WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydride forming metal

  1. Method of forming metal hydride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  2. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  3. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  4. Metal hydrides form halogen bonds: measurement of energetics of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan A; Brammer, Lee; Hunter, Christopher A; Perutz, Robin N

    2014-01-29

    The formation of halogen bonds from iodopentafluorobenzene and 1-iodoperfluorohexane to a series of bis(η(5)-cyclopentadienyl)metal hydrides (Cp2TaH3, 1; Cp2MH2, M = Mo, 2, M = W, 3; Cp2ReH, 4; Cp2Ta(H)CO, 5; Cp = η(5)-cyclopentadienyl) is demonstrated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Interaction enthalpies and entropies for complex 1 with C6F5I and C6F13I are reported (ΔH° = -10.9 ± 0.4 and -11.8 ± 0.3 kJ/mol; ΔS° = -38 ± 2 and -34 ± 2 J/(mol·K), respectively) and found to be stronger than those for 1 with the hydrogen-bond donor indole (ΔH° = -7.3 ± 0.1 kJ/mol, ΔS° = -24 ± 1 J/(mol·K)). For the more reactive complexes 2-5, measurements are limited to determination of their low-temperature (212 K) association constants with C6F5I as 2.9 ± 0.2, 2.5 ± 0.1, <1.5, and 12.5 ± 0.3 M(-1), respectively.

  5. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  6. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  7. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  8. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  9. Characterization of the whiskerlike products formed by hydriding magnesium metal powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herley, P. J.; Jones, W.; Vigeholm, Bjørn

    1985-01-01

    The structure of filamentary crystals produced during the hydriding of magnesium powder has been studies in detail. The needles of small dimensions (typically 0.5 μm in diameter) have been identified by electron analytical techniques to be oriented microcrystals of metallic magnesium...

  10. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today......’s hydride batteries, but a much poorer stability towards repeated charge/discharge cycling. The aim was to see if the cycleability of CaNi5 could be enhanced enough by modifications to make the compound a suitable electrode material. An alloying method based on mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill...... by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated...

  11. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated......This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly followed...

  12. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  13. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  14. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  15. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen Storage Capacity Hydride by weight (%) [1) by volume (g/ml) [2] MgH2 7.00 0.101 Mg2NiH4 3.84 0,081 Mg2CuH4 2.04 - - 27 ...Include Security Classification) Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) DelaRosa, Mark J. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...objective of this program was to develop an economical process for pr-ducing a lightweight hydrogen storage medium by the chemical vapor infiltration

  17. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  18. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  19. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  20. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen...... and metal and for the stable hydrides this is associated with release of heat (#DELTA#H_f ). The more thermodynamically stable the hydride, the larger DHf, and the higher temperature is needed in order to desorphydrogen (reverse reaction) and vice versa. For practical application the temperature needed...

  1. Coinage Metal Hydrides: Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Abraham J; Lalic, Gojko; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2016-08-10

    Hydride complexes of copper, silver, and gold encompass a broad array of structures, and their distinctive reactivity has enabled dramatic recent advances in synthesis and catalysis. This Review summarizes the synthesis, characterization, and key stoichiometric reactions of isolable or observable coinage metal hydrides. It discusses catalytic processes in which coinage metal hydrides are known or probable intermediates, and presents mechanistic studies of selected catalytic reactions. The purpose of this Review is to convey how developments in coinage metal hydride chemistry have led to new organic transformations, and how developments in catalysis have in turn inspired the synthesis of reactive new complexes.

  2. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Wagner, Lucas (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO)

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  3. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  4. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  5. Research on Metal Hydride Compressor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ti-Zr series Laves phase hydrogen storage alloys with good hydrogen storage properties, such as large hydrogen capacity, rapid hydriding and dehydriding rate, high compression ratio, gentle plateau, small hysteresis, easily being activated and long cyclic stability etc. for metal hydride compressor have been investigated. In addition, a hydride compressor with special characteristics, namely, advanced filling method, good heat transfer effect and reasonable structural design etc. has also been constructed. A hydride compressor cryogenic system has been assembled coupling the compressor with a J-T micro-throttling refrigeration device and its cooling capacity can reach 0.4 W at 25 K.

  6. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  7. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogdanovic, Borislav; Felderhoff, Michael; Streukens, Guido

    2009-01-01

    ...) are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides...

  8. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  9. Trialkylborane-Assisted CO(2) Reduction by Late Transition Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2011-01-01

    Trialkylborane additives promote reduction of CO(2) to formate by bis(diphosphine) Ni(II) and Rh(III) hydride complexes. The late transition metal hydrides, which can be formed from dihydrogen, transfer hydride to CO(2) to give a formate-borane adduct. The borane must be of appropriate Lewis acidity: weaker acids do not show significant hydride transfer enhancement, while stronger acids abstract hydride without CO(2) reduction. The mechanism likely involves a pre-equilibrium hydride transfer followed by formation of a stabilizing formate-borane adduct.

  10. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  11. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  12. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  13. Optimizing Misch-Metal Compositions In Metal Hydride Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical cells based on metal hydride anodes investigated experimentally in effort to find anode compositions maximizing charge/discharge-cycle performances. Experimental anodes contained misch metal alloyed with various proportions of Ni, Co, Mn, and Al, and experiments directed toward optimization of composition of misch metal.

  14. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  15. Activation and discharge kinetics of metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Stein Egil

    2003-07-01

    Potential step chronoamperometry and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (eis) measurements were performed on single metal hydride particles. For the {alpha}-phase, the bulk diffusion coefficient and the absorption/adsorption rate parameters were determined. Materials produced by atomisation, melt spinning and conventional casting were investigated. The melt spun and conventional cast materials were identical and the atomised material similar in composition. The particles from the cast and the melt spun material were shaped like parallelepipeds. A corresponding equation, for this geometry, for diffusion coupled to an absorption/adsorption reaction was developed. It was found that materials produced by melt spinning exhibited lower bulk diffusion (1.7E-14 m2/s) and absorption/adsorption reaction rate (1.0E-8 m/s), compared to materials produced by conventionally casting (1.1E-13 m2/s and 5.5E-8 m/s respectively). In addition, the influence of particle active surface and relative diffusion length were discussed. It was concluded that there are uncertainties connected to these properties, which may explain the large distribution in the kinetic parameters measured on metal hydride particles. Activation of metal hydride forming materials has been studied and an activation procedure, for porous electrodes, was investigated. Cathodic polarisation of the electrode during a hot alkaline surface treatment gave the maximum discharge capacity on the first discharge of the electrode. The studied materials were produced by gas atomisation and the spherical shape was retained during the activation. Both an AB{sub 5} and an AB{sub 2} alloy was successfully activated and discharge rate properties determined. The AB{sub 2} material showed a higher maximum discharge capacity, but poor rate properties, compared to the AB{sub 5} material. Reduction of surface oxides, and at the same time protection against corrosion of active metallic nickel, can explain the satisfying results of

  16. Neutral binuclear rare-earth metal complexes with four μ₂-bridging hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weifeng; He, Dongliang; Wang, Meiyan; Mou, Zehuai; Cheng, Jianhua; Yao, Changguang; Li, Shihui; Trifonov, Alexander A; Lyubov, Dmitrii M; Cui, Dongmei

    2015-03-25

    The first neutral rare-earth metal dinuclear dihydrido complexes [(NPNPN)LnH2]2 (2-Ln; Ln = Y, Lu; NPNPN: N[Ph2PNC6H3((i)Pr)2]2) bearing μ2-bridging hydride ligands have been synthesized. In the presence of THF, 2-Y undergoes intramolecular activation of the sp(2) C-H bond to form dinuclear aryl-hydride complex 3-Y containing three μ2-bridging hydride ligands.

  17. Experimental comparison on heat transfer-enhancing component of metal hydride bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun-goo, E-mail: hgkang@nfri.re.kr; Chung, Dong-you; Oh, Yun Hee; Chang, Min Ho; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Two small ZrCo metal hydride beds were developed. • Copper foam or fin as heat transfer-enhancing component are experimentally compared. • Copper foam bed is more efficient for uniform and rapid heating of metal hydride. • Copper foam bed is more efficient in removal of reaction heat during absorption. - Abstract: Metal hydride bed will be one of the key components for safe handling of tritium in fusion fuel cycle. In case of normal or emergency shutdown of fuel cycle, metal hydride bed installed in storage and delivery system (SDS) of tritium plant will absorb tritium gas in the system as soon as possible. Supply of hydrogen isotope gas to fueling system of fusion reactor will start from the metal hydride beds. Rapid delivery, rapid recovery including rapid heating and cooling are key issues. For better performance of metal hydride bed, various forms of heat transfer enhancing component or design can be applied. This study aims to help the selection of heat transfer enhancing component. Two small ZrCo beds with copper foam and copper fin were developed and experimented with hydrogen gas. Recovery and delivery performance, heating and cooling performance are compared. Experimental results show metal hydride bed with copper foam has improved performance. Uniform heating of metal hydride during desorption and removal of reaction heat during absorption are more efficient with copper foam bed than copper fin bed.

  18. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  19. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions

  20. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  1. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form

  2. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  3. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  4. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  5. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  6. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  7. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  8. Structural isotope effects in metal hydrides and deuterides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Valeska P; Henry, Paul F; Kohlmann, Holger; Wilson, Chick C; Weller, Mark T

    2010-03-07

    Historically the extraction of high-quality crystallographic information from inorganic samples having high hydrogen contents, such as metal hydrides, has involved preparing deuterated samples prior to study using neutron powder diffraction. We demonstrate, through direct comparison of the crystal structure refinements of the binary hydrides SrH(2) and BaH(2) with their deuteride analogues at 2 K and as a function of temperature, that precise and accurate structural information can be obtained from rapid data collections from samples containing in excess of 60 at.% hydrogen using modern high-flux, medium resolution, continuous wavelength neutron powder diffraction instruments. Furthermore, observed isotope-effects in the extracted lattice parameters and atomic positions illustrate the importance of investigating compounds in their natural hydrogenous form whenever possible.

  9. Rules and trends of metal cation driven hydride-transfer mechanisms in metal amidoboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Young; Lee, Han Myoung; Seo, Jongcheol; Shin, Seung Koo; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-01-01

    Group I and II metal amidoboranes have been identified as one of the promising families of materials for efficient H(2) storage. However, the underlying mechanism of the dehydrogenation of these materials is not well understood. Thus, the mechanisms and kinetics of H(2) release in metal amidoboranes are investigated using high level ab initio calculations and kinetic simulations. The metal plays the role of catalyst for the hydride transfer with formation of a metal hydride intermediate towards the dehydrogenation. In this process, with increasing ionic character of the metal hydride bond in the intermediate, the stability of the intermediate decreases, while the dehydrogenation process involving ionic recombination of the hydridic H with the protic H proceeds with a reduced barrier. Such correlations lead directly to a U-shaped relationship between the activation energy barrier for H(2) elimination and the ionicity of metal hydride bond. Oligomerized intermediates are formed by the chain reaction of the size-driven catalytic effects of metals, competing with the non-oligomerization pathway. The kinetic rates at low temperatures are determined by the maximum barrier height in the pathway (a Lambda-shaped relation), while those at moderately high temperatures are determined by most of multiple-barriers. This requires kinetic simulations. At the operating temperatures of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the metal amidoboranes with lithium and sodium release H(2) along both oligomerization and non-oligomerization paths. The sodium amidoboranes show the most accelerated rates, while others release H(2) at similar rates. In addition, we predict that the novel metal amidoborane-based adducts and mixtures would release H(2) with accelerated rates as well as with enhanced reversibility. This comprehensive study is useful for further developments of active metal-based better hydrogen storage materials.

  10. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  11. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  12. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  13. Carbene-metal hydrides can be much less acidic than phosphine-metal hydrides: significance in hydrogenations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ye; Fan, Yubo; Burgess, Kevin

    2010-05-05

    Acidities of iridium hydride intermediates were shown to be critical in some transformations mediated by the chiral analogues of Crabtree's catalyst, 1-3. To do this, several experiments were undertaken to investigate the acidities of hydrogenation mixtures formed using these iridium-oxazoline complexes. DFT calculations indicated that the acidity difference for Ir-H intermediates in these hydrogenations were astounding; iridium hydride from the N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst 1 was calculated to be around seven pK(a) units less acidic than those from the P-based complexes 2 and 3. Consistent with this, the carbene complex 1 was shown to be more effective for hydrogenations of acid-sensitive substrates. In deuteration experiments, less "abnormal" deuteration was observed, corresponding to fewer complications from acid-mediated alkene isomerization preceding the D(2)-addition step. Finally, simple tests with pH indicators provided visual evidence that phosphine-based catalyst precursors give significantly more acidic reaction mixtures than the corresponding N-heterocyclic carbene ones. These observations indicate carbene-for-phosphine (and similar) ligand substitutions may impact the outcome of catalytic reactions by modifying the acidities of the metal hydrides formed.

  14. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  15. Investigation of long term stability in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmaro, Roger W.; Lynch, Franklin E.; Chandra, Dhanesh; Lambert, Steve; Sharma, Archana

    1991-01-01

    It is apparent from the literature and the results of this study that cyclic degradation of AB(5) type metal hydrides varies widely according to the details of how the specimens are cycled. The Rapid Cycle Apparatus (RCA) used produced less degradation in 5000 to 10000 cycles than earlier work with a Slow Cycle Apparatus (SCA) produced in 1500 cycles. Evidence is presented that the 453 K (356 F) Thermal Aging (TA) time spent in the saturated condition causes hydride degradation. But increasing the cooling (saturation) period in the RCA did not greatly increase the rate of degradation. It appears that TA type degradation is secondary at low temperatures to another degradation mechanism. If rapid cycles are less damaging than slow cycles when the saturation time is equal, the rate of hydriding/dehydriding may be an important factor. The peak temperatures in the RCA were about 30 C lower than the SCA. The difference in peak cycle temperatures (125 C in the SCA, 95 C in RCA) cannot explain the differences in degradation. TA type degradation is similar to cyclic degradation in that nickel peaks and line broadening are observed in X ray diffraction patterns after either form of degradation.

  16. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, W.D. II

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ (Cp=eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/ and PPN = (Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 2/) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN/sup +/(CpV(C)/sub 3/X)/sup -/ and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN/sup +/ (CpV(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/H/sup -/. The borohydride salt PPN/sup +/(CpV(CO)/sub 3/BH/sub 4/)/sup -/ has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ or a mixture of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ and CpCo(CO)/sub 2/ affords two new anions, PPN/sup +/ (Cp/sub 2/Rh/sub 3/(CO)/sub 4/)/sup -/ and PPN/sup +/(Cp/sub 2/RhCo(CO)/sub 2/)/sup -/. CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with CpMo(CO)/sub 3/R (R=CH/sub 3/,C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/) at 25 to 50/sup 0/C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers (CpMo(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and (CpMo(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/. In general, CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species.

  17. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, W.D. II

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ (Cp=eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/ and PPN = (Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 2/) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN/sup +/(CpV(C)/sub 3/X)/sup -/ and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN/sup +/ (CpV(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/H/sup -/. The borohydride salt PPN/sup +/(CpV(CO)/sub 3/BH/sub 4/)/sup -/ has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ or a mixture of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ and CpCo(CO)/sub 2/ affords two new anions, PPN/sup +/ (Cp/sub 2/Rh/sub 3/(CO)/sub 4/)/sup -/ and PPN/sup +/(Cp/sub 2/RhCo(CO)/sub 2/)/sup -/. CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with CpMo(CO)/sub 3/R (R=CH/sub 3/,C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/) at 25 to 50/sup 0/C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers (CpMo(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and (CpMo(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/. In general, CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species.

  18. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  19. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications--metal hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bédard, Stéphane

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software.

  20. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  1. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  2. The use of metal hydrides in fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo V. Lototskyy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews state-of-the-art developments in hydrogen energy systems which integrate fuel cells with metal hydride-based hydrogen storage. The 187 reference papers included in this review provide an overview of all major publications in the field, as well as recent work by several of the authors of the review. The review contains four parts. The first part gives an overview of the existing types of fuel cells and outlines the potential of using metal hydride stores as a source of hydrogen fuel. The second part of the review considers the suitability and optimisation of different metal hydrides based on their energy efficient thermal integration with fuel cells. The performances of metal hydrides are considered from the viewpoint of the reversible heat driven interaction of the metal hydrides with gaseous H2. Efficiencies of hydrogen and heat exchange in hydrogen stores to control H2 charge/discharge flow rates are the focus of the third section of the review and are considered together with metal hydride – fuel cell system integration issues and the corresponding engineering solutions. Finally, the last section of the review describes specific hydrogen-fuelled systems presented in the available reference data.

  3. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

  4. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  5. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites.

  6. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  7. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  8. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  9. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-07

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  10. Metal hydrides for smart window and sensor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshimura, K.; Langhammer, C.; Dam, B.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogenation of metals often leads to changes in optical properties in the visible range. This allows for fundamental studies of the hydrogenation process, as well as the exploration of various applications using these optical effects. Here, we focus on recent developments in metal hydride-base

  11. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  12. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ramesh [Dept. of Physics, Feroze Gandhi Insititute of Engineering and Technology, Raebareli-229001 (India); Shukla, Seema, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Dwivedi, Shalini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Sharma, Yamini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Dept. of Physics Feroze Gandhi College, Raebareli-229001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  13. Light metal hydrides and complex hydrides for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüth, F; Bogdanović, B; Felderhoff, M

    2004-10-21

    The availability of feasible methods for hydrogen storage is one of the key-maybe the key-requirements for the large scale application of PEM fuel cells in cars. There are in principle four different approaches, i.e. cryostorage in liquid form, high pressure storage, storage in the form of a chemical compound which is converted to hydrogen by on-board reforming, or reversible chemical storage in different kinds of storage materials. New developments in the field of chemical storage make such systems attractive compared to the other options. This review will discuss the different possibilities for chemical storage of hydrogen and the focus on the presently most advanced system with respect to storage capacity and kinetics, i.e. catalyzed alanates, especially NaAlH(4).

  14. Investigation of the hydrogen neutrals in a discharge source used for production of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhinova, I.; Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the possible mechanisms for production of metal hydrides (MH) in a DC discharge source. The results of different experiments suggest that the molecules are sputtered directly from the surface of the cathode, where they are formed after adsorption of atomic hydrogen. This hypothesis allows one to understand the operation of the source studied and to optimize its working conditions.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  16. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovshinsky, S R; Fetcenko, M A; Ross, J

    1993-04-09

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved.

  17. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  18. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  19. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  20. Nanocrystalline Metal Hydrides Obtained by Severe Plastic Deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Huot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD techniques could be used to obtain nanostructured metal hydrides with enhanced hydrogen sorption properties. In this paper we review the different SPD techniques used on metal hydrides and present some specific cases of the effect of cold rolling on the hydrogen storage properties and crystal structure of various types of metal hydrides such as magnesium-based alloys and body centered cubic (BCC alloys. Results show that generally cold rolling is as effective as ball milling to enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics. However, for some alloys such as TiV0.9Mn1.1 alloy ball milling and cold rolling have detrimental effect on hydrogen capacity. The exact mechanism responsible for the change in hydrogenation properties may not be the same for ball milling and cold rolling. Nevertheless, particle size reduction and texture seems to play a leading role in the hydrogen sorption enhancement of cold rolled metal hydrides.

  1. KNH2-KH: a metal amide-hydride solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Sørby, Magnus H; Chierotti, Michele R; Garroni, Sebastiano; Pinatel, Eugenio; Karimi, Fahim; Cao, Hujun; Bergemann, Nils; Le, Thi T; Puszkiel, Julián; Gobetto, Roberto; Baricco, Marcello; Hauback, Bjørn C; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-09-27

    We report for the first time the formation of a metal amide-hydride solid solution. The dissolution of KH into KNH2 leads to an anionic substitution, which decreases the interaction among NH2(-) ions. The rotational properties of the high temperature polymorphs of KNH2 are thereby retained down to room temperature.

  2. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were

  4. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  5. Optimization of Internal Cooling Fins for Metal Hydride Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Kukkapalli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride alloys are considered as a promising alternative to conventional hydrogen storage cylinders and mechanical hydrogen compressors. Compared to storing in a classic gas tank, metal hydride alloys can store hydrogen at nearly room pressure and use less volume to store the same amount of hydrogen. However, this hydrogen storage method necessitates an effective way to reject the heat released from the exothermic hydriding reaction. In this paper, a finned conductive insert is adopted to improve the heat transfer in the cylindrical reactor. The fins collect the heat that is volumetrically generated in LaNi5 metal hydride alloys and deliver it to the channel located in the center, through which a refrigerant flows. A multiple-physics modeling is performed to analyze the transient heat and mass transfer during the hydrogen absorption process. Fin design is made to identify the optimum shape of the finned insert for the best heat rejection. For the shape optimization, use of a predefined transient heat generation function is proposed. Simulations show that there exists an optimal length for the fin geometry.

  6. Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor); Fultz, Brent (Inventor); Witham, Charles K. (Inventor); Bowman, Robert C. (Inventor); Hightower, Adrian (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  7. Metal hydride-based thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J.; Fang, Zhigang

    2017-10-03

    The invention provides a thermal energy storage system comprising a metal-containing first material with a thermal energy storage density of about 1300 kJ/kg to about 2200 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; a metal-containing second material with a thermal energy storage density of about 200 kJ/kg to about 1000 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; and a hydrogen conduit for reversibly transporting hydrogen between the first material and the second material. At a temperature of 20.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal is converted to the hydride. At a temperature of 0.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal hydride is converted to the metal and hydrogen. The disclosed metal hydride materials have a combination of thermodynamic energy storage densities and kinetic power capabilities that previously have not been demonstrated. This performance enables practical use of thermal energy storage systems for electric vehicle heating and cooling.

  8. The electric double layer in hydriding metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jamroziak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The effect of penetration hydrogen into fatigue load metals is widely investigated by many researchers.Hydrogen is the chemical element which plays negative role in fatigue durability of structures. It decides on fatiguebrittle cracking. In the paper authors carry out an analysis of fatigue durability. Making use of naturally coming intoexistence the electric double layer phenomenon authors discussed the model of absorbing hydrogen into fatigue gap.Design/methodology/approach: A proposed model of the mechanism of hydrogen absorption by metal wasbased on particle hydrogen and water vapor from the air.Findings: It assumes that the EDL has crucial role in intercepting of polar dipole particles of hydrogenand water’s vapor, especially in an already formed fatigue micro-gaps and gaps by effects of its electrostaticattraction force. The authors assume that the main source of hydrogen is water’s vapor, and number of hydrogendipoles is negligible.Practical implications: The problems of metals’ fragility/durability were also discussed in other papersin which author mainly tried to develop new methods of materials’ production with the consideration of assumedfatigue durability.Originality/value: Currently, in progress are works on proposing a model for hydrogen absorption by metal.Such approach to optimization in production and development of the new technologies is an essence of modernconstructions that work in all variety of mechanical stress conditions.

  9. Designing metal hydride complexes for water splitting reactions: a molecular electrostatic potential approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, K S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-08-28

    The hydridic character of octahedral metal hydride complexes of groups VI, VII and VIII has been systematically studied using molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography. The absolute minimum of MESP at the hydride ligand (Vmin) and the MESP value at the hydride nucleus (VH) are found to be very good measures of the hydridic character of the hydride ligand. The increasing/decreasing electron donating feature of the ligand environment is clearly reflected in the increasing/decreasing negative character of Vmin and VH. The formation of an outer sphere metal hydride-water complex showing the HH dihydrogen interaction is supported by the location and the value of Vmin near the hydride ligand. A higher negative MESP suggested lower activation energy for H2 elimination. Thus, MESP features provided a way to fine-tune the ligand environment of a metal-hydride complex to achieve high hydridicity for the hydride ligand. The applicability of an MESP based hydridic descriptor in designing water splitting reactions is tested for group VI metal hydride model complexes of tungsten.

  10. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications.

  11. Matrix infrared spectra and density functional calculations of transition metal hydrides and dihydrogen complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lester

    2004-02-20

    Metal hydrides are of considerable importance in chemical synthesis as intermediates in catalytic hydrogenation reactions. Transition metal atoms react with dihydrogen to produce metal dihydrides or dihydrogen complexes and these may be trapped in solid matrix samples for infrared spectroscopic study. The MH(2) or M(H(2)) molecules so formed react further to form higher MH(4), (H(2))MH(2), or M(H(2))(2), and MH(6), (H(2))(2)MH(2), or M(H(2))(3) hydrides or complexes depending on the metal. In this critical review these transition metal and dihydrogen reaction products are surveyed for Groups 3 though 12 and the contrasting behaviour in Groups 6 and 10 is discussed. Minimum energy structures and vibrational frequencies predicted by Density Functional Theory agree with the experimental results, strongly supporting the identification of novel binary transition metal hydride species, which the matrix-isolation method is well-suited to investigate. 104 references are cited.

  12. Development of a novel metal hydride-air secondary battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamburzev, S.; Zhang, W.; Velev, O.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A.J. [Texas A and M University, College Station (United States). Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research; Visintin, A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Insituto Nacional de Investigaciones Fisicoquimica Teoricas y Applicadas

    1998-05-01

    A laboratory metal hydride/air cell was evaluated. Charging was via a bifunctional air gas-diffusion electrode. Mixed nickel and cobalt oxides, supported on carbon black and activated carbon, were used as catalysts in this electrode. At 30 mA cm{sup -2} in 6 M KOH, the air electrode potentials were -0.2 V (oxygen reduction) and +0.65 V (oxygen evolution) vs Hg/HgO. The laboratory cell was cycled for 50 cycles at the C/2 rate (10 mA cm{sup -2}). The average discharge/charge voltages of the cell were 0.65 and 1.6 V, respectively. The initial capacity of the metal hydride electrode decreased by about 15% after 50 cycles. (author)

  13. Reversible metal-hydride phase transformation in epitaxial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytburd, Alexander L; Boyerinas, Brad M; Bruck, Hugh A

    2015-03-11

    Metal-hydride phase transformations in solids commonly proceed with hysteresis. The extrinsic component of hysteresis is the result of the dissipation of energy of internal stress due to plastic deformation and fracture. It can be mitigated on the nanoscale, where plastic deformation and fracture are suppressed and the transformation proceeds through formation and evolution of coherent phases. However, the phase coherency introduces intrinsic thermodynamic hysteresis, preventing reversible transformation. In this paper, it is shown that thermodynamic hysteresis of coherent metal-hydride transformation can be eliminated in epitaxial film due to substrate constraint. Film-substrate interaction leads to formation of heterophase polydomain nanostructure with variable phase fraction which can change reversibly by varying temperature in a closed system or chemical potential in an open system.

  14. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Vishvanath P.; Badiger Nagappa M.; Gerward Leif

    2016-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neu...

  15. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Modellization of Metal Hydride Canister for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Maceiras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen shows very interesting features for its use on-board applications as fuel cell vehicles. This paper presents the modelling of a tank with a metal hydride alloy for on-board applications, which provides good performance under ambient conditions. The metal hydride contained in the tank is Ti0.98Zr0.02V0.43Fe0.09Cr0.05Mn1.5. A two-dimensional model has been performed for the refuelling process (absorption and the discharge process (desorption. For that, individual models of mass balance, energy balance, reaction kinetics and behaviour of hydrogen gas has been modelled. The model has been developed under Matlab / Simulink© environment. Finally, individual models have been integrated into a global model, and simulated under ambient conditions. With the aim to analyse the temperature influence on the state of charge and filling and emptying time, other simulations were performed at different temperatures. The obtained results allow to conclude that this alloy offers a good behaviour with the discharge process under normal ambient conditions. Keywords: Hydrogen storage; metal hydrides; fuel cell; simulation; board applications

  17. Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonds in the Reactions of Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-08-10

    The dihydrogen bond-an interaction between a transition-metal or main-group hydride (M-H) and a protic hydrogen moiety (H-X)-is arguably the most intriguing type of hydrogen bond. It was discovered in the mid-1990s and has been intensively explored since then. Herein, we collate up-to-date experimental and computational studies of the structural, energetic, and spectroscopic parameters and natures of dihydrogen-bonded complexes of the form M-H···H-X, as such species are now known for a wide variety of hydrido compounds. Being a weak interaction, dihydrogen bonding entails the lengthening of the participating bonds as well as their polarization (repolarization) as a result of electron density redistribution. Thus, the formation of a dihydrogen bond allows for the activation of both the MH and XH bonds in one step, facilitating proton transfer and preparing these bonds for further transformations. The implications of dihydrogen bonding in different stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, such as hydrogen exchange, alcoholysis and aminolysis, hydrogen evolution, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation, are discussed.

  18. Metal Hydrides as hot carrier cell absorber materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Wen, Xiaoming; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2016-09-01

    The hot Carrier Solar Cell (HCSC) allows the photon-induced hot carriers (the carriers with energy larger than the band gap) to be collected before they completely thermalise. The absorber of the HCSC should have a large phononic band gap to supress Klemens Decay, which results in a slow carrier cooling speed. In fact, a large phononic band gap likely exists in a binary compound whose constituent elements have a large mass ratio between each other. Binary hydrides with their overwhelming mass ratio of the constituent elements are important absorber candidates. Study on different types of binary hydrides as potential absorber candidates is presented in this paper. Many binary transition metal hydrides have reported theoretical or experimental phonon dispersion charts which show large phononic band gaps. Among these hydrides, the titanium hydride (TiHX) is outstanding because of its low cost, easy fabrication process and is relatively inert to air and water. A TiHX thin film is fabricated by directly hydrogenating an evaporated titanium thin film. Characterisation shows good crystal quality and the hydrogenation process is believed to be successful. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy is used to study the electron cooling time of TiHX. The result is very noisy due to the low absorption and transmission of the sample. The evolution of the TA curves has been explained by band to band transition using the calculated band structure of TiH2. Though not reliable due to the high noise, decay time fitting at 700nm and 600nm shows a considerably slow carrier cooling speed of the sample.

  19. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  20. Orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Manuel A; Vidossich, Pietro; Conejero, Salvador; Lledós, Agustí

    2014-12-15

    Hydrogen atoms in the coordination sphere of a transition metal are highly mobile ligands. Here, a new type of dynamic process involving hydrides has been characterized by computational means. This dynamic event consists of an orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers containing N-heterocyclic carbenes. The hydride movement around the carbene-metal-carbene axis is the lowest energy mode connecting energy equivalent isomers. This understanding provides crucial information for the interpretation of NMR spectra.

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and pressur

  2. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and

  3. Air passivation of metal hydride beds for waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J. E.; Hsu, R. H. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    One waste acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the bed be non-pyrophoric. Batch-wise air ingress tests were performed which determined the amount of air consumed by a metal hydride bed. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 deg.C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 deg.C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 sec air was consumed by the bed (0.08 sec per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12. cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water. (authors)

  4. True boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-04

    Despite many exploratory studies over the past several decades, the presently known transition metals that form homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes are limited to the Groups 7-12. Here we present evidence for the formation of Mg3 CrH8 , containing the first Group 6 hydride complex [CrH7 ](5-) . Our theoretical calculations reveal that pentagonal-bipyramidal H coordination allows the formation of σ-bonds between H and Cr. The results are strongly supported by neutron diffraction and IR spectroscopic measurements. Given that the Group 3-5 elements favor ionic/metallic bonding with H, along with the current results, the true boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes should be between Group 5 and 6. As the H coordination number generally tends to increase with decreasing atomic number of transition metals, the revised boundary suggests high potential for further discovery of hydrogen-rich materials that are of both technological and fundamental interest.

  5. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    and Ca(BH4)2, respectively [3,4]. An attempt to synthesize alkali and alkaline earth metal borohydrides from various borides by ball milling under high hydrogen pressure is presented here. MgB2, AlB2 and CaB6 have been milled with MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) at p(H2) = 110 bar for 24 hours. All samples were...

  6. Dual-mode chemical vapor generation for simultaneous determination of hydride-forming and non-hydride-forming elements by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Kailai; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-05-21

    A dual-mode chemical vapor generation integrating hydride generation and photochemical vapor generation was developed for simultaneous multi-element analysis of hydride-forming and non-hydride-forming elements by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Four elements were selected as model elements of hydride-forming (As, Cd) and non-hydride-forming (Ni, Fe) elements to validate this proposed method. Standard or sample solutions were separately pumped to mix with tetrahydroborate, and concentrated formic acid and ammonia, and then directed to a hydride generator and a photochemical reactor to realize simultaneous hydride generation and photochemical vapor generation, respectively. Optimum conditions for dual-mode chemical vapor generation were carefully investigated. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection of 0.05, 0.008, 0.8 and 0.1 μg L(-1) were obtained for As, Cd, Fe and Ni, respectively. The precisions were 5.0, 5.5, 4.3 and 4.5% (n = 6, RSDs) for 2 μg L(-1) of As, 1 μg L(-1) of Cd, 50 μg L(-1) of Fe and 10 μg L(-1) of Ni, respectively. This method was validated for accuracy with three certified reference water samples and applied to the simultaneous determination of these elements in a tap water sample with spike recoveries in the range of 95-99%.

  7. Simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzo, Z. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Altos de Pipe, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Matos-Reyes, M.N.; Cervera, M.L.; Guardia, M. de la, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The operating characteristics of a dual nebulization system were studied including instrumental and chemical conditions for the hydride generation and analytical figures of merit for both, hydride and non hydride forming elements. Analytical performance of the nebulization system was characterized by detection limits from 0.002 to 0.0026 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the hydride forming elements and between 0.0034 and 0.0121 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the non-hydride forming elements, relative standard deviation for 10 replicate measurements at 0.25 mg L{sup -1} level and recovery percentages between 97 and 103%. The feasibility of the system was demonstrated in the simultaneous determination of Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Zn, As, Bi, Sb, Se, and Te in the NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder), NIST 1570a (spinach leaves), DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) certified samples for trace elements. Results found were in good agreement with the certified ones. (author)

  8. Metal hydrides studied in gas discharge tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhinova, I.; Kolev, S.; Popov, Tsv.; Pashov, A.; Dimitrova, M.

    2016-05-01

    A novel construction of gas discharge tube has been tested for production of high densities of metal hydrydes. Its performance turned out to be comparable with the existing sources of the same type and even better. First results of the tests on NiH are reported and critically analysed. Plans for future modifiaction of the construction and application of the tube are discussed.

  9. Kinetics of Liquid-Phase Hydrogenation of Benzene in a Metal Hydride Slurry System Formed by M1Ni5 and Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代世耀; 徐国华; 安越; 陈长聘; 陈立新; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene in misch metal nickel-five (M1Ni5) and benzene slurry system was studied by investigating the influences of the reaction temperature, pressure, alloy concentration and stirring speed on the mass transfer-reaction processes inside the slurry. The results show that the whole process is controlled by the reaction at the surface of the catalyst. The mass transfer resistance at gas-liquid interface and that from the bulk liquid phase to the surface of the catalyst particles are negligible. The apparent reaction rate is zero order for benzene concentration and first order for hydrogen concentration in the liquid phase. The kinetic model obtained fits the experimental data very well. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogen absorption reaction of M1Ni5-C6H6 slurry system is 42.16 kJ·mo1-1.

  10. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  11. Electronic Principles of Hydrogen Incorporation and Dynamics in Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Matović

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach to various metal hydrides based on electronic principles is presented. The effective medium theory (EMT is used to illustrate fundamental aspects of metal-hydrogen interaction and clarify the most important processes taking place during the interaction. The elaboration is extended using the numerous existing results of experiment and calculations, as well as using some new material. In particular, the absorption/desorption of H in the Mg/MgH2 system is analyzed in detail, and all relevant initial structures and processes explained. Reasons for the high stability and slow sorption in this system are noted, and possible solutions proposed. The role of the transition-metal impurities in MgH2 is briefly discussed, and some interesting phenomena, observed in complex intermetallic compounds, are mentioned. The principle mechanism governing the Li-amide/imide transformation is also discussed. Latterly, some perspectives for the metal-hydrides investigation from the electronic point of view are elucidated.

  12. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  13. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, Karl; Havela, Ladislav; Prokleska, Jan; Stelmakhovych, Olha; Danis, Stanislav [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Santava, Eva [Inst. of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Miliyanchuk, Khrystyna [Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National Univ. of Lviv (Ukraine)

    2009-09-15

    Due to hydrogenation, the crystal structure of GdNiAl distorts from hexagonal to orthorhombic. The magnetic ordering temperature decreases dramatically and the magnetic entropy of this phase transition is in good agreement with theory. LuNiAl does not change its structure type, but it was found that the electronic contribution to specific heat decreases dramatically. None of the two phases loses its metallic character. (orig.)

  14. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hardy, B. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Corgnale, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Motyka, Ted [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-31

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate a metal hydride-based TES system for use with a CSP system. A unique approach has been applied to this project that combines our modeling experience with the extensive material knowledge and expertise at both SRNL and Curtin University (CU). Because of their high energy capacity and reasonable kinetics many metal hydride systems can be charged rapidly. Metal hydrides for vehicle applications have demonstrated charging rates in minutes and tens of minutes as opposed to hours. This coupled with high heat of reaction allows metal hydride TES systems to produce very high thermal power rates (approx. 1kW per 6-8 kg of material). A major objective of this work is to evaluate some of the new metal hydride materials that have recently become available. A problem with metal hydride TES systems in the past has been selecting a suitable high capacity low temperature metal hydride material to pair with the high temperature material. A unique aspect of metal hydride TES systems is that many of these systems can be located on or near dish/engine collectors due to their high thermal capacity and small size. The primary objective of this work is to develop a high enthalpy metal hydride that is capable of reversibly storing hydrogen at high temperatures (> 650 °C) and that can be paired with a suitable low enthalpy metal hydride with low cost materials. Furthermore, a demonstration of hydrogen cycling between the two hydride beds is desired.

  15. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  16. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Blaine Kermit [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  17. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the Electro Energy, Inc.'s bipolar nickel metal hydride battery. The advantages of the design are that each cell is individually sealed, and that there are no external cell terminals, no electrode current collectors, it is compatible with plastic bonded electrodes, adaptable to heat transfer fins, scalable to large area, capacity and high voltage. The design will allow for automated flexible manufacturing, improved energy and power density and lower cost. The development and testing of the battery's component are described. Graphic presentation of the results of many of the tests are included.

  18. Research in Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen papers focusing on recent research investigations in the field of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been selected for this Special Issue of Batteries. These papers summarize the joint efforts in Ni/MH battery research from BASF, Wayne State University, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Michigan State University, and FDK during 2015–2016 through reviews of basic operational concepts, previous academic publications, issued US Patent and filed Japan Patent Applications, descriptions of current research results in advanced components and cell constructions, and projections of future works.

  19. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  20. Nickel/metal hydride technology for consumer and electric vehicle batteries—a review and up-date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, S. K.; Ovshínsky, S. R.; Gifford, P. R.; Corrigan, D. A.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Venkatesan, S.

