximating its action with a differencing operation, Albany leverages the Trilinos Sacado package to form the Jacobian via automatic differentiation. We present results that describe the performance of the model in comparison with as-fabricated Zry4 as well as HB Robinson fuel cladding. Further, we also present performance results that demonstrate the efficacy of the overall solution method employed to host the model.

  19. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated......This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly followed...

  20. Innovative Detection System of Ochratoxin A by Thin Film Photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Scipinotti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present, for the first time, a rapid, compact and innovativemethod for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H sensors. 2 μl of acidified toluene containing OTA at different concentrations werespotted on the silica side of a High Performance Thin Layer Cromatography plate andaligned with a a-Si:H p-i-n photodiode deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical VaporDeposition on a different glass substrate. As an UV radiation excites the mycotoxin, the re-emitted light is detected by the a-Si:H sensor. Results show a very good linearity betweenOTA concentration and the sensor photocurrent over almost three orders of magnitude. Theminimum detected OTA concentration is equal to 0.1ng, showing that the presented systemhas the potential for a low cost system suitable for the early detection of toxins in foods.

  1. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen...... and metal and for the stable hydrides this is associated with release of heat (#DELTA#H_f ). The more thermodynamically stable the hydride, the larger DHf, and the higher temperature is needed in order to desorphydrogen (reverse reaction) and vice versa. For practical application the temperature needed...

  2. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  3. Coinage Metal Hydrides: Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Abraham J; Lalic, Gojko; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2016-08-10

    Hydride complexes of copper, silver, and gold encompass a broad array of structures, and their distinctive reactivity has enabled dramatic recent advances in synthesis and catalysis. This Review summarizes the synthesis, characterization, and key stoichiometric reactions of isolable or observable coinage metal hydrides. It discusses catalytic processes in which coinage metal hydrides are known or probable intermediates, and presents mechanistic studies of selected catalytic reactions. The purpose of this Review is to convey how developments in coinage metal hydride chemistry have led to new organic transformations, and how developments in catalysis have in turn inspired the synthesis of reactive new complexes.

  4. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  5. Superconductivity and unexpected chemistry of germanium hydrides under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari Esfahani, M. Mahdi; Oganov, Artem R.; Niu, Haiyang; Zhang, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Following the idea that hydrogen-rich compounds might be high-Tc superconductors at high pressures, and the very recent breakthrough in predicting and synthesizing hydrogen sulfide with record-high Tc=203 K , an ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction was employed to find stable germanium hydrides. In addition to the earlier structure of germane with space group Ama2, we propose a C2/m structure, which is energetically more favorable at pressures above 278 GPa (with inclusion of zero-point energy). Our calculations indicate that the C2/m phase of germane is a superconductor with Tc=67 K at 280 GPa. Germane is found to become thermodynamically unstable to decomposition to hydrogen and the compound Ge3H11 at pressures above 300 GPa. Ge3H11 with space group I 4 ¯m 2 is found to become stable at above 285 GPa with Tc=43 K . We find that the pressure-induced phase stability of germanium hydrides is distinct from analogous isoelectronic systems, e.g., Si hydrides and Sn hydrides. Superconductivity stems from large electron-phonon coupling associated with the wagging, bending, and stretching intermediate-frequency modes derived mainly from hydrogen.

  6. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  7. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  8. Thin and Automated Blanket Lamination and Encapsulation Systems (TABLES) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flexible photovoltaic array technologies require very thin and precisely controlled deposition of the polymeric films used to fabricate them. In most flexible...

  9. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  10. A combined experimental, theoretical, and Van't Hoff model study for identity methyl, proton, hydrogen atom, and hydride exchange reactions. Correlation with three-center four-, three-, and two-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Henk M.

    We have studied carbon transfer reactions following an SN2 reaction profile. With ab initio calculations and experimental geometries concerning the nature of the various complexes indicated as stable, intermediate, and transition state we were able to show the additional value of van't Hoff's tetrahedral configuration by changing its geometry via a trigonal pyramid into a trigonal bipyramid. The ratio of the apical bond and corresponding tetrahedral bond distances is then nearly 1.333. The relevance of this approach has also been shown for identity proton-(hydrogen atom-, and hydride-) in-line reactions. The use of this geometrical transmission will be demonstrated for the hydrogen bonding distances in e.g., DNA duplexes and other biological (supra) molecular systems.

  11. Research and development of peripheral technology for photovoltaic power systems. Study of nickel-hydride storage battery for photovoltaic generation systems; Shuhen gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu. Taiyoko hatsuden`yo suiso denchi no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuta, M. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the study results on R and D of nickel-hydride storage battery for photovoltaic generation systems in fiscal 1994. (1) On the study on low-cost electrode materials, the physical properties and electrode characteristics were studied of the prototype hydrogen absorbing alloys prepared by substituting Cu or Ni for Co in Mm(Ni-Co-Mn-Al)5 (Mm: mixture of rare earth elements). The result clarified that it is difficult to reduce Co content in the alloy to 0.4 atom or less. Simple heat treatment and milling processes in production of hydrogen absorbing alloy electrodes were achieved by adopting an improved metal mold and gas atomization method. Characteristics and cycle life of the Ni positive electrode prepared by applying active paste material of Ni(OH)2 were studied, however, the result showed only lives of nearly 300 cycles. (2) On the study on electrode structure for high-performance (long-life) battery, the 3-D porous metal electrode support was evaluated, and various battery configurations were studied. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

    2009-06-07

    Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

  13. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr D.F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1 On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate

  14. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  15. Ionic conduction of lithium hydride single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilipenko, G.I.; Oparin, D.V.; Zhuravlev, N.A.; Gavrilov, F.F.

    1987-09-01

    Using the electrical-conductivity- and NMR-measurement- methods, the ionic-conduction mechanism is established in stoichiometric lithium hydride single crystals. The activation energies of migration of anion- and cation-vacancies and the formation of Schottky-pair defects are determined. They assume that the mechanisms of self-diffusion and conductivity are different in lithium hydride.

  16. Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Subhendu Guha; Dr. Jeff Yang

    2012-05-25

    The goal of the program is to develop 'LOW COST THIN FILM BUILDING-INTEGRATED PV SYSTEMS'. Major focus was on developing low cost solution for the commercial BIPV and rooftop PV market and meet DOE LCOE goal for the commercial market segment of 9-12 cents/kWh for 2010 and 6-8 cents/kWh for 2015. We achieved the 2010 goal and were on track to achieve the 2015 goal. The program consists of five major tasks: (1) modules; (2) inverters and BOS; (3) systems engineering and integration; (4) deployment; and (5) project management and TPP collaborative activities. We successfully crossed all stage gates and surpassed all milestones. We proudly achieved world record stable efficiencies in small area cells (12.56% for 1cm2) and large area encapsulated modules (11.3% for 800 cm2) using a triple-junction amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon/nanocrystalline silicon structure, confirmed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We collaborated with two inverter companies, Solectria and PV Powered, and significantly reduced inverter cost. We collaborated with three universities (Syracuse University, University of Oregon, and Colorado School of Mines) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and improved understanding on nanocrystalline material properties and light trapping techniques. We jointly published 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals and International Conference Proceedings. We installed two 75kW roof-top systems, one in Florida and another in New Jersey demonstrating innovative designs. The systems performed satisfactorily meeting/exceeding estimated kWh/kW performance. The 50/50 cost shared program was a great success and received excellent comments from DOE Manager and Technical Monitor in the Final Review.

  17. Interference effects in the sum frequency generation spectra of thin organic films. II: Applications to different thin-film systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yujin; Zhao, Yanbao; Li, Na; Ma, Yunsheng; Osawa, Masatoshi; Davies, Paul B; Ye, Shen

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, the results of the modeling calculations carried out for predicting the interference effects expected in the sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of a specific thin-layer system, described in the accompanying paper, are tested by comparing them with the experimental spectra obtained for a real thin-layer film comprising an organic monolayer/variable thickness dielectric layer/gold substrate. In this system, two contributions to the SFG spectra arise, a resonant contribution from the organic film and a nonresonant contribution from the gold substrate. The modeling calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra over a wide range of thicknesses and for different polarization combinations. The introduction of another resonant monolayer adjacent to the gold substrate and with the molecules having a reverse orientation has a significant affect on the spectral shapes which is predicted. If a dielectric substrate such as CaF(2) is used instead of a gold substrate, only the spectral intensities vary with the film thickness but not the spectral shapes. The counterpropagating beam geometry will change both the thickness dependent spectral shapes and the intensity of different vibrational modes in comparison with a copropagating geometry. The influences of these experimental factors, i.e., the molecular orientational structure in the thin film, the nature of the substrate, and the selected incident beam geometry, on the experimental SFG spectra are quantitatively predicted by the calculations. The thickness effects on the signals from a SFG active monolayer contained in a thin liquid-layer cell of the type frequently used for in situ electrochemical measurements is also discussed. The modeling calculation is also valid for application to other thin-film systems comprising more than two resonant SFG active interfaces by appropriate choice of optical geometries and relevant optical properties.

  18. Thermal conductivity measurements of copper-coated metal hydrides (LaNi{sub 5}, Ca{sub 0.6}Mm{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 5}, and LaNi{sub 4.75}Al{sub 0.25}) for use in metal hydride hydrogen compression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michael; Kim, Kwang J.; Hopkins, Ryan R. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Gawlik, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This study was performed to supplement the limited data on metal hydrides by experimentally determining the thermal conductivity of various metal hydride powder pellets that underwent a copper coating process. Three different metal hydride powders were tested (LaNi{sub 5}, Ca{sub 0.6}Mm{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 5}, and LaNi{sub 4.75}Al{sub 0.25}) for their thermal conductivity, with variations in testing parameters, and with copper coating processes that varied from 30 to 60 s A testing apparatus was specifically designed for this experiment, and the study reported thermal conductivity values of 3-6 W/m-K. (author)

  19. Compensation Effect in the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Metal Hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Vegge, T.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi5 based hydrides. For these systems, we...... find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency...... analysis rather than a physical phenomenon. In the case of LaNi5 based hydrides, observed scatter in reported apparent activation energies is less pronounced supporting the general experience that LaNi5 is less sensitive toward surface contamination....

  20. Speculations on the existence of hydride ions in proton conducting oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and physical nature of the hydride ion is briefly treated. Several reactions of the hydride ion in oxides or oxygen atmosphere are given, A number of perovskites and inverse perovskites are listed. which contain the H- ion on the oxygen or B-anion sites in the archetype ABO(3) System....... H- is stable with respect to oxide and halide anions but, among cations only with respect to oxides and halides of strongly electropositive metals such as alkaline, alkaline-earth and main group III metals. H- is only stable in combination with transition metal ions of certain elements...... in their lowest positive oxidation state. Mixed oxide/hydride containing perovskites may thus exist. Steinsvik et al. have recently suggested a defect model for a perovskite including substitutional hydride ions on the oxygen site, H-O(.), and protons associated with a lattice oxygen, OHO.. The defect equations...

  1. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  2. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  3. Reversible metal-hydride phase transformation in epitaxial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytburd, Alexander L; Boyerinas, Brad M; Bruck, Hugh A

    2015-03-11

    Metal-hydride phase transformations in solids commonly proceed with hysteresis. The extrinsic component of hysteresis is the result of the dissipation of energy of internal stress due to plastic deformation and fracture. It can be mitigated on the nanoscale, where plastic deformation and fracture are suppressed and the transformation proceeds through formation and evolution of coherent phases. However, the phase coherency introduces intrinsic thermodynamic hysteresis, preventing reversible transformation. In this paper, it is shown that thermodynamic hysteresis of coherent metal-hydride transformation can be eliminated in epitaxial film due to substrate constraint. Film-substrate interaction leads to formation of heterophase polydomain nanostructure with variable phase fraction which can change reversibly by varying temperature in a closed system or chemical potential in an open system.

  4. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  5. Application of the ThinPrep Imaging System in Urine Cytology A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemel, Bettien M.; Haarsma, Jolanda G.; Ruitenbeek, Teus; Groen, Henk; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In this prospective study, for the first time, the authors compared the accuracy of reading urine specimens using the ThinPrep Imager System (TIS) with the accuracy of conventional screening for the detection of abnormal urine cells. METHODS ThinPrep slides were made from 1455 urine speci

  6. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  7. Solvent influence on the thermodynamics for hydride transfer from bis(diphosphine) complexes of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly Robinson, Samantha J; Zall, Christopher M; Miller, Deanna L; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-06-14

    The thermodynamic hydricity of a metal hydride can vary considerably between solvents. This parameter can be used to determine the favourability of a hydride-transfer reaction, such as the reaction between a metal hydride and CO2 to produce formate. Because the hydricities of these species do not vary consistently between solvents, reactions that are thermodynamically unfavourable in one solvent can be favourable in others. The hydricity of a water-soluble, bis-phosphine nickel hydride complex was compared to the hydricity of formate in water and in acetonitrile. Formate is a better hydride donor than [HNi(dmpe)2](+) by 7 kcal mol(-1) in acetonitrile, and no hydride transfer from [HNi(dmpe)2](+) to CO2 occurs in this solvent. The hydricity of [HNi(dmpe)2](+) is greatly improved in water relative to acetonitrile, in that reduction of CO2 to formate by [HNi(dmpe)2](+) was found to be thermodynamically downhill by 8 kcal mol(-1). Catalysis for the hydrogenation of CO2 was pursued, but the regeneration of [HNi(dmpe)2] under catalytic conditions was unfavourable. However, the present results demonstrate that the solvent dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as hydricity and acidity can be exploited in order to produce systems with balanced or favourable overall thermodynamics. This approach should be advantageous for the design of future water-soluble catalysts.

  8. Effects of metastability on hydrogen sorption in fluorine substituted hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatel, E.R.; Corno, M.; Ugliengo, P.; Baricco, M., E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Fluorine substitution in simple metal hydrides has been modelled. • The stability of the MH{sub (1−x)}F{sub x} solid solutions has been discussed. • Conditions for reversibility of sorption reactions have been suggested. - Abstract: In this work ab initio calculations and Calphad modelling have been coupled to describe the effect of fluorine substitution on the thermodynamics of hydrogenation–dehydrogenation in simple hydrides (NaH, AlH{sub 3} and CaH{sub 2}). These example systems have been used to discuss the conditions required for the formation of a stable hydride–fluoride solid solution necessary to obtain a reversible hydrogenation reaction.

  9. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN, InGaN, ScN, and ScAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD); hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE); gallium nitride (GaN); indium gallium nitride (InGaN); scandium nitride (ScN); scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN); semiconductors; thin films; nanowires; III nitrides; crystal growth - We studied the HVPE growth of different III ni

  10. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  11. PHYSICAL BASES OF SYSTEMS CREATION FOR MAGNETIC-IMPULSIVE ATTRACTION OF THIN-WALLED SHEET METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the physical base of systems creating for the thin-walled sheet metals magnetic pulse attraction. Some practical realization models of the author’s suggestions are represented.

  12. Nonnegative global weak solutions for a degenerate parabolic system modeling thin films driven by capillarity

    CERN Document Server

    Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2011-01-01

    We prove global existence of nonnegative weak solutions for a strongly coupled, fourth order degenerate parabolic system governing the motion of two thin fluid layers in a porous medium when capillarity is the sole driving mechanism.

  13. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogdanovic, Borislav; Felderhoff, Michael; Streukens, Guido

    2009-01-01

    ...) are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides...

  14. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  15. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per

  16. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  17. Optical absorption enhancement in a hybrid system photonic crystal - thin substrate for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buencuerpo, Jeronimo; Munioz-Camuniez, Luis E; Dotor, Maria L; Postigo, Pablo A

    2012-07-02

    A hybrid approach for light trapping using photonic crystal nanostructures (nanorods, nanopillars or nanoholes) on top of an ultra thin film as a substrate is presented. The combination of a nanopatterned layer with a thin substrate shows an enhanced optical absorption than equivalent films without patterning and can compete in performance with nanostructured systems without a substrate. The designs are tested in four relevant materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), crystalline silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP). A consistent enhancement is observed for all of the materials when using a thin hybrid system (300 nm) even compared to the non patterned thin film with an anti-reflective coating (ARC). A realistic solar cell structure composed of a hybrid system with a layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) an ARC and a back metal layer is performed, showing an 18% of improvement for the nanostructured device.

  18. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused...

  19. Development of a direct hydride generation nebulizer for the determination of selenium by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, Nereida E-mail: ncarrion@strix.ciens.ucv.ve; Murillo, Miguel; Montiel, Edie; Diaz, Dorfe

    2003-08-15

    A study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a new direct hydride generation nebulizer system for determination of hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. This system was designed and optimized to obtain the highest sensitivity. Several experimental designs were used for these purposes. To optimize the individual parameters of the system, and to study the interaction between these parameters for both direct hydride generation nebulizers, a central composite orthogonal design with eight factors was set up. Significant behavioral differences were observed in the two direct hydride generation nebulizers studied. Finally, a 70 {mu}m gas orifice nebulizer exhibits a better detection limit than the 120 {mu}m nebulizer. Generally, for determination of selenium, this new direct hydride generation nebulizer system exhibits a linear dynamic range and detection limit (3{sigma}b) of 3 orders of magnitude and 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} for selenium, respectively. This new hydride generator is much simpler system that conventional hydride generation systems, which does not need to be changed to work in normal mode with the inductively coupled plasma, since this system may be used for hydride forming elements and those that do not form them. It produces a rapid response with low memory effect. It reduces the interference level of Ni, Co and Cu to 600, 500 and 5 mg l{sup -1}, respectively. The accuracy of the system was verified by the determination of selenium in several standard reference materials of ambient, food and clinical sample matrices. No statistically significant differences (95 confidence level) were obtained between our method and the reference values.

  20. Hybrid Systems in Foil (HySiF) exploiting ultra-thin flexible chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harendt, Christine; Kostelnik, Jan; Kugler, Andreas; Lorenz, Enno; Saller, Stefan; Schreivogel, Alina; Yu, Zili; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2015-11-01

    Electronics embedded in foil is an enabling technology for flexible electronics and for special form factors of electronic components. In contrast to strictly printed electronics, Hybrid Systems-in-Foil (HySiF), comprising thin flexible, embedded chips and large-area thin-film electronic elements, feature a versatile and reliable technological solution for industrial applications of flexible electronics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of HySiF technology, including aspects of thin-chip fabrication, reliability and assembly. Also presented is an industrial demonstrator utilizing such a HySiF component.

  1. The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components Delayed Hydride Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Puls, Manfred P

    2012-01-01

    By drawing together the current theoretical and experimental understanding of the phenomena of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys, The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components: Delayed Hydride Cracking provides a detailed explanation focusing on the properties of hydrogen and hydrides in these alloys. Whilst the focus lies on zirconium alloys, the combination of both the empirical and mechanistic approaches creates a solid understanding that can also be applied to other hydride forming metals.   This up-to-date reference focuses on documented research surrounding DHC, including current methodologies for design and assessment of the results of periodic in-service inspections of pressure tubes in nuclear reactors. Emphasis is placed on showing that our understanding of DHC is supported by progress across a broad range of fields. These include hysteresis associated with first-order phase transformations; phase relationships in coherent crystalline metallic...

  2. Preliminary development of flaw evaluation procedures for delayed hydride cracking initiation under hydride non-ratcheting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Cui, J.; Kawa, D.; Shek, G.K.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The flaw evaluation procedure for Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) initiation currently provided in the CSA Standard N285.8 was developed for hydride ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides do not completely dissolve at peak temperature. Test results have shown that hydrided regions formed under non-ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides completely dissolve at peak temperature, have significantly higher resistance to cracking than those formed under ratcheting conditions. This paper presents some preliminary work on the development of a procedure for the evaluation of DHC initiation for flaws under hydride non-ratcheting conditions. (author)

  3. A new radiochromic thin-film dosimeter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.; Batsberg, W.; Karman, W.

    A film dosimeter based on pararosaniline cyanide dissolved in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) has been developed and its properties are described. The dosimeter is made in 3 versions: 1) a clear, thin film that requires a thickness measurement for evaluation, 2) a film with a relatively high absorbance for automatic thickness correction, 3) a UV-protected pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. The response of the dosimeter is independent on the dose rate, and it may be used for routine dose measurement of both gamma and electron irradiation. Its high spatial resolution makes it particularly useful for dose distribution measurements.

  4. A thin, hardware-supported middleware management system for reconfigurable manufacturing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean, Roscoe Roy Peter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS paradigm was introduced in response to the need for a manufacturing environment that can handle high-frequency market-driven change. Although this has resulted in much research into the implementation of such a system, there is currently a gap in the technology covering the rapid establishment of control after a reconfiguration. This gap involves the detection of the factory floor’s state, and the communication link between the factory floor and the high-level software (ERP and MES. This paper proposes a thin, hardware-supported middleware management system to support the reconfiguration process and to support industrial implementation to the RMS paradigm.

  5. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  6. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-01-30

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  7. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and hydro......This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure...

  8. Phane Nomenclature. Part II: Modification of the Degree of Hydrogenation and Substitution Derivatives of Phane Parent Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šumanovac Ramljak, T.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophane and linear phane systems are considered as parent hydrides. Their derivatives are named in conformity with the principles, rules, and conventions prescribed for naming organic compounds. The following nomenclatural features are described: indicated and added hydrogen, order of seniority for numbering, substituents expressed as suffixes, substituents cited as prefixes, phane parent hydrides modified by addition or subtraction of hydrogen atoms, and polyfunctional derivatives.

  9. Deducing effective light transport parameters in optically thin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We present an extensive Monte Carlo study on light transport in optically thin slabs, addressing both axial and transverse propagation. We completely characterize the so-called ballistic-to-diffusive transition, notably in terms of the spatial variance of the transmitted/reflected profile. We test the validity of the prediction cast by diffusion theory, that the spatial variance should grow independently of absorption and, to a first approximation, of the sample thickness and refractive index contrast. Based on a large set of simulated data, we build a freely available look-up table routine allowing reliable and precise determination of the microscopic transport parameters starting from robust observables which are independent of absolute intensity measurements. We also present the Monte Carlo software package that was developed for the purpose of this study.

  10. Demand-type gas supply system for rocket borne thin-window proportional counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, L. W.; Caravalho, R.; Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    A simple closed loop control system has been developed to maintain the gas pressure in thin-window proportional counters during rocket flights. This system permits convenient external control of detector pressure and system flushing rate. The control system is activated at launch with the sealing of a reference volume at the existing system pressure. Inflight control to plus or minus 2 torr at a working pressure of 760 torr has been achieved on six rocket flights.

