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Sample records for hydraulic soil parameters

  1. Pedotransfer functions estimating soil hydraulic properties using different soil parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions (PTF) are useful in many studies such as hydrochemical modelling and soil mapping. The objective of this study was to calibrate and test parametric PTFs that predict soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity...... conductivity parameters. A larger data set (1618 horizons) with a broader textural range was used in the development of PTFs to predict the van Genuchten parameters. The PTFs using either three or seven textural classes combined with soil organic mater and bulk density gave the most reliable predictions...... of the hydraulic properties of the studied soils. We found that introducing measured water content as a predictor generally gave lower errors for water retention predictions and higher errors for conductivity predictions. The best of the developed PTFs for predicting hydraulic conductivity was tested against PTFs...

  2. Calibration of effective soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soil profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhorar, R.K.; Dam, van J.C.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.; Feddes, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Distributed hydrological models are useful tools to analyse the performance of irrigation systems at different levels. For the successful application of these models, it is imperative that effective soil hydraulic parameters at the scale of model application are known. The majority of previous

  3. Soil water balance scenario studies using predicted soil hydraulic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Wösten, J.H.M.; Bouma, J.; Várallyay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have become a topic drawing increasing interest within the field of soil and environmental research because they can provide important soil physical data at relatively low cost. Few studies, however, explore which contributions PTFs can make to land-use planning, in

  4. A Combined Parameter Scaling and Inverse Technique to Upscale the Unsaturated Hydraulic Parameters for Heterogeneous Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2004-08-01

    Determination of large number of soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soils remains a challenge since inverting for too many parameters can lead to the non-uniqueness of parameter values and may need very long simulation time, for example, months or more. In this research, a combined parameter scaling and inverse technique (CPSIT) was proposed to upscale hydraulic parameters from local scale to field scale. The CPSIT approach includes two steps. Step 1, the number of parameters to be estimated at field scale (FS) is reduced by applying parameter scaling [Zhang et al., 2003]. A heterogeneous soil is treated as a composition of multiple equivalent homogeneous media (EHM) and a reference EHM is chosen. Each parameter is assigned a scaling factor that is defined as the ratio of the parameter of an EHM to the corresponding parameter of the reference EHM. These scaling factors are determined using local-scale parameter values. Step 2, the FS parameters of the reference EHM are determined using the inverse technique and well-designed field experiments. Then, the FS parameters of each of the EHMs is determined by multiplying the FS parameter value by the corresponding scaling factor. The advantages of the CPSIT approach are that the number of parameters to be inverted is reduced by a factor of the number of EHMs (M) and the simulation time is reduced by a factor of about the square of M. The CPSIT approach was tested by upscaling the hydraulic parameter using a field injection experiment in a heterogeneous soil at the Hanford’s Sisson and Lu site, which has the horizontal dimension of 16 m and vertical dimension of 18 m. The results show that, when the CPSIT upscaled parameters were used to simulated flow, the mean squared residual was reduced by 86% relative to that when the local-scale parameters were used.

  5. High-resolution hydraulic parameter maps for surface soils in tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthews, T. R.; Quesada, C. A.; Galbraith, D. R.; Malhi, Y.; Mullins, C. E.; Hodnett, M. G.; Dharssi, I.

    2014-05-01

    Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking, especially in the tropics. We present much-improved gridded data sets of hydraulic parameters for surface soil for the critical area of tropical South America, describing soil profile water movement across the region to 30 cm depth. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey, Campbell, van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine soil hydraulic models, which are widely used hydraulic sub-models in land surface models. This has been possible through interpolating soil measurements from several sources through the SOTERLAC soil and terrain data base and using the most recent pedotransfer functions (PTFs) derived for South American soils. All soil parameter data layers are provided at 15 arcsec resolution and available for download, this being 20x higher resolution than the best comparable parameter maps available to date. Specific examples are given of the use of PTFs and the importance highlighted of using PTFs that have been locally parameterised and that are not just based on soil texture. We discuss current developments in soil hydraulic modelling and how high-resolution parameter maps such as these can improve the simulation of vegetation development and productivity in land surface models.

  6. Evaluation of Hydraulic Parameters Obtained by Different Measurement Methods for Heterogeneous Gravel Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of soil hydraulic parameters for the van Genuchten function is important to characterize soil water movement for watershed management. Accurate and rapid prediction of soil water flow in heterogeneous gravel soil has become a hot topic in recent years. However, it is difficult to precisely estimate hydraulic parameters in a heterogeneous soil with rock fragments. In this study, the HYDRUS-2D numerical model was used to evaluate hydraulic parameters for heterogeneous gravel soil that was irregularly embedded with rock fragments in a grape production base. The centrifugal method (CM, tensiometer method (TM and inverse solution method (ISM were compared for various parameters in the van Genuchten function. The soil core method (SCM, disc infiltration method (DIM and inverse solution method (ISM were also investigated for measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity. Simulation with the DIM approach revealed a problem of overestimating soil water infiltration whereas simulation with the SCM approach revealed a problem of underestimating water movement as compared to actual field observation. The ISM approach produced the best simulation result even though this approach slightly overestimated soil moisture by ignoring the impact of rock fragments. This study provides useful information on the overall evaluation of soil hydraulic parameters attained with different measurement methods for simulating soil water movement and distribution in heterogeneous gravel soil.

  7. Soil moisture prediction with the ensemble Kalman filter: Handling uncertainty of soil hydraulic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, N.; Erdal, D.; Neuweiler, I.

    2017-12-01

    For predicting flow in the unsaturated zone, an adequate choice of the model parameters, especially the soil hydraulic parameters, is essential. It is difficult to determine these parameters, as the parameter estimation problem easily becomes ill-posed, e.g. due to pseudo-correlations among two or more of the unknown parameters. In the field, this problem is strongly related to the available observations which, in monitoring networks, are not optimized to be used for parameter estimation. In this paper, we investigate the potential of data assimilation using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with unsaturated zone models under conditions where model parameters are highly uncertain and not identifiable. Different ways of dealing with the parameter uncertainty, such as parameter updates and bias correction, are discussed and compared. It is shown that jointly updating all uncertain parameters and states is the best method to account for the error induced by parameter uncertainty.

  8. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Scharnagl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and precisely estimate all the soil hydraulic parameters. In this case study, we explored to which degree prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters can help improve parameter identifiability in inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics under natural boundary conditions. We used percentages of sand, silt, and clay as input variables to the ROSETTA pedotransfer function that predicts the parameters in the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM model of the soil hydraulic functions. To derive additional information about the correlation structure of the predicted parameters, which is not readily provided by ROSETTA, we employed a Monte Carlo approach. We formulated three prior distributions that incorporate to different extents the prior information about the VGM parameters derived with ROSETTA. The inverse problem was posed in a formal Bayesian framework and solved using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation with the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM algorithm. Synthetic and real-world soil water content data were used to illustrate the approach. The results of this study demonstrated that prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters significantly improved parameter identifiability and that this approach was effective and robust, even in case of biased prior information. To be effective and robust, however, it was essential to use a prior distribution that incorporates information about parameter correlation.

  9. Effects of Superabsorbent Polymers on the Hydraulic Parameters and Water Retention Properties of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renkuan Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs are widely applied in dryland agriculture. However, their functional property of repeated absorption and release of soil water exerts periodic effects on the hydraulic parameters and water-retention properties of soil, and as this property gradually diminishes with time, its effects tend to be unstable. During the 120-day continuous soil cultivation experiment described in this paper, horizontal soil column infiltration and high-speed centrifugation tests were conducted on SAP-treated soil to measure unsaturated diffusivity D and soil water characteristic curves. The experimental results suggest that the SAP increased the water retaining capacity of soil sections where the suction pressure was between 0 and 3,000 cm. The SAP significantly obstructed water diffusion in the soil in the early days of the experiment, but the effect gradually decreased in the later period. The average decrease in water diffusivity in the treatment groups fell from 76.6% at 0 days to 1.2% at 120 days. This research also provided parameters of time-varying functions that describe the unsaturated diffusivity D and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K of soils under the effects of SAPs; in future research, these functions can be used to construct water movement models applicable to SAP-treated soil.

  10. Optimal Choice of Soil Hydraulic Parameters for Simulating the Unsaturated Flow: A Case Study on the Island of Miyakojima, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Okamoto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the influence of input soil hydraulic parameters on HYDRUS-1D simulations of evapotranspiration and volumetric water contents (VWCs in the unsaturated zone of a sugarcane field on the island of Miyakojima, Japan. We first optimized the parameters for root water uptake and examined the influence of soil hydraulic parameters (water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity on simulations of evapotranspiration. We then compared VWCs simulated using measured soil hydraulic parameters with those using pedotransfer estimates obtained with the ROSETTA software package. Our results confirm that it is important to always use soil hydraulic parameters based on measured data, if available, when simulating evapotranspiration and unsaturated water flow processes, rather than pedotransfer functions.

  11. A MATLAB program for estimation of unsaturated hydraulic soil parameters using an infiltrometer technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Mikkel; Hansen, Søren; Petersen, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    We combined an inverse routine for assessing the hydraulic soil parameters of the Campbell/Mualem model with the power series solution developed by Philip for describing one-dimensional vertical infiltration into a homogenous soil. We based the estimation routine on a proposed measurement procedure...... especially suitable for early-time infiltrometer experiments where the flow can be considered as one-dimensional. The routine requires input of the initial soil water content and cumulative infiltration in two experiments with different pressures at the upper boundary and/or initial conditions....... An independent measurement of the soil water content at saturation may reduce the uncertainty of estimated parameters. Response surfaces of the objective function were analysed. Scenarios for various soils and conditions, using numerically generated synthetic cumulative infiltration data with normally...

  12. Handling the unknown soil hydraulic parameters in data assimilation for unsaturated flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Natascha; Erdal, Daniel; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    Model predictions of flow in the unsaturated zone require the soil hydraulic parameters. However, these parameters cannot be determined easily in applications, in particular if observations are indirect and cover only a small range of possible states. Correlation of parameters or their correlation in the range of states that are observed is a problem, as different parameter combinations may reproduce approximately the same measured water content. In field campaigns this problem can be helped by adding more measurement devices. Often, observation networks are designed to feed models for long term prediction purposes (i.e. for weather forecasting). A popular way of making predictions with such kind of observations are data assimilation methods, like the ensemble Kalman filter (Evensen, 1994). These methods can be used for parameter estimation if the unknown parameters are included in the state vector and updated along with the model states. Given the difficulties related to estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters in general, it is questionable, though, whether these methods can really be used for parameter estimation under natural conditions. Therefore, we investigate the ability of the ensemble Kalman filter to estimate the soil hydraulic parameters. We use synthetic identical twin-experiments to guarantee full knowledge of the model and the true parameters. We use the van Genuchten model to describe the soil water retention and relative permeability functions. This model is unfortunately prone to the above mentioned pseudo-correlations of parameters. Therefore, we also test the simpler Russo Gardner model, which is less affected by that problem, in our experiments. The total number of unknown parameters is varied by considering different layers of soil. Besides, we study the influence of the parameter updates on the water content predictions. We test different iterative filter approaches and compare different observation strategies for parameter identification

  13. Sensitivity of soil water content simulation to different methods of soil hydraulic parameter characterization as initial input values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Seuntjens, Piet; Shahidi, Reihaneh; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydraulic parameters, which can be derived from in situ and/or laboratory experiments, are key input parameters for modeling water flow in the vadose zone. In this study, we measured soil hydraulic properties with typical laboratory measurements and field tension infiltration experiments using Wooding's analytical solution and inverse optimization along the vertical direction within two typical podzol profiles with sand texture in a potato field. The objective was to identify proper sets of hydraulic parameters and to evaluate their relevance on hydrological model performance for irrigation management purposes. Tension disc infiltration experiments were carried out at five different depths for both profiles at consecutive negative pressure heads of 12, 6, 3 and 0.1 cm. At the same locations and depths undisturbed samples were taken to determine the water retention curve with hanging water column and pressure extractors and lab saturated hydraulic conductivity with the constant head method. Both approaches allowed to determine the Mualem-van Genuchten (MVG) hydraulic parameters (residual water content θr, saturated water content θs,, shape parameters α and n, and field or lab saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs and Kls). Results demonstrated horizontal differences and vertical variability of hydraulic properties. Inverse optimization resulted in excellent matches between observed and fitted infiltration rates in combination with final water content at the end of the experiment, θf, using Hydrus 2D/3D. It also resulted in close correspondence of  and Kfs with those from Logsdon and Jaynes' (1993) solution of Wooding's equation. The MVG parameters Kfs and α estimated from the inverse solution (θr set to zero), were relatively similar to values from Wooding's solution which were used as initial value and the estimated θs corresponded to (effective) field saturated water content θf. We found the Gardner parameter αG to be related to the optimized van

  14. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  15. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharnagl, B.; Vrugt, J.A.; Vereecken, H.; Herbst, M.

    2011-01-01

    In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and

  16. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse GPR data measured at Selhausen, Germany

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach that uses time-lapse off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data to estimate soil hydraulic parameters, and apply it to a dataset collected in the field. Off-ground GPR data are mainly sensitive to the near-surface water content profile and dynamics, and are thus related to soil hydraulic parameters, such as the parameters of the hydraulic conductivity and water retention functions. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS 1-D was used with a two-layer single- and dual-porosity model. To monitor the soil water content dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. The dual porosity model provided better results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is supported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agreement with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and monitoring water dynamics at the field scale.

  17. Parameter estimation of soil hydraulic and thermal property functions for unsaturated porous media using the HYDRUS-2D code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakhaei Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of soil hydraulic and thermal properties is essential for studies involving the combined effects of soil temperature and water input on water flow and redistribution processes under field conditions. The objective of this study was to estimate the parameters characterizing these properties from a transient water flow and heat transport field experiment. Real-time sensors built by the authors were used to monitor soil temperatures at depths of 40, 80, 120, and 160 cm during a 10-hour long ring infiltration experiment. Water temperatures and cumulative infiltration from a single infiltration ring were monitored simultaneously. The soil hydraulic parameters (the saturated water content θ s, empirical shape parameters α and n, and the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and soil thermal conductivity parameters (coefficients b1, b2, and b3 in the thermal conductivity function were estimated from cumulative infiltration and temperature measurements by inversely solving a two-dimensional water flow and heat transport using HYDRUS-2D. Three scenarios with a different, sequentially decreasing number of optimized parameters were considered. In scenario 1, seven parameters (θ s, Ks, α, n, b1, b2, and b3 were included in the inverse problem. The results indicated that this scenario does not provide a unique solution. In scenario 2, six parameters (Ks, α, n, b1, b2, and b3 were included in the inverse problem. The results showed that this scenario also results in a non-unique solution. Only scenario 3, in which five parameters (α, n, b1, b2, and b3 were included in the inverse problem, provided a unique solution. The simulated soil temperatures and cumulative infiltration during the ring infiltration experiment compared reasonably well with their corresponding observed values.

  18. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone) simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek, d) HYPRES, and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June - October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is

  19. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baroni

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c Rawls and Brakensiek, d HYPRES, and e ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June – October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of

  20. Optimization of Soil Hydraulic Model Parameters Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauwels, Valentijn; Balenzano, Anna; Satalino, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are a very valuable source of information for the modeling of the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. During the last couple of decades, most of the research on the use of SAR data in hydrologic applications has...... that no direct relationships between the remote-sensing observations, more specifically radar backscatter values, and the parameter values can be derived. However, land surface models can provide these relationships. The objective of this paper is to retrieve a number of soil physical model parameters through...... a combination of remote sensing anti land surface modeling. Spatially distributed and multitemporal SAR-based soil moisture maps are the basis of the study. The surface soil moisture values are used in a parameter estimation procedure basest on the Extended Kalman Filter equations. In fact, the land surface...

  1. Soil Structure and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskova, B.; Nagy, V.

    The role of soil structure on saturated hydraulic conductivity changes is studied in plough layers of texturally different soils. Three localities in western part of Slovakia in Zitny ostrov (Corn Island) were under investigation: locality Kalinkovo with light Calcaric Fluvisol (FAO 1970), Macov with medium heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol and Jurova with heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol. Soil structure was determined in dry as well as wet state and in size of macro and micro aggregates. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured by the help of double ring method. During the period of ring filling the soil surface was protected against aggregates damage by falling water drops. Spatial and temporal variability of studied parameters was evaluated. Cultivated crops were ensilage maize at medium heavy and heavy soil and colza at light soil. Textural composition of soil and actual water content at the beginning of measurement are one of major factor affecting aggregate stability and consequently also saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  2. Linking soil hydraulic properties to structure indicators : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Weynants, Mélanie

    2011-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties are needed for modelling below-ground water flow and solute movements. They are very variable in space and time and across scales and their characterisation is tedious. Pedotransfer functions (PTF) are tools developed to predict hydraulic properties from more readily available information. This thesis provides PTF predicting the parameters of a closed-form model of the soil hydraulic conductivity and moisture retention curves based on the soil texture, bulk density a...

  3. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters in the field by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-01-01

    An integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach was used to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data collected at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field. The GPR model combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propaga- tion in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. The hydrological simu- lator HYDRUS-1D was used with a two layer single- and dual-porosity model. The radar model was coupled to the hydrodynamic model, such that the soil electrical properties (permitivity and conductivity) that serve as input to the GPR model become a function of the hydrodynamic model output (water content), thereby permiting estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters from the GPR data in an inversion loop. To monitor the soil water con- tent dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. Significant effects of water dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR data and in particular precipitation and evaporation events were clearly visible. The dual porosity model provided betier results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is sup- ported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agree- ment with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and moni- toring water dynamics at the field scale. © Soil Science Society of America.

  4. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; Dam, van J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still

  5. Physico-empirical approach for mapping soil hydraulic behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D'Urso

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Pedo-transfer functions are largely used in soil hydraulic characterisation of large areas. The use of physico-empirical approaches for the derivation of soil hydraulic parameters from disturbed samples data can be greatly enhanced if a characterisation performed on undisturbed cores of the same type of soil is available. In this study, an experimental procedure for deriving maps of soil hydraulic behaviour is discussed with reference to its application in an irrigation district (30 km2 in southern Italy. The main steps of the proposed procedure are: i the precise identification of soil hydraulic functions from undisturbed sampling of main horizons in representative profiles for each soil map unit; ii the determination of pore-size distribution curves from larger disturbed sampling data sets within the same soil map unit. iii the calibration of physical-empirical methods for retrieving soil hydraulic parameters from particle-size data and undisturbed soil sample analysis; iv the definition of functional hydraulic properties from water balance output; and v the delimitation of soil hydraulic map units based on functional properties.