    Nickel/metal hydride batteries today represent the fastest growing market segment for rechargeable batteries due to the high energy density and more environmentally acceptable chemistry offered by this technology. The high energy density of nickel/metal hydride batteries coupled with high power density and long cycle life make this battery chemistry a key enabling technology for practical electric vehicles, including cars, vans, trucks, and other forms of transportation such as scooters, bicycles, and three-wheelers. This paper provides a review of Ovonic technology and up-dates recent developments in materials and cell development for both consumer electronic and EV applications, and highlights areas for future development.

  1. Pore-Confined Light Metal Hydrides for Energy Storage and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramwell, P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Light metal hydrides have enjoyed several decades of attention in the field of hydrogen storage, but their applications have recently begun to diversify more and more into the broader field of energy storage. For example, light metal hydrides have shown great promise as battery materials, in sensors

  2. Theoretical study on hydrogenation catalysts containing a metal hydride as additional hydrogen supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A hypothetical hydrogenation catalyst consisting of porous, catalytically active particles embedded with metal hydride powder was evaluated. The metal hydride provides temporarily additional hydrogen if the mass transfer rate of the hydrogen to the internal of the particle is not sufficient. A numer

  3. Complex transition metal hydrides: linear correlation of countercation electronegativity versus T-D bond lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T D; Sheppard, D A; Buckley, C E

    2015-06-30

    For homoleptic 18-electron complex hydrides, an inverse linear correlation has been established between the T-deuterium bond length (T = Fe, Co, Ni) and the average electronegativity of the metal countercations. This relationship can be further employed towards aiding structural solutions and predicting physical properties of novel complex transition metal hydrides.

  4. Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei-Kang; Noreus, Dag [Department of Materials and Enviromental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air (MH-air) cells with a gas management device were designed in order to minimize the loss of electrolyte. An AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy was used as anode materials of the MH-air. The thickness of the metal hydride electrodes was in the range of 3.0-3.4 mm. Porous carbon-based air electrodes with Ag{sub 2}O catalysts were used as bi-functional electrodes for oxygen reduction and generation. The electrodes were first examined in half-cells to evaluate their performance and then assembled into one MH-air cell. The results showed the good cycling stability of the rechargeable MH-air cell with a capacity of 1990 mAh. The discharge voltage was 0.69 V at 0.05-0.1 C. The charge efficiency was about 90%. The specific and volumetric energy densities were about 95Wh kg{sup -1} and 140 Wh L{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  5. Effects of Alkaline Pre-Etching to Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejun Meng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The responses of one AB5, two AB2, four A2B7, and one C14-related body-centered-cubic (BCC metal hydrides to an alkaline-etch (45% KOH at 110 °C for 2 h were studied by internal resistance, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, inductively coupled plasma, and AC impedance measurements. Results show that while the etched rare earth–based AB5 and A2B7 alloys surfaces are covered with hydroxide/oxide (weight gain, the transition metal–based AB2 and BCC-C14 alloys surfaces are corroded and leach into electrolyte (weight loss. The C14-predominated AB2, La-only A2B7, and Sm-based A2B7 showed the most reduction in the internal resistance with the alkaline-etch process. Etched A2B7 alloys with high La-contents exhibited the lowest internal resistance and are suggested for use in the high-power application of nickel/metal hydride batteries.

  6. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  7. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  8. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Bogdanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  9. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  10. Standardized hydrogen storage module with high utilization factor based on metal hydride-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Inga; Dieterich, Mila; Pohlmann, Carsten; Röntzsch, Lars; Linder, Marc

    2017-02-01

    In view of hydrogen based backup power systems or small-scale power2gas units, hydrogen storages based on metal hydrides offer a safe and reliable solution. By using Hydralloy C5 as suitable hydride forming alloy, the present tank design guarantees very simple operating conditions: pressures between 4 bar and 30 bar, temperatures between 15 °C and 40 °C and minimal efforts for thermal management in combination with fast and constant charging and discharging capabilities. The modular tank consists of 4 layers with 5 reactor tubes each that are filled with metal hydride-graphite composites of a diameter of 21 mm. Experiments show that each layer of this tank is able to desorb the desired amount of hydrogen for a fuel cell operation at electrical power of 160 Wel for 100 min reaching a utilization factor of 93% of the stored hydrogen at RC. Furthermore, the experimental results of modularity, increasing loads and the electric air ventilation are presented.

  11. Estimating the acidity of transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes by adding ligand acidity constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2014-02-05

    A simple equation (pKa(THF) = ∑AL + Ccharge + Cnd + Cd6) can be used to obtain an estimate of the pKa of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes in tetrahydrofuran, and, by use of conversion equations, in other solvents. It involves adding acidity constants AL for each of the ligands in the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-coordinate conjugate base complex of the hydride or dihydrogen complex along with a correction for the charge (Ccharge = -15, 0 or 30 for x = +1, 0 or -1 charge, respectively) and the periodic row of the transition metal (Cnd = 0 for 3d or 4d metal, 2 for 5d metal) as well as a correction for d(6) octahedral acids (Cd6 = 6 for d(6) metal ion in the acid, 0 for others) that are not dihydrogen complexes. Constants AL are provided for 13 commonly occurring ligand types; of these, nine neutral ligands are correlated with Lever's electrochemical ligand parameters EL. This method gives good estimates of the over 170 literature pKa values that range from less than zero to 50 with a standard deviation of 3 pKa units for complexes of the metals chromium to nickel, molybdenum, ruthenium to palladium, and tungsten to platinum in the periodic table. This approach allows a quick assessment of the acidity of hydride complexes found in nature (e.g., hydrogenases) and in industry (e.g., catalysis and hydrogen energy applications). The pKa values calculated for acids that have bulky or large bite angle chelating ligands deviate the most from this correlation. The method also provides an estimate of the base strength of the deprotonated form of the complex.

  12. First-principles study of superabundant vacancy formation in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjun; Alavi, Ali

    2005-07-13

    Recent experiments have established the generality of superabundant vacancies (SAV) formation in metal hydrides. Aiming to elucidate this intriguing phenomenon and to clarify previous interpretations, we employ density-functional theory to investigate atomic mechanisms of SAV formation in fcc hydrides of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au. We have found that upon H insertion, vacancy formation energies reduce substantially. This is consistent with experimental suggestions. We demonstrate that the entropy effect, which has been proposed to explain SAV formation, is not the main cause. Instead, it is the drastic change of electronic structure induced by the H in the SAV hydrides, which is to a large extent responsible. Interesting trends in systems investigated are also found: ideal hydrides of 5d metals and noble metals are unstable compared to the corresponding pure metals, but the SAV hydrides are more stable than the corresponding ideal hydrides, whereas opposite results exist in the cases of Ni, Rh, and Pd. These trends of stabilities of the SAV hydrides are discussed in detail and a general understanding for SAV formation is provided. Finally, we propose an alternative reaction pathway to generate a SAV hydride from a metal alloy.

  13. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  14. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  15. Progress towards a process for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric cells using a deep eutectic solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R.StJ. Foreman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction experiments relating to the recycling of the transition metals and lanthanides in nickel metal hydride cells are presented. The metal extraction is occurring from a deep eutectic solvent which is formed from chemicals suitable for use in food and related products. While it has been shown that the water content of the DES has a large effect on the extraction of transition metals by a mixture of chloride ionic liquid (Aliquat 336 and an aromatic solvent, the water content has a smaller effect on the solvent extraction of lanthanides with a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl hydrogen phosphate (DEHPA in a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbon. This study suggests that an industrial scale solvent extraction process for the recycling of metals from nickel hydride electrical cells will be feasible.

  16. A review of recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varin, R. A.; Zbroniec, L. [University of Waterloo, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Polanski, M.; Bystrzycki, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology and Chemistry, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada) and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland) are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size) induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions). It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH{sub 4}, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl{sub 2} catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, 40 and 80 {sup o}C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems. (authors)

  17. A Review of Recent Advances on the Effects of Microstructural Refinement and Nano-Catalytic Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Metal and Complex Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bystrzycki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions. It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH4, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl2 catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at RT, 40 and 80 °C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems.

  18. Electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell system for seasonal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Lund, P.D.; Tolonen, J.S. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Engineering Physics and Mathematics Dept., Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    A small-scale seasonal energy storage system, comprising an electrolyser, metal hydride hydrogen store and fuel cell, has been studied. According to the feasibility study, solid polymer electrolysers and fuel cells are the best options for the electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell energy storage systems. A round-trip efficiency of 30% has already been demonstrated, and the next target is to reach a round-trip efficiency close to 40%. The electyrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell systems are suitable for small-scale self-sufficient applications in which high volumetric capacity is needed and safety aspects are appreciated. (Author)

  19. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure...... and hydrogen content, respectively, are accounted for by interpolating experimental data. The effect of variable parameters on the critical metal hydride thickness is investigated and compared to results obtained from a constant-parameter analysis. Finally, the discrepancy in the metal hydride thickness value...

  20. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishvanath P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable combination of low- and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors.

  1. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  2. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Satya Sekhar, B. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muthukumar, P. [Mechanical Department, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Linkov, V.; Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • MH H{sub 2} storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H{sub 2} charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system.

  3. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  4. Ovonic nickel metal hydride batteries for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D. A.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Gifford, P. R.; Dhar, S. K.; Ovshinsky, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Ovonic nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries are easily adaptable to a variety of applications. Small consumer NiMH cells were developed and are now being manufactured by licensees throughout the world. This technology was successfully scaled up in larger prismatic cells aimed at electric vehicle applications. Sealed cells aimed at satellite power applications were also built and cycle tested by OBC and other outside agencies. Prototype batteries with high specific energy (over 80 Wh/kg), high energy density (245 Wh/L), and excellent power capability (400 W/kg) were produced. Ovonic NiMH batteries demonstrated an excellent cycle life of over 10,000 cycles at 30 percent DOD. Presently, Ovonic Battery Company is working on an advanced version of this battery for space applications as part of an SBIR contract from NASA.

  5. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  6. Ammonia-Borane and Amine-Borane Dehydrogenation Mediated by Complex Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Andrea; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-08-10

    This review is a comprehensive survey of the last 10 years of research on ammonia-borane and amine-borane dehydrogenation mediated by complex metal hydrides (CMHs), within the broader context of chemical hydrogen storage. The review also collects those cases where CMHs are the catalyst spent form or its resting state. Highlights on the reaction mechanism (strictly dependent on the CMH of choice) and the catalysts efficiency (in terms of equivalents of H2 produced and relative reaction rates) are provided throughout the discussion.

  7. Strategies for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of metal hydride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui

    2008-10-24

    Metal hydrides are an important family of materials that can potentially be used for safe, efficient and reversible on-board hydrogen storage. Light-weight metal hydrides in particular have attracted intense interest due to their high hydrogen density. However, most of these hydrides have rather slow absorption kinetics, relatively high thermal stability, and/or problems with the reversibility of hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. This paper discusses a number of different approaches for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of these materials, with emphasis on recent research on tuning the ionic mobility in mixed hydrides. This concept opens a promising pathway to accelerate hydrogenation kinetics, reduce the activation energy for hydrogen release, and minimize deleterious possible by-products often associated with complex hydride systems.

  8. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Robin, E-mail: robin.orr@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Godfrey, Hugh [National Nuclear Laboratory, Workington Laboratory, Havelock Road, Derwent Howe, Workington, Cumbria, CA14 3YQ (United Kingdom); Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Diggle, Andrew [Sellafield Ltd., Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, John [Sellafield Ltd., Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, WA3 6GR (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH{sub 3} fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition. - Highlights: • The reaction of uranium in dry hydrogen and hydrogen/water vapour has been measured between 30 and 200 °C. • Water vapour extends the induction period but does not necessarily prevent UH{sub 3} formation or affect the reaction rate. • X-ray diffraction analysis shows a gradual increase in α-UH{sub 3} and reduction in β-UH{sub 3} with decreasing preparation temperature. • Particle morphology and specific surface area show only a modest variation with temperature.

  9. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  10. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS FOR HYDRIDING IN METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE TANK%金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建华; 蒋利军; 李志念; 刘晓鹏; 王树茂

    2011-01-01

    Based on the principle of hydride adsorption, a one-dimensional mathematical model for hydriding in a cylindrical metal hydride hydrogen storage tank was established. The heat and mass transfer of metal hydride beds was computed by finite difference method. The variation in temperature and hydrogen concentration at different radial positions of the hydride layer was analyzed during the process of hydriding. The effects of supply pressure, heat convection coefficient and hydride layer radial thickness on the hydriding was studied. It is shown that hydride formation initially takes place uniformly all over the metal hydride layer, but with the process of hydriding, the hydriding rate at the core region is gradually slower than one at surface region. The increase of supply pressure and heat convection coefficient can accelerate the hydriding of the hydrogen storage tank. The effect of hydride layer radial thickness is significant on the hydriding rate, and the thinner hydride layer, the higher the hydriding rate.%基于金属氢化物吸氢基本特性,建立圆柱形金属氢化物储氢器吸氢过程的-维数学物理模型.采用有限差分法对金属氢化物床体的传热传质进行计算.分别研究金属氢化物床体各处温度和氢含量在吸氢过程中的变化以及氢气压力、对流传热系数和金属氢化物床体径向厚度对金属氢化物吸氢过程的影响.计算结果表明:初始阶段金属氢化物床均匀吸氢,但随着氢化过程的进行,其中心区域的吸氢速率逐渐低于边缘区域;增加吸氢压力、提高对流传热系数均可促进储氢器的吸氢;金属氢化物床的径向厚度对吸氢速率影响很大,金属氢化物床越薄,氢化反应的速度越快.

  11. Dihydrogen bonding vs metal-σ interaction in complexes between H2 and metal hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, Jose; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Grabowski, Sławomir J

    2011-01-20

    The complexes formed by hydrogen with metal hydrides (LiH, NaH, BeH(2), MgH(2), BH(3), AlH(3), Li(2)H(2), Na(2)H(2), Be(2)H(4), and Mg(2)H(4)) have been theoretically studied at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ, MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ levels of theory. The hydrogen molecule can act as a Lewis acid or base. In the first case, a dihydrogen bonded complex is obtained and in the second an interaction between the σ-bond of the hydrogen molecule and an empty orbital of the metal atoms is found. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbitals methods have been applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. Additionally, the cooperativity effects are analyzed for selected complexes with two H(2) molecules where both kinds of interactions exist simultaneously.

  12. The diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic iridium hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Nicolas; Mazet, Clément

    2016-08-23

    We report herein the highly diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic Ir(iii) hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre following various strategies. The configurational stability of these compounds has also been investigated.

  13. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  14. Brønsted-Lowry Acid Strength of Metal Hydride and Dihydrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydride complexes are usually amphoteric, not only acting as hydride donors, but also as Brønsted-Lowry acids. A simple additive ligand acidity constant equation (LAC for short) allows the estimation of the acid dissociation constant Ka(LAC) of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes. It is remarkably successful in systematizing diverse reports of over 450 reactions of acids with metal complexes and bases with metal hydrides and dihydrogen complexes, including catalytic cycles where these reactions are proposed or observed. There are links between pKa(LAC) and pKa(THF), pKa(DCM), pKa(MeCN) for neutral and cationic acids. For the groups from chromium to nickel, tables are provided that order the acidity of metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes from most acidic (pKa(LAC) -18) to least acidic (pKa(LAC) 50). Figures are constructed showing metal acids above the solvent pKa scales and organic acids below to summarize a large amount of information. Acid-base features are analyzed for catalysts from chromium to gold for ionic hydrogenations, bifunctional catalysts for hydrogen oxidation and evolution electrocatalysis, H/D exchange, olefin hydrogenation and isomerization, hydrogenation of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and carbon dioxide, hydrogenases and their model complexes, and palladium catalysts with hydride intermediates.

  15. Heat transfer characteristics of the metal hydride vessel based on the plate-fin type heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Tsutomu; Maki, Kohei; Sakaki, Yoshinori

    Heat transfer characteristics of the metal hydride vessel based on the plate-fin type heat exchanger were investigated. Metal hydride beds were filled with AB 2 type hydrogen-storage alloy's particles, Ti 0.42Zr 0.58Cr 0.78Fe 0.57Ni 0.2Mn 0.39Cu 0.03, with a storage capacity of 0.92 wt.%. Heat transfer model in the metal hydride bed based on the heat transfer mechanism for packed bed proposed by Kunii and co-workers is presented. The time-dependent hydrogen absorption/desorption rate and pressure in the metal hydride vessel calculated by the model were compared with the experimental results. During the hydriding, calculated hydrogen absorption rates agreed with measured ones. Calculated thermal equilibrium hydrogen pressures were slightly lower than the measured hydrogen pressures at the inlet of metal hydride vessel. Taking account of the pressure gradient between the inlet of metal hydride vessel and the metal hydride bed, it is considered that this discrepancy is reasonable. During the dehydriding, there were big differences between the calculated hydrogen desorption rates and measured ones. As calculated hydrogen desorption rates were lower than measured ones, there were big differences between the calculated thermal equilibrium hydrogen pressures and the measured hydrogen pressures at the inlet of metal hydride vessel. It is considered that those differences are due to the differences of the heat transfer characteristics such as thermal conductivity of metal hydride particles and porosity between the assumed and actual ones. It is important to obtain the heat transfer characteristics such as thermal conductivity of metal hydride particles and porosity both during the hydriding and dehydriding to design a metal hydride vessel.

  16. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  17. Dissociation potential curves of low-lying states in transition metal hydrides. 3. Hydrides of groups 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Shiro; Matsushita, Takeshi; Gordon, Mark S

    2006-02-23

    The dissociation curves of low-lying spin-mixed states in monohydrides of groups 6 and 7 were calculated by using an effective core potential (ECP) approach. This approach is based on the multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) method, followed by first-order configuration interaction (FOCI) calculations, in which the method employs an ECP basis set proposed by Stevens and co-workers (SBKJC) augmented by a set of polarization functions. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects are estimated within the one-electron approximation by using effective nuclear charges, since SOC splittings obtained with the full Breit-Pauli Hamitonian are underestimated when ECP basis sets are used. The ground states of group 6 hydrides have Omega = (1)/(2)(X(6)Sigma(+)(1/2)), where Omega is the z component of the total angular momentum quantum number. Although the ground states of group 7 hydrides have Omega = 0(+), their main adiabatic components are different; the ground state in MnH originates from the lowest (7)Sigma(+), while in TcH and ReH the main component of the ground state is the lowest (5)Sigma(+). The present paper reports a comprehensive set of theoretical results including the dissociation energies, equilibrium distances, electronic transition energies, harmonic frequencies, anharmonicities, and rotational constants for several low-lying spin-mixed states in these hydrides. Transition dipole moments were also computed among the spin-mixed states and large peak positions of electronic transitions are suggested theoretically for these hydrides. The periodic trends of physical properties of metal hydrides are discussed, based on the results reported in this and other recent studies.

  18. Photochromism of rare-earth metal-oxy-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafezarefi, F.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Cornelius, S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, thin films of yttrium oxy-hydride (YOxHy) were reported to show an unusual color-neutral photochromic effect promising for application in smart windows. Our present work demonstrates that also oxy-hydrides based on Gd, Dy, and Er have photochromic properties and crystal structures similar to YOxHy. Compared to YOxHy, the optical bandgaps of the lanthanide based oxy-hydrides are smaller while photochromic contrast and kinetics show large variation among different cations. Based on these findings, we propose that cation alloying is a viable pathway to tailor the photochromic properties of oxy-hydride materials. Furthermore, we predict that the oxy-hydrides of the other lanthanides are also potentially photochromic.

  19. Design and Fabricate a Metallic Hydride Heat Pump with a Cooling Capacity of 9000 BTU/H

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-07

    I ERGENICS, INC. N 681 Lawl Ins Road Wyckoff. NJ 07481 DESIGN AND FABRICATE A METALLIC HYDRIDE HEAT PUMP WITH A COOLING CAPACITY OF 9000 BTU/H...air conditioning unit employing a metal hydride heat pump and a silicone heat transfer fluid. The contract was subsequently modified on 29 September 3...for thermally driven ECE systems. Metal hydride heat pumps were proposed as for this application.. However, only laboratory bench experiments have

  20. Development of Novel Metal Hydride-Carbon Nanomaterial Based Nanocomposites as Anode Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Final Progress Report (27-02-2012 To 26-02-2014) Project Title:- Development of novel metal hydride -carbon nanomaterial based nanocomposites as...anode electrode materials for Lithium ion battery Objectives:- The aim of this study is to develop metal hydride –carbon nanomaterial based...be as follows:- Milestone I • Synthesis of nanosized metal hydrides (NMH)-carbon nanotubes (CNT) hybridizing with G (NMH- CNT-G) nanocomposites

  1. Molecular early main group metal hydrides : synthetic challenge, structures and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](infinity) and [MH2](infinity) salts

  2. Molecular early main group metal hydrides : synthetic challenge, structures and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](infinity) and [MH2](infinity) salts

  3. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  4. Metal borohydride formation from aluminium boride and metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Kasper T; Fogh, Alexander S; Paskevicius, Mark; Skibsted, Jørgen; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-10-05

    Metal borides are often decomposition products from metal borohydrides and thus play a role in the reverse reaction where hydrogen is absorbed. In this work, aluminium boride, AlB2, has been investigated as a boron source for the formation of borohydrides under hydrogen pressures of p(H2) = 100 or 600 bar at elevated temperatures (350 or 400 °C). The systems AlB2-MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) have been investigated, producing LiBH4, NaBH4 and Ca(BH4)2, whereas the formation of Mg(BH4)2 was not observed at T = 400 °C and p(H2) = 600 bar. The formation of the metal borohydrides is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy and the fraction of boron in AlB2 and M(BH4)x is determined quantitatively by (11)B MAS NMR. Hydrogenation for 12 h at T = 350-400 °C and p(H2) = 600 bar leads to the formation of substantial amounts of LiBH4 (38.6 mol%), NaBH4 (83.0 mol%) and Ca(BH4)2 (43.6 mol%).

  5. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Improved hydrogen desorption from lithium hydrazide by alkali metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Liang, E-mail: liangzeng@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki [Institute for Sustainable Sciences and Development, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •LiH can dramatically improve the hydrogen desorption properties of LiNHNH{sub 2}. •KH doping had positive effect in promoting the hydrogen desorption properties of LiNHNH{sub 2}–LiH mixture. •The reaction mechanism between LiNHNH{sub 2} and LiH was studied and discussed. -- Abstract: Lithium hydrazide (LiNHNH{sub 2}), which is a white solid with 8.0 mass% of theoretical hydrogen content, was synthesized from a reaction between anhydrous hydrazine and n-butyllithium in diethyl ether. The thermodynamic properties of this compound and its detailed decomposition pathways had been investigated in our previous work. However, a number of undesired gaseous products such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were generated during the thermal decomposition of LiNHNH{sub 2}. In this work, alkali metal hydride was used to suppress the impurities in the desorbed hydrogen and improved the hydrogen desorption properties. The reaction mechanism between LiNHNH{sub 2} and LiH was also studied and discussed in this paper.

  7. Improved Electrochemical Performance of Surface-Modified Metal Hydride Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai; WU Feng; CHEN Shi; ZHANG Cun-zhong

    2005-01-01

    A novel plating process was applied to the surface modification of the metal hydride (MH) electrode of the MH/Ni batteries. The electrode was plated with a thin nickel film about 0.1 μm thick by using multi-arc ion plating technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to analyze the electrodes. Influence of the surface modification on the performance of the MH/Ni batteries was studied. It is shown that the surface modification could enhance the electrode conductivity and decrease the batteries ohimic resistance by 28.2 %. After surface modification, the discharge capacity of modification also improves the cyclic durability of the batteries. The inner pressure of the batteries with modified electrode during overcharging is much lower than that with unmodified electrode. The experimental results demonstrate that this process is an effective way for the surface modification of the electrode of MH/Ni batteries.

  8. Microscopy Techniques for Analysis of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Graham J C; Wronski, Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    With the need for improvements in the performance of rechargeable batteries has come the necessity to better characterize cell electrodes and their component materials. Electron microscopy has been shown to reveal many important features of microstructure that are becoming increasingly important for understanding the behavior of the components during the many charge/discharge cycles required in modern applications. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of how the full suite of techniques available using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy was applied to the case of materials for the positive electrode in nickel metal hydride rechargeable battery electrodes. Embedding and sectioning of battery-grade powders with an ultramicrotome was used to produce specimens that could be readily characterized by TEM. Complete electrodes were embedded after drying, and also after dehydration from the original wet state, for examination by optical microscopy and using focused ion beam techniques. Results of these studies are summarized to illustrate the significance of the microstructural information obtained.

  9. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents in viewgraph format an overview of NASDA's evaluation of commercial nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells and the development and testing of Ni-MH cells for use in space. The commercial cells are concluded to be feasible and suitable for use in LEO; for GEO, the durability for overcharge is needed because long-term charge retention is required. For the aerospace Ni-MH cell design, two activation procedures are applied to evaluate the effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection and precharge. Specific energy of the Ni-MH cell is nearly accomplished at 50 Wh/kg. Initial characteristics indicate the effect derived from precharge. Thirty-five amp-hour class Ni-MH cells have good performance for LEO cycle of 25 and 40 percent DOD up to 3000 cycles as similar to commercial cells. The effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection will appear in life test.

  10. Fluorine substituent effects on dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-09-07

    Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of the fluorinated alcohol (CF(3))(2)CHOH with the transition metal complex WH(CO)(2)(NO)(PMe(3))(2) has been explored by a set of four exemplary density functional theory methods that comprises the BP86, PBE, B3LYP and TPSS functionals. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligands of the tungsten complex have been considered as sites of protonation. The main effect of fluorination is an increased dihydrogen bond strength by about 15 kJ mol(-1). The [see equation in text] dihydrogen bond is about 10 kJ mol(-1) stronger than the [W]-NOH-OR hydrogen bond. Of the four DFT methods investigated, the BP86 functional provides the most satisfying quantitative as well as qualitative agreement with experiment. The geometry of the [see equation in text] linkage is significantly influenced by secondary dispersive intermolecular bonding. Linear and bent dihydrogen bonds are separated in energy only by about 1 kJ mol(-1), and represent local minima on the corresponding energy hypersurface.

  11. Effects of the Electronic Doping In the Stability of the Metal Hydride NaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Amezcua, Monica-Araceli; Rivas-Silva, Juan-Francisco; de La Peña-Seaman, Omar; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Despite metal hydrides light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, the Hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Attempts for improvement the hydrogenation properties have been focus on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping on the metal hydride. We present a systematic study of the electronic doping effects on the stability of a model system, NaH doped with magnesium, forming the alloying system Na1-xMgxH. We use the density functional theory (DFT) and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) to model the doping of NaH with Mg. The evolution of the ground state structural and electronic properties is analyzed as a function of Mg-content. The full-phonon dispersion, calculated by the linear response theory (LRT) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT), is analyzed for several Mg-concentrations, paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA), the free energy from zero-point motion is obtained, and its influence on the properties under study is analyzed. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP (OMPS-EXC14-I) and CONACYT-Mexico (No. 221807) projects.

  12. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  13. Hydrogenation of cyclohexene with LaNi5−xAlxHn metal hydrides suspended in cyclohexane or ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogenation of cyclohexene on the metal hydride forming alloys LaNi4.8Al0.2, LaNi4.9Al0.1 and LaNi5, all suspended in cyclohexane and LaNi5 suspended in ethanol, has been investigated. Two sources for hydrogen are recognized: hydrogen supplied by the gas phase and hydrogen which is available i

  14. Hydrogenation of cyclohexene with LaNi5-xAlxHn metal hydrides, suspended in cyclohexane or ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogenation of cyclohexene on the metal hydride forming alloys LaNi4.8Al0.2, LaNi4.9Al0.1 and LaNi5, all suspended in cyclohexane and LaNi5 suspended in ethanol, has been investigated. Two sources for hydrogen are recognized: hydrogen supplied by the gas phase and hydrogen which is available i

  15. Monitoring and control of a hydrogen production and storage system consisting of water electrolysis and metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Herranz, V.; Perez-Page, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. Universidad Politecnica de Valencia. Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Beneito, R. [Area de Energia. Departamento de Gestion e Innovacion. Instituto Tecnologico del Juguete (AIJU). Avda. Industria 23, 03440 Ibi, Alicante (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Renewable energy sources such as wind turbines and solar photovoltaic are energy sources that cannot generate continuous electric power. The seasonal storage of solar or wind energy in the form of hydrogen can provide the basis for a completely renewable energy system. In this way, water electrolysis is a convenient method for converting electrical energy into a chemical form. The power required for hydrogen generation can be supplied through a photovoltaic array. Hydrogen can be stored as metal hydrides and can be converted back into electricity using a fuel cell. The elements of these systems, i.e. the photovoltaic array, electrolyzer, fuel cell and hydrogen storage system in the form of metal hydrides, need a control and monitoring system for optimal operation. This work has been performed within a Research and Development contract on Hydrogen Production granted by Solar Iniciativas Tecnologicas, S.L. (SITEC), to the Politechnic University of Valencia and to the AIJU, and deals with the development of a system to control and monitor the operation parameters of an electrolyzer and a metal hydride storage system that allow to get a continuous production of hydrogen. (author)

  16. Hydrogen storage of a novel combined system of LiNH2-NaMgH3: synergistic effects of in situ formed alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Fang, Fang; Song, Yun; Li, Yuesheng; Sun, Dalin; Zheng, Shiyou; Bendersky, Leonid A; Zhang, Qingan; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min

    2013-02-07

    Bimetallic hydride NaMgH(3) is used for the first time as a vehicle to enhance hydrogen release and uptake from LiNH(2). The combination of NaMgH(3) with LiNH(2) at a molar ratio of 1 : 2 can release about 4.0 wt% of hydrogen without detectable NH(3) emission in the temperature range of 45 °C to 325 °C and exhibiting superior dehydrogenation as compared to individual NaH and/or MgH(2) combined with LiNH(2). A high capacity retention of about 75% resulting from the introduction of NaMgH(3) is also achieved in LiNH(2) as well as re-hydrogenation under milder conditions of 180 °C and 5 MPa H(2) pressure. These significant improvements are attributed to synergistic effects of in situ formed NaH and MgH(2)via the decomposition of NaMgH(3) where a succession of competing reactions from the cyclic consumption/recovery of NaH are involved and serve as a "carrier" for the ultra-rapid conveyance of the N-containing species between the [NH(2)](-) amide and the resulting [NH](2-) imide complexes.

  17. Hydrogen storage over alkali metal hydride and alkali metal hydroxide composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Yu; Yong Shen Chua; Hujun Cao; Zhitao Xiong; Guotao Wu; Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Alkali metal hydroxide and hydride composite systems contain both protic (H bonded with O) and hydridic hydrogen. The interaction of these two types of hydrides produces hydrogen. The enthalpy of dehydrogenation increased with the increase of atomic number of alkali metals, i.e.,-23 kJ/molH2 for LiOH-LiH, 55.34 kJ/molH2 for NaOH-NaH and 222 kJ/molH2 for KOH-KH. These thermodynamic calculation results were consistent with our experimental results. H2 was released from LiOH-LiH system during ball milling. The dehydrogenation temperature of NaOH-NaH system was about 150◦C; whereas KOH and KH did not interact with each other during the heating process. Instead, KH decomposed by itself. In these three systems, NaOH-NaH was the only reversible hydrogen storage system, the enthalpy of dehydrogenation was about 55.65 kJ/molH2 , and the corresponding entropy was ca. 101.23 J/(molH2 ·K), so the temperature for releasing 1.0 bar H2 was as high as 518◦C, showing unfavorable thermodynamic properties. The activation energy for hydrogen desorption of NaOH-NaH was found to be 57.87 kJ/mol, showing good kinetic properties.

  18. DETERMINATION OF METAL HYDRIDE SYSTEMS CHARACTERISTICS WHILE HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Kluchka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental dependence of the pressure of hydrogen in the hydride cartridge when it is heated is obtained. Experimental data prove the theoretical values with an accuracy of ≈ 6%.

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  20. Transition-metal-doped aluminum hydrides as building blocks for supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Yu, Jiamei; Ge, Qingfeng

    2010-11-25

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out to characterize a series of transition-metal-doped aluminum hydrides, forming TMAl(n)H(2n) and TMAl(n)H(2n+1) (TM = Sc, Ti, V; n = 3,4), in either charged or neutral form. A new electron-counting rule for these clusters was formulated as PSEN (paired skeleton electron number) = 4n, which can characterize both closed-shell and open-shell clusters. On the basis of this electron-counting rule, the superatomic clusters such as TiAl(4)H(9) and TiAl(3)H(6) were identified and can be used to assemble supramolecular structures. Electronic structure analysis showed that three-centered TM-H-Al bonds largely contributed to the structural stability. Also, the spin state of a wide range of clusters in their ground state can be predicted by the electron-counting rule.

  1. (abstract) Studies on AB(sub 5) Metal Hydride Alloys with Sn Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.; Stefano, S. Di; Halpert, G.; Witham, C.; Fultz, B.

    1994-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in alkaline rechargeable cells is becoming increasingly popular, due to several advantages offered by the metal hydrides over conventional anode materials (such as Zn, Cd) in terms of specific energy environmental cycle life and compatibility. Besides, the similarities in the cell voltage pressure characteristics, and charge control methods of the Ni-MH cells to the commonly used Ni-Cd point to a projected take over of 25% of the Ni-Cd market for consumer electronics by the Ni-MH cells in the next couple of years. Two classes of metal hydrides alloys based on rare earth metals (AB(sub 5)) and titanium (AB(sub 2)) are being currently developed at various laboratories. AB(sub 2) alloys exhibit higher specific energy than the AB(sub 5) alloys but the state of the art commercial Ni-MH cells are predominately manufactured using AB(sub 5) alloys.

  2. Kinetic behaviour of low-Co AB{sub 5}-type metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tliha, M., E-mail: Mohamed.Tliha@esstt.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia); Boussami, S.; Mathlouthi, H.; Lamloumi, J. [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia); Percheron-Guegan, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, GLVT, 2-8 Rue Henri Dunant 94320, Thiais Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    The kinetic behaviour of the LaNi{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.35} metal hydride, used as a negative electrode in the nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries, was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different state of charge (SOC). Impedance measurements were performed in the frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 mHz. Electrochemical impedance spectrum of the metal hydride electrode was interpreted by an equivalent circuit including the different electrochemical processes taking place on the interface between the MH electrode and the electrolyte. Electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the charge-transfer resistance R{sub tc}, the exchange current density I{sub 0} and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient D{sub H} were determined at different state of charge. The results of EIS measurements indicate that the electrochemical reaction activity of the LaNi{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.35} metal hydride electrode was markedly improved with increasing state of charge (SOC). The transformation {alpha}-{beta} is probably a limiting step in the mechanisms of hydrogenation of metal hydride electrode.

  3. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  4. Metal hydride heat pump engineering demonstration and evaluation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Franklin E.

    1993-01-01

    Future generations of portable life support systems (PLSS's) for space suites (extravehicular mobility units or EMU's) may require regenerable nonventing thermal sinks (RNTS's). For purposes of mobility, a PLSS must be as light and compact as possible. Previous venting PLSS's have employed water sublimators to reject metabolic and equipment heat from EMU's. It is desirable for long-duration future space missions to minimize the use of water and other consumables that need to be periodically resupplied. The emission of water vapor also interferes with some types of instrumentation that might be used in future space exploration. The test article is a type of RNTS based on a metal hydride heat pump (MHHP). The task of reservicing EMU's after use must be made less demanding in terms of time, procedures, and equipment. The capability for quick turnaround post-EVA servicing (30 minutes) is a challenging requirement for many of the RNTS options. The MHHP is a very simple option that can be regenerated in the airlock within the 30 minute limit by the application of a heating source and a cooling sink. In addition, advanced PLSS's must provide a greater degree of automatic control, relieving astronauts of the need to manually adjust temperatures in their liquid cooled ventilation garments (LCVG's). The MHHP includes automatic coolant controls with the ability to follow thermal load swings from minimum to maximum in seconds. The MHHP includes a coolant loop subsystem with pump and controls, regeneration equipment for post-EVA servicing, and a PC-based data acquisition and control system (DACS).

  5. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  6. Compensation Effect in the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Metal Hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Vegge, T.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi5 based hydrides. For these systems, we...... find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency...... analysis rather than a physical phenomenon. In the case of LaNi5 based hydrides, observed scatter in reported apparent activation energies is less pronounced supporting the general experience that LaNi5 is less sensitive toward surface contamination....

  7. Effects of confinement on the thermodynamics and kinetics of metal hydrides templated in ordered nanoporous frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Bhakta, R.; Behrens, R. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Majzoub, E.H.; Liu, X.; Peaslee, D. [Missouri Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Herberg, J.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Wagner, L.K.; Grossman, J.C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this work is to use Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) and Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) as templates for the synthesis of metal hydride nanoparticles with controlled size and chemical environment to establish the origins of the nanoscale destabilization predicted by theory and reported experimentally. (orig.)

  8. Metal forming and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Lubrication is essential in most metal forming processes. The lubricant film has two basic functions, [1]: i. to separate the work piece and tool surfaces and ii. to cool the workpiece and the tool. Separation of the two surfaces implies lower friction facilitating deformation and lowering the tool...... deformation step to avoid overheating and breakdown of the lubricant....

  9. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  10. Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries during fast charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Peyman; Yazdanpour, Maryam; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-01-01

    A novel distributed transient thermal model is proposed to investigate the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries under fast-charging processes at constant currents. Based on the method of integral transformation, a series-form solution for the temperature field inside the battery core is obtained that takes account for orthotropic heat conduction, transient heat generation, and convective heat dissipation at surfaces of the battery. The accuracy of the developed theoretical model is confirmed through comparisons with numerical and experimental data for a sample 30 ampere-hour NiMH battery. The comparisons show that even the first term of the series solution fairly predicts the temperature field with the modest numerical cost. The thermal model is also employed to define an efficiency for charging processes. Our calculations confirm that the charging efficiency decreases as the charging current increases.

  11. Atoms and Nanoparticles of Transition Metals as Catalysts for Hydrogen Desorption from Magnesium Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bazzanella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen desorption kinetics of composite materials made of magnesium hydride with transition metal additives (TM: Nb, Fe, and Zr was studied by several experimental techniques showing that (i a few TM at.% concentrations catalyse the H2 desorption process, (ii the H2 desorption kinetics results stabilized after a few H2 sorption cycles when TM atoms aggregate by forming nanoclusters; (iii the catalytic process occurs also at TM concentration as low as 0.06 at.% when TM atoms clustering is negligible, and (iv mixed Fe and Zr additives produce faster H2 desorption kinetics than single additive. The improved H2 desorption kinetics of the composite materials can be explained by assuming that the interfaces between the MgH2 matrix and the TM nanoclusters act as heterogeneous sites for the nucleation of the Mg phase in the MgH2 matrix and promote the formation of fast diffusion channels for H migrating atoms.

  12. Effect of preparation method of metal hydride electrode on efficiency of hydrogen electrosorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giza, Krystyna [Czestochowa University of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Production Engineering and Materials Technology; Drulis, Henryk [Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research PAS, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    The preparation of negative electrodes for nickel-metal hydride batteries using LaNi{sub 4.3}Co{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy is presented. The constant current discharge technique is employed to determine the discharge capacity, the exchange current density and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the studied electrodes. The electrochemical performance of metal hydride electrode is strongly affected by preparation conditions. The results are compared and the advantages and disadvantages of preparation methods of the electrodes are also discussed.