  11. Multislice simulations for in-situ HRTEM studies of nanostructured magnesium hydride at ambient hydrogen pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrey, Alexander; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd

    2017-01-31

    The use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the structural characterization of many nanostructured hydrides, which are relevant for solid state hydrogen storage, is hindered due to a rapid decomposition of the specimen upon irradiation with the electron beam. Environmental TEM allows to stabilize the hydrides by applying a hydrogen back pressure of up to 4.5 bar in a windowed environmental cell. The feasibility of high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigations of light weight metals and metal hydrides in such a "nanoreactor" is studied theoretically by means of multislice HRTEM contrast simulations using Mg and its hydride phase, MgH2, as model system. Such a setup provides the general opportunity to study dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions at the nanoscale under technological application conditions. We analyze the dependence of both the spatial resolution and the HRTEM image contrast on parameters such as the defocus, the metal/hydride thickness, and the hydrogen pressure in order to explore the possibilities and limitations of in-situ experiments with windowed environmental cells. Such simulations may be highly valuable to pre-evaluate future experimental studies.

  12. Atom probe analysis of titanium hydride precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Otsuka, H; Fujii, H

    2009-04-01

    It is expected that the three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) will be used as a tool to visualize the atomic scale of hydrogen atoms in steel is expected, due to its high spatial resolution and very low detection limit. In this paper, the first 3DAP analysis of titanium hydride precipitates in metal titanium is reported in terms of the quantitative detection of hydrogen. FIB fabrication techniques using the lift-out method have enabled the production of needle tips of hydride precipitates, of several tens of microns in size, within a titanium matrix. The hydrogen concentration estimated from 3DAP analysis was slightly smaller than that of the hydride phase predicted from the phase diagram. We discuss the origin of the difference between the experimental and predicted values and the performance of 3DAP for the quantitative detection of hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  14. Iron Group Hydrides in Noyori Bifunctional Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-12-01

    This is an overview of the hydride-containing catalysts prepared in the Morris group for the efficient hydrogenation of simple ketones, imines, nitriles and esters and the asymmetric hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of prochiral ketones and imines. The work was inspired by and makes use of Noyori metal-ligand bifunctional concepts involving the hydride-ruthenium amine-hydrogen HRuNH design. It describes the synthesis and some catalytic properties of hydridochloro, dihydride and amide complexes of ruthenium and in one case, osmium, with monodentate, bidentate and tetradentate phosphorus and nitrogen donor ligands. The iron hydride that has been identified in a very effective asymmetric transfer hydrogenation process is also mentioned. The link between the HMNH structure and the sense of enantioinduction is demonstrated by use of simple transition state models.

  15. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  16. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Stitt

    Full Text Available Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed.

  17. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, C A; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; Paraskevoulakos, C; Banos, A; Rennie, S; Jowsey, J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed.

  18. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...... = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Er) have been synthesized, which pave the way for studying the polymorphic transition in these compounds, obtaining new bimetallic borohydrides and designing new reactive hydride composites with improved hydrogen storage capacities. Two novel polymorphs of Pr(BH4)3 are identified...

  19. Interface reactions and stability of a hydride composite (NaBH4 + MgH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Bielmann, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-06-21

    The use of the interaction of two hydrides is a well-known concept used to increase the hydrogen equilibrium pressure of composite mixtures in comparison to that of pure systems. The thermodynamics and reaction kinetics of such hydride composites are reviewed and experimentally verified using the example NaBH(4) + MgH(2). Particular emphasis is placed on the measurement of the kinetics and stability using thermodesorption experiments and measurements of pressure-composition isotherms, respectively. The interface reactions in the composite reaction were analysed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by simultaneously probing D(2) desorption from NaBD(4) and H(2) desorption from MgH(2). The observed destabilisation is in quantitative agreement with the calculated thermodynamic properties, including enthalpy and entropy. The results are discussed with respect to kinetic limitations of the hydrogen desorption mechanism at interfaces. General aspects of modifying hydrogen sorption properties via hydride composites are given.

  20. Tensoresistive Properties of Thin Film Systems Based on Ag and Co

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Pazukha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of research strain deformation properties of thin films Ag, Co and two-layers films Ag/Co in the range of deformation Δεl = 0-1 % were presented. The plastic deformation in Co layer caused a similar deformation in the entire film system, even if the strain range Ag layer is not reached the limits of the transition elastic/plastic deformation. The increasing of gauge factor value of two-layer systems in comparison with thin films Ag and Co appears as a result of electron interface scattering.

  1. Evidence of stress-induced hydrogen ordering in zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steuwer, A. [FaME38 at the ESRF-ILL, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); ESS Scandinavia, University of Lund, Stora Algatan 4, 22350 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; Santisteban, J.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Preuss, M. [University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Peel, M.J.; Buslaps, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Harada, M. [R and D Section, Chofu-Kita Plant, Kobe Special Tube Co, Shimonoseki 752-0953 (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    The formation of hydrides in zirconium alloys significantly affects their mechanical properties and is considered to play a critical role in their failure mechanisms, yet relatively little is known about the micromechanical behavior of hydrides in the bulk. This paper presents the result of in situ uniaxial mechanical tensioning experiments on hydrided zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 specimens using energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction, which suggests that a stress-induced transformation of the {delta}-hydride to {gamma}-hydride via ordering of the hydrogen atoms occurs, akin to a Snoek-type relaxation. Subsequent annealing was found to reverse the ordering phenomenon.

  2. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH2.7(s), PuN(s), Pu2O3(s), N2, O2 and H2, therefore , the system described involves of 2 independent reactions ,both those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The present paper has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect.

  3. Determination of Thickness of an Inaccessible Thin Film under a Multilayered System from Natural Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chang-Zhi; LI Ming-Xuan; MAO Jie; WANG Xiao-Min

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the relationship between natural frequencies of a multilayered system of different elastic materials and the thickness of the undermost thin film. The natural frequencies are numerically calculated from the reflection coefficient of a sample system of "steel-epoxy resin-aluminium-thin polymer' with normal incidence.Strain energy ratio is defined and calculated to give the physics explanation why some frequencies are sensitive to thickness of the thin film in certain range. Experiments of three specimens indicate that the measured natural frequencies agree well with the theoretical ones. It is found in our experiments that the ratio of the lowest film thickness to wavelength is about 1/5. The average relative errors for the inverted polymer film thicknesses are found to be 11.8%, -4.8% and -1.3%, respectively.

  4. Development of physics based analytical interatomic potential for palladium-hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Ho; Hijazi, Iyad

    2017-04-01

    Palladium hydrides (Pd-H) research is an important topic in materials research with many practical industrial applications. The complex behavior of the Pd-H alloy system such as phase miscibility gap, however, presents a huge challenge for developing reliable computational models. The embedded atom method (EAM) offers an advantage of computational efficiency and being suited to the metal-hydride system. We propose a new EAM interatomic potential for the complete mathematical modeling of palladium hydride. The present interatomic potential well predicts the lattice constant, cohesive energy, bulk modulus, other elastic constants, and stable alloy crystal structures during molecular dynamics simulations. The phase miscibility gap is also accurately predicted for the Pd-H system using the present potential. To our knowledge, only two Pd-H EAM potentials were used for predicting the phase miscibility gap for the PdH system. The predicted values from these works, however, considerably deviated from the experimental result, which hinders further application to the palladium hydride system. The present potential is reliably accurate and can be used to study the Pd-H system with its compete description of the mathematical formalism.

  5. Hydride formation on deformation twin in zirconium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Sung-Dae; Yoon, Jonghun

    2016-12-01

    Hydrides deteriorate the mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) alloys used in nuclear reactors. Intergranular hydrides that form along grain boundaries have been extensively studied due to their detrimental effects on cracking. However, it has been little concerns on formation of Zr hydrides correlated with deformation twins which is distinctive heterogeneous nucleation site in hexagonal close-packed metals. In this paper, the heterogeneous precipitation of Zr hydrides at the twin boundaries was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. It demonstrates that intragranular hydrides in the twinned region precipitates on the rotated habit plane by the twinning and intergranular hydrides precipitate along the coherent low energy twin boundaries independent of the conventional habit planes. Interestingly, dislocations around the twin boundaries play a substantial role in the nucleation of Zr hydrides by reducing the misfit strain energy.

  6. Hydrogen storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride nanoparticle thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelo, Steven; Rogers, Matthew; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Hydrogen sorption property of magnesium (Mg) in the form of sandwiched Pd/Mg/Pd films is investigated. Pulsed laser deposition method was applied to deposit the samples consisting of films of nanoparticles. The enthalpy of formation of MgH{sub 2} was found to be -68 kJ/mol H{sub 2} for films with nanoparticle size on the order of 50 nm, which is smaller than the value for bulk MgH{sub 2} and may be explained by the concept of excess volume. (author)

  7. Development of novel control system to grow ZnO thin films by reactive evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Gordillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a novel system implemented to grow ZnO thin films by plasma assisted reactive evaporation with adequate properties to be used in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices with different architectures. The innovative aspect includes both an improved design of the reactor used to activate the chemical reaction that leads to the formation of the ZnO compound as an electronic system developed using the virtual instrumentation concept. ZnO thin films with excellent opto-electrical properties were prepared in a reproducible way, controlling the deposition system through a virtual instrument (VI with facilities to control the amount of evaporated zinc involved in the process that gives rise to the formation of ZnO, by means of the incorporation of PID (proportional integral differential and PWM (pulse width modulation control algorithms. The effectiveness and reliability of the developed system was verified by obtaining with good reproducibility thin films of n+-ZnO and i-ZnO grown sequentially in situ with thicknesses and resistivities suitable for use as window layers in chalcopyrite based thin film solar cells.

  8. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Louthan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); PNNL, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  9. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  10. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

    2008-12-31

    Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  11. STUDY ON Ni-Cr SYSTEM SOLAR SELECTIVE THIN FILMS PREPARED BY MAGNETRON REACTIVE SPUTTERING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.W. Wang; H. Shen

    2002-01-01

    Ni-Cr System solar selective thin solid films were prepared by d.c. magnetron reactivesputtering under the atmosphere of O2 and N2. Ni-Cr alloy was chosen as targetmaterial and copper sheets as substrate. Using SEM, Spectrophotometer and Talystepto analyze the relations between the selective characteristic and the structure, theformation and the thickness of the thin films. The aim is to obtain good solar selectivethin films with high absorptance and low emittance, which is applied to flat plate solarheat collectors.

  12. Apparatus for producing a thin sample band in a microchannel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.

    2008-05-13

    The present invention improves the performance of microchannel systems for chemical and biological synthesis and analysis by providing a method and apparatus for producing a thin band of a species sample. Thin sample bands improve the resolution of microchannel separation processes, as well as many other processes requiring precise control of sample size and volume. The new method comprises a series of steps in which a species sample is manipulated by controlled transport through a junction formed at the intersection of four or more channels. A sample is first inserted into the end of one of these channels in the vicinity of the junction. Next, this sample is thinned by transport across the junction one or more times. During these thinning steps, flow enters the junction through one of the channels and exists through those remaining, providing a divergent flow field that progressively stretches and thins the band with each traverse of the junction. The thickness of the resulting sample band may be smaller than the channel width. Moreover, the thickness of the band may be varied and controlled by altering the method alone, without modification to the channel or junction geometries. The invention is applicable to both electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport, to combined electrokinetic transport, and to some special cases in which bulk fluid transport is driven by pressure gradients. It is further applicable to channels that are open, filled with a gel or filled with a porous or granular material.

  13. Organic donor-acceptor thin film systems. Towards optimized growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Kerstin Andrea

    2009-06-30

    In this work the preparation of organic donor-acceptor thin films was studied. A chamber for organic molecular beam deposition was designed and integrated into an existing deposition system for metallic thin films. Furthermore, the deposition system was extended by a load-lock with integrated bake-out function, a chamber for the deposition of metallic contacts via stencil mask technique and a sputtering chamber. For the sublimation of the organic compounds several effusion cells were designed. The evaporation characteristic and the temperature profile within the cells was studied. Additionally, a simulation program was developed, which calculates the evaporation characteristics of different cell types. The following processes were integrated: evaporation of particles, migration on the cell walls and collisions in the gas phase. It is also possible to consider a temperature gradient within the cell. All processes can be studied separately and their relative strength can be varied. To verify the simulation results several evaporation experiments with different cell types were employed. The thickness profile of the prepared thin films was measured position-dependently. The results are in good agreement with the simulation. Furthermore, the simulation program was extended to the field of electron beam induced deposition (EBID). The second part of this work deals with the preparation and characterization of organic thin films. The focus hereby lies on the charge transfer salt (BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ), which has three known structure variants. Thin films were prepared by different methods of co-evaporation and were studied with optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX).The formation of the monoclinic phase of (BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ) could be shown. As a last part tunnel structures were prepared as first thin film devices and measured in a He{sub 4} cryostat. (orig.)

  14. Aberration-free two-thin-lens systems based on negative-index materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhi-Li; Ding Jie-Chen; Zhang Pu

    2008-01-01

    Since the complete correction of all five monochromatic Seidel aberrations for a singlet lens with random shape or a two-thin-lens system is unprocurable merely by using the conventional positive-index materials both in theory and practice, this paper proposes that when one or both of the two lenses is/are made from negative-index materials, an imaging system composed of a pair of spherical thin lenses is possible to form a real image, in air, free from all five monochromatic Seidel aberrations. The calculated numerical solutions to the structural parameters of such lens systems possessing superior performance are provided and examples of them are illustrated for the given combinations of the two lenses' refractive indices, including an ultimately-remote imaging system.

  15. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  16. Electronic Principles of Hydrogen Incorporation and Dynamics in Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Matović

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach to various metal hydrides based on electronic principles is presented. The effective medium theory (EMT is used to illustrate fundamental aspects of metal-hydrogen interaction and clarify the most important processes taking place during the interaction. The elaboration is extended using the numerous existing results of experiment and calculations, as well as using some new material. In particular, the absorption/desorption of H in the Mg/MgH2 system is analyzed in detail, and all relevant initial structures and processes explained. Reasons for the high stability and slow sorption in this system are noted, and possible solutions proposed. The role of the transition-metal impurities in MgH2 is briefly discussed, and some interesting phenomena, observed in complex intermetallic compounds, are mentioned. The principle mechanism governing the Li-amide/imide transformation is also discussed. Latterly, some perspectives for the metal-hydrides investigation from the electronic point of view are elucidated.

  17. Catalyzed light hydride nanomaterials embedded in a micro-channels hydrogen storage container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouche, Zahir; Peretti, Hernán A; Yoo, Yeong; Belkacemi, Khaled; Goyette, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Activated alloys synthesized by arc-melting were examined as catalysts for improving the hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured magnesium hydride, proposed as a reversible hydrogen storage material. The MgH(2)-catalyst absorbing materials were prepared by ball milling of pure MgH(2) with hydrided Zr(47)Ni(53), Zr(9)Ni(11), and other alloys investigated. The nanostructured MgH(2)-intermetallic systems were tested at 250 degrees C and catalyst addition of eutectoid Zr(47)Ni(53) resulted in the fastest desorption time and highest initial desorption rate. The catalyzed Mg-hydride with activated Zr(9)Ni(11) and Zr(7)Ni(10) phases showed fast desorption kinetics. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the composition of dispersed Zr(x)Ni(y)catalysts has a strong influence on the amount of accumulated hydrogen and desorption rate of Mg-nanocomposite. Part two covers advanced micro-channels hydrogen storage module design based on the results of semi-empirical computer simulations of heat and mass transfers in the container. The micro-channels reservoir concept offers many advantages over the conventional metal hydride hydrogen storage system. It is a micro-structured system that can pack a lot of power into a small space and dissipate effectively the heat of the sorption reactions. This review summarizes recent patents related to CNTS.

  18. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Satya Sekhar, B. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muthukumar, P. [Mechanical Department, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Linkov, V.; Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • MH H{sub 2} storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H{sub 2} charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system.

  19. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  20. A uniaxial tension system and its applications in testing of thin films and small components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenwang; Li, Xide; Liu, Liang

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this investigation is to develop a uniaxial tension system for testing very small samples that allows observation of the gauge section by optical or atomic force microscopy. Major parts of the system consist of a pair of identical piezoelectric actuators, two symmetrical double-cantilevered force sensors, and two symmetrical universal coupling joints. It can accomplish both-end loaded uniaxial tension to produce centrosymmetric deformations of the tested objects in the field of view and can apply tensile loads in the range from 7.8 microN to 15 N to the samples. Sample extensions from submicrometers to 100 microm can be measured with displacement resolution of several tens of nanometers. The system's performance is demonstrated by tests of a polycrystalline aluminum alloy thin sheet, a mica thin sheet, and a fibril of bamboo.

  1. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  2. Kinetics of Liquid-Phase Hydrogenation of Benzene in a Metal Hydride Slurry System Formed by M1Ni5 and Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代世耀; 徐国华; 安越; 陈长聘; 陈立新; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene in misch metal nickel-five (M1Ni5) and benzene slurry system was studied by investigating the influences of the reaction temperature, pressure, alloy concentration and stirring speed on the mass transfer-reaction processes inside the slurry. The results show that the whole process is controlled by the reaction at the surface of the catalyst. The mass transfer resistance at gas-liquid interface and that from the bulk liquid phase to the surface of the catalyst particles are negligible. The apparent reaction rate is zero order for benzene concentration and first order for hydrogen concentration in the liquid phase. The kinetic model obtained fits the experimental data very well. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogen absorption reaction of M1Ni5-C6H6 slurry system is 42.16 kJ·mo1-1.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  4. Characterization Of Superconducting Samples With SIC System For Thin Film Developments: Status And Recent Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, H. Lawrence [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY (United States); Eremeev, Grigory V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Within any thin film development program directed towards SRF accelerating structures, there is a need for an RF characterization device that can provide information about RF properties of small samples. The current installation of the RF characterization device at Jefferson Lab is Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system. The data acquisition environment for the system has recently been improved to allow for automated measurement, and the system has been routinely used for characterization of bulk Nb, films of Nb on Cu, MgB{sub 2}, NbTiN, Nb{sub 3}Sn films, etc. We present some of the recent results that illustrate present capabilities and limitations of the system.

  5. Real time intelligent process control system for thin film solar cell manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Atanasoff

    2010-10-29

    This project addresses the problem of lower solar conversion efficiency and waste in the typical solar cell manufacturing process. The work from the proposed development will lead toward developing a system which should be able to increase solar panel conversion efficiency by an additional 12-15% resulting in lower cost panels, increased solar technology adoption, reduced carbon emissions and reduced dependency on foreign oil. All solar cell manufacturing processes today suffer from manufacturing inefficiencies that currently lead to lower product quality and lower conversion efficiency, increased product cost and greater material and energy consumption. This results in slower solar energy adoption and extends the time solar cells will reach grid parity with traditional energy sources. The thin film solar panel manufacturers struggle on a daily basis with the problem of thin film thickness non-uniformity and other parameters variances over the deposited substrates, which significantly degrade their manufacturing yield and quality. Optical monitoring of the thin films during the process of the film deposition is widely perceived as a necessary step towards resolving the non-uniformity and non-homogeneity problem. In order to enable the development of an optical control system for solar cell manufacturing, a new type of low cost optical sensor is needed, able to acquire local information about the panel under deposition and measure its local characteristics, including the light scattering in very close proximity to the surface of the film. This information cannot be obtained by monitoring from outside the deposition chamber (as traditional monitoring systems do) due to the significant signal attenuation and loss of its scattering component before the reflected beam reaches the detector. In addition, it would be too costly to install traditional external in-situ monitoring systems to perform any real-time monitoring over large solar panels, since it would require

  6. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  7. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  8. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL's MBM Framework for Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, Blythe; Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding. While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models. The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  9. Silicon carbide thin films for high temperature microelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Aaron Judah

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) was studied for use as a material in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). An APCVD reactor was built to deposit SiC on 100-mm diameter substrates. 3C-SiC films were grown heteroepitaxially atop 100-mm Si wafers. SiC was deposited atop suitable sacrificial layers of polysilicon and thermal oxide. The reactor gas flow was modeled using finite element techniques. The gas flow formed a recirculating pattern, with fresh reactant gases injected at the top of the reactor, traveling down the inside sidewalls and introduced at the bottom of the wafer, forming a plume of heated gases rising to the top of the reactor. This recirculation pattern explains the gradually decreasing growth rate from the wafer's bottom to its top as reactant gases are gradually depleted as they rise. Intentional doping of 3C-SiC films was studied, using diborane and phosphine dopant sources. SIMS indicated that B and P could be incorporated into 3C-SiC films, however B doped films were electrically compensated due to trace amounts of nitrogen in the diborane. Boron concentrations above 3C-SiC's solid solubility caused the SiC to become polycrystalline. Phosphorus incorporation was less predictable and did not vary linearly with phosphine flow rates. A reactive ion etch (REE) process was developed to etch 3C-SiC. Addition of He to the plasma chemistry enhanced the etch rates and etch anisotropy of the 3C-SiC. The etch recipe also produced similar results for polycrystalline SiC on polysilicon and thermal oxide. A maximum SiC etch rate of 1,267 A/min with a selectivity of 1.4 to Si was obtained. Using the above methods, SiC resonant devices were fabricated using polysilicon and thermal oxide as sacrificial layers. Polysilicon resonant devices were fabricated for comparison. The devices were tested by measuring their resonant frequency at room and elevated temperatures to 900°C to determine Young's modulus and its temperature dependence. All devices showed resonant frequency

  10. Scaling at the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in yttrium hydride

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, A F T; Rosenbaum, T F

    2003-01-01

    A single yttrium hydride thin film is conveniently driven through the T 0 metal-insulator transition by fine-tuning the charge carrier density n via persistent photoconductivity at low temperature. Simultaneously, electrical conductivity and Hall measurements are performed for temperatures T down to 350 mK and magnetic fields up to 14 T. A scaling analysis is applied and critical exponents, resolved separately on the metallic and insulating sides of the critical region, are determined consistently. We introduce corrections to scaling to invoke collapse of the data onto a single master curve over an extended region of the (n, T) phase diagram.