  6. Effect of Subsoil Compaction on Hydraulic Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per

    Soil compaction is a major threat to sustainable soil quality and is increasing since agricultural machinery is becoming heavier and is used more intensively. Compaction not only reduces pore volume, but also modifies the pore connectivity. The inter-Nordic research project POSEIDON (Persistent...... effects of subsoil compaction on soil ecological services and functions) put forward the hypothesis that due to a decrease in the hydraulic conductivity in the soil matrix, compaction increases the frequency of preferential flow events in macropores and therefore increases the leaching of otherwise...... relatively immobile agrochemicals. In a morainic clay soil, undisturbed soil cores (6280 cm3) were sampled at 20-40 and 60-80 cm depth in the spring 2009 fourteen years after operation with a heavy sugar beet harvester. Soil cores were sampled both from uncompacted reference blocks and from compacted blocks...

  7. Mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in cohesive soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-jie Wang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing in the soil core of earth-rockfill dams is a common problem affecting the safety of the dams. Based on fracture tests, a new criterion for hydraulic fracturing in cohesive soil was suggested. Using this criterion, the mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in cubic soil specimens were investigated. The results indicate that the propagation of the crack in a cubic specimen under water pressure occurs in a mixed mode I-II if the crack face is not perpendicular to any of the principal stresses, and the crack most likely to propagate is the one that is perpendicular to the minor principal stress and propagates in mode I.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF VADOSE-ZONE HYDRAULIC PARAMETER VALUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS PM

    2008-01-21

    Several approaches have been developed to establish a relation between the soil-moisture retention curve and readily available soil properties. Those relationships are referred to as pedotransfer functions. Described in this paper are the rationale, approach, and corroboration for use of a nonparametric pedotransfer function for the estimation of soil hydraulic-parameter values at the yucca Mountain area in Nevada for simulations of net infiltration. This approach, shown to be applicable for use at Yucca Mountain, is also applicable for use at the Hanford Site where the underlying data were collected.

  9. Assessing soil hydraulic characteristics using HYPROP and BEST: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Georg; Obojes, Nikolaus; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of ecohydrological characteristics with high spatial resolution is a prerequisite for large-scale hydrological modelling. Data on soil hydraulic characteristics are of major importance, but measurements are often seen as time consuming and costly. In order to accurately model grassland productivity and in particular evapotranspiration, soil sampling and infiltration experiments at 25 grassland sites ranging from 900m to 2300m a.s.l. were conducted in the long term socio-ecological research (LTSER) site Stubai Valley, Tyrolean Alps, Austria, covering 265 km². Here we present a comparison of two methods to determine important hydrological properties of soils: (1) the evaporation method HYPROP (Hydraulic Property Analyzer; UMS Munich, 2010), and (2) the BEST-model (Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer Parameters; Lassabatère et al. (2006)), each determining the soil hydraulic characteristics and in particular the water retention curve. For the most abundant soil types we compared the pf-curves calculated from HYPROP data suing the Van Genuchten equation to the ones resulting from the comparatively time efficient BEST approach to find out if the latter is a suitable method to determine pf curves of alpine grassland soils. Except for the soil type Rendzina, the comparison of HYPROP and BEST showed slightly variations in the pF curves and resulting hydraulic characteristics. At the starting point BEST curves presented a slower dehydration, HYPROP a fast and continuous water loss. HYPROP analyses showed the highest variability in the measured values of Rendzina. Regarding BEST, the Alluvial Soils showed the highest variability. To assess equivalence between HYPROP and BEST we deduced several hydraulic characteristics from the pF curves, e.g. saturated water content, field capacity, permanent wilting point, pore size distribution, and minimum water retention. The comparison of HYPROP and BEST revealed that the results of soil water characteristics may depend on

  10. Soil Systems for Upscaling Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity (Ksat) for Hydrological Modeling in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful hydrological model predictions depend on appropriate framing of scale and the spatial-temporal accuracy of input parameters describing soil hydraulic properties. Saturated soil hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is one of the most important properties influencing water movement through soil un...

  11. On the Choice of Soil Hydraulic Models in Land-Surface Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaping; Irannejad, Parviz

    The uncertainties in soil hydraulic functions and soil hydraulic parameters affect the performance of land-surface schemes used in climate and weather prediction models. The Clapp-Hornberger soil hydraulic model of is most widely used in land-surface modelling, while other models favoured by soil physicists are hardly used for the purpose. In this study, we give a summary of four soil hydraulic models and examine the impact of these models on the performance of a land-surface scheme. It is found that inconsistency in soil hydraulic functions and parameters leads to different outcomes in land-surface modelling. We introduce a technique to match the soil hydraulic parameters for different models, so that the disagreement in the description of soil hydraulic properties among different models is reduced, while intrinsic differences in the soil hydraulic functions remain. The numerical tests also show that the land-surface model has a degree of tolerance to the uncertainties in soil hydraulic models, at least in the case of off-line simulations. The van Genuchten model performs well, but is numerically expensive. The Brooks-Corey and Clapp-Hornberger models are sufficiently accurate with numerical efficiency, and are therefore more suitable for land-surface schemes used in atmospheric models.

  12. Temporal variability in soil hydraulic properties under drip irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarak, I.; Mailhol, J.C.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Ruelle, P.; P. Boivin; M. R. Khaledian

    2009-01-01

    Predicting soil hydraulic properties and understanding their temporal variability during the irrigated cropping season are required to mitigate agro-environmental risks. This paper reports field measurements of soil hydraulic properties under two drip irrigation treatments, full (FT) and limited (LT). The objective was to identify the temporal variability of the hydraulic properties of field soil under high-frequency water application during a maize cropping season. Soil hydraulics were chara...

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

  14. Prediction of soil hydraulic characteristics from basic soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) prove to be powerful tools for predicting soil hydraulic characteristics from basic soil properties. PTFs have the advantage over direct measurement techniques that they are inexpensive and easy to use. Accuracy of predictions for many applications on regional and

  15. Evaluating models for predicting hydraulic characteristics of layered soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavimbela, S. S. W.; van Rensburg, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K-coefficient) are critical hydraulic properties governing soil water activity on layered soils. Sustainable soil water conservation would not be possible without accurate knowledge of these hydraulic properties. Infield rainwater harvesting (IRWH) is one conservation technique adopted to improve the soil water regime of a number of clay soils found in the semi arid areas of Free State province of South Africa. Given that SWCC is much easier to measure, most soil water studies rely on SWCC information to predict in-situ K-coefficients. This work validated this practice on the Tukulu, Sepane and Swartland layered soil profiles. The measured SWCC was first described using Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980) and Kasugi (1996) parametric models. The conductivity functions of these models were then required to fit in-situ based K-coefficients derived from instantaneous profile method (IPM). The same K-coefficient was also fitted by HYDRUS 1-D using optimised SWCC parameters. Although all parametric models fitted the measured SWCC fairly well their corresponding conductivity functions could not do the same when fitting the in-situ based K-coefficients. Overestimates of more than 2 orders of magnitude especially at low soil water content (SWC) were observed. This phenomenon was pronounced among the upper horizons that overlaid a clayey horizon. However, optimized α and n parameters using HYDRUS 1-D showed remarkable agreement between fitted and in-situ K-coefficient with root sum of squares error (RMSE) recording values not exceeding unity. During this exercise the Brooks and Corey was replaced by modified van Genuchten model (Vogel and Cislerova, 1988) since it failed to produce unique inverse solutions. The models performance appeared to be soil specific with van Genuchten-Mualem (1980) performing fairly well on the Orthic and neucutanic horizons while its modified form fitted very

  16. Assessment the effect of homogenized soil on soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohawesh, O.; Janssen, M.; Maaitah, O.; Lennartz, B.

    2017-09-01

    Soil hydraulic properties play a crucial role in simulating water flow and contaminant transport. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly measured using homogenized soil samples. However, soil structure has a significant effect on the soil ability to retain and to conduct water, particularly in aggregated soils. In order to determine the effect of soil homogenization on soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport, undisturbed soil samples were carefully collected. Five different soil structures were identified: Angular-blocky, Crumble, Angular-blocky (different soil texture), Granular, and subangular-blocky. The soil hydraulic properties were determined for undisturbed and homogenized soil samples for each soil structure. The soil hydraulic properties were used to model soil water transport using HYDRUS-1D.The homogenized soil samples showed a significant increase in wide pores (wCP) and a decrease in narrow pores (nCP). The wCP increased by 95.6, 141.2, 391.6, 3.9, 261.3%, and nCP decreased by 69.5, 10.5, 33.8, 72.7, and 39.3% for homogenized soil samples compared to undisturbed soil samples. The soil water retention curves exhibited a significant decrease in water holding capacity for homogenized soil samples compared with the undisturbed soil samples. The homogenized soil samples showed also a decrease in soil hydraulic conductivity. The simulated results showed that water movement and distribution were affected by soil homogenizing. Moreover, soil homogenizing affected soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport. However, field studies are being needed to find the effect of these differences on water, chemical, and pollutant transport under several scenarios.

  17. Synthesis of soil-hydraulic properties and infiltration timescales in wildfire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    We collected soil-hydraulic property data from the literature for wildfire-affected soils, ash, and unburned soils. These data were used to calculate metrics and timescales of hydrologic response related to infiltration and surface runoff generation. Sorptivity (S) and wetting front potential (Ψf) were significantly different (lower) in burned soils compared with unburned soils, whereas field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) was not significantly different. The magnitude and duration of the influence of capillarity during infiltration was greatly reduced in burned soils, causing faster ponding times in response to rainfall. Ash had large values of S and Kfs but moderate values of Ψf, compared with unburned and burned soils, indicating ash has long ponding times in response to rainfall. The ratio of S2/Kfs was nearly constant (~100 mm) for unburned soils but more variable in burned soils, suggesting that unburned soils have a balance between gravity and capillarity contributions to infiltration that may depend on soil organic matter, whereas in burned soils the gravity contribution to infiltration is greater. Changes in S and Kfs in burned soils act synergistically to reduce infiltration and accelerate and amplify surface runoff generation. Synthesis of these findings identifies three key areas for future research. First, short timescales of capillary influences on infiltration indicate the need for better measurements of infiltration at times less than 1 min to accurately characterize S in burned soils. Second, using parameter values, such as Ψf, from unburned areas could produce substantial errors in hydrologic modeling when used without adjustment for wildfire effects, causing parameter compensation and resulting underestimation of Kfs. Third, more thorough measurement campaigns that capture soil-structural changes, organic matter impacts, quantitative water repellency trends, and soil-water content along with soil-hydraulic properties could drive the

  18. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention properties across a soil-slope transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak P.; Mousli, Zak

    2000-11-01

    The hydraulic properties of soil and their spatial structures are important for understanding soil moisture dynamics, land surface and subsurface hydrology, and contaminant transport. We investigated whether landscape features, including relative position on a slope, contribute to the variability of soil hydraulic properties in a complex terrain of a glacial till material. Using 396 undisturbed soil cores collected along two orthogonal transects, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and soil water retention functions at two (15 and 30 cm) depths across a glacial till landscape in central Iowa that encompassed two soil types (Nicollet loam with 1-3% slope on the hilltop position and Clarion loam with 2-5% slope on the shoulder position). The van Genuchten-Mualem model was fitted to the experimental data using the RETC optimization computer code. At the 15 cm depth a statistical comparison indicated significant differences in Ksat, saturated water content (θs), water content at permanent wilting point (θ15,000) and van Genuchten fitting parameters (α and n) between soil types and landscape positions. At the 30 cm depth, θs, θ15,000, and residual water content (θr) were found to be significantly different across the soil-slope transition. Available water content (θ333-15,000) did not show any significant difference across the soil-slope transition for either depth. No clear directional trend was observed, with some exceptions for Ksat, θs, and α on specific transect limbs and depths. Drifts in the soil hydraulic parameters due to soil-slope transition were removed using a mean-polishing approach. Geostatistical analyses of these parameters showed several important characteristics including the following: (1) The spatial correlation lengths and semivariogram patterns of the independently measured (or estimated) loge Ksat and θs at 30-cm depth matched extremely well; (2) better spatial structures with large correlation lengths were observed for

  19. Determination of hydraulic properties of a tropical soil of Hawaii using column experiments and inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Sobotkova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for determining soil hydraulic properties of a weathered tropical soil (Oxisol using a medium-sized column with undisturbed soil is presented. The method was used to determine fitting parameters of the water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity functions of a soil column in support of a pesticide leaching study. The soil column was extracted from a continuously-used research plot in Central Oahu (Hawaii, USA and its internal structure was examined by computed tomography. The experiment was based on tension infiltration into the soil column with free outflow at the lower end. Water flow through the soil core was mathematically modeled using a computer code that numerically solves the one-dimensional Richards equation. Measured soil hydraulic parameters were used for direct simulation, and the retention and soil hydraulic parameters were estimated by inverse modeling. The inverse modeling produced very good agreement between model outputs and measured flux and pressure head data for the relatively homogeneous column. The moisture content at a given pressure from the retention curve measured directly in small soil samples was lower than that obtained through parameter optimization based on experiments using a medium-sized undisturbed soil column.

  20. Optimization of hydraulic turbine governor parameters based on WPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunyang; Yu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Yong; Feng, Baohao

    2018-01-01

    The parameters of hydraulic turbine governor directly affect the dynamic characteristics of the hydraulic unit, thus affecting the regulation capacity and the power quality of power grid. The governor of conventional hydropower unit is mainly PID governor with three adjustable parameters, which are difficult to set up. In order to optimize the hydraulic turbine governor, this paper proposes wolf pack algorithm (WPA) for intelligent tuning since the good global optimization capability of WPA. Compared with the traditional optimization method and PSO algorithm, the results show that the PID controller designed by WPA achieves a dynamic quality of hydraulic system and inhibits overshoot.

  1. Estimation of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity by artificial neural networks ensemble in smectitic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, A.; Bayat, H.; Safari Sinegani, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity ( K s ) of the soil is one of the main soil physical properties. Indirect estimation of this parameter using pedo-transfer functions (PTFs) has received considerable attention. The Purpose of this study was to improve the estimation of K s using fractal parameters of particle and micro-aggregate size distributions in smectitic soils. In this study 260 disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were collected from Guilan province, the north of Iran. The fractal model of Bird and Perrier was used to compute the fractal parameters of particle and micro-aggregate size distributions. The PTFs were developed by artificial neural networks (ANNs) ensemble to estimate K s by using available soil data and fractal parameters. There were found significant correlations between K s and fractal parameters of particles and microaggregates. Estimation of K s was improved significantly by using fractal parameters of soil micro-aggregates as predictors. But using geometric mean and geometric standard deviation of particles diameter did not improve K s estimations significantly. Using fractal parameters of particles and micro-aggregates simultaneously, had the most effect in the estimation of K s . Generally, fractal parameters can be successfully used as input parameters to improve the estimation of K s in the PTFs in smectitic soils. As a result, ANNs ensemble successfully correlated the fractal parameters of particles and micro-aggregates to K s .

  2. Inverse estimation of soil hydraulic properties under oil palm trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, Nor Suhada Abd; Askari, Muhamad; Tanaka, Tadashi; Simunek, Jirka; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    Canopies of forested and agricultural ecosystems can significantly alter rainfall patterns into separate stemflow and throughfall areas. These two areas often have also different organic matter contents and soil compaction properties, and hence also soil hydraulic properties, thus causing further

  3. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes-Abellan, J.; Jiménez-Martínez, J.; Candela, L.; Tamoh, K.

    2015-07-01

    Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i) non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii) automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic). Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm). Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher. (Author)

  4. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Valdes-Abellan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic. Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm. Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher.

  5. Soil hydraulic properties near saturation, an improved conductivity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye; Hansen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The hydraulic properties near saturation can change dramatically due to the presence of macropores that are usually difficult to handle in traditional pore size models. The purpose of this study is to establish a data set on hydraulic conductivity near saturation, test the predictive capability...... of commonly used hydraulic conductivity models and give suggestions for improved models. Water retention and near saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured for a variety of 81 top and subsoils. The hydraulic conductivity models by van Genuchten [van Genuchten, 1980. A closed-form equation...... for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892–898.] (vGM) and Brooks and Corey, modified by Jarvis [Jarvis, 1991. MACRO—A Model of Water Movement and Solute Transport in Macroporous Soils. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Soil Sciences...

  6. Spatial Variability and Geostatistical Prediction of Some Soil Hydraulic Coefficients of a Calcareous Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moosavi

    2017-02-01

    calculated in various directions and their surface semivariograms were also prepared to determine the isotropic or anisotropic behavior of each studied soil attributes. Since all of studied soil hydraulic attributes were isotropic variables, therefore, the omnidirectional semivariograms were calculated and different theoretical models were fitted to them. The best fitted semivariogram models were determined using the determination coefficient, R2, and the residual sum of the square, RSS. The parameters of the best fitted models to the experimental semivariograms were also determined. The prediction of study hydraulic attributes was carried out using the parameters of semivariogram models by applying the ordinary Kriging approach. Predictions were also carried out using the Inverse Distance Weighing approach. The results of predictions were compared to each other using the Jackknifing evaluation approach and the suitable prediction method was determined and zoning was performed using the results of introducing prediction method. All of the semivariogram calculations and modeling, prediction of zoning of study hydraulic attributes were performed using the GS+ 5.1 software packages. Results and Discussion: Results indicated that all of the studied soil hydraulic attributes belonged to the weak to moderated spatial correlation classes and the spherical model was the best fitted model for their semivariograms (except for Kfs and D that their best semivariogram models were exponential. The sill of all semivariograms ranged between 0.0003 to 0.419 for the S and Kfs, respectively. The nugget effects and the Range parameter of all semivariograms were located between 0.00015 to 0.108 for the S and Фm, and 211 to 6.4 m for Ks and D, respectively. Results also indicated that 3.5 and 50% of total variation of D and Ks was spatially structured and the other was random, respectively. The spatial correlation classes of near saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and soil hydraulic

  7. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  8. Determination of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of alfisol soil in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hydrolic conductivity of soil measures the ease at which water moves through the soil by determining the flux density of water passing through the soil. The estimation of hydraulic conductivity indicates how fluids flow throuhg a substance and thus determine the water balance in the soil profile. The trend lines of ...