  13. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and hydro......This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure...

  14. Adhesion of oxide layer to metal-doped aluminum hydride surface: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Tomoki; Itoi, Junichi; Kannan, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to evaluate the adhesion energy of the oxide layer to the metal-doped surface of hydrogen storage material, aluminum hydride (alane, AlH3). The total energy calculations using slab model revealed that the surface doping of some metals to aluminum hydride weakens the adhesion strength of the oxide layer. The influence of titanium, iron, cobalt, and zirconium doping on adhesion strength were evaluated. Except for iron doping, the adhesion strength becomes weak by the doping.

  15. Effects of electron doping on the stability of the metal hydride NaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Amezcua, M. A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; de la Peña-Seaman, O.; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K. P.

    2017-04-01

    Alkali and alkali-earth metal hydrides have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities, but due to their high thermodynamic stability, they possess high dehydrogenation temperatures which may be reduced by transforming these compounds into less stable states/configurations. We present a systematic computational study of the electron doping effects on the stability of the alkali metal hydride NaH substituted with Mg, using the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the alloy Na1-x Mg x H. The phonon dispersions were studied paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure taking into account the zero point energy contribution. We found that substitution of Na by Mg in the hydride invokes a reduction of the frequencies, leading to dynamical instabilities for Mg content of 25%. The microscopic origin of these instabilities could be related to the formation of ellipsoidal Fermi surfaces centered at the L point due to the metallization of the hydride by the Mg substitution. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, thermodynamic properties like heat capacities, vibrational entropies and vibrational free energies as a function of temperature at zero pressure are obtained. These properties determine an upper temperature for the thermodynamic stability of the hydride, which decreases from 600 K for NaH to 300 K at 20% Mg concentration. This significant reduction of the stability range indicates that dehydrogenation could be favoured by electron doping of NaH.

  16. Effects of electron doping on the stability of the metal hydride NaH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Amezcua, M A; Rivas-Silva, J F; de la Peña-Seaman, O; Heid, R; Bohnen, K P

    2017-04-12

    Alkali and alkali-earth metal hydrides have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities, but due to their high thermodynamic stability, they possess high dehydrogenation temperatures which may be reduced by transforming these compounds into less stable states/configurations. We present a systematic computational study of the electron doping effects on the stability of the alkali metal hydride NaH substituted with Mg, using the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the alloy Na1-x Mg x H. The phonon dispersions were studied paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure taking into account the zero point energy contribution. We found that substitution of Na by Mg in the hydride invokes a reduction of the frequencies, leading to dynamical instabilities for Mg content of 25%. The microscopic origin of these instabilities could be related to the formation of ellipsoidal Fermi surfaces centered at the L point due to the metallization of the hydride by the Mg substitution. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, thermodynamic properties like heat capacities, vibrational entropies and vibrational free energies as a function of temperature at zero pressure are obtained. These properties determine an upper temperature for the thermodynamic stability of the hydride, which decreases from 600 K for NaH to 300 K at 20% Mg concentration. This significant reduction of the stability range indicates that dehydrogenation could be favoured by electron doping of NaH.

  17. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  18. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which

  19. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅰ. Absorption of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Storage Alloy MlNi5 Suspended in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The absorption of hydrogen was studied in metal hydride slurry, which is formed by benzene and hydrogen storage alloy powder. The influence of temperature on the rate of absorption was discussed using three-phase mass transfer model. It is also concluded that the suitable absorption temperature is 313 K.

  20. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  1. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...... = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Er) have been synthesized, which pave the way for studying the polymorphic transition in these compounds, obtaining new bimetallic borohydrides and designing new reactive hydride composites with improved hydrogen storage capacities. Two novel polymorphs of Pr(BH4)3 are identified...

  2. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  3. "Long-range" metal-ligand cooperation in H2 activation and ammonia-promoted hydride transfer with a ruthenium-acridine pincer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Gnanaprakasam, Boopathy; Iron, Mark A; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2010-10-27

    The acridine-based pincer complex 1 exhibits an unprecedented mode of metal-ligand cooperation involving a "long-range" interaction between the distal acridine C9 position and the metal center. Reaction of 1 with H(2)/KOH results in H(2) splitting between the Ru center and C9 with concomitant dearomatization of the acridine moiety. DFT calculations show that this process involves the formation of a Ru dihydride intermediate bearing a bent acridine ligand in which C9 is in close proximity to a hydride ligand followed by through-space hydride transfer. Ammonia induces transfer of a hydride from the Ru center of 1 to C9 of the flexible acridine pincer ligand, forming an unusual dearomatized fac-acridine PNP complex.

  4. ANALISA PENGARUH PERIODIK CHARGING DAN DISCHARGING PADA WAKTU CHARGING DAN DISCHARGING DARI METAL HYDRIDE REACTOR (MHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taurista Perdana Syawitri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perpindahan panas merupakan faktor penting yang mempengaruhi kinerja tangki penyimpanan hydrogen dalam bentuk metal hydride. Penelitian sebelumnya menyimpulkan bahwa penambahan sejumlah kecil metal foam pada interior metal hydride reactor (MHR merupakan cara yang efektif untuk meningkatkan perpindahan panas pada reaktor, sehingga mengurangi waktu charging. Namun, proses charging dan discharging MHR dilakukan secara terpisah dalam studi ini. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini menyimulasikan model 2-D axisymmetric menggunakan software COMSOL untuk menginvestigasi pengaruh dari periodik charging dan discharging dari MHR yang mengandung metal foam dengan fraksi volume tertentu. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bahwa model saat ini mempunyai hasil yang sesuai dengan hasil yang ditunjukkan di dalam literatur. Selain itu, ditemukan bahwa terdapat nilai optimum dari fraksi volume metal foam di setiap proses charging dan proses discharging yang memberikan waktu charging dan discharging lebih pendek.

  5. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313907854; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the

  6. Low Energy Neutron Production by Inverse-beta decay in Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuchi, S; Polosa, A D; Riquer, V; Ruocco, G; Vignati, M

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently argued that inverse-beta nuclear transmutations might occur at an impressively high rate in a thin layer at the metallic hydride surface under specific conditions. In this note we present a calculation of the transmutation rate which shows that there is little room for such a remarkable effect.

  7. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the k

  8. First-principles screening of complex transition metal hydrides for high temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-17

    Metal hydrides with enhanced thermodynamic stability with respect to the associated binary hydrides are useful for high temperature applications in which highly stable materials with low hydrogen overpressures are desired. Though several examples of complex transition metal hydrides (CTMHs) with such enhanced stability are known, little thermodynamic or phase stability information is available for this materials class. In this work, we use semiautomated thermodynamic and phase diagram calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and grand canonical linear programming (GCLP) methods to screen 102 ternary and quaternary CTMHs and 26 ternary saline hydrides in a library of over 260 metals, intermetallics, binary, and higher hydrides to identify materials that release hydrogen at higher temperatures than the associated binary hydrides and at elevated temperatures, T > 1000 K, for 1 bar H2 overpressure. For computational efficiency, we employ a tiered screening approach based first on solid phase ground state energies with temperature effects controlled via H2 gas alone and second on the inclusion of phonon calculations that correct solid phase free energies for temperature-dependent vibrational contributions. We successfully identified 13 candidate CTMHs including Eu2RuH6, Yb2RuH6, Ca2RuH6, Ca2OsH6, Ba2RuH6, Ba3Ir2H12, Li4RhH4, NaPd3H2, Cs2PtH4, K2PtH4, Cs3PtH5, Cs3PdH3, and Rb2PtH4. The most stable CTMHs tend to crystallize in the Sr2RuH6 cubic prototype structure and decompose to the pure elements and hydrogen rather than to intermetallic phases.

  9. Comparison between alkalimetal and group 11 transition metal halide and hydride tetramers: molecular structure and bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamdi, Majid; Solà, Miquel; Frenking, Gernot; Poater, Jordi

    2013-08-22

    A comparison between alkalimetal (M = Li, Na, K, and Rb) and group 11 transition metal (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) (MX)4 tetramers with X = H, F, Cl, Br, and I has been carried out by means of the Amsterdam Density Functional software using density functional theory at the BP86/QZ4P level of theory and including relativistic effects through the ZORA approximation. We have obtained that, in the case of alkalimetals, the cubic isomer of Td geometry is more stable than the ring structure with D4h symmetry, whereas in the case of group 11 transition metal tetramers, the isomer with D4h symmetry (or D2d symmetry) is more stable than the Td form. To better understand the results obtained we have made energy decomposition analyses of the tetramerization energies. The results show that in alkalimetal halide and hydride tetramers, the cubic geometry is the most stable because the larger Pauli repulsion energies are compensated by the attractive electrostatic and orbital interaction terms. In the case of group 11 transition metal tetramers, the D4h/D2d geometry is more stable than the Td one due to the reduction of electrostatic stabilization and the dominant effect of the Pauli repulsion.

  10. Chemistry of guanidinate-stabilised diboranes: transition-metal-catalysed dehydrocoupling and hydride abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arne; Litters, Sebastian; Elias, Jana; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-09-22

    Herein, we analyse the catalytic boron-boron dehydrocoupling reaction that leads from the base-stabilised diborane(6) [H2 B(hpp)]2 (hpp=1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) to the base-stabilised diborane(4) [H2 B(hpp)]2 . A number of potential transition-metal precatalysts was studied, including transition-metal complexes of the product diborane(4). The synthesis and structural characterisation of two further examples of such complexes is presented. The best results for the dehydrocoupling reactions were obtained with precatalysts of Group 9 metals in the oxidation state of +I. The active catalyst is formed in situ through a multistep process that involves reduction of the precatalyst by the substrate [H2 B(hpp)]2 , and mechanistic investigations indicate that both heterogeneous and (slower) homogeneous reaction pathways play a role in the dehydrocoupling reaction. In addition, hydride abstraction from [H2 B(hpp)]2 and related diboranes is analysed and the possibility for subsequent deprotonation is discussed by probing the protic character of the cationic boron-hydrogen compounds with NMR spectroscopic analysis.

  11. An all-solid-state metal hydride - Sulfur lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aranguren, Pedro; Berti, Nicola; Dao, Anh Ha; Zhang, Junxian; Cuevas, Fermín; Latroche, Michel; Jordy, Christian

    2017-07-01

    A metal hydride is used for the first time as anode in a complete all-solid-state battery with sulfur as cathode and LiBH4 as solid electrolyte. The hydride is a nanocomposite made of MgH2 and TiH2 counterparts. The battery exhibits a high reversible capacity of 910 mAh g-1 with discharge plateaus at 1.8 V and 1.4 V. Moreover, the capacity remains to 85% of the initial value over the 25 first charge/discharge cycles.

  12. Using first principles calculations to identify new destabilized metal hydride reactions for reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Sudhakar V; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2007-03-28

    Hydrides of period 2 and 3 elements are promising candidates for hydrogen storage, but typically have heats of reaction that are too high to be of use for fuel cell vehicles. Recent experimental work has focused on destabilizing metal hydrides through mixing metal hydrides with other compounds. A very large number of possible destabilized metal hydride reaction schemes exist, but the thermodynamic data required to assess the enthalpies of these reactions are not available in many cases. We have used density functional theory calculations to predict the reaction enthalpies for more than 300 destabilization reactions that have not previously been reported. The large majority of these reactions are predicted not to be useful for reversible hydrogen storage, having calculated reaction enthalpies that are either too high or too low, and hence these reactions need not be investigated experimentally. Our calculations also identify multiple promising reactions that have large enough hydrogen storage capacities to be useful in practical applications and have reaction thermodynamics that appear to be suitable for use in fuel cell vehicles and are therefore promising candidates for experimental work.

  13. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called ;MHC breathing;). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Hydride/Carbon Aerogel Composites for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4, a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs, a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. The objectives of the present work have been to investigate the synthesis, characterization, and hydrogenation behavior of Pd-, Ti- or Fe-doped CAs, NaAlH4, and MgH2 nanocomposites. The diameters of Pd nanoparticles onto CA’s surface and BET surface area of CAs were 3–10 nm and 700–900 m2g−1, respectively. The H2 storage capacity of metal hydrides has been studied using high-pressure TGA microbalance and they were 4.0, 2.7, 2.1, and 1.2 wt% for MgH2-FeTi-CAs, MgH2-FeTi, CAs-Pd, and 8 mol% Ti-doped NaAlH4, respectively, at room temperature. Carbon aerogels with higher surface area and mesoporous structures facilitated hydrogen diffusion and adsorption, which accounted for its extraordinary hydrogen storage phenomenon. The hydrogen adsorption abilities of CAs notably increased after inclusion of metal hydrides by the “hydrogen spillover” mechanisms.

  15. The development of nickel-metal hydride technology for use in aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampel, Guy; Johnson, Herschel; Dell, Dan; Wu, Tony; Puglisi, Vince

    1992-01-01

    The nickel metal hydride technology for battery application is relatively immature even though this technology was made widely known by Philips' scientists as long ago as 1970. Recently, because of the international environmental regulatory pressures being placed on cadmium in the workplace and in disposal practices, battery companies have initiated extensive development programs to make this technology a viable commercial operation. These hydrides do not pose a toxilogical threat as does cadmium. Also, they provide a higher energy density and specific energy when compared to the other nickel based battery technologies. For these reasons, the nickel metal hydride electrochemisty is being evaluated as the next power source for varied applications such as laptop computers, cellular telephones, electric vehicles, and satellites. A parallel development effort is under way to look at aerospace applications for nickel metal hydride cells. This effort is focused on life testing of small wound cells of the commercial type to validate design options and development of prismatic design cells for aerospace applications.

  16. First-principles prediction of new complex transition metal hydrides for high temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-17

    Metal hydrides with high thermodynamic stability are desirable for high-temperature applications, such as those that require high hydrogen release temperatures or low hydrogen overpressures. First-principles calculations have been used previously to identify complex transition metal hydrides (CTMHs) for high temperature use by screening materials with experimentally known structures. Here, we extend our previous screening of CTMHs with a library of 149 proposed materials based on known prototype structures and charge balancing rules. These proposed materials are typically related to known materials by cation substitution. Our semiautomated, high-throughput screening uses density functional theory (DFT) and grand canonical linear programming (GCLP) methods to compute thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams: 81 of the 149 materials are found to be thermodynamically stable. We identified seven proposed materials that release hydrogen at higher temperatures than the associated binary hydrides and at high temperature, T > 1000 K, for 1 bar H2 overpressure. Our results indicate that there are many novel CTMH compounds that are thermodynamically stable, and the computed thermodynamic data and phase diagrams should be useful for selecting materials and operating parameters for high temperature metal hydride applications.

  17. Bed geometries, fueling strategies and optimization of heat exchanger designs in metal hydride storage systems for automotive applications: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Dornheim, Martin; Sloth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    given to metal hydride storage tanks for light duty vehicles, since this application is the most promising one for such storage materials and has been widely studied in the literature. Enhancing cooling/heating during hydrogen uptake and discharge has found to be essential to improve storage systems......This review presents recent developments for effective heat management systems to be integrated in metal hydride storage tanks, and investigates the performance improvements and limitations of each particular solution. High pressures and high temperatures metal hydrides can lead to different design...

  18. A REVIEW: THE EFFECT OF OPERATING CONDITIONS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT ON THE PERFORMANCES OF METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taurista Perdana Syawitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For safety and operability concerns, the use of metal hydrides to store hydrogen appears to be particularly promising option for alternative energy at present. However, the process of adding, removing and distributing heat during the hydrogen charging/ discharging process is problematic due to the poor effective thermal conductivity of the metal hydride porous bed and the high enthalpies of H2 adsorption/desorption. Therefore, heat transfer is a critical factor affecting the performance of metal hydride hydrogen (MHR storage tanks. Over decade, many researches focused on MHR’s operating conditions and its thermal management to improve its performance.

  19. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E

    2008-12-07

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  20. Electrochemical cell comprising stable hydride-forming material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, J. J. G. S. A.; van Beek, J. R. G. C. M.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1984-12-11

    An electrochemical cell having a negative electrode comprising a compound derived from LaNi/sub 5/, in which La is optionally substituted by a plateau pressure-increasing element and in which Ni is substituted entirely or partly by a plateau pressure-reducing element, for example, Co and/or Cu, with the object of considerably reducing volume steps and hence crack formation of the intermetallic compound during charging and discharging. Moreover, the corrosion of the intermetallic compound is counteracted by adding small quantities of Al, Cr and/or Si, Which metals enhance the formation of a protecting oxide layer.

  1. Computational study of alkynes insertion into metal-hydride bonds catalyzed by bimetallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Stefania; Tognetti, Vincent; Sicilia, Emilia; Adamo, Carlo; Russo, Nino

    2010-11-01

    Density Functional Theory investigations on the insertion mechanism of phenylacetylene into metal-hydride bonds in bimetallic (Pt,Os) catalysts have been carried out. The results obtained have been also compared with the non-reactive monometallic (Os-based) system, to elucidate the cooperative effects and to explain the observed absence of reactivity. The identified reaction path involves phenylacetylene coordination followed by the insertion into the metal-hydride bond, leading to the formation of the experimentally observed products. Both steps do not require large energies compatible with the experimental conditions. The comparison with the reaction path for the monometallic species gives some hints on the cooperative effects due to the presence of the second metal which is related to its role in the CO release for creating a coordination site for phenylacetylene and not in the insertion energetics. The calculations provide a detailed analysis of the reaction complexity and provide a rationale for the efficiency of the process.

  2. Recovery Of Electrodic Powder From Spent Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries (NiMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin S.M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on recycling process newly proposed to recover electrodic powder enriched in nickel (Ni and rare earth elements (La and Ce from spent nickel-metal hydride batteries (NiMH. In addition, this new process was designed to prevent explosion of batteries during thermal treatment under inert atmosphere. Spent nickel metal hydride batteries were heated over range of 300°C to 600°C for 2 hours and each component was completely separated inside reactor after experiment. Electrodic powder was successfully recovered from bulk components containing several pieces of metals through sieving operation. The electrodic powder obtained was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and image of the powder was taken by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was finally found that nickel and rare earth elements were mainly recovered to about 45 wt.% and 12 wt.% in electrodic powder, respectively.

  3. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Hydride Cluster Anions and Their Roles in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    The interaction between transition metals and hydrogen has been an intriguing research topic for such applications as hydrogen storage and catalysis of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. Special bonding features between TM and hydrogen are interesting not only because they are scarcely reported but also because they could help to discover and understand the nature of chemical bonding. Very recently, we discovered a PtZnH5- cluster which possessed an unprecedented planar pentagonal coordination between the H5- moiety and Pt, and exhibited special σ-aromaticity. The H5-kernel as a whole can be viewed as a η5-H5 ligand for Pt. As the second example, an H2 molecule was found to act as a ligand in the PdH3-cluster, in which two H atoms form a η2-H2 type of ligation to Pd. These transition metal hydride clusters were considered to be good hydrogen sources for hydrogenation. The reactions between PtHn- and CO2 were investigated. We observed formate in the final product H2Pt(HCO2)- .

  4. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9]3−), tungsten ([WH9]3−), niobium ([NbH9]4−) and tantalum ([TaH9]4−) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature. PMID:28287143

  5. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-13

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9](3-)), tungsten ([WH9](3-)), niobium ([NbH9](4-)) and tantalum ([TaH9](4-)) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature.

  6. Advances in metal forming expert system for metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    Hingole, Rahulkumar Shivajirao

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book offers a clear account of the theory and applications of advanced metal forming. It provides a detailed discussion of specific forming processes, such as deep drawing, rolling, bending extrusion and stamping. The author highlights recent developments of metal forming technologies and explains sound, new and powerful expert system techniques for solving advanced engineering problems in metal forming. In addition, the basics of expert systems, their importance and applications to metal forming processes, computer-aided analysis of metalworking processes, formability analysis, mathematical modeling and case studies of individual processes are presented.

  7. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  8. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  9. Xylose isomerase in substrate and inhibitor michaelis states: atomic resolution studies of a metal-mediated hydride shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Timothy D; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-06-01

    Xylose isomerase (E.C. 5.3.1.5) catalyzes the interconversion of aldose and ketose sugars and has an absolute requirement for two divalent cations at its active site to drive the hydride transfer rates of sugar isomerization. Evidence suggests some degree of metal movement at the second metal site, although how this movement may affect catalysis is unknown. The 0.95 A resolution structure of the xylitol-inhibited enzyme presented here suggests three alternative positions for the second metal ion, only one of which appears positioned in a catalytically competent manner. To complete the reaction, an active site hydroxyl species appears appropriately positioned for hydrogen transfer, as evidenced by precise bonding distances. Conversely, the 0.98 A resolution structure of the enzyme with glucose bound in the alpha-pyranose state only shows one of the metal ion conformations at the second metal ion binding site, suggesting that the linear form of the sugar is required to promote the second and third metal ion conformations. The two structures suggest a strong degree of conformational flexibility at the active site, which seems required for catalysis and may explain the poor rate of turnover for this enzyme. Further, the pyranose structure implies that His53 may act as the initial acid responsible for ring opening of the sugar to the aldose form, an observation that has been difficult to establish in previous studies. The glucose ring also appears to display significant segmented disorder in a manner suggestive of ring opening, perhaps lending insight into means of enzyme destabilization of the ground state to promote catalysis. On the basis of these results, we propose a modified version of the bridged bimetallic mechanism for hydride transfer in the case of Streptomyces olivochromogenes xylose isomerase.

  10. Metal hydrides used as negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Sabrina; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Energy is a key issue for future generation. Researches are conducted worldwide to develop new efficient means for energy conversion and storage. Electrochemical storage is foreseen as an efficient way to handle intermittent renewable energy production. The most advanced batteries are nowadays based on lithium-ion technology though their specific capacities should be significantly increased to bring solution to mass storage. Conversion reactions are one way to step forward larger capacities at the anode. We here review the possibility to use metallic or complex hydrides as negative electrode using conversion reaction of hydride with lithium. Moreover, promising alloying of lithium with the metallic species might provide additional reversible capacities. Both binary and ternary systems are reviewed and results are compared in the frame of the electrochemical application.

  11. Degradation Behavior of Electrochemical Performance of Sealed-Type Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 吴锋; 杨凯

    2003-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of electrochemical performance of sealed-type nickel/metal hydride batteries was investigated. The results indicate that the degradation behavior of Ni/MH battery is not only owing to the lack of electrolyte, but also the deterioration of the active materials on the positive and negative electrodes of Ni/MH batteries. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser granularity analyses are presented. The particle pulverization and oxidation during charge/discharge are identified as the main causes for deterioration of the negative and positive electrode in nickel/metal hydride batteries, as well as the cross-section cracking of both anode and cathode.

  12. Theoretical Standard Model Rates of Proton to Neutron Conversions Near Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A

    2006-01-01

    The process of radiation induced electron capture by protons or deuterons producing new ultra low momentum neutrons and neutrinos may be theoretically described within the standard field theoretical model of electroweak interactions. For protons or deuterons in the neighborhoods of surfaces of condensed matter metallic hydride cathodes, such conversions are determined in part by the collective plasma modes of the participating charged particles, e.g. electrons and protons. The radiation energy required for such low energy nuclear reactions may be supplied by the applied voltage required to push a strong charged current across a metallic hydride surface employed as a cathode within a chemical cell. The electroweak rates of the resulting ultra low momentum neutron production are computed from these considerations.

  13. Transition-metal-free coupling reaction of vinylcyclopropanes with aldehydes catalyzed by tin hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieki, Ryosuke; Kani, Yuria; Tsunoi, Shinji; Shibata, Ikuya

    2015-04-13

    Donor-acceptor cyclopropanes are useful building blocks for catalytic cycloaddition reactions with a range of electrophiles to give various cyclic products. In contrast, relatively few methods are available for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols through coupling of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) with aldehydes, even with transition-metal catalysts. Here, we report that the hydrostannation of vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs) was effectively promoted by dibutyliodotin hydride (Bu2 SnIH). The resultant allylic tin compounds reacted easily with aldehydes. Furthermore, the use of Bu2 SnIH was effectively catalytic in the presence of hydrosilane as a hydride source, which established a coupling reaction of VCPs with aldehydes for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols without the use of transition-metal catalysts. In contrast to conventional catalytic reactions of VCPs, the presented method allowed the use of several VCPs in addition to conventional donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  14. Technical challenges and future direction for high-efficiency metal hydride thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick A.; Corgnale, Claudio; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore; Hardy, Bruce; Sheppard, Drew; Buckley, Craig; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in thermal energy storage (TES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, which allow for continuous operation when sunlight is unavailable. Thermochemical energy storage materials have the advantage of much higher energy densities than latent or sensible heat materials. Furthermore, thermochemical energy storage systems based on metal hydrides have been gaining great interest for having the advantage of higher energy densities, better reversibility, and high enthalpies. However, in order to achieve higher efficiencies desired of a thermal storage system by the US Department of Energy, the system is required to operate at temperatures >600 °C. Operation at temperatures >600 °C presents challenges including material selection, hydrogen embrittlement and permeation of containment vessels, appropriate selection of heat transfer fluids, and cost. Herein, the technical difficulties and proposed solutions associated with the use of metal hydrides as TES materials in CSP applications are discussed and evaluated.

  15. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  16. A dehydrogenation mechanism of metal hydrides based on interactions between Hdelta+ and H-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2006-10-16

    This paper describes a reaction mechanism that explains the dehydrogenation reactions of alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides. These light metal hydrides, e.g., lithium-based compounds such as LiH, LiAlH4, and LiNH2, are the focus of intense research recently as the most promising candidate materials for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Although several interesting and promising reactions and materials have been reported, most of these reported reactions and materials have been discovered by empirical means because of a general lack of understanding of any underlying principles. This paper describes an understanding of the dehydrogenation reactions on the basis of the interaction between negatively charged hydrogen (H-, electron donor) and positively charged hydrogen (Hdelta+, electron acceptor) and experimental evidence that captures and explains many observations that have been reported to date. This reaction mechanism can be used as a guidance for screening new material systems for hydrogen storage.

  17. Superhalogens: A Bridge between Complex Metal Hydrides and Li Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Puru

    2015-04-02

    Complex metal hydrides and Li ion batteries play an integral role in the pursuit of clean and sustainable energy. The former stores hydrogen and can provide a clean energy solution for the transportation industry, while the latter can store energy harnessed from the sun and the wind. However, considerable materials challenges remain in both cases, and research for finding solutions has traditionally followed parallel paths. In this Perspective, I show that there is a common link between these two seemingly disparate fields that can be unveiled by studying the electronic structure of the anions in complex metal hydrides and in electrolytes of Li ion batteries; they are both superhalogens. I demonstrate that considerable progress made in our understanding of superhalogens in the past decade can provide solutions to some of the materials challenges in both of these areas.

  18. Sub-millimeter Spectroscopy of Astrophysically Important Molecules and Ions: Metal Hydrides, Halides, and Cyanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Flory, M. A.; Halfen, D. T.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of SOFIA, Herschel, and SAFIR, new wavelength regions will become routinely accessible for astronomical spectroscopy, particularly at submm frequencies (0.5-1.1 THz). Molecular emission dominates the spectra of dense interstellar gas at these wavelengths. Because heterodyne detectors are major instruments of these missions, accurate knowledge of transition frequencies is crucial for their success. The Ziurys spectroscopy laboratory has been focusing on the measurement of the pure rotational transitions of astrophysically important molecules in the sub-mm regime. Of particular interest have been metal hydride species and their ions, as well as metal halides and cyanides. A new avenue of study has included metal bearing molecular ions.

  19. Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kai-yu; HUANG Bai-yun; ZHANG Ping-min; HE Yue-hui; ZHOU Ke-chao; SU Geng

    2006-01-01

    Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system was investigated, and the influence of state of charge on the thermal electrochemical performance of hydrogen storage materials was studied. The results show that both the absolute value of the molar enthalpy change and the internal resistance of evolution hydrogen reaction are less than that of absorption hydrogen reaction at the same state of charge. The molar reaction enthalpy change of absorption and evolution of hydride electrode change contrarily with the enhancement of filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode. The relation curve of molar reaction enthalpy change to state of charge, both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction, is close to a constant when the state of charge is 10%-60%, and during state of charge below 10% or state of charge above 60%, the molar reaction enthalpy change varies sharply. Meanwhile, the internal resistance of electrode reaction has an ascending trend with the enhancement on filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode in both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction.

  20. Compensation effect in the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Anders; Vegge, Tejs; Pedersen, Allan S

    2005-03-03

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi(5) based hydrides. For these systems, we find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency of observed apparent activation energy on the degree of surface oxidation, i.e., a physical effect. On the other hand, we find the large concurrent changes in apparent prefactors to be a direct result of the Arrhenius analysis. Thus, we find the observed compensation effect to be an artifact of the data analysis rather than a physical phenomenon. In the case of LaNi(5) based hydrides, observed scatter in reported apparent activation energies is less pronounced supporting the general experience that LaNi(5) is less sensitive toward surface contamination.

  1. Hydrogen storage properties of carbon nanomaterials and carbon containing metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehlen, Jan Petter

    2003-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is structural investigations of carbon containing materials in respect to their hydrogen storage properties. This work was initially triggered by reports of extremely high hydrogen storage capacities of specific carbon nanostructures. It was decided to try to verify and understand the mechanisms in play in case of the existence of such high hydrogen densities in carbon. Two different routes towards the goal were employed; by studying selected hydrides with carbon as one of its constituents (mainly employing powder diffraction techniques in combination with hydrogen absorption and desorption measurements) and by carefully conducting hydrogen sorption experiments on what was believed to be the most ''promising'' carbon nanomaterial sample. In the latter case, a lot of effort was attributed to characterisations of different carbon nanomaterial containing samples with the aid of electron microscopy. Three different carbon-containing metal hydride systems, Y2C-H, YCoC-H and Y5SiC0.2-H, were examined. A relation between hydrogen occupation and the local arrangement of metal and carbon atoms surrounding the hydrogen sites was established. Several characteristic features of the compounds were noted in addition to solving the structure of the former unknown deuterideY5Si3C0.2D2.0 by the use of direct methods. Several carbon-nanomaterial containing samples were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction, thus gaining knowledge concerning the structural aspects of nanomaterials. Based on these investigations, a specific sample containing a large amount of open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes was chosen for subsequent hydrogen storage experiments. The latter experiments revealed moderate hydrogen storage capacities of the nanotubes not exceeding the values obtained for more conventional forms of carbon. These two different routes in investigating the hydrogen storage properties of carbon and

  2. High performance nickel-metal hydride battery in bipolar stack design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohms, D.; Kohlhase, M.; Benczúr-Ürmössy, G.; Wiesener, K.; Harmel, J.

    The consumption of fuel in cars can be reduced by using hybrid concepts. Even for fuel cell vehicles, a high power battery may cut costs and allow the recovery of energy during retarding. Alkaline batteries, such as nickel-metal hydride batteries, have displayed long cycle life combined with high power ability. In order to improve the power/energy ratio of Ni/MH to even higher values, the cells may be arranged in a bipolar stack design.

  3. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  4. An experimental system to investigate kinetics and isotopic properties of the electrolytic metal hydride formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leardini, F. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: fabrice.leardini@uam.es; Bodega, J. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.F. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, C. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-12-08

    We present in this paper an experimental set-up based in a mass spectrometer connected to a closed electrolytic cell. Calibrations accomplished with a Pt cathode and H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O mixtures have shown new kinetics in galvanostatic electrolysis. These findings may be relevant in some important processes such as the hydrogen evolution reaction, isotopic separation factors or the electrolytic formation of metal hydrides.

  5. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans.

  6. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g-1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  7. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g−1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles. PMID:27270184

  8. Minimum Entropy Generation Theorem Investigation and Optimization of Metal Hydride Alloy Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to carry out numerical simulation of the hydrogen storage on exothermic reaction of metal hydride LaNi5 alloy container. In addition to accelerating the reaction speed of the internal metal hydride by internal control tube water-cooled mode, analyze via the application of second law of thermodynamics the principle of entropy generation. Use COMSOL Mutilphysics 4.3 a to engage in finite element method value simulation on two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Also on the premise that the internal control tube parameters the radius ri, the flow rate U meet the metal hydride saturation time, observe the reaction process of two parameters on the tank, entropy distribution and the results of the accumulated entropy. And try to find the internal tube parameter values of the minimum entropy, whose purpose is to be able to identify the reaction process and the reaction results of internal tank’s optimum energy conservation.

  9. Molecular heterometallic hydride clusters composed of rare-earth and d-transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takanori; Luo, Yi; Stewart, Timothy; Bau, Robert; McIntyre, Garry J; Mason, Sax A; Hou, Zhaomin

    2011-09-18

    Heteromultimetallic hydride clusters containing both rare-earth and d-transition metals are of interest in terms of both their structure and reactivity. However, such heterometallic complexes have not yet been investigated to a great extent because of difficulties in their synthesis and structural characterization. Here, we report the synthesis, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies, and hydrogen addition and release properties of a family of rare-earth/d-transition-metal heteromultimetallic polyhydride complexes of the core structure type 'Ln(4)MH(n)' (Ln = Y, Dy, Ho; M = Mo, W; n = 9, 11, 13). Monitoring of hydrogen addition to a hydride cluster such as [{(C(5)Me(4)SiMe(3))Y}(4)(μ-H)(9)Mo(C(5)Me(5))] in a single-crystal to single-crystal process by X-ray diffraction has been achieved for the first time. Density functional theory studies reveal that the hydrogen addition process is cooperatively assisted by the Y/Mo heteromultimetallic sites, thus offering unprecedented insight into the hydrogen addition and release process of a metal hydride cluster.

  10. Studies on MgNi-Based Metal Hydride Electrode with Aqueous Electrolytes Composed of Various Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Compositions of MgNi-based amorphous-monocrystalline thin films produced by radio frequency (RF sputtering with a varying composition target have been optimized. The composition Mg52Ni39Co3Mn6 is identified to possess the highest initial discharge capacity of 640 mAh·g−1 with a 50 mA·g−1 discharge current density. Reproduction in bulk form of Mg52Ni39Co3Mn6 alloy composition was prepared through a combination of melt spinning (MS and mechanical alloying (MA, shows a sponge-like microstructure with >95% amorphous content, and is chosen as the metal hydride (MH alloy for a sequence of electrolyte experiments with various hydroxides including LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, CsOH, and (C2H54N(OH. The electrolyte conductivity is found to be closely related to cation size in the hydroxide compound used as 1 M additive to the 4 M KOH aqueous solution. The degradation performance of Mg52Ni39Co3Mn6 alloy through cycling demonstrates a strong correlation with the redox potential of the cation in the alkali hydroxide compound used as 1 M additive to the 5 M KOH aqueous solution. NaOH, CsOH, and (C2H54N(OH additions are found to achieve a good balance between corrosion and conductivity performances.

  11. Development of a metal hydride refrigeration system as an exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Feng; Chen, Jiangping; Chen, Zhijiu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Lu, Manqi; Yang, Ke [Engineering Center, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Zhou, Yimin [Research Center, Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co. Ltd., Tiantai County, Zhejiang Province 317200 (China)

    2007-10-15

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioners, two types of systems varying in heat carriers were preliminarily designed. A new hydride pair LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} was developed working at 120-200 C/20-50 C/-10-0 C. P-C isotherms and reaction kinetics were tested. Reaction enthalpy, entropy and theoretical cycling coefficient of performance (COP) were deducted from Van't-Hoff diagram. Test results showed that the hydride pair has flat plateau slopes, fast reaction dynamics and small hystereses; the reaction enthalpy of the refrigeration hydride is -27.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2} and system theoretical COP is 0.711. Mean particle sizes during cycles were verified to be an intrinsic property affected by constitution, heat treatment and cycle numbers rather than initial grain sizes. Based on this work pair, cylindrical reactors were designed and a function proving metal hydride intermittent refrigeration system was constructed with heat conducting oil as heat source and water as heat sink. The reactor equivalent thermal conductivity is merely 1.3 W/(m K), which still has not meet practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power is 84.6 W at 150 C/30 C/0 C with COP being 0.26. The regulations of cycling performance and minimum refrigeration temperature (MRT) were determined by altering heat source temperature. Results showed that cooling power and system COP increase while MRT decreases with the growth of heat source temperature. This study develops a new hydride pair and confirms its application in automobile refrigeration systems, while their heat transfer properties still need to be improved for better performance. (author)

  12. Topotactic Solid-State Metal Hydride Reductions of Sr2MnO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernden, Bradley C; Lussier, Joey A; Bieringer, Mario

    2015-05-04

    We report novel details regarding the reactivity and mechanism of the solid-state topotactic reduction of Sr2MnO4 using a series of solid-state metal hydrides. Comprehensive details describing the active reducing species are reported and comments on the reductive mechanism are provided, where it is shown that more than one electron is being donated by H(-). Commonly used solid-state hydrides LiH, NaH, and CaH2, were characterized in terms of reducing power. In addition the unexplored solid-state hydrides MgH2, SrH2, and BaH2 are evaluated as potential solid-state reductants and characterized in terms of their reductive reactivities. These 6 group I and II metal hydrides show the following trend in terms of reactivity: MgH2 metal electronegativity and bond strengths. NaH and the novel use of SrH2 allowed for targeted synthesis of reduced Sr2MnO(4-x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.37) phases. The enhanced control during synthesis demonstrated by this soft chemistry approach has allowed for a more comprehensive and systematic evaluation of Sr2MnO(4-x) phases than previously reported phases prepared by high temperature methods. Sr2MnO3.63(1) has for the first time been shown to be monoclinic by powder X-ray diffraction and the oxidative monoclinic to tetragonal transition occurs at 450 °C.

  13. In search of metal hydrides: an X-ray absorption and emission study of [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenbruch, Stefan; Shafaat, Hannah S; Krämer, Tobias; Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Weber, Katharina; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-04-28

    Metal hydrides are invoked as important intermediates in both chemical and biological H2 production. In the [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes, pulsed EPR and high-resolution crystallography have argued that the hydride interacts primarily at the Ni site. In contrast, in [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes, it is observed that the bridging hydride interacts primarily with the Fe. Herein, we utilize a combination of Ni and Fe X-ray absorption (XAS) and emission (XES) spectroscopies to examine the contribution of the bridging hydride to the observed spectral features in [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H)Fe(CO)3](+). The corresponding data on (dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)Fe(CO)3 are used as a reference for the changes that occur in the absence of a hydride bridge. For further interpretation of the observed spectral features, all experimental spectra were calculated using a density functional theory (DFT) approach, with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It is found that the iron valence-to-core (VtC) XES spectra reveal clear signatures for the presence of a Fe-H interaction in the hydride bridged model complex. In contrast, the Ni VtC XES spectrum largely reflects changes in the local Ni geometry and shows little contribution from a Ni-H interaction. A stepwise theoretical analysis of the hydride contribution and the Ni site symmetry provides insights into the factors, which govern the different metal-hydride interactions in both the model complexes and the enzyme. Furthermore, these results establish the utility of two-color XES to reveal important insights into the electronic structure of various metal-hydride species.