  11. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of silicon carbide nanowires thin film by HF-PECVD system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhang Enlei; Wang Guosheng; Long Xiaozhu; Wang Zhumin

    2014-10-01

    A sample and scalable synthetic strategy was developed for the fabrication of nanocrystalline SiC (nc-SiC) thin film. Thin sheet of nanocrystalline diamond was deposited on Si substrate by hot filamentassisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition system (HF-PECVD). Further, the resulting carbonbased sheet was heated at 1200 °C to allow a solid state reaction between C and Si substrate to form the SiC thin films. The synthesized films mainly consist of -SiC nanowires with diameters of about 50 nm and tens of micrometers long. The nanowires axes lie along the [1 1 1] direction and possess a high density of planar defects. The -SiC nanowires thin films exhibit the strong photoluminescence (PL) peak at a wavelength of 400 nm, which is significantly shifted to the blue compared with the reported PL results of SiC materials. The blue shift may be ascribed to morphology, quantum size confinement effects of the nanomaterials and abundant structure defects that existed in the nanowires.

  12. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  13. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  14. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  15. Compensation effect in the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Anders; Vegge, Tejs; Pedersen, Allan S

    2005-03-03

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi(5) based hydrides. For these systems, we find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency of observed apparent activation energy on the degree of surface oxidation, i.e., a physical effect. On the other hand, we find the large concurrent changes in apparent prefactors to be a direct result of the Arrhenius analysis. Thus, we find the observed compensation effect to be an artifact of the data analysis rather than a physical phenomenon. In the case of LaNi(5) based hydrides, observed scatter in reported apparent activation energies is less pronounced supporting the general experience that LaNi(5) is less sensitive toward surface contamination.

  16. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid...... is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program included testing of small scale specimens by applying shear (push-off) loading and semi-full scale specimens...

  17. Construction of sputtering system and preparation of high temperature superconducting thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Kaynak, E

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of high T sub c superconducting thin film is important both for the understanding of fundamental behaviours of these materials and for the investigations on the usefulness of technological applications. High quality thin films can be prepared by various kinds of techniques being used today. Among these, sputtering is the most preferred one. The primary aim of this work is the construction of a r. f. and c. magnetron sputtering system. For this goal, a magnetron sputtering system was designed and constructed having powers up to 500W (r.f.) and 1KW (d.c.) that enables to deposit thin films of various kinds of materials: metals, ceramics and magnetic materials. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of the films was investigated by using four-point probe method. The zero resistance and the transition with of the films were measured as 80-85 K, and 2-9 K, respectively. The A.C. susceptibility experiments were done by utilising the system that was designed and constructed. The appl...

  18. Improved electrochemical hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Y thin films as a function of substrate temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyan Wang; Gongbiao Xin; Chongyun Wang; Huiyu Li; Wei Li; Jie Zheng; Xingguo Li

    2014-01-01

    Pd-capped Mg78 Y22 thin films have been prepared by direct current magnetron co-sputtering system at different substrate temperatures and their electrochemical hydrogen storage properties have been investigated. It is found that rising substrate temperature to 60◦C can coarsen the surface of thin film, thus facilitating the diffusion of hydrogen atoms and then enhancing its discharge capacity to ∼1725 mAh·g-1 . Simultaneously, the cyclic stability is effectively improved due to the increased adhesion force between film and substrate as a function of temperature. In addition, the specimen exhibits a very long and flat discharge plateau at about-0.67 V, at which nearly 60%of capacity is maintained. The property is favorable for the application in metal hydride/nickel secondary batteries. The results indicate that rising optimal substrate temperature has a beneficial effect on the electrochemical hydrogen storage of Mg-Y thin films.

  19. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  20. Fe-B-Nd-Nb metallic glass thin films for microelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T. A.; Oguchi, H.; Hara, M.; Shikida, M.; Hida, H.; Ando, T.; Sato, K.; Kuwano, H.

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we investigate the mechanical properties, residual stress, and microprocessing compatibility of Fe67.5B22.5Nd6.3Nb3.7 metallic glass thin films (Fe-MGTFs). The mechanical properties are measured using a specially designed microtensile tester. The fracture toughness of the Fe-MGTF (6.36 MPa × m1/2) is more than twice that of Si, and the highest among the thin films developed for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to this point. In addition, the fabrication of freestanding microcantilevers illustrates the low residual stress and high microprocessing compatibility of Fe-MGTFs. The present study verifies the great potential of Fe-MGTFs for use in MEMS.

  1. Investigation of the direct hydride generation nebulizer for the determination of arsenic, antimony and selenium in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Illiana; Murillo, Miguel; Carrion, Nereida; Chirinos, Jose [Centro de Quimica Analitica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, P.O. Box 47102, 1041a, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2003-05-01

    A direct hydride generation nebulizer (DHGN) was explored for introduction of the sample in inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) using radially viewed mode. This simple hydride generation system was constructed in our laboratory and requires similar plasma operating conditions to conventional nebulizer-spray-chamber arrangements. This work was focused on the optimization of the operating conditions for hydride generation and evaluation of the main analytical figures of merit for the determination of As, Sb and Se. The excitation conditions of the ICP-OES instrument operated with the DHGN were also explored. Results showed that the analytical performance of the new system for the determination of As, Sb and Se was superior to that of conventional nebulization systems. The DHGN also enabled the determination of elements that do not form volatile hydrides, but with less sensitivity than conventional nebulization systems. Evaluation of the plasma robustness showed that gases generated in hydride generation do not significantly affects the plasma discharge. Similar to conventional hydride generation techniques, analysis with DHGN was susceptible to non-spectroscopic interferences produced by transition metals. Finally, the utility of the DHGN in practical ICP-OES studies was demonstrated in the determination of trace elements in an oyster tissue standard reference material. (orig.)

  2. Improved Electrochemical Performance of Surface-Modified Metal Hydride Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai; WU Feng; CHEN Shi; ZHANG Cun-zhong

    2005-01-01

    A novel plating process was applied to the surface modification of the metal hydride (MH) electrode of the MH/Ni batteries. The electrode was plated with a thin nickel film about 0.1 μm thick by using multi-arc ion plating technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to analyze the electrodes. Influence of the surface modification on the performance of the MH/Ni batteries was studied. It is shown that the surface modification could enhance the electrode conductivity and decrease the batteries ohimic resistance by 28.2 %. After surface modification, the discharge capacity of modification also improves the cyclic durability of the batteries. The inner pressure of the batteries with modified electrode during overcharging is much lower than that with unmodified electrode. The experimental results demonstrate that this process is an effective way for the surface modification of the electrode of MH/Ni batteries.

  3. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  4. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  5. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and properties of some organozinc hydride complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A.J. de; Boersma, J.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the monopyridine complexes of ethylzinc hydride and phenylzinc hydride are described. On treatment with TMED these complexes are converted into R2Zn3H4. TMED species through a combination of ligand-exchange and disproportionation. The formation of organozinc hyd

  7. Hydride morphology and striation formation during delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5% Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shek, G.K. [Ontario Hydro Technol., Ont. (Canada). Mater. Technol. Unit; Jovanovic, M.T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineering; Seahra, H. [Ontario Hydro Technol., Ont. (Canada). Mater. Technol. Unit; Ma, Y. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineering; Li, D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineering; Eadie, R.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineering

    1996-08-01

    These experiments were designed to study hydride formation at the crack tip, acoustic emission (AE), potential drop (PD) and striation formation during DHC (delayed hydride cracking) in Zr-2.5% Nb. The test material was taken from an especially extruded pressure tube, which showed similar strength properties to normal pressure tube material but somewhat coarser microstructure. In testing at K{sub I} below 12 MPa {radical}m at both 200 and 250 C very large striations (>40 {mu}m at 200 and >50 {mu}m at 250 C) were produced. In simultaneous monitoring with acoustic emission and potential drop, both AE and PD jumps were shown to be monolithic. The number of striations on the fracture surface corresponded to the number of monolithic AE/PD jumps. Tapered shaped hydrides with the thick end adjacent to the crack tip were observed. These hydrides grew in size during the incubation period until they reached the striation length and then fractured monolithically. However, when K{sub I} was increased beyond about 12 MPa {radical}m for these same specimens, the striation spacing decreased below 30 {mu}m, the monolithic jumping dissolved into more continuous changes in signals, although the smaller striations were still visible on the fracture surface. (orig.).

  8. Hydride morphology and striation formation during delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5% Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, G. K.; Jovanoviċ, M. T.; Seahra, H.; Ma, Y.; Li, D.; Eadie, R. L.

    1996-08-01

    These experiments were designed to study hydride formation at the crack tip, acoustic emission (AE), potential drop (PD) and striation formation during DHC (delayed hydride cracking) in Zr-2.5% Nb. The test material was taken from an especially extrude pressure tube, which showed similar strength properties to normal pressure tube material but somewhat coarser microstructure. In testing at KI below 12 MPa √m at both 200 and 250°C very large striations (> 40 μ at 200 and >50 μm at 250°C) were produced. In simultaneous monitoring with acoustic emission and potential drop, both AE and PD jumps were shown to be monolithic. The number of striations on the fracture surface corresponded to the number of monolithic AE/PD jumps. Tapered shaped hydrides with the thick end adjacent to the crack tip were observed. These hydrides grew in size during the incubation period until they reached the striation length and then fractured monolithically. However, when KI was increased beyond about 12 MPa √m for these same specimens, the striation spacing decreased below 30 μ, the monolithic jumping dissolved into more continuous changes in signals, although the smaller striations were still visible on the fracture surface.

  9. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licavoli, Joseph J., E-mail: jjlicavo@mtu.edu; Sanders, Paul G., E-mail: sanders@mtu.edu

    2015-09-20

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH{sub 2} decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis.

  10. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  11. Light metal hydrides and complex hydrides for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüth, F; Bogdanović, B; Felderhoff, M

    2004-10-21

    The availability of feasible methods for hydrogen storage is one of the key-maybe the key-requirements for the large scale application of PEM fuel cells in cars. There are in principle four different approaches, i.e. cryostorage in liquid form, high pressure storage, storage in the form of a chemical compound which is converted to hydrogen by on-board reforming, or reversible chemical storage in different kinds of storage materials. New developments in the field of chemical storage make such systems attractive compared to the other options. This review will discuss the different possibilities for chemical storage of hydrogen and the focus on the presently most advanced system with respect to storage capacity and kinetics, i.e. catalyzed alanates, especially NaAlH(4).

  12. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  13. Encapsulation of hydride by molecular main group metal clusters: manipulating the source and coordination sphere of the interstitial ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Sally R; Coles, Martyn P; Eyre-Brook, Vicki; García, Felipe; Haigh, Robert; Hitchcock, Peter B; McPartlin, Mary; Morey, James V; Naka, Hiroshi; Raithby, Paul R; Sparkes, Hazel A; Tate, Christopher W; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2006-12-21

    The sequential treatment of Lewis acids with N,N'-bidentate ligands and thereafter with ButLi has afforded a series of hydride-encapsulating alkali metal polyhedra. While the use of Me3Al in conjunction with Ph(2-C5H4N)NH gives Ph(2-C5H4N)NAlMe2 and this reacts with MeLi in thf to yield the simple 'ate complex Ph(2-C5H4N)NAlMe3Li.thf, the employment of an organolithium substrate capable of beta-hydride elimination redirects the reaction significantly. Whereas the use of ButLi has previously yielded a main group interstitial hydride in which H- exhibits micro6-coordination, it is shown here that variability in the coordination sphere of the encapsulated hydride may be induced by manipulation of the organic ligand. Reaction of (c-C6H11)(2-C5H4N)NH with Me3Al/ButLi yields [{(c-C6H11)(2-C5H4N)N}6HLi8]+[(But2AlMe2)2Li]-, which is best viewed as incorporating only linear di-coordination of the hydride ion. The guanidine 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidine (hppH) in conjunction with Me2Zn/ButLi yields the micro8-hydride [(hpp)6HLi8]+[But3Zn]-.0.5PhMe. Formation of the micro8-hydride [(hpp)6HLi8]+[ButBEt3]- is revealed by employment of the system Et3B/ButLi. A new and potentially versatile route to interstitial hydrides of this class is revealed by synthesis of the mixed borohydride-lithium hydride species [(hpp)6HLi8]+[Et3BH]- and [(hpp)6HLi8]+[(Et3B)2H]- through the direct combination of hppLi with Et3BHLi.

  14. Pressure-induced transformations of molecular boron hydride

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, S; Gregoryanz, E A; Goncharov, A F; Mao Ho Kwang

    2002-01-01

    Decaborane, a molecular boron hydride, was compressed to 131 GPa at room temperature to explore possible non-molecular phases in this system and their physical properties. Decaborane changed its colour from transparent yellow to orange/red above 50 GPa and then to black above 100 GPa, suggesting some transformations. Raman scattering and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy reveal significant structural changes. Above 100 GPa, B-B skeletal, B-H and B-H-B Raman/IR peaks gradually disappeared, which implies a transformation into a non-molecular phase in which conventional borane-type bonding is lost. The optical band gap of the material at 100 GPa was estimated to be about 1.0 eV.

  15. Optical constants and nonlinear calculations of fluorescein/FTO thin film optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, H. Y.; Iqbal, Javed; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-11-01

    The organic thin films of fluorescein dye were deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate by using low-cost spin coating technique. The surface of the deposited film was characterized by using AFM and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, which shows that the film is uniform and amorphous. The spectrophotometric study was carried out at the wavelength range of 300-2500 nm. The spectral dependences of the linear refractive index and absorption index were found to decrease as the wavelength was increased. Tauc's plot study revealed that the film shows the direct transition and energy band gap values were found 1.75 eV and 3.55 eV for the thin film and the substrate, respectively. Optical constants were found nearly the same in the higher energy domain (1.0-4.5 eV). Spectroscopic method was employed to study the nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (3). The deposited thin film is a promising optical system for new generation of optoelectronics.

  16. Synthesis of CuInS2 thin films by spray pyrolysis deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, K. M. A.; Podder, J.; Saha, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    Copper indium disulfide (CuInS2) thin films were deposited on the glass substrate by the locally made spray pyrolysis deposition system. The films were characterized by using energy dispersive analytical X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometry. The XRD pattern indicated that the prepared CuInS2 thin films are chalcopyrite structure. Lattice parameters and FWHM values were verified by the standard values of JCPDS 270159 file. The EDAX analysis indicated the stoichiometric ratio of 1.14:1:1.88 (CIS-2) thin films. The SEM analysis showed that the average grain size of the film was 100-800 nm and that of XRD data indicate the values of 30-50 nm. The high absorption co-efficient and 1.48 eV band gap of the films indicate that the films are useful as an absorber for photovoltaic application in the solar cell.

  17. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, Dennis C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  18. Exploration of CIGAS Alloy System for Thin-Film Photovoltaics on Novel Lightweight and Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lawrence M.; Kalla, Ajay; Ribelin, Rosine

    2007-01-01

    Thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV) on lightweight and flexible substrates offer the potential for very high solar array specific power (W/kg). ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) is developing flexible TFPV blanket technology that has potential for specific power greater than 2000 W/kg (including space coatings) that could result in solar array specific power between 150 and 500 W/kg, depending on array size, when mated with mechanical support structures specifically designed to take advantage of the lightweight and flexible substrates.(1) This level of specific power would far exceed the current state of the art for spacecraft PV power generation, and meet the needs for future spacecraft missions.(2) Furthermore the high specific power would also enable unmanned aircraft applications and balloon or high-altitude airship (HAA) applications, in addition to modular and quick deploying tents for surface assets or lunar base power, as a result of the high power density (W/sq m) and ability to be integrated into the balloon, HAA or tent fabric. ITN plans to achieve the high specific power by developing single-junction and two-terminal monolithic tandem-junction PV cells using thin-films of high-efficiency and radiation resistant CuInSe2 (CIS) partnered with bandgap-tunable CIS-alloys with Ga (CIGS) or Al (CIAS) on novel lightweight and flexible substrates. Of the various thin-film technologies, single-junction and radiation resistant CIS and associated alloys with gallium, aluminum and sulfur have achieved the highest levels of TFPV device performance, with the best efficiency reaching 19.5% under AM1.5 illumination conditions and on thick glass substrates.(3) Thus, it is anticipated that single- and tandem-junction devices with flexible substrates and based on CIS and related alloys will achieve the highest levels of thin-film space and HAA solar array performance.

  19. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M. A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F. J.

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  20. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  1. Growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin Mg films on Mo(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Davies, Jonathan Conrad; Vegge, Tejs;

    2005-01-01

    The growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin magnesium overlayers have been investigated on a Mo(1 1 1) single crystal substrate. For increasing magnesium coverages we observe intermediate stages in the TPD and LEISS profiles, which illustrate the transition from one monolayer to multilayer growth....... are necessary to sustain this purely adsorbed state. Using predissociated hydrogen we show that the hydride formation is self-stabilizing and the hydride only decomposes at a temperature where a considerable desorption of magnesium occurs....

  2. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  3. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  4. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  5. An introduction to fast dissolving oral thin film drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Gupte, Aasavari

    2013-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies are switching their products from tablets to fast dissolving oral thin films (OTFs). Films have all the advantages of tablets (precise dosage, easy administration) and those of liquid dosage forms (easy swallowing, rapid bioavailability). Statistics have shown that four out of five patients prefer orally disintegrating dosage forms over conventional solid oral dosages forms. Pediatric, geriatric, bedridden, emetic patients and those with Central Nervous System disorders, have difficulty in swallowing or chewing solid dosage forms. Many of these patients are non-compliant in administering solid dosage forms due to fear of choking. OTFs when placed on the tip or the floor of the tongue are instantly wet by saliva. As a result, OTFs rapidly hydrate and then disintegrate and/or dissolve to release the medication for local and/or systemic absorption. This technology provides a good platform for patent non- infringing product development and for increasing the patent life-cycle of the existing products. The application of fast dissolving oral thin films is not only limited to buccal fast dissolving system, but also expands to other applications like gastroretentive, sublingual delivery systems. This review highlights the composition including the details of various types of polymers both natural and synthetic, the different types of manufacturing techniques, packaging materials and evaluation tests for the OTFs.

  6. Corrosion inhibition in sputter-deposited thin-film systems using an intermediary layer of palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Accelerated and long term corrosion data are presented for the Ti--Ag and Cr--Au thin film metallization systems deposited by sputter deposition. The Ti--Ag conductor system is used as an electrode for high intensity silicon solar cells, and it has been found that an intermediate layer of 1500 A of palladium greatly improves the environmental stability of the metallization. The Cr--Au system has been used as an electrical circuit pattern, and thin films of palladium (100--300 A) have been incorporated to improve storage, processing, and service stability. A 100 A palladium intermediary did not affect the etch patterning of the Cr--Au metallization. It is observed that the introduction of palladium modifies the anodic potential of the active metal producing a passive oxide when exposed to an electrolytic environment. It is proposed that this modified oxide, at exposed pinhole sites, is responsible for the increased corrosion resistance when palladium is present as an intermediate layer for either the Ti--Ag or Cr--Au metallization systems.

  7. Hydrogen storage over alkali metal hydride and alkali metal hydroxide composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Yu; Yong Shen Chua; Hujun Cao; Zhitao Xiong; Guotao Wu; Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Alkali metal hydroxide and hydride composite systems contain both protic (H bonded with O) and hydridic hydrogen. The interaction of these two types of hydrides produces hydrogen. The enthalpy of dehydrogenation increased with the increase of atomic number of alkali metals, i.e.,-23 kJ/molH2 for LiOH-LiH, 55.34 kJ/molH2 for NaOH-NaH and 222 kJ/molH2 for KOH-KH. These thermodynamic calculation results were consistent with our experimental results. H2 was released from LiOH-LiH system during ball milling. The dehydrogenation temperature of NaOH-NaH system was about 150◦C; whereas KOH and KH did not interact with each other during the heating process. Instead, KH decomposed by itself. In these three systems, NaOH-NaH was the only reversible hydrogen storage system, the enthalpy of dehydrogenation was about 55.65 kJ/molH2 , and the corresponding entropy was ca. 101.23 J/(molH2 ·K), so the temperature for releasing 1.0 bar H2 was as high as 518◦C, showing unfavorable thermodynamic properties. The activation energy for hydrogen desorption of NaOH-NaH was found to be 57.87 kJ/mol, showing good kinetic properties.

  8. Design and operation of grid-interactive thin-film silicon PV systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Bill; Atmaram, Gobind; Lashway, Clin; Strachan, John W.

    Results are described from the operation of 11 thin-film amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems at three test facilities: the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New Mexico Solar Energy Institute, and Sandia National Laboratories. Commercially available modules from four US manufacturers are used in these systems, with array sizes from 133 to 750 W peak. Measured array efficiencies are from 3.1 to 4.8 percent. Except for one manufacturer, array peak power is in agreement with the calculated design ratings. For certain grid-connected systems, nonoptimal operation exists because the array peak power voltage is below the lower voltage limit of the power conditioning system. Reliability problems are found in two manufacturers' modules when shorts to ground and terminal corrosion occur. Array leakage current data are presented.

  9. Nanoconfined hydrides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-05-01

    The world in the 21st century is facing increasing challenges within the development of more environmentally friendly energy systems, sustainable and `green chemistry' solutions for a variety of chemical and catalytic processes. Nanomaterials science is expected to contribute strongly by the development of new nanotools, e.g. for improving the performance of chemical reactions. Nanoconfinement is of increasing interest and may lead to significantly enhanced kinetics, higher degree of stability and/or more favourable thermodynamic properties. Nanoconfined chemical reactions may have a wide range of important applications in the near future, e.g. within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy. This review provides selected examples within nanoconfinement of hydrogen storage materials, which may serve as an inspiration for other research fields as well. Selected nanoporous materials, methods for preparation of nanoconfined systems and their hydrogen storage properties are reviewed.The world in the 21st century is facing increasing challenges within the development of more environmentally friendly energy systems, sustainable and `green chemistry' solutions for a variety of chemical and catalytic processes. Nanomaterials science is expected to contribute strongly by the development of new nanotools, e.g. for improving the performance of chemical reactions. Nanoconfinement is of increasing interest and may lead to significantly enhanced kinetics, higher degree of stability and/or more favourable thermodynamic properties. Nanoconfined chemical reactions may have a wide range of important applications in the near future, e.g. within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy. This review provides selected examples within nanoconfinement of hydrogen storage materials, which may serve as an inspiration for other research fields as well. Selected nanoporous materials, methods for preparation of nanoconfined systems and their hydrogen storage

  10. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of External Thermal Insulation Composite System: Thin Rendered Expanded Polystyrene Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Hai-tao; LI Hui-qiang; YIN Xiu-qin

    2009-01-01

    The finite element model of an external thermal composite insulation system, thin rendered expanded polystyrene (EPS) board, was built with ANSYS 1.0, which had two forms: one with window and one without window. The finite element analysis results show that the EPS board had very good insulation capacity at both high or low temperature, stress concentration was produced in the center of wall and around window, and the maximum deformation was observed at the edge of board and the minimum deformation was in the center.