  9. Estimation of the empirical model parameters of unsaturated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchemella Salima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For each flow modelling in the unsaturated soils, it is necessary to determine the retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve of studied soils. Some empirical models use the same parameters to describe these two hydraulic properties. For this reason, the estimation of these parameters is achieved by adjusting the experimental points to the retention curve only, which is more easily measured as compared with the hydraulic conductivity curve. In this work, we show that the adjustment of the retention curve θ (h is not generally sufficient to describe the hydraulic conductivity curve K (θ and the spatio-temporal variation of the moisture in the soil θ (z. The models used in this study are van Genuchten- Mualem model (1980-1976 and Brooks and Corey model (1964, for two different soils; Gault clay and Givors silt.

  10. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, Carsten; Herbst, Michael; Weihermüller, Lutz; Verhoef, Anne; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC) and hydraulic conductivity (HCC) curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller-Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem-van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional) climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based on the ROSETTA PTF

  11. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montzka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC and hydraulic conductivity (HCC curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs. Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller–Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem–van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based

  12. Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil organic matter in a sandy-loam soil in Ikwuano lga of Abia state. ... Samples were analyzed for soil properties like; Ksat, WSA (%) and percent organic carbon (OC %), Data from the analysis were subjected to ANOVA using a split plot in RCBD. Results ...

  13. Gas diffusion-derived tortuosity governs saturated hydraulic conductivity in sandy soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is essential for the development of better distributed hydrological models and area-differentiated risk assessment of chemical leaching. The saturated hydraulic conductivity is often estimated from basic soil properties such as particle...... size distribution or, more recently, soil-air permeability. However, similar links to soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) have not been fully explored even though gas diffusivity is a direct measure of connectivity and tortuosity of the soil pore network. Based on measurements for a coarse sandy soil....../Do model to measured data, and subsequently linked to the cementation exponent of the wellestablished Revil and Cathles predictive model for saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, a two-parameter model, analogue to the Kozeny-Carman equation, was developed for the Ksat - Dp/Do relationships. All 44...

  14. Comparative study of methods to estimate hydraulic parameters in the hydraulically undisturbed Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, (France); Yu, C.; Gonçalvès, J. [Aix Marseille Université UMR 6635 CEREGE Technopôle Environnement Arbois-Méditerranée Aix-en-Provence, Cedex 4 (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    The deep borehole (DB) experiment gave the opportunity to acquire hydraulic parameters in a hydraulically undisturbed zone of the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland). Three methods were used to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage values of the Opalinus Clay formation and its bounding formations through the 248 m deep borehole BDB-1: application of a Poiseuille-type law involving petrophysical measurements, spectral analysis of pressure time series and in situ hydraulic tests. The hydraulic conductivity range in the Opalinus Clay given by the first method is 2 × 10{sup -14}-6 × 10{sup -13} m s{sup -1} for a cementation factor ranging between 2 and 3. These results show low vertical variability whereas in situ hydraulic tests suggest higher values up to 7 × 10{sup -12} m s{sup -1}. Core analysis provides economical estimates of the homogeneous matrix hydraulic properties but do not account for heterogeneities at larger scale such as potential tectonic conductive features. Specific storage values obtained by spectral analysis are consistent and in the order of 10{sup -6} m{sup -1}, while formulations using phase shift and gain between pore pressure signals were found to be inappropriate to evaluate hydraulic conductivity in the Opalinus Clay. The values obtained are globally in good agreement with the ones obtained previously at the rock laboratory. (authors)

  15. Saturated hydraulic conductivity as parameter for modeling applications - comparison of determination methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Thomas; Kreiselmeier, Janis; Chandrasekhar, Parvarthy; Julich, Stefan; Feger, Karl-Heinz; Schwärzel, Kai; Schwen, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity is broadly used to parametrize physical characteristics of soil. Many methods for its determination have been developed, but still no standard has been established. For the interpretation of results it has to be considered that different methods yield varying results. In this study, values for saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured directly by the falling head lab-method as well as derived indirectly by model fitting to data from hood-infiltrometer experiments in the field and evaporation experiments in the lab. Successive sampling of the exactly same soil body for all three methods ensured the highest possible comparability. Additional physical soil parameters were measured and tested for their suitability as predictors in pedotransfer functions. The experiments were conducted all through the vegetation period 2016 at 4 sites in Lower Austria and Saxony, Germany. Sampled soils had a sandy loam or loamy silt texture and were cultivated with regionally common annual field crops. Subsequently, the results were evaluated with regard to their further use as key parameter in the expression of hydraulic soil properties. Significant differences were found between the evaporation method and the two other methods, where the former underestimated the saturated conductivity considerably. Consequently, an appropriate procedure for the determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity was formulated which combines results of hood infiltrometry and falling head method.

  16. Saturated hydraulic conductivity values of some forest soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple falling-head method is presented for the laboratory determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity of some forest soils of Ghana. Using the procedure, it was found that saturated hydraulic conductivity was positively and negatively correlated with sand content and clay content, respectively, both at P = 0.05 level.

  17. FEASIBILITY OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF SOILS TO IMPROVE REMEDIAL ACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing, a technique commonly used to increase the yields of oil wells, could improve the effectiveness of several methods of in situ remediation. This project consisted of laboratory and field tests in which hydraulic fractures were created in soil. Laboratory te...

  18. Relations between soil hydraulic properties and burn severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moody, J.A.; Ebel, B.A.; Stoof, C.R.; Nyman, P.; Martin, D.A.; McKinley, R.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire can affect soil hydraulic properties, often resulting in reduced infiltration. The magnitude of change in infiltration varies depending on the burn severity. Quantitative approaches to link burn severity with changes in infiltration are lacking. This study uses controlled laboratory

  19. Simulation of parameters of hydraulic drive with volumetric type controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukin, V. L.; Boldyrev, A. V.; Karelin, D. L.; Belousov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The article presents a mathematical model of volumetric type hydraulic drive controller that allows to calculate the parameters of forward and reverse motion. According to the results of simulation static characteristics of rod’s speed and the force of the hydraulic cylinder rod were built and the influence of the angle of swash plate of the controller at the characteristics profile is shown. The results analysis showed that the proposed controller allows steplessly adjust the speed□ц of hydraulic cylinder’s rod motion and the force developed on the rod without the use of flow throttling.

  20. Root Zone Soil Hydraulic Property Estimation by SMAP: An Unified Framework for Continental USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.

    2016-12-01

    We hypothesized that effective soil hydraulic property in the root zone at the footprint-scale is an effective indicator for combined soil, topography, and vegetation heterogeneities in land-atmosphere interaction models at different spatial scales. To test this overarching scientific hypothesis we will utilize SMAP near-surface soil moisture data at multiple resolutions (by downscaling), CONUS soil maps with a newly developed inverse model including a soil-water-atmosphere-plant model and advanced parameter estimation techniques. Efficacy related to various soil types, vegetation, rooting depth, and hydroclimates across the continental USA will be discussed. Determining "effective root zone soil hydraulic properties" in complex landscapes from remote sensing data at continental scale will open up a new paradigm and will have tremendous impacts on our ability to predict terrestrial hydrology, weather, climate, and global circulation of water, energy, and chemicals in the environment.

  1. Variability and scaling of hydraulic properties for 200 Area soils, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, R.; Freeman, E.J.

    1995-10-01

    Over the years, data have been obtained on soil hydraulic properties at the Hanford Site. Much of these data have been obtained as part of recent site characterization activities for the Environmental Restoration Program. The existing data on vadose zone soil properties are, however, fragmented and documented in reports that have not been formally reviewed and released. This study helps to identify, compile, and interpret all available data for the principal soil types in the 200 Areas plateau. Information on particle-size distribution, moisture retention, and saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub s}) is available for 183 samples from 12 sites in the 200 Areas. Data on moisture retention and K{sub s} are corrected for gravel content. After the data are corrected and cataloged, hydraulic parameters are determined by fitting the van Genuchten soil-moisture retention model to the data. A nonlinear parameter estimation code, RETC, is used. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relationship can subsequently be predicted using the van Genuchten parameters, Mualem`s model, and laboratory-measured saturated hydraulic conductivity estimates. Alternatively, provided unsaturated conductivity measurements are available, the moisture retention curve-fitting parameters, Mualem`s model, and a single unsaturated conductivity measurement can be used to predict unsaturated conductivities for the desired range of field moisture regime.

  2. Links between matrix bulk density, macropore characteristics and hydraulic behavior of soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The relationship of soil bulk density with the hydraulic behavior of soil and the role of macropores in preferential flow and transport has been extensively studied in literatures. Yet, the influence of soil structural heterogeneity as simultaneous variation of bulk density and macropore characte......The relationship of soil bulk density with the hydraulic behavior of soil and the role of macropores in preferential flow and transport has been extensively studied in literatures. Yet, the influence of soil structural heterogeneity as simultaneous variation of bulk density and macropore...... characteristics on soil hydraulic functions has rarely been studied. With the objective of studying the links between these parameters we quantified macropore characteristics of intact soil columns (19 cm diameter x 20 cm high) from two agricultural field sites (Silstrup and Faardrup) in Denmark using coarse....... However, in Faardrup soils macroporosity and matrix bulk density were weakly correlated. Though macroporosity and interconnectivity of macropores could explain some variation in the hydraulic behavior of a few samples from Faardrup, the preferential flow behavior was observed to be primarily influenced...

  3. Upscaling soil saturated hydraulic conductivity from pore throat characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upscaling and/or estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat at the core scale from microscopic/macroscopic soil characteristics has been actively under investigation in the hydrology and soil physics communities for several decades. Numerous models have beendeveloped based on different approac...

  4. Determining hydraulic parameters of a karst aquifer using unique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining hydraulic parameters of a karst aquifer using unique historical data from large-scale dewatering by deep level mining – a case study from South Africa. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader).

  5. Accuracy of sample dimension-dependent pedotransfer functions in estimation of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat is a fundamental characteristic in modeling flow and contaminant transport in soils and sediments. Therefore, many models have been developed to estimate Ksat from easily measureable parameters, such as textural properties, bulk density, etc. However, Ksat is no...

  6. Hydraulic parameters estimation from well logging resistivity and geoelectrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, S.; Ainchil, J. E.; Kruse, E.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a methodology is suggested for deriving hydraulic parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity combining classical hydrogeological data with geophysical measurements. Estimates values of transmissivity and conductivity, with this approach, can reduce uncertainties in numerical model calibration and improve data coverage, reducing time and cost of a hydrogeological investigation at a regional scale. The conventional estimation of hydrogeological parameters needs to be done by analyzing wells data or laboratory measurements. Furthermore, to make a regional survey many wells should be considered, and the location of each one plays an important role in the interpretation stage. For this reason, the use of geoelectrical methods arises as an effective complementary technique, especially in developing countries where it is necessary to optimize resources. By combining hydraulic parameters from pumping tests and electrical resistivity from well logging profiles, it was possible to adjust three empirical laws in a semi-confined alluvial aquifer in the northeast of the province of Buenos Aires (Argentina). These relations were also tested to be used with surficial geoelectrical data. The hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity estimated in porous material were according to expected values for the region (20 m/day; 457 m2/day), and are very consistent with previous results from other authors (25 m/day and 500 m2/day). The methodology described could be used with similar data sets and applied to other areas with similar hydrogeological conditions.

  7. Effective Hydraulic Properties Determined from Transient Unsaturated Flow in Anisotropic Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2007-11-01

    Hydraulic parameters including the pore connectivity/tortuosity tensor (L_i) were inversely estimated using the STOMP numerical simulator coupled with the parameter estimation code, UCODE. Results show that six of eight parameters required for a modified van Genuchten-Mualem model could be inversely estimated using water content measured during transient infiltration from a surface line source and approximated prior information. Soils showed evidence of saturation-dependent anisotropy that was well described with the connectivity tensor. Variability of the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger than the horizontal. The autocorrelation ranges for the horizonatal and vertical Ks; the inverse of the air-entry value, and the horizontal connectivity were between 2.4 and 4.6 m whereas the van Genuchten shape parameter, n, and saturated water content showed no autocorrelation. Accurate upscaling of hydraulic properties requires the correct assessment of the connectivity of facies.

  8. Temporal and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties with implications on soil moisture simulations and irrigation scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Mouna; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Mancini, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The increase in consumption of water resources, combined with climate change impacts, calls for new sources of water supply and/or different managements of available resources in agriculture. One way to increase the quality and quantity of agricultural production is using modern technology to make farms more "intelligent", the so-called "precision agriculture" also known as 'smart farming'. To this aim hydrological models play crucial role for their ability to simulate water movement from soil surface to groundwater and to predict onset of stress condition. However, optimal use of mathematical models requires intensive, time consuming and expensive collection of soil related parameters. Typically, soils to be characterized, exhibit large variations in space and time as well during the cropping cycle, due to biological processes and agricultural management practices: tillage, irrigation, fertilization and harvest. Soil properties are subjected to diverse physical and chemical changes that lead to a non-stability in terms of water and chemical movements within the soil and to the groundwater as well. The aim of this study is to assess the variability of soil hydraulic properties over a cropping cycle. The study site is a surface irrigated Maize field located in Secugnago (45◦13'31.70" N, 9 ◦36'26.82 E), in Northern Italy-Lombardy region. The field belongs to the Consortium Muzza Bassa Lodigiana, within which meteorological data together with soil moisture were monitored during the cropping season of 2015. To investigate soil properties variations, both measurements in the field and laboratory tests on both undisturbed and disturbed collected samples were performed. Soil samples were taken from different locations within the study area and at different depths (surface, 20cm and 40cm) at the beginning and in the middle of the cropping cycle and after the harvest. During three measuring campaigns, for each soil samples several parameters were monitored (Organic

  9. Effects of biochars on hydraulic properties of clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jingbo; Palladino, Mario; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has gained popularity as an amendment to improve soil hydraulic properties. Since biochar properties depend on feedstocks and pyrolysis temperatures used for its production, proper selection of biochar type as soil amendment is of great importance for soil hydraulic properties improvement. This study investigated the effects of eight types of biochar on physical and hydraulic properties of clayey soil. Biochars were derived from four different feedstocks (Alfalfa hay, municipal organic waste, corn residues and wood chip) pyrolyzed at two different temperatures (300 and 550 °C). Clayey soil samples were taken from Leone farm (40° 26' 15.31" N, 14° 59' 45.54" E), Italy, and were oven-dried at 105 °C to determine dry bulk density. Biochars were mixed with the clayey soil at 5% by mass. Bulk densities of the mixtures were also determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the original clayey soil and corresponding mixtures were measured by means of falling-head method. Soil water retention measurements were conducted for clayey soil and mixtures using suction table apparatus and Richards' plate with the pressure head (h) up to 12000 cm. van Genuchten retention function was selected to evaluate the retention characteristics of clayey soil and mixtures. Available water content (AWC) was calculated by field capacity (h = - 500 cm) minus wilting pointing (h = -12000 cm). The results showed that biochar addition decreased the bulk density of clayey soil. The Ks of clayey soil increased due to the incorporation of biochars except for waste and corn biochars pyrolyzed at 550 °C. AWC of soils mixed with corn biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and wood biochar pyrolyzed at 550 °C, increased by 31% and 7%, respectively. Further analysis will be conducted in combination of biochar properties such as specific surface area and total pore volume. Better understanding of biochar impact on clayey soil will be helpful in biochar selection for soil amendment and

  10. Spatial Prediction of Hydraulic Zones from Soil Properties and Secondary Data Using Factorial Kriging Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, James; Morari, Francesco; Scudiero, Elia; Teatini, Pietro; Vellidis, George

    2015-04-01

    The development of pedotransfer functions (PTF) is an important topic in soil science research because there is a critical need for incorporation of vadose zone phenomena into large scale climate models. Soil measurements are inherently spatially dependent and therefore application of geospatial statistics provides an avenue for estimating soil properties. The aim of this study is to define management zones based on soil hydraulic properties. Samples were collected from 50 locations at 4 depths in a 20.8ha field located in the Po River delta in Italy. Water retention curves (WRC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves (UHC) and were determined via inversion of measurements taken using the Wind (Dane and Topp, 1994) method. This region is in known to have paleo-channel structures and highly heterogeneous soils. Factorial kriging analysis (FKA) was applied to hydraulic parameters in one data set and soil physical properties in another data set at 4 depths. The mapped principal components (PCs) were used in a fuzzy-c means algorithm to define zones of like properties. To examine the physical significance of these zones, curve parameters and hydraulic curves were investigated. Zones were able to distinguish between θ_s(saturated water content), n (shape parameter) and α (inverse of air entry) while θr (residual water content) and Ks (saturated conductivity) were not statistically different between the groups. For curve comparisons, WRC were found to be significantly different between zones at all tensions while effective saturation curves (Se) differ for the majority of tensions (except at 28cm), but UHC did not differ. The spatial relevance of the zones was examined by overlaying hydraulic zones with zones defined using the FKA and fuzzy-c means approach from soil physical properties such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic zones overlaid with areal accuracy ranging from 46.66% to 92.41%. As there is much similarity between these sets of zones, there

  11. Effects of long-term irrigation with treated wastewater on the hydraulic properties of a clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, S.; Narkis, K.

    2011-08-01

    The increasing demand for freshwater (FW) for domestic use turns treated wastewater (WW) into an attractive source of water for irrigated agriculture. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 yrs of irrigation with WW on hydraulic properties and flow processes in a clayey soil, compared to FW use. It also quantitatively addressed the distribution with depth along the soil profile of that impact on soil hydraulic properties. Standard methods used in soil physics at the laboratory scale, and numerical solutions of the flow equations on the basis of HYDRUS, were applied to define fundamental soil hydraulic properties of disturbed soil samples from 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm layers in the root zone. Results showed that saturated hydraulic conductivity, sorptivity, and infiltration rates are consistently lower in the WW irrigated soil samples at all depths. Water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions were affected by the use of WW, leading to a smaller, simulated-wetted volume below a dripper for the WW-irrigated soil case. These results illustrate the combined and complex effect of WW use on soil-exchangeable sodium percentage, and suggest changes in contact angle and pore size distribution. They also suggest that WW application will affect differently different zones in the soil profile, depending on irrigation management parameters and plant uptake characteristics.