  14. Catalitic effect of Co on hydrogen desorption form nanostucturated magnesium hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matović Ljiljana Lj.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the influence of 3d transition metal addition on desorption kinetics of MgH2 ball milling of MgH2-Co blends was performed under Ar. Microstructural and morphological characterization, performed by XRD and SEM, show a huge correlation with thermal stability and hydrogen desorption properties investigated by DSC. A complex desorption behavior is correlated with the dispersion of the metal additive particles on hydride matrix. The activation energy for H2 desorption from MgH2-Co composite was calculated from both non-isothermal and isothermal methods to be 130 kJ/mol which means that mutually diffusion and nucleation and growth of new phase control the dehydration process.

  15. Influence of surface contaminations on the hydrogen storage behaviour of metal hydride alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schülke, Mark; Paulus, Hubert; Lammers, Martin; Kiss, Gábor; Réti, Ferenc; Müller, Karl-Heinz

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides is a promising alternative to common storage methods. The surface of a metal hydride plays an important part in the absorption of hydrogen, since important partial reaction steps take place here. The development of surface contaminations and their influence on hydrogen absorption is examined by means of absorption experiments and surface analysis, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS) and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), in this work. All investigations were carried out on a modern AB(2) metal hydride alloy, namely Ti(0.96)Zr(0.04)Mn(1.43)V(0.45)Fe(0.08). Surface analysis (SNMS, XPS) shows that long-term air storage (several months) leads to oxide layers about 15 nm thick, with complete oxidation of all main alloy components. By means of in situ oxygen exposure at room temperature and XPS analysis, it can be shown that an oxygen dose of about 100 Langmuirs produces an oxide layer comparable to that after air storage. Manganese enrichment (segregation) is also clearly observed and is theoretically described here. This oxide layer hinders hydrogen absorption, so an activation procedure is necessary in order to use the full capacity of the metal hydride. This procedure consists of heating (T = 120 degrees C) in vacuum and hydrogen flushing at pressures like p = 18 bar. During the activation process the alloy is pulverized to particles of approximately 20 microm through lattice stretches. It is shown that this pulverization of the metal hydride (creating clean surface) during hydrogen flushing is essential for complete activation of the material. Re-activation of powder contaminated by small doses of air (p approximately 0.1 bar) does not lead to full absorption capacity. In ultrahigh vacuum, hydrogen is only taken up by the alloy after sputtering of the surface (which is done in order to remove oxide layers from it), thus creating adsorption sites for the hydrogen. This

  16. Stability of alkali-metal hydrides: effects of n-type doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea Amezcua, Monica Araceli; de La Peña Seaman, Omar; Rivas Silva, Juan Francisco; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    Metal hydrides could be considered ideal solid-state hydrogen storage systems, they have light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, but the hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Efforts have been performed to improve their dehydrogenation properties, based on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping. We present a systematic study of the n-type (electronic) doping effects on the stability of two alkali-metal hydrides: Na1-xMgxH and Li1-xBexH. These systems have been studied within the framework of density functional perturbation theory, using a mixed-basis pseudopotential method and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the doping. The full-phonon dispersions are analyzed for several doping content, paying special attention to the crystal stability. It is found a doping content threshold for each system, where they are close to dynamical instabilities, which are related to charge redistribution in interstitial zones. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, the vibrational free energy, the linear thermal expansion and heat capacities are obtained for both hydrides systems and are analyzed as a function of the doping content. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP 2016 and CONACYT-México (No.221807) projects.

  17. Identification of destabilized metal hydrides for hydrogen storage using first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Sudhakar V; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2006-05-04

    Hydrides of period 2 and 3 elements are promising candidates for hydrogen storage but typically have heats of reaction that are too high to be of use for fuel cell vehicles. Recent experimental work has focused on destabilizing metal hydrides through alloying with other elements. A very large number of possible destabilized metal hydride reaction schemes exist. The thermodynamic data required to assess the enthalpies of these reactions, however, are not available in many cases. We have used first principles density functional theory calculations to predict the reaction enthalpies for more than 100 destabilization reactions that have not previously been reported. Many of these reactions are predicted not be useful for reversible hydrogen storage, having calculated reaction enthalpies that are either too high or too low. More importantly, our calculations identify five promising reaction schemes that merit experimental study: 3LiNH(2) + 2LiH + Si --> Li(5)N(3)Si + 4H(2), 4LiBH(4) + MgH(2) --> 4LiH + MgB(4) + 7H(2), 7LiBH(4) + MgH(2) --> 7LiH + MgB(7) + 11.5H(2), CaH(2) + 6LiBH(4) --> CaB(6) + 6LiH + 10H(2), and LiNH(2) + MgH(2) --> LiMgN + 2H(2).

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Pneumatic Artificial Muscle Actuation via Hydrogen Driving Metal Hydride-LaNi5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative understanding of mechanical actuation of intricate Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuators is technically required in control system design for effective real-time implementation.This paper presents mathematical modeling of the PAM driven by hydrogen-gas pressure due to absorption and desorption of metal hydride.Empirical models of both mechanical actuation of industrial PAM and chemical reaction of the metal hydride-LaNi5 are derived systematically where their interactions comply with the continuity principle and energy balance in describing actual dynamic behaviors of the PAM actuator (PAM and hydriding/dehydriding-reaction bed).Simulation studies of mechanical actuation under various loads are conducted so as to present dynamic responses of the PAM actuators.From the promising results,it is intriguing that the heat input for the PAM actuator can be supplied to,or pumped from the reaction bed,in such a way that absorption and desorption of hydrogen gas take place,respectively,in controlling the pressure of hydrogen gas within the PAM actuator.Accordingly,this manipulation results in desired mechanical actuation of the PAM actuator in practical uses.

  19. First-principles study on structural stability of 3d transition metal alloying magnesium hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method based on the density functional theory was used to investigate the energy and electronic structure of magnesium hydride (MgH2) alloyed by 3d transition metal elements. Through calculations of the negative heat formation of magnesium hydride alloyed by X (X denotes 3d transition metal) element, it is found that when a little X (not including Sc) dissolves into magnesium hydride, the structural stability of alloying systems decreases, which indicates that the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 can be improved. After comparing the densities of states(DOS) and the charge distribution of MgH2 with or without X alloying, it is found that the improvement for the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 alloyed by X attributes to the fact that the weakened bonding between magnesium and hydrogen is caused by the stronger interactions between X (not including Cu) and hydrogen. The calculation results of the improvement for the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2-X (X=Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co,Ni, Cu) systems are in agreement with the experimental results. Hence, the dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 are expected to be improved by addition of Cr, Zn alloying elements.

  20. Metal hydride work pair development and its application on automobile air conditioning systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Feng; CHEN Jiang-ping; ZHANG Wen-feng; CHEN Zhi-jiu

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas driving automobile air conditioning systems, a hydride pair LaNi4.61Mn0.26A10.13/La0.6Y0.4Ni4.8Mn0.2 was developed working at 393~473 K/293~323 K/263~273 K. Property tests showed that both alloys have flat plateau slopes and small hystereses; system theoretical coefficient of performance (COP) is 0.711. Based on this work pair, a function proving automobile metal hydride refrigeration system was constructed. The equivalent thermal conductivities of the activated reaction beds were merely 1.1~1.6 W/(m·K), which had not met practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power was 84.6 W at 423 K/303 K/273 K with COP being 0.26. By altering cycling parameters, experiment data showed that cooling power and system COP increase with the growth of heat source temperature as well as pre-heating and regeneration time while decrease with heat sink temperature increment. This study confirms the feasibility of automobile metal hydride refrigeration systems, while heat transfer properties of reaction beds still need to be improved for better performance.

  1. Laser rapid forming of low cost hydride-dehydride titanium alloy powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing; ZHANG Feng-ying; LIN Xin; TAN Hua; HUANG Wei-dong

    2006-01-01

    Low cost hydride-dehydride (HDH) Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) alloy powder was employed to investigate the metallurgical quality and mechanical properties of laser formed samples. With appropriate control of the laser forming processing parameters and the loose density of HDH powder, two kinds of defect, i.e. porosity and ill-bonding, can be avoided. Rare earth Nd powder was added to HDH Ti-64 powder to purify laser formed alloy. The results show that with a few additive of Nd, the microstructure of laser formed alloy changes from Widmanst-tten morphology to a basket weave microstructure. Accordingly an appropriate addition of Nd is effective to improve both the strength and ductility of laser formed HDH Ti-64 alloy. The values of tensile test meet the wrought specification with the content of Nd ranging from 0.1%-0.2%(mass fraction).

  2. Scaling at the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in yttrium hydride

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, A F T; Rosenbaum, T F

    2003-01-01

    A single yttrium hydride thin film is conveniently driven through the T 0 metal-insulator transition by fine-tuning the charge carrier density n via persistent photoconductivity at low temperature. Simultaneously, electrical conductivity and Hall measurements are performed for temperatures T down to 350 mK and magnetic fields up to 14 T. A scaling analysis is applied and critical exponents, resolved separately on the metallic and insulating sides of the critical region, are determined consistently. We introduce corrections to scaling to invoke collapse of the data onto a single master curve over an extended region of the (n, T) phase diagram.

  3. Protonation of transition-metal hydrides: a not so simple process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besora, Maria; Lledós, Agustí; Maseras, Feliu

    2009-04-01

    The protonation of a transition-metal hydride is a formally simple process between a proton donor and a proton acceptor with several potential basic centres. The detailed mechanism is however quite subtle, with multistep reactions and involvement of different intermediates. The process is furthermore very sensitive to the nature of both the proton donor and the transition-metal complex, as well as to the solvent and to the presence and identity of eventual counteranions. This tutorial review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of the reaction, obtained through the joint application of a number of computational and experimental techniques.

  4. Alkaline-earth metal hydrides as novel host lattices for Eu(II) luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Sayede, Adlane; Springborg, Michael

    2011-07-04

    Luminescence of divalent europium has been investigated for the first time in metal hydrides. A complete solid-solution series was found for the pseudobinary system Eu(x)Sr(1-x)H(2) [a = 637.6(1) pm -12.1(3)x pm, b = 387.0(1)-6.5(2)x pm, c = 732.2(2)-10.1(4)x pm]. Europium-doped alkaline-earth hydrides Eu(x)M(1-x)H(2) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) with a small europium concentration (x = 0.005) exhibit luminescence with maximum emission wavelengths of 764 nm (M = Ca), 728 nm (M = Sr), and 750 nm (M = Ba); i.e., the emission energy of divalent europium shows an extremely large red shift compared to the emission energies of fluorides or oxides. Theoretical calculations (LDA+U) confirm decreasing band gaps with increasing europium content of the solid solutions.

  5. Interaction between a transition-metal fluoride and a transition-metal hydride: water-mediated hydrofluoric acid evolution following fluoride solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierotti, Michele R; Rossin, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2013-11-04

    The reaction between the nickel(II) PCP pincer fluoride complex ((tBu)PCP)Ni(F) [(tBu)PCP = 2,6-C6H3(CH2P(t)Bu2)2] and the tungsten(II) carbonyl hydride CpW(H)(CO)3 (Cp = η(5)-C5H5(-)) leads to hydrofluoric acid evolution and formation of the bimetallic isocarbonylic species [CpW(CO)2(μ-κ,C:κ,O-CO)···Ni((tBu)PCP)]. The process has been monitored through multinuclear ((19)F, (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H) variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, collecting (19)F T1 data values for a fluoride ligand bound to a transition metal. The extremely short relaxation time (minimum value of 13 ms at 193 K) is ascribed to the large chemical shift anisotropy of the Ni-F bond (688 ppm). The in-depth NMR analysis has revealed that the fluoride-hydride interaction is not direct but water-mediated, at odds with what was previously observed for the "hydride-hydride" case ((tBu)PCP)Ni(H)/CpW(H)(CO)3. Kinetic measurements have unveiled that the first step of the overall mechanism is thought to be solvation of the fluoride ligand (as a result of Ni-F···H2O hydrogen bonding), while further reaction of the solvated fluoride with CpW(H)(CO)3 is extremely slow and competes with the side reaction of fluoride replacement by a water molecule on the nickel center to form the [((tBu)PCP)Ni(H2O)](+) aquo species. Finally, density functional theory analysis of the solvation process through a discrete + continuum model has been accomplished, at the M06//6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, to support the mechanistic hypothesis.

  6. Hyphenating multisyringe flow injection lab-on-valve analysis with atomic fluorescence spectrometry for on-line bead-injection preconcentration and determination of trace levels of hydride-forming elements in environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    of the functional moieties, so that maximum benefit can be taken from the application of the bead renewal strategy. The proposed procedure is characterized by a high tolerance to metal species and interfering hydride forming elements. In fact, ratios of Se(IV) to As ≤ 5000 and Sb(V) to As ≤ 500 are tolerated...

  7. Hydrogen Absorbing Material in Carbonaceous-Metal Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mulana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising materials for storing hydrogen in solid state would be included in metal-carbon composites. In order to obtain nanocrystalline metal particles encapsulated by crystalline or amorphous carbon, mechanosynthesis of zirconium-carbonaceous composites and alkali metal-carbonaceous composites was performed. For zirconium-carbonaceous composites, only zirconium-carbon black composite absorbed more hydrogen than expected for a mere mixture with the same composition. The higher hydrogen capacity on the zirconium-carbon black composite would be due to some specific sites on the carbonaceous material created during the milling. Another effect of the composite formation was stabilization of zirconium, that is, the composites did not ignite in air. On alkali metal-carbonaceous composites, carbon black has superior effect in composite formation compared with graphite in which some cooperative effect was only detected on alkali metal-carbon black composite. The effect of the carbonaceous composite formation was resistance to air and anti-sticking characteristics to balls and the wall of the vial during the ball milling.

  8. Using magnetization measurements to detect small amounts of plutonium hydride formation in plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Wook [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mielke, Charles H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baiardo, Joseph P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mun, Eun D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Alice Iulia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 atomic % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here we use magnetization, X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx, largely on the surface of the sample with x ~ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with precipitates of ferromagnetic PuH1.9.

  9. DFT study on the mechanism of water-assisted dihydrogen elimination in group 6 octahedral metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, K S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2012-08-28

    The reaction of water with octahedral bis-, tris- and tetrakis-(phosphine)tungsten, (phosphine)molybdenum and (phosphine)chromium complexes has been studied using B3LYP/def2-TZVPP level of DFT to elucidate dissociative, associative and hydride migratory insertion mechanisms for hydrogen elimination. In the dissociative mechanism, phosphine dissociation requires 19.3-28.5 kcal mol(-1) of energy. The phosphine-water ligand exchange is endergonic due to poor coordination ability of water to group 6 metals (binding energy 8.8-15.5 kcal mol(-1)). The ligand exchange leads to intermolecular M-H···H(2)O dihydrogen interaction and facilitates dihydrogen elimination (G(act) = 6.8-15.5 kcal mol(-1)). In the associative mechanism, a water molecule in the first solvation shell interacts with the M-H bond through a dihydrogen bond (interaction energy 2.7-4.0 kcal mol(-1)) and leads to the elimination of H(2) by forming a hydroxide complex. Compared to the dissociative mechanism, G(act) of associative mechanisms are ~22 kcal mol(-1) higher. In the hydride migratory insertion mechanism, the hydride ligand shifts to the CO ligand (G(act) = 25.4-30.4 kcal mol(-1)) to afford a formyl complex and subsequently the H-H bond coupling occurs between formyl and water ligand (G(act) = 2.8-4.4 kcal mol(-1)). In many cases, the migratory insertion mechanism can simultaneously operate with the dissociative mechanism as a minor pathway, whereas owing to high G(act) value, the associative mechanism can be described as inactive in the reaction. The general argument that dihydrogen elimination is preceded by the formation of a dihydrogen intermediate is not applicable for the systems studied herein as the most favoured dissociative mechanism does not pass through such an intermediate. On the other hand, irrespective of the mechanisms, dihydrogen elimination invariably occurs with the formation of a dihydrogen bonded transition state. Our results also suggest that group 6 octahedral metal

  10. Neutral and Ionized Hydrides in Star-forming Regions -- Observations with Herschel/HIFI

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Staeuber, Pascal; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of hydrides depends critically on high-energy UV, X-ray, and particle irradiation. Here we study hydrides in star-forming regions where irradiation by the young stellar object can be substantial, and density and temperature can be much enhanced over interstellar values. Lines of OH, CH, NH, SH and their ions OH+, CH+, NH+, SH+, H2O+, and H3O+ were observed in star-forming regions by the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular column densities are derived from observed ground-state lines, models, or rotational diagrams. We report here on two prototypical high-mass regions, AFGL 2591 and W3 IRS5, and compare them to chemical calculations making assumptions on the high-energy irradiation. A model assuming no ionizing protostellar emission is compared with (i) a model assuming strong protostellar X-ray emission and (ii) a two-dimensional (2D) model including emission in the far UV (FUV, 6 -- 13.6 eV) irradiating the outflow walls that separate the outflowing gas an...

  11. A study of H+ production using metal hydride and other compounds by means of laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine M.; Kondo K.; Okamura, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2012-02-22

    A laser ion source can provide wide variety of ion beams from solid target materials, however, it has been difficult to create proton beam efficiently. We examined capability of proton production using beeswax, polyethylene, and metal hydrides (MgH2 and ZrH2) as target materials. The results showed that beeswax and polyethylene could not be used to produce protons because these targets are transparent to the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. On the other hand, the metal hydrides could supply protons. Although the obtained particle numbers of protons were less than those of the metal ions, the metal hydrides could be used as a target for proton laser ion source.

  12. A study of H{sup +} production using metal hydride and other compounds by means of laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, K.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A laser ion source can provide wide variety of ion beams from solid target materials, however, it has been difficult to create proton beam efficiently. We examined capability of proton production using beeswax, polyethylene, and metal hydrides (MgH{sub 2} and ZrH{sub 2}) as target materials. The results showed that beeswax and polyethylene could not be used to produce protons because these targets are transparent to the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. On the other hand, the metal hydrides could supply protons. Although the obtained particle numbers of protons were less than those of the metal ions, the metal hydrides could be used as a target for proton laser ion source.

  13. A study of H+ production using metal hydride and other compounds by means of laser ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2012-02-01

    A laser ion source can provide wide variety of ion beams from solid target materials, however, it has been difficult to create proton beam efficiently. We examined capability of proton production using beeswax, polyethylene, and metal hydrides (MgH2 and ZrH2) as target materials. The results showed that beeswax and polyethylene could not be used to produce protons because these targets are transparent to the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. On the other hand, the metal hydrides could supply protons. Although the obtained particle numbers of protons were less than those of the metal ions, the metal hydrides could be used as a target for proton laser ion source.

  14. A study of H+ production using metal hydride and other compounds by means of laser ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M; Kondo, K; Okamura, M; Hayashizaki, N

    2012-02-01

    A laser ion source can provide wide variety of ion beams from solid target materials, however, it has been difficult to create proton beam efficiently. We examined capability of proton production using beeswax, polyethylene, and metal hydrides (MgH(2) and ZrH(2)) as target materials. The results showed that beeswax and polyethylene could not be used to produce protons because these targets are transparent to the laser wavelength of 1064 nm. On the other hand, the metal hydrides could supply protons. Although the obtained particle numbers of protons were less than those of the metal ions, the metal hydrides could be used as a target for proton laser ion source.

  15. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery– Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B. K.; Wainright, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used. PMID:22711974

  16. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery- Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B K; Wainright, J S

    2012-05-15

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H(2)) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used.

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  18. The Planck Sorption Cooler: Using Metal Hydrides to Produce 20 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David P.; Bowman, R.; Prina, M.; Wilson, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has built and delivered two continuous closed cycle hydrogen Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers for the ESA Planck mission, which will measure the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background. The metal hydride compressor consists of six sorbent beds containing LaNi4.78Sn0.22 alloy and a low pressure storage bed of the same material. Each sorbent bed contains a separate gas-gap heat switch that couples or isolates the bed with radiators during the compressor operating cycle. ZrNiHx hydride is used in this heat switch. The Planck compressor produces hydrogen gas at a pressure of 48 Bar by heating the hydride to approx.450 K. This gas passes through a cryogenic cold end consisting of a tube-in-tube heat exchanger, three pre-cooling stages to bring the gas to nominally 52 K, a JT value to expand the gas into the two-phase regime at approx.20 K, and two liquid - vapor heat exchangers that must remove 190 and 646 mW of heat respectively.

  19. A simple approach to metal hydride alloy optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C.; Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Certain metals and related alloys can combine with hydrogen in a reversible fashion, so that on being heated, they release a portion of the gas. Such materials may find application in the large scale storage of hydrogen. Metal and alloys which show high dissociation pressure at low temperatures, and low endothermic heat of dissociation, and are therefore desirable for hydrogen storage, give values of the Hildebrand-Scott solubility parameter that lie between 100-118 Hildebrands, (Ref. 1), close to that of dissociated hydrogen. All of the less practical storage systems give much lower values of the solubility parameter. By using the Hildebrand solubility parameter as a criterion, and applying the mixing rule to combinations of known alloys and solid solutions, correlations are made to optimize alloy compositions and maximize hydrogen storage capacity.

  20. Hydrogen release reactions of Al-based complex hydrides enhanced by vibrational dynamics and valences of metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Daemen, L; Cheng, Y-Q; Tomiyasu, K; Takagi, S; Orimo, S

    2016-09-27

    Hydrogen release from Al-based complex hydrides composed of metal cation(s) and [AlH4](-) was investigated using inelastic neutron scattering viewed from vibrational dynamics. The hydrogen release followed the softening of translational and [AlH4](-) librational modes, which was enhanced by vibrational dynamics and the valence(s) of the metal cation(s).

  1. Complex transition metal hydrides incorporating ionic hydrogen: Synthesis and characterization of Na{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 8} and Na{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}RuH{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, Terry D., E-mail: terry_humphries81@hotmail.com [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takagi, Shigeyuki; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Sato, Toyoto [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Sørby, Magnus H.; Deledda, Stefano; Hauback, Bjørn C. [Physics Department, Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO-2027 (Norway); Orimo, Shin-ichi [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Structures of Na{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 8} and Na{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}RuH{sub 8} have been determined by XRD and PND. • Compounds incorporate independently coordinated ionic and covalent hydrogen. • [TH{sub 6}]{sup 4−} anion is surrounded by a cubic array of four Mg{sup 2+} and four Na{sup +} cations. • H{sup −} anions are octahedrally coordinated by four Na{sup +} and two Mg{sup 2+} cations. • Vibrational modes of the H{sup −} anions and complex hydride anion are observed. - Abstract: A new class of quaternary complex transition metal hydrides (Na{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}TH{sub 8} (T = Fe, Ru)) have been synthesized and their structures determined by combined synchrotron radiation X-ray and powder neutron diffraction. The compounds can be considered as a link between ionic and complex hydrides in terms of incorporating independently coordinated ionic and covalent hydrogen. These novel isostructural complex transition metal hydrides crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbam, where the octahedral complex hydride anion is surrounded by a cubic array of four Mg{sup 2+} and four Na{sup +} cations, forming distinct two-dimensional layers. An intriguing feature of these materials is the distorted octahedral coordination of the isolated H{sup −} anions by four Na{sup +} and two Mg{sup 2+} cations, which form layers between the transition metal containing layers. The vibrational modes of the H{sup −} anions and complex hydride anion are independently observed for the first time in a quaternary complex transition metal hydride system by Raman and IR spectroscopy.

  2. Modelling and analysis of a metal hydride cooling system

    OpenAIRE

    Payá Herrero, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    La tesis doctoral que se presenta a continuación ha sido realizado en el Instituto de Ingeniería Energética de la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, y parcialmente en el instituto de Stuttgart (Alemania) "Institüt für Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme" (IKE). El presente estudio consiste en el modelado y validación de un sistema de producción de frío basado en la absorción/desorción de hidrógeno en metales. La instalación experimental que se ha modelado se halla en el instituto IKE. ...

  3. Hydride formation on deformation twin in zirconium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Sung-Dae; Yoon, Jonghun

    2016-12-01

    Hydrides deteriorate the mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) alloys used in nuclear reactors. Intergranular hydrides that form along grain boundaries have been extensively studied due to their detrimental effects on cracking. However, it has been little concerns on formation of Zr hydrides correlated with deformation twins which is distinctive heterogeneous nucleation site in hexagonal close-packed metals. In this paper, the heterogeneous precipitation of Zr hydrides at the twin boundaries was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. It demonstrates that intragranular hydrides in the twinned region precipitates on the rotated habit plane by the twinning and intergranular hydrides precipitate along the coherent low energy twin boundaries independent of the conventional habit planes. Interestingly, dislocations around the twin boundaries play a substantial role in the nucleation of Zr hydrides by reducing the misfit strain energy.

  4. Improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Ramachandran, S. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Low cost, high density storage of hydrogen will remove the most serious barrier to large-scale utilization of hydrogen as a non-polluting, zero-emission fuel. An important challenge for the practical use of Mg-based, high capacity hydrogen storage alloys has been the development of a low-cost, bulk production technique. Two difficulties in preparation of Mg-based alloys are the immiscibility of Mg with many transition metals and the relatively high volatility of Mg compared to many transition metals. These factors preclude the use of conventional induction melting techniques for the Mg-based alloy preparation. A mechanical alloying technique, in which Mg immiscibility and volatility do not present a problem, was developed and shows great promise for production of Mg-based alloys. A number of Mg-based alloys were prepared via modified induction melting and mechanical alloying methods. The alloys were tested for gas phase hydrogen storage properties, composition, structure and morphology. The mechanically alloyed samples are multi-component, multi-phase, highly disordered materials in their as-prepared state. These unoptimized alloys have shown reversible H-storage capacity of more than 5 wt.% hydrogen. After 2000 absorption/desorption cycles, the alloys show no decline in storage capacity or desorption kinetics. The alloys have also demonstrated resistance to CH{sub 4} and CO poisoning in preliminary testing. Upon annealing, with an increase in crystallinity, the H-storage capacity decreases, indicating the importance of disorder.

  5. Structural and kinetic studies of metal hydride hydrogen storage materials using thin film deposition and characterization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephen Thomas

    Hydrogen makes an attractive energy carrier for many reasons. It is an abundant chemical fuel that can be produced from a wide variety of sources and stored for very long periods of time. When used in a fuel cell, hydrogen emits only water at the point of use, making it very attractive for mobile applications such as in an automobile. Metal hydrides are promising candidates for on-board reversible hydrogen storage in mobile applications due to their very high volumetric storage capacities---in most cases exceeding even that of liquid hydrogen. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has set fuel system targets for an automotive hydrogen storage system, but as of yet no single material meets all the requirements. In particular, slow reaction kinetics and/or inappropriate thermodynamics plague many metal hydride hydrogen storage materials. In order to engineer a practical material that meets the DOE targets, we need a detailed understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of these materials during the phase change. In this work I employed sputter deposited thin films as a platform to study materials with highly controlled chemistry, microstructure and catalyst placement using thin film characterization techniques such as in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron reflectivity. I observed kinetic limitations in the destabilized Mg2Si system due to the slow diffusion of the host Mg and Si atoms while forming separate MgH2 and Si phases. Conversely, I observed that the presence of Al in the Mg/Al system inhibits hydrogen diffusion while the host Mg and Al atoms interdiffuse readily, allowing the material to fall into a kinetic and/or thermodynamic trap by forming intermetallic compounds such as Mg17Al 12. By using in situ XRD to analyze epitaxial Mg films grown on (001) oriented Al2O3 substrates I observed hydride growth consistent with a model of a planar hydride layer growing into an existing metal layer. Subsequent film cycling changes the hydrogen

  6. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  7. High cycle life, cobalt free, AB{5} metal hydride electrodes [Revised 11/10/98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Tom; Reilly, J.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Adzic, G.D.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.

    1998-11-10

    Cobalt-free La(Ni,Sn)5+x alloys have been identified as low cost, corrosion resistant electrodes for nickel-metal-hydride batteries. The structure of theses alloys are similar to non-stoichiometric La(Ni,Cu)5+x compounds; i.e., they retain the P6/mmm space group while Ni dumbbells occupy La sites. Electrodes fabricated from some of these novel alloys have capacities and cycle lives equivalent to those made from commercial, battery grade, AB5 alloys with cobalt.

  8. Pressure-induced hydrogen-dominant metallic state in aluminum hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, Igor; Eremets, M I; Hanfland, M; Tse, J S; Amboage, M; Yao, Y; Trojan, I A

    2008-02-01

    Two structural transitions in covalent aluminum hydride AlH3 were characterized at high pressure. A metallic phase stable above 100 GPa is found to have a remarkably simple cubic structure with shortest first-neighbor H-H distances ever measured except in H2 molecule. Although the high-pressure phase is predicted to be superconductive, this was not observed experimentally down to 4 K over the pressure range 120-164 GPa. The results indicate that the superconducting behavior may be more complex than anticipated.

  9. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  10. Feasibility study for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabatini, J.C.; Field, E.L.; Wu, I.C.; Cox, M.R.; Barnett, B.M.; Coleman, J.T. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This feasibility study examined three possible recycling processes for two compositions (AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5}) of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries to determine possible rotes for recovering battery materials. Analysts examined the processes, estimated the costs for capital equipment and operation, and estimated the value of the reclaimed material. They examined the following three processes: (1) a chemical process that leached battery powders using hydrochloric acid, (2) a pyrometallurical process, and (3) a physical separation/chemical process. The economic analysis revealed that the physical separation/chemical process generated the most revenue.

  11. A modified coupled pair functional approach. [for dipole moment calculation of metal hydride ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A modified coupled pair functional (CPF) method is presented for the configuration interaction problem that dramatically improves properties for cases where the Hartree-Fock reference configuration is not a good zeroth-order wave function description. It is shown that the tendency for CPF to overestimate the effect of higher excitations arises from the choice of the geometric mean for the partial normalization denominator. The modified method is demonstrated for ground state dipole moment calculations of the NiH, CuH, and ZnH transition metal hydrides, and compared to singles-plus-doubles configuration interaction and the Ahlrichs et al. (1984) CPF method.

  12. Accelerated cycle life performance for ovonic nickel-metal hydride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otzinger, Burton M.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries have emerged as the leading candidate for commercial replacement of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. An important incentive is that the Ni-MH cell provides approximately twice the capacity of a Ni-Cd cell for a given size. A six-cell battery was committed to an accelerated cycle life test to determine the effect of separation type on performance. Results of the test may also show the Ni-MH battery to be a replacement candidate for the aerospace Ni-Cd battery.

  13. Rotational frequencies of transition metal hydrides for astrophysical searches in the far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John M.; Beaton, Stuart P.; Evenson, Kenneth M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate frequencies for the lowest rotational transitions of five transition metal hydrides (CrH, FeH, CoH, NiH, and CuH) in their ground electronic states are reported to help the identification of these species in astrophysical sources from their far-infrared spectra. Accurate frequencies are determined in two ways: for CuH, by calculation from rotational constants determined from higher J transitions with an accuracy of 190 kHz; for the other species, by extrapolation to zero magnetic field from laser magnetic resonance spectra with an accuracy of 0.7 MHz.

  14. Hyphenating multisyringe flow injection lab-on-valve analysis with atomic fluorescence spectrometry for on-line bead-injection preconcentration and determination of trace levels of hydride-forming elements in environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald;

    2006-01-01

    of the functional moieties, so that maximum benefit can be taken from the application of the bead renewal strategy. The proposed procedure is characterized by a high tolerance to metal species and interfering hydride forming elements. In fact, ratios of Se(IV) to As ≤ 5000 and Sb(V) to As ≤ 500 are tolerated...... feasible by interfacing the micromachined LOV-module with AFS by a multisyringe flowing stream network for on-line post column derivatization of the eluate aimed at the generation of hydride species. The potential of this new hyphenated technique for environmental assays was ascertained via...

  15. Synthetic, structural, and theoretical investigations of alkali metal germanium hydrides--contact molecules and separated ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Weijie; Allis, Damian G; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of a series of crown ether ligated alkali metal (M=K, Rb, Cs) germyl derivatives M(crown ether)nGeH3 through the hydrolysis of the respective tris(trimethylsilyl)germanides is reported. Depending on the alkali metal and the crown ether diameter, the hydrides display either contact molecules or separated ions in the solid state, providing a unique structural insight into the geometry of the obscure GeH3- ion. Germyl derivatives displaying M--Ge bonds in the solid state are of the general formula [M([18]crown-6)(thf)GeH3] with M=K (1) and M=Rb (4). The compounds display an unexpected geometry with two of the GeH3 hydrogen atoms closely approaching the metal center, resulting in a partially inverted structure. Interestingly, the lone pair at germanium is not pointed towards the alkali metal, rather two of the three hydrides are approaching the alkali metal center to display M--H interactions. Separated ions display alkali metal cations bound to two crown ethers in a sandwich-type arrangement and non-coordinated GeH3- ions to afford complexes of the type [M(crown ether)2][GeH3] with M=K, crown ether=[15]crown-5 (2); M=K, crown ether=[12]crown-4 (3); and M=Cs, crown ether=[18]crown-6 (5). The highly reactive germyl derivatives were characterized by using X-ray crystallography, 1H and 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to analyze the geometry of the GeH3- ion in the contact molecules 1 and 4.

  16. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  17. Mn in misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy - Part 1 structural, hydrogen storage and electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K.; Wong, D. F.; Wang, L.; Nei, J.; Ouchi, T.; Yasuoka, S.

    2015-03-01

    The structural, gaseous phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of a series of Mn-modified misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloys were investigated in part one of this two-part series of papers. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that these alloys are all multi-phased compositions with different abundances of AB2, AB3, A2B7, AB4, and AB5 phases. Substitution of Ni in the B-site by Mn promotes AB5 phase formation and decreases both gaseous phase and electrochemical capacities due to the reduction in the abundance of main hexagonal A2B7 phase. AC impedance and magnetic susceptibility measurement were employed to characterize the surface of Mn-free and Mn-modified alloys and show deterioration in surface catalytic ability as the Mn-content increases. Mn-modification adversely affected misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy properties such as phase homogeneity, capacity, cycle stability, high-rate performance, and surface reaction.

  18. The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components Delayed Hydride Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Puls, Manfred P

    2012-01-01

    By drawing together the current theoretical and experimental understanding of the phenomena of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys, The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components: Delayed Hydride Cracking provides a detailed explanation focusing on the properties of hydrogen and hydrides in these alloys. Whilst the focus lies on zirconium alloys, the combination of both the empirical and mechanistic approaches creates a solid understanding that can also be applied to other hydride forming metals.   This up-to-date reference focuses on documented research surrounding DHC, including current methodologies for design and assessment of the results of periodic in-service inspections of pressure tubes in nuclear reactors. Emphasis is placed on showing that our understanding of DHC is supported by progress across a broad range of fields. These include hysteresis associated with first-order phase transformations; phase relationships in coherent crystalline metallic...

  19. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  20. Ionic Liquid-Based Non-Aqueous Electrolytes for Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejun Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The voltage of an alkaline electrolyte-based battery is often limited by the narrow electrochemical stability window of water (1.23 V. As an alternative to water, ionic liquid (IL-based electrolyte has been shown to exhibit excellent proton conducting properties and a wide electrochemical stability window, and can be used in proton conducting batteries. In this study, we used IL/acid mixtures to replace the 30 wt % KOH aqueous electrolyte in nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries, and verified the proton conducting character of these mixtures through electrochemical charge/discharge experiments. Dilution of ILs with acetic acid was found to effectively increase proton conductivity. By using 2 M acetic acid in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, stable charge/discharge characteristics were obtained, including low charge/discharge overpotentials, a discharge voltage plateau at ~1.2 V, a specific capacity of 161.9 mAh·g−1, and a stable cycling performance for an AB5 metal hydride anode with a (Ni,Co,Zn(OH2 cathode.

  1. Theoretical dipole moments for the first-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.; Walch, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (D sub e, r sub e, mu) are determined for the first-row transition metal hydrides using better than DZP basis sets at the modified coupled pair functional (MCPF) level. Extensive comparisons between MCPF and complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations with natural orbital iterations, and studies with more extensive basis sets, show this level of treatment to supply an accurate and cost-effective treatment of these systems. For the transition metal hydrides, the bonding can arise from either the 3d(n)4s(2) or 3d(n + 1)4s(1) atomic asymptotes, or a mixture of both. Since the dipole moment arising from these two bonding mechanisms is very different, the dipole moment is found to be directly related to the 3d population. Thus, the magnitude of the dipole moments provides a sensitive test of the wave function, and gives insight into the nature of the bonding.

  2. First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Karl Johnson

    2011-05-20

    The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

  3. Bio-inspired transition metal-organic hydride conjugates for catalysis of transfer hydrogenation: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSkimming, Alex; Chan, Bun; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Ball, Graham E; Colbran, Stephen B

    2015-02-09

    Taking inspiration from yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH), a benzimidazolium (BI(+) ) organic hydride-acceptor domain has been coupled with a 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) metal-binding domain to afford a novel multifunctional ligand (L(BI+) ) with hydride-carrier capacity (L(BI+) +H(-) ⇌L(BI) H). Complexes of the type [Cp*M(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 (M=Rh, Ir) have been made and fully characterised by cyclic voltammetry, UV/Vis spectroelectrochemistry, and, for the Ir(III) congener, X-ray crystallography. [Cp*Rh(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ]2 catalyses the transfer hydrogenation of imines by formate ion in very goods yield under conditions where the corresponding [Cp*Ir(L(BI) )Cl][PF6 ] and [Cp*M(phen)Cl][PF6 ] (M=Rh, Ir) complexes are almost inert as catalysts. Possible alternatives for the catalysis pathway are canvassed, and the free energies of intermediates and transition states determined by DFT calculations. The DFT study supports a mechanism involving formate-driven RhH formation (90 kJ mol(-1) free-energy barrier), transfer of hydride between the Rh and BI(+) centres to generate a tethered benzimidazoline (BIH) hydride donor, binding of imine substrate at Rh, back-transfer of hydride from the BIH organic hydride donor to the Rh-activated imine substrate (89 kJ mol(-1) barrier), and exergonic protonation of the metal-bound amide by formic acid with release of amine product to close the catalytic cycle. Parallels with the mechanism of biological hydride transfer in yADH are discussed.

  4. Metal Hydrides, MOFs, and Carbon Composites as Space Radiation Shielding Mitigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Liang, Daniel; Hill, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, metal hydrides and MOFs (Metal-Organic Framework/microporous organic polymer composites - for their hydrogen and methane storage capabilities) have been studied with applications in fuel cell technology. We have investigated a dual-use of these materials and carbon composites (CNT-HDPE) to include space radiation shielding mitigation. In this paper we present the results of a detailed study where we have analyzed 64 materials. We used the Band fit spectra for the combined 19-24 October 1989 solar proton events as the input source term radiation environment. These computational analyses were performed with the NASA high energy particle transport/dose code HZETRN. Through this analysis we have identified several of the materials that have excellent radiation shielding properties and the details of this analysis will be discussed further in the paper.