  12. Methodology for choice of harvesting system for energy wood from early thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitila, J.

    2012-11-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to develop a methodology for estimating the procurement cost of forest chips from early thinnings. The most common logging systems and supply chains of forest chips used in early thinnings in Finland were compared at stand and regional level using productivity models and cost parameters obtained mainly from the substudies of this thesis. Furthermore, a decision tree was constructed for selecting harvesting method for energy wood originating from early thinnings. Forwarding productivity following mechanised cutting was significantly higher compared to productivity after motor-manual cutting. Mechanised cutting by the harvester enables felling and bunching of whole trees into large grapple loads close to strip roads, which facilitates increasing forwarding output and reducing costs. The two-machine system comprised of a harvester and a forwarder was the most cost-efficient logging system due to higher efficiency in cutting and especially in the forwarding phase. The cost of motor-manual whole-tree cutting was equal to mechanised whole-tree cutting, while forwarding cost after motor-manual cutting was almost double that after mechanised cutting. Using a forwarderbased harwarder resulted in the highest logging costs. However, with large tree volumes and removals its costs were almost equal to those of motor-manual-based logging. In order to achieve a breakthrough for the harwarder system, costs must be reduced by improving both machine technology and working techniques. Available volumes and procurement costs of fuel chips made of small-diameter trees were compared at regional level. The trees were harvested either by the multi-stem delimbed shortwood or whole-tree method and chipped by a truck-mounted drum chipper at the roadside. Based on the availability analysis, delimbing reduced regional cutting recovery by 42% compared to whole tree harvesting, when the minimum concentration of energy wood was set at 25 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1

  13. Thermal treatment of superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using domestic microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, J. B.; Carvalho, C. L.; Torsoni, G. B.; Aquino, H. A.; Zadorosny, R.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we report the preparation of a superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using a good quality powder with nominal composition Bi1.8Pb0.4Sr2CaCu2Ox which was thermally treated using a domestic microwave oven (2.45 GHz, 800 W). This film was grew on a single crystal of LaAlO3 (1 0 0) substrate and exhibited a crystalline structure with the c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. An onset superconducting transition temperature was measured at 80 K.

  14. Thermal treatment of superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using domestic microwave oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, J.B.; Carvalho, C.L.; Torsoni, G.B.; Aquino, H.A. [Grupo de Desenvolvimento e Aplicacoes de Materiais, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira, Univers Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Caixa Postal 31, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Zadorosny, R., E-mail: rafazad@yahoo.com.br [Grupo de Desenvolvimento e Aplicacoes de Materiais, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira, Univers Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Caixa Postal 31, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we report the preparation of a superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using a good quality powder with nominal composition Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} which was thermally treated using a domestic microwave oven (2.45 GHz, 800 W). This film was grew on a single crystal of LaAlO{sub 3} (1 0 0) substrate and exhibited a crystalline structure with the c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. An onset superconducting transition temperature was measured at 80 K.

  15. Gating System Design for Casting thin Aluminium Alloy (Al-Si) Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Victor ANJO; Reyaz KHAN

    2013-01-01

    The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminium oxide films, cuts and washes, low casting yield and entrapped gas. This study describes the design of a gating system to produce thin Aluminium cast alloy plates of different sizes and thicknesses of 4mm, 6mm, 8mm, and 10mm using the non-pressurized gating with ratio of 1:4:4 and green sand moulding technique. The gating design was based on the laws of fluid mechanics and empirical rules of gating for non ferrous metals. The ...

  16. Magnetism in heterogeneous thin film systems: Resonant x-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.; Hellwig, O.; Marguiles, D.T.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2002-10-28

    Magnetic and chemical heterogeneity are common in a broad range of magnetic thin film systems. Emerging resonant soft x-ray scattering techniques are well suited to resolve such heterogeneity at relevant length scales. Resonant x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements laterally average over heterogeneity but can provide depth resolution in different ways, as illustrated in measurements resolving reversible and irreversible changes in different layers of exchange-spring heterostructures. Resonant small-angle scattering measures in-plane heterogeneity and can resolve magnetic and chemical scattering sources in different ways, as illustrated in measurements of granular alloy recording media.

  17. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  18. Analysis of Pipe Wall-thinning Caused by Water Chemistry Change in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hun; Hwang, Kyeongmo [KEPCO E and C, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seung-Jae [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Pipe wall-thinning by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a significant and costly damage of secondary system piping in nuclear power plants (NPPs). All NPPs have their management programs to ensure pipe integrity from wall-thinning. This study analyzed the pipe wall-thinning caused by changing the amine, which is used for adjusting the water chemistry in the secondary system of NPPs. The pH change was analyzed according to the addition of amine. Then, the wear rate calculated in two different amines was compared at the steam cycle in NPPs. As a result, increasing the pH at operating temperature (Hot pH) can reduce the rate of FAC damage significantly. Wall-thinning is affected by amine characteristics depending on temperature and quality of water.

  19. Electroanalysis of tetracycline using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode applied to flow injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treetepvijit, Surudee; Chuanuwatanakul, Suchada; Einaga, Yasuaki; Sato, Rika; Chailapakult, Orawon

    2005-05-01

    The electrochemical analysis of tetracycline was investigated using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry with a flow injection system. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemical oxidation of tetracycline. Comparison experiments were carried out using as-deposited boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (BDD). Nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (Ni-DIA) provided well-resolved oxidation irreversible cyclic voltammograms. The current signals were higher than those obtained using the as-deposited BDD electrode. Results using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode in flow injection system coupled with amperometric detection are presented. The optimum potential for tetracycline was 1.55 V versus Ag/AgCl. The linear range of 1.0 to 100 microM and the detection limit of 10 nM were obtained. In addition, the application for drug formulation was also investigated.

  20. Stability of alkali-metal hydrides: effects of n-type doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea Amezcua, Monica Araceli; de La Peña Seaman, Omar; Rivas Silva, Juan Francisco; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    Metal hydrides could be considered ideal solid-state hydrogen storage systems, they have light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, but the hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Efforts have been performed to improve their dehydrogenation properties, based on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping. We present a systematic study of the n-type (electronic) doping effects on the stability of two alkali-metal hydrides: Na1-xMgxH and Li1-xBexH. These systems have been studied within the framework of density functional perturbation theory, using a mixed-basis pseudopotential method and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the doping. The full-phonon dispersions are analyzed for several doping content, paying special attention to the crystal stability. It is found a doping content threshold for each system, where they are close to dynamical instabilities, which are related to charge redistribution in interstitial zones. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, the vibrational free energy, the linear thermal expansion and heat capacities are obtained for both hydrides systems and are analyzed as a function of the doping content. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP 2016 and CONACYT-México (No.221807) projects.

  1. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  2. From permanent magnets to rechargeable hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, J.J.G.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    1987-02-15

    A brief historical survey is given of how the study of coercitivity mechanisms in SmCo/sub 5/ permanent-magnet materials eventually led to the discovery of the favourable hydrogen sorption properties of the compound LaNi/sub 5/. It is shown how continued research by many investigators dealing with a variety of different physical and chemical properties has resulted in an advanced understanding of some of the principles that govern hydrogen absorption and which are responsible for the changes in physical properties that accompany it. The problems associated with various applications of LaNi/sub 5/-based hydrogen-storage materials are also briefly discussed. A large part of this paper is devoted to the applicability of LaNi/sub 5/-type materials in batteries. Research in this area has resulted in the development of a new type of rechargeable battery: the nickel-hydride cell. This battery can be charged and discharged at high rates and is relatively insensitive to overcharging and overdischarging. Special attention is given to the nature of the electrode degradation process and the effect of composition variations in LaNi/sub 5/-related materials on the lifetime of the corresponding hydride electrodes when subjected to severe electrochemical charge-discharge cycles.

  3. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  5. Thin film fabrication and system integration test run for a microactuator for a tuneable lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Dominik; Rissing, Lutz

    2014-03-01

    An electromagnetic microactuator, for controlling of a tuneable lens, with an integrated electrostatic element is fabricated by thin film technology. The actuator consists of two parts: the first part with microcoil and flux guide and the second part with a ring shaped back iron on a polyimide membrane. The back iron is additionally useable as electrode for electrostatic measurement of the air gap and for electrostatic actuation. By attracting the back iron an optical liquid is displaced and forms a liquid lens inside the back iron ring covered by the membrane. For testing the thin film fabrication sequence, up-scaled systems are generated in a test run. To fabricate the flux guide in an easy and quick way, a Ni-Fe foil with a thickness of 50 μm is laminated on the Si-wafer. This foil is also utilized in the following fabrication sequence as seed layer for electroplating. Compared to Ni-Fe structures deposited by electroplating, the foil is featuring better soft magnetic properties. The foil is structured by wet chemical etching and the backside of the wafer is structured by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). For post fabrication thinning, the polyimide membrane is treated by oxygen plasma etching. To align the back iron to the microcoil and the flux guide, a flip-chip-bonder is used during test run of system integration. To adjust a constant air gap, a water solvable polymer is tested. A two component epoxy and a polyimide based glue are compared for their bonding properties of the actuator parts.

  6. Heavy hydrides: H2Te ultraviolet photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, J.; Chastaing, D.; Lee, S.; Wittig, C.

    2005-08-01

    The room-temperature ultraviolet absorption spectrum of H2Te has been recorded. Unlike other group-6 hydrides, it displays a long-wavelength tail that extends to 400 nm. Dissociation dynamics have been examined at photolysis wavelengths of 266 nm (which lies in the main absorption feature) and 355 nm (which lies in the long-wavelength tail) by using high-n Rydberg time-of-flight spectroscopy to obtain center-of-mass translational energy distributions for the channels that yield H atoms. Photodissociation at 355 nm yields TeH(Π1/22) selectively relative to the TeH(Π3/22) ground state. This is attributed to the role of the 3A' state, which has a shallow well at large RH-TeH and correlates to H +TeH(Π1/22). Note that the Π1/22 state is analogous to the P1/22 spin-orbit excited state of atomic iodine, which is isoelectronic with TeH. The 3A' state is crossed at large R only by 2A″, with which it does not interact. The character of 3A' at large R is influenced by a strong spin-orbit interaction in the TeH product. Namely, Π1/22 has a higher degree of spherical symmetry than does Π3/22 (recall that I(P1/22) is spherically symmetric), and consequently Π1/22 is not inclined to form either strongly bonding or antibonding orbitals with the H atom. The 3A'←X transition dipole moment dominates in the long-wavelength region and increases with R. Structure observed in the absorption spectrum in the 380-400 nm region is attributed to vibrations on 3A'. The main absorption feature that is peaked at ˜240nm might arise from several excited surfaces. On the basis of the high degree of laboratory system spatial anisotropy of the fragments from 266 nm photolysis, as well as high-level theoretical studies, the main contribution is believed to be due to the 4A″ surface. The 4A″←X transition dipole moment dominates in the Franck-Condon region, and its polarization is in accord with the experimental observations. An extensive secondary photolysis (i.e., of nascent TeH) is

  7. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  8. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Tomohiro; Shinohara, Yasunari; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro [Nuclear Development Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper.

  9. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  10. An intelligent system for mineral identification in thin sections based on a cascade approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Hossein; Sadri, Javad; Bayati, Mahdokht

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an intelligent system for mineral identification in thin sections is proposed based on RGB and HSI color spaces and texture features in plane and cross polarized light. The proposed system has two phases for mineral identification. In phase#1, which is the segmentation phase, 12 color components are extracted for each pixel, and using an incremental clustering algorithm, several mineral clusters including index mineral are produced. Afterwards, in phase#2 which is the identification phase, the produced mineral clusters are identified based on a cascade classification approach. The first level of the cascade includes a set of artificial neural networks (ANNs) corresponding to the number of input minerals which are trained based on color components. In the first level, those minerals exhibiting different colors in plane or cross polarized light are identified. The second level of the cascade includes one ANN which is trained based on texture features in plane and cross polarized light images. In the second level, those minerals which are indistinguishable based on color components in both plane and cross polarized light are identified (are rejected in the first level of the cascade). The final output of the system is the name and number of minerals, boundary and percentage of each mineral in thin section, and eventually the name of probable target rock. The proposed system is able to recognize 23 test igneous minerals with the overall accuracy of 93.81%. The proposed system can be applied in important applications which require a real time segmentation and identification map such as petrography, and NASA Mars Explorations.

  11. MgB{sub 2} thin films grown on graphene/Ni–Mo alloy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linghu, Kehuan, E-mail: linghukehuan@126.com [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Song, Qingjun [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Huai [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, QianQian [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhang, Jibo; Wu, Qianhong; Nie, Ruijuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Dai, Lun [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Feng, Qingrong; Wang, Furen [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Artificial Structure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films on graphene/Ni–Mo alloy substrate by HPCVD is a completely new method. • The growth of MgB{sub 2} thin films in this system lays a good foundation of depositing MgB{sub 2} thick films. • We directly deposite MgB{sub 2} films on graphene(without transferring) which keeps graphene’s original morphology and properties. - Abstract: 200 nm Ni film is coated on 25 μm thick Mo foil, and graphene is grown on the Ni–Mo system by CVD method. After the annealing process of CVD, the Ni/Mo bilayer transforms into Ni–Mo alloy, then we have successfully fabricated MgB{sub 2} films on graphene/Ni–Mo alloy system via the hybrid physical–chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique. The transition temperature T{sub c} onset is 38.25 K with a corresponding transition width of 0.75 K. The average thickness of MgB{sub 2} films is 200 nm (25% concentration B{sub 2}H{sub 6}). The critical current density derives from the magnetization measurement at 5 K is, j{sub c} (5 K, 0 T) = 9.6 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. We can easily deposite MgB{sub 2} on graphene/Ni–Mo alloy system with a lower B{sub 2}H{sub 6} concentration and less gas flow, which lays a good foundation for depositing MgB{sub 2} thick films. The graphene in this system is multilayer and with defects, it may act like an intermediary film for the growth of MgB{sub 2}, or a carbon-doping source.

  12. Benefits of assimilating thin sea ice thickness from SMOS into the TOPAZ system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiping; Counillon, François; Bertino, Laurent; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Kaleschke, Lars

    2016-11-01

    An observation product for thin sea ice thickness (SMOS-Ice) is derived from the brightness temperature data of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. This product is available in near-real time, at daily frequency, during the cold season. In this study, we investigate the benefit of assimilating SMOS-Ice into the TOPAZ coupled ocean and sea ice forecasting system, which is the Arctic component of the Copernicus marine environment monitoring services. The TOPAZ system assimilates sea surface temperature (SST), altimetry data, temperature and salinity profiles, ice concentration, and ice drift with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). The conditions for assimilation of sea ice thickness thinner than 0.4 m are favorable, as observations are reliable below this threshold and their probability distribution is comparable to that of the model. Two parallel Observing System Experiments (OSE) have been performed in March and November 2014, in which the thicknesses from SMOS-Ice (thinner than 0.4 m) are assimilated in addition to the standard observational data sets. It is found that the root mean square difference (RMSD) of thin sea ice thickness is reduced by 11 % in March and 22 % in November compared to the daily thin ice thicknesses of SMOS-Ice, which suggests that SMOS-Ice has a larger impact during the beginning of the cold season. Validation against independent observations of ice thickness from buoys and ice draft from moorings indicates that there are no degradations in the pack ice but there are some improvements near the ice edge close to where the SMOS-Ice has been assimilated. Assimilation of SMOS-Ice yields a slight improvement for ice concentration and degrades neither SST nor sea level anomaly. Analysis of the degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) indicates that the SMOS-Ice has a comparatively small impact but it has a significant contribution in constraining the system (> 20 % of the impact of all ice and ocean

  13. Metal hydrides used as negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Sabrina; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Energy is a key issue for future generation. Researches are conducted worldwide to develop new efficient means for energy conversion and storage. Electrochemical storage is foreseen as an efficient way to handle intermittent renewable energy production. The most advanced batteries are nowadays based on lithium-ion technology though their specific capacities should be significantly increased to bring solution to mass storage. Conversion reactions are one way to step forward larger capacities at the anode. We here review the possibility to use metallic or complex hydrides as negative electrode using conversion reaction of hydride with lithium. Moreover, promising alloying of lithium with the metallic species might provide additional reversible capacities. Both binary and ternary systems are reviewed and results are compared in the frame of the electrochemical application.

  14. Computational study of alkynes insertion into metal-hydride bonds catalyzed by bimetallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Stefania; Tognetti, Vincent; Sicilia, Emilia; Adamo, Carlo; Russo, Nino

    2010-11-01

    Density Functional Theory investigations on the insertion mechanism of phenylacetylene into metal-hydride bonds in bimetallic (Pt,Os) catalysts have been carried out. The results obtained have been also compared with the non-reactive monometallic (Os-based) system, to elucidate the cooperative effects and to explain the observed absence of reactivity. The identified reaction path involves phenylacetylene coordination followed by the insertion into the metal-hydride bond, leading to the formation of the experimentally observed products. Both steps do not require large energies compatible with the experimental conditions. The comparison with the reaction path for the monometallic species gives some hints on the cooperative effects due to the presence of the second metal which is related to its role in the CO release for creating a coordination site for phenylacetylene and not in the insertion energetics. The calculations provide a detailed analysis of the reaction complexity and provide a rationale for the efficiency of the process.

  15. Alkaline-earth metal hydrides as novel host lattices for Eu(II) luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Sayede, Adlane; Springborg, Michael

    2011-07-04

    Luminescence of divalent europium has been investigated for the first time in metal hydrides. A complete solid-solution series was found for the pseudobinary system Eu(x)Sr(1-x)H(2) [a = 637.6(1) pm -12.1(3)x pm, b = 387.0(1)-6.5(2)x pm, c = 732.2(2)-10.1(4)x pm]. Europium-doped alkaline-earth hydrides Eu(x)M(1-x)H(2) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) with a small europium concentration (x = 0.005) exhibit luminescence with maximum emission wavelengths of 764 nm (M = Ca), 728 nm (M = Sr), and 750 nm (M = Ba); i.e., the emission energy of divalent europium shows an extremely large red shift compared to the emission energies of fluorides or oxides. Theoretical calculations (LDA+U) confirm decreasing band gaps with increasing europium content of the solid solutions.

  16. A dehydrogenation mechanism of metal hydrides based on interactions between Hdelta+ and H-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2006-10-16

    This paper describes a reaction mechanism that explains the dehydrogenation reactions of alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides. These light metal hydrides, e.g., lithium-based compounds such as LiH, LiAlH4, and LiNH2, are the focus of intense research recently as the most promising candidate materials for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Although several interesting and promising reactions and materials have been reported, most of these reported reactions and materials have been discovered by empirical means because of a general lack of understanding of any underlying principles. This paper describes an understanding of the dehydrogenation reactions on the basis of the interaction between negatively charged hydrogen (H-, electron donor) and positively charged hydrogen (Hdelta+, electron acceptor) and experimental evidence that captures and explains many observations that have been reported to date. This reaction mechanism can be used as a guidance for screening new material systems for hydrogen storage.

  17. Uniform dehydrogenation of amorphous silicon thin films using a wide thermal annealing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Taehoon; Ahn, Jinho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yeo, Won-Jae; Park, In-Sung

    2017-02-01

    To prevent ablation caused by sudden hydrogen eruption during crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin films, a wide dehydrogenation thermal annealing (wDTA) system was developed to reduce hydrogen content in a-Si:H film prior to its crystallization process. The annealed a-Si:H films were fully dehydrogenated and nanocrystallized by the wDTA system. Raman scattering measurement revealed that the dehydrogenation process lowers the hydrogen content through disappearance of the peak intensity at 2000 cm-1. The a-Si:H film was transformed into nanocrystallized Si with lower residual stress. The major advantage of this wDTA was the large area uniformity of the thermal and the resulting material properties for 8 generation display. The uniform material characteristics of the hydrogen content, thickness, energy bandgap, and transmittance of the annealed Si films in the overall area was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and UV-vis spectrometer measurement.

  18. A dynamical systems' approach for the contact-line singularity in thin-film flows

    CERN Document Server

    Belgacem, Fethi Ben; Kuehn, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in a complete characterization of the contact-line singularity of thin-film flows for zero and nonzero contact angles. By treating the model problem of source-type self-similar solutions, we demonstrate that this singularity can be understood by the study of invariant manifolds of a suitable dynamical system. In particular, we prove regularity results for singular expansions near the contact line for a wide class of mobility exponents and for zero and nonzero dynamic contact angles. Key points are the reduction to center manifolds and identifying resonance conditions at equilibrium points. The results are extended to radially-symmetric source-type solutions in higher dimensions. Furthermore, we give dynamical systems' proofs for the existence and uniqueness of self-similar droplet solutions in the nonzero dynamic contact-angle case.

  19. The effect of surfaces on molecular ordering in thin liquid-crystal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.; JeŻewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical method for analyzing the interplay between pair long-range intermolecular forces and nonlocal, relatively short-range, surface interactions in liquid crystals, confined between plates of thin planar cells, is developed. It is shown that this method, as involving the concept of local orientational and translational order parameters, enables detailed investigations of the emergence of smectic A, nematic, and isotopic phases, as well as yields an insight into phase transitions between them, in cases of systems strongly affected by surfaces. The evidence of various surface effects, including the coexistence of different phases and the inward propagation of surface melting under the increase of temperature, is also given. The underlying numerical procedure, based on the algorithm of self-consistent calculations of local order parameters, is found to be very effective, allowing one to consider model systems of rather large thicknesses, corresponding to thicknesses of real sample cells.