  12. effective hydraulic conductivity for a soil of variable pore size with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Two models were derived for the estimation of effective hydraulic conductivity (K models were derived for the estimation of effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) of a soil layer based on exponential and inverse square variation of hydraulic conductivity with soil depth. Darcy's law was applied to a vertical soil stratum ...

  13. Stabilization of soil hydraulic properties under a long term no-till system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Lozano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The area under the no-tillage system (NT has been increasing over the last few years. Some authors indicate that stabilization of soil physical properties is reached after some years under NT while other authors debate this. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the last crop in the rotation sequence (1st year: maize, 2nd year: soybean, 3rd year: wheat/soybean on soil pore configuration and hydraulic properties in two different soils (site 1: loam, site 2: sandy loam from the Argentinean Pampas region under long-term NT treatments in order to determine if stabilization of soil physical properties is reached apart from a specific time in the crop sequence. In addition, we compared two procedures for evaluating water-conducting macroporosities, and evaluated the efficiency of the pedotransfer function ROSETTA in estimating the parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM model in these soils. Soil pore configuration and hydraulic properties were not stable and changed according to the crop sequence and the last crop grown in both sites. For both sites, saturated hydraulic conductivity, K0, water-conducting macroporosity, εma, and flow-weighted mean pore radius, R0ma, increased from the 1st to the 2nd year of the crop sequence, and this was attributed to the creation of water-conducting macropores by the maize roots. The VGM model adequately described the water retention curve (WRC for these soils, but not the hydraulic conductivity (K vs tension (h curve. The ROSETTA function failed in the estimation of these parameters. In summary, mean values of K0 ranged from 0.74 to 3.88 cm h-1. In studies on NT effects on soil physical properties, the crop effect must be considered.

  14. Influence of stone content on soil hydraulic properties: experimental investigation and test of existing model concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mahyar; Richter, Niels; Iden, Sascha C.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    . However, the effect on SHP could not be modelled by assuming stones to be simply impermeable objects that occupy a part of the soil space. This was indicated by a nonlinear increase of the van Genuchten shape parameter α and a decrease of n with increasing gravel content, the latter indicating a widening of the effective pore-size distribution. Saturated conductivity decreased with increasing stone content, but then steeply increased for stone contents > 40%. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves of stone-soil mixtures showed a less pronounced decrease with increasing suction as compared to the pure components, again indicating a widening of the effective pore-size distribution and a nonlinear dependence of the effective unsaturated conductivity on stone content.

  15. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity using soil morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Karahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been conducted to predict soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks by parametric soil properties such as bulk density and particle-size distribution. Although soil morphological properties have a strong effect on Ks, studies predicting Ks by soil morphological properties such as type, size, and strength of soil structure; type, orientation and quantity of soil pores and roots and consistency are rare. This study aimed at evaluating soil morphological properties to predict Ks. Undisturbed soil samples (15 cm length and 8.0 cm id. were collected from topsoil (0-15 cm and subsoil (15-30 cm (120 samples with a tractor operated soil sampler at sixty randomly selected sampling sites on a paddy field and an adjecent grassland in Central Anatolia (Cankırı, Turkey. Synchronized disturbed soil samples were taken from the same sampling sites and sampling depths for basic soil analyses. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured on the soil columns using a constant-head permeameter. Following the Ks measurements, the upper part of soil columns were covered to prevent evaporation and colums were left to drain in the laboratory. When the water flow through the column was stopped, a subsample were taken for bulk density and then soil columns were disturbed for describing the soil morphological properties. In addition, soil texture, bulk density, pH, field capacity, wilting point, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, aggregate stability, organic matter, and calcium carbonate were measured on the synchronized disturbed soil samples. The data were divided into training (80 data values and validation (40 data values sets. Measured values of Ks ranged from 0.0036 to 2.14 cmh-1 with a mean of 0.86 cmh-1. The Ks was predicted from the soil morphological and parametric properties by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Soil structure class, stickiness, pore-size, root-size, and pore-quantity contributed to the Ks prediction

  16. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  17. Novel evaporation experiment to determine soil hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel experimental approach to determine soil hydraulic material properties for the dry and very dry range is presented. Evaporation from the surface of a soil column is controlled by a constant flux of preconditioned air and the resulting vapour flux is measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The data are inverted under the assumptions that (i the simultaneous movement of water in the liquid and vapour is represented by Richards' equation with an effective hydraulic conductivity and that (ii the coupling between the soil and the well-mixed atmosphere can be modelled by a boundary layer with a constant transfer resistance. The optimised model fits the data exceptionally well. Remaining deviations during the initial phase of an experiment are thought to be well-understood and are attributed to the onset of the heat flow through the column which compensates the latent heat of evaporation.

  18. Kinematic Parameters Of Rotary Transmission With Hydraulic Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaschuk Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of designing drives, which provide low frequency (max. 1 rotation per minute rotation with a big moment (min 1 MN m of large technical bodies utilized in restricted spaces, is a complex and contradictory one. The drives of geokhod propeller, rotor actuators of tunneling machines with overload protection, as well as actuators of other machinery meeting aforementioned requirements are examples of such machines. The paper considers mathematical model developed by the authors which determines the relation of design factors of transmission tooled with hydraulic cylinders to kinematic parameters of output element movement. The paper also provides description of methods to determine pumping unit efficiency for rotary transmission tooled with hydraulic cylinders.

  19. Topological and fractal aspects of the main hydraulic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapin Anton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept of wetted cross-section, wetted perimeter and hydraulic radius seems fairly simple and clear, especially in the case of smooth boundaries of the flow. However, for the rough boundary surface covered with randomly arranged roughness the definition of the wetted cross-section as a normal to all elementary streams becomes notably problematic. More controversial seems the concept of wetted perimeter. This issue is of particular importance for the beds with high-dimensional roughness for which the geometric dimensions of the flow and the roughness elements are of the same order. The article shows that topological features of the boundary surfaces for the natural channels allow definitely refer them to fractals. Further study of the bed roughness based on its fractal nature can form a new approach to methodological soundness of main hydraulic parameters and open up new opportunities for their description.

  20. Effect of Soil Washing for Lead and Zinc Removal on Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Gerhard; Zupanc, Vesna; Gluhar, Simon; Lestan, Domen

    2017-04-01

    Soil washing as a metal pollution remediation process, especially part with intensive mixing of the soil slurry and soil compression after de-watering, significantly deteriorates physical properties of soil compared to those of non-remediated soil. Furthermore, changed physical characteristics of remediated soil influence interaction of plant roots with soil system and affect soil water regime. Remediated soils showed significant differences to their original state in water retention properties and changed structure due to the influence of artificial structure created during remediation process. Disturbed and undisturbed soil samples of remediated and original soils were analyzed. We evaluated soil hydraulic properties as a possible constraint for re-establishing soil structure and soil fertility after the remediation procedure.

  1. Impacts of Salinity on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Evaporation Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, V.; Cristi Matte, F.; Suarez, F. I.; Munoz, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Saline soils are common in arid zones, where evaporation from shallow groundwater is generally the main component of the water balance. Thus, to correctly manage water resources in these zones, it is important to quantify the evaporation fluxes. Evaporation from saline soils is a complex process that couples the movement of salts, heat, liquid water and water vapor, and strongly depends on the soil water content. Precipitation/dissolution reactions can change the soil structure and alter flow paths, modifying evaporation fluxes. We utilized the HYDRUS-1D model to investigate the effects of salinity on soil hydraulic properties and evaporation fluxes. HYDRUS-1D simulates the transport of liquid water, water vapor, and heat, and can incorporate precipitation/dissolution reactions of the major ions. To run the model, we determined the water retention curve for a soil with different salinities; and we used meteorological forcing from an experimental site from the Atacama Desert. It was found that higher sodium adsorption ratios in the soil increase the soil water retention capacity. Also, it was found that evaporation fluxes increase salts concentration near the soil surface, changing the soil's water retention capacity in that zone. Finally, movement of salts causes differences in evaporation fluxes. It is thus necessary to incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution reactions and its effects on the water retention curve to correctly simulate evaporation in saline soils

  2. Soil hydraulic properties of sphagnum moss and peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The moisture state of the vadose zone (acrotelm) of ombrotrophic peatlands decisively determines whether carbon is contained in soil organic matter or released to the atmosphere. As the pore space is variably saturated with water throughout the year, oxygen diffusion, heat, and solute transport and thus the redox state are a function of water content over time. For prediction purposes, the hydrological processes must be epitomised in computer models which establish a link between the terrestrial water cycle and the carbon cycle. This requires a proper representation of effective soil hydraulic properties which are a mandatory input to the Richards equation, the standard model for variably-saturated flow processes in porous media. By applying the Richards equation to peatlands, one assumes that the acrotelm can be conceptualised as a rigid porous material. To test this approximation and select the most adequate set of soil hydraulic property functions, we conducted a series of specifically designed laboratory evaporation experiments on sphagnum moss and decomposed sphagnum peat. Sampling was carried out in five centimeter depth increments of an ombrotrophic bog profile in the Harz mountains. We selected sphagnum moss as it is a predominant plant species colonising bogs of the Boreal. Inverse modelling was used to test the adequacy of different parameterizations of soil hydraulic property functions. We used pressure head data measured by two tensiometers in the objective function to identify soil hydraulic properties. The Richards equation was used as process model. We critically assess the applicability of the van Genuchten/Mualem model, which finds frequent application in peatland hydrology, and discuss alternatives which account for (1) multimodal pore size distributions, (2) physical plausibility towards the dry end, (3) capillary and non-capillary storage and flow, and (4) isothermal flow of water vapour. Finally, our results indicate that applying the Richards

  3. Impacts of Evaporation from Saline Soils on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Water Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, V.; Hernandez, M. F.; Braud, I.; Cristi Matte, F.; Hausner, M. B.; Suarez, F. I.; Munoz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Saline soils are common in arid zones, where evaporation from shallow groundwater is generally the major component of the water balance. Thus, accurate quantification of soil water evaporation is crucial to improve water resource management in these regions. Evaporation from saline soils is a complex process that couples the movement of salts, heat, liquid water and water vapor. Precipitation/dissolution reactions can alter the soil structure and modify flow paths. The impact of evaporation from shallow groundwater on soil properties and water fluxes poses a major hydrologic challenge that remains to be answered. As a preliminary approach to consider these effects, we used the SiSPAT model (Simple Soil Plant Atmospheric Transfer) to represent the movement of liquid water and water vapor in a saline soil column subjected to two groundwater levels under nonisothermal conditions. To parameterize the model, we determined the hydraulic properties of the soil before performing the soil column experiments. When the SiSPAT model was run using uniform and constant hydraulic properties, it was unable to predict the moisture and thermal profiles, or the cumulative evaporation. This inability to reproduce the observed data is most likely due to alterations of the soil structure as a result of precipitation/dissolution reactions. When the soil hydraulic properties were allowed to vary in space, the model reproduced the experimental data successfully, suggesting that the structure of the initially homogeneous soil column was modified. It is thus necessary to incorporate salt precipitation to correctly simulate evaporation in saline soils.

  4. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) in relation to some soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the study showed that the particle size fractions of the soils varied from sandy loam to clay loam. Bulk density and particle density were low to moderate with mean values of 1.44 gcm-3 and 2.34 gcm-3. Total porosity was low with mean value of 38.06% and a coefficient of variation of 9.56%. Saturated hydraulic ...

  5. Interrelations among the soil-water retention, hydraulic conductivity, and suction-stress characteristic curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The three fundamental constitutive relations that describe fluid flow, strength, and deformation behavior of variably saturated soils are the soil-water retention curve (SWRC), hydraulic conductivity function (HCF), and suction-stress characteristic curve (SSCC). Until recently, the interrelations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC have not been well established. This work sought experimental confirmation of interrelations among these three constitutive functions. Results taken from the literature for six soils and those obtained for 11 different soils were used. Using newly established analytical relations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC and these test results, the authors showed that these three constitutive relations can be defined by a common set of hydromechanical parameters. The coefficient of determination for air-entry pressures determined independently using hydraulic and mechanical methods is >0.99, >0.98 for the pore size parameter, and 0.94 for the residual degree of saturation. One practical implication is that one of any of the four experiments (axis-translation, hydraulic, shear-strength, or deformation) is sufficient to quantify all three constitutive relations.

  6. Estimation of the water retention curve from the soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity in an upward infiltration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret-Fernández, David; Angulo, Marta; Latorre, Borja; González-Cebollada, César; López, María Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Determination of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, and the α and n parameters of the van Genuchten (1980) water retention curve, θ(h), are fundamental to fully understand and predict soil water distribution. This work presents a new procedure to estimate the soil hydraulic properties from the inverse analysis of a single cumulative upward infiltration curve followed by an overpressure step at the end of the wetting process. Firstly, Ks is calculated by the Darcy's law from the overpressure step. The soil sorptivity (S) is then estimated using the Haverkamp et al., (1994) equation. Next, a relationship between α and n, f(α,n), is calculated from the estimated Sand Ks. The α and n values are finally obtained by the inverse analysis of the experimental data after applying the f(α,n) relationship to the HYDRUS-1D model. The method was validated on theoretical synthetic curves for three different soils (sand, loam and clay), and subsequently tested on experimental sieved soils (sand, loam, clay loam and clay) of known hydraulic properties. A robust relationship was observed between the theoretical α and nvalues (R2 > 0.99) of the different synthetic soils and those estimated from inverse analysis of the upward infiltration curve. Consistent results were also obtained for the experimental soils (R2 > 0.85). These results demonstrated that this technique allowed accurate estimates of the soil hydraulic properties for a wide range of textures, including clay soils.

  7. Effect of polyacrylamide on soil physical and hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalasmeh, Ammar; Gharaibeh, Mamoun; Hamdan, Enas

    2017-04-01

    The effect of polyacrylamide (PAM), as a soil conditioner, on selected soil physical and hydraulic properties (infiltration rate (f(t)), hydraulic conductivity (HC), soil moisture content, aggregate stability (AS), and soil aggregation) was studied. Two types of anionic PAM were used: Low molecular weight (LPAM) (1×105 g/mol) with medium charge density (33-43) and high molecular weight (HPAM) (1-6×106 g/mol) with medium charge density (33-43). Sandy loam soil was packed into plastic columns; PAM solutions at different concentrations (100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg L-1) were used every two weeks in four wetting and drying cycles. The highest infiltration rate value was 0.16 mm s-1 at 1000 mg/L low molecular weight PAM while the highest value of infiltration rate in high PAM molecular weight was 0.11 mm s-1 compared to the control (0.01 mm s-1). Soil HC was about 3.00 cm h-1 for LPAM at 1000 mg L-1 PAM, while the highest value for HPAM was about 2 cm h-1 for the same concentration, compared to the control. The amount of water that can be held by soil increased with the addition of PAM compared to the control. Differences in water content were more pronounced in LPAM compared to HPAM. The addition of LPAM increased aggregate stability proportional to PAM concentration. Moreover, 1000 mg L-1 produced the highest aggregate stability (19{%}) compared to HPAM and control (7{%} and 5{%}), respectively. As PAM concentration increased, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) increased for both PAM molecular weights compared to control (0.4 mm). At 1000 mg L-1 the GMD values were 0.88 mm and 0.79 mm for LPAM and HPAM, respectively. The addition of PAM improved soil physical and hydraulic properties, with an advantage to LPAM owing that to its ability to penetrate soil aggregates and therefore stabilizing them.

  8. Effect of unrepresented model errors on estimated soil hydraulic material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    Unrepresented model errors influence the estimation of effective soil hydraulic material properties. As the required model complexity for a consistent description of the measurement data is application dependent and unknown a priori, we implemented a structural error analysis based on the inversion of increasingly complex models. We show that the method can indicate unrepresented model errors and quantify their effects on the resulting material properties. To this end, a complicated 2-D subsurface architecture (ASSESS) was forced with a fluctuating groundwater table while time domain reflectometry (TDR) and hydraulic potential measurement devices monitored the hydraulic state. In this work, we analyze the quantitative effect of unrepresented (i) sensor position uncertainty, (ii) small scale-heterogeneity, and (iii) 2-D flow phenomena on estimated soil hydraulic material properties with a 1-D and a 2-D study. The results of these studies demonstrate three main points: (i) the fewer sensors are available per material, the larger is the effect of unrepresented model errors on the resulting material properties. (ii) The 1-D study yields biased parameters due to unrepresented lateral flow. (iii) Representing and estimating sensor positions as well as small-scale heterogeneity decreased the mean absolute error of the volumetric water content data by more than a factor of 2 to 0. 004.

  9. Two and Three-Phases Fractal Models Application in Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELNAZ Rezaei abajelu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil Hydraulic conductivity is considered as one of the most important hydraulic properties in water and solutionmovement in porous media. In recent years, variousmodels as pedo-transfer functions, fractal models and scaling technique are used to estimate the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks. Fractal models with two subset of two (solid and pore and three phases (solid, pore and soil fractal (PSF are used to estimate the fractal dimension of soil particles. The PSF represents a generalization of the solid and pore mass fractal models. The PSF characterizes both the solid and pore phases of the porous material. It also exhibits self-similarity to some degree, in the sense that where local structure seems to be similar to the whole structure.PSF models can estimate interface fractal dimension using soil pore size distribution data (PSD and soil moisture retention curve (SWRC. The main objective of this study was to evaluate different fractal models to estimate the Ksparameter. Materials and Methods: The Schaapetal data was used in this study. The complex consists of sixty soil samples. Soil texture, soil bulk density, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil particle size distribution curve were measured by hydrometer method, undistributed soil sample, constant head method and wet sieve method, respectively for all soil samples.Soil water retention curve were determined by using pressure plates apparatus.The Ks parameter could be estimated by Ralws model as a function of fractal dimension by seven fractal models. Fractal models included Fuentes at al. (1996, Hunt and Gee (2002, Bird et al. (2000, Huang and Zhang (2005, Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990, Kutlu et al. (2008, Sepaskhah and Tafteh (2013.Therefore The Ks parameter can be estimated as a function of the DS (fractal dimension by seven fractal models (Table 2.Sensitivity analysis of Rawls model was assessed by making changes±10%, ±20% and±30%(in input parameters

  10. Multi-scale hydraulic pedotransfer functions for Hungarian soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.

    2003-01-01

    Water and nutrient balance are among the main concerns about the sustainability of our soils. Numerous computer models have been developed to simulate soil water and solute transport and plant growth. However, use of these models has often been limited by lack of accurate input parameters. Often,

  11. Prediction of the saturated hydraulic conductivity from Brooks and Corey’s water retention parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasta, P.; Vrugt, J.A.; Romano, N.