  5. Reviews on the Japanese Patent Applications Regarding Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taihei Ouchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Patent Applications filed on the topic of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been reviewed. Patent applications filed by the top nine battery manufacturers (Matsushita, Sanyo, Hitachi Maxell, Yuasa, Toshiba, FDK, Furukawa, Japan Storage, and Shin-kobe, five component suppliers (Tanaka, Mitsui, Santoku, Japan Metals & Chemicals Co. (JMC, and Shin-Etsu, and three research institutes (Industrial Research Institute (ISI, Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, and Toyota R & D were chosen as the main subjects for this review, based on their production volume and contribution to the field. By reviewing these patent applications, we can have a clear picture of the technology development in the Japanese battery industry. These patent applications also provide insights, know-how, and future directions for engineers and scientists working in the rechargeable battery field.

  6. Predicting impurity gases and phases during hydrogen evolution from complex metal hydrides using free energy minimization enabled by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Allendorf, Mark D; Stavila, Vitalie; Sholl, David S

    2010-09-07

    First-principles calculations represent a potent tool for screening metal hydride mixtures that can reversibly store hydrogen. A number of promising new hydride systems with high hydrogen capacity and favorable thermodynamics have been predicted this way. An important limitation of these studies, however, is the assumption that H(2) is the only gas-phase product of the reaction, which is not always the case. This paper summarizes new theoretical and numerical approaches that can be used to predict thermodynamic equilibria in complex metal hydride systems with competing reaction pathways. We report thermochemical equilibrium calculations using data obtained from density functional theory (DFT) computations to describe the possible occurrence of gas-phase products other than H(2) in three complex hydrides, LiNH(2), LiBH(4), and Mg(BH(4))(2), and mixtures of these with the destabilizing compounds LiH, MgH(2), and C. The systems under investigation contain N, C, and/or B and thus have the potential to evolve N(2), NH(3), hydrocarbons, and/or boranes as well as H(2). Equilibria as a function of both temperature and total pressure are predicted. The results indicate that significant amounts of these species can form under some conditions. In particular, the thermodynamic model predicts formation of N(2) and NH(3) as products of LiNH(2) decomposition. Comparison with published experimental data indicates that N(2) formation must be kinetically limited. Our examination of C-containing systems indicates that methane is the stable gas-phase species at low temperatures, not H(2). On the other hand, very low amounts of boranes (primarily BH(3)) are predicted to form in B-containing systems.

  7. Hydrogen Storage Characteristics of Metal Hydro-Borate and Transition Element-Added Magnesium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Kwak, Young Jun [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye Ryoung [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    A metal hydro-borate Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} was prepared by milling ZnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} in a planetary ball mill in an Ar atmosphere. This sample contained NaCl. 95 wt% MgH{sub 2}-2.5 wt% Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5 wt% Ni samples [named MgH{sub 2}-2.5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni] were then prepared by milling in a planetary ball mill in a hydrogen atmosphere. The hydrogen absorption and release properties of the prepared samples were investigated. In particular, variations in the initial hydriding and dehydriding rates with temperature were examined. MgH{sub 2}-2.5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni dehydrided at the fourth cycle contained Mg, MgO, and small amounts of β-MgH2 and Mg2Ni. The sample after hydriding-dehydriding cycling had a slightly smaller average particle size and a larger BET specific surface area than the sample after milling. Increasing the temperature from 573 K to 623 K led to a decrease in the initial hydriding rate. The initial dehydriding rate increased as the temperature increased from 573 K to 643 K. At 573 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}, the sample absorbed 3.85 wt% H for 2.5 min, 4.60 wt% H for 5 min, 4.64 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.80 wt% H for 60 min. The MgH{sub 2}-2.5Zn(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}-2.5Ni had an effective hydrogen storage capacity (the quantity of hydrogen absorbed for 60 min) of near 5 wt% (4.96 wt% at 593 K).

  8. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  9. Green Lubricants for Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The increasing focus on legislation towards diminishing the impact on working environment as well as external environment has driven efforts to develop new, environmentally benign lubricants for metal forming. The present paper gives an overview of these efforts to substitute environmentally haza...

  10. On the effect of particle size distribution on the discharge performance of nickel-metal hydride cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikonen, J.M. [Center for Scientific Computing, Espoo (Finland); Nagarajan, G.S.; Zee, J.W. van [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of particle size distribution on the discharge performance of nickel-metal hydride cells with mathematical models is investigated. A model with a continuous size distribution is presented and a simplified discrete version with two particle sizes is numerically analyzed for various parameter values. Simulation results are compared with experiments from another article and the deviations are analyzed. (orig.) 13 refs.

  11. LDA or GGA? A combined experimental inelastic neutron scattering and ab initio lattice dynamics study of alkali metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, G.D. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia SJB, Ciudad Universitaria, 9005 Comodoro Rivadavia (Argentina); Colognesi, D. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano s.n.c., 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Mitchell, P.C.H. [School of Chemistry, University of Reading, RG6 6AD (United Kingdom); Ramirez-Cuesta, A.J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Reading, RG6 6AD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.j.ramirez-cuesta@rl.ac.uk

    2005-10-31

    In a previous work, we carried out inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy experiments and preliminary first principles calculations on alkali metal hydrides. The complete series of alkali metal hydrides, LiH, NaH, KH, RbH and CsH was measured in the high-resolution TOSCA INS spectrometer at ISIS. Here, we present the results of ab initio electronic structure calculations of the properties of the alkali metal hydrides using both the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) parameterization. Properties calculated were lattice parameters, bulk moduli, dielectric constants, effective charges, electronic densities and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra. We took advantage of the currently available computer power to use full lattice dynamics theory to calculate thermodynamic properties for these materials. For the alkali metal hydrides (LiH, NaH, KH, RbH and CsH) using lattice dynamics, we found that the INS spectra calculated using LDA agreed better with the experimental data than the spectra calculated using GGA. Both zero-point effects and thermal contributions to free energies had an important effect on INS and several thermodynamic properties.

  12. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    -up storage systems are designed, tested and described numerically by finite elements simulation. The influence of the tank diameter on sorption rates, hydrogen capacities and temperature profiles inside the material beds is demonstrated. Key aspects for the design of future light metal hydride storage tank systems were derived from the experimental obtained results and the theoretical simulation of Li-RHC as a representative model system for RHCs.

  13. A computational study on novel carbon-based lithium materials for hydrogen storage and the role of carbon in destabilizing complex metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouri, Mohammed Minhaj

    One of the major impediments in the way of the realization of hydrogen economy is the storage of hydrogen gas. This involves both the storage for stationary applications as well as that of storage onboard vehicles for transportation applications. For obvious reasons, the system targets for the automotive applications are more stringent. There are many approaches which are still being researched for the storage of hydrogen for vehicular applications. Among them are the high pressure storage of hydrogen gas and the storing of liquid hydrogen in super insulated cryogenic cylinders. While both of them have been demonstrated practically, the high stakes of their respective shortcomings is hindering the wide spread application of these methods. Thus different solid state storage materials are being looked upon as promising solutions. Metal hydrides are a class of solid state hydrogen storage materials which are formed by the reaction of metals or their alloys with hydrogen. These materials have very good gravimetric storage densities, but are very stable thermodynamically to desorp hydrogen at room temperatures. Research is going on to improve the thermodynamics and the reaction kinetics of different metal hydrides. This dissertation tries to address the problem of high thermodynamic stability of the existing metal hydrides in two ways. First, a novel carbon based lithium material is proposed as a viable storage option based on its promising thermodynamic heat of formation. Pure beryllium (Be) clusters and the carbon-beryllium (C-Be) clusters are studied in detail using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) computational methods. Their interactions with hydrogen molecule are further studied. The results of these calculations indicate that hydrogen is more strongly physisorbed to the beryllium atom in the C-Be cluster, rather than to a carbon atom. After these initial studies, we calculated the geometries and the energies of more than 100 different carbon based lithium

  14. Effect of design parameters on enhancement of hydrogen charging in metal hydride reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Y. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The effects of heat transfer mechanisms on the charging process in metal hydride reactors are studied under various charging pressures. Three different cylindrical reactors with the same base dimensions are designed and manufactured. The first one is a closed cylinder cooled with natural convection, the fins are manufactured around the second reactor and the third reactor is cooled with water circulating around the reactor. The temperatures of the reactor at several locations are measured during charging with a range of pressure of 1-10 bar. The third reactor shows the lowest temperature increase with the fastest charging time under all charging pressures investigated. The effective heat transfer coefficients of the reactors are also calculated according to the experimental results and they are found to be 5.5 {+-} 1 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}, 35 {+-} 2 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1} and 113 {+-} 1 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}, respectively. The experimental results showed that the charging of hydride reactors is mainly heat transfer dependent and the reactor with better cooling exhibits the fastest charging characteristics. (author)

  15. Reduced enthalpy of metal hydride formation for Mg-Ti nanocomposites produced by spark discharge generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopol, Anca; Pfeiffer, Tobias V; Middelkoop, Joost; Lafont, Ugo; Canales-Perez, Roger J; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Mulder, Fokko M; Eijt, Stephan W H

    2013-05-29

    Spark discharge generation was used to synthesize Mg-Ti nanocomposites consisting primarily of a metastable body-centered-cubic (bcc) alloy of Mg and Ti. The bcc Mg-Ti alloy transformed upon hydrogenation into the face-centered-cubic fluorite Mg1-yTiyHx phase with favorable hydrogen storage properties. Both metal and metal hydride nanocomposites showed a fractal-like porous morphology, with a primary particle size of 10-20 nm. The metal content of 70 atom % (at %) Mg and 30 at % Ti, consistently determined by XRD, TEM-EDS, and ICP-OES, was distributed uniformly across the as-prepared sample. Pressure-composition isotherms for the Mg-Ti-H nanocomposites revealed large differences in the thermodynamics relative to bulk MgH2, with a much less negative enthalpy of formation of the hydride as small as -45 ± 3 kJ/molH2 as deduced from van't Hoff plots. The plateau pressures of hydrogenation were substantially higher than those for bulk MgH2 in the low temperature range from 150 to 250 °C. The reaction entropy was simultaneously reduced to values down to 84 ± 5 J/K mol H2, following a linear relationship between the enthalpy and entropy. Plausible mechanisms for the modified thermodynamics are discussed, including the effect of lattice strains, the presence of interfaces and hydrogen vacancies, and the formation of excess free volume due to local deformations. These mechanisms all rely on the finely interdispersed nanocomposite character of the samples which is maintained by grain refinement.

  16. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters for the low-lying states of the second-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the low-lying states of all of the second-row transition metal (TM) hydrides except CdH is reported. The calculations included the dominant relativistic contributions through the use of the relativistic effective core potentials of Hay and Wadt (1985). Electron correlation was incorporated, using single-plus-double configuration interaction, the coupled pair functional (CPF) formalism of Ahlrichs et al. (1985), and the Chong and Langhoff (1986) modified version of the CPF method. The spectroscopic parameters D(e), r(e), and mu(e) determined for the low-lying states are compared with the available experimental data and previous theoretical results. In contrast to the first-row TM hydrides studied earlier (Chong et al., 1986), the spectroscopic constants for the second-row TM hydrides were found to be much less sensitive to the level of correlation treatment.

  17. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters for the low-lying states of the second-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the low-lying states of all of the second-row transition metal (TM) hydrides except CdH is reported. The calculations included the dominant relativistic contributions through the use of the relativistic effective core potentials of Hay and Wadt (1985). Electron correlation was incorporated, using single-plus-double configuration interaction, the coupled pair functional (CPF) formalism of Ahlrichs et al. (1985), and the Chong and Langhoff (1986) modified version of the CPF method. The spectroscopic parameters D(e), r(e), and mu(e) determined for the low-lying states are compared with the available experimental data and previous theoretical results. In contrast to the first-row TM hydrides studied earlier (Chong et al., 1986), the spectroscopic constants for the second-row TM hydrides were found to be much less sensitive to the level of correlation treatment.

  18. New synthesis route for ternary transition metal amides as well as ultrafast amide-hydride hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Richter, Theresia M M; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-04-14

    K2[Mn(NH2)4] and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were successfully synthesized via a mechanochemical method. The mixture of K2[Mn(NH2)4] and LiH showed excellent rehydrogenation properties. In fact, after dehydrogenation K2[Mn(NH2)4]-8LiH fully rehydrogenates within 60 seconds at ca. 230 °C and 5 MPa of H2. This is one of the fastest rehydrogenation rates in amide-hydride systems known to date. This work also shows a strategy for the synthesis of transition metal nitrides by decomposition of the mixtures of M[M'(NH2)n] (where M is an alkali or alkaline earth metal and M' is a transition metal) and metal hydrides.

  19. Insights into dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols and amines catalyzed by a (PNN)-Ru(II) hydride complex: unusual metal-ligand cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guixiang; Li, Shuhua

    2011-11-07

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of dehydrogenative coupling of primary alcohols and amines mediated by a PNN-Ru(II) hydride complex (PNN = (2-(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)-6-(diethylaminomethyl)pyridine)). A plausible reaction pathway was proposed which contains three stages: (1) The alcohol dehydrogenation reaction to generate the aldehyde and H(2); (2) The aldehyde-amine condensation reaction to form the hemiaminal intermediate; (3) The dehydrogenation process of the hemiaminal intermediate to yield the final amide product with the liberation of H(2). The first and third stages occur via a similar pathway: (a) Proton transfer from the substrate to the PNN ligand; (b) Intramolecular rearrangement of the deprotonated substrate to form an anagostic complex; (c) Hydride transfer from the deprotonated substrate to the Ru center to yield the trans-dihydride intermediate and the aldehyde (or amide); (d) Benzylic proton migration from the PNN ligand to the metal center forming a dihydrogen complex and subsequent H(2) liberation to regenerate the catalyst. In all these steps, the metal-ligand cooperation plays an essential role. In proton transfer steps (a) and (d), the metal-ligand cooperation is achieved through the aromatization/dearomatization processes of the PNN ligand. While in steps (b) and (c), their collaboration are demonstrated by the formation of an anagostic interaction between Ru and the C-H bond and two ionic hydrogen bonds supported by the PNN ligand.

  20. Photorechargeable Properties of Metal Hydride-SrTiO3 Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Kui ZHANG; Xi Li TONG; Hui HUANG; Yong Ping GAN; Na HUANG

    2005-01-01

    A photosensitive metal hydride electrode was prepared by modification with perovskite-type SrTiO3 photocatalyst. The photorechargeable properties of the prepared electrodes were investigated by using electrochemical cyclic voltammetry and EIS measurements. The results showed that the modified electrode exhibited the obvious photorechargeable properties. The reduction current increased remarkably under the xeon light irradiation compared with the unmodified electrode. During the photocharging process, the potential of the modified electrode shifted quickly to negative direction and a potential plateau of about -0.90V (vs. Hg/HgO) occurred at the end of light irradiation. The corresponding discharge capacity of the electrode was about 5.4mAh/g.

  1. A high-efficiency power cycle in which hydrogen is compressed by absorption in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J R; Salzano, F J; Yu, W S; Milau, J S

    1976-07-23

    A high-efficiency power cycle is proposed in which molecular hydrogen gas is used as a working fluid in a regenerative closed Brayton cycle. The hydrogen gas is compressed by an absorption-desorption cycle on metal hydride (FeTiH(x)) beds. Low-temperature solar or geothermal heat (temperature about 100 degrees C) is used for the compression process, and high-temperature fossil fuel or nuclear heat (temperature about 700 degrees C) supplies the expansion work in the turbine. Typically, about 90 percent of the high-temperature heat input is converted to electricity, while about 3 kilowatts of low-temperature heat is required per kilowatt of electrical output.

  2. A new regeneration process for spent nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; WU Feng; CHEN Ren-jie; GAO Xue-ping; SHAN Zhong-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic method was used to recycle nickel/metal hydride(MH-Ni) batteries under undestroyed state.The effects of ultrasonic on electrode material performance of MH-Ni batteries were investigated by using SEM,EDAX and XRD. The results indicate that with the ultrasonic time increasing, there are obvious dispersing phenomena in the positive and negative electrodes. This can make the inertia oxidation layer break off from the negative electrode, and the fresh surface comes out. These changes can increase the reaction centers of the active materials, as well as improve the catalysis capability and discharge ability. But if the ultrasonic time is too long, it can make the active materials reunite and accelerate its pulverization, and lead to its degradation. The improvement of electrochemical performance for MH-Ni batteries is obvious by ultrasonic for 6 h continuously.

  3. Structure improvement and electrochemical studies of bipolar nickel metal hydride batteries for hybrid electric vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Chao; SHI Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery in bipolar design offers some advantages for its application as a power storage system for electric and hybrid vehicles. This paper deals with the structure design and electrochemical studies of bipolar Ni/MH batteries for hybrid vehicles. An improvement is applied in bipolar battery design,and such bipolar Ni/MH batteries with 5 sub-cells have been assembled and investigated. Testing results show that bipolar batteries with improved structure have better compression tolerance and cycle performance than conventional ones. In addition, the improved bipolar batteries display excellent large current discharge ability and high power density. As simulating working conditions for hybrid vehicles, the batteries show good stability during pulse cycles, which verifies the possibility of being used as a power storage device on hybrid vehicles.

  4. Heat exchanger selection and design analyses for metal hydride heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Voskuilen, Tyler G.; Waters, Essene L.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a design analysis for the development of highly efficient heat exchangers within stationary metal hydride heat pumps. The design constraints and selected performance criteria are applied to three representative heat exchangers. The proposed thermal model can be applied to select...... the most efficient heat exchanger design and provides outcomes generally valid in a pre-design stage. Heat transfer effectiveness is the principal performance parameter guiding the selection analysis, the results of which appear to be mildly (up to 13%) affected by the specific Nusselt correlation used....... The thermo-physical properties of the heat transfer medium and geometrical parameters are varied in the sensitivity analysis, suggesting that the length of independent tubes is the physical parameter that influences the performance of the heat exchangers the most. The practical operative regions for each...

  5. Startup and Operation of a Metal Hydride Based Isotope Separation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scogin, J.H.; Poore, A.S.

    1995-02-27

    Production scale separation of tritium from other hydrogen isotopes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, has been accomplished by several methods. These methods include thermal diffusion (1957--1986), fractional absorption (1964--1968), and cryogenic distillation (1967-present). Most recently, the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP), a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation system, began production in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) on April 9, 1994. TCAP has been in development at the Savannah River Technology Center since 1980. The production startup of this semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process is a significant accomplishment for the Savannah River Site and was achieved after years of design, development, and testing.

  6. Startup and operation of a metal hydride based isotope separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scogin, J.H.; Poore, A.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Production scale separation of tritium from other hydrogen isotopes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, USA, has been accomplished by several methods. These methods include thermal diffusion (1957-1986), fractional absorption (1964-1968), and cryogenic distillation (1967-present). Most recently, the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP), a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation system, began production in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) on April 9, 1994. TCAP has been in development at the Savannah River Technology Center since 1980. The production startup of this semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process is a significant accomplishment for the Savannah River Site and was achieved after years of design, development, and testing. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Electrochemical Studies on LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x) Metal Hydride Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Hightower, A.; Fultz, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were performed on LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x) with 0(less than or equal to)x(less than or equal to)0.5. We measured the effect of the Sn substituent on the kinetics of charge transfer and diffusion during hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the cyclic lifetimes of LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x) electrodes in 250 mAh laboratory test cells. We report beneficial effects of making small substitutions of Sn for Ni in LaNi(sub 5) on the performance of metal hydride alloy anode in terms of cyclic lifetime, capacity and kinetics. The optimal concentration of Sn in LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x) alloys for negative electrodes in alkaline rechargable secondary cells was found to lie in the range 0.25(less than or equal to)x(less than or equal to)0.3.

  8. Effect of Overcharge on Electrochemical Performance of Sealed-Type Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; WU Feng; CHEN Ren-jie; CHEN Shi

    2005-01-01

    The effects of overcharge on electrochemical performance of AA size sealed-type nickel/metal hydride(Ni/MH) batteries and its degradation mechanism were investigated. The results indicated that the relationship between the effects of different overcharge currents on the increasing velocity of inner pressure and the degradation velocity of cycle life and discharge voltage remains in almost direct proportion. After overcharge cycles, the positive electrode materials remain the original structure, but there occur some breaks because of the irreversible expand of crystal lattice. And the negative electrode alloy particles have inconspicuous pulverization, but are covered with lots of corrosive products and its main component is rare earth hydroxide or oxide. These are all the main reasons leading to the degradation behavior of the discharge capacity and cycle life of Ni/MH batteries.

  9. In situ Raman cell for high pressure and temperature studies of metal and complex hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech-Ferrer, Roger; Ziegs, Frank; Klod, Sabrina; Lindemann, Inge; Voigtländer, Ralf; Dunsch, Lothar; Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2011-04-15

    A novel cell for in situ Raman studies at hydrogen pressures up to 200 bar and at temperatures as high as 400 °C is presented. This device permits in situ monitoring of the formation and decomposition of chemical structures under high pressure via Raman scattering. The performance of the cell under extreme conditions is stable as the design of this device compensates much of the thermal expansion during heating which avoids defocusing of the laser beam. Several complex and metal hydrides were analyzed to demonstrate the advantageous use of this in situ cell. Temperature calibration was performed by monitoring the structural phase transformation and melting point of LiBH(4). The feasibility of the cell in hydrogen atmosphere was confirmed by in situ studies of the decomposition of NaAlH(4) with added TiCl(3) at different hydrogen pressures and the decomposition and rehydrogenation of MgH(2) and LiNH(2).

  10. Discharge tube with coaxial geometry for efficient production of metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhinova, I; Kolev, St; Dimitrova, M; Popov, Tsv; Pashov, A

    2013-09-01

    The production of metal hydrides in vapour phase is one of the problems which makes their spectroscopic investigation at high resolution difficult. The molecular densities are usually low and the absorption is often increased by the use of multipass cells or intracavity setups. In this contribution a discharge tube with coaxial geometry is investigated, which is able to produce relatively high densities of NiH (≈10(12) cm(-3)). Additional advantage of the present geometry is that the densities are very homogeneous along the discharge length, 250 mm in our case, which can be made in principle arbitrary long. As a result, reliable absorption was detected even in a single pass experiment. We also present the results of a numerical model which explains the general properties of the plasma in the tube. Based on this understanding, we discuss possible improvements and other applications of this discharge geometry.

  11. Ti–V–Mn based metal hydrides for hydrogen compression applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, Lydia, E-mail: lydia.pickering@btinternet.com; Reed, Daniel; Bevan, Alexander I.; Book, David, E-mail: d.book@bham.ac.uk

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Ti–V–Mn based alloys were investigated as V was substituted for Nb, Cr, Mo and Ta. • The produced alloys were found to possess C14 Laves, BCC and FCC phases. • <0.2 Nb substituted for V led to small hysteresis and high dissociation pressures. • Ti{sub 0.5}–V{sub 0.45}–Nb{sub 0.05}–Mn is a suitable alloy to be used in a metal hydride compressor. - Abstract: Ti–V–Mn based alloys, consisting mainly of the hexagonal C14 Laves and BCC phases, with nominal compositions of Ti{sub 0.5}V{sub 0.4}TM{sub 0.1}Mn, where TM = Nb, Cr, Mo, Ta and Ti{sub 0.5}V{sub 0.5−x}Nb{sub x}Mn, where x = 0.05 and 0.2, were synthesised by arc melting. It was found that small amounts of Nb substituted for V (x = 0.05 and 0.1) resulted in smaller hysteresis between absorption and desorption as well as higher hydrogen dissociation pressures, compared to Ti{sub 0.5}V{sub 0.5}Mn. These findings show that Ti{sub 0.5}–V{sub 0.45}–Nb{sub 0.05}–Mn is a suitable alloy to be used in a metal hydride compressor to deliver a pressure of 650 bar in the temperature range 303–473 K.

  12. Encapsulation of hydride by molecular main group metal clusters: manipulating the source and coordination sphere of the interstitial ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Sally R; Coles, Martyn P; Eyre-Brook, Vicki; García, Felipe; Haigh, Robert; Hitchcock, Peter B; McPartlin, Mary; Morey, James V; Naka, Hiroshi; Raithby, Paul R; Sparkes, Hazel A; Tate, Christopher W; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2006-12-21

    The sequential treatment of Lewis acids with N,N'-bidentate ligands and thereafter with ButLi has afforded a series of hydride-encapsulating alkali metal polyhedra. While the use of Me3Al in conjunction with Ph(2-C5H4N)NH gives Ph(2-C5H4N)NAlMe2 and this reacts with MeLi in thf to yield the simple 'ate complex Ph(2-C5H4N)NAlMe3Li.thf, the employment of an organolithium substrate capable of beta-hydride elimination redirects the reaction significantly. Whereas the use of ButLi has previously yielded a main group interstitial hydride in which H- exhibits micro6-coordination, it is shown here that variability in the coordination sphere of the encapsulated hydride may be induced by manipulation of the organic ligand. Reaction of (c-C6H11)(2-C5H4N)NH with Me3Al/ButLi yields [{(c-C6H11)(2-C5H4N)N}6HLi8]+[(But2AlMe2)2Li]-, which is best viewed as incorporating only linear di-coordination of the hydride ion. The guanidine 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidine (hppH) in conjunction with Me2Zn/ButLi yields the micro8-hydride [(hpp)6HLi8]+[But3Zn]-.0.5PhMe. Formation of the micro8-hydride [(hpp)6HLi8]+[ButBEt3]- is revealed by employment of the system Et3B/ButLi. A new and potentially versatile route to interstitial hydrides of this class is revealed by synthesis of the mixed borohydride-lithium hydride species [(hpp)6HLi8]+[Et3BH]- and [(hpp)6HLi8]+[(Et3B)2H]- through the direct combination of hppLi with Et3BHLi.

  13. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features.

  14. Materials considerations in the design of a metal-hydride heat pump for an advanced extravehicular mobility unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    A metal-hydride heat pump (HHP) has been proposed to provide an advanced regenerable nonventing thermal sink for the liquid-cooled garment worn during an extravehicular activity (EVA). The conceptual design indicates that there is a potential for significant advantages over the one presently being used by shuttle crew personnel as well as those that have been proposed for future use with the space station. Compared to other heat pump designs, a HHP offers the potential for extended use with no electrical power requirements during the EVA. In addition, a reliable, compact design is possible due to the absence of moving parts other than high-reliability check valves. Because there are many subtleties in the properties of metal hydrides for heat pump applications, it is essential that a prototype hydride heat pump be constructed with the selected materials before a committment is made for the final design. Particular care must be given to the evaporator heat exchanger worn by the astronaut since the performance of hydride heat pumps is generally heat transfer limited.

  15. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in TM-doped MgH2 hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, M.; Bhihi, M.; Naji, S.; Mounkachi, O.; Benyoussef, A.; Loulidi, M.; El Kenz, A.

    2015-06-01

    We show that, in addition to its thermodynamic properties that make it a good candidate for hydrogen storage, the MgH2 hydride exhibits interesting magnetic properties when doped with some transition metals (TM). Using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method (KKR) combined with the coherent potential approximation in the framework of first-principle calculations, we study the half-metallic ferromagnetic properties of the MgH2 doped with TM: Co, V, Cr, Ti; Mg0.95TM0.05H2. The ferromagnetic state energy is computed and compared with the disordered local moment state energy. We show, from the electronic structure, that doping MgH2 with TM elements can convert the material to a half-metallic with a high wide impurity band and high magnetic moment. We have found that the corresponding Curie temperature is bigger than the room temperature, which is considered as a relevant parameter for spintronic applications. Moreover, the mechanism of the hybridization and the interaction between the magnetic ions are also investigated showing that the double exchange is the underlying mechanism responsible for the magnetism of such materials.

  16. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-08

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples.

  17. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  18. C(sp₃)-H bond activation with triel metals: indium and gallium zwitterions through internal hydride abstraction in rigid salan ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudoux, Nicolas; Fang, Jian; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-06-16

    The hydropyrimidine salan (salan=N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylene]-1,2-diaminoethane) proteo-ligands with a rigid backbone {ON^(CH2)^NO}H2 react with M(CH2SiMe3)3 (M=Ga, In) to yield the zwitterions {ON^(CH(+))^NO}M(-)(CH2SiMe3)2 (M=Ga, 2; In, 3) by abstraction of a hydride from the ligand backbone followed by elimination of dihydrogen. By contrast, with Al2Me6, the neutral-at-metal bimetallic complex [{ON^(CH2)^NO}AlMe]2 ([1]2) is obtained quantitatively. The formation of indium zwitterions is also observed with sterically more encumbered ligands containing o-Me substituents on the phenolic rings, or an N (CHPh) N moiety in the heterocyclic core. Overall, the ease of C(sp3)-H bond activation follows the order Al≪Gametal-hydride species. DFT calculations indicate that the systems {ON^(CH2)^NO}H2+M(CH2SiMe3)3 (M=Al, Ga, In) all initially lead to the formation of the neutral monophenolate dihydrocarbyl species through a single protonolysis. From here, the thermodynamic product, the model neutral-at-metal complex 1, is formed in the case of aluminum after a second protonolysis. On the other hand, lower activation energy pathways lead to the generation of zwitterionic complexes 2 and 3 in the cases of gallium and indium, and the formation of these zwitterions obeys a strict kinetic control; the computations suggest that, as inferred from the experimental data, the reaction proceeds through an instable metal-hydride species, which could not be isolated synthetically.

  19. The Importance of Rare-Earth Additions in Zr-Based AB2 Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of substitutions of rare earth (RE elements (Y, La, Ce, and Nd to the Zr-based AB2 multi-phase metal hydride (MH alloys on the structure, gaseous phase hydrogen storage (H-storage, and electrochemical properties were studied and compared. Solubilities of the RE atoms in the main Laves phases (C14 and C15 are very low, and therefore the main contributions of the RE additives are through the formation of the RENi phase and change in TiNi phase abundance. Both the RENi and TiNi phases are found to facilitate the bulk diffusion of hydrogen but impede the surface reaction. The former is very effective in improving the activation behaviors. −40 °C performances of the Ce-doped alloys are slightly better than the Nd-doped alloys but not as good as those of the La-doped alloys, which gained the improvement through a different mechanism. While the improvement in ultra-low-temperature performance of the Ce-containing alloys can be associated with a larger amount of metallic Ni-clusters embedded in the surface oxide, the improvement in the La-containing alloys originates from the clean alloy/oxide interface as shown in an earlier transmission electron microscopy study. Overall, the substitution of 1 at% Ce to partially replace Zr gives the best electrochemical performances (capacity, rate, and activation and is recommended for all the AB2 MH alloys for electrochemical applications.

  20. Prototype design of a wearable metal hydride actuator using a soft bellows for motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Shuichi; Sato, Mitsuru; Hosono, Minako; Nakajima, Sawako; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Izumi, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A bedside and home rehabilitation system for people with motor disabilities due to stroke or the aging process requires a human-compatible actuator with softness, low noise and a high power-to-weight ratio. To achieve these types of joint motor rehabilitation systems, we designed a wearable metal hydride (MH) actuator using a soft bellows. The purpose of the current study is the development the soft and light bellows made of a polymer laminate film for the MH actuator. As a result of experimental tests, this soft bellows weighs 20 times less and stretches 30 times longer than the metal bellows used in a conventional MH actuator, and it has hydrogen impermeability, flex durability and adequate compliance for human joints. The MH actuator using the soft bellows can drive at a slow and safe enough speed for motor rehabilitation of patients' limbs. These preliminary findings support the efficacy of an MH actuator with a soft bellows for the purpose of developing a system for motor rehabilitation or human power assist.

  1. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  2. Erroneous Wave Functions of Ciuchi et al for Collective Modes in Neutron Production on Metallic Hydride Cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Larsen, L

    2012-01-01

    There is a recent comment (Ciuchi et al., 2012) concerning the theory of collective many body effects on the neutron production rates in a chemical battery cathode. Ciuchi et al employ an inverse beta decay expression that contains a two body amplitude. Only one electron and one proton may exist in the Ciuchi et al model initial state wave function. A flaw in their reasoning is that one cannot in reality describe collective many body correlations with only a two particle wave function. One needs very many particles to describe collective effects. In the model wave functions of Ciuchi et al there are no metallic hydrides, there are no cathodes and there are no chemical batteries. Employing a wave function with only one electron and one proton is inadequate for describing collective metallic hydride surface quantum plasma physics in cathodes accurately.

  3. Refrigeration Performance Analysis and Its Applicability of a New Metal Hydride Couple in Auto Air-conditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jiu-jian; CHEN Jiang-ping; CHEN Zhi-jiu; QIN Feng; L(U) Man-qi; YANG Ke

    2005-01-01

    With COP and dynamic characteristics in refrigeration cycle as criteria,a new metal hydride couple--LaNi4.61Mn0. 26Al0. 13/La0. 6Y0. 4Ni4.8Mn0.2 was selected by establishing calculation procedure and metal hydride selection model. The experimental results show that the refigeration cycle of the selected couple is good in the performance. The recovered waste heat and refrigeration power from exhaust gas of several kinds of automobile are calculated by waste-heat formula,coefficient RQ and COP. Refrigeration cycle of the new couple can satisfy the air-conditioning requirement of truck and car and is not enough in passenger car ,according to the respective cooling load.

  4. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  5. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo study of the binding of a positron to alkali-metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yukiumi; Maezono, Ryo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Towler, Mike D; Needs, Richard J

    2011-08-07

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used to investigate the binding of a positron to the alkali-metal hydrides, XH (X = Na and K). We obtain positron affinities for the NaH and KH molecules of 1.422(10) eV and 2.051(39) eV, respectively. These are considerably larger than the previous results of 1.035 eV and 1.273 eV obtained from multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations. Together with our previous results for [LiH;e(+)] [Y. Kita et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 134310 (2009)], our study confirms the strong correlation between the positron affinity and dipole moment of alkali-metal hydrides.

  6. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  7. Effect of Cold Rolling on the Hydrogen Desorption Behavior of Binary Metal Hydride Powders under Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaldete da Silva Dupim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report that cold rolling could drastically improve hydrogen desorption kinetics under microwave irradiation. Samples of metal hydride powders (TiH2, ZrH2, and MgH2 in as-received conditions and after cold rolling were microwave irradiated in a vacuum using a simple experimental setup. After irradiation, the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction in other to evaluate the effectiveness of microwave heating. The diffraction patterns indicated that only MgH2 could be fully decomposed (dehydrided in the as received state. TiH2 was only partially decomposed while no decomposition was observed for ZrH2. However, cold rolling the hydride powders prior to microwave heating led to a significant improvement of hydride decomposition, resulting in the complete dehydriding of TiH2 and extensive dehydriding of ZrH2. These results clearly indicated the positive effects of cold rolling on the microwave assisted desorption of the investigated binary hydrides.

  8. Rare-earth metal hydrides supported by silicon-bridged boratabenzene fluorenyl ligands: synthesis, structure and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhong; Xiang, Li; Leng, Xuebing; Chen, Yaofeng

    2017-01-24

    The reactions of rare-earth metal benzyl complexes supported by silicon-bridged boratabenzene fluorenyl ligands with PhSiH3 in toluene gave the corresponding dinuclear hydrides [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}Ln(μ-H)(THF)]2 (3-Ln; Ln = La, Nd, Gd), wherein the rare-earth metal ions are linked by both silicon-bridged boratabenzene fluorenyl ligands and hydrido ligands. The reactivity of these hydrides toward unsaturated substrates was studied. Among these, alkynides [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}Ln(μ-CCPh)]2 (4-Ln; Ln = La, Nd) were obtained via the σ-bond metathesis reaction, when 3-Ln (Ln = La, Nd) was treated with phenylacetylene. While reacting with 3-hexyne, the mono-addition product [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}Ln]2(μ-H)[μ-C(Et)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)Et] (5-Ln; Ln = La, Nd) was formed. Further investigations on the reactivity of 3-La displayed that benzonitrile and tert-butyl isonitrile readily inserted into the La-H bonds, affording an azomethine complex [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}La{μ-N[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)Ph}]2 (6-La) and an N-tert-butylformimidoyl complex [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}La{μ,η(2)-C(H)[double bond, length as m-dash]N(t)Bu}]2 (7-La), respectively. The reaction with N,N'-diisopropylcarbodiimide at room temperature or at 75 °C gave a dimeric complex [{μ-[Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]}La]2(μ-H)[μ-N((i)Pr)CHN((i)Pr)] (8-La) or a monomeric complex [Me2Si(C13H8)(C5H4BNEt2)]La[N((i)Pr)CHN((i)Pr)] (9-La), respectively.

  9. In situ electrochemical investigations of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of nickel-metal hydride traction batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Guang; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Although large ampere hour nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) traction batteries are in the stage of being commercialized for electric and hybrid vehicle applications, little is known about their performance characteristics. By using a standard Hg/HgO reference electrode in a commercial Ni-MH battery, we were able to conduct in situ measurements to determine both kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the system, including the characteristics of individual electrodes. Using the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), we simultaneously and effectively determined the open-circuit voltage of the battery, the equilibrium electrode potentials, and the diffusion coefficient of proton and hydrogen in the nickel and metal hydride electrode, respectively, as a function of the states of charge (SOC). Using the current-step excitation technique, we found that the internal resistance of the battery primarily comes from the metal hydride electrode, which is greater by one order of magnitude than that of the Ni electrode. The cyclic linear micro-polarization experiments, on the other hand, showed that the charge-transfer resistance of the electrochemical reaction at the metal hydride electrode is about twice larger than that of the Ni counterpart above 20% SOC. In comparison, the internal resistance is an order of magnitude smaller than those of the electrochemical charge-transfer reactions. The micro-polarization technique also allowed us to calculate the exchange current densities of the respective electrode electrochemical reactions and the associated specific exchange current densities. These in situ, simple but detailed, characterizations of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Ni-MH system provided valuable information for better understanding of the battery performance.

  10. Actuation of Pneumatic Artificial Muscle via Hydrogen Absorption/Desorption of Metal Hydride-LaNi5

    OpenAIRE

    Thanana Nuchkrua; Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental studies on mechanical actuations of a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM), which is driven by hydrogen gas based metal hydride (MH). The dynamic performances of hydrogen absorption/desorption, taking place within a MH reactor, are controlled via implementing cooling/heating effects of a thermoelectric module (TEM). Hydrogen pressure is applied as a driving force to commanding work outputs of the PAM as desired mechanical actuations. Due to strong inherent nonlin...

  11. Desorption of hydrogen from light metal hydrides: concerted electronic rearrangement and role of H···H interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstenholme, David J; Roy, Matthew M D; Thomas, Michael E; McGrady, G Sean

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical study of the desorption of hydrogen from rhombic Group 1 metal hydride dimers reveals a concerted reorganisation of the electron density for the M-H and H-H moieties as the reaction coordinate is traversed and a closed-shell H···H interaction evolves into a covalent H2 bond. The central role played by homopolar dihydrogen bonding in this process is revealed and analysed.