  20. Significantly improved electrochemical hydrogen storage properties of magnesium nickel hydride modified with nano-nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Yunfeng; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jiguang; Li, Menghuai; Li, Liquan

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) used as negative electrode material in nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) secondary battery is modified by nano-nickel via mechanical milling. In this paper, we systematically investigate the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the modified system with different milling durations. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses confirm the amorphous transformation of Mg2Ni-based hydride and a novel NiH0.75 nanocrystalline with a diameter of about 5 nm embedding or covering on the surface of the base particle has been observed. Its formation mechanism and positive effects on electrochemical properties of the Mg2NiH4 have also been elaborated. Electrochemical measurements show that the 5 h milled composite possesses markedly increased discharge capacity up to 896 mAh g-1. With prolonging the milling duration from 5 h to 40 h, the discharge capacity at the 10th cycle increases from 99 mAh g-1 to 359 mAh g-1. Besides, the discharging procedure changes from stepwise processes to one single-step process with increasing the milling duration. Tafel polarization test shows that the nano-nickel modified system exhibits a much better anti-corrosion ability during charging/discharging cycles. Meanwhile, both the charge-transfer reaction on the alloy surface and hydrogen diffusion inside the alloy bulk are enhanced with nano-nickel modification.

  1. First-principles study on structural stability of 3d transition metal alloying magnesium hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method based on the density functional theory was used to investigate the energy and electronic structure of magnesium hydride (MgH2) alloyed by 3d transition metal elements. Through calculations of the negative heat formation of magnesium hydride alloyed by X (X denotes 3d transition metal) element, it is found that when a little X (not including Sc) dissolves into magnesium hydride, the structural stability of alloying systems decreases, which indicates that the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 can be improved. After comparing the densities of states(DOS) and the charge distribution of MgH2 with or without X alloying, it is found that the improvement for the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 alloyed by X attributes to the fact that the weakened bonding between magnesium and hydrogen is caused by the stronger interactions between X (not including Cu) and hydrogen. The calculation results of the improvement for the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2-X (X=Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co,Ni, Cu) systems are in agreement with the experimental results. Hence, the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 are expected to be improved by addition of Cr, Zn alloying elements.

  2. Multiphysics phase field modeling of hydrogen diffusion and delta-hydride precipitation in alpha-zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokisaari, Andrea M.

    Hydride precipitation in zirconium is a significant factor limiting the lifetime of nuclear fuel cladding, because hydride microstructures play a key role in the degradation of fuel cladding. However, the behavior of hydrogen in zirconium has typically been modeled using mean field approaches, which do not consider microstructural evolution. This thesis describes a quantitative microstructural evolution model for the alpha-zirconium/delta-hydride system and the associated numerical methods and algorithms that were developed. The multiphysics, phase field-based model incorporates CALPHAD free energy descriptions, linear elastic solid mechanics, and classical nucleation theory. A flexible simulation software implementing the model, Hyrax, is built on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) finite element framework. Hyrax is open-source and freely available; moreover, the numerical methods and algorithms that have been developed are generalizable to other systems. The algorithms are described in detail, and verification studies for each are discussed. In addition, analyses of the sensitivity of the simulation results to the choice of numerical parameters are presented. For example, threshold values for the CALPHAD free energy algorithm and the use of mesh and time adaptivity when employing the nucleation algorithm are studied. Furthermore, preliminary insights into the nucleation behavior of delta-hydrides are described. These include a) the sensitivities of the nucleation rate to temperature, interfacial energy, composition and elastic energy, b) the spatial variation of the nucleation rate around a single precipitate, and c) the effect of interfacial energy and nucleation rate on the precipitate microstructure. Finally, several avenues for future work are discussed. Topics encompass the terminal solid solubility hysteresis of hydrogen in zirconium and the effects of the alpha/delta interfacial energy, as well as thermodiffusion, plasticity

  3. Acute arsenious hydride intoxication. Four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosselin, B.; Mathieu, D.; Desprez-Nolf, M.; Cosson, A.; Goudemand, J.; Haguenoer, J.M.; Wattel, F.

    1982-02-06

    While engaged in the repair of a zinc furnace, 4 workers were accidentally exposed to arsenious hydride (AsH3) fumes. Acute intravascular haemolysis developed within a few hours. On admission, the patients immediately underwent exsanguino-transfusion; 8.2 to 10.2 l of blood were exchanged through a continuous perfusion pump at the rate of 1 l/hour. Two patients resumed diuresis during transfusion, but the other two required repeated haemodialysis. Between the 10th and 30th days, while renal function was gradually returning to normal, mildly megaloblastic anaemia developed. This was followed during the 3rd month by clinical and electric signs of polyneuritis of the lower and upper limbs, which subsequently regressed. Regular measurements of arsenic levels in the blood and urine were performed between and during exsanguino-transfusion and haemodialysis.

  4. Hydrogen desorption from nanostructured magnesium hydride composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brdarić Tanja P.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of 3d transition metal addition (Fe, Co and Ni on the desorption properties of magnesium hydride were studied. The ball milling of MgH2-3d metal blends was performed under Ar. Microstructural and morphological characterization were performed by XRD and SEM analysis, while the hydrogen desorption properties were investigated by DSC. The results show a strong correlation between the morphology and thermal stability of the composites. The complex desorption behavior (the existence of more than one desorption peak was correlated with the dispersion of the metal additive particles that appear to play the main role in the desorption. The desorption temperature can be reduced by more than 100 degrees if Fe is added as additive. The activation energy for H2 desorption from the MgH2-Fe composite is 120 kJ/mol, implying that diffusion controls the dehydration process.

  5. Review of magnesium hydride-based materials: development and optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivello, J. -C.; Dam, B.; Denys, R. V.; Dornheim, M.; Grant, D. M.; Huot, J.; Jensen, T. R.; de Jongh, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372; Latroche, M.; Milanese, C.; Milcius, D.; Walker, G. S.; Webb, C. J.; Zlotea, C.; Yartys, V. A.

    Magnesium hydride has been studied extensively for applications as a hydrogen storage material owing to the favourable cost and high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. However, its high enthalpy of decomposition necessitates high working temperatures for hydrogen desorption while the

  6. Direct observation of hydrides formation in cavity-grade niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Barkov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Niobium is an important technological superconductor used to make radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. Using laser confocal microscopy we have directly investigated hydride precipitates formation in cavity-grade niobium at 77 and 140 K. We have found that large hydrides were usually formed after chemical or mechanical treatments, which are known to lead to a strong degradation of the quality factor known as Q disease. From our experiments we can conclude that hydrides causing Q disease are islands with a characteristic thickness of ≳100  nm and in-plane dimensions 1–10  μm. Our results show that mechanical polishing uploads a lot of hydrogen into bulk niobium while electropolishing leads to a mild contamination. Vacuum treatments at 600–800°C are demonstrated to preclude large hydride formation in line with the absence of Q disease in similarly treated cavities.

  7. Structure and bonding of second-row hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Blinder, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The atomic orbitals, hybridization and chemical bonding of the most common hydrides of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are described. This can be very instructive for beginning students in chemistry and chemical physics.

  8. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-07

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  9. Out-of-pile accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy fasteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    Mechanical joints between Zircaloy and nickel-bearing alloys, mainly the Zircaloy-4/Inconel-600 combination, were exposed to water at 450/sup 0/F and 520/sup 0/F to study hydriding of Zircaloy in contact with a dissimilar metal. Accelerated hydriding of the Zircaloy occurred at both temperatures. At 450/sup 0/F the dissolved hydrogen level of the water was over ten times that at 520/sup 0/F. At 520/sup 0/F the initially high hydrogen ingress rate decreased rapidly as exposure time increased and was effectively shut off in about 25 days. Severely hydrided Zircaloy components successfully withstood thermal cycling and mechanical testing. Chromium plating of the nickel-bearing parts was found to be an effective and practical barrier in preventing nickel-alloy smearing and accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy.

  10. High color fidelity thin film multilayer systems for head-up display use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Yi-Jen D.; Ho, Fang C.

    1996-09-01

    Head-up display is gaining increasing access in automotive vehicles for indication and position/navigation purposes. An optical combiner, which allows the driver to receive image information from outside and inside of the automobile, is the essential part of this display device. Two multilayer thin film combiner coating systems with distinctive polarization selectivity and broad band spectral neutrality are discussed. One of the coating systems was designed to be located at the lower portion of the windshield. The coating reduced the exterior glare by approximately 45% and provided about 70% average see-through transmittance in addition to the interior information display. The other coating system was designed to be integrated with the sunshield located at the upper portion of the windshield. The coating reflected the interior information display while reducing direct sunlight penetration to 25%. Color fidelity for both interior and exterior images were maintained in both systems. This facilitated the display of full-color maps. Both coating systems were absorptionless and environmentally durable. Designs, fabrication, and performance of these coating systems are addressed.

  11. Atomically modified thin interface in metal-dielectric hetero-integrated systems: control of electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kenji; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2017-04-01

    We have performed first-principles studies of the electronic properties of Cu-diamond hetero-integrated systems, particularly placing emphasis on elucidating the effects of surface modification of diamond with H or O. It is found that the electronic properties crucially depend on the chemical compositions of the modified atomically thin interface region. The local density of states (LDOS) of the H-terminated diamond moiety near the Cu surface exhibits a clearly different distribution from that near the vacuum region, whereas the LDOS of the O-terminated diamond is almost independent of the Cu deposition. In other words, the effects of the electronic interactions between Cu and diamond on the electronic properties in the interface region are readily controlled by surface modification with only one atomic (i.e. H or O) layer. Electric field (EF) effects on the Cu-diamond systems also strongly depend on the electronic details, i.e. atomistic modification in the interface regions. In particular, at the interface between the H-terminated diamond moiety and the vacuum region, its conduction band energy is strongly affected by an applied EF much more than the valence band energy; that is, the band gap can be varied with an applied EF. The band gap variation is found to be attributed to an atomistic level difference in the spatial extension of the valence and conduction bands and thus is not explained with a macroscopic band diagram model. It has been demonstrated that the electronic properties of hetero-integrated systems are described and controlled well by carefully designing atomically thin interface regions.

  12. Ab-Initio Study of the Group 2 Hydride Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.; Manship, Daniel R.

    2013-06-01

    The beryllium hydride (BeH)- dimer has recently been shown to be surprisingly strongly bound, with an electronic structure which is highly dependent on internuclear separation. At the equilibrium distance, the negative charge is to be found on the beryllium atom, despite the higher electronegativity of the hydrogen. The current study expands this investigation to the other Group 2 hydrides, and attempts to explain these effects. M. Verdicchio, G. L. Bendazzoli, S. Evangelisti, T. Leininger J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, 192, (2013)

  13. Suppression of the critical temperature in binary vanadium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, M.D., E-mail: michael.dolan@csiro.au [CSIRO Energy Technology, 1 Technology Court, Pullenvale, QLD 4069 (Australia); McLennan, K.G. [CSIRO Energy Technology, 1 Technology Court, Pullenvale, QLD 4069 (Australia); Chandra, D. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Kochanek, M.A. [CSIRO Energy Technology, 1 Technology Court, Pullenvale, QLD 4069 (Australia); Song, G. [CSIRO Process Science and Engineering, Gate 4, Normanby Rd, Clayton, VIC 3168 (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Addition of 10 mol% Cr to V increases the β-hydride T{sub C} to >200 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Ni to V increases the β-hydride T{sub C} to >400 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Al to V decreases the β-hydride T{sub C} to <30 °C. • V{sub 90}Al{sub 10} membrane can be cycled to <30 °C under H{sub 2} without β-hydride formation. -- Abstract: The tendency of vanadium-based alloy membranes to embrittle is the biggest commercialisation barrier for this hydrogen separation technology. Excessive hydrogen absorption and the α → β hydride transition both contribute to brittle failure of these membranes. Alloying is known to reduce absorption, but the influence of alloying on hydride phase formation under conditions relevant to membrane operation has not been studied in great detail previously. Here, the effect of Cr, Ni, and Al alloying additions on V–H phase equilibrium has been studied using hydrogen absorption measurements and in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The addition of 10 mol% Ni increases the critical temperature for α + β hydride formation to greater than 400 °C, compared to 170 °C for V. Cr also increases the critical temperature, to between 200 and 300 °C. The addition of 10 mol% Al, however, suppresses the critical temperature to less than 30 °C, thereby enabling this material to be cycled thermally and hydrostatically while precluding formation of the β-hydride phase. This is despite Al also decreasing hydrogen absorption. The implication of this finding is that one of the mechanisms of brittle failure in vanadium-based hydrogen-selective membranes has been eliminated, thereby increasing the robustness of this material relative to V.

  14. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  15. Method of selective reduction of halodisilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, John J.; Sharp, Kenneth G.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and sequential reduction of halodisilanes by reacting these compounds at room temperature or below with trialkyltin hydrides or dialkyltin dihydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. The alkyltin hydrides selectively and sequentially reduce the Si-Cl, Si-Br or Si-I bonds while leaving intact the Si-Si and Si-F bonds present.

  16. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  17. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  18. Standardized hydrogen storage module with high utilization factor based on metal hydride-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Inga; Dieterich, Mila; Pohlmann, Carsten; Röntzsch, Lars; Linder, Marc

    2017-02-01

    In view of hydrogen based backup power systems or small-scale power2gas units, hydrogen storages based on metal hydrides offer a safe and reliable solution. By using Hydralloy C5 as suitable hydride forming alloy, the present tank design guarantees very simple operating conditions: pressures between 4 bar and 30 bar, temperatures between 15 °C and 40 °C and minimal efforts for thermal management in combination with fast and constant charging and discharging capabilities. The modular tank consists of 4 layers with 5 reactor tubes each that are filled with metal hydride-graphite composites of a diameter of 21 mm. Experiments show that each layer of this tank is able to desorb the desired amount of hydrogen for a fuel cell operation at electrical power of 160 Wel for 100 min reaching a utilization factor of 93% of the stored hydrogen at RC. Furthermore, the experimental results of modularity, increasing loads and the electric air ventilation are presented.

  19. Coenzyme binding and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin/flavodoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Ana; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Goñi, Guillermina; Medina, Milagros; Hermoso, Juan A; Carrillo, Néstor; Cortez, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases catalyse the reversible hydride/electron exchange between NADP(H) and ferredoxin/flavodoxin, comprising a structurally defined family of flavoenzymes with two distinct subclasses. Those present in Gram-negative bacteria (FPRs) display turnover numbers of 1-5 s(-1) while the homologues of cyanobacteria and plants (FNRs) developed a 100-fold activity increase. We investigated nucleotide interactions and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus FPR comparing them to those reported for FNRs. NADP(H) binding proceeds as in FNRs with stacking of the nicotinamide on the flavin, which resulted in formation of charge-transfer complexes prior to hydride exchange. The affinity of FPR for both NADP(H) and 2'-P-AMP was 100-fold lower than that of FNRs. The crystal structure of FPR in complex with 2'-P-AMP and NADP(+) allowed modelling of the adenosine ring system bound to the protein, whereas the nicotinamide portion was either not visible or protruding toward solvent in different obtained crystals. Stabilising contacts with the active site residues are different in the two reductase classes. We conclude that evolution to higher activities in FNRs was partially favoured by modification of NADP(H) binding in the initial complexes through changes in the active site residues involved in stabilisation of the adenosine portion of the nucleotide and in the mobile C-terminus of FPR.

  20. Uranium and thorium hydride complexes as multielectron reductants: a combined neutron diffraction and quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Daniel J; Stewart, Timothy J; Bau, Robert; Miller, Kevin A; Mason, Sax A; Gutmann, Matthias; McIntyre, Garry J; Gagliardi, Laura; Evans, William J

    2012-03-19

    The unusual uranium reaction system in which uranium(4+) and uranium(3+) hydrides interconvert by formal bimetallic reductive elimination and oxidative addition reactions, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)UH(2)](2) (1) ⇌ [(C(5)Me(5))(2)UH](2) (2) + H(2), was studied by employing multiconfigurational quantum chemical and density functional theory methods. 1 can act as a formal four-electron reductant, releasing H(2) gas as the byproduct of four H(2)/H(-) redox couples. The calculated structures for both reactants and products are in good agreement with the X-ray diffraction data on 2 and 1 and the neutron diffraction data on 1 obtained under H(2) pressure as part of this study. The interconversion of the uranium(4+) and uranium(3+) hydride species was calculated to be near thermoneutral (~-2 kcal/mol). Comparison with the unknown thorium analogue, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)ThH](2), shows that the thorium(4+) to thorium(3+) hydride interconversion reaction is endothermic by 26 kcal/mol.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Pneumatic Artificial Muscle Actuation via Hydrogen Driving Metal Hydride-LaNi5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative understanding of mechanical actuation of intricate Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuators is technically required in control system design for effective real-time implementation.This paper presents mathematical modeling of the PAM driven by hydrogen-gas pressure due to absorption and desorption of metal hydride.Empirical models of both mechanical actuation of industrial PAM and chemical reaction of the metal hydride-LaNi5 are derived systematically where their interactions comply with the continuity principle and energy balance in describing actual dynamic behaviors of the PAM actuator (PAM and hydriding/dehydriding-reaction bed).Simulation studies of mechanical actuation under various loads are conducted so as to present dynamic responses of the PAM actuators.From the promising results,it is intriguing that the heat input for the PAM actuator can be supplied to,or pumped from the reaction bed,in such a way that absorption and desorption of hydrogen gas take place,respectively,in controlling the pressure of hydrogen gas within the PAM actuator.Accordingly,this manipulation results in desired mechanical actuation of the PAM actuator in practical uses.

  2. Metallographic and fractographic observations of hydrides during delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5% Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, M.T.; Eadie, R.L. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Shek, G.K.; Seahra, H. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-01-01

    Potential drop measurements, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were performed to study the mechanism of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), the relation of the fracture to the hydride morphology, and the fractography of the DHC mechanism. The material used in this study was taken from modified extrusions of the material used to manufacture Zr-2.5% Nb pressure tubes. The material was electrolytically hydrided to approximately 60 {micro}g/g before testing. Cracking tests were carried out at 250 C with an applied K{sub 1} of 12 MPa {radical}m. The number of potential jumps was strongly correlated to the number of striations on the fracture surface. The results indicate that the DHC process occurs in these samples in an intermittent fashion. Brittle fracture is the operating fracture mechanism for the hydrides that cover most of the fracture surface, but there are some regions of ductile fracture both within the fracture and at the striations.

  3. Charged-particle acceleration through laser irradiation of thin foils at Prague Asterix Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Maria; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Musumeci, Paolo; Calcagno, Lucia; Wolowski, Jerzy; Rosinski, Marcin; Zaras-Szydlowska, Agnieszka; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Velyhan, Andreiy

    2014-05-01

    Thin foils, 0.5-50 μm in thickness, have been irradiated in vacuum at Prague Asterix Laser System in Prague using 1015-16 W cm-2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different focal positions. Produced plasmas from metals and polymers films have been monitored in the forward and backward directions. Ion and electron accelerations have been investigated by using Thomson parabola spectrometer, x-ray streak camera, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors, the latter employed in time-of-flight configuration. Ion acceleration up to about 3 MeV per charge state was measured in the forward direction. Ion and electron emissions were detected at different angles as a function of the irradiation conditions.

  4. Thin Double-gap RPCs for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the CMS Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kyong Sei

    2017-01-01

    High-sensitive double-gap phenolic Resistive Plate Chambers are studied for the Phase-2 upgrade of the CMS muon system at high pseudorapidity $\\eta$. Whereas the present CMS RPCs have a gas gap thickness of 2 mm, we propose to use thinner gas gaps, which will improve the performance of these RPCs. To validate this proposal, we constructed double-gap RPCs with two different gap thicknesses of 1.2 and 1.4 mm using high-pressure laminated plates having a mean resistivity of about 5 $\\times$ 10$^{10}$ $\\Omega$-cm. This paper presents test results using cosmic muons and $^{137}$Cs gamma rays. The rate capabilities of these thin-gap RPCs measured with the gamma source exceed the maximum rate expected in the new high-$\\eta$ endcap RPCs planned for future Phase-2 runs of LHC.

  5. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law fluid in an Eulerian coordinate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁; 白玉川

    2016-01-01

    The mass transport velocity in a thin layer of muddy fluid is studied theoretically. The mud motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free surface, and the mud is described by a power-law model. Based on the key assumptions of the shallowness and the small deformation, a perturbation analysis is conducted up to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity in an Eulerian coordinate system. The numerical iteration method is adopted to solve these non-linear equations of the leading order. From the numerical results, both the first-order flow fields and the second-order mass transport velocities are examined. The verifications are made by comparing the numerical results with experimental results in the literature, and a good agreement is confirmed.

  6. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rasooli; M A Boutorabi; M Divandari; A Azarniya

    2013-04-01

    DTA and TGA curves of titanium hydride powder were determined in air at different heating rates. Also the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into consideration. A great breakthrough of the practical interest in the research was the depiction of the H2-time curves of TiH2 powder at various temperatures in air. In accordance with the results, an increase in heating rate to higher degrees does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, following the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in titanium lattice, thin layers TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process. On the contrary, from 700 °C later on, the process is controlled by oxidation of titanium hydride powder. In fact, the powder oxidation starts around 650 °C and may escalate following an increase in the heating rate too.

  7. Trialkylborane-Assisted CO(2) Reduction by Late Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2011-01-01

    Trialkylborane additives promote reduction of CO(2) to formate by bis(diphosphine) Ni(II) and Rh(III) hydride complexes. The late transition metal hydrides, which can be formed from dihydrogen, transfer hydride to CO(2) to give a formate-borane adduct. The borane must be of appropriate Lewis acidity: weaker acids do not show significant hydride transfer enhancement, while stronger acids abstract hydride without CO(2) reduction. The mechanism likely involves a pre-equilibrium hydride transfer followed by formation of a stabilizing formate-borane adduct.

  8. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  9. Design and development of an in-line sputtering system and process development of thin film multilayer neutron supermirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, A.; Sampathkumar, R.; Kumar, Ajaya; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lagoo, K. D.; Veerapur, R. D.; Padmanabhan, M.; Puri, R. K. [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhattacharya, Debarati; Singh, Surendra; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Neutron supermirrors and supermirror polarizers are thin film multilayer based devices which are used for reflecting and polarizing neutrons in various neutron based experiments. In the present communication, the in-house development of a 9 m long in-line dc sputtering system has been described which is suitable for deposition of neutron supermirrors on large size (1500 mm × 150 mm) substrates and in large numbers. The optimisation process of deposition of Co and Ti thin film, Co/Ti periodic multilayers, and a-periodic supermirrors have also been described. The system has been used to deposit thin film multilayer supermirror polarizers which show high reflectivity up to a reasonably large critical wavevector transfer of ∼0.06 Å{sup −1} (corresponding to m = 2.5, i.e., 2.5 times critical wavevector transfer of natural Ni). The computer code for designing these supermirrors has also been developed in-house.

  10. Validation of a pulsed eddy current system for measuring wall thinning through insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Colin R.; de Raad, Jan A.