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of flow through variably saturated porous media requires accurate knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties, namely the water retention function (WRF) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). Unfortunately, direct measurement of the HCF is time consuming and expensive. In this

  12. Measuring lateral saturated soil hydraulic conductivity at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Marrosu, Roberto; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Among the soil hydraulic properties, saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks, is particularly important since it controls many hydrological processes. Knowledge of this soil property allows estimation of dynamic indicators of the soil's ability to transmit water down to the root zone. Such dynamic indicators are valuable tools to quantify land degradation and developing 'best management' land use practice (Castellini et al., 2016; Iovino et al., 2016). In hillslopes, lateral saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks,l, is a key factor since it controls subsurface flow. However, Ks,l data collected by point-scale measurements, including infiltrations tests, could be unusable for interpreting field hydrological processes and particularly subsurface flow in hillslopes. Therefore, they are generally not representative of subsurface processes at hillslope-scale due mainly to soil heterogeneities and the unknown total extent and connectivity of macropore network in the porous medium. On the other hand, large scale Ks,l measurements, which allow to average soil heterogeneities, are difficult and costly, thus remain rare. Reliable Ks,l values should be measured on a soil volume similar to the representative elementary volume (REV) in order to incorporate the natural heterogeneity of the soil. However, the REV may be considered site-specific since it is expected to increase for soils with macropores (Brooks et al., 2004). In this study, laboratory and in-situ Ks,l values are compared in order to detect the dependency Ks,l from the spatial scale of investigation. The research was carried out at a hillslope located in the Baratz Lake watershed, in northwest Sardinia, Italy, characterized by degraded vegetation (grassland established after fire or clearing of the maquis). The experimental area is about 60 m long, with an extent of approximately 2000 m2, and a mean slope of 30%. The soil depth is about 35 to 45 cm. The parent material is a very dense grayish, altered

  13. Hydraulic characterization of a sealed loamy soil in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Vincenzo; Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Guaitoli, Fabio; Iovino, Massimo; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Water infiltration measurements constitute a common way for an indirect characterization of sealed/crusted soils (Alagna et al., 2013). The Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer (BEST) parameters procedure by Lassabatere et al. (2006) is very attractive for practical use since it allows an estimation of both the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions. The BEST method considers certain analytical formulae for the hydraulic characteristic curves and estimates their shape parameters, which are texture dependent, from particle-size analysis by physical-empirical pedotransfer functions. Structure dependent scale parameters are estimated by a beerkan experiment, i.e. a three-dimensional (3D) field infiltration experiment at ideally zero pressure head. BEST substantially facilitates the hydraulic characterization of unsaturated soils, and it is gaining popularity in soil science (Bagarello et al., 2014a; Di Prima, 2015; Di Prima et al., 2016b). Bagarello et al. (2014b) proposed a beerkan derived procedure to explain surface runoff and disturbance phenomena at the soil surface occurring during intense rainfall events. Di Prima et al. (2016a) applied this methodology in a vineyard with a sandy-loam texture. These authors compared this simple methodology with rainfall simulation experiments establishing a physical link between the two methodologies through the kinetic energy of the rainfall and the gravitational potential energy of the water used for the beerkan runs. They also indirectly demonstrated the occurrence of a certain degree of compaction and mechanical breakdown using a minidisk infiltrometer (Decagon, 2014). With this device, they reported a reduction of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by 2.3 times, due to the seal formation. The ability of the BEST method to distinguish between crusted and non-crusted soils was demonstrated by Souza et al. (2014). However, the potential of the beerkan runs to detect the effect of the seal on flow and

  14. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mossadeghi-Björklund Mona; Arvidsson Johan; Keller Thomas; Koestel John; Lamandé Mathieu; Larsbo Mats; Jarvis Nick

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites in the following...

  15. Hydraulic Conductivity of a Silty Sand Obtained from the Soil Water Characteristic Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallegos-Fonseca G.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the determination of the hydraulic conductivity of a silty sand (SM, according to USCS. For this purpose, the soil water characteristic curve at drying and wetting was first determined. Then, these curves were adjusted using the Fredlund and Xing model and finally the hydraulic conductivity of the soil for both paths was obtained.

  16. Effects of hedgerow systems on soil moisture and unsaturated hydraulics conductivity measured by the Libardi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S . Prijono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hedgerow systems are the agroforestry practices suggesting any positive impacts and negative impacts on soil characteristics. This study evaluated the effects of hedgerows on the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil with the Libardi method approach. This study was conducted in North Lampung for 3 months on the hedgerow plots of Peltophorum dassyrachis (P, Gliricidia sepium (G, and without hedgerow plot (K, with four replications. Each plot was watered as much as 150 liters of water until saturated, then the soil surface were covered with the plastic film. Observation of soil moisture content was done to a depth of 70 cm by the 10 cm intervals. Soil moisture content was measured using the Neutron probe that was calibrated to get the value of volumetric water content. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil was calculated by using the Libardi Equation. Data were tested using the analysis of variance, the least significant different test (LSD, Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT, correlation and regression analysis. The results showed that the hedgerow significantly affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Soil moisture content on the hedgerow plots was lower than the control plots. The value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the hedgerow plots was higher than the control plots. Different types of hedgerows affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The positive correlation was found between the volumetric soil moisture content and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil.

  17. Inverse modelling in estimating soil hydraulic functions: a Genetic Algorithm approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. M. Ines

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The practical application of simulation models in the field is sometimes hindered by the difficulty of deriving the soil hydraulic properties of the study area. The procedure so-called inverse modelling has been investigated in many studies to address the problem where most of the studies were limited to hypothetical soil profile and soil core samples in the laboratory. Often, the numerical approach called forward-backward simulation is employed to generate synthetic data then added with random errors to mimic the real-world condition. Inverse modelling is used to backtrack the expected values of the parameters. This study explored the potential of a Genetic Algorithm (GA to estimate inversely the soil hydraulic functions in the unsaturated zone. Lysimeter data from a wheat experiment in India were used in the analysis. Two cases were considered: (1 a numerical case where the forward-backward approach was employed and (2 the experimental case where the real data from the lysimeter experiment were used. Concurrently, the use of soil water, evapotranspiration (ET and the combination of both were investigated as criteria in the inverse modelling. Results showed that using soil water as a criterion provides more accurate parameter estimates than using ET. However, from a practical point of view, ET is more attractive as it can be obtained with reasonable accuracy on a regional scale from remote sensing observations. The experimental study proved that the forward-backward approach does not take into account the effects of model errors. The formulation of the problem is found to be critical for a successful parameter estimation. The sensitivity of parameters to the objective function and their zone of influence in the soil column are major determinants in the solution. Generally, their effects sometimes lead to non-uniqueness in the solution but to some extent are partly handled by GA. Overall, it was concluded that the GA approach is promising to the

  18. Effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil hydraulic properties of an artificial sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar, a product of the pyrolysis of biomass, has become an increasingly studied subject of interest as an agricultural soil amendment to address issues of carbon emission, population density, and food scarcity. Biochar has been reported to increase content and retention of nutrients, pH, cation-exchange capacity, vegetative growth, microbial community, and carbon sequestration. A number of studies addressing the usefulness of biochar as a soil amendment have focused on chemical and biological properties, disregarding the effects on soil physical properties of amended soil. Aside from biochar, lime (calcium carbonate) addition to soils has also been utilized in agricultural practices, typically to raise the pH value of acidic soils, increase microbial activity, and enhance soil stability and productivity as a result. Both biochar and lime amendments may be beneficial in increasing the soil physical properties, particularly through the formation of aggregates. In previous studies an increase in soil particle aggregates resulted in higher rates of biological activity, infiltration rates, pore space, and aeration, all of which are a measure of soil quality. While the effectiveness of biochar and lime as soil amendments has been independently documented, their combined effectiveness on soil physical properties is less understood. This study aims to provide a further understanding on the effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil particle aggregation and hydraulic properties of a low reactive pre-limed artificial sandy soil with and without microbial communities. Microbial communities are known to increase soil aggregates by acting as cementing agents. Understanding the impact of biochar addition on soil physical properties will have implications in the development of sustainable agricultural practices, especially in systems undergoing climate stress and intensive agriculture.

  19. Using Remotely-Sensed Estimates of Soil Moisture to Infer Soil Texture and Hydraulic Properties across a Semi-arid Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Garcia, Matthew E.; Mocko, David M.; Tischler, Michael A.; Moran, M. Susan; Thoma, D. P.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface soil moisture is a critical component of land surface energy and water balance studies encompassing a wide range of disciplines. However, the processes of infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration in the vadose zone of the soil are not easy to quantify or predict because of the difficulty in accurately representing soil texture and hydraulic properties in land surface models. This study approaches the problem of parameterizing soils from a unique perspective based on components originally developed for operational estimation of soil moisture for mobility assessments. Estimates of near-surface soil moisture derived from passive (L-band) microwave remote sensing were acquired on six dates during the Monsoon '90 experiment in southeastern Arizona, and used to calibrate hydraulic properties in an offline land surface model and infer information on the soil conditions of the region. Specifically, a robust parameter estimation tool (PEST) was used to calibrate the Noah land surface model and run at very high spatial resolution across the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed. Errors in simulated versus observed soil moisture were minimized by adjusting the soil texture, which in turn controls the hydraulic properties through the use of pedotransfer functions. By estimating a continuous range of widely applicable soil properties such as sand, silt, and clay percentages rather than applying rigid soil texture classes, lookup tables, or large parameter sets as in previous studies, the physical accuracy and consistency of the resulting soils could then be assessed. In addition, the sensitivity of this calibration method to the number and timing of microwave retrievals is determined in relation to the temporal patterns in precipitation and soil drying. The resultant soil properties were applied to an extended time period demonstrating the improvement in simulated soil moisture over that using default or county-level soil parameters. The methodology is also

  20. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Paulo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical non-equilibrium dual-porosity type formulation for solute transport. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach was used in which the unknown parameters were estimated with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method through implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Sensitivity coefficients were examined in order to determine the most meaningful measurements for identifying the unknown hydraulic and transport parameters. Results obtained using the measured pressure head and solute concentration data collected during the unsaturated soil column experiment revealed the robustness of the proposed approach.

  1. Identification of Physical Parameters for A Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application of the laws of physics...

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Analysis for Regulatory Parameters - A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is a progress report on the analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for regulatory compounds outlined in the various US EPA methodologies. Fracturing fluids vary significantly in consistency and viscosity prior to fracturing. Due to the nature of the fluids the analytical challenges will have to be addressed. This presentation also outlines the sampling issues associated with the collection of dissolved gas samples.

  3. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine waterbalance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schwaerzel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which reduces both time and financial effort significantly. The method was applied on several sites in the Rhinluch, a fen peat land 60 km northwest of Berlin, Germany. Over a two-year period, upward capillary flow and evapotranspiration rates under grassland with different groundwater levels were measured. The installation of tensiometers and TDR probes additionally allowed the in situ determination of the soil hydraulic properties (water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of the measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity demonstrate that more than one single method has to be applied if the whole range of the conductivity function from saturation to highly unsaturated is to be covered. Measuring the unsaturated conductivity can be done only in the lab for an adequately wide range of soil moisture conditions. Keywords: peat soils, soil hydraulic properties, evapotranspiration, capillary flow, root distribution, unsaturated zone

  4. Mapping of Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Navroud-Assalem Watershed in Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Khaledian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With increasing awareness of human beings towards the environment, researchers pay more attention to process and redistribution of water flow and solute transport in the soil and groundwater. Moreover, determination of soil hydraulic conductivity is necessary to determine the runoff from basins. Water movement within the unsaturated zone is often described by the formulae proposed by Richards. To solve this equation, initial and boundary conditions of the hydraulic conductivity and the soil water pressure should be determined as functions of soil water content. Beerkan method was developed to identify retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. In this method, van Gunechten with Burdine condition and Brooks and Corey equations were used to describe water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. Recognition of the spatial pattern of studied parameter using semivariogram and then preparing zoning map with interpolation methods such as IDW and kriging can help us in relevant watershed management. The aim of this study was to spatial analyze of saturated hydraulic conductivity from 50 infiltration tests at watershed scale using Beerkan method and then preparing zoning map for the Navroud watershed. Materials and Methods: Navroud-Assalem watershed with an area of about 307 km2 is located in the west part of Guilan province, within the city of Talesh. Of the total watershed area of Navroud, about 41 km2 is plains and the rest of it is about 266 km2, corresponding to the mountainous area. The study area includes an area with a height above 130 m. In order to complete the database of the studied watershed the present study was designed to assess soil saturated hydraulic conductivity. In this study, a 2×2 km network was designed in Navroud watershed with a surface area of 307 km2, and then infiltration tests were carried out in each node using single ring of Beerkan. Beerkan method derives shape parameters from particle

  5. Improvement of Hydraulic and Water Quality Renovation Functions by Intermittent Aeration of Soil Treatment Areas in Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Kalen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested intermittent aeration of the soil treatment area (STA of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS for its ability to restore and maintain STA hydraulic flow and improve the water quality functions of conventional OWTS. Evaluation was conducted on hydraulically-failed conventional OWTS at three state-owned medical group homes in Washington County, RI, USA. Testing was conducted in two phases, with Phase I (before intermittent soil aeration (ISA comprising the first 6 months of the study, and Phase II (during ISA the remaining 7 months. Intermittent soil aeration restored STA hydraulic function in all three systems despite a marked reduction in the STA total infiltrative surface. Soil pore water was collected from 30 and 90 cm below the STA during both phases and analyzed for standard wastewater parameters. Although the STA infiltrative surface was reduced—and the contaminant load per unit of area increased—after installation of the ISA system, no differences were observed between phases in concentration of total N, NO3, total P, or dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Apparent removal rates—which do not account for dilution or differences in infiltrative area—for total N, total P, and DOC remained the same or improved during Phase II relative to the pre-operation phase. Furthermore, intermittent soil aeration enhanced actual removal rates —which do account for dilution and differences in infiltrative area. The effects of ISA on actual removal of contaminants from STE increased with increasing hydraulic load—a counterintuitive phenomenon, but one that has been previously observed in laboratory studies. The results of our study suggest that intermittent soil aeration can restore and maintain hydraulic flow in the STA and enhance carbon and nutrient removal in conventional OWTS.

  6. DEFINITION OF OPERATING PARAMETERS OUTPUT RANGE OF FUNCTIONAL SUBSYSTEMS HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS OF THE AIRCRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bobrin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the operational tolerance field hydraulic output parameters under various working conditions and the flight stages are mathematical relationships and the results obtained in the environment Mathcad in graphical form.

  7. Impact of land management on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodesova, Radka; Jirku, Veronika; Nikodem, Antonin; Muhlhanselova, Marcela; Zigova, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Study is focused on a comparison of a soil structure and soil hydraulic properties within soil profiles of a same soil type under different land management. Study was performed in Haplic Luvisol in Hnevceves the Czech Republic. Two soil profiles, which were in close distance from each other, were chosen: 1. under the conventional tillage, 2. under the permanent (30 years) grass cover. Soil sampling and field experiments were carried out immediately after the harvest of winter barley in 2008. The micromorphological images were used to evaluate the soil structure of all Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C diagnostic horizons. The hydraulic properties of the diagnostic horizons were studied in the laboratory using multistep outflow experiments performed on the undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples. A tension disc infiltrometer (with a disc radius of 10 cm) and minidisc tension infiltrometers (with a disc radius of 2.2 cm) were used to measure cumulative water infiltration under unsaturated conditions created using a pressure head of -2 cm. Measurements were performed at a depths of 5, 45, 75 and 110 cm, which corresponded to the Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C horizons of studied Haplic Luvisol at both locations. The Guelph permeameter was used to measure cumulative water flux under surface ponding conditions. The depth of the drilled well was 10, 50, 80 and 115 cm, the well radius was 3 cm, and the well ponding depth was 5 cm. Both tests were used to evaluate hydraulic conductivity (K for h=-2cm, and Ks) values. Results showed, that while properties in the Bt2 and C horizons of both soil profiles were relatively similar, properties in the Ap and Bt1 horizons were different. The fraction of gravitational pores (which may cause preferential flow) in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the convectional tillage was large than those in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the permanent grass. This influenced for instance the Ks values measured using the Guelph permeametr. The Ks

  8. Evaluating lysimeter drainage against soil deep percolation modeled with profile soil moisture, field tracer propagation, and lab measured soil hydraulic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Vicente; Thomsen, Anton Gårde; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    them have been reported. To compare among methods, one year of four large-scale lysimeters drainage (D) was evaluated against modeled soil deep percolation using either profile soil moisture, bromide breakthrough curves from suction cups, or measured soil hydraulic properties in the laboratory...... model using field q, and 572 mm with the laboratory measured soil hydraulic properties. In conclusion, lysimeters presented the lowest D and can be considered as a lower bound for D; whereas either laboratory measured soil hydraulic properties or models calibrated with profile soil moisture yielded....... Measured volumetric soil water content (q) was 3-4% higher inside lysimeters than in the field probably due to a zero tension lower boundary condition inside lysimeters. D from soil hydraulic properties measured in the laboratory resulted in a 15% higher evapotranspiration and 12% lower drainage...

  9. Development and use of a database of hydraulic properties of European soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, J.H.M.; Nemes, A.; Lilly, A.; Bas, Le C.