  12. Electrochemical characterization of melt spun AB{sub 5} alloys for metal hydride batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brateng, Randi

    2003-05-01

    This thesis is part of a larger research project where two metal hydride forming AB{sub 5} type alloys have been investigated. A slightly non-stoichiometric alloy with mischmetal on A-site and nickel, cobalt, manganese and aluminium on B-site has been characterized. The composition of this material, which will be referred to as Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5.15}, is close to the normal battery composition. The other alloy characterized is LaNi{sub 5} based, where nickel is partly substituted with tin. This material will later be referred to as La(NiSn){sub 5}. These materials were produced by melt spinning to vary the cooling rate during solidification. The main purpose of the study has been to characterize the electrochemical properties related to battery performance. The production as well as the metallurgical and structural characterization of the materials were performed in another part of the project. For Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5.15} the unit cell volume was dependent on the cooling rate before heat treatment, while the unit cell volume was almost independent of the cooling rate for La(NiSn){sub 5}. For both alloy compositions, the electrochemical properties seemed to change with varying cooling rate. The desorption equilibrium potential, the discharge capacity when discharging at a low current and the deterioration rate were found to be reduced with decreasing unit cell volume and increased with increasing unit cell volume, before heat treatment of Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5.15}. The self discharge rate was observed to be inversely proportional to the unit cell volume for this material. For not heat treated La(NiSn){sub 5}, produced at different cooling rates, the desorption equilibrium potential decreased when the self discharge rate and the discharge capacity increased after cycling for 300 cycles. The deterioration rate decreased when the desorption equilibrium potential was reduced for La(NiSn){sub 5}. The electrochemical parameters both before and after heat treatment of La

  13. Highly diastereo- and regioselective transition metal-catalyzed additions of metal hydrides and bimetallic species to cyclopropenes: easy access to multisubstituted cyclopropanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alexander; Rubina, Marina; Rubin, Michael; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    The first highly efficient, diastereo- and regioselective transition metal-catalyzed addition of metal hydrides (stannanes, silanes, and germanes) and bimetallic species (ditins and silyltins) to cyclopropenes has been developed. It was shown that the addition across the double bond of cyclopropenes is generally controlled by steric factors and proceeds from the least hindered face. This methodology represents a powerful and atom-economic approach toward a wide variety of highly substituted stereodefined cyclopropylmetals, useful building blocks unavailable by other methods.

  14. Beyond Metal-Hydrides: Non-Transition-Metal and Metal-Free Ligand-Centered Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Andrew Z; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M; Buchanan, Robert M; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2016-06-29

    A new pathway for homogeneous electrocatalytic H2 evolution and H2 oxidation has been developed using a redox active thiosemicarbazone and its zinc complex as seminal metal-free and transition-metal-free examples. Diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) and zinc diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazide) display the highest reported TOFs of any homogeneous ligand-centered H2 evolution catalyst, 1320 and 1170 s(-1), respectively, while the zinc complex also displays one of the highest reported TOF values for H2 oxidation, 72 s(-1), of any homogeneous catalyst. Catalysis proceeds via ligand-centered proton-transfer and electron-transfer events while avoiding traditional metal-hydride intermediates. The unique mechanism is consistent with electrochemical results and is further supported by density functional theory. The results identify a new direction for the design of electrocatalysts for H2 evolution and H2 oxidation that are not reliant on metal-hydride intermediates.

  15. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of metal hydride based hydrogen storage systems using in-situ Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bellosta von Colbe, J. M.; Bücherl, T.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2016-10-01

    For the storage of hydrogen, complex metal hydrides are considered as highly promising with respect to capacity, reversibility and safety. The optimization of corresponding storage tanks demands a precise and time-resolved investigation of the hydrogen distribution in scaled-up metal hydride beds. In this study it is shown that in situ fission Neutron Radiography provides unique insights into the spatial distribution of hydrogen even for scaled-up compacts and therewith enables a direct study of hydrogen storage tanks. A technique is introduced for the precise quantification of both time-resolved data and a priori material distribution, allowing inter alia for an optimization of compacts manufacturing process. For the first time, several macroscopic fields are combined which elucidates the great potential of Neutron Imaging for investigations of metal hydrides by going further than solely 'imaging' the system: A combination of in-situ Neutron Radiography, IR-Thermography and thermodynamic quantities can reveal the interdependency of different driving forces for a scaled-up sodium alanate pellet by means of a multi-correlation analysis. A decisive and time-resolved, complex influence of material packing density is derived. The results of this study enable a variety of new investigation possibilities that provide essential information on the optimization of future hydrogen storage tanks.

  16. Getting metal-hydrides to do what you want them to

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the discovery of AB/sub 5/ compounds, intermetallic hydrides with unusual properties began to be developed (H dissociation pressures of one to several atmospheres, extremely rapid and reversible adsorption/desorption very large amounts of H adsorbed). This paper reviews the factors that must be controlled in order to modify these hydrides to make them useful. The system LaNi/sub 5/ + H/sub 2/ is used as example. Use of AB/sub 5/ hydrides to construct a chemical heat pumps is discussed. Results of a systematic study substituting Al for Ni are reported; the HYCSOS pump is described briefly. Use of hydrides as hydrogen getters (substituted ZrV/sub 2/) is also discussed. Finally, possible developments in intermetallic hydride research in the 1980's and the hydrogen economy are discussed. 10 figures. (DLC)

  17. Hydrogenase Enzymes and Their Synthetic Models: The Role of Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilter, David; Camara, James M; Huynh, Mioy T; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2016-08-10

    Hydrogenase enzymes efficiently process H2 and protons at organometallic FeFe, NiFe, or Fe active sites. Synthetic modeling of the many H2ase states has provided insight into H2ase structure and mechanism, as well as afforded catalysts for the H2 energy vector. Particularly important are hydride-bearing states, with synthetic hydride analogues now known for each hydrogenase class. These hydrides are typically prepared by protonation of low-valent cores. Examples of FeFe and NiFe hydrides derived from H2 have also been prepared. Such chemistry is more developed than mimicry of the redox-inactive monoFe enzyme, although functional models of the latter are now emerging. Advances in physical and theoretical characterization of H2ase enzymes and synthetic models have proven key to the study of hydrides in particular, and will guide modeling efforts toward more robust and active species optimized for practical applications.

  18. In operando neutron diffraction study of LaNdMgNi9H13 as a metal hydride battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazer, N. S.; Denys, R. V.; Yartys, V. A.; Hu, Wei-Kang; Latroche, M.; Cuevas, F.; Hauback, B. C.; Henry, P. F.; Arnberg, L.

    2017-03-01

    La2MgNi9-related alloys are superior metal hydride battery anodes as compared to the commercial AB5 alloys. Nd-substituted La2-yNdyMgNi9 intermetallics are of particular interest because of increased diffusion rate of hydrogen and thus improved performance at high discharge currents. The present work presents in operando characterization of the LaNdMgNi9 intermetallic as anode for the nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery. We have studied the structural evolution of LaNdMgNi9 during its charge and discharge using in situ neutron powder diffraction. The work included experiments using deuterium gas and electrochemical charge-discharge measurements. The alloy exhibited a high electrochemical discharge capacity (373 mAh/g) which is 20% higher than the AB5 type alloys. A saturated β-deuteride synthesized by solid-gas reaction at PD2 = 1.6 MPa contained 12.9 deuterium atoms per formula unit (D/f.u.) which resulted in a volume expansion of 26.1%. During the electrochemical charging, the volume expansion (23.4%) and D-contents were found to be slightly reduced. The reversible electrochemical cycling is performed through the formation of a two-phase mixture of the α-solid solution and β-hydride phases. Nd substitution contributes to the high-rate dischargeability, while maintaining a good cyclic stability. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the anode electrode on cycling. A mathematical model for the impedance response of a porous electrode was utilized. The EIS showed a decreased hydrogen transport rate during the long-term cycling, which indicated a corresponding slowing down of the electrochemical processes at the surface of the metal hydride anode.

  19. Baterias de níquel-hidreto metálico, uma alternativa para as baterias de níquel-cádmio Nickel-metal hydride batteries, an alternative for the nickel-cadmium batteries

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have emerged as an alternative for replacement of nickel-cadmium batteries, because of their more environmental compatibility and high energy capacity. In this article, we described the properties and applications for Ni-MH batteries, giving some emphasis on the metal-hydride electrode, including the description of composition, the charge storage capacity and the discharge profile. The key component of the nickel-metal hydride electrode is a hydrogen sto...

  20. High performance liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry for the speciation of the hydride and chemical vapour-forming elements As, Se, Sb and Hg: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yuwei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury P3E 2C6 (Canada); Belzile, Nelson, E-mail: nbelzile@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury P3E 2C6 (Canada); Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2010-06-25

    We present the most recent applications of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) hyphenated to hydride generation or chemical vapour generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG/CVG-AFS), for the determination and speciation of the selected hydride-forming elements arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and antimony (Sb) and the chemical vapour-forming metal Hg. The review focuses on sample preparation, post-column treatments and on the applications of this technique to various liquid and solid samples. This review also intends to discuss some limitations associated to HPLC-HG/CVG-AFS due to the necessity on post-column treatments, including the oxidation of organo-element compounds and the pre-reduction to a suitable valence. Nevertheless, the hyphenated technique HPLC-HG/CVG-AFS remains an efficient, sensitive and affordable approach to perform speciation of the four studied elements as shown by the variety of applications presented and discussed in this review.

  1. Vibrational progressions in the valence ionizations of transition metal hydrides: evaluation of metal-hydride bonding and vibrations in (eta(5)-C(5)R(5))Re(NO)(CO)H [R = H, CH(3)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Dennis L; Gruhn, Nadine E; Rai-Chaudhuri, Anjana; Renshaw, Sharon K; Gladysz, John A; Jiao, Haijun; Seyler, Jeff; Igau, Alain

    2002-02-20

    The first examples of vibrational structure in metal-ligand sigma-bond ionizations are observed in the gas-phase photoelectron spectra of CpRe(NO)(CO)H and CpRe(NO)(CO)H [Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5), Cp = eta(5)-C(5)(CH(3))(5)]. The vibrational progressions are due to the Re-H stretch in the ion states formed by removal of an electron from the predominantly Re-H sigma-bonding orbitals. A vibrational progression is also observed in the corresponding ionization of the deuterium analogue, CpRe(NO)(CO)D, but with lower vibrational energy spacing as expected from the reduced mass effect. The vibrational progressions in these valence ionizations are directly informative about the nature of the metal-hydride bonding and electronic structure in these molecules. Franck-Condon analysis shows that for these molecules the Re-H or Re-D bond lengthens by 0.25(1) A when an electron is removed from the Re-H or Re-D sigma-bond orbital. This bond lengthening is comparable to that of H(2) upon ionization. Removal of an electron from the Re-H or Re-D bonds leads to a quantum-mechanical inner sphere reorganization energy (lambda(QM)) of 0.34(1) eV. These observations suggest that even in these low symmetry molecules the orbital corresponding to the Re-H sigma bond and the Re-H vibrational mode is very localized. Theoretical calculations of the electronic structure and normal vibrational modes of CpRe(NO)(CO)H support a localized two-electron valence bond description of the Re-H interaction.

  2. [Investigation of enhancing effect for hydride generation-atomic fluorescence of transition metal elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han-Wen; Suo, Ran

    2008-11-01

    A mechanism of hydride generation based on disassembly reaction of hydrogen-transferred interim state [M(BH4)m]* was developed by investigating the effect of reaction medium acidity on hydride generation. The effects of Co2+ and Ni2+, phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on hydride generation-atomic fluorescence signals of Zn, Cd, Cu and Ni were studied, respectively, and their enhancing mechnism was discussed. The enhancing effect Co2+ and Ni2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd was due to the increase in transmission efficiency of hydride of Zn and Cd. There was a synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline or 8-hydroxyquinoline and Co2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd, however no synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd. The simulative action of cationic surfactant, anion surfactant and non-ionic surfactant surfactant to hydride generation was investigated. It is shown that both cationic surfactant and non-ionic surfactant have obvious enhancing effect on the fluorescence signals of analytes because of the decrease in surface tension of reaction solution. The release characteristics of hydride from the absorption solution containing surfactant was ulteriorly examined by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and the mechanism of enhancing effect of surfactant on hydride generation and transmission was proposed.

  3. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-08-05

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations and compared with the corresponding proton affinities (PA). One purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K AMCAs of all anionic (XHn-1(-) ) constituted by main group-element hydrides of groups 14-17 along the periods 2-6. In particular, we wish to establish the trend in affinity for a cation as the latter varies from proton to, and along, the alkali cations. Our main purpose is to understand these trends in terms of the underlying bonding mechanism using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory together with a quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Development of battery management system for nickel-metal hydride batteries in electric vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Do Yang; Lee, Baek Haeng; Kim, Sun Wook

    Electric vehicle (EV) performance is very dependent on traction batteries. For developing electric vehicles with high performance and good reliability, the traction batteries have to be managed to obtain maximum performance under various operating conditions. Enhancement of battery performance can be accomplished by implementing a battery management system (BMS) that plays an important role in optimizing the control mechanism of charge and discharge of the batteries as well as monitoring the battery status. In this study, a BMS has been developed for maximizing the use of Ni-MH batteries in electric vehicles. This system performs several tasks: the control of charging and discharging, overcharge and over-discharge protection, the calculation and display of state-of-charge (SOC), safety, and thermal management. The BMS is installed in and tested in a DEV5-5 electric vehicle developed by Daewoo Motor Co. and the Institute for Advanced Engineering in Korea. Eighteen modules of a Panasonic nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery, 12 V, 95 A h, are used in the DEV5-5. High accuracy within a range of 3% and good reliability are obtained. The BMS can also improve the performance and cycle-life of the Ni-MH battery peak, as well as the reliability and the safety of the electric vehicles.

  5. Pyrometallurgical Extraction of Valuable Elements in Ni-Metal Hydride Battery Electrode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yin-ju; Deng, Yong-chun; Bu, Wen-gang

    2015-10-01

    Gas selective reduction-oxidation (redox) and melting separation were consecutively applied to electrode materials of AB5-type Ni-metal hydride batteries leading to the production of a Ni-Co alloy and slag enriched with rare earth oxides (REO). In the selective redox process, electrode materials were treated with H2/H2O at 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C). Active elements such as REs, Al, and Mn were oxidized whereas relatively inert elements such as Ni and Co were transformed into their elemental states in the treated materials. SiO2 and Al2O3 powders were added into the treated materials as fluxes which were then melted at 1823 K (1550 °C) to yield a Ni-Co alloy and a REO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO slag. The high-purity Ni-Co alloy produced can be used as a raw material for AB5-type hydrogen-storage alloy. The REO content in slag was very high, i.e., 48.51 pct, therefore it can be used to recycle rare earth oxides.

  6. An XAS investigation of corrosion characteristics in AB{sub 5} type metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Reilly, J.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Adzic, G.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Marrero, M.R. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-08-01

    Apart from the stress cracking due to lattice expansion and contraction during cycling, several substituents such as Ce and Co, and additions to the electrolyte such as ZnO have the ability to significantly improve the cycle life and corrosion characteristics in AB5 type metal hydride alloys. In situ XANES and SVET studies reveal that Ce substitution causes a protective passivation layer comprising of Ce oxides. This significantly reduces the extent of corrosion of substituents such as Ni despite greater percent volume expansion and contraction cycle compared with non Ce substituted samples. The Co substitution reduces the extent of percent volume expansion in the lattice cycle and hence the extent of stress cracking. It also segregates to the surface as Co(OH)2 which due to its higher conductivity counters the resistive effects due to build up of surface Ni(OH)2. Addition of ZnO to the electrolyte suppresses corrosion of substituents such as Ni in non Ce substituted alloys resulting in improved cycle life. The effects on Ce substituted alloys is negligible.

  7. Numerical simulation of hydrogen desorption from high-density metal hydride hydrogen storage vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Kun, O.; Yi, Kyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Wook

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride (MH) alloys are a promising type of material in hydrogen storage applications, allowing for low-pressure, high-density storage. However, while many studies are being performed on enhancing the hydrogen storage properties of such alloys, there has been little research on large-scale storage vessels which make use of the alloys. In particular, large-scale, high-density storage devices must make allowances for the temperature variations caused by the heat of reaction between hydrogen and MH alloys, which may impact the storage characteristics. In this study, we propose a numerical model for the design and evaluation of hydrogen storage devices using MH alloys. Hydrogen desorption reaction behavior for an alloy is observed in terms of temperature and reaction rate. This behavioral correlation is used as the basis for a comprehensive simulation model of the alloy system. Calculated results are found to be in good agreement with experimentally measured data, indicating that the model may be applied to multiple system geometries, scales, and alloy compositions.

  8. Metal Hydride Nanoparticles with Ultrahigh Structural Stability and Hydrogen Storage Activity Derived from Microencapsulated Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Zhu, Yunfeng; Lin, Huaijun; Liu, Yana; Zhang, Yao; Li, Shenyang; Ma, Zhongliang; Li, Liquan

    2017-06-01

    Metal hydrides (MHs) have recently been designed for hydrogen sensors, switchable mirrors, rechargeable batteries, and other energy-storage and conversion-related applications. The demands of MHs, particular fast hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics, have brought their sizes to nanoscale. However, the nanostructured MHs generally suffer from surface passivation and low aggregation-resisting structural stability upon absorption/desorption. This study reports a novel strategy named microencapsulated nanoconfinement to realize local synthesis of nano-MHs, which possess ultrahigh structural stability and superior desorption kinetics. Monodispersed Mg2 NiH4 single crystal nanoparticles (NPs) are in situ encapsulated on the surface of graphene sheets (GS) through facile gas-solid reactions. This well-defined MgO coating layer with a thickness of ≈3 nm efficiently separates the NPs from each other to prevent aggregation during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles, leading to excellent thermal and mechanical stability. More interestingly, the MgO layer shows superior gas-selective permeability to prevent further oxidation of Mg2 NiH4 meanwhile accessible for hydrogen absorption/desorption. As a result, an extremely low activation energy (31.2 kJ mol(-1) ) for the dehydrogenation reaction is achieved. This study provides alternative insights into designing nanosized MHs with both excellent hydrogen storage activity and thermal/mechanical stability exempting surface modification by agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metal hydride and pyrophoric fuel additives for dicyclopentadiene based hybrid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shark, Steven C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of reactive energetic fuel additives that have the potential to increase the combustion performance of hybrid rocket propellants in terms of solid fuel regression rate and combustion efficiency. Additives that can augment the combustion flame zone in a hybrid rocket motor by means of increased energy feedback to the fuel grain surface are of great interest. Metal hydrides have large volumetric hydrogen densities, which gives these materials high performance potential as fuel additives in terms of specifc impulse. The excess hydrogen and corresponding base metal may also cause an increase in the hybrid rocket solid fuel regression rate. Pyrophoric additives also have potential to increase the solid fuel regression rate by reacting more readily near the burning fuel surface providing rapid energy feedback. An experimental performance evaluation of metal hydride fuel additives for hybrid rocket motor propulsion systems is examined in this study. Hypergolic ignition droplet tests and an accelerated aging study revealed the protection capabilities of Dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) as a fuel binder, and the ability for unaided ignition. Static hybrid rocket motor experiments were conducted using DCPD as the fuel. Sodium borohydride (NabH4) and aluminum hydride (AlH3) were examined as fuel additives. Ninety percent rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) was used as the oxidizer. In this study, the sensitivity of solid fuel regression rate and characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency to total fuel grain port mass flux and particle loading is examined. These results were compared to HTPB combustion performance as a baseline. Chamber pressure histories revealed steady motor operation in most tests, with reduced ignition delays when using NabH4 as a fuel additive. The addition of NabH4 and AlH3 produced up to a 47% and 85% increase in regression rate over neat DCPD, respectively. For all test conditions examined C* efficiency ranges

  10. Pulse power 350 V nickel-metal hydride battery power-D-005-00181

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskra, Michael D.; Ralston, Paula; Salkind, Alvin; Plivelich, Robert F.

    Energy-storage devices are needed for applications requiring very high-power over short periods of time. Such devices have various military (rail guns, electromagnetic launchers, and DEW) and commercial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles, vehicle starting (SLI), and utility peak shaving. The storage and delivery of high levels of burst power can be achieved with a capacitor, flywheel, or rechargeable battery. In order to reduce the weight and volume of many systems they must contain advanced state-of-the-art electrochemical or electromechanical power sources. There is an opportunity and a need to develop energy-storage devices that have improved high-power characteristics compared to existing ultra capacitors, flywheels or rechargeable batteries. Electro Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of bipolar nickel-metal hydride batteries, which may fulfil the requirements of some of these applications. This paper describes a module rated at 300 V (255 cells) (6 Ah). The volume of the module is 23 L and the mass is 56 kg. The module is designed to deliver 50 kW pulses of 10 s duration at 50% state-of-charge. Details of the mechanical design of the module, safety considerations, along with the results of initial electrical characterization testing by the customer will be discussed. Some discussion of the possibilities for design optimization is also included.

  11. Probing the chemistry of nickel/metal hydride battery cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Bryan J.

    1994-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a valuable tool for investigating the chemical and physical processes occurring at electrode surfaces. It offers information about electron transfer at interfaces, kinetics of reactions, and diffusion characteristics of the bulk phase between the electrodes. For battery cells, this technique offers another advantage in that it can be done without taking the battery apart. This non-destructive analysis technique can thus be used to gain a better understanding of the processes occurring within a battery cell. This also raises the possibility of improvements in battery design and identification or prediction of battery characteristics useful in industry and aerospace applications. EIS as a technique is powerful and capable of yielding significant information about the cell, but it also requires that the many parameters under investigation can be resolved. This implies an understanding of the processes occurring in a battery cell. Many battery types were surveyed in this work, but the main emphasis was on nickel/metal hydride batteries.

  12. Application of metal hydride paper to simple pressure generator for use in soft actuator systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Shuichi; Sakaki, Kouji; Hosono, Minako; Doi, Kouki; Shimada, Shigenobu; Chikai, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) actuators have a simple structure and a number of features that make them attractive for use in rehabilitation engineering and assistive technology. The MH actuator provides a high power-to-weight ratio, high-strain actuation, human-compatible softness, and noiseless operation, while being environmentally benign. On the other hand, there remain technical challenges to be overcome to improve the MH actuator regarding its speed of operation and energy efficiency, given the low heat conductivity of the MH powder that is used as the pressure generator for soft actuation. To overcome the issues of low heat conductivity and the handling of MH powder, we developed an MH paper, which is a special paper incorporating MH powder and carbon fiber, for use as a new pressure-generating element for a soft MH actuator system. In addition, the basic properties and structure of the proposed MH paper were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and several thermodynamic experiments. The results of these experiments showed that the hydrogen absorption and desorption rates of the MH paper were significantly higher than those of the MH powder around room temperature.

  13. Increased Oxygen Recovery from Sabatier Systems Using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology and Metal Hydride Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Miller, Lee A.; Dahl, Roger W.; Hadley, Neal M.; Wambolt, Spencer R.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is based on the Sabatier reaction where less than 50% of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic CO2. The reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. This is further exacerbated when Sabatier methane (CH4) is vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover hydrogen has the potential to dramatically increase oxygen recovery and thus drastically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. Due to the highly unstable nature of acetylene, a separation system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of a full-scale Third Generation PPA is reported and investigations into metal hydride hydrogen separation technology is discussed.

  14. Effect of surface modification of metal hydride electrode on performance of MH/Ni batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai; WU Feng; CHEN Shi; ZHANG Cun-zhong

    2007-01-01

    A novel method was applied to the surface modification of the metal hydride(MH) electrode of MH/Ni batteries. Both sides of the electrode were plated with a thin silver film about 0.1μm thick using vacuum evaporation plating technology, and the effect of the electrode on the performance of MH/Ni batteries was examined. It is found that the surface modification can enhance the electrode conductivity and decrease the battery ohimic resistance. After surface modification, the discharge capacity at 5C (7.5A) is increased by 212 mA·h and the discharge voltage is increased by 0.11 V, the resistance of the batteries is also decreased by 32%. The batteries with modified electrode exhibit satisfactory durability. The remaining capacity of the modified batteries is 89% of the initial capacity even after 500 cycles. The inner pressure of the batteries during overcharging is lowered and the charging efficiency of the batteries is improved.

  15. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained.

  16. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding between neutral transition metal hydrides (eta(5)-C5H5)M(CO)3H (M = Mo, W) and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Filippov, Oleg A; Levina, Vladislava A; Valyaev, Dmitriy A; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2006-03-22

    The interaction of CpM(CO)3H (M = Mo, W) hydrides as proton donors with different bases (B = pyridine, (n-Oc)3PO, ((CH3)2N)3PO, H3BNEt3) was studied by variable temperature IR spectroscopy and theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations. The data obtained show for the first time the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the neutral transition metal hydrides and bases in solutions of low polarity. These M-H...B hydrogen bonds are shown to precede the hydrides' deprotonation.

  17. Cesium Platinide Hydride 4Cs 2 Pt-CsH: An Intermetallic Double Salt Featuring Metal Anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetana, Volodymyr [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, and Critical Materials Institute, Ames Iowa 50011-3020 USA; Mudring, Anja-Verena [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, and Critical Materials Institute, Ames Iowa 50011-3020 USA; Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames Iowa 50011-3111 USA

    2016-10-24

    With Cs9Pt4H a new representative of ionic compounds featuring metal anions can be added to this rare-membered family. Cs9Pt4H exhibits a complex crystal structure containing Cs+ cations, Pt2- and H- anions. Being a red, transparent compound its band gap is in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum and the ionic type of bonding is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. This cesium platinide hydride can formally be considered as a double salt of the “alloy” cesium–platinum, or better cesium platinide, Cs2Pt, and the salt cesium hydride CsH according to Cs9Pt4H≡4 Cs2Pt∙CsH.

  18. Cesium Platinide Hydride 4Cs2 Pt⋅CsH: An Intermetallic Double Salt Featuring Metal Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2016-11-14

    With Cs9 Pt4 H a new representative of ionic compounds featuring metal anions can be added to this rare-membered family. Cs9 Pt4 H exhibits a complex crystal structure containing Cs(+) cations, Pt(2-) and H(-) anions. Being a red, transparent compound its band gap is in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum and the ionic type of bonding is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. This cesium platinide hydride can formally be considered as a double salt of the "alloy" cesium-platinum, or better cesium platinide, Cs2 Pt, and the salt cesium hydride CsH according to Cs9 Pt4 H≡4 Cs2 Pt⋅CsH.

  19. Cesium platinide hydride 4Cs{sub 2}Pt.CsH: an intermetallic double salt featuring metal anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetana, Volodymyr [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, and Critical Materials Institute, Ames, Iowa, 50011-3020 (United States); Mudring, Anja-Verena [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, and Critical Materials Institute, Ames, Iowa, 50011-3020 (United States); Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, 50011-3111 (United States)

    2016-11-14

    With Cs{sub 9}Pt{sub 4}H a new representative of ionic compounds featuring metal anions can be added to this rare-membered family. Cs{sub 9}Pt{sub 4}H exhibits a complex crystal structure containing Cs{sup +} cations, Pt{sup 2-} and H{sup -} anions. Being a red, transparent compound its band gap is in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum and the ionic type of bonding is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. This cesium platinide hydride can formally be considered as a double salt of the ''alloy'' cesium-platinum, or better cesium platinide, Cs{sub 2}Pt, and the salt cesium hydride CsH according to Cs{sub 9}Pt{sub 4}H≡4 Cs{sub 2}Pt.CsH. (copyright 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  1. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  2. Enhanced hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium hydride by coupling non-metal doping and nano-confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daliang; Wang, Yulong; Wu, Chengzhang; Li, Qian; Ding, Weizhong; Sun, Chenghua

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) offers excellent capacity to store hydrogen, but it suffers from the high desorption temperature (>283 °C for starting release hydrogen). In this work, we calculated the hydrogen desorption energy of Mg76H152 clusters with/without non-metal dopants by density functional theory method. Phosphorus (P), as identified as the best dopant, can reduce the reaction energy for releasing one hydrogen molecule from 0.75 eV (bulk MgH2) to 0.20 eV. Inspired by the calculation, P-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) was synthesized by one-step method and employed as the scaffold for loading MgH2 nanoparticles, forming MgH2@P/CMK-3. Element analysis shows that phosphorus dopants have been incorporated into the CMK-3 scaffold and magnesium and phosphorus elements are well-distributed in carbon scaffold hosts. Tests of hydrogen desorption confirmed that P-doping can remarkably enhance the hydrogen release properties of nanoconfined MgH2 at low temperature, specifically ˜1.5 wt. % H2 released from MgH2@P/CMK-3 below 200 °C. This work, based on the combination of computational calculations and experimental studies, demonstrated that the combined approach of non-metal doping and nano-confinement is promising for enhancing the hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2, which provides a strategy to address the challenge of hydrogen desorption from MgH2 at mild operational conditions.

  3. O2 insertion into group 9 metal-hydride bonds: evidence for oxygen activation through the hydrogen-atom-abstraction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jason M; Teets, Thomas S; Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-09-03

    A detailed density functional study was performed to examine the reaction of mixed-valence dirhodium and diiridium species [M(2)(0,II)(tfepma)(2)(CN(t)Bu)(2)(Cl)(2) (1, tfepma = MeN[P(OCH(2)CF(3))(2)](2), CN(t)Bu = tert-butyl isocyaninde)] with HCl and oxygen with an interest in examining the pathways for oxygen insertion into the intermediate metal hydride to form hydroperoxo species. The O(2) hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism for both the Rh and Ir was found to be feasible. This is the first time this mechanism has been applied to a Rh system and only the second time it has been examined for a system other than Pd. The competing trans HCl reductive elimination pathway was also examined and found to be greatly dependent on the stereochemistry of the starting hydride primarily due to the intermediate formed upon the loss of Cl(-). As a result, the reductive elimination pathway was more favorable by 11.5 kcal/mol for the experimentally observed Ir stereoisomer, while the two pathways were isoenergetic for the other stereoisomer of the Rh complex. All findings are consistent with the kinetics study previously performed.

  4. A new lubricant carrier for metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    A lubricant carrier for metal forming processes is developed. Surfaces with pores of micrometer size for entrapping lubricant are generated by electrochemical deposition of an alloy, consisting of two immiscible metals, of which one metal subsequently is etched away leaving 5 mu m layers with a s......A lubricant carrier for metal forming processes is developed. Surfaces with pores of micrometer size for entrapping lubricant are generated by electrochemical deposition of an alloy, consisting of two immiscible metals, of which one metal subsequently is etched away leaving 5 mu m layers...

  5. Microstructures of the oxides on the activated AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} metal hydride alloys surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K., E-mail: kwo.young@BASF.com [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Chao, B. [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Liu, Y. [Electron Microscopy Facility, 145 Linus Pauling Science Center, 2900 SW Campus Way, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Nei, J. [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Morphologies of surface hydroxide of AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5}, and A{sub 2}B{sub 7} alloys were compared. • Nd promotes the formation of thick rod instead of fine needles. • Both AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} show similar buffer oxide + surface oxide structure. • The surface oxide layers in AB{sub 2} are thicker than those from AB{sub 5}. • AB{sub 2} surface is covered by oxide with less solubility in KOH. - Abstract: The surface oxides of the activated metal hydride alloys used as the negative electrode for nickel–metal hydride battery were studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscope techniques. In transition metal based AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloys, the surface of the powder is covered with oxides as a product of oxidation from the electrolyte and protected by zirconium oxide and vanadium-rich BCC-structured secondary phase. In the rare-earth based AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 7} metal hydride alloys, the surface is decorated with nano-structured needles and larger-scaled rods of hydroxides from the precipitation of rare earth ions after the oxidation by the electrolyte. Further TEM studies show the existence of a buffer oxide layer sandwiched between the inclusion-embedded surface oxide and alloy bulk in both AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} alloys. In both cases, the inclusions are found to be metallic nanocrystals mainly composed of Ni and Co as determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy, selective area electron diffraction, transmission electron atomic image, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Co-to-Ni ratio in the inclusion is larger than that in the bulk due to the less corrosive nature of Co. The additions of Co and Al in the AB{sub 2} are found to reduce number of activation cycles needed to generate a surface oxide with proper catalytic capability.

  6. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions.

  7. Comparison of C14- and C15-Predomiated AB2 Metal Hydride Alloys for Electrochemical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a comparison of the electrochemical hydrogen-storage characteristics of two state-of-art Laves phase-based metal hydride alloys (Zr21.5Ti12.0V10.0Cr7.5Mn8.1Co8.0Ni32.2Sn0.3Al0.4 vs. Zr25.0Ti6.5V3.9Mn22.2Fe3.8Ni38.0La0.3 prepared by induction melting and hydrogen decrepitation. The relatively high contents of lighter transition metals (V and Cr in the first composition results in an average electron density below the C14/C15 threshold ( e / a ~ 6.9 and produces a C14-predominated structure, while the average electron density of the second composition is above the C14/C15 threshold and results in a C15-predominated structure. From a combination of variations in composition, main phase structure, and degree of homogeneity, the C14-predominated alloy exhibits higher storage capacities (in both the gaseous phase and electrochemical environment, a slower activation, inferior high-rate discharge, and low-temperature performances, and a better cycle stability compared to the C15-predominated alloy. The superiority in high-rate dischargeability in the C15-predominated alloy is mainly due to its larger reactive surface area. Annealing of the C15-predominated alloy eliminates the ZrNi secondary phase completely and changes the composition of the La-containing secondary phase. While the former change sacrifices the synergetic effects, and degrades the hydrogen storage performance, the latter may contribute to the unchanged surface catalytic ability, even with a reduction in total volume of metallic nickel clusters embedded in the activated surface oxide layer. In general, the C14-predominated alloy is more suitable for high-capacity and long cycle life applications, and the C15-predominated alloy can be used in areas requiring easy activation, and better high-rate and low-temperature performances.

  8. Development of nickel/metal-hydride batteries for EVs and HEVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Akihiro; Fujioka, Noriyuki; Ikoma, Munehisa; Ohta, Akira

    This paper is to introduce the nickel/metal-hydride (Ni/MH) batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) developed and mass-produced by our company. EV-95 for EVs enables a vehicle to drive approximately 200 km per charge. As the specific power is extremely high, more than 200 W/kg at 80% depth of discharge (DOD), the acceleration performance is equivalent to that of gasoline fuel automobiles. The life characteristic is also superior. This battery gives the satisfactory result of more than 1000 cycles in bench tests and approximately 4-year on-board driving. EV-28 developed for small EVs comprises of a compact and light battery module with high specific power of 300 W/kg at 80% DOD by introducing a new technology for internal cell connection. Meanwhile, our cylindrical battery for the HEV was adopted into the first generation Toyota Prius in 1997 which is the world's first mass-product HEV, and has a high specific power of 600 W/kg. Its life characteristic was found to be equivalent to more than 100,000 km driving. Furthermore, a new prismatic module in which six cells are connected internally was used for the second generation Prius in 2000. The prismatic battery comprises of a compact and light battery pack with a high specific power of 1000 W/kg, which is approximately 1.7 times that of conventional cylindrical batteries, as a consequence of the development of a new internal cell connection and a new current collection structure.

  9. Are cyclopentadienylberyllium, magnesium and calcium hydrides carbon or metal acids in the gas phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Marcela; Lamsabhi, Al-Mokhtar; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2010-05-21

    The structure and bonding of cyclopentadienylberyllium (CpBeH), magnesium (CpMgH), and calcium (CpCaH) hydrides as well as those of their deprotonated species have been investigated by means of B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//QCISD/6-311+G(d,p) density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The three compounds exhibit C(5v) equilibrium conformations in their ground states. For CpBeH the agreement between the calculated geometry and that determined by MW spectroscopy is excellent. CpMgH and CpCaH can be viewed almost as the result of the interaction between a C₅H₅⁻ anion and a XH(+) (X = Mg, Ca) cation. Conversely, for CpBeH the interaction between the C₅H₅ and the BeH subunits is significantly covalent. These compounds exhibit a significant aromaticity, usually named three-dimension aromaticity, in contrast with the unsubstituted cyclopentadiene compound. The CpBeH derivative behaves as a C acid in the gas phase and is less acidic than cyclopentadiene. More importantly, CpMgH and CpCaH, in spite of the X(+δ)H(-δ) polarity exhibited by the X-H bond in the neutral systems, are predicted to be metal acids in the gas phase. Also surprisingly, both the Mg and the Ca derivatives are stronger acids than the Be analogue, and only slightly weaker acids than cyclopentadiene. This somewhat unexpected result is the consequence of two concomitant facts: the lower dissociation energy of the X-H (X = Mg, Ca) bonds with respect to the C-H bonds, and the significantly high electron affinity of the C₅H₅X* (X = Mg, Ca) radicals.

  10. High performance nickel-metal hydride and lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, U.; Kümpers, J.; Ullrich, M.

    In comparison to pure electric vehicles (EV) the opportunities for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) are much better, since range restrictions no longer apply and the interaction of the internal combustion engine and electrical drive bring increased energy efficiency and environmental friendliness. The batteries used in such applications must meet very high standards in terms of performance and service life. Although the battery capacity is smaller than for a purely EV, it needs to be able to generate far higher levels of power. The technical challenges of hybrid applications have led to the development of high-performance batteries. At the forefront of these is the nickel-metal hydride system (NiMH). With specific power and energy data in the range from 300 to 900 W/kg, 55 to 37 Wh/kg, respectively (based on cell weight), excellent charge efficiency and energy throughput levels of more than 10,000 times the nominal energy, the NiMH system comes very close to satisfying the needs of the HEV. Parallel developments with the lithium-ion system based on manganese spinel as cathode material show that, with specific power and energy levels above 1000 W/kg, 50 Wh/kg, respectively, this technology will also be able to play an important role in the future. Service life figures in terms of calendar life have been improved tremendously to about three years, but there is still a need for further improvement in order to meet the specifications of car manufacturers. For this reason, an increase of life span is the subject of intensive development work.

  11. On the structure and bonding of first row transition metal ozone carbonyl hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard A; Raubenheimer, Helgard G; Dillen, Jan

    2007-08-23

    Model complexes of the general form M(CO)m(H)n(O3) (m = 1-5, n = 0 or 1) between ozone and the transition metals Ti to Cu were studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CDA charge decomposition method was used to analyze the interaction between the metal atom and the ozone ligand in terms of the traditional donation-back-donation mechanisms. Information about bond strengths was extracted from an analysis of the electron density in terms of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The bonding in the ozone-metal complex was also studied within the NBO paradigm. Bond dissociation energies were calculated to be positive for all the complexes studied. Considering all the criteria employed in this study to analyze the interaction between the ozone and the transition metal, the Fe-complex is predicted to be the most stable, whereas the copper complex has the weakest metal-ozone interaction.

  12. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  13. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, J.

    1999-02-12

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable

  14. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J; Mark, J

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

  15. Infrared spectra of the ethynyl metal hydrides produced in reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Gook; Andrews, Lester

    2011-05-19

    The ethynyl metal hydride molecules (HM-C≡CH) are identified in the matrix infrared spectra from reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene using D and (13)C isotopic substitution and density functional computed frequencies. The assignment of strong M-H as well as C≡C bond stretching product absorptions suggests oxidative C-H insertion during reagent codeposition and subsequent photolysis. The unique linear structure calculated for HMn-C≡CH is parallel to C(3v) structures found recently for Mn complexes including CH(3)-MnF.