    1996-11-01

    There have been several failures in power plant feedwater piping systems due to wall thinning caused by flow- accelerated corrosion of the inner surface. Detection of wastage in susceptible pipes is costly as traditional NDE methods such as ultrasonic testing entail removal and reinstallation of insulation over many meters of pipework. Radiography is one solution to this problem, but it is slow to apply and requires careful attention to safety. The RTD Incotest system uses pulsed eddy current technology to measure pipewall thickness through insulation and external cladding. The technology has been licensed from Arco, Inc., who originally developed the technique for large diameter pipelines and storage tanks where the area interrogated was made deliberately large. This paper describes an optimized Incotest systems which can detect and measure internal or external wall wastage which is more localized and typical of flow-accelerated corrosion. Improvements have also been made to the inspection and data acquisition in order to increase the inspection rate and overall productivity. Ultimately the performance of the optimized Incotest system has been verified on samples which contain artificial and real corrosion.

  11. Designing metal hydride complexes for water splitting reactions: a molecular electrostatic potential approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, K S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-08-28

    The hydridic character of octahedral metal hydride complexes of groups VI, VII and VIII has been systematically studied using molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography. The absolute minimum of MESP at the hydride ligand (Vmin) and the MESP value at the hydride nucleus (VH) are found to be very good measures of the hydridic character of the hydride ligand. The increasing/decreasing electron donating feature of the ligand environment is clearly reflected in the increasing/decreasing negative character of Vmin and VH. The formation of an outer sphere metal hydride-water complex showing the HH dihydrogen interaction is supported by the location and the value of Vmin near the hydride ligand. A higher negative MESP suggested lower activation energy for H2 elimination. Thus, MESP features provided a way to fine-tune the ligand environment of a metal-hydride complex to achieve high hydridicity for the hydride ligand. The applicability of an MESP based hydridic descriptor in designing water splitting reactions is tested for group VI metal hydride model complexes of tungsten.

  12. Effect of sodium cation on metallacycle β-hydride elimination in CO2-ethylene coupling to acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Dong; Williard, Paul G; Hazari, Nilay; Bernskoetter, Wesley H

    2014-03-10

    The catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide and olefins into acrylates has been a long standing target, because society attempts to synthesize commodity chemicals in a more economical and sustainable fashion. Although nickel complexes have been known to successfully couple CO2 and ethylene for decades, a key β-hydride elimination step has proven a major obstacle to the development of a catalytic process. Recent studies have shown that Lewis acid additives can be used to create a lower-energy pathway for β-hydride elimination and facilitate a low number of catalytic turnovers. However, the exact manner, in which the Lewis acid promotes β-hydride elimination remains to be elucidated. Herein, we describe the kinetic and thermodynamic role that commercially relevant and weakly Lewis acidic sodium salts play in promoting β-hydride elimination from nickelalactones synthesized from CO2 and ethylene. This process is compared to a non-Lewis acid promoted pathway, and DFT calculations were used to identify differences between the two systems. The sodium-free isomerization reaction gave a rare CO2 -derived β-nickelalactone complex, which was structurally characterized.

  13. Structure and microdomain structure of ordered niobium hydrides and deuterides by means of neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung]|[Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66123, Saarbruecken (Germany); Hempelmann, R. [Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66123, Saarbruecken (Germany); Udovic, T.J.; Rush, J.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kockelmann, W.; Jansen, E.; Schaefer, W. [Institut fuer Mineralogie der Universitaet Bonn, Aussenstelle Juelich, 52425, Juelich (Germany); Richter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung

    1997-05-20

    Extensive high-resolution vibrational density of states measurements have been performed on ordered niobium hydrides and deuterides by means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS). The investigations show a splitting of the hydrogen vibrational modes into a two-peak system in the case of the {epsilon}-phase and a three-peak system in the case of the {lambda}-phase. These different peak systems can be assigned to different hydrogen sites, which is further confirmed by neutron diffraction (ND) data. (orig.) 5 refs.

  14. Hydriding and Dehydriding Properties of Zinc Borohydride, Nickel, and Titanium-Added Magnesium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Jun; Kwon, Sung Nam; Song, Myoung Youp [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    A Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} sample was prepared by milling ZnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} in a planetary ball mill under Ar gas. This sample contained NaCl. Then, 90 wt% MgH{sub 2}-5 wt% Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5 wt% Ni-2.5 wt% Ti samples [named 90MgH{sub 2}-5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni-2.5Ti] were prepared by milling in a planetary ball mill under H{sub 2} gas. The hydrogen absorption and release properties of the prepared samples were investigated. In particular, the variations of the initial hydriding and dehydriding rates with temperature were examined. SEM micrographs and XRD patterns of 90MgH{sub 2}-5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni-2.5Ti after reactive mechanical grinding and after hydriding-dehydriding were also studied. Particle size distributions and BET specific surface areas of 90MgH{sub 2}-5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni-2.5Ti after reactive mechanical grinding and after 11 hydriding-dehydriding cycles were analyzed. The 90MgH{sub 2}-5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni-2.5Ti had an effective hydrogen storage capacity (the quantity of hydrogen absorbed for 60 min) of near 5 wt% (4.91 wt% at 593 K).

  15. Fluorite transition metal hydride induced destabilization of the MgH2 system in MgH2/TMH2 multilayers ( TM=Sc , Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr, Nb, La, Hf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, S. X.; Notten, P. H. L.; van Santen, R. A.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2010-09-01

    The structural changes in MgH2 induced by contact with fluorite transition metal hydrides ( TMH2 , TM=Sc , Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr, Nb, La, Hf) have been studied using density-functional theory calculations. Models of MgH2(rutile)/TiH2(fluorite) and MgH2(fluorite)/TiH2(fluorite) multilayers with different Mg:TM ratios have been designed. With a fixed thickness of the TMH2 layer, structure transformation of MgH2 from rutile to fluorite occurs with a decrease in thickness of the MgH2 layer. The hydrogen desorption energy from the fluorite MgH2 layer in the multilayers is significantly lower than that of the bulk rutile MgH2 . The structural deformation of the MgH2 layer due to the strain induced by TMH2 is found to be responsible for the destabilization of the Mg-H bond: the more structural deformation, the more destabilization of the Mg-H. Our results provide an important insight for the development of new hydrogen-storage materials with desirable thermodynamic properties.

  16. Hydrogen storage of a novel combined system of LiNH2-NaMgH3: synergistic effects of in situ formed alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Fang, Fang; Song, Yun; Li, Yuesheng; Sun, Dalin; Zheng, Shiyou; Bendersky, Leonid A; Zhang, Qingan; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min

    2013-02-07

    Bimetallic hydride NaMgH(3) is used for the first time as a vehicle to enhance hydrogen release and uptake from LiNH(2). The combination of NaMgH(3) with LiNH(2) at a molar ratio of 1 : 2 can release about 4.0 wt% of hydrogen without detectable NH(3) emission in the temperature range of 45 °C to 325 °C and exhibiting superior dehydrogenation as compared to individual NaH and/or MgH(2) combined with LiNH(2). A high capacity retention of about 75% resulting from the introduction of NaMgH(3) is also achieved in LiNH(2) as well as re-hydrogenation under milder conditions of 180 °C and 5 MPa H(2) pressure. These significant improvements are attributed to synergistic effects of in situ formed NaH and MgH(2)via the decomposition of NaMgH(3) where a succession of competing reactions from the cyclic consumption/recovery of NaH are involved and serve as a "carrier" for the ultra-rapid conveyance of the N-containing species between the [NH(2)](-) amide and the resulting [NH](2-) imide complexes.

  17. Random walk model of subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz

    2015-02-01

    We consider in this paper subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane. The subdiffusion parameters are the same in both parts of the system separated by the membrane. Using the random walk model with discrete time and space variables the probabilities (Green's functions) P(x,t) describing a particle's random walk are found. The membrane, which can be asymmetrical, is characterized by the two probabilities of stopping a random walker by the membrane when it tries to pass through the membrane in both opposite directions. Green's functions are transformed to the system in which the variables are continuous, and then the membrane permeability coefficients are given by special formulas which involve the probabilities mentioned above. From the obtained Green's functions, we derive boundary conditions at the membrane. One of the conditions demands the continuity of a flux at the membrane, but the other one is rather unexpected and contains the Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative P(x(N)(-),t)=λ(1)P(x(N)(+),t)+λ(2)∂(α/2)P(x(N)(+),t)/∂t(α/2), where λ(1),λ(2) depending on membrane permeability coefficients (λ(1)=1 for a symmetrical membrane), α is a subdiffusion parameter, and x(N) is the position of the membrane. This boundary condition shows that the additional "memory effect," represented by the fractional derivative, is created by the membrane. This effect is also created by the membrane for a normal diffusion case in which α=1.

  18. A continuum framework for grain boundary diffusion in thin film/substrate systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayas, Can; van der Giessen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional continuum model is developed for stress relaxation in thin films through grain boundary (GB) diffusion. When a thin film with columnar grains is subjected to thermal stress, stress gradients along the GBs are relaxed by diffusion of material from the film surface into the GBs. The

  19. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  20. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  1. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  2. Thin soil layer of green roof systems studied by X-Ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šácha, Jan; Jelínková, Vladimíra; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-04-01

    The popular non-invasive visualization technique of X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been used for 3D examination of thin soil layer of vegetated roof systems. The two categories of anthropogenic soils, usually used for green roof systems, were scanned during the first months after green roof system construction. First was represented by stripped topsoil with admixed crushed bricks and was well graded in terms of particle size distribution. The other category represented a commercial lightweight technogenic substrate. The undisturbed soil samples of total volume of 62.8 ccm were studied be means of X-ray Computed Tomography using X-ray Inspection System GE Phoenix Nanomex 180T with resulting spatial resolution about 57 μm in all directions. For both soil categories visible macroporosity, connectivity (described by the Euler characteristic), dimensionless connectivity and critical cross section of pore network were determined. Moreover, the temporal structural changes of studied soils were discussed together with heat and water regime of the green roof system. The analysis of CT images of anthropogenic soils was problematic due to the different X-ray attenuation of individual constituents. The correct determination of the threshold image intensity differentiating the soil constituents from the air phase had substantial importance for soil pore network analyses. However, X-ray CT derived macroporosity profiles reveal significant temporal changes notably in the soil comprised the stripped topsoil with admixed crushed bricks. The results implies that the technogenic substrate is structurally more stable over time compared to the stripped topsoil. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  3. Easy calibration method of vision system for in-situ measurement of strain of thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hyub PARK; Dong-Joong KANG; Myung-Soo SHIN; Sung-Jo LIM; Son-Cheol YU; Kwang-Soo LEE; Jong-Eun HA; Sung-Hoon CHOA

    2009-01-01

    An easy calibration method was presented for in-situ measurement of displacement in the order of nanometer during micro-tensile test for thin films by using CCD camera as a sensing device. The calibration of the sensing camera in the system is a central element part to measure displacement in the order of nanometer using images taken with the camera. This was accomplished by modeling the optical projection through the camera lens and relative locations between the object and camera in 3D space. A set of known 3D points on a plane where the film is located on is projected to an image plane as input data. These points, known as a calibration points, are then used to estimate the projection parameters of the camera. In the measurement system of the micro-scale by CCD camera, the calibration data acquisition and one-to-one matching steps between the image and 3D planes need precise data extraction procedures and repetitive user's operation to calibrate the measuring devices. The lack of the robust image feature extraction and easy matching prevent the practical use of these methods. A data selection method was proposed to overcome these limitations and offer an easy and convenient calibration of a vision system that has the CCD camera and the 3D reference plane with calibration marks of circular type on the surface of the plane. The method minimizes the user's intervention such as the fine tuning of illumination system and provides an efficient calibration method of the vision system for in-situ axial displacement measurement of the micro-tensile materials.

  4. Automated screening versus manual screening: a comparison of the ThinPrep imaging system and manual screening in a time study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schledermann, Doris; Hyldebrandt, Tina; Ejersbo, Dorthe;

    2007-01-01

    The ThinPrep Imaging System (TIS) is an automated system that assists cytotechnologists in the primary screening of ThinPrep liquid based cervical samples. Between June 1, 2004, and April 1, 2005, four experienced cytotechnologists participated in the study in which the duration of the screening ...

  5. Dynamical systems analysis of electrostatic and aerodynamic forced vibrations of a thin flexible electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanu, Sushma Bala

    Transverse vibrations of an electrostatically actuated thin flexible cantilever perturbed by low-speed air flow is studied using both experiments and numerical modeling. In the experiments the dynamic characteristics of the cantilever are studied by supplying a DC voltage with an AC component for electrostatic forcing and a constant uniform air flow around the cantilever system for aerodynamic forcing. The maximum voltage applied varies from 1 - 9 kV and air flow speeds range from 0.224 - 3.58 m/s (0.5 - 8 mile/hr). The Reynolds numbers for these speeds lie in the range of 1000 - 20000. A range of control parameters leading to stable vibrations are established using the Strouhal number as the operating parameter whose inverse values change from 100 - 2500. The Numerical results are validated with experimental results. Assuming the amplitude of vibrations are small, then a non-linear dynamic Euler-Bernoulli beam equation with viscous damping and gravitational effects is used to model the vibrations of the dynamical system. Aerodynamic forcing is modeled as a temporally sinusoidal and uniform force acting perpendicular to the beam length. The forcing amplitude is found to be proportional to square of air flow velocity by obtaining relationship between the experimental amplitude of vibrations and air flow velocity. Numerical results strongly agree with those of experiments predicting accurate vibration amplitudes, displacement frequency and quasi-periodic displacements of the cantilever tip.

  6. Data acquisition and processing system for drug release characterization by thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, J P; Greer, R; Carlson, D

    1989-01-01

    Samples of an antibiotic released from an ocular insert in an in vitro test are characterized by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Conventional characterization methods include cutting and weighing strip chart paper peak profiles obtained with a scanning densitometer for spotted TLC plates, and relating peaks for unknowns to peaks for standards on the basis of relative weights. A data collection and processing system is described in which the data collection and processing is highly automated utilizing a specially developed software program. A Kontes densitometer (Model 800) and a personal computer (IBM PC-AT or Zenith-248) are interfaced using a Keithley 570 data acquisition system. Two BASIC software programs were developed to provide quantitative evaluation of chromatograms of an antibiotic (tylosin tartrate); the first program generates chromatograms on the computer screen through initiating controlled operation of a scanning densitometer for TLC plate analysis, and the second program processes the data providing quantitative analysis of the spectral output through a peak detection and peak integration routine. The approach represents a new general, versatile, quick and effective method to characterize TLC samples for various numbers of peaks for unknowns and standards for different concentration levels.

  7. Asymptotic solutions for buckling delamination induced crack propagation in the thin film-compliant substrate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqing Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a thin film-substrate system in-plane compressive stress is commonly generated in the film due to thermal mismatch in operation or fabrication process. If the stress exceeds a critical value, part of the film may buckle out of plane along the defective interface. After buckling delamination, the interface crack at the ends may propagate. In the whole process, the compliance of the substrate compared with the film plays an important role. In this work, we study a circular film subject to compressive stress on an infinitely thick substrate. We study the effects of compliance of the substrate by modeling the system as a plate on an elastic foundation. The critical buckling condition is formulated. The asymptotic solutions of post-buckling deformation and the corresponding energy release rate of the interface crack are obtained with perturbation methods. The results show that the more compliant the substrate is, the easier for the film to buckle and easier for the interface crack to propagate after buckling.

  8. Investigation of Cracked Lithium Hydride Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bird, e.l.; mustaleski, t.m.

    1999-06-01

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds, most of which were circumferentially located in the bottom portion of the vessels. Sections were cut from the vessels containing these cracks and examined by use of the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. Most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the base material and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depths of those examined sections ranged from {approximately}300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 1/8 in. The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue, whereby crack propagation may have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which indicates a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  9. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  10. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  11. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim.

  12. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  13. On the Effective Temperature of Sunspot Umbrae using Beryllium Hydride Isotopomer Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha, R.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A search for fourteen bands of the visibleand infrared systems of the beryllium hydride isotopomers, in addition to the previously identified bands A - X(0, 0; 1, 1; 2, 2 for BeH, A - X(0, 0; 1, 1; 2, 2 for BeD and A - X(0, 0; 1, 1; 2, 2 for BeT molecules was conducted. The equivalent widths were measured for the well isolated identified lines of the strongest band and the effective temperatures were estimated for the systems for which the presence of hints is confirmed.

  14. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  15. Effect of variable thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the calculation of the critical metal hydride thickness for Ti1.1CrMn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    High pressure metal hydrides have been recently considered as one of the most promising hydrogen solid storage options for on - board applications. Unfortunately the high purchasing costs related to these materials and the complexity related to building a scaled high pressure tank system with act......High pressure metal hydrides have been recently considered as one of the most promising hydrogen solid storage options for on - board applications. Unfortunately the high purchasing costs related to these materials and the complexity related to building a scaled high pressure tank system...

  16. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions.

  17. Comparison of Hydrogen Elimination from Molecular Zinc and Magnesium Hydride Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, J.; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-beta-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the

  18. Use of triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid as risk mitigant for aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2017-08-08

    A process and a resulting product by process of an aluminum hydride which is modified with by physically combining in a ball milling process an aluminum hydride with a triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid. The resulting product is an aluminum hydride which is resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while maintaining useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  19. Comparison of Hydrogen Elimination from Molecular Zinc and Magnesium Hydride Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, J.; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-beta-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the

  20. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  1. A review of recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varin, R. A.; Zbroniec, L. [University of Waterloo, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Polanski, M.; Bystrzycki, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology and Chemistry, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada) and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland) are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size) induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions). It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH{sub 4}, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl{sub 2} catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, 40 and 80 {sup o}C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems. (authors)

  2. A Review of Recent Advances on the Effects of Microstructural Refinement and Nano-Catalytic Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Metal and Complex Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bystrzycki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions. It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH4, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl2 catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at RT, 40 and 80 °C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems.

  3. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  4. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization.

  5. Surface imprinted thin polymer film systems with selective recognition for bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, David R; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-03-09

    Molecularly imprinted polymers are synthetic antibody mimics formed by the crosslinking of organic or inorganic polymers in the presence of an analyte which yields recognitive polymer networks with specific binding pockets for that biomolecule. Surface imprinted polymers were synthesized via a novel technique for the specific recognition of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Thin films of recognitive networks based on 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) as the functional monomer and varying amounts of either N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) or poly(ethylene glycol) (400) dimethacrylate (PEG400DMA) as the crosslinking agent were synthesized via UV free-radical polymerization and characterized. A clear and reproducible increase in recognition of the template BSA was demonstrated for these systems at 1.6-2.5 times more BSA recognized by the MIP sample relative to the control polymers. Additionally, these polymers exhibited selective recognition of the template relative to competing proteins with up to 2.9 times more BSA adsorbed than either glucose oxidase or bovine hemoglobin. These synthetic antibody mimics hold significant promise as the next generation of robust recognition elements in a wide range of bioassay and biosensor applications.

  6. Fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems via the integration of high surface area glancing angle deposition thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, J. N.; Sauer, V. T. K.; Kwan, J. K.; Hiebert, W. K.; Sit, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) coated with a high surface area thin film are fabricated. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is used to uniformly deposit high surface area, nanostructured SiO2 films on top of released NEMS. The resonance frequencies and quality factors are measured to assess the potential of the high surface area NEMS for sensing experiments. Resonance frequencies of coated cantilevers, although reduced by mass loading, can be predicted accurately using our derived model. Compressive stress makes the resonance frequencies of coated doubly-clamped beams difficult to predict. The quality factors of the coated NEMS are reduced by one order of magnitude by a quasi-continuous layer at the base of the GLAD film, which also introduces an estimated compressive stress of 5.3-9.3 MPa. The limit of detection is demonstrated to be ˜2 pg cm-2. With this successful proof-of-concept demonstration, we anticipate the future use of these devices as high surface area gravimetric mass sensors for applications such as gas chromatography.

  7. Cosmic ray test system for the ATLAS thin gap chamber modules at KOBE

    CERN Document Server

    Suigmoto, T; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ichimiya, R; Ikeno, M; Ishii, K; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Kurashige, H; Mima, T; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nakaune, Y; Nozaki, M; Ohshita, H; Okumura, K; Sasaki, O; Suzuki, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Uda, J; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    Thin gap chamber modules giving function of forward muon trigger to the ATLAS detector in the LHC experiment have been constructed at High Energy Research Organization (KEK) in Japan and their performances have been checked at Kobe University. A large-scale test system specially designed for measuring uniformity of the detection efficiencies and the timing resolution of 8 TGC modules at the same time was successfully operated. Each TGC module had 72 anode wire channels and 64 cathode strip channels (in total 1088 readout channels for 8 modules). Drift tubes consisted of 12 layers (total 428 tubes), between which the TGC modules are put, determined trajectories of cosmic rays. Hit pattern and timing of all detector signals (Trigger counter. Drift tubes and TGCs) were measured by using VME modules. In regular data acquisition situation, i.e. about effective 19 Hz trigger rate from scintillation counters and 73% tracking efficiency by the drift tubes, the detection efficiency of each layer by 5 mm * 5 mm region ...

  8. RF Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Capacitive Switches Using Ultra Thin Hafnium Oxide Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Onodera, Kazumasa; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    A π-type RF capacitive switch using about 45-nm-thick HfO2 dielectric layer was fabricated. High isolation performance was obtained in wide-band range when the switch was down-state. The isolation was better than -40 dB at the frequency range of 4-35 GHz. Particularly, the isolation was better than -50 dB in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz, i.e., X band. HfO2 showed excellent process compatibility with conventional microfabrication procedure. The 45-nm-thick HfO2 film was prepared using sputtering at room temperature so that it was feasible to be integrated into RF switch and other microwave circuits. The results of constant bias stressing showed that the ultra thin HfO2 had excellent reliability. The electric breakdown of HfO2 was observed, which had no apparent negative effects on the reliability of the dielectric. HfO2 dielectrics were attractive in the application of RF micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) switch for new generation of low-loss high-linearity microwave circuits.