    1999-01-01

    Many environmental studies on the protection of European soil and water resources make use of soil water simulation models. A major obstacle to the wider application of these models is the lack of easily accessible and representative soil hydraulic properties. In order to overcome this apparent lack

  10. Modeling Hydraulic Properties and Hydrologic Processes in Shrink-swell Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Abou Najm, M. R.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recognizing the need for tractable models that accurately describe the hydrologic behaviors of shrink-swell soils, we propose a new conceptual model that identifies up to five porosity domains based on morphological and hydrological distinctions. We provide governing equations that predict the porosity distribution as a function of soil water content and six additional parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory measurements conducted on individual soil samples. We next derive new expressions for the hydraulic properties of such soils, which can be used to model infiltration at the plot scale. Finally, we incorporate these expressions into new models that can be used to predict and quantify surface runoff (i.e., overland flow) thresholds, and which may be used to reveal the dominant mechanisms by which water moves through clayey soils. Altogether, these models successfully link small-scale shrinkage/swelling behaviors with large-scale processes, and can be applied to such practical applications as converting measurements between gravimetric and volumetric water contents, as well as to predicting field-scale processes such as the sealing of individual cracks.

  11. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of US soils grouped according textural class and bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Importance of the saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil hydraulic property led to the development of multiple pedotransfer functions for estimating it. One approach to estimating Ksat was using textural classes rather than specific textural fraction contents as pedotransfer inputs. The objective...

  12. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of US soils grouped according to textural class and bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Importance of the saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil hydraulic property led to the development of multiple pedotransfer functions for estimating it. One approach to estimating Ksat was using textural classes rather than specific textural fraction contents as pedotransfer inputs. The objective...

  13. Sample dimensions effect on prediction of soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC) are key hydraulic properties for unsaturated zone hydrology and groundwater. Not only are the SWRC and SHC measurements time-consuming, their results are scale dependent. Although prediction of the SWRC and SHC from availab...

  14. Understanding the influence of biofilm accumulation on the hydraulic properties of soils: a mechanistic approach based on experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Freixa, Anna; Romaní, Anna M.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The distribution, amount, and characteristics of biofilms and its components govern the capacity of soils to let water through, to transport solutes, and the reactions occurring. Therefore, unraveling the relationship between microbial dynamics and the hydraulic properties of soils is of concern for the management of natural systems and many technological applications. However, the increased complexity of both the microbial communities and the geochemical processes entailed by them causes that the phenomenon of bioclogging remains poorly understood. This highlights the need for a better understanding of the microbial components such as live and dead bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), as well as of their spatial distribution. This work tries to shed some light on these issues, providing experimental data and a new mechanistic model that predicts the variably saturated hydraulic properties of bio-amended soils based on these data. We first present a long-term laboratory infiltration experiment that aims at studying the temporal variation of selected biogeochemical parameters along the infiltration path. The setup consists of a 120-cm-high soil tank instrumented with an array of sensors plus soil and liquid samplers. Sensors measured a wide range of parameters in continuous, such as volumetric water content, electrical conductivity, temperature, water pressure, soil suction, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Samples were kept for chemical and biological analyses. Results indicate that: i) biofilm is present at all depths, denoting the potential for deep bioclogging, ii) the redox conditions profile shows different stages, indicating that the community was adapted to changing redox conditions, iii) bacterial activity, richness and diversity also exhibit zonation with depth, and iv) the hydraulic properties of the soil experienced significant changes as biofilm proliferated. Based on experimental evidences, we propose a tool to predict changes in the

  15. Dynamic Characteristics of Communication Lines with Distributed Parameters to Control the Throttle-controlled Hydraulic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Popov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a mathematical model of the hydraulic line for remote control of electro-hydraulic servo drive (EHSD with throttle control. This type of hydraulic lines is designed as a backup to replace the electrical connections, which are used to control EHSD being remote from the site with devices located to form the control signals of any object. A disadvantage of electric connections is that they are sensitive to magnetic fields and thereby do not provide the required reliability of the remote control. Hydraulic lines have no this disadvantage and therefore are used in aircraft and other industrial systems. However, dynamic characteristics of hydraulic systems still have been investigated insufficiently in the case of transmitting control signals at a distance at which the signal may be distorted when emerging the wave processes.The article results of mathematical simulation, which are verified through physical experimentation, largely eliminate the shortcomings of said information.The mathematical model described in the paper is based on the theory of unsteady pressure compressible fluids. In the model there are formulas that provide calculation of frequency characteristics of the hydraulic lines under hydraulic oscillations of the laminar flow parameters of viscous fluid.A real mock-up of the system under consideration and an experimental ad hoc unit are used to verify the results of mathematically simulated hydraulic systems.Calculated logarithmic amplitude and phase frequency characteristics compared with those obtained experimentally prove, under certain conditions, the proposed theoretical method of calculation. These conditions have to ensure compliance with initial parameters of fluid defined under stationary conditions. The applied theory takes into consideration a non-stationary hydraulic resistance of the line when calculating frequency characteristics.The scientific novelty in the article material is presented in

  16. Coevolution of hydraulic, soil and vegetation processes in estuarine wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivisonno, Franco; Rodriguez, Jose F.; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia; Stenta, Hernan

    2014-05-01

    Estuarine wetlands of south eastern Australia, typically display a vegetation zonation with a sequence mudflats - mangrove forest - saltmarsh plains from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient. Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitats for fish and many terrestrial species. They also have a carbon sequestration capacity that surpasess terrestrial forest. Estuarine wetlands respond to sea-level rise by vertical accretion and horizontal landward migration, in order to maintain their position in the tidal frame. In situations in which buffer areas for landward migration are not available, saltmarsh can be lost due to mangrove encroachment. As a result of mangrove invasion associated in part with raising estuary water levels and urbanisation, coastal saltmarsh in parts of south-eastern Australia has been declared an endangered ecological community. Predicting estuarine wetlands response to sea-level rise requires modelling the coevolving dynamics of water flow, soil and vegetation. This paper presents preliminary results of our recently developed numerical model for wetland dynamics in wetlands of the Hunter estuary of NSW. The model simulates continuous tidal inflow into the wetland, and accounts for the effect of varying vegetation types on flow resistance. Coevolution effects appear as vegetation types are updated based on their preference to prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. The model also considers that accretion values vary with vegetation type. Simulations are driven using local information collected over several years, which includes estuary water levels, accretion rates, soil carbon content, flow resistance and vegetation preference to hydraulic conditions. Model results predict further saltmarsh loss under current conditions of moderate increase of estuary water levels.

  17. Hydraulic Conductivity of a Silty Sand Obtained from the Soil Water Characteristic Curve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallegos-Fonseca G; Leal-Vaca J.C; Rojas-González E

    2011-01-01

    This work shows the determination of the hydraulic conductivity of a silty sand (SM), according to USCS. For this purpose, the soil water characteristic curve at drying and wetting was first determined...

  18. Estimation of Field-scale Aquifer Hydraulic and Sorption Parameters Based on Borehole Spectral Gamma Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, A. L.; Draper, K.; Hasan, N.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of spatially variable aquifer hydraulic and sorption parameters is a pre-requisite for an improved understanding of the transport and spreading of sorbing solutes and for the development of effective strategies for remediation. Local-scale estimates of these parameters are often derived from core measurements but are typically not representative of field values. Fields-scale estimates are typically derived from pump and tracer tests but often lack the spatial resolution necessary to deconvolve the effects of fine-scale heterogeneities. Geophysical methods have the potential to bridge this gap both in terms of coverage and resolution, provided meaningful petrophysical relationships can be developed. The objective of this study was to develop a petrophysical relationship between soil textural attributes and the gamma-energy response of natural sediments. Measurements from Hanford’s 300 Area show the best model to be a linear relationship between 232Th concentration and clay content (R2 = 94%). This relationship was used to generate a 3-D distribution of clay mass fraction based on borehole spectral gamma logs. The distribution of clay was then used to predict distributions of permeability, porosity, bubbling pressure, and the pore-size distribution index, all of which are required for predicting variably saturated flow, as well as the specific surface area and cation exchange capacity needed for reactive transport predictions. With this approach, it is possible to obtain reliable estimates of hydraulic properties in zones that could not be characterized by field or laboratory measurements. The spatial distribution of flow properties is consistent with lithologic transitions inferred from geologist’s logs. A preferential flow path, identified from solute and heat tracer experiments and attributed to an erosional incision in the low-permeability Ringold Formation, is also evident. The resulting distributions can be used as a starting model for the

  19. Treated wastewater irrigation effects on soil hydraulic conductivity and aggregate stability of loamy soils in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schacht Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of treated wastewater (TWW for agricultural irrigation becomes increasingly important in water stressed regions like the Middle East for substituting fresh water (FW resources. Due to elevated salt concentrations and organic compounds in TWW this practice has potential adverse effects on soil quality, such as the reduction of hydraulic conductivity (HC and soil aggregate stability (SAS. To assess the impact of TWW irrigation in comparison to FW irrigation on HC, in-situ infiltration measurements using mini disk infiltrometer were deployed in four different long-term experimental orchard test sites in Israel. Topsoil samples (0-10 cm were collected for analyzing SAS and determination of selected soil chemical and physical characteristics.

  20. Inference of soil hydrologic parameters from electronic soil moisture records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture is an important control on hydrologic function, as it governs vertical fluxes from and to the atmosphere, groundwater recharge, and lateral fluxes through the soil. Historically, the traditional model parameters of saturation, field capacity, and permanent wilting point have been deter...

  1. The perceptual trap: Experimental and modelling examples of soil moisture, hydraulic conductivity and response units in complex subsurface settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Demand, Dominic; Allroggen, Niklas; Loritz, Ralf; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    In order to discuss hypothesis testing in hydrology, the question of the solid foundation of such tests has to be answered. But how certain are we about our measurements of the components of the water balance and the states and dynamics of the complex systems? What implicit assumptions or bias are already embedded in our perception of the processes? How can we find light in the darkness of heterogeneity? We will contribute examples from experimental findings, modelling approaches and landscape analysis to the discussion. Example soil moisture and the soil continuum: The definition of soil moisture as fraction of water in the porous medium assumes locally well-mixed conditions. Moreover, a unique relation of soil water retention presumes instant local thermodynamic equilibrium in the pore water arrangement. We will show findings from soil moisture responses to precipitation events, from irrigation experiments, and from a model study of initial infiltration velocities. The results highlight, that the implicit assumption relating soil moisture state dynamics with actual soil water flow is biased towards the slow end of the actual velocity distribution and rather blind for preferential flow acting in a very small proportion of the pore space. Moreover, we highlight the assumption of a well-defined continuum during the extrapolation of point-scale measurements and why spatially and temporally continuous observation techniques of soil water states are essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. Example hydraulic conductivity: Hydraulic conductivity lies at the heart of hydrological research and modelling. Its values can range across several orders of magnitude at a single site alone. Yet, we often consider it a crisp, effective parameter. We have conducted measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity in the lab and in the field. Moreover, we assessed infiltration capacity and conducted plot-scale irrigation experiments to

  2. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation of field-scale soil hydraulic and dielectric parametersthrough joint inversion of GPR and hydrological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Finsterle, Stefan; Peterson, John; Hubbard,Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Majer, Ernest; Ward, Andy; Gee, Glendon

    2005-05-05

    A method is described for jointly using time-lapse multiple-offset cross-borehole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel time measurements and hydrological measurements to estimate field-scale soil hydraulic parameters and parameters of the petrophysical function, which relates soil porosity and water saturation to the effective dielectric constant. We build upon previous work to take advantage of a wide range of GPR data acquisition configurations and to accommodate uncertainty in the petrophysical function. Within the context of water injection experiments in the vadose zone, we test our inversion methodology with synthetic examples and apply it to field data. The synthetic examples show that while realistic errors in the petrophysical function cause substantial errors in the soil hydraulic parameter estimates,simultaneously estimating petrophysical parameters allows for these errors to be minimized. Additionally, we observe in some cases that inaccuracy in the GPR simulator causes systematic error in simulated travel times, making necessary the simultaneous estimation of a correction parameter. We also apply the method to a three-dimensional field setting using time-lapse GPR and neutron probe (NP) data sets collected during an infiltration experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site in Washington. We find that inclusion of GPR data in the inversion procedure allows for improved predictions of water content, compared to predictions made using NP data alone.

  4. Estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability from soil physical properties using state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe; Møldrup, Per; Nielsen, Don

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic conductivity (K) and air permeability (k(a)) at given soil-water potentials are often used as reference points in constitutive models for K and k(a) as functions of moisture content and are, therefore, a prerequisite for predicting migration of water, air, and dissolved......) ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) modeling, and (iii) State-space modeling. In addition to actual soil property values, ARIMA and state-space models account for effects of spatial correlation in soil properties. Measured data along two 70-m-long transects at a 20-year old constructed...... and gaseous chemicals in the vadose zone. In this study, three modeling approaches were used to identify the dependence of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-S) and air permeability at -100 cm H2O soil-water potential (k(a100)) on soil physical properties in undisturbed soil: (i) Multiple regression, (ii...

  5. Predicted Infiltration for Sodic/Saline Soils from Reclaimed Coastal Areas: Sensitivity to Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Dongli; Yu, Shuang'en; Shao, Guangcheng

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the influences of soil surface conditions and initial soil water content on water movement in unsaturated sodic soils of reclaimed coastal areas. Data was collected from column experiments in which two soils from a Chinese coastal area reclaimed in 2007 (Soil A, saline) and 1960 (Soil B, nonsaline) were used, with bulk densities of 1.4 or 1.5 g/cm3. A 1D-infiltration model was created using a finite difference method and its sensitivity to hydraulic related parameters was tested. The model well simulated the measured data. The results revealed that soil compaction notably affected the water retention of both soils. Model simulations showed that increasing the ponded water depth had little effect on the infiltration process, since the increases in cumulative infiltration and wetting front advancement rate were small. However, the wetting front advancement rate increased and the cumulative infiltration decreased to a greater extent when θ 0 was increased. Soil physical quality was described better by the S parameter than by the saturated hydraulic conductivity since the latter was also affected by the physical chemical effects on clay swelling occurring in the presence of different levels of electrolytes in the soil solutions of the two soils. PMID:25197699

  6. Predicted Infiltration for Sodic/Saline Soils from Reclaimed Coastal Areas: Sensitivity to Model Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the influences of soil surface conditions and initial soil water content on water movement in unsaturated sodic soils of reclaimed coastal areas. Data was collected from column experiments in which two soils from a Chinese coastal area reclaimed in 2007 (Soil A, saline and 1960 (Soil B, nonsaline were used, with bulk densities of 1.4 or 1.5 g/cm3. A 1D-infiltration model was created using a finite difference method and its sensitivity to hydraulic related parameters was tested. The model well simulated the measured data. The results revealed that soil compaction notably affected the water retention of both soils. Model simulations showed that increasing the ponded water depth had little effect on the infiltration process, since the increases in cumulative infiltration and wetting front advancement rate were small. However, the wetting front advancement rate increased and the cumulative infiltration decreased to a greater extent when θ0 was increased. Soil physical quality was described better by the S parameter than by the saturated hydraulic conductivity since the latter was also affected by the physical chemical effects on clay swelling occurring in the presence of different levels of electrolytes in the soil solutions of the two soils.

  7. Predicted infiltration for sodic/saline soils from reclaimed coastal areas: sensitivity to model parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongdong; She, Dongli; Yu, Shuang'en; Shao, Guangcheng; Chen, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the influences of soil surface conditions and initial soil water content on water movement in unsaturated sodic soils of reclaimed coastal areas. Data was collected from column experiments in which two soils from a Chinese coastal area reclaimed in 2007 (Soil A, saline) and 1960 (Soil B, nonsaline) were used, with bulk densities of 1.4 or 1.5 g/cm(3). A 1D-infiltration model was created using a finite difference method and its sensitivity to hydraulic related parameters was tested. The model well simulated the measured data. The results revealed that soil compaction notably affected the water retention of both soils. Model simulations showed that increasing the ponded water depth had little effect on the infiltration process, since the increases in cumulative infiltration and wetting front advancement rate were small. However, the wetting front advancement rate increased and the cumulative infiltration decreased to a greater extent when θ₀ was increased. Soil physical quality was described better by the S parameter than by the saturated hydraulic conductivity since the latter was also affected by the physical chemical effects on clay swelling occurring in the presence of different levels of electrolytes in the soil solutions of the two soils.

  8. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey M. Warren; J. Renée Brooks; Maria I. Dragila; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal increases in water potential and water content in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux, a process termed hydraulic redistribution (HR). However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the daily recovery in water content, confounding efforts to determine the actual...

  9. Impacts of wildfire severity on hydraulic conductivity in forest, woodland, and grassland soils (Chapter 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary

    2011-01-01

    Forest, woodland, and grassland watersheds throughout the world are major sources of high quality water for human use because of the nature of these soils to infiltrate, store, and transmit most precipitation instead of quickly routing it to surface runoff. This characteristic of these wildland soils is due to normally high infiltration rates, porosities, and hydraulic...

  10. Simulation of Hydraulic Fracture in Unsaturated Soils with High Degree of Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tielin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation approach of hydraulic fracture process, considering the couplings of the stress distribution, the fluid flow of the water-air mixture, the compression and dissolution of air, and the element damage evolution, has been developed to investigate the mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in porous media during hydraulic fracturing. The concept of homogenized pore fluid has been adopted to represent the water air mixture. A large number of numerical analysis on hydraulic fracturing in clay with incipient injection slot have been carried out to study the mechanism of hydraulic fracturing in unsaturated soil with the characteristic of critical model I type of crack loading using stress intensity factor KIc. The results provide a numerical picture depicting the mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation during hydraulic fracturing. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results, which confirms the adequacy and the power of the numerical approach.