  16. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  17. Dehydrogenation in lithium borohydride/conventional metal hydride composite based on a mutual catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.B.; Shi, Qing; Vegge, Tejs;

    2009-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of LiBH4 ball-milled with hydrogenated 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V alloy was investigated. It was found that there is a mutual catalysis between the two hydrides, lowering the temperature of hydrogen release from both hydrides. In the case of 1h milled LiBH4/40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V...... with a mass ratio of 1:4, the peak temperatures of 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V and LiBH4 were decreased to 195 and 390°C, respectively, which are 77 and 50°C lower than the respective hydride on its own....

  18. Reversible storage of the hydrogen by nano structured magnesium hydride; Stockage reversible de l'hydrogene sous forme d'hydrure de magnesium nano-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rango, P. de; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S. [Institut Neel et CRETA, CNRS - UJF, 38 - Grenoble (France); Marty, P. [LEGI - INPG, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    The magnesium hydride MgH{sub 2} is an excellent hydrogen storage element: low cost, abundant, high mass storage capacity up to 7,6% by weight. Meanwhile it presents slow absorption-desorption kinetics and too high thermodynamical stability. Many studies have been realized to improve these kinetics by co-milling with a transition metal. The author presents the metal transition mechanism of this process and the transfer of the production in the industry. (A.L.B.)

  19. Research Update: A hafnium-based metal-organic framework as a catalyst for regioselective ring-opening of epoxides with a mild hydride source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Casey J.; Hassan Beyzavi, M.; Klet, Rachel C.; Hupp, Joseph T., E-mail: j-hupp@northwestern.edu, E-mail: o-farha@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Farha, Omar K., E-mail: j-hupp@northwestern.edu, E-mail: o-farha@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-01

    Reaction of styrene oxide with sodium cyanoborohydride and a catalytic amount of Hf-NU-1000 yields the anti-Markovnikov product, 2-phenylethanol, with over 98% regioselectivity. On the other hand, propylene oxide is ring opened in a Markovnikov fashion to form 2-propanol with 95% regioselectivity. Both styrene oxide and propylene oxide failed to react with sodium cyanoborohydride without the addition of Hf-NU-1000 indicative of the crucial role of Hf-NU-1000 as a catalyst in this reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a metal-organic framework material as a catalyst for ring-opening of epoxides with hydrides.

  20. Research Update: A hafnium-based metal-organic framework as a catalyst for regioselective ring-opening of epoxides with a mild hydride source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey J. Stephenson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of styrene oxide with sodium cyanoborohydride and a catalytic amount of Hf-NU-1000 yields the anti-Markovnikov product, 2-phenylethanol, with over 98% regioselectivity. On the other hand, propylene oxide is ring opened in a Markovnikov fashion to form 2-propanol with 95% regioselectivity. Both styrene oxide and propylene oxide failed to react with sodium cyanoborohydride without the addition of Hf-NU-1000 indicative of the crucial role of Hf-NU-1000 as a catalyst in this reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a metal-organic framework material as a catalyst for ring-opening of epoxides with hydrides.

  1. Hydrogen bonding and proton transfer to ruthenium hydride complex CpRuH(dppe): metal and hydride dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silantyev, Gleb A; Filippov, Oleg A; Tolstoy, Peter M; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Weisz, Klaus; Shubina, Elena S

    2013-02-18

    The combination of variable temperature (190-297 K) IR and NMR spectroscopy studies with quantum-chemical calculations at the DFT/B3PW91 and AIM level had the aim to determine the mechanism of proton transfer to CpRuH(dppe) (1, dppe = Ph(2)P(CH(2))(2)PPh(2)) and the structures of intermediates. Dihydrogen bond (DHB) formation was established in the case of interaction with weak proton donors like CF(3)CH(2)OH. Low-temperature protonation (at about 200 K) by stronger proton donors leads via DHB complex to the cationic nonclassical complex [CpRu(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)](+) (2). Thermodynamic parameters of DHB formation (for CF(3)CH(2)OH: ΔH°(HB) = -4.9 ± 0.2 kcal·mol(-1), ΔS°(HB) = -17.8 ± 0.7 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) and proton transfer (for (CF(3))(2)CHOH: ΔH°(PT) = -5.2 ± 0.3 kcal·mol(-1), ΔS°(PT) = -23 ± 1 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) were determined. Above 240 K 2 transforms into trans-[CpRu(H)(2)(dppe)](+) (3) yielding a mixture of 2 and 3 in 1:2 ratio. Kinetic analysis and activation parameters for the "[Ru(η(2)-H(2))](+) → trans-[Ru(H)(2)](+)" transformation indicate reversibility of this process in contrast to irreversible intramolecular isomerization of the Cp* analogue. Calculations show that the driving force of this process is greater stability (by 1.5 kcal·mol(-1) in ΔE scale) of the dihydride cation in comparison with the dihydrogen complex. The calculations of the potential energy profile indicate the low barrier for deprotonation of 2 suggesting that the formation of trans-[CpRu(H)(2)(dppe)](+) proceeds via deprotonation of [Ru(η(2)-H(2))](+) to DHB complex, formation of hydrogen bond with Ru atom and subsequent proton transfer to the metal site.

  2. Computational Design, Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) - Metal Oxide/Metal Hydride Composite - A Practicable Hydrogen Storage Medium for Fuel Cell - 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    18 2 Theoretical Investigation First Principles Study of Hydrogen Storage in SWCNT Functionalized with metal complexes ( MgH2 , TiO2 & SnO2...10,10) armchair single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalized with some metal complexes (Magnesium hydride ( MgH2 ), Titanium dioxide (TiO2...points scheme. As a beginning, single molecule of MgH2 (TiO2, SnO2) is attached to the CNT. The molecules are attached at a large distance in the outer

  3. Effect of variable thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the calculation of the critical metal hydride thickness for Ti1.1CrMn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    High pressure metal hydrides have been recently considered as one of the most promising hydrogen solid storage options for on - board applications. Unfortunately the high purchasing costs related to these materials and the complexity related to building a scaled high pressure tank system with act......High pressure metal hydrides have been recently considered as one of the most promising hydrogen solid storage options for on - board applications. Unfortunately the high purchasing costs related to these materials and the complexity related to building a scaled high pressure tank system...

  4. AI applications in sheet metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises chapters on research work done around the globe in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) applications in sheet metal forming. The first chapter offers an introduction to various AI techniques and sheet metal forming, while subsequent chapters describe traditional procedures/methods used in various sheet metal forming processes, and focus on the automation of those processes by means of AI techniques, such as KBS, ANN, GA, CBR, etc. Feature recognition and the manufacturability assessment of sheet metal parts, process planning, strip-layout design, selecting the type and size of die components, die modeling, and predicting die life are some of the most important aspects of sheet metal work. Traditionally, these activities are highly experience-based, tedious and time consuming. In response, researchers in several countries have applied various AI techniques to automate these activities, which are covered in this book. This book will be useful for engineers working in sheet metal industri...

  5. High performance nickel-metal hydride and lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, U.; Kruger, F.J.; Kuempers, J.; Maul, M.; Niggemann, E.; Schoenfelder, H.H. [VARTA Batterie AG, Kelkheim (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The development of high performance traction batteries is a key issue for the future market acceptance of electric and hybrid vehicles. The Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) system is besides Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) the most promising battery system for electric vehicles. NiMH batteries have already penetrated the consumer market worldwide. Due to its high design flexibility and robustness the NiMH battery system is an ideal candidate for the whole range of battery applications from small consumer cells up to large traction batteries. Because of its high power capability for charging and discharging, the NiMH system is regarded as the optimum battery system for hybrid vehicles. VARTA is developing three different NiMH product lines: high energy, high power and ultra-high power cells. The specific energy of these products exceeds 80 Wh/kg (high energy cells) and a specific power of more than 1000 W/kg (ultra high power cells) can be achieved. The most prominent feature of the Li-Ion battery system is its high gravimetric and volumetric energy density. Although still in the early stage of development, large prismatic Li-Ion cells reach specific energies of more than 120 Wh/kg and energy densities over 300 Wh/l. There is a predicted potential for a further increase of the specific energy of more than 30% and for the energy density of above 60% during the next 4 years. The system works within a wide temperature range of {minus}20 to +60 C and can run up to 1200 cycles. The Li-Ion system represents the latest battery technology. It is expected to be the dominating technology for electric vehicles and aerospace applications. Therefore, VARTA has developed large prismatic cells up to 240 Wh employing low cost manganese spinell cathodes and carbon anodes. This talk describes VARTA`s high performance NiMH and Li-Ion cells as well as complete batteries.

  6. Multivariate optimization and simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride-forming elements in samples of a wide pH range using dual-mode sample introduction with plasma techniques: application on leachates from cement mortar material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Asfaw, Alemayehu

    2009-02-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (As, Sb) and non-hydride-forming (Cr, Mo, V) elements in aqueous samples of a wide pH range (pH 3-13). The methods used dual-mode (DM) sample introduction with ICP-AES and ICP-MS instruments. The effect of selected experimental variables, i.e., sample pH and concentrations of HNO(3), thiourea, and NaBH(4), were studied in a multivariate way using face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). Compromised optimum values of the experimental parameters were identified using a response optimizer. The statistically found optimum values were verified experimentally. The methods provided improved sensitivities for the hydride-forming elements compared with the respective conventional nebulization (Neb) systems by factors of 67 (As) and 64 (Sb) for ICP-AES and 36 (As) and 54 (Sb) for ICP-MS. Slight sensitivity improvements were also observed for the non-hydride-forming elements. The limits of detection (LOD) of As and Sb were lowered, respectively, to 0.8 and 0.9 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-AES system and to 0.01 and 0.02 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-MS system. The short-term stabilities of both methods were between 2.1 and 5.4%. The methods were applied for the analysis of leachates of a cement mortar material prepared in the pH range 3-13. The elemental concentration of the leachates determined by the two DM methods were statistically compared with the values obtained from Neb-ICP-MS analysis; the values showed good agreement at the 95% confidence level. Quantitative spike recoveries were obtained for the analytes from most of the leachates using both DM methods.

  7. Large-scale screening of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage from first-principles calculations based on equilibrium reaction thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Kulkarni, Anant D; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2011-04-21

    Systematic thermodynamics calculations based on density functional theory-calculated energies for crystalline solids have been a useful complement to experimental studies of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides. We report the most comprehensive set of thermodynamics calculations for mixtures of light metal hydrides to date by performing grand canonical linear programming screening on a database of 359 compounds, including 147 compounds not previously examined by us. This database is used to categorize the reaction thermodynamics of all mixtures containing any four non-H elements among Al, B, C, Ca, K, Li, Mg, N, Na, Sc, Si, Ti, and V. Reactions are categorized according to the amount of H(2) that is released and the reaction's enthalpy. This approach identifies 74 distinct single step reactions having that a storage capacity >6 wt.% and zero temperature heats of reaction 15 ≤ΔU(0)≤ 75 kJ mol(-1) H(2). Many of these reactions, however, are likely to be problematic experimentally because of the role of refractory compounds, B(12)H(12)-containing compounds, or carbon. The single most promising reaction identified in this way involves LiNH(2)/LiH/KBH(4), storing 7.48 wt.% H(2) and having ΔU(0) = 43.6 kJ mol(-1) H(2). We also examined the complete range of reaction mixtures to identify multi-step reactions with useful properties; this yielded 23 multi-step reactions of potential interest.

  8. A unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear resonance and inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limbach, H.H.; Ulrich, S.; Buntkowsky, G. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination du C.N.R.S.; Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-08-12

    In this paper a unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is presented. It is shown that both exchange processes coexist i.e. do not transform into each other although they may dominate the spectra in different temperature ranges. This superposition is the consequence of the incorporation of the tunnel frequency J of the coherent process into the nuclear two-spin hamiltonian of hydrogen pairs which allows to treat the problem using the well known density matrix theory of NMR line-shapes developed by Alexander and Binsch. It is shown that this theory can also be used to predict the line-shapes of the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra of transition metal dihydrogen complexes and that both NMR and INS spectra depend on similar parameters.

  9. Recovery of rare earths from acid leach solutions of spent nickel-metal hydride batteries using solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏允; 肖连生; 田吉英; 李兆洋; 曾理

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of rare earths from acid leach solutions of spent nickel-metal hydride batteries using a primary amine ex-tractant of N1923 was studied. The effects of feed pH, temperature, agitation rate and time on the extraction of rare earths, as well as stripping agent composition and concentration, phase ratio on the stripping were investigated. In addition, the extraction isotherm was determined. The pilot plant test results showed that the extraction of rare earths reached 99.98% after a five-stage counter current ex-traction. The mixed rare earths oxalates with the 99.77% purity of rare earth elements and impurity content less than 0.05% were ob-tained by the addition of oxalic acids in loaded strip liquors. The extractant exhibited good selectivity of rare earths over base metals of iron, nickel, copper and manganese.

  10. Cerium-Hydride Secondary Building Units in a Porous Metal-Organic Framework for Catalytic Hydroboration and Hydrophosphination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengfei; Sawano, Takahiro; Lin, Zekai; Urban, Ania; Boures, Dean; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-11-16

    We report the stepwise, quantitative transformation of Ce(IV)6(μ3-O)4(μ3-OH)4(OH)6(OH2)6 nodes in a new Ce-BTC (BTC = trimesic acid) metal-organic framework (MOF) into the first Ce(III)6(μ3-O)4(μ3-OLi)4(H)6(THF)6Li6 metal-hydride nodes that effectively catalyze hydroboration and hydrophosphination reactions. CeH-BTC displays low steric hindrance and electron density compared to homogeneous organolanthanide catalysts, which likely accounts for the unique 1,4-regioselectivity for the hydroboration of pyridine derivatives. MOF nodes can thus be directly transformed into novel single-site solid catalysts without homogeneous counterparts for sustainable chemical synthesis.

  11. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  12. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus

  13. Synthesis and crystal structure of the novel transition- metal substituted tin hydride H2Sn2[Mn(CO)5]4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, K.D.; Bulten, E.J.; Noltes, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    Dicyclopentadienyltin reacts with manganese pentacarbonyl hydride to give the first transition-metal substituted ditin dihydride, H[Mn(CO)5]2Sn---Sn- [Mn(CO)5]2H, the structure of which has been determined by X-ray analysis. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group with four molecul

  14. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus

  15. Phosphenium Hydride Reduction of [(cod)MX2] (M = Pd, Pt; X = Cl, Br): Snapshots on the Way to Phosphenium Metal(0) Halides and Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaus, Jan; Imbrich, Dominik A; Schlindwein, Simon H; Geyer, Adrian H; Nieger, Martin; Gudat, Dietrich

    2017-03-06

    The outcome of the reduction of [(cod)PtX2] (X = Cl, Br; cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with N-heterocyclic phosphenium hydrides (R)NHP-H depends strongly on the steric demand of the N-aryl group R and the nature of X. Reaction of [(cod)PtCl2] with (Dipp)NHP-H featuring bulky N-Dipp groups produced an unprecedented monomeric phosphenium metal(0) halide [((Dipp)NHP)((Dipp)NHP-H)PtCl] stabilized by a single phosphine ligand. The phosphenium unit exhibits a pyramidal coordination geometry at the phosphorus atom and may according to DFT calculations be classified as a Z-type ligand. In contrast, reaction of [(cod)PtBr2] with the sterically less protected (Mes)NHP-H afforded a mixture of donor-ligand free oligonuclear complexes [{((Mes)NHP)PtBr}n] (n = 2, 3), which are structural analogues of known palladium complexes with μ2-bridging phosphenium units. All reductions studied proceed via spectroscopically detectable intermediates, several of which could be unambiguously identified by means of multinuclear ((1)H, (31)P, (195)Pt) NMR spectroscopy and computational studies. The experimental findings reveal that the phosphenium hydrides in these multistep processes adopt a dual function as ligands and hydride transfer reagents. The preference for the observed intricate pathways over seemingly simpler ligand exchange processes is presumably due to kinetic reasons. The attempt to exchange the bulky phosphine ligand in [((Dipp)NHP)((Dipp)NHP-H)PtCl] by Me3P resulted in an unexpected isomerization to a platinum(0) chlorophosphine complex via a formal chloride migration from platinum to phosphorus, which accentuates the electrophilic nature of the phosphenium ligand. Phosphenium metal(0) halides of platinum further show a surprising thermal stability, whereas the palladium complexes easily disintegrate upon gentle heating in dimethyl sulfoxide to yield metal nanoparticles, which were characterized by TEM and XRD studies.

  16. Dihydrogen addition in a dinuclear rare-earth metal hydride complex supported by a metalated TREN ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Ajay; Fegler, Waldemar; Spaniol, Thomas P; Maron, Laurent; Okuda, Jun

    2011-11-09

    The dinuclear lutetium dihydride dication supported by metalated tripodal ligands undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H(2) to form a trihydride dication. Molecular orbital analysis shows that the LUMO is a bonding Lu···Lu orbital that is poised to activate dihydrogen.

  17. Lubricant Test Methods for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2008-01-01

    Sheet metal forming of tribologically difficult materials such as stainless steel, Al-alloys and Ti-alloys or forming in tribologically difficult operations like ironing, punching or deep drawing of thick plate requires often use of environmentally hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...

  18. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements of copper-coated metal hydrides (LaNi{sub 5}, Ca{sub 0.6}Mm{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 5}, and LaNi{sub 4.75}Al{sub 0.25}) for use in metal hydride hydrogen compression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michael; Kim, Kwang J.; Hopkins, Ryan R. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Gawlik, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This study was performed to supplement the limited data on metal hydrides by experimentally determining the thermal conductivity of various metal hydride powder pellets that underwent a copper coating process. Three different metal hydride powders were tested (LaNi{sub 5}, Ca{sub 0.6}Mm{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 5}, and LaNi{sub 4.75}Al{sub 0.25}) for their thermal conductivity, with variations in testing parameters, and with copper coating processes that varied from 30 to 60 s A testing apparatus was specifically designed for this experiment, and the study reported thermal conductivity values of 3-6 W/m-K. (author)

  20. Thermal ammonia activation by cationic transition-metal hydrides of the first row--small but mighty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Robert; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2012-06-01

    The thermal reactions of cationic 3d transition-metal hydrides MH(+) (M=Sc-Zn, except V and Cu) with ammonia have been studied by gas-phase experiments and computational methods. There are three primary reaction channels: 1) H(2) elimination by N-H bond activation, 2) ligand exchange under the formation of M(NH(3))(+), and 3) proton transfer to yield NH(4)(+). Computational studies of these three reaction channels have been performed for the couples MH(+)/NH(3) (M=Sc-Zn) to elucidate mechanistic aspects and characteristic reaction patterns of the first row. For N-H activation, σ-bond metathesis was found to be operative.

  1. Transmission electron microscope studies in the surface oxide on the La-containing AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K., E-mail: kwo.young@basf.com; Chao, B.; Pawlik, D.; Shen, H.T.

    2016-07-05

    La-addition to a Laves-phase based AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloy improves the high-rate discharge and −40 °C charge-transfer resistance significantly. Surface oxide formation and embedded Ni inclusions of the alloy were studied using magnetic susceptibility, BET surface area and pore size measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). BET measurements correlate with the double-layer capacitance measured at −40 °C, indicating a factor 3 increase in surface area with 5 at.% La replacement of Zr. Surface catalytic ability of the same alloy improves by a factor of 13. TEM reveals the surface of the La-free sample as lightly oxidized Ni, Ti, and Zr, while the La-containing sample is randomly distributed and heavily-oxidized (Ni, Cr)O{sub x} coating the grain/oxide channel wall. These catalytic channels are believed to be the source of improvement in the low-temperature performance of these La-containing AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloys. - Highlights: • Surface area and catalytic ability improve with La-addition in an AB{sub 2} MH alloy. • TEM is used to study the surface oxide structure in the La-containing AB{sub 2} MH alloy. • Catalytic ability improvement was linked to the aligned channels in grain boundaries. • The open channel can transport both electrolyte and soluble ions. • Surface Ni-clusters have no direct impact on the La-containing AB{sub 2} MH alloys.

  2. Mesoporous metal catalysts formed by ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeferhans, Jana; Pazos Perez, Nicolas; Andreeva, Daria [Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Bayreuth (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We study the ultrasound-driven formation of mesoporous metal sponges. The collapse of acoustic cavitations leads to very high temperatures and pressures on very short scales. Therefore, structures may be formed and quenched far from equilibrium. Mechanism of metal modification by ultrasound is complex and involves a variety of aspects. We propose that modification of metal particles and formation of mesoporous inner structures can be achieved due to thermal etching of metals by ultrasound stimulated high speed jets of liquid. Simultaneously, oxidation of metal surfaces by free radicals produced in water during cavitation stabilizes developed metal structures. Duration and intensity of the ultrasonication treatment is able to control the structure and morphology of metal sponges. We expect that this approach to the formation of nanoscale composite sponges is universal and opens perspective for a whole new class of catalytic materials that can be prepared in a one-step process. The developed method makes it possible to control the sponge morphology and can be used for formation of modern types of catalysts. For example, the sonication technique allows to combine the fabrication of mesoporous support and distribution of metal (Cu, Pd, Au, Pt etc.) nanoparticles in its pores into a single step.

  3. Ca2LiC3H: a new complex carbide hydride phase grown in metal flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David A; Zaikina, Julia V; Lovingood, Derek D; Gedris, Thomas E; Latturner, Susan E

    2010-12-15

    The reaction of carbon and CaH2 in a calcium/lithium flux mixture produces crystals of the new compound Ca2LiC3H. This phase forms with a new structure type in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (a = 6.8236(1) Å, c = 3.7518(1) Å, Z = 2, R1 = 0.0151). This is a stuffed variant of the Cs2(NH2)N3 structure, containing hydride anions in octahedral sites; the structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction surprisingly allowed the hydrogen to be detected. The Ca2LiC3H structure also features the rarely seen C3(4-) carbide anion; the protolysis reaction of this compound with ammonium chloride produces C3H4. The electronic properties of Ca2LiC3H were studied by quantum-chemical calculations including band structure and electron localization function (ELF) analysis; the phase is a charge-balanced semiconductor with a calculated band gap of 0.48 eV. This is in agreement with (7)Li, (13)C, and (1)H MAS NMR data, which show resonances in the ionic region instead of the Knight shifted region. ELF analysis of the theoretical nonhydrided Ca2LiC3 structure confirms the ability of these calculations to properly locate hydrides and supports the structural model based on X-ray diffraction data.

  4. Simultaneous dehydrogenation of organic compounds and hydrogen removal by hydride forming alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman, W.J.T.M.; Kuczynski, M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of hydrogen-absorbing metals in dehydrogenation reactions was investigated. Based on thermodynamic considerations, operating ranges were defined within which an increase of the reactant conversion can he achieved owing to an in situ hydrogen removal by the alloy. Low plateau pressu

  5. Dislocation evolution with rheological forming of metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    It is known that some internal defects exist in metal materials. Preliminary attempt to relate dislo cation evolution with metal rheological forming was done. By the attempt, it is learned that the evolution of dislocation density p( x, y, t ) is essentially the change of n independent internal variables qα (α = 1, 2, …n ) with material. The preliminary research in theory and experiments showed that dislocations piling-up could be avoided. One can improve the internal microstructure and mechanical properties of products by rheological forming method.

  6. Reversible hydrogen storage in nano-structured magnesium hydride; Stockage reversible de l'hydrogene sous forme d'hydrure de magnesium nano-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rango, P. de; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S. [Grenoble-1 Univ. Joseph-Fourier, Institut Neel / CRETA, CNRS, 38 (France); Marty, P. [Institut National Polytechnique (INPG-LEGI), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    Magnesium hydride MgH{sub 2} is an excellent potential material for hydrogen storage: abundant and cheap, it presents a high gravimetric density (7.6% in mass of hydrogen). Nevertheless, it presents both very slow absorption/desorption kinetics and a too important thermodynamic stability leading to absorption/desorption temperatures of about 300 C. A lot of studies have been carried out to improve the reaction kinetics by co-grinding with a transition metal. The aim of this work is to explain particularly the role of the transition metal. Experimental results are presented and analyzed. (O.M.)

  7. In-situ Hydrogen Sorption 2D-ACAR Facility for the Study of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerstee, W. J.; de Roode, J.; Anastasopol, A.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.

    We developed a dedicated hydrogen sorption setup coupled to a positron 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) setup employing a 22Na-source, which will enable to collect 2D-ACAR momentum distributions in-situ as a function of temperature, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen content. In parallel, a dedicated glovebox was constructed for handling air-sensitive metal and metal hydride samples, with a special entrance for the 2D-ACAR sample insert. The 2D-ACAR setup was tested in first measurements on a Pd0.75Ag0.25 foil and on a ball-milled MgH2 powder in both the hydrogen loaded and desorbed states. The hydrogen loaded Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx sample was kept under a 1 bar hydrogen pressure to prevent partial desorption during measurements at room temperature. The collected 2D-ACAR distributions of Pd0.75Ag0.25 and Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx showed similar features as observed in previous studies. The broadening of the ACAR distributions observed for the Mg to MgH2 metal-insulator transition was compared in a quantitative manner to ab-initio calculations reported in the literature.

  8. Trimethylsilyl-Substituted Hydroxycyclopentadienyl Ruthenium Hydrides as Benchmarks to Probe Ligand and Metal Effects on the Reactivity of Shvo Type Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P; Guan, Hairong

    2012-01-01

    The bis(trimethylsilyl)-substituted hydroxycyclopentadienyl ruthenium hydride [2,5-(SiMe(3))(2)-3,4-(CH(2)OCH(2))(η(5)-C(4)COH)]Ru(CO)(2)H (10) is an efficient catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones. Because 10 transfers hydrogen rapidly to aldehydes and ketones and because it does not form an inactive bridging hydride during reaction, hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones can be performed at room temperature under relatively low hydrogen pressure (3 atm); this is a significant improvement compared with previously developed Shvo type catalysts. Kinetic and (2)H NMR spectroscopic studies of the stoichiometric reduction of aldehydes and ketones by 10 established a two-step process for the hydrogen transfer: (1) rapid and reversible hydrogen bond formation between OH of 10 and the oxygen of the aldehyde or ketone, (2) followed by slow transfer of both proton and hydride from 10 to the aldehyde or ketone. The stoichiometric and catalytic activities of complex 10 are compared to those of other Shvo type ruthenium hydrides and related iron hydrides.

  9. Spin Forming of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An exploratory effort between NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and SpinCraft, Inc., to experimentally spin form cylinders and concentric parts from small and thin sheets of aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC), successfully yielded good microstructure data and forming parameters. MSFC and SpinCraft will collaborate on the recent technical findings and develop strategy to implement this technology for NASA's advanced propulsion and airframe applications such as pressure bulkheads, combustion liner assemblies, propellant tank domes, and nose cone assemblies.

  10. Trends and Visions in Metal Forming Tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Research and development in metal forming tribology is characterized by intensified focus on new tribo-systems such as new lubricants, tool materials and tool coatings in order to substitute environmentally hazardous lubricant systems. Other means to solve these problems include the development...

  11. Failure by fracture in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, C.M.A.; Alves, Luis M.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits formability in bulk metal forming in the light of fundamental concepts of plasticity,ductile damage and crack opening modes. It proposes a new test to appraise the accuracy, reliability and validity of fracture loci associated with crack opening by tension and out-of-plane she...

  12. Characterization of fracture loci in metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, P.A.F.; Bay, Niels; Tekkaya, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture in metal forming can occur in three different modes: (i) tensile; (ii) in-plane shear; and (iii) out-of-plane shear (respectively the same as modes I, II and III of fracture mechanics). The circumstances under which each mode will occur are identified in terms of plastic flow and microst...

  13. Optimization and control of metal forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Gosse Tjipke

    2016-01-01

    Inevitable variations in process and material properties limit the accuracy of metal forming processes. Robust optimization methods or control systems can be used to improve the production accuracy. Robust optimization methods are used to design production processes with low sensitivity to the distu

  14. Modelling of ductile failure in metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.H.; Huetink, J.

    2009-01-01

    Damage and fracture are important criteria in the design of products and processes. Damage models can be used to predict ductile failure in metal forming processes. Nonlocal models avoid the mesh dependency problems of local damage models. A nonlocal damage model has been implemented in LSDYNA using

  15. Low temperature hydrogenolysis of waxes to diesel range gasoline and light alkanes: Comparison of catalytic properties of group 4, 5 and 6 metal hydrides supported on silica-alumina

    KAUST Repository

    Norsic, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal hydrides (M = Zr, Hf, Ta, W) supported on silica-alumina were studied for the first time in hydrogenolysis of light alkanes in a continuous flow reactor. It was found that there is a difference in the reaction mechanism between d 0 metal hydrides of group 4 and d 0 ↔ d 2 metal hydrides of group 5 and group 6. Furthermore, the potential application of these catalysts has been demonstrated by the transformation of Fischer-Tropsch wax in a reactive distillation set-up into typical gasoline and diesel molecules in high selectivity (up to 86 wt%). Current results show that the group 4 metal hydrides have a promising yield toward liquid fuels.

  16. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured chemical hydrides in hydrogen alloying mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronski, Z. [CANMET' s Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: zwronski@nrcan.gc.ca; Varin, R.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chiu, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Czujko, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Calka, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2518 (Australia)

    2007-05-31

    Mechanical alloying of magnesium metal powders with hydrogen in specialized hydrogen ball mills can be used as a direct route for mechanochemical synthesis of emerging chemical hydrides and hydride mixtures for advanced solid-state hydrogen storage. In the 2Mg-Fe system, we have successfully synthesized the ternary complex hydride Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 6} in a mixture with nanometric Fe particles. The mixture of complex magnesium-iron hydride and nano-iron released 3-4 wt.%H{sub 2} in a thermally programmed desorption experiment at the range 285-295 {sup o}C. Milling of the Mg-2Al powder mixture revealed a strong competition between formation of the Al(Mg) solid solution and the {beta}-MgH{sub 2} hydride. The former decomposes upon longer milling as the Mg atoms react with hydrogen to form the hydride phase, and drive the Al out of the solid solution. The mixture of magnesium dihydride and nano-aluminum released 2.1 wt.%H{sub 2} in the temperature range 329-340 {sup o}C in the differential scanning calorimetry experiment. The formation of MgH{sub 2} was suppressed in the Mg-B system; instead, a hydrogenated amorphous phase (Mg,B)H {sub x}, was formed in a mixture with nanometric MgB{sub 2}. Annealing of the hydrogen-stabilized amorphous mixture produced crystalline MgB{sub 2}.

  17. Low temperature route for the synthesis of rare earth transition metal borides and their hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramp, S.; Febri, M.; Joubert, J.C. [CNRS UMR 5628, Saint Martin d`Heres (France)

    1997-10-01

    Synthesis of rare earth-based alloys by the ORD technique consists in the reduction of rare earth oxides in a melt of calcium under argon, and simultaneous diffusion-reaction of the just formed rare earth metal with the other elements. This method has been applied with success to numerous ternary borides containing transition metals such as the magnetic alloys Y{sub 2}Co{sub 14}B, LnCo{sub 4}B, and YCo{sub 3}B{sub 2}. By using a small excess of Ca, boride particles grow in a viscous slurry media containing unreacted (melted) Ca and nanosize CaO particles. Single phase boride alloys can be obtained at 1000{degrees}C as loose micrometer-size particles of very high crystal quality as confirmed by the sharp diffraction peaks on the corresponding X-ray diagrams. Particles can be easily recovered by gentle wishing in diluted weak acid solution, and dried under vacuum at room temperature. This rather low temperature technique is particularly adapted to the synthesis of incongruent melting phases, as well as for the alloys containing volatile rare earth elements (Sm, Yb, Tb,...).

  18. A Low Temperature Route for the Synthesis of Rare Earth Transition Metal Borides and Their Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, S.; Febri, M.; Joubert, J. C.

    1997-10-01

    Synthesis of rare earth-based alloys by the ORD technique consists in the reduction of rare earth oxides in a melt of calcium under argon, and simultaneous diffusion-reaction of the just formed rare earth metal with the other elements. This method has been applied with success to numerous ternary borides containing transition metals such as the magnetic alloys Y2Co14B, LnCo4B, and YCo3B2. By using a small excess of Ca, boride particles grow in a viscous slurry media containing unreacted (melted) Ca and nanosize CaO particles. Single phase boride alloys can be obtained at 1000°C as loose micrometer-size particles of very high crystal quality as confirmed by the sharp diffraction peaks on the corresponding X-ray diagrams. Particles can be easily recovered by gentle washing in diluted weak acid solution, and dried under vacuum at room temperature. This rather low temperature technique is particularly adapted to the synthesis of incongruent melting phases, as well as for the alloys containing volatile rare earth elements (Sm, Yb, Tb,…).

  19. Hydride reactivity of Ni(II)-X-Ni(II) entities: mixed-valent hydrido complexes and reversible metal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Henrike; Metzinger, Ramona; Herwig, Christian; Intemann, Julia; Harder, Sjoerd; Limberg, Christian

    2013-01-28

    After the lithiation of PYR-H(2) (PYR(2-) =[{NC(Me)C(H)C(Me)NC(6)H(3)(iPr)(2)}(2)(C(5)H(3)N)](2-)), which is the precursor of an expanded β-diketiminato ligand system with two binding pockets, its reaction with [NiBr(2) (dme)] led to a dinuclear nickel(II)-bromide complex, [(PYR)Ni(μ-Br)NiBr] (1). The bridging bromide ligand could be selectively exchanged for a thiolate ligand to yield [(PYR)Ni(μ-SEt)NiBr] (3). In an attempt to introduce hydride ligands, both compounds were treated with KHBEt(3). This treatment afforded [(PYR)Ni(μ-H)Ni] (2), which is a mixed valent Ni(I)-μ-H-Ni(II) complex, and [(PYR-H)Ni(μ-SEt)Ni] (4), in which two tricoordinated Ni(I) moieties are strongly antiferromagnetically coupled. Compound 4 is the product of an initial salt metathesis, followed by an intramolecular redox process that separates the original hydride ligand into two electrons, which reduce the metal centres, and a proton, which is trapped by one of the binding pockets, thereby converting it into an olefin ligand on one of the Ni(I) centres. The addition of a mild acid to complex 4 leads to the elimination of H(2) and the formation of a Ni(II)Ni(II) compound, [(PYR)Ni(μ-SEt)NiOTf] (5), so that the original Ni(II) (μ-SEt)Ni(II) X core of compound 3 is restored. All of these compounds were fully characterized, including by X-ray diffraction, and their molecular structures, as well as their formation processes, are discussed.

  20. Transition metal (Co, Ni) nanoparticles wrapped with carbon and their superior catalytic activities for the reversible hydrogen storage of magnesium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Xiao, Xuezhang; Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiulin; Zhang, Liuting; Cheng, Changjun; Li, Shouquan; Ge, Hongwei; Wang, Qidong; Chen, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) exhibits long-term stability and has recently been developed as a safe alternative to store hydrogen in the solid state, due to its high capacity of 7.6 wt% H2 and low cost compared to other metal hydrides. However, the high activation energy and poor kinetics of MgH2 lead to inadequate hydrogen storage properties, resulting in low energy efficiency. Nano-catalysis is deemed to be the most effective strategy in improving the kinetics performance of hydrogen storage materials. In this work, robust and efficient architectures of carbon-wrapped transition metal (Co/C, Ni/C) nanoparticles (8-16 nm) were prepared and used as catalysts in the MgH2 system via ball milling to improve its de/rehydrogenation kinetics. Between the two kinds of nano-catalysts, the Ni/C nanoparticles exhibit a better catalytic efficiency. MgH2 doped with 6% Ni/C (MgH2-6%Ni/C) exhibits a peak dehydrogenation temperature of 275.7 °C, which is 142.7, 54.2 and 32.5 °C lower than that of commercial MgH2, milled MgH2 and MgH2 doped with 6% Co/C (MgH2-6%Co/C), respectively. MgH2 doped with 6% Ni/C can release about 6.1 wt% H2 at 250 °C. More importantly, the dehydrogenated MgH2-6%Ni/C is even able to uptake 5.0 wt% H2 at 100 °C within 20 s. Moreover, a cycling test of MgH2 doped with 8% Ni/C demonstrates its excellent hydrogen absorption/desorption stability with respect to both capacity (up to 6.5 wt%) and kinetics (within 8 min at 275 °C for dehydrogenation and within 10 s at 200 °C for rehydrogenation). Mechanistic research reveals that the in situ formed Mg2Ni and Mg2NiH4 nanoparticles can be regarded as advanced catalytically active species in the MgH2-Ni/C system. Meanwhile, the carbon attached around the surface of transition metal nanoparticles can successfully inhibit the aggregation of the catalysts and achieve the steadily, prompting de/rehydrogenation during the subsequent cycling process. The intrinsic catalytic effects and the uniform distributions of Mg2Ni

  1. Complex rare-earth aluminum hydrides: mechanochemical preparation, crystal structure and potential for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenthaler, Claudia; Pommerin, André; Felderhoff, Michael; Sun, Wenhao; Wolverton, Christopher; Bogdanović, Borislav; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-11-25

    A novel type of complex rare-earth aluminum hydride was prepared by mechanochemical preparation. The crystal structure of the REAlH(6) (with RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds was calculated by DFT methods and confirmed by preliminary structure refinements. The trigonal crystal structure consists of isolated [AlH(6)](3-) octahedra bridged via [12] coordinated RE cations. The investigation of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides during thermolysis shows a decrease of thermal stability with increasing atomic number of the RE element. Rare-earth hydrides (REH(x)) are formed as primary dehydrogenation products; the final products are RE-aluminum alloys. The calculated decomposition enthalpies of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides are at the lower end for reversible hydrogenation under moderate conditions. Even though these materials may require somewhat higher pressures and/or lower temperatures for rehydrogenation, they are interesting examples of low-temperature metal hydrides for which reversibility might be reached.

  2. Mechanism of the reaction of the [W3S4H3(dmpe)3]+ cluster with acids: evidence for the acid-promoted substitution of coordinated hydrides and the effect of the attacking species on the kinetics of protonation of the metal-hydride bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basallote, Manuel G; Feliz, Marta; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Llusar, Rosa; Safont, Vicent S; Uriel, Santiago

    2004-03-19

    The cluster [W(3)S(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) (1) (dmpe=1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) reacts with HX (X=Cl, Br) to form the corresponding [W(3)S(4)X(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) (2) complexes, but no reaction is observed when 1 is treated with an excess of halide salts. Kinetic studies indicate that the hydride 1 reacts with HX in MeCN and MeCN-H(2)O mixtures to form 2 in three kinetically distinguishable steps. In the initial step, the W-H bonds are attacked by the acid to form an unstable dihydrogen species that releases H(2) and yields a coordinatively unsaturated intermediate. This intermediate adds a solvent molecule (second step) and then replaces the coordinated solvent with X(-) (third step). The kinetic results show that the first step is faster with HCl than with solvated H(+). This indicates that the rate of protonation of this metal hydride is determined not only by reorganization of the electron density at the M-H bonds but also by breakage of the H-X or H(+)-solvent bonds. It also indicates that the latter process can be more important in determining the rate of protonation.