  9. Gating System Design for Casting thin Aluminium Alloy (Al-Si Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor ANJO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminium oxide films, cuts and washes, low casting yield and entrapped gas. This study describes the design of a gating system to produce thin Aluminium cast alloy plates of different sizes and thicknesses of 4mm, 6mm, 8mm, and 10mm using the non-pressurized gating with ratio of 1:4:4 and green sand moulding technique. The gating design was based on the laws of fluid mechanics and empirical rules of gating for non ferrous metals. The equipments used for this experiment includes; a coal fired crucible furnace and an X-Ray machine. Materials used include; silica sand, clay, wood, glue and Aluminium alloy scraps. The experimental procedure involved: the gating design calculations, construction of wooden pattern and gating; using the wooden pattern and gating to produce the mould cavities and gating; melting, melt treatment and pouring of melt in the sand mould to produce the casting. The plate castings after removal from mould were visually examined for surface defects and after fettling and cleaning X-Ray radiography was used to find the internal soundness of the castings. From the results obtained in the experiment, it was found that there were no internal defects and quality castings were produced.

  10. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  11. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovshinsky, S R; Fetcenko, M A; Ross, J

    1993-04-09

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved.

  12. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  13. Zirconium hydride formation in Hanford production reactor process tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winegardner, W.K.; Griggs, B.

    1967-12-01

    Examination of Zircaloy-2 process tubes from Hanford Production Reactors has revealed extensive zirconium hydride formation. In general, attack is limited to the downstream portions of tubes where aluminum spacers are located. Most of the hydride platelets are contained in a case or layer on the inner surface of the tube. It is not unusual to find cases 0.004 to 0.005 in. thick. Analyses of the 0.037 in. wall tubes with such cases intact often reveal hydrogen concentrations greater than 1000 ppM. Investigation indicates that the hydriding is the result of galvanic contact between aluminum and Zircaloy-2. The galvanic couple (contact between dissimilar metals in the presence of reactor cooling water which serves as the electrolyte) results in the cathodic charging of hydrogen into the Zircaloy.

  14. Development of pressure control system in counter gravity casting for large thin-walled A357 aluminum alloy components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-lei; HAO Qi-tang; JIE Wan-qi; ZHOU Yu-chuan

    2008-01-01

    Counter gravity casting equipments(CGCE) were widely used to produce large thin-walled A357 aluminum alloy components. To improve the pressure control precision of CGCE to get high quality castings, a pressure control system based on fuzzy-PID hybrid control technology and the digital assembled valve was developed. The actual pressure tracking experiment results show that the special system by applying PID controller and fuzzy controller to varied phases, is not only able to inherit the small error and good static stability of classical PID control, but also has fuzzy control's advantage of fully adapting itself to the object. The pressure control error is less than 0.3 kPa. By using this pressure control system, large complex thin-walled A357 aluminum alloy castings with high quality was successfully produced.

  15. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS FOR HYDRIDING IN METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE TANK%金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建华; 蒋利军; 李志念; 刘晓鹏; 王树茂

    2011-01-01

    Based on the principle of hydride adsorption, a one-dimensional mathematical model for hydriding in a cylindrical metal hydride hydrogen storage tank was established. The heat and mass transfer of metal hydride beds was computed by finite difference method. The variation in temperature and hydrogen concentration at different radial positions of the hydride layer was analyzed during the process of hydriding. The effects of supply pressure, heat convection coefficient and hydride layer radial thickness on the hydriding was studied. It is shown that hydride formation initially takes place uniformly all over the metal hydride layer, but with the process of hydriding, the hydriding rate at the core region is gradually slower than one at surface region. The increase of supply pressure and heat convection coefficient can accelerate the hydriding of the hydrogen storage tank. The effect of hydride layer radial thickness is significant on the hydriding rate, and the thinner hydride layer, the higher the hydriding rate.%基于金属氢化物吸氢基本特性,建立圆柱形金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的-维数学物理模型.采用有限差分法对金属氢化物床体的传热传质进行计算.分别研究金属氢化物床体各处温度和氢含量在吸氢过程中的变化以及氢气压力、对流传热系数和金属氢化物床体径向厚度对金属氢化物吸氢过程的影响.计算结果表明:初始阶段金属氢化物床均匀吸氢,但随着氢化过程的进行,其中心区域的吸氢速率逐渐低于边缘区域;增加吸氢压力、提高对流传热系数均可促进储氢器的吸氢;金属氢化物床的径向厚度对吸氢速率影响很大,金属氢化物床越薄,氢化反应的速度越快.

  16. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  17. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, K. A. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Schmidt, F. A. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Frerichs, A. E. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ament, K. A. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  18. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  19. Hydrogen Desorption from Mg Hydride: An Ab Initio Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Giusepponi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen desorption from hydride matrix is still an open field of research. By means of accurate first-principle molecular dynamics (MD simulations an Mg–MgH2 interface is selected, studied and characterized. Electronic structure calculations are used to determine the equilibrium properties and the behavior of the surfaces in terms of structural deformations and total energy considerations. Furthermore, extensive ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed at several temperatures to characterize the desorption process at the interface. The numerical model successfully reproduces the experimental desorption temperature for the hydride.

  20. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ramesh [Dept. of Physics, Feroze Gandhi Insititute of Engineering and Technology, Raebareli-229001 (India); Shukla, Seema, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Dwivedi, Shalini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Sharma, Yamini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Dept. of Physics Feroze Gandhi College, Raebareli-229001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  1. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  2. Uranium Hydride Nucleation and Growth Model FY'16 ESC Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richards, Andrew Walter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holby, Edward F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Roland K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Uranium hydride corrosion is of great interest to the nuclear industry. Uranium reacts with water and/or hydrogen to form uranium hydride which adversely affects material performance. Hydride nucleation is influenced by thermal history, mechanical defects, oxide thickness, and chemical defects. Information has been gathered from past hydride experiments to formulate a uranium hydride model to be used in a Canned Subassembly (CSA) lifetime prediction model. This multi-scale computer modeling effort started in FY’13, and the fourth generation model is now complete. Additional high-resolution experiments will be run to further test the model.

  3. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  4. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  5. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with hydrides as potential hydrogen storage media: A survey of intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surya, V.J.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkataramanan, N.S.; Mizuseki, H.; Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, we have analyzed the intermolecular interactions between H{sub 2} and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-hydride complexes and project their capability as a practicable hydrogen storage medium (HSM). In this respect, we have investigated the type of interactions namely van der Waals, electrostatic, and orbital interactions to understand the molecular hydrogen binding affinity of various systems. We found that the charge transfer effects coupled with induced electrostatic interactions are responsible for synergetic action of SWCNT and hydrides on adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules at ambient conditions. Also we have calculated the thermodynamically usable capacity of hydrogen in all the systems. This study enables one to identify and design potential hydrogen storage materials. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. The influence of hydride on fracture toughness of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: 175877@mail.csc.com.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Ming-Feng [China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yen-Chen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, RXA cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to target hydrogen content levels between 150 and 800 wppm (part per million by weight). The strings of zirconium hydrides observed in the cross sections are mostly oriented in the circumferential direction. The fracture toughness of hydrided RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured to evaluate its hydride embrittlement susceptibility. With increasing hydrogen content, the fracture toughness of hydrided RXA cladding decreases at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Moreover, highly localized hydrides (forming a hydride rim) aggravate the degradation of the fracture properties of RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Brittle features in the form of quasi-cleavages and secondary cracks were observed on the fracture surface of the hydride rim, even for RXA cladding tested at 300 °C.

  7. Ultrasonic monitoring of erosion/corrosion thinning rates in industrial piping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Farhang; Salehi, Farzaneh; Safavi, Vahid; Mokhtari, Arman; Sinclair, Anthony N

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring pipe wall erosion/corrosion thinning rates is an important issue in petrochemical and power generation industries. In this paper, two signal processing techniques are utilized for estimating the thinning rate based on ultrasonic pipe wall thickness data collected over a short period of time. The first is a combination of cross-correlation and polynomial curve fitting and the second is a model-based estimation (MBE) scheme. These techniques are applied to data collected from an accelerated thinning rate apparatus and both show that they are capable of estimating the thinning rates quickly in short time periods with good accuracy. In laboratory applications, thinning rates as low as 10 μm/year were measured within 15 days with an uncertainty of ±1.5 μm/year by both techniques. Although the MBE technique can yield marginally better accuracy, the greater stability and computational speed of the cross-correlation technique make it the preferred choice for industrial use.

  8. Metal hydride heat pump engineering demonstration and evaluation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Franklin E.

    1993-01-01

    Future generations of portable life support systems (PLSS's) for space suites (extravehicular mobility units or EMU's) may require regenerable nonventing thermal sinks (RNTS's). For purposes of mobility, a PLSS must be as light and compact as possible. Previous venting PLSS's have employed water sublimators to reject metabolic and equipment heat from EMU's. It is desirable for long-duration future space missions to minimize the use of water and other consumables that need to be periodically resupplied. The emission of water vapor also interferes with some types of instrumentation that might be used in future space exploration. The test article is a type of RNTS based on a metal hydride heat pump (MHHP). The task of reservicing EMU's after use must be made less demanding in terms of time, procedures, and equipment. The capability for quick turnaround post-EVA servicing (30 minutes) is a challenging requirement for many of the RNTS options. The MHHP is a very simple option that can be regenerated in the airlock within the 30 minute limit by the application of a heating source and a cooling sink. In addition, advanced PLSS's must provide a greater degree of automatic control, relieving astronauts of the need to manually adjust temperatures in their liquid cooled ventilation garments (LCVG's). The MHHP includes automatic coolant controls with the ability to follow thermal load swings from minimum to maximum in seconds. The MHHP includes a coolant loop subsystem with pump and controls, regeneration equipment for post-EVA servicing, and a PC-based data acquisition and control system (DACS).

  9. Mutual Inductance Problem for a System Consisting of a Current Sheet and a Thin Metal Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; Nath, S.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Rapid inspection of aircraft structures for flaws is of vital importance to the commercial and defense aircraft industry. In particular, inspecting thin aluminum structures for flaws is the focus of a large scale R&D effort in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. Traditional eddy current methods used today are effective, but require long inspection times. New electromagnetic techniques which monitor the normal component of the magnetic field above a sample due to a sheet of current as the excitation, seem to be promising. This paper is an attempt to understand and analyze the magnetic field distribution due to a current sheet above an aluminum test sample. A simple theoretical model, coupled with a two dimensional finite element model (FEM) and experimental data will be presented in the next few sections. A current sheet above a conducting sample generates eddy currents in the material, while a sensor above the current sheet or in between the two plates monitors the normal component of the magnetic field. A rivet or a surface flaw near a rivet in an aircraft aluminum skin will disturb the magnetic field, which is imaged by the sensor. Initial results showed a strong dependence of the flaw induced normal magnetic field strength on the thickness and conductivity of the current-sheet that could not be accounted for by skin depth attenuation alone. It was believed that the eddy current imaging method explained the dependence of the thickness and conductivity of the flaw induced normal magnetic field. Further investigation, suggested the complexity associated with the mutual inductance of the system needed to be studied. The next section gives an analytical model to better understand the phenomenon.

  10. An evaluation of deep thin coal seams and water-beating/resisting layers in the quaternary system using seismic inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong-zhong; HUANG Wei-chuan; CHEN Tong-jun; CUI Ruo-fei; CHEN Shi-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Non-liner wave equation inversion, wavelet analysis and artificial neural networks were used to obtain stratum parame-ters and the distribution of thin coal seams. The lithology of the water-bearing/resisting layer in the Quaternary system was also predicted. The implementation process included calculating the well log parameters, stratum contrasting the seismic data and the well logs, and extracting, studying and predicting seismic attributes. Seismic inversion parameters, including the layer velocity and wave impedance, were calculated and effectively used for prediction and analysis. Prior knowledge and seismic interpretation were used to remedy a dearth of seismic data during the inversion procedure. This enhanced the stability of the inversion method. Non-linear seismic inversion and artificial neural networks were used to interpret coal seismic lithology and to study the wa-ter-bearing/resisting layer in the Quaternary system. Interpretation of the 1-2 m thin coal seams, and also of the wa-ter-bearing/resisting layer in the Quaternary system, is provided. The upper mining limit can be lifted from 60 m to 45 m. The pre-dictions show that this method can provide reliable data useful for thin coal seam exploitation and for lifting the upper mining limit, which is one of the principles of green mining.

  11. Topotactic synthesis of strontium cobalt oxyhydride thin film with perovskite structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Katayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of hydride anions (H− into transition metal oxides has recently become possible through topotactic reactions or high-pressure synthesis methods. However, the fabrication of oxyhydrides is still difficult because of their inherently less-stable frameworks. In this study, we successfully fabricated perovskite SrCoOxHy thin films via the topotactic hydride doping of brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 epitaxial thin films with CaH2. The perovskite-type cation framework was maintained during the topotactic treatment owing to epitaxial stabilization. Structural and chemical analyses accompanied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements revealed that the doped hydride ions form a two-dimensional network of Co-H−-Co bonds, in contrast to other reported perovskite oxyhydrides, SrMO3−xHx (M = Cr, Ti, V. The SrCoOxHy thin film exhibited insulating behavior and had a direct band gap of 2.1 eV. Thus, topotactic hydride doping of transition-metal-oxide thin films on suitable substrates is a promising method for the synthesis of new transition metal oxyhydrides.

  12. Topotactic synthesis of strontium cobalt oxyhydride thin film with perovskite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Tsukasa [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Chikamatsu, Akira, E-mail: chikamatsu@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kamisaka, Hideyuki [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yokoyama, Yuichi; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Wadati, Hiroki [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Fukumura, Tomoteru [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The substitution of hydride anions (H{sup −}) into transition metal oxides has recently become possible through topotactic reactions or high-pressure synthesis methods. However, the fabrication of oxyhydrides is still difficult because of their inherently less-stable frameworks. In this study, we successfully fabricated perovskite SrCoO{sub x}H{sub y} thin films via the topotactic hydride doping of brownmillerite SrCoO{sub 2.5} epitaxial thin films with CaH{sub 2}. The perovskite-type cation framework was maintained during the topotactic treatment owing to epitaxial stabilization. Structural and chemical analyses accompanied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements revealed that the doped hydride ions form a two-dimensional network of Co-H{sup −}-Co bonds, in contrast to other reported perovskite oxyhydrides, SrMO{sub 3−x}H{sub x} (M = Cr, Ti, V). The SrCoO{sub x}H{sub y} thin film exhibited insulating behavior and had a direct band gap of 2.1 eV. Thus, topotactic hydride doping of transition-metal-oxide thin films on suitable substrates is a promising method for the synthesis of new transition metal oxyhydrides.

  13. Multivariate optimization and simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride-forming elements in samples of a wide pH range using dual-mode sample introduction with plasma techniques: application on leachates from cement mortar material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Asfaw, Alemayehu

    2009-02-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (As, Sb) and non-hydride-forming (Cr, Mo, V) elements in aqueous samples of a wide pH range (pH 3-13). The methods used dual-mode (DM) sample introduction with ICP-AES and ICP-MS instruments. The effect of selected experimental variables, i.e., sample pH and concentrations of HNO(3), thiourea, and NaBH(4), were studied in a multivariate way using face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). Compromised optimum values of the experimental parameters were identified using a response optimizer. The statistically found optimum values were verified experimentally. The methods provided improved sensitivities for the hydride-forming elements compared with the respective conventional nebulization (Neb) systems by factors of 67 (As) and 64 (Sb) for ICP-AES and 36 (As) and 54 (Sb) for ICP-MS. Slight sensitivity improvements were also observed for the non-hydride-forming elements. The limits of detection (LOD) of As and Sb were lowered, respectively, to 0.8 and 0.9 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-AES system and to 0.01 and 0.02 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-MS system. The short-term stabilities of both methods were between 2.1 and 5.4%. The methods were applied for the analysis of leachates of a cement mortar material prepared in the pH range 3-13. The elemental concentration of the leachates determined by the two DM methods were statistically compared with the values obtained from Neb-ICP-MS analysis; the values showed good agreement at the 95% confidence level. Quantitative spike recoveries were obtained for the analytes from most of the leachates using both DM methods.

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Porous Materials and Magnesium Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzech, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis representatives of two different types of materials for potential hydrogen storage application are presented. Usage of either nanoporous materials or metal hydrides has both operational advantages and disadvantages. A main objective of this thesis is to characterize the hydrogen

  15. Pore confined synthesis of magnesium boron hydride nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Yuen S.; Yan, Yigang; De Jong, Krijn P.; Remhof, Arndt; De Jongh, Petra E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured materials based on light elements such as Li, Mg, and Na are essential for energy storage and conversion applications, but often difficult to prepare with control over size and structure. We report a new strategy that is illustrated for the formation of magnesium boron hydrides,

  16. Novel baker's yeast catalysed hydride reduction of an epoxide moiety

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horak, RM

    1995-02-27

    Full Text Available -4039(95)00043-7 Tetrahedron Letters, Vol. 36, No. 9, pp. 1541-1544, 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in Great Britain 0040-4039/95 $9.50+0.00 A Novel Baker's Yeast Catalysed Hydride Reduction of an Epoxide Moiety R. Marthinus Horak, Robin A...

  17. Release of hydrogen from nanoconfined hydrides by application of microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Moral, Luis Miguel; Navarrete, Alexander; Sturm, Guido; Link, Guido; Rueda, Miriam; Stefanidis, Georgios; Martín, Ángel

    2017-06-01

    The release of hydrogen from solid hydrides by thermolysis can be improved by nanoconfinement of the hydride in a suitable micro/mesoporous support, but the slow heat transfer by conduction through the support can be a limitation. In this work, a C/SiO2 mesoporous material has been synthesized and employed as matrix for nanoconfinement of hydrides. The matrix showed high surface area and pore volume (386 m2/g and 1.41 cm3/g), which enabled the confinement of high concentrations of hydride. Furthermore, by modification of the proportion between C and SiO2, the dielectric properties of the complex could be modified, making it susceptible to microwave heating. As with this heating method the entire sample is heated simultaneously, the heat transfer resistances associated to conduction were eliminated. To demonstrate this possibility, ethane 1,2-diaminoborane (EDAB) was embedded on the C/SiO2 matrix at concentrations ranging from 11 to 31%wt using a wet impregnation method, and a device appropriate for hydrogen release from this material by application of microwaves was designed with the aid of a numerical simulation. Hydrogen liberation tests by conventional heating and microwaves were compared, showing that by microwave heating hydrogen release can be initiated and stopped in shorter times.

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Porous Materials and Magnesium Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzech, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis representatives of two different types of materials for potential hydrogen storage application are presented. Usage of either nanoporous materials or metal hydrides has both operational advantages and disadvantages. A main objective of this thesis is to characterize the hydrogen stora

  19. Review of magnesium hydride-based materials: development and optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivello, J. -C.; Dam, B.; Denys, R. V.; Dornheim, M.; Grant, D. M.; Huot, J.; Jensen, T. R.; de Jongh, P.; Latroche, M.; Milanese, C.; Milcius, D.; Walker, G. S.; Webb, C. J.; Zlotea, C.; Yartys, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium hydride has been studied extensively for applications as a hydrogen storage material owing to the favourable cost and high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. However, its high enthalpy of decomposition necessitates high working temperatures for hydrogen desorption while the slo

  20. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1...

  2. Pore confined synthesis of magnesium boron hydride nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Yuen S.; Yan, Yigang; De Jong, Krijn P.; Remhof, Arndt; De Jongh, Petra E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured materials based on light elements such as Li, Mg, and Na are essential for energy storage and conversion applications, but often difficult to prepare with control over size and structure. We report a new strategy that is illustrated for the formation of magnesium boron hydrides, relev

  3. Optimization of Internal Cooling Fins for Metal Hydride Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Kukkapalli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride alloys are considered as a promising alternative to conventional hydrogen storage cylinders and mechanical hydrogen compressors. Compared to storing in a classic gas tank, metal hydride alloys can store hydrogen at nearly room pressure and use less volume to store the same amount of hydrogen. However, this hydrogen storage method necessitates an effective way to reject the heat released from the exothermic hydriding reaction. In this paper, a finned conductive insert is adopted to improve the heat transfer in the cylindrical reactor. The fins collect the heat that is volumetrically generated in LaNi5 metal hydride alloys and deliver it to the channel located in the center, through which a refrigerant flows. A multiple-physics modeling is performed to analyze the transient heat and mass transfer during the hydrogen absorption process. Fin design is made to identify the optimum shape of the finned insert for the best heat rejection. For the shape optimization, use of a predefined transient heat generation function is proposed. Simulations show that there exists an optimal length for the fin geometry.

  4. Structural stability of complex hydrides LiBH4 revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodziana, Zbigniew; Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    A systematic approach to study the phase stability of LiBH4 based on ab initio calculations is presented. Three thermodynamically stable phases are identified and a new phase of Cc symmetry is proposed for the first time for a complex hydride. The x-ray diffraction pattern and vibrational spectra...

  5. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  6. Optimizing Misch-Metal Compositions In Metal Hydride Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical cells based on metal hydride anodes investigated experimentally in effort to find anode compositions maximizing charge/discharge-cycle performances. Experimental anodes contained misch metal alloyed with various proportions of Ni, Co, Mn, and Al, and experiments directed toward optimization of composition of misch metal.

  7. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  8. Nanocrystalline Metal Hydrides Obtained by Severe Plastic Deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Huot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD techniques could be used to obtain nanostructured metal hydrides with enhanced hydrogen sorption properties. In this paper we review the different SPD techniques used on metal hydrides and present some specific cases of the effect of cold rolling on the hydrogen storage properties and crystal structure of various types of metal hydrides such as magnesium-based alloys and body centered cubic (BCC alloys. Results show that generally cold rolling is as effective as ball milling to enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics. However, for some alloys such as TiV0.9Mn1.1 alloy ball milling and cold rolling have detrimental effect on hydrogen capacity. The exact mechanism responsible for the change in hydrogenation properties may not be the same for ball milling and cold rolling. Nevertheless, particle size reduction and texture seems to play a leading role in the hydrogen sorption enhancement of cold rolled metal hydrides.

  9. Metal hydrides for smart window and sensor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshimura, K.; Langhammer, C.; Dam, B.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogenation of metals often leads to changes in optical properties in the visible range. This allows for fundamental studies of the hydrogenation process, as well as the exploration of various applications using these optical effects. Here, we focus on recent developments in metal hydride-base

  10. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  11. KNH2-KH: a metal amide-hydride solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Sørby, Magnus H; Chierotti, Michele R; Garroni, Sebastiano; Pinatel, Eugenio; Karimi, Fahim; Cao, Hujun; Bergemann, Nils; Le, Thi T; Puszkiel, Julián; Gobetto, Roberto; Baricco, Marcello; Hauback, Bjørn C; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-09-27

    We report for the first time the formation of a metal amide-hydride solid solution. The dissolution of KH into KNH2 leads to an anionic substitution, which decreases the interaction among NH2(-) ions. The rotational properties of the high temperature polymorphs of KNH2 are thereby retained down to room temperature.