  11. Alteration of soil hydraulic properties and soil water repellency by fire and vegetation succession in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    This study explores the impacts of fire and plant community succession on soil water repellency (SWR) and infiltration properties to improve understanding the long term impacts of prescribed fire on SWR and infiltration properties in sagebrush-steppe ecosystem. The objectives of this study were: 1) To explore the temporal effects of prescribed burning in sagebrush dominated landscape; 2) To investigate spatial variability of soil hydrologic properties; 3) To determine the relationship among soil organic fraction, soil hydrophobicity and infiltration properties. Fieldwork was conducted in paired catchments with three dominant vegetation cover communities: Low sage, big mountain sage and aspen. Detailed, heavily replicated analyses were conducted for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, sorptivity water drop penetration time and static soil-water-air contact angle. The results show that the severity and presence of surface soil water repellency were considerably reduced six years after fire and that hydraulic conductivity increased significantly in each vegetation cover compared to pre-burn condition. Comparisons among soil hydrological properties shows that hydraulic conductivity is not strongly related to SWR, and that sorptivity is negatively correlated with SWR. The spatial variance of hydraulic properties within the burned high sage and low sage, in particularly, spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity is basically controlled by soil texture and sorptivity is affected by soil wettability. The average water repellency in Low Sage area was significantly different with Big Sage and Aspen as the gap of organic content between Low Sage and other vegetation area. The result of contact angle measurement and organic content analysis shows a strong positive correlation between SWR and organic matter.

  12. Effect of clay distribution in synthetic sand-clay mixtures on hydraulic and geophysical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, G. K.; Keating, K.; Slater, L. D.; Sugand, M.; Binley, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of porous geological media is known to be controlled by clay content as well as the distribution of clay. Although numerous studies have explored the effect of clay content on geophysical measurements, most studies of synthetic sediment packs focus on a homogenous distribution of clay particles. In this laboratory experiment, we explore how both clay content and clay distribution impact hydraulic and geophysical parameters. Using two clays—kaolinite and montmorillonite—we prepared homogeneous and heterogeneous sand-clay mixtures containing 0 to 10% clay by mass. To create the heterogeneous mixtures, small (nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) mean-log T2 relaxation time, parameters known to be sensitive to changes in pore geometry. Our results show that for the homogenous clay samples, the hydraulic conductivity decreases with increasing clay content, as expected, and both SIP and NMR parameters correlate with the changing hydraulic conductivity. For the aggregated clay samples, there is no correlation between hydraulic conductivity and clay content; however, increasing clay content still impacts the geophysical data. The SIP data are less sensitive to increasing aggregated clay content than the NMR data, which display a similar degree of variability with clay content in mean-log T­2 relaxation time for both homogenous and aggregated clay samples. The results suggest that in heterogeneous clay-bearing sediments, NMR measured parameters are less sensitive to the specific pore geometries controlling fluid flow than the SIP parameters. This research represents a first step towards understanding how the distributions of clay in porous media impacts relationships between geophysical measurements and hydraulic conductivity.

  13. Water and salt dynamics and the hydraulic conductivity feedback: irreversible soil degradation and reclamation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-04-01

    We present a model for the dynamics of soil water, salt concentration and exchangeable sodium fraction in the root zone, driven by irrigation water of various qualities and stochastic rainfall. The main nonlinear feedback is the decrease in hydraulic conductivity for low salinity and/or high sodicity levels. The three variables have quite disparate characteristic time scales: soil water can vary two or three orders of magnitude faster than the exchangeable sodium fraction. In certain limiting cases in which the input of water is constant, the system can be simplified by eliminating the equation for soil water, allowing a full description of the dynamics in the two-dimensional salinity-sodicity phase space. We estimate soil structure degradation time scales for high sodium-adsorption-ratio irrigation water, and delineate the regions in the salinity-sodicity phase space where sodium-induced degradation is effectively irreversible. This apparent irreversibility is the result of relatively long evolution time scales with respect to human activity. When we take into account stochastic rainfall—and the accompanying wetting and drying cycles—the system produces a myriad of statistical steady states. This means that equal environmental conditions can produce different outcomes, accessible to each other only by large interventions, such as temporary changes in the quality of irrigation water or one-time amendment use. Our characterization of the dynamics of water and salt in the root zone, and how it depends on environmental parameters, offers us opportunities to control and reclaim degraded states making optimal resource use. We show an example of sodic soil reclamation through calcium-based fertigation, with minimal time (and applied water) expenditure.

  14. Spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties on a steep slope in the loess plateau of China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Hu; Ming An Shao; Quan Jiu Wang; Jun Fan; Klaus Reichardt

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of the structure of the spatial variability of soil surface hydraulic properties on steep slopes is important for modeling infiltration and runoff processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the spatial variability of these properties on a steep slope of the Loess Plateau in northwest China. A 9600 m² area was systematically sampled in a grid of 106 points spaced 10 m x 10 m. Hydraulic properties were determined with a disc infiltrometer under multiple pressure...

  15. Water infiltration and hydraulic conductivity in a natural Mediterranean oak forest: impacts of hydrology-oriented silviculture on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Bautista, Inmaculada; Cerdà, Artemi; Cullotta, Sebastiano; del Campo, Antonio; González-Sanchis, María; Iovino, Massimo; Maetzke, Federico

    2016-04-01

    the practice of forest management persist for almost one century. It is therefore important to monitor managed sites over longer periods, since short-term investigations are insufficient to detect changes that may influence e.g. larger parts of watersheds (Bens et al., 2006). In addition, soil hydraulic properties exhibit strong spatial and temporal variations and a large number of determinations are required to assess the magnitude of the variation within the selected area (Logsdon and Jaynes, 1996). The use of simple and rapid field techniques is therefore important to obtain reliable data with a sustainable effort (Bagarello et al., 2014; Di Prima et al., 2016). The Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer (BEST) parameters procedure by Lassabatere et al. (2006) is very attractive for practical use since it allows an estimation of both the soil water retention and the hydraulic conductivity functions from cumulative infiltration collected during a ponded field experiment and a few routinely laboratory determinations. Lassabatere et al. (2006) suggested to measure the infiltration time of small volumes of water repeatedly poured on the soil surface confined by a ring inserted to a depth of about 1 cm into the soil. BEST considers a zero ponded infiltration model which was assumed to be appropriate for an infiltration run performed with small, but positive, pressure heads. This assumption was supported by numerical tests carried out by Touma et al. (2007). Recently, Di Prima (2015) developed a method to automate data collection with a compact infiltrometer under constant head conditions. The device, maintaining a small quasi-constant head of water (i.e., 2-3 mm) on the infiltration surface, is equipped with a differential pressure transducer to measure the stepwise drop of water level in the reservoir, and, in turn, to quantify cumulative infiltration into the soil. The data acquisition system has been designed with low cost components and it is based on the open source

  16. Effect of hydraulic parameters on sediment transport capacity in overland flow over erodible beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sediment transport is an important component of the soil erosion process, which depends on several hydraulic parameters like unit discharge, mean flow velocity, and slope gradient. In most of the previous studies, the impact of these hydraulic parameters on transport capacity was studied for non-erodible bed conditions. Hence, this study aimed to examine the influence of unit discharge, mean flow velocity and slope gradient on sediment transport capacity for erodible beds and also to investigate the relationship between transport capacity and composite force predictors, i.e. shear stress, stream power, unit stream power and effective stream power. In order to accomplish the objectives, experiments were carried out in a 3.0 m long and 0.5 m wide flume using four well sorted sands (0.230, 0.536, 0.719, 1.022 mm. Unit discharges ranging from 0.07 to 2.07 × 10−3 m2 s−1 were simulated inside the flume at four slopes (5.2, 8.7, 13.2 and 17.6% to analyze their impact on sediment transport rate. The sediment transport rate measured at the bottom end of the flume by taking water and sediment samples was considered equal to sediment transport capacity, because the selected flume length of 3.0 m was found sufficient to reach the transport capacity. The experimental result reveals that the slope gradient has a stronger impact on transport capacity than unit discharge and mean flow velocity due to the fact that the tangential component of gravity force increases with slope gradient. Our results show that unit stream power is an optimal composite force predictor for estimating transport capacity. Stream power and effective stream power can also be successfully related to the transport capacity, however the relations are strongly dependent on grain size. Shear stress showed poor performance, because part of shear stress is dissipated by bed irregularities, bed form evolution and sediment detachment. An empirical transport

  17. Saturated hydraulic conductivity model computed from bimodal water retention curves for a range of New Zealand soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollacco, Joseph Alexander Paul; Webb, Trevor; McNeill, Stephen; Hu, Wei; Carrick, Sam; Hewitt, Allan; Lilburne, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Descriptions of soil hydraulic properties, such as the soil moisture retention curve, θ(h), and saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks, are a prerequisite for hydrological models. Since the measurement of Ks is expensive, it is frequently derived from statistical pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Because it is usually more difficult to describe Ks than θ(h) from pedotransfer functions, Pollacco et al. (2013) developed a physical unimodal model to compute Ks solely from hydraulic parameters derived from the Kosugi θ(h). This unimodal Ks model, which is based on a unimodal Kosugi soil pore-size distribution, was developed by combining the approach of Hagen-Poiseuille with Darcy's law and by introducing three tortuosity parameters. We report here on (1) the suitability of the Pollacco unimodal Ks model to predict Ks for a range of New Zealand soils from the New Zealand soil database (S-map) and (2) further adaptations to this model to adapt it to dual-porosity structured soils by computing the soil water flux through a continuous function of an improved bimodal pore-size distribution. The improved bimodal Ks model was tested with a New Zealand data set derived from historical measurements of Ks and θ(h) for a range of soils derived from sandstone and siltstone. The Ks data were collected using a small core size of 10 cm diameter, causing large uncertainty in replicate measurements. Predictions of Ks were further improved by distinguishing topsoils from subsoil. Nevertheless, as expected, stratifying the data with soil texture only slightly improved the predictions of the physical Ks models because the Ks model is based on pore-size distribution and the calibrated parameters were obtained within the physically feasible range. The improvements made to the unimodal Ks model by using the new bimodal Ks model are modest when compared to the unimodal model, which is explained by the poor accuracy of measured total porosity. Nevertheless, the new bimodal model provides an

  18. Saturated hydraulic conductivity model computed from bimodal water retention curves for a range of New Zealand soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Pollacco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Descriptions of soil hydraulic properties, such as the soil moisture retention curve, θ(h, and saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks, are a prerequisite for hydrological models. Since the measurement of Ks is expensive, it is frequently derived from statistical pedotransfer functions (PTFs. Because it is usually more difficult to describe Ks than θ(h from pedotransfer functions, Pollacco et al. (2013 developed a physical unimodal model to compute Ks solely from hydraulic parameters derived from the Kosugi θ(h. This unimodal Ks model, which is based on a unimodal Kosugi soil pore-size distribution, was developed by combining the approach of Hagen–Poiseuille with Darcy's law and by introducing three tortuosity parameters. We report here on (1 the suitability of the Pollacco unimodal Ks model to predict Ks for a range of New Zealand soils from the New Zealand soil database (S-map and (2 further adaptations to this model to adapt it to dual-porosity structured soils by computing the soil water flux through a continuous function of an improved bimodal pore-size distribution. The improved bimodal Ks model was tested with a New Zealand data set derived from historical measurements of Ks and θ(h for a range of soils derived from sandstone and siltstone. The Ks data were collected using a small core size of 10 cm diameter, causing large uncertainty in replicate measurements. Predictions of Ks were further improved by distinguishing topsoils from subsoil. Nevertheless, as expected, stratifying the data with soil texture only slightly improved the predictions of the physical Ks models because the Ks model is based on pore-size distribution and the calibrated parameters were obtained within the physically feasible range. The improvements made to the unimodal Ks model by using the new bimodal Ks model are modest when compared to the unimodal model, which is explained by the poor accuracy of measured total porosity. Nevertheless, the new bimodal

  19. Joint Estimation of Hydraulic and Poroelastic Parameters from a Pumping Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A; Mok, Chin Man W

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of hydraulic and poroelastic processes is critical in predicting processes involving the deformation of the geologic medium in response to fluid extraction or injection. Numerical models that consider the coupling of hydraulic and poroelastic processes require the knowledge of relevant parameters for both aquifer and aquitard units. In this study, we jointly estimated hydraulic and poroelastic parameters from pumping test data exhibiting "reverse water level fluctuations," known as the Noordbergum effect, in aquitards adjacent to a pumped aquifer. The joint estimation was performed by coupling BIOT2, a finite element, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, groundwater model that considers poroelastic effects with the parameter estimation code PEST. We first tested our approach using a synthetic data set with known parameters. Results of the synthetic case showed that for a simple layered system, it was possible to reproduce accurately both the hydraulic and poroelastic properties for each layer. We next applied the approach to pumping test data collected at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) on the University of Waterloo (UW) campus. Based on the detailed knowledge of stratigraphy, a five-layer system was modeled. Parameter estimation was performed by: (1) matching drawdown data individually from each observation port and (2) matching drawdown data from all ports at a single well simultaneously. The estimated hydraulic parameters were compared to those obtained by other means at the site yielding good agreement. However, the estimated shear modulus was higher than the static shear modulus, but was within the range of dynamic shear modulus reported in the literature, potentially suggesting a loading rate effect. © 2014, National GroundWater Association.

  20. DETERMINATION OF OPERATING FIELDS OF TOLERANCES OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS PARAMETERS FOR AIRCRAFT BOARD COMPUTER COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the operating fields of the tolerances of hydraulic systems parameters for various conditions of work and phases of flight given mathematical relationships and the results obtained in Mathcad in analytical form for the board computer system.

  1. Soil physical and hydraulic properties modification under Arachis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation of soil moisture is one of the major limiting factors to crop production. Improvement of soil physical properties could enhance soil moisture conservation, improve crop productivity and reduce food insecurity in sub Saharan Africa. A field study was carried out to determine the effects of 3 plant densities (33333, ...

  2. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  3. Long-term irrigation with treated wastewater: effects on the hydraulic properties of a clay soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Gopali; Russo, David; Levy, Guy

    2017-04-01

    Treated wastewater (TWW) is an important water resource, especially in semiarid and arid regions. However, there are some concerns that irrigation with TWW could lead to degradation of soil physical and hydraulic properties. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of long-term (≥15 y) irrigation with secondary TWW on some basic and hydraulic soil properties of a clay soil. Undisturbed soil samples (cores) were taken to a depth of 4.5 m (in sections of 0.5 m) over a diagonal cross section of a five year old orchard irrigated with TWW. Samples were taken from five sites within the tree rows (i.e., representing soil directly affected by TWW; referred to as "within rows") and four sites between the rows of trees (i.e., the control treatment representing soil that was not directly subjected to the irrigation water; referred to as "between rows"). Soil analyses included an array of basic properties, determination of a continuous particle size distribution and measurement of the saturated hydraulic conductivity (HC). The latter two were used for the computation of soil characteristic curve, Θ(ψ), and the unsaturated HC curve, K(ψ). The results showed that irrigation with TWW had insignificant effects on bulk density, moisture content, cation exchange capacity, pH and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), but caused a reduction in the saturated HC, Ks. The computed Θ(ψ) curve at a given soil depth, averaged over the different sites, was similar for the TWW-irrigated samples and the control ones. On the contrary, the computed K(ψ) curve at a given soil depth, averaged over the different sites, for the TWW-irrigated samples were lower than those for the control samples at matric potential > -100 cm (=pF2 for the two treatments. Possible reasons for the observed differences in the hydraulic properties between the TWW-irrigated samples and the control ones are discussed.

  4. Hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and soil organic carbon loss on steep slopes for extreme rainstorms on the Chinese loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Li, Z. W.; Nie, X. D.; He, J. J.; Huang, B.; Chang, X. F.; Liu, C.; Xiao, H. B.; Wang, D. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Building a hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and soil organic carbon (SOC) loss is significant because of the complex erosion process that includes gravitational erosion, ephemeral gully, and gully erosion for loess soils. To address this issue, a simulation of rainfall experiments was conducted in a 1 m × 5 m box on slope gradients of 15°, 20°, and 25° for four typical loess soils with different textures, namely, Ansai, Changwu, Suide, and Yangling. The simulated rainfall of 120 mm h-1 lasted for 45 min. Among the five hydraulic factors (i.e., flow velocity, runoff depth, shear stress, stream power, and unit stream power), flow velocity and stream power showed close relationships with SOC concentration, especially the average flow velocity at 2 m from the outlet where the runoff attained the maximum sediment load. Flow velocity controlled SOC enrichment by affecting the suspension-saltation transport associated with the clay and silt contents in sediments. In consideration of runoff rate, average flow velocity at 2 m location from the outlet, and slope steepness as input variables, a hydraulic-based sediment and SOC loss model was built on the basis of the relationships of hydraulic factors to sediment and SOC loss. Nonlinear regression models were built to calculate the parameters of the model. The difference between the effective and dispersed median diameter (δD50) or the SOC content of the original soil served as the independent variable. The hydraulic-based sediment and SOC loss model exhibited good performance for the Suide and Changwu soils, that is, these soils contained lower amounts of aggregates than those of Ansai and Yangling soils. The hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and SOC loss can serve as an important reference for physical-based sediment models and can bring new insights into SOC loss prediction when serious erosion occurs on steep slopes.

  5. ESTIMATION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND CONTENT OF FINES FROM EXPERIMENTAL LAWS THAT CORELATE HYDRAULIC AND ELECTRIC PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor José Peinado-Guevara

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic conductivity is a basic element in the advancement of knowledge of a geological environment in both the flow and transport processes of pollutants for conservation projects, managementand environmental management and also for the development of public policies for protection of ecosystems, among others. The aim of this paper is to obtain the hydraulic conductivity (K and the finescontent (C of saturated granular half using two empirical laws. One correlates the electrical conductivity of saturated granular media σo and water saturated σw which depends on the formation factor(F, cation exchange capacity (CEC and the fines content in the saturated soil. Using data obtained from materials of 18 samples from 6 wells the relationships between F-C and CEC-C were obtained,so the equation reduces to a σo function in terms of σw and C, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.97. A second experimental law is the one that results from the experimental relationship between K and C,being 1.4054 K 0.1804.C with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.96. From both experimental expressions relationships between K and C, a and C,and C are created so from every pair knowing one of them you get to know the other one. Under the scheme outlined electrical conductivity sections for the saturated medium and fines content are obtained,finding that the groundwater in the study area consists of a thin top layer and beneath it there is a predominantly sandy environment.