  3. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); McGrady, Sean [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton NB (Canada); Severa, Godwin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Eliseo, Jennifer [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Chong, Marina [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH3), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH3 and γ-AlD3. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190 º C). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the

  4. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [University of Hawaii; McGrady, Sean [University of New Brunswick; Severa, Godwin [University of Hawaii; Eliseo, Jennifer [University of Hawaii; Chong, Marina [University of Hawaii

    2015-02-08

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH₃), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH₃ and γ-AlD₃. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190ºC). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the dehydrogenation making re

  5. Influence factors of capacity loss after short-time standing of metal-hydride electrode and its EIS model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩楠; 晁栋梁; 周万海; 陈云贵; 吴朝玲

    2013-01-01

    Considerable irreversible capacity loss was observed after the electrode standing at small state-of-charge (SOC) for only a short term. Influence of SOC, standing time and the replacement elements of LaNi5-type hydrogen storage alloys to standing was discussed. Charge-transfer resistance, exchange current density (I0), and hydrogen diffusion coefficient were determined based on the study of electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS), linear polarization (LP) and constant potential step (CPS), respectively. The oxi-dation of metal Ni on the alloy surface after standing was responsible for the rapid deterioration of capacity, charge-transfer resistance and I0. Galvanostatic, LP, EIS and CPS measurements suggested the presence of an oxide and/or corrosion layer on the alloy surface of raw material and electrode after standing at 0%SOC for 2 d. It was proved that the first small semicircle in high-frequency region of EIS was related to this layer. Novel EIS model in metal hydride electrode was proposed accordingly.

  6. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  7. Hydride-induced anionic cyclization: an efficient method for the synthesis of 6-H-phenanthridines via a transition-metal-free process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Yan-Fu; Hsieh, Jen-Chieh

    2015-03-20

    A novel procedure for hydride-induced anionic cyclization has been developed. It includes the reduction of a biaryl bromo-nitrile with a nucleophilic aromatic substitution (S(N)Ar). A range of polysubstituted 6-H-phenanthridines were so obtained in moderate to good yield with good substrate tolerance. This method involves a concise transition-metal-free process and was applied to synthesize natural alkaloids.

  8. Sheet-bulk metal formingforming of functional components from sheet metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merklein Marion

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview on the application of sheet-bulk metal forming operations in both scientific and industrial environment. Beginning with the need for an innovative forming technology, the definition of this new process class is introduced. The rising challenges of the application of bulk metal forming operations on sheet metals are presented and the demand on a holistic investigation of this topic is motivated. With the help of examples from established production processes, the latest state of technology and the lack on fundamental knowledge is shown. Furthermore, perspectives regarding new research topics within sheet-bulk metal forming are presented. These focus on processing strategies to improve the quality of functional components by the application of process-adapted semi-finished products as well as the local adaption of the tribological system.

  9. The reactivity of sodium alanates with O[2], H[2]O, and CO[2] : an investigation of complex metal hydride contamination in the context of automotive systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedrick, Daniel E.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    Safe and efficient hydrogen storage is a significant challenge inhibiting the use of hydrogen as a primary energy carrier. Although energy storage performance properties are critical to the success of solid-state hydrogen storage systems, operator and user safety is of highest importance when designing and implementing consumer products. As researchers are now integrating high energy density solid materials into hydrogen storage systems, quantification of the hazards associated with the operation and handling of these materials becomes imperative. The experimental effort presented in this paper focuses on identifying the hazards associated with producing, storing, and handling sodium alanates, and thus allowing for the development and implementation of hazard mitigation procedures. The chemical changes of sodium alanates associated with exposure to oxygen and water vapor have been characterized by thermal decomposition analysis using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) and X-ray diffraction methods. Partial oxidation of sodium alanates, an alkali metal complex hydride, results in destabilization of the remaining hydrogen-containing material. At temperatures below 70 C, reaction of sodium alanate with water generates potentially combustible mixtures of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In addition to identifying the reaction hazards associated with the oxidation of alkali-metal containing complex hydrides, potential treatment methods are identified that chemically stabilize the oxidized material and reduce the hazard associated with handling the contaminated metal hydrides.

  10. Field cryofocussing hydride generation applied to the simultaneous multi-elemental determination of alkyl-metal(loid) species in natural waters using ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C M; Amouroux, D; Brindle, I D; Donard, O F

    2000-12-01

    Two hydride generation manifold systems, utilizing flow injection and cryotrapping techniques for alkyl-metal(loid) speciation analysis in natural waters, are described in this paper. They provide shipboard capacity for simultaneous derivatization of analytes with NaBH4 and cryotrapping of the generated products in a field packed column at -196 degrees C. The first system is a large-volume hydride generator, using a reagent-injection flow technique as a flow batch type, that has been fully optimized and applied to the simultaneous detection of alkylated species in estuarine waters. The technique permits the analysis of a large volume sample (0.5-11) at a sampling rate of 3 h-1. The second is an online continuous flow hydride generator. A sampling rate of 3-12 h-1 can be achieved with samples of 0.1-0.51. In addition, shipboard operation eliminates major problems related to sample pretreatment, transport and storage. Ultra-trace multi-element determination is finally performed in the laboratory by cryogenic GC hyphenated with ICP-MS. Routine detection limits of 0.5-10 pg (as metal) for 0.51 water samples were achieved for the selected alkyl-metal(loid) species of arsenic, germanium, mercury and tin. Concentrations of various species, obtained from water samples taken from the Rhine estuary, are also presented. These species include alkylated arsenic compounds, other than methyl derivatives, that have been tentatively identified and are reported here for the first time.

  11. 金属氢化物储氢装置研究%Study on Metal Hydride Canister

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓鹏; 蒋利军; 陈立新

    2009-01-01

    The temperature field of the inner cylindrical canister was simulated by using finite difference method and 2D heat transfer model during the hydrogenation process. It is showed that a temperature gradient is distributed obviously in the metal hydride bed, and the ceutric place of the canister has the highest temperature. Therefore, heat assembled in the centric place must be intensively transferred to improve the hydrogen storage properties of the metal hydride canister. In order to improve the hydrogen absorption/desorption cycle performance of the canister, the cycle life of as-cast and melt-spinning TiV0.41 Fe0.09Mn1.5 alloy was comparatively studied. It is indicated that the cycle life of the melt -spinning alloy is considerably longer than that of the as-cast one. The canister prepared by using melt-spinning TiV0.41Fe0.09Mn1.5 alloy has 94% of the hydrogen storage capacity after 3600 cycles.%用有限差分法和二维导热模型计算了圆柱形金属氢化物储氢装置内部储氢过程的温度场分布,结果表明空气换热型储氢装置内部的合金反应床存在明显的温度梯度场,吸氢时储氢装置中心部位的温度最高,需要强化其芯部换热条件,以提高储氢装置的储放氢性能.对比研究了铸态以及甩带快淬工艺制备 TiV0.41 Fe0.09Mn1.5合金吸放氢循环寿命,表明甩带快淬工艺可以显著提高储氢合金的吸放氢循环性能.以甩带快淬工艺制备的TiV0.41Fe0.09Mn1.5合金为工质的储氢装置,经过3 600次吸放氢循环后的容量保持率达到94%以上.

  12. Failure Prediction in Bulk Metal Forming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameen Topa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An important concern in metal forming is whether the desired deformation can be accomplished without defects in the final product. Various ductile fracture criteria have been developed and experimentally verified for a limited number of cases of metal forming processes. These criteria are highly dependent on the geometry of the workpiece and cannot be utilized for complicated shapes without experimental verification. However, experimental work is a resource hungry process. This paper proposes the ability of finite element analysis (FEA software such as LS-DYNA to pinpoint the crack-like flaws in bulk metal forming products. Two different approaches named as arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE and smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH formulations were adopted. The results of the simulations agree well with the experimental work and a comparison between the two formulations has been carried out. Both approximation methods successfully predicted the flow of workpiece material (plastic deformation. However ALE method was able to pinpoint the location of the flaws.

  13. Comprehensive thermochemistry of W-H bonding in the metal hydrides CpW(CO)2(IMes)H, [CpW(CO)2(IMes)H](•+), and [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(H)2]+. Influence of an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand on metal hydride bond energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John A S; Appel, Aaron M; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-21

    The free energies interconnecting nine tungsten complexes have been determined from chemical equilibria and electrochemical data in MeCN solution (T = 22 °C). Homolytic W-H bond dissociation free energies are 59.3(3) kcal mol(-1) for CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H and 59(1) kcal mol(-1) for the dihydride [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)(H)(2)](+) (where IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene), indicating that the bonds are the same within experimental uncertainty for the neutral hydride and the cationic dihydride. For the radical cation, [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H](•+), W-H bond homolysis to generate the 16-electron cation [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)](+) is followed by MeCN uptake, with free energies for these steps being 51(1) and -16.9(5) kcal mol(-1), respectively. Based on these two steps, the free energy change for the net conversion of [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H](•+) to [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)(MeCN)](+) in MeCN is 34(1) kcal mol(-1), indicating a much lower bond strength for the 17-electron radical cation of the metal hydride compared to the 18-electron hydride or dihydride. The pK(a) of CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H in MeCN was determined to be 31.9(1), significantly higher than the 26.6 reported for the related phosphine complex, CpW(CO)(2)(PMe(3))H. This difference is attributed to the electron donor strength of IMes greatly exceeding that of PMe(3). The pK(a) values for [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H](•+) and [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)(H)(2)](+) were determined to be 6.3(5) and 6.3(8), much closer to the pK(a) values reported for the PMe(3) analogues. The free energy of hydride abstraction from CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)H is 74(1) kcal mol(-1), and the resultant [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)](+) cation is significantly stabilized by binding MeCN to form [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)(MeCN)](+), giving an effective hydride donor ability of 57(1) kcal mol(-1) in MeCN. Electrochemical oxidation of [CpW(CO)(2)(IMes)](-) is fully reversible at all observed scan rates in cyclic voltammetry experiments (E° = -1.65 V vs Cp(2)Fe(+/0) in MeCN), whereas CpW(CO)(2

  14. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-03-10

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was imitated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized and the knowledge on the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant part of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides are collaborators in the IEA task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of the complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides and their thermodynamic properties, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  15. Discharge capacity and microstructures of La Mg Pr Al Mn Co Ni alloys for nickel-metal hydride batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, J.C.S.; Galdino, G.S.; Ferreira, E.A.; Takiishi, H.; Faria, R.N., E-mail: jcasini@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (DM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia

    2010-07-01

    La{sub 0.7-x}Mg{sub x}Pr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 3.8} (x = 0.0, 0.3 and 0.7) alloys have been investigated aiming the production of negative electrodes for nickel-metal hydride batteries. The alloys employed in this work were used in the as cast state. The results showed that the substitution of magnesium by lanthanum increased the discharge capacity of the Ni-MH batteries. A battery produced with the La{sub 0.4}Mg{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 3.8} alloy shown a high discharge capacity (380mAh/g) also good stability compared to other alloys. The electrode materials were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). (author)

  16. Actuation of Pneumatic Artificial Muscle via Hydrogen Absorption/Desorption of Metal Hydride-LaNi5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanana Nuchkrua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental studies on mechanical actuations of a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM, which is driven by hydrogen gas based metal hydride (MH. The dynamic performances of hydrogen absorption/desorption, taking place within a MH reactor, are controlled via implementing cooling/heating effects of a thermoelectric module (TEM. Hydrogen pressure is applied as a driving force to commanding work outputs of the PAM as desired mechanical actuations. Due to strong inherent nonlinearity, a conventional proportional integral derivative (PID control law is not capable of regulating thermodynamic variables of the HM reaction according to desired performances of the PAM. In this study, the fuzzy adaptive PID control is proposed in manipulating the MH reaction via the TEM. This viability of the proposed methodology is confirmed by the fact that the gains of PID control law are adapted by fuzzy rule-based tuning scheme at various operating conditions of the MH reactor. The experimental results show that the proposed control technique is much more effective than a PID control in both transient and steady state performances of the MH reactor for servo mechanical actuation of the PAM.

  17. Sorption properties of nanocrystalline metal hydrides for the storage of hydrogen; Sorptionseigenschaften von nanokristallinen Metallhydriden fuer die Wasserstoffspeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, W.

    2000-07-01

    For the utilisation of hydrogen in emission-free automobiles new nanostructured Mg-based metal hydrides were developed. These materials show significantly faster absorption and desorption kinetics, which can be even further enhanced by additions of suitable catalysts. Contrary to conventional magnesium powder, hydrogenation at room temperature is demonstrated for the first time. During dehydrogenation at 250 C a desorption rate of 3 to 8 kW/kg with a capacity of 2.5 kWh/kg is achieved, that fulfills the technical requirements for automobile application. (orig.) [German] Im Hinblick auf den Einsatz von Wasserstoff in emissionsfreien Kraftfahrzeugen wurden neuartige nanostrukturierte Metallhydride auf Basis von Magnesium hergestellt. Diese Materialien zeigen eine deutlich schnellere Absorptions- und Desorptionskinetik, die sich durch den Zusatz von geeigneten Katalysatoren noch weiter steigern laesst. Im Gegensatz zu konventionellem Magnesiumpulver konnte erstmals eine Hydrierung bei Raumtemperatur demonstriert werden. Bei der Dehydrierung bei 250 C wird eine Desorptionsrate von 3 bis 8 kW/kg bei einer Kapazitaet von 2,5 kWh/kg erreicht, die die technischen Leistungsanforderungen von Kraftfahrzeugen erfuellt. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of cracks in GaN films grown by combined hydride and metal organic vapor-phase epitaxial method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tieying

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cracks appeared in GaN epitaxial layers which were grown by a novel method combining metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOCVD and hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE in one chamber. The origin of cracks in a 22-μm thick GaN film was fully investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD, micro-Raman spectra, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Many cracks under the surface were first observed by SEM after etching for 10 min. By investigating the cross section of the sample with high-resolution micro-Raman spectra, the distribution of the stress along the depth was determined. From the interface of the film/substrate to the top surface of the film, several turnings were found. A large compressive stress existed at the interface. The stress went down as the detecting area was moved up from the interface to the overlayer, and it was maintained at a large value for a long depth area. Then it went down again, and it finally increased near the top surface. The cross-section of the film was observed after cleaving and etching for 2 min. It was found that the crystal quality of the healed part was nearly the same as the uncracked region. This indicated that cracking occurred in the growth, when the tensile stress accumulated and reached the critical value. Moreover, the cracks would heal because of high lateral growth rate.

  19. Thermal coupling potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with metal hydride tanks: Thermodynamic and design considerations towards integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Kosmidis, Lefteris I.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2014-12-01

    We study the thermal coupling potential between a high temperature metal hydride (MH) tank and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) aiming towards the design of an efficient integrated system, where the thermal power produced during normal SOFC operation is redirected towards the MH tank in order to maintain H2 desorption without the use of external heating sources. Based on principles of thermodynamics, we calculate the energy balance in the SOFC/MH system and derive analytical expressions for both the thermal power produced during SOFC operation and the corresponding thermal power required for H2 desorption, as a function of the operating temperature, efficiency and fuel utilization ratio in the SOFC, and the MH enthalpy of desorption in the tank. Based on these calculations, we propose an integrated SOFC/MH design where heat is transferred primarily by radiation to the tank in order to maintain steady-state desorption conditions. We develop a mathematical model for this particular design that accounts for heat/mass transfer and desorption kinetics in the tank, and solve for the dynamics of the system assuming MgH2 as a storage material. Our results focus primarily on tank operating conditions, such as pressure, temperature and H2 saturation profiles vs operation time.

  20. First principles static and dynamic calculations for the transition metal hydride series MH4L3 (M = Fe, Ru and Os; L = NH3, PH3 and PF3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Kendrick, Thomas; Tiana, Davide; Morrison, Carole A

    2015-03-07

    We present a first principles static and dynamical study of the transition metal hydride series MH4L3 (M = Fe, Ru and Os; L = NH3, PH3 and PF3), with a view to arriving at an understanding of how the variation in the electronic properties of the metal sites and ligands can influence the dynamics of the resulting complexes. A broad range of behaviour was observed, encompassing stable classical minima (M = Os, L = NH3 and M = Ru, L = PH3) to stable η(2)-H2 non-classical minima (M = Fe, L = PF3 and M = Ru, L = PH3 or PF3), with the other structures exhibiting dynamical behaviour that spontaneously converted between the classical and non-classical states during the molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of a small L(axial)-M-L(axial) angle in stabilising the non-classical state is highlighted, as is a short η(2)-H2···H(cis) distance in non-classical complexes that spontaneously convert to the classical form. We also investigated the changes in the electronic structure of the complex FeH4(PH3)3 during a η(2)-H2 bond breaking/bond making reaction and observed direct evidence of the 'cis effect', whereby a neighbouring hydride ligand acts to stabilise the intermediate classical state.

  1. Chiral [Mo3S4H3(diphosphine)3]+ hydrido clusters and study of the effect of the metal atom on the kinetics of the acid-assisted substitution of the coordinated hydride: Mo vs W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Feliz, Marta; Guillamón, Eva; Llusar, Rosa; Sorribes, Ivan; Vicent, Cristian

    2010-07-05

    The molybdenum(IV) cluster hydrides of formula [Mo(3)S(4)H(3)(diphosphine)(3)](+) with diphosphine = 1,2-(bis)dimethylphosphinoethane (dmpe) or (+)-1,2-bis-(2R,5R)-2,5-(dimethylphospholan-1-yl)ethane ((R,R)-Me-BPE) have been isolated in moderate to high yields by reacting their halide precursors with borohydride. Complex [Mo(3)S(4)H(3)((R,R)-Me-BPE)(3)](+) as well as its tungsten analogue are obtained in optically pure forms. Reaction of the incomplete cuboidal [M(3)S(4)H(3)((R,R)-Me-BPE)(3)](+) (M = Mo, W) complex with acids in CH(2)Cl(2) solution shows kinetic features similar to those observed for the related incomplete cuboidal [W(3)S(4)H(3)(dmpe)(3)](+) cluster. However, there is a decrease in the value of the rate constants that is explained as a result of the higher steric effect of the diphosphine. The rate constants for the reaction of both clusters [M(3)S(4)H(3)((R,R)-Me-BPE)(3)](+) (M = Mo, W) with HCl have similar values, thus indicating a negligible effect of the metal center on the kinetics of reaction of the hydrides coordinated to any of both transition metals.

  2. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, A I; Castellanos, M; Hägele, G F

    2006-01-01

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  3. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  4. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  5. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  6. Over or under: hydride attack at the metal versus the coordinated nitrosyl ligand in ferric nitrosyl porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abucayon, E G; Khade, R L; Powell, D R; Shaw, M J; Zhang, Y; Richter-Addo, G B

    2016-11-15

    Hydride attack at a ferric heme-NO to give an Fe-HNO intermediate is a key step in the global N-cycle. We demonstrate differential reactivity when six- and five-coordinate ferric heme-NO models react with hydride. Although Fe-HNO formation is thermodynamically favored from this reaction, Fe-H formation is kinetically favored for the 5C case.

  7. Review of Incremental Forming of Sheet Metal Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimbalkar D.H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Incremental sheet forming has demonstrated its great potential to form complex three dimensional parts without using a component specific tooling. The die-less nature in incremental forming provides competitive alternative for economically and effectively fabricating low volume functional sheet products. The process locally deforms sheet metal using a moving tool head achieving higher forming limit than those conventional sheet metal stamping process. Incremental sheet metal forming has the potential to revolutionize sheet metal forming, making it accessible to all level of manufacturing. This paper describes the current state of the art of Incremental sheet metal forming.

  8. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  9. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  10. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  11. Syntheses and properties of several metastable and stable hydrides derived from intermetallic compounds under high hydrogen pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipek, S. M.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Liu, R. S.; Jacob, I.; Tsutaoka, T.; Budziak, A.; Morawski, A.; Sugiura, H.; Zachariasz, P.; Dybko, K.; Diduszko, R.

    2016-12-01

    Brief summary of our former work on high hydrogen pressure syntheses of novel hydrides and studies of their properties is supplemented with new results. Syntheses and properties of a number of hydrides (unstable, metastable or stable in ambient conditions) derived under high hydrogen pressure from intermetallic compounds, like MeT2, MeNi5, Me7T3, Y6Mn23 and YMn12 (where Me = zirconium, yttrium or rare earth; T = transition metal) are presented. Stabilization of ZrFe2H4 due to surface phenomena was revealed. Unusual role of manganese in hydride forming processes is pointed out. Hydrogen induced phase transitions, suppression of magnetism, antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic and metal-insulator or semimetal-metal transitions are described. Equations of state (EOS) of hydrides submitted to hydrostatic pressures up to 30 GPa are presented and discussed.

  12. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  13. Tribo-systems for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The present paper gives an overview of more than 10 years work by the author’s research group through participation in national as well as international framework programmes on developing and testing environmentally friendly lubricants and tool materials and coatings inhibiting galling. Partners......’s research group has especially been involved in the development of a system of tribo-tests for sheet metal forming and in testing and modelling of friction and limits of lubrication of new, environmentally friendly lubricants and tool materials....... in the programmes come from Germany, United Kingdom, Finland, Poland, Slovenia, Spain and Denmark. They represent lubricant developers, testing experts and industrial end users as well as numerical modelling experts simulating fundamental lubrication mechanisms and computing basic process parameters. The author...

  14. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  15. The effect of metal oxide additives on the hydrogen sorption behaviour of magnesium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    MgH2 is considered to be one of the most promising options for a solid state hydrogen storage material. For practical use it is still imperative to find a convenient means of overcoming its slow kinetics and high stability. In this investigation, a range of binary and ternary metal oxides of aluminium, silicon, titanium, and zirconium, as well as Pd-modified Ti02 samples, were prepared and characterised. The prepared oxides were ball milled with MgH2, and the hydrogen sorption behaviour of th...

  16. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi5 for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB5 alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi5 substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 μm) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB5 alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB5 alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB5 alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB5 alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB5 production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle

  17. First-principles point defect models in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7 binary intermetallic compounds and their implications in nickel-metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Diana F.

    Zr-Ni-based alloys as nickel-metal hydride battery anode materials offer low-cost, flexible and tunable battery performance. Zr7Ni 10 is an important secondary phase found in multi-phased AB2 Laves-phase-based metal hydride alloys, and the synergetic effect between the Zr-Ni and the Laves phases allows access to the high hydrogen storage of the Zr-Ni phases despite the lower absorption/desorption kinetics. Zr7Ni10 displays a small solubility window for Zr-rich compositions, while Zr2Ni7, with no solubility window, shows poor capacity with good kinetics. Stability of point defects within the crystal structure allows Zr7Ni10 to maintain the same structure at off-stoichiometric compositions, thus it is theorized that defects may play a role in the difference between the electrochemical behaviors in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7. Defect models in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7 compounds computed using a combination of density functional theory and statistical mechanics offer a starting point for understanding the possible roles that point defects have on the performance of Zr-Ni based active negative electrode materials in Ni/MH batteries. Theoretical vacancy and anti-site defect formation energies are calculated and reported for Zr-rich, Ni-rich, and stoichiometric compounds of Zr7Ni 10 and Zr2Ni7, and the implications of the defect models on nickel-metal hydride negative electrode active material design and performance are discussed.

  18. Bioleaching of Nickel and Cobalt from Spent Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries by Acidithiobacilli spp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans(At.f) and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (At.t) were used in bio-dissolution experiments of heavy metals in spent MH/Ni batteries. The influences of the initial pH value, the concentration of electrode materials, the temperature and substrate concentration on the leaching rate of heavy metal Ni, Co have been investigated. The obtained results indicate that the efficiency of nickel extraction and cobalt extraction is dependent on all of the mentioned factors. Especially, the initial pH value and the temperature have more effect than other factors for these microorganisms. In addition, the results show that the optimal leaching rate of Ni and Co in the spent MH/Ni batteries reaches to 95.7% and 72.4% respectively after 20 days under the conditions of the initial pH value 1.0, concentration of electrode materials 1.0%, temperature 30℃ and substrate(sulfur) concentration 4.0g·L-1.

  19. 密封双极性MH/Ni电池结构改进与研制%Structure improvement and development of sealed nickel metal hydride batteries in bipolar design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓超; 史鹏飞

    2005-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride batteries in bipolar design offer significant advantages as a power storage system for electric vehicles. This study deals with some aspects in structure design and development of bipolar nickel metal hydride batteries. An improvement on conventional bipolar structure was made, and some novel sealed bipolar nickel metal hydride batteries with 6 cells were assembled and studied. Testing results showed that the improved structure effectively protected the worst single cell of bipolar battery, and led to a better pressure and cycle performances of novel batteries compared with conventional ones. In addition, the improved bipolar batteries showed excellent discharge and recharge ability, and low resistance in electrochemical tests. As simulating hybrid electric vehicle working conditions, the batteries displayed good stability during pulse cycles, which indicated the possibility of being used on electric vehicles.

  20. Effects of Nd-addition on the structural, hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of C14 metal hydride alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.F. [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Young, K., E-mail: kwo.young@basf.com [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Nei, J.; Wang, L. [BASF/Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Ng, K.Y.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-25

    Nd-addition to the AB{sub 2}-based alloy Ti{sub 12}Zr{sub 22.8−x}V{sub 10}Cr{sub 7.5}Mn{sub 8.1}Co{sub 7.0}Ni{sub 32.2}Al{sub 0.4}Nd{sub x} is studied for its effects on the structure, gaseous-phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties. This study follows a series of Cu, Mo, Fe, Y, Si, and La doping studies in similar AB{sub 2}-based alloys. Limited solubility of Nd in the main Laves phase promotes the formation of secondary phases (AB and Zr{sub 7}Ni{sub 10}) to provide catalytic effects and synergies for improved capacity and high-rate dischargeability (HRD) performance. The main C14 storage phase has smaller lattice constants and cell volumes, and these effects reduce the storage capacity at higher Nd levels. Different hydrogen absorption mechanisms can occur in these multi-component, multi-phase alloys depending on the interfaces of the phases, and they have effects on the alloy properties. Higher Nd-levels improve the HRD performance despite having lower bulk diffusion and surface exchange current. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate large percentage of larger metallic nickel clusters are present in the surface oxide of alloys with higher Nd-content, and AC impedance studies show very low charge-transfer resistance with high catalytic capability in the alloys. The −40 °C charge-transfer resistance of 8.9 Ω g in this Nd-series of alloys is the lowest measured out of the studies investigating doped AB{sub 2}-based MH alloys for improved low-temperature characteristics. The improvement in HRD and low-temperature performance appears to be related to the proportion of the highly catalytic NdNi-phase at the surface, which must offset the increased bulk diffusion resistance in the alloy. - Graphical abstract: Schematics of hydrogen flow and corresponding PCT isotherms in funneling mode. - Highlights: • Structural and hydrogen storage properties of Nd-substituted AB{sub 2} metal hydride are reported. • Nd contributes to the lowest

  1. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-08

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques.

  2. Recovery of rare metal compounds from nickel-metal hydride battery waste and their application to CH4 dry reforming catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Motohide; Miyake, Michihiro

    2009-09-30

    The recovery of valuable components such as nickel from nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery waste by chemical processes and their applications to CH(4) dry reforming catalysts were investigated. Three types of compound, identified by XRD analysis as NiO, CeO(2) and LaCoO(3) phases, were successfully separated from the waste by a series of chemical processes at room temperature using aqueous solutions of HCl, NaOH and NH(3), and Ni component of approximately 70% in Ni-MH battery waste was recovered. The separated NiO, CeO(2) and LaCoO(3) showed catalytic activities for CH(4) dry reforming. In particular, the separated NiO easily reduced to Ni(0) at an initial stage, and exhibited excellent catalytic activity in terms of CH(4) conversion and stability. Furthermore, it was found that the resulting Ni from separated NiO exhibited an anomalous catalysis from the comparison with that from regent NiO.

  3. Mechanics and forming theory of liquid metal forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗守靖; 姜巨福; 王迎; 藤东东

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of steel liquid forging and aluminium alloy liquid forging, liquid metal forging was investigated, such as the assembly model, metal plastic flowing, the force-displacement curves, the harmonious equation, calculation of value of altitude deformation and determination of specific pressure of liquid metal forging. On the basis of the theory of metal plastic forming and the characteristics of liquid metal forging, the achievements on the mechanics and forming theory of liquid metal forging were given out by combining the theory and experiments systematically, and an important preparation for establishing liquid metal forging theory was suggested.

  4. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  5. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Helium Bubble Implantation in Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bufford, Daniel Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Snow, Clark Sheldon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Here we investigated the microstructural response of various Pd physically vapor deposited films and Er and ErD2 samples prepared from neutron Tube targets to implanted He via in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscopy and subsequent in situ annealing experiments. Small bubbles formed in both systems during implantation, but did not grow with increasing fluence or a short duration room temperature aging (weeks). Annealing produced large cavities with different densities in the two systems. The ErD2 showed increased cavity nucleation compared to Er. The spherical bubbles formed from high fluence implantation and rapid annealing in both Er and ErD2 cases differed from microstructures of naturally aged tritiated samples. Further work is still underway to determine the transition in bubble shape in the Er samples, as well as the mechanism for evolution in Pd films.

  6. Effect of variable thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the calculation of the critical metal hydride thickness for Ti1.1CrMn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    High pressure metal hydrides have been recently considered as one of the most promising hydrogen solid storage options for on - board applications. Unfortunately the high purchasing costs related to these materials and the complexity related to building a scaled high pressure tank system...... model is applied to the metal hydride system, with Ti 1.1 CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of absorbed hydrogen and solid bed temperat ure . Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and hydrogen content respectively , are accounted for...

  7. Hydrogenation of AB{sub 5} and AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloys studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Young, K., E-mail: kwo.young@basf.com [BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Nei, J.; Pawlik, D. [BASF – Battery Materials Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309 (United States); Ng, K.Y.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation process of an AB{sub 5} alloy and two AB{sub 2} alloys were studied by quasi in-situ XRD. • In both AB{sub 5} and AB{sub 2} metal alloy, hydrogen occupation sites on the half-plane were taken first. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C14 phase is the main hydrogen storage phase with a lower equilibrium pressure. • In the C14/C15 mixed alloy, C15 phase is the catalyst hydrogen storage phase with a higher equilibrium pressure. • Small amount of C15 was hydrided first but not completed until C14 phase was fully hydrided. - Abstract: The evolution of lattice constants and abundances of metal (α) and metal hydride (β) phases during the hydrogenation process of an AB{sub 5} alloy with a CaCu{sub 5} crystal structure, an AB{sub 2} alloy with a predominating C14 structure, and a C14/C15-mixed AB{sub 2} alloy were reported. The preferred hydrogen insertion sites at different states of charge in both the α and β phases were studied based on the lattice parameter changes during hydrogenation. During the hydrogenation of the AB{sub 5} alloy, the ratio between lattice parameters a and c (a/c ratio) in the α phase decreases, stabilizes, and then decreases again while that in the β phase decreases and then stabilizes. The trends in unit cell volume changes are increasing, plateauing, and increasing again in the α phase and increasing followed by plateauing in the β phase as the hydrogenation level increases. In the C14-predominant AB{sub 2} alloy, the a/c ratio in the α phase increases at the beginning and then stabilizes while that in the β phase remains about the same and then increases during the addition of hydrogen. Moreover, the unit cell volume in the α phase increases slightly during hydrogenation, comparing to the increasing, decreasing, and then increasing trend in the β phase. In the C14/C15 mixed AB{sub 2} alloy, hydrogenation of the C15 phase starts at the beginning and promotes the hydrogenation of the C14 phase. The C14

  8. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States); Wiley, John B., E-mail: jwiley@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb{sub 2}LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H{sub 2}S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb{sub 2}Cl)LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S{sup 2−} alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H{sub 2}Se{sub (g)} were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  9. Preliminary development of flaw evaluation procedures for delayed hydride cracking initiation under hydride non-ratcheting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Cui, J.; Kawa, D.; Shek, G.K.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The flaw evaluation procedure for Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) initiation currently provided in the CSA Standard N285.8 was developed for hydride ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides do not completely dissolve at peak temperature. Test results have shown that hydrided regions formed under non-ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides completely dissolve at peak temperature, have significantly higher resistance to cracking than those formed under ratcheting conditions. This paper presents some preliminary work on the development of a procedure for the evaluation of DHC initiation for flaws under hydride non-ratcheting conditions. (author)

  10. NC INCREMENTAL SHEET METAL FORMING PROCESS AND VERTICAL WALL SQUARE BOX FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Liuru; Mo Jianhua; Xiao Xiangzhi

    2004-01-01

    The forming principle and deformation analysis of NC incremental sheet metal forming process as well as the process planning, experiment and key process parameters of vertical wall square box forming are presented. Because the deformation of sheet metal only occurs around the tool head and the deformed region is subjected to stretch deformation, the deformed region of sheet metal thins, and surface area increases. Sheet metal forming stepwise is to lead to the whole sheet metal deformation. The forming half-apex angle θ and corner radius R are the main process parameters in NC incremental forming of vertical wall square box. According to sine law, a vertical wall square box can't be formed by NC incremental sheet metal forming process in a single process, rather, it must be formed in multi processes. Thus, the parallel line type tool path process method is presented to form the vertical wall square box, and the experiment and analysis are made to verify it.

  11. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a nickel metal hydride battery worker: a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hou-rong; CAO Min; MENG Fan-qing; WEI Jing-yi; HOU Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) is a very rare chronic interstitial pneumonia caused by exposure to metal compounds such as cobalt or tungsten carbide. Although GIP was included in an original framework for the histologic classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias by Liebow and Carrington in 1969,1 GIP is currently considered a form of pneumoconiosis.

  12. Studies on self- discharge of metal hydride nickel battery%金属氢化物镍电池的自放电因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文保

    2001-01-01

    金属氢化物镍电池的自放电与多种因素有关。论述了正极中的钴含量、电解液的组成、氢气等对正极活性物质自分解的影响。同时还讨论了隔膜材料、负极贮氢材料中的锰含量以及化成方法对氢化物镍电池自放电的影响。%The self - discharge of nickel - metal hydride battery was related to various factors. The influcences of cobalt contents in nickel hydroxide electrode, electrolyte compositions and hydrogen gas on the self - decomposition of positive active material were discussed. The effects of the separator materials,manganese contents in anode alloy and the formation process on the self-discharge of nickel metal hydride battery were also discussed.

  13. Stable Polymer Micelles Formed by Metal Coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Junyou; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Otto, Sijbren; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2012-01-01

    Metal-containing polymer micelles have attracted much attention due to their potential for medical and nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we present a method to prepare stable metal-containing polymer micelles. A diblock copolymer poly(4-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P4VP(48)-b-

  14. Forming processes and mechanics of sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burchitz, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    The report is dealing with the numerical analysis of forming processes. Forming processes is the large group of manufacturing processes used to obtain various product shapes by means of plastic deformations. The report is organized as follows. An overview of the deformation processes and the materia

  15. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-01-30

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  16. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  17. Electrochemical and metallurgical characterization of ZrCr{sub 1-x}NiMo{sub x} AB{sub 2} metal hydride alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erika, Teliz [Universidad de la República, Facultad de Ciencias, Laboratorio de Electroquímica Fundamental, Núcleo Interdisciplinario Ingeniería Electroquímica, Igua 4225, CP 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay); Ricardo, Faccio [Universidad de la República, Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Facultad de Química, Montevideo (Uruguay); Fabricio, Ruiz [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas , CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche , Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CAB-CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, RN (Argentina); Fernando, Zinola [Universidad de la República, Facultad de Ciencias, Laboratorio de Electroquímica Fundamental, Núcleo Interdisciplinario Ingeniería Electroquímica, Igua 4225, CP 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay); and others

    2015-11-15

    The effects of partial replacement of chromium by molybdenum was studied on the structure and electrochemical kinetic properties of ZrCr{sub 1-x}NiMo{sub x}(x = 0.0, 0.3 and 0.6) metal hydride alloys. The arc-melting prepared alloys were metallurgically characterized by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy microanalysis, which showed AB{sub 2} (with hexagonal C14 structure) and Zr{sub x}Ni{sub y} (Zr{sub 7}Ni{sub 10}, Zr{sub 9}Ni{sub 11}) phases. After a partial substitution of chromium by molybdenum, secondary phases monotonically increase with the C14 unit cell volume indicating that most of molybdenum atoms locate in the B-site. The alloys were electrochemically characterized using charge/discharge cycling, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and rate capability experiments that allowed the determination of hydriding reaction kinetic parameters. The presence of molybdenum produces a positive effect for hydrogen diffusion in the alloy lattice, and ZrCr{sub 0.7}NiMo{sub 0.3} alloy depicts the better kinetics associated with a fast activation, lower charge transfer resistance and the best high rate discharge behavior. This fact would be related to a lower diffusion time constant and a bigger value of the product between exchange density current and surface active area. There is a trade-off in the amounts of secondary phase and Laves phases in order to improve the kinetic performance. - Highlights: • Metallurgical characterization evidences the presence of Zr{sub x}Ni{sub y} and C14 phases. • The partial replacement of Cr by Mo promotes the segregation of Zr{sub x}Ni{sub y} phase. • The incorporation of molybdenum improves the kinetics for the hydriding process. • Mo produces a decrease in the diffusion time constant.

  18. An anti CuO2-type metal hydride square net structure in Ln2M2As2H(x) (Ln=La or Sm, M=Ti, V, Cr, or Mn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Park, SangWon; Hiraka, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Hosono, Hideo

    2015-03-02

    Using a high pressure technique and the strong donating nature of H(-), a new series of tetragonal La2Fe2Se2O3-type layered mixed-anion arsenides, Ln2M2As2H(x), was synthesized (Ln=La or Sm, M=Ti, V, Cr, or Mn; x≈3). In these compounds, an unusual M2H square net, which has anti CuO2 square net structures accompanying two As(3-) ions, is sandwiched by (LaH)2 fluorite layers. Notably, strong metal-metal bonding with a distance of 2.80 Å was confirmed in La2Ti2As2H2.3, which has metallic properties. In fact, these compounds are situated near the boundary between salt-like ionic hydrides and transition-metal hydrides with metallic characters.

  19. Complex metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Morten Brix

    2014-01-01

    Vedvarende energikilder er ulige fordelt både geografisk og over tid. Nye energibærere er nødvendige, hvis vedvarende energi skal være et alternativ til fossile brændstoffer. Energi kan opbevares i en række forskellige kemiske forbindelser eller elektrokemisk i batterier. Globalt er brintopbevari...

  20. High-energy-rate magnetohydraulic metal forming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    In the magnetohydraulic metal forming system, a sonic shock wave is generated in a liquid medium by a coil energized by an electrical discharge. These waves transfer energy from a metal diaphragm, actuated by a pulsed magnetic field, to a metal workpiece. In the development a study was made of the pressure pulse phenomenon in a liquid medium.