  12. Efficient pump beam shaping for high-power thin-disk laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rui; Weichelt, Birgit; Liang, Dawei; Morais, Paulo J; Gouveia, Helena; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Voss, Andreas; Graf, Thomas

    2010-09-20

    We report a beam-shaping technique whereby the output power from a high-power laser-diode stack is efficiently coupled, reconfigured, and transmitted to a thin-disk laser by means of a compact optical fiber bundle. By using this technique, the power density is increased by a factor of 2 when compared to direct coupling with a octagonal fused silica rod while the numerical aperture is kept constant. Transmission efficiency of 80% was measured for the beam shaper without antireflection coating. The top-hat distribution is numerically calculated at the thin-disk laser crystal.

  13. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  14. Activation and discharge kinetics of metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Stein Egil

    2003-07-01

    Potential step chronoamperometry and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (eis) measurements were performed on single metal hydride particles. For the {alpha}-phase, the bulk diffusion coefficient and the absorption/adsorption rate parameters were determined. Materials produced by atomisation, melt spinning and conventional casting were investigated. The melt spun and conventional cast materials were identical and the atomised material similar in composition. The particles from the cast and the melt spun material were shaped like parallelepipeds. A corresponding equation, for this geometry, for diffusion coupled to an absorption/adsorption reaction was developed. It was found that materials produced by melt spinning exhibited lower bulk diffusion (1.7E-14 m2/s) and absorption/adsorption reaction rate (1.0E-8 m/s), compared to materials produced by conventionally casting (1.1E-13 m2/s and 5.5E-8 m/s respectively). In addition, the influence of particle active surface and relative diffusion length were discussed. It was concluded that there are uncertainties connected to these properties, which may explain the large distribution in the kinetic parameters measured on metal hydride particles. Activation of metal hydride forming materials has been studied and an activation procedure, for porous electrodes, was investigated. Cathodic polarisation of the electrode during a hot alkaline surface treatment gave the maximum discharge capacity on the first discharge of the electrode. The studied materials were produced by gas atomisation and the spherical shape was retained during the activation. Both an AB{sub 5} and an AB{sub 2} alloy was successfully activated and discharge rate properties determined. The AB{sub 2} material showed a higher maximum discharge capacity, but poor rate properties, compared to the AB{sub 5} material. Reduction of surface oxides, and at the same time protection against corrosion of active metallic nickel, can explain the satisfying results of

  15. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  16. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of High-Crystalline Nanoporous ZnO Thin Films by Modified Thermal Evaporation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. S.; Hossain, M. F.; Razzak, S. M. A.; Haque, M. M.; Saha, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate high-crystalline nanoporous zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films by a modified thermal evaporation system. First, zinc thin films have been deposited on bare glass substrate by the modified thermal evaporation system with pressure of 0.05mbar, source-substrate distance of 3cm and source temperature 700∘C. Then, high-crystalline ZnO thin film is obtained by annealing at 500∘C for 2h in atmosphere. The prepared ZnO films are characterized with various deposition times of 10min and 20min. The structural property was investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The optical bandgap and absorbance/transmittance of these films are examined by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometer. The surface morphological property has been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). ZnO films have showed uniform nanoporous surface with high-crystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure. The ZnO films prepared with 20min has excitation absorption-edge at 369nm, which is blueshifted with respect to the bulk absorption-edge appearing at 380nm. The gap energy of ZnO film is decreased from 3.14eV to 3.09eV with increase of the deposition time, which can enhance the excitation of ZnO films by the near visible light, and is suitable for the application of photocatalyst of waste water cleaning and polluted air purification.

  18. SSH2S: Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides for an auxiliary power unit based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricco, Marcello; Bang, Mads; Fichtner, Maximilian; Hauback, Bjorn; Linder, Marc; Luetto, Carlo; Moretto, Pietro; Sgroi, Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of the SSH2S (Fuel Cell Coupled Solid State Hydrogen Storage Tank) project was to develop a solid state hydrogen storage tank based on complex hydrides and to fully integrate it with a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was used as the main storage material for the tank, due to its high gravimetric storage capacity and relatively low hydrogen desorption temperature. The mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was coupled with a standard intermetallic compound to take advantage of its capability to release hydrogen at ambient temperature and to ensure a fast start-up of the system. The hydrogen storage tank was designed to feed a 1 kW HT-PEM stack for 2 h to be used for an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). A full thermal integration was possible thanks to the high operation temperature of the fuel cell and to the relative low temperature (170 °C) for hydrogen release from the mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system.

  19. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  20. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  1. New synthesis route for ternary transition metal amides as well as ultrafast amide-hydride hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Richter, Theresia M M; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-04-14

    K2[Mn(NH2)4] and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were successfully synthesized via a mechanochemical method. The mixture of K2[Mn(NH2)4] and LiH showed excellent rehydrogenation properties. In fact, after dehydrogenation K2[Mn(NH2)4]-8LiH fully rehydrogenates within 60 seconds at ca. 230 °C and 5 MPa of H2. This is one of the fastest rehydrogenation rates in amide-hydride systems known to date. This work also shows a strategy for the synthesis of transition metal nitrides by decomposition of the mixtures of M[M'(NH2)n] (where M is an alkali or alkaline earth metal and M' is a transition metal) and metal hydrides.

  2. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  3. AUTHENTICATION ALGORITHM FOR PARTICIPANTS OF INFORMATION INTEROPERABILITY IN PROCESS OF OPERATING SYSTEM REMOTE LOADING ON THIN CLIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Gatchin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.This paper presents solution of authentication problem for all components of information interoperabilityin process of operation system network loading on thin client from terminal server. System Definition. In the proposed solution operation system integrity check is made by hardware-software module, including USB-token with protected memory for secure storage of cryptographic keys and loader. The key requirement for the solution is mutual authentication of four participants: terminal server, thin client, token and user. We have created two algorithms for the problem solution. The first of the designed algorithms compares the encrypted one-time password (random number with the reference value stored in the memory of the token and updates this number in case of successful authentication. The second algorithm uses the public and private keys of the token and the server. As a result of cryptographic transformation, participants are authenticated and the secure channel is formed between the token, thin client and terminal server. Main Results. Additional research was carried out to find out if the designed algorithms meet the necessary requirements. Criteria used included applicability in a multi-access terminal system architecture, potential threats evaluation and overall system security. According to analysis results, it is recommended to use the algorithm based on PKI due to its high scalability and usability. High level of data security is proved as a result of asymmetric cryptography application with the guarantee that participants' private keys are never sent in the authentication process. Practical Relevance. The designed PKI-based algorithm allows solving the problem with the use of cryptographic algorithms according to state standard even in its absence on asymmetric cryptography. Thus, it can be applied in the State Information Systems with increased requirements to information security.

  4. Stress relaxation in thin film/substrate systems by grain boundary diffusion : a discrete dislocation framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayas, C; Van der Giessen, E

    2009-01-01

    The relaxation of stress in a thin film due to grain boundary diffusion is investigated in terms of a new discrete dislocation framework. Discrete dislocations along grain boundaries are nucleated from the free surface and are then driven to 'climb' by the Peach-Koehler force, with a mobility that i

  5. Rigid Biopolymer Nanocrystal Systems for Controlling Multicomponent Nanoparticle Assembly and Orientation in Thin Film Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-10-31

    We have discovered techniques to synthesize well-defined DN conjugated nanostructures that are stable in a wide variety of conditions needed for DNA mediated assembly. Starting from this, we have shown that DNA can be used to control the assembly and integration of semiconductor nanocrystals into thin film devices that show photovoltaic effects.

  6. Stress relaxation in thin film/substrate systems by grain boundary diffusion : a discrete dislocation framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayas, C; Van der Giessen, E

    The relaxation of stress in a thin film due to grain boundary diffusion is investigated in terms of a new discrete dislocation framework. Discrete dislocations along grain boundaries are nucleated from the free surface and are then driven to 'climb' by the Peach-Koehler force, with a mobility that

  7. Quantitative Raman characterization of cross-linked collagen thin films as a model system for diagnosing early osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Durney, Krista M.; Fomovsky, Gregory; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Vukelic, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    The onset of osteoarthritis (OA)in articular cartilage is characterized by degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Specifically, breakage of cross-links between collagen fibrils in the articular cartilage leads to loss of structural integrity of the bulk tissue. Since there are no broadly accepted, non-invasive, label-free tools for diagnosing OA at its early stage, Raman spectroscopyis therefore proposed in this work as a novel, non-destructive diagnostic tool. In this study, collagen thin films were employed to act as a simplified model system of the cartilage collagen extracellular matrix. Cross-link formation was controlled via exposure to glutaraldehyde (GA), by varying exposure time and concentration levels, and Raman spectral information was collected to quantitatively characterize the cross-link assignments imparted to the collagen thin films during treatment. A novel, quantitative method was developed to analyze the Raman signal obtained from collagen thin films. Segments of Raman signal were decomposed and modeled as the sum of individual bands, providing an optimization function for subsequent curve fitting against experimental findings. Relative changes in the concentration of the GA-induced pyridinium cross-links were extracted from the model, as a function of the exposure to GA. Spatially resolved characterization enabled construction of spectral maps of the collagen thin films, which provided detailed information about the variation of cross-link formation at various locations on the specimen. Results showed that Raman spectral data correlate with glutaraldehyde treatment and therefore may be used as a proxy by which to measure loss of collagen cross-links in vivo. This study proposes a promising system of identifying onset of OA and may enable early intervention treatments that may serve to slow or prevent osteoarthritis progression.

  8. Multilayer systems of alternating chalcogenide As Se and polymer thin films prepared using thermal evaporation and spin-coating techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, T.; Wagner, T.; Orava, J.; Krbal, M.; Ilavsky, J.; Vesely, D.; Frumar, M.

    2007-05-01

    We describe preparation and characterization of multilayer planar systems based on alternating chalcogenide As Se and polymer polyamide-imide (PAI) or polyvinyl-butyral (PVB) thin films. We deposited films of thermally evaporated As33Se67 chalcogenide glass periodically alternating with PAI or PVB films. Fifteen layers of As Se+PAI system and 17 layers of As Se+PVB system were deposited. The film thicknesses were approximately 100 nm for all of the film types. Polymer film thicknesses were calculated from profilometric measurements performed by an atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of prepared multilayers and also As Se, PAI and PVB single layers were established using UV vis NIR and ellipsometric spectroscopies. Both, As Se+PAI and As Se+PVB multilayer systems, exhibited the reflection (stop) bands centered near 830 nm. The bandwidth of reflection band of As Se+PAI multilayer was 90 nm while bandwidth of As Se+PVB system increased to 150 nm because PVB films had about 0.2 lower refractive index. A new possibility for the application of chalcogenide thin films appeared as high refractive index materials suitable for fabrication of optical elements (reflectors) for near-infrared region. Changing the films composition and thickness, multilayer systems with tailored position of stop band could be designed and prepared.

  9. Hydride structures in Ti-aluminides subjected to high temperature and hydrogen pressure charging conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legzdina, D.; Robertson, I. M.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and chemistry of hydrides produced in single and dual phase alloys with a composition near TiAl have been investigated by using a combination of TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The alloys were exposed at 650 C to 13.8 MPa of gaseous H2 for 100 h. In the single-phase gamma alloy, large hydrides preferentially nucleated on the grain boundaries and matrix dislocations and a population of small hydrides was distributed throughout the matrix. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from these hydrides indicated that they have an fcc structure with a lattice parameter of 0.45 nm. EDAX analysis of the hydrides showed that they were enriched in Ti. The hydrides were mostly removed by vacuum annealing at 800 C for 24 h. On dissolution of the hydrides, the chemistry of hydride-free regions of the grain boundary returned to the matrix composition, suggesting that Ti segregation accompanied the hydride formation rather than Ti enrichment causing the formation of the hydride.

  10. Hydriding performances and modeling of a small-scale ZrCo bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, D.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Paek, S.; Chung, H. [KAERI-UST, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, M.H.; Yun, S.H.; Cho, S.; Jung, K.J. [NFRI, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    In order to evaluate the performance of the hydriding of a ZrCo bed, a small-scale getter bed of ZrCo was designed and fabricated. The results show that the hydriding time at room temperature was somewhat shorter than that at higher temperatures of ZrCo and that the performance of hydriding at low temperatures of ZrCo was better than that at high temperatures of ZrCo. The experimental results of the hydrogen pressure of hydriding (ZrCoH{sub 2.8}) at different temperatures were in agreement with the computed values using a numerical modeling equation but with a small difference during the first 10 minutes of the hydriding of ZrCo. The model is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation. The effect of a helium blanket on hydriding was measured and analyzed. The hydriding with no helium blanket in the primary vessel of ZrCo is much faster than that with a helium blanket. The hydriding at a helium concentration of 8% is slower than that at 0%. As the helium concentration increases, the hydriding of ZrCo decreases. The experimental results of the hydriding with 0 %, 4%, and 8% of helium concentration are in agreement with the calculated values but with minimal differences during the first 10 minutes.

  11. In situ electrochemical investigations of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of nickel-metal hydride traction batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Guang; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Although large ampere hour nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) traction batteries are in the stage of being commercialized for electric and hybrid vehicle applications, little is known about their performance characteristics. By using a standard Hg/HgO reference electrode in a commercial Ni-MH battery, we were able to conduct in situ measurements to determine both kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the system, including the characteristics of individual electrodes. Using the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), we simultaneously and effectively determined the open-circuit voltage of the battery, the equilibrium electrode potentials, and the diffusion coefficient of proton and hydrogen in the nickel and metal hydride electrode, respectively, as a function of the states of charge (SOC). Using the current-step excitation technique, we found that the internal resistance of the battery primarily comes from the metal hydride electrode, which is greater by one order of magnitude than that of the Ni electrode. The cyclic linear micro-polarization experiments, on the other hand, showed that the charge-transfer resistance of the electrochemical reaction at the metal hydride electrode is about twice larger than that of the Ni counterpart above 20% SOC. In comparison, the internal resistance is an order of magnitude smaller than those of the electrochemical charge-transfer reactions. The micro-polarization technique also allowed us to calculate the exchange current densities of the respective electrode electrochemical reactions and the associated specific exchange current densities. These in situ, simple but detailed, characterizations of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Ni-MH system provided valuable information for better understanding of the battery performance.

  12. The sup 252 Cf-source-driven noise measurements of unreflected uranium hydride cylinder subcriticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Pare, V.K.; Blakeman, E.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Subcritical neutron multiplication factors have been measured by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method for unreflected, 15.0-cm-diam uranium hydride cylinders of varying heights. Because of the difficulty and cost of controlling the H/U ratio in damp uranium (93.2 wt% {sup 235}U) oxide power and fabricating sufficient material for experiments, few experiments have been performed with materials of low H/U ratios. These measurements may provide alternate information that can be used for verifying calculational methods since the H/U ratio for this material is 3.00. These measurements, which are the first application of this method to uranium hydride, were performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility in 1989. These measurements were used to demonstrate the capability of this measurement method for this type of material and to provide a benchmark experiment for calculational methods with slightly moderated systems. Previous experiments by this method were for a wide variety of well-moderated systems or unmoderated uranium metal cylinders.

  13. Effects of the Electronic Doping In the Stability of the Metal Hydride NaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Amezcua, Monica-Araceli; Rivas-Silva, Juan-Francisco; de La Peña-Seaman, Omar; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Despite metal hydrides light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, the Hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Attempts for improvement the hydrogenation properties have been focus on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping on the metal hydride. We present a systematic study of the electronic doping effects on the stability of a model system, NaH doped with magnesium, forming the alloying system Na1-xMgxH. We use the density functional theory (DFT) and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) to model the doping of NaH with Mg. The evolution of the ground state structural and electronic properties is analyzed as a function of Mg-content. The full-phonon dispersion, calculated by the linear response theory (LRT) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT), is analyzed for several Mg-concentrations, paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA), the free energy from zero-point motion is obtained, and its influence on the properties under study is analyzed. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP (OMPS-EXC14-I) and CONACYT-Mexico (No. 221807) projects.

  14. Dissociation potential curves of low-lying states in transition metal hydrides. 3. Hydrides of groups 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Shiro; Matsushita, Takeshi; Gordon, Mark S

    2006-02-23

    The dissociation curves of low-lying spin-mixed states in monohydrides of groups 6 and 7 were calculated by using an effective core potential (ECP) approach. This approach is based on the multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) method, followed by first-order configuration interaction (FOCI) calculations, in which the method employs an ECP basis set proposed by Stevens and co-workers (SBKJC) augmented by a set of polarization functions. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects are estimated within the one-electron approximation by using effective nuclear charges, since SOC splittings obtained with the full Breit-Pauli Hamitonian are underestimated when ECP basis sets are used. The ground states of group 6 hydrides have Omega = (1)/(2)(X(6)Sigma(+)(1/2)), where Omega is the z component of the total angular momentum quantum number. Although the ground states of group 7 hydrides have Omega = 0(+), their main adiabatic components are different; the ground state in MnH originates from the lowest (7)Sigma(+), while in TcH and ReH the main component of the ground state is the lowest (5)Sigma(+). The present paper reports a comprehensive set of theoretical results including the dissociation energies, equilibrium distances, electronic transition energies, harmonic frequencies, anharmonicities, and rotational constants for several low-lying spin-mixed states in these hydrides. Transition dipole moments were also computed among the spin-mixed states and large peak positions of electronic transitions are suggested theoretically for these hydrides. The periodic trends of physical properties of metal hydrides are discussed, based on the results reported in this and other recent studies.

  15. The design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Li, Xiaojin; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Hongqiao

    2014-09-01

    Active support system is a low-frequency wavefront error correction system, which is often used to correct the mirror deformation resulting from gravity, temperature, wind load, manufacture, installation and other factors. In addition, the active support technology can improve the efficiency of grinding and polishing by adjusting the surface shape in the process of manufacturing large mirrors. This article describes the design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror. The support system consists of 37 axial pneumatic actuators. And in order to change the shape of thin primary mirror we need to precisely control the 37 pneumatic actuators. These 37 pneumatic actuators are divided into six regions. Each region is designed with a control circuit board to realize force closed-loop control for the pneumatic actuators, and all control panels are connected to the PC by CAN bus. The control panels have to support: receive commands from the host PC; control the actuators; periodically return result of control. The whole control system is composed by hardware and control algorithm and communication program.

  16. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  17. A system of two piezoelectric transducers and a storage circuit for wireless energy transmission through a thin metal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongping; Hu, Yuantai; Chen, Chuanyao; Wang, Ji

    2008-10-01

    A system to wirelessly convey electric energy through a thin metal wall is proposed in the paper, where 2 piezoelectric transducers are used to realize energy transformation between electric and mechanical, and a rechargeable battery is employed to store the transmitted energy. To integrate them as a whole, an interface of a modulating circuit is applied between the transducer system and the storage battery. In addition, a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor in parallel with the transducer system is introduced to artificially extend the closed interval of the modulating circuit. The process of transmitting energy is computed, and the performance of the transducer system is optimized in detail for a prescribed external electric source. The results obtained are useful for understanding and designing wireless energy supply systems.

  18. A hybrid DGTD scheme for transient analysis of electromagnetic field interactions on microwave systems loaded with thin wires

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2015-10-15

    Use of the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method for analyzing electromagnetic field interactions on microwave structures loaded with thin wires has been very limited despite its well-known advantages. Direct application of the three dimensional (3D) DGTD method to such structures calls for very fine volumetric discretizations in the proximity of the thin wires. In this work, to avoid this possible source of computational inefficiency, electromagnetic field interactions on thin wires and the rest of the structures are modeled separately using the modified telegrapher and Maxwell equations, respectively. Then, 1D and 3D DGTD methods are used to discretize them. The coupling between the two resulting matrix systems is realized by introducing equivalent source terms in each equation set. A weighted electric field obtained from the 3D discretization around the wire is introduced as a voltage source in the telegrapher equations. A volume current density obtained from the 1D discretization on the wire is introduced as a current source in the Ampere law equation. © 2015 IEEE.

  19. Sample Fabrication and Experimental Approach for Studying Interfacial Sliding in Thin Film-Substrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Technology 14.5 (1998): 405-410. 19. Zuruzi, A. S., H. Li, and G. Dong. "Diffusion Bonding of Aluminium Alloy 6061 in Air Using an Interface...428. 18. Huang, Y., F. J. Humphreys, N. Ridley, and Z. C. Wang. "Diffusion Bonding of Hot Rolled 7075 Aluminium Alloy." Materials Science and...and Takashi Ohnishi. "Effect of Aluminium Oxide Caps on Hillock Formation in Aluminium Alloy Films." Thin Solid Films 349 (1999): 191-198. 53

  20. Performance of a Polymer Flood with Shear-Thinning Fluid in Heterogeneous Layered Systems with Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sang Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the potential of a polymer flood for mobility control requires an accurate model on the viscosities of displacement fluids involved in the process. Because most polymers used in EOR exhibit shear-thinning behavior, the effective viscosity of a polymer solution is a highly nonlinear function of shear rate. A reservoir simulator including the model for the shear-rate dependence of viscosity was used to investigate shear-thinning effects of polymer solution on the performance of the layered reservoir in a five-spot pattern operating under polymer flood followed by waterflood. The model can be used as a quantitative tool to evaluate the comparative studies of different polymer flooding scenarios with respect to shear-rate dependence of fluids’ viscosities. Results of cumulative oil recovery and water-oil ratio are presented for parameters of shear-rate dependencies, permeability heterogeneity, and crossflow. The results of this work have proven the importance of taking non-Newtonian behavior of polymer solution into account for the successful evaluation of polymer flood processes. Horizontal and vertical permeabilities of each layer are shown to impact the predicted performance substantially. In reservoirs with a severe permeability contrast between horizontal layers, decrease in oil recovery and sudden increase in WOR are obtained by the low sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough through highly permeable layer, especially for shear-thinning fluids. An increase in the degree of crossflow resulting from sufficient vertical permeability is responsible for the enhanced sweep of the low permeability layers, which results in increased oil recovery. It was observed that a thinning fluid coefficient would increase injectivity significantly from simulations with various injection rates. A thorough understanding of polymer rheology in the reservoir and accurate numerical modeling are of fundamental importance for the exact estimation