  6. Effects of native forest restoration on soil hydraulic properties, Auwahi, Maui, Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kimberlie S.; Nimmo, John R.; Medeiros, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    Over historic time Hawai'i's dryland forests have been largely replaced by grasslands for grazing livestock. On-going efforts have been undertaken to restore dryland forests to bring back native species and reduce erosion. The reestablishment of native ecosystems on land severely degraded by long-term alternative use requires reversal of the impacts of erosion, organic-matter loss, and soil structural damage on soil hydraulic properties. This issue is perhaps especially critical in dryland forests where the soil must facilitate native plants' optimal use of limited water. These reforestation efforts depend on restoring soil ecological function, including soil hydraulic properties. We hypothesized that reforestation can measurably change soil hydraulic properties over restoration timescales. At a site on the island of Maui (Hawai'i, USA), we measured infiltration capacity, hydrophobicity, and abundance of preferential flow channels in a deforested grassland and in an adjacent area where active reforestation has been going on for fourteen years. Compared to the nearby deforested rangeland, mean field-saturated hydraulic conductivity in the newly restored forest measured by 55 infiltrometer tests was greater by a factor of 2.0. Hydrophobicity on an 8-point scale increased from average category 6.0 to 6.9. A 4-point empirical categorization of preferentiality in subsurface wetting patterns increased from an average 1.3 in grasslands to 2.6 in the restored forest. All of these changes act to distribute infiltrated water faster and deeper, as appropriate for native plant needs. This study indicates that vegetation restoration can lead to ecohydrologically important changes in soil hydraulic properties over decadal time scales.

  7. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakai, Masaru; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-01-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic

  8. Using scaling factors for evaluating spatial and temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties within one elevation transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodem, Antonín; Kodešová, Radka; Jakšík, Ondřej; Fér, Miroslav; Klement, Aleš

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in Southern Moravia, in the Czech Republic. The original soil unit in the wider area is a Haplic Chernozem developed on loess. The intensive agricultural exploitation in combination with terrain morphology has resulted in a highly diversified soil spatial pattern. Nowadays the original soil unit is preserved only on top of relatively flat parts, and is gradually transformed by water erosion up to Regosols on the steepest slopes, while colluvial soils are formed in terrain depressions and at toe slopes due to sedimentation of previously eroded material. Soils within this area has been intensively investigated during the last several years (e.g. Jakšík et al., 2015; Vašát et al., 2014, 2015a,b). Soil sampling (disturbed and undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples) was performed at 5 points of one elevation transect in November 2010 (after wheat sowing) and August 2011 (after wheat harvest). Disturbed soil samples were used to determine basic soil properties (grain size distribution and organic carbon content etc.). Undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. Scaling factors (alpha-h for pressure head, alpha-theta for soil water contents and alpha-k for hydraulic conductivities) were used here to express soil hydraulic properties variability. Evaluated scaling factors reflected position within the elevation transect as well as time of soil sampling. In general large values of alpha-h, lower values of alpha-k and similar values of alpha-theta were obtained in 2010 in comparison to values obtained in 2011, which indicates development of soil structure during the vegetation season. Jakšík, O., Kodešová, R., Kubiš, A., Stehlíková, I., Drábek, O., Kapička, A. (2015): Soil aggregate stability within morphologically diverse areas. Catena, 127, 287-299. Vašát, R., Kode

  9. Estimation of Hydraulic properties of a sandy soil using ground-based active and passive microwave remote sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Jonard, François

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we experimentally analyzed the feasibility of estimating soil hydraulic properties from 1.4 GHz radiometer and 0.8-2.6 GHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. Radiometer and GPR measurements were performed above a sand box, which was subjected to a series of vertical water content profiles in hydrostatic equilibrium with a water table located at different depths. A coherent radiative transfer model was used to simulate brightness temperatures measured with the radiometer. GPR data were modeled using full-wave layered medium Green\\'s functions and an intrinsic antenna representation. These forward models were inverted to optimally match the corresponding passive and active microwave data. This allowed us to reconstruct the water content profiles, and thereby estimate the sand water retention curve described using the van Genuchten model. Uncertainty of the estimated hydraulic parameters was quantified using the Bayesian-based DREAM algorithm. For both radiometer and GPR methods, the results were in close agreement with in situ time-domain reflectometry (TDR) estimates. Compared with radiometer and TDR, much smaller confidence intervals were obtained for GPR, which was attributed to its relatively large bandwidth of operation, including frequencies smaller than 1.4 GHz. These results offer valuable insights into future potential and emerging challenges in the development of joint analyses of passive and active remote sensing data to retrieve effective soil hydraulic properties.

  10. A model for hydraulic redistribution incorporating coupled soil-root moisture transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenu, G. G.; Kumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    One of the adaptive strategies of vegetation, particularly in water limited ecosystems, is the development of deep roots and the use of hydraulic redistribution which enables them to make optimal use of resources available throughout the soil column. Hydraulic redistribution refers to roots acting as a preferential pathway for the movement of water from wet to dry soil layers driven by the moisture gradient - be it from the shallow to deep layers or vice versa. This occurs during the nighttime while during the daytime moisture movement is driven to fulfill the transpiration demand at the canopy. In this study, we develop a model to investigate the effect of hydraulic redistribution by deep roots on the terrestrial climatology. Sierra Nevada eco-region is chosen as the study site which has wet winters and dry summers. Hydraulic redistribution enables the movement of moisture from the upper soil layers to deeper zones during the wet months and this moisture is then available to meet the transpiration demand during the late dry season. It results in significant alteration of the profiles of soil moisture and water uptake as well as increase in the canopy transpiration, carbon assimilation, and the associated water-use-efficiency during the dry summer season. This also makes the presence of roots in deeper soil layers much more important than their proportional abundance would otherwise dictate. Comparison with observations of latent heat from a flux tower demonstrates improved predictability and provides validation of the model results. Hydraulic redistribution serves as a mechanism for the interaction between the variability of deep layer soil-moisture and the land-surface climatology and could have significant implications for seasonal and sub-seasonal climate prediction.

  11. Estimating the saturated soil hydraulic conductivity by the near steady-state phase of a beerkan infiltration run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    Simple infiltration experiments carried out in the field allow an easy and inexpensive way of characterizing soil hydraulic behavior, maintaining the functional connection of the sampled soil volume with the surrounding soil. The beerkan method consists of a three-dimensional (3D) infiltration experiment at zero pressure head (Haverkamp et al., 1996). It uses a simple annular ring inserted to a depth of about 0.01 m to avoid lateral loss of the ponded water. Soil disturbance is minimized by the limited ring insertion depth. Infiltration time of small volumes of water repeatedly poured on the confined soil are measured to determine the cumulative infiltration. Different algorithms based on this methodology (the so-called BEST family of algorithms) were developed for the determination of soil hydraulic characteristic parameters (Bagarello et al., 2014a; Lassabatere et al., 2006; Yilmaz et al., 2010). Recently, Bagarello et al. (2014b) developed a Simplified method based on a Beerkan Infiltration run (SBI method) to determine saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks, by only the transient phase of a beerkan infiltration run and an estimate of the α* parameter, expressing the relative importance of gravity and capillary forces during an infiltration process (Reynolds and Elrick, 1990). However, several problems yet arise with the existing BEST-algorithms and the SBI method, including (i) the need of supplementary field and laboratory measurements (Bagarello et al., 2013); (ii) the difficulty to detect a linear relationship between I / √t and √t in the early stage of the infiltration process (Bagarello et al., 2014b); (iii) estimation of negative Ks values for hydrophobic soils (Di Prima et al., 2016). In this investigation, a new Simplified method based on the analysis of the Steady-state Beerkan Infiltration run (SSBI method) was proposed and tested. In particular, analytical data were generated to simulate beerkan infiltration experiments for six contrasting

  12. The influence of clay particles on the hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahmy, M.I.

    1961-01-01

    The relation between hydraulic conductivity and size of the sand particles and clay content was investigated in artificial mixtures of sand and clay and in natural soils, in four different ways in the laboratory and field.

    In the artificial mixtures coarse aggregates of illitic clay hardly

  13. Changes of soil thermal and hydraulic regimes in the Heihe River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoqing; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-09-02

    Soil thermal and hydraulic regimes are critical factors influencing terrestrial processes in cold regions. Collection of field data from frozen ground has occurred at point scales, but limited data exist that characterize changes of soil thermal and hydraulic regimes at the scale of the whole Heihe River Basin. This study uses a long-term regional climate model coupled with land surface model to investigate the soil thermal and hydraulic regime changes at a large spatial scale. It also explores potential factors, including the climate and non-climate factors. Results show that there is significant variability in mean annual air temperature (MAAT) of about 0.47 °C/decade during 1980-2013. A time series of area-averaged mean annual soil temperature (MAST) over the whole Heihe River Basin shows a significant increase between 0.25 and 0.36 °C/decade during 1984-2013, with a net change of 0.9 °C. A trend of increasing wetness is found in soil moisture. Frozen days (FD) decreased significantly both in seasonally frozen ground (SFG) regions and permafrost regions, with a net change between 7 and 13 days during 1984-2013. Freezing index (FI) had a positive effect on FD, while thawing index (TI), MAAT, precipitation, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) had a negative effect. These results are important to understand dynamic mechanisms of soil freeze/thaw cycles.

  14. Biochar-Induced Changes in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Dissolved Nutrient Fluxes Constrained by Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rebecca T.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent

  15. Variation of soil hydraulic properties with alpine grassland degradation in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tao; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Shaohong; Liu, Yujie; Liu, Yanhua; Zou, Xintong; Herzberger, Anna; Liu, Jianguo

    2017-05-01

    Ecosystems in alpine mountainous regions are vulnerable and easily disturbed by global environmental change. Alpine swamp meadow, a unique grassland type in the eastern Tibetan Plateau that provides important ecosystem services to the upstream and downstream regions of international rivers of Asia and other parts of the world, is undergoing severe degradation, which can dramatically alter soil hydraulic properties and water cycling processes. However, the effects of alpine swamp meadow degradation on soil hydraulic properties and the corresponding influencing mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, soil moisture content (SMC), field capacity (FC) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) together with several basic soil properties under lightly degraded (LD), moderately degraded (MD) and severely degraded (SD) alpine swamp meadow were investigated; the variations in SMC, FC and Ks with alpine swamp meadow degradation and their dominant influencing factors were analysed. The results showed that SMC and FC decreased consistently from LD to SD, while Ks decreased from LD to MD and then increased from MD to SD, following the order of LD > SD > MD. Significant differences in soil hydraulic properties between degradation degrees were found in the upper soil layers (0-20 cm), indicating that the influences of degradation were most pronounced in the topsoils. FC was positively correlated with capillary porosity, water-stable aggregates, soil organic carbon, and silt and clay content; Ks was positively correlated with non-capillary porosity (NCP). Relative to other soil properties, soil porosity is the dominant factor influencing FC and Ks. Capillary porosity explained 91.1 % of total variance in FC, and NCP explained 97.3 % of total variance in Ks. The combined effect of disappearing root activities and increasing sand content was responsible for the inconsistent patterns of NCP and Ks. Our findings suggest that alpine swamp meadow degradation would

  16. Agricultural use of soil, consequences in soil organic matter and hydraulic conductivity compared with natural vegetation in central Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Verónica; Carral, Pilar; Alvarez, Ana Maria; Marques, Maria Jose

    2014-05-01

    When ecosystems are under pressure due to high temperatures and water scarcity, the use of land for agriculture can be a handicap for soil and water conservation. The interactions between plants and soils are site-specific. This study provides information about the influence of the preence vs. The absence of vegetation on soil in a semi-arid area of the sout-east of Madrid (Spain, in the Tagus River basin. In this area soil materials are developed over a calcareous-evaporitic lithology. Soils can be classified as Calcisols, having horizons of accumulation with powdered limestone and irregular nodules of calcium carbonate. They can be defined as Haplic Cambisols and Leptic Calcisols (WRB 2006-FAO). The area is mainly used for rainfed agriculture, olive groves, vineyards and cereals. There are some patches of bushes (Quercus sp.) and grasses (Stipa tenacissima L.) although only found on the top of the hills. This study analyses the differences found in soils having three different covers: Quercus coccifera, Stipa tenacissima and lack of vegetation. This last condition was found in the areas between cultivated olive trees. Soil organic matter, porosity and hydraulic conductivity are key properties of soil to understand its ability to adapt to climate or land use changes. In order to measure the influence of different soil covers, four replicates of soil were sampled in each condition at two soil depth, (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm). Hydraulic conductivity was measured in each soil condition and replicate using a Mini-disk® infiltrometer. There were no differences between the two depths sampled. Similarly, there were no changes in electric conductivity (average 0.1±0.03 dS m-1); pH (8.7±0.2) or calcium carbonate content (43±20 %). Nevertheless, significant differences (p>0.001) were found in soil organic matter. The maximum was found in soils under Quercus (4.7±0.5 %), followed by Stipa (2.2±1.1 %). The soil without vegetation in the areas between olive trees had only 0

  17. Simulating runoff from an area covered by soil contour ridges using a hydraulic cascade model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slah, Nasri

    2015-04-01

    Runoff agriculture and rainwater harvesting are well known farming techniques that have guaranteed crop production in the arid zone of Tunisia since ancient times. At present, soil contour ridges (banquettes) are the main water and soil conservation used. Actually about one million ha farming land were protected by this technique. Usually, soil contour ridges are designed for a 10-year return period to reduce runoff and erosion in hill-slope catchments. However, the detailed hydraulic function of this technique is still to a major extent unknown. For this purpose a runoff model was developed to simulate the discharge from an upstream system of several soil contour ridges. The model was validated using experimental runoff. The simulated runoff agreed well with observed discharge. The validated model was used to simulate runoff from a system of one to several soil contour ridges in a cascade from a 10-year rainfall event. Practical conclusions are drawn by discussing the spacing and design of the soil contour ridges. Key words: Soil surface management, soil contour ridge, discharge, hydraulic cascade.

  18. Sandy Soil Microaggregates: Rethinking Our Understanding of Hydraulic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradiś, Ashley; Brueck, Christopher; Meisenheimer, Douglas; Wanzek, Thomas; Dragila, Maria Ines

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the peculiar structure of microaggregates in coarse sandy soils that exhibit only external porosity and investigated their control on soil hydrology. The microstructure underpins a hydrologic existence that differs from finer textured soils where aggregates have internal porosity. Understanding the impact of these microaggregates on soil hydrology will permit improved agricultural irrigation management and estimates associated with ecosystem capacity and resiliency. Microstructure was investigated using a digital microscope, and aspects of the structure were quantified by sedimentation and computed microtomography. Sandy soil microaggregates were observed to be comprised of a solid sand-grain core that is coated with fines, presumably cemented by organic media. This microstructure leads to three distinct water pools during drainage: capillary water, followed by thick films (1–20 μm) enveloping the outer surfaces of the crusted microaggregates, followed by adsorbed thin films (<1 μm). The characteristics of the thick films were investigated using an analytical model. These films may provide as much as 10 to 40% saturation in the range of plant-available water. Using lubrication theory, it was predicted that thick film drainage follows a power law function with an exponent of 2. Thick films may also have a role in the geochemical evolution of soils and in ecosystem function because they provide contiguous water and gas phases at relatively high moisture contents. And, because the rough outer crust of these microaggregates can provide good niches for microbial activity, biofilm physics will dominate thick film processes, and consequently hydrologic, biologic, and geochemical functions for coarse sandy soils.

  19. Thermal Hydraulic design parameters study for severe accidents using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Keun Sun [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To provide the information on severe accident progression is very important for advanced or new type of nuclear power plant (NPP) design. A parametric study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effect of thermal hydraulic design parameters on severe accident progression of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Nine parameters, which are considered important in NPP design or severe accident progression, were selected among the various thermal hydraulic design parameters. The backpropagation neural network (BPN) was used to determine parameters, which might more strongly affect the severe accident progression, among nine parameters. For training, different input patterns were generated by the latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique and then different target patterns that contain core uncovery time and vessel failure time were obtained for Young Gwang Nuclear (YGN) Units 3 and 4 using modular accident analysis program (MAAP) 3.0B code. Three different severe accident scenarios, such as two loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and station blackout (SBO), were considered in this analysis. Results indicated that design parameters related to refueling water storage tank (RWST), accumulator and steam generator (S/G) have more dominant effects on the progression of severe accidents investigated, compared to the other six parameters. 9 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  20. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance the remediation of DNAPL in low permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, L. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Slack, B. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Meager rates of fluid flow are a major obstacle to in situ remediation of low permeability soils. This paper describes methods designed to avoid that obstacle by creating fractures and filling them with sand to increase well discharge and change paths of fluid flow in soil. Gently dipping fractures 10 m in maximum dimension and 1 to 2 cm thick can be created in some contaminated soils at depths of a few in or greater. Hydraulic fractures can also be used to create electrically conductive layers or to deliver granules of chemically or biologically active compounds that will degrade contaminants in place. Benefits of applying hydraulic fractures to DNAPL recovery include rates of fluid recovery, enhancing upward gradients to improve hydrodynamic stabilization, forming flat-lying reactive curtains to intersect compounds moving downward, or improving the performance of electrokinetics intended to recover compounds dissolved in water. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Analysis of soil hydraulic erosion model based on convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Xiong

    2017-11-01

    Soil erosion is a very complicated process. This paper uses convolution theory, through the runoff and sediment data of economic forest area natural rainfall conditions of southeast coastal area collected, and divided into several micro slope unit, using convolution model, slope soil erosion analysis. The simulated values were verified with the measured values, the results show that the simulated values and measured values of the average relative error is 40%, the effective model coefficient is 0.614; the simulation value had a significant linear relationship with rainfall and runoff.

  2. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (networks that are available for gas transport through the porous material. Then, the famous predictive models, the water induced linear reduction (WLR) model for Dp and the reference point law (RPL) model for ka were modified with reference point measurements (dry conditions) and model parameters and they correlated linearly to dry bulk density values for both fractions of landfill final cover soil.

  3. Microbially Induced Changes in Unsaturated Zone Hydraulic Properties During Soil Flushing Remediation Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. E.; Badley, J. A.; Smith, J. M.; Bashir, R.

    2004-05-01

    Field trials were conducted to assess a cyclodextrin as a soil flushing remediation agent. During those trials, data collected with Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR), the Guelph Permeameter, and timed-application without-ponding showed significant and substantial changes in water holding capacity, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, and infiltration rates respectively. The changes were large enough to limit the treatment period for the highest application rate plots. The changes were assumed to be due to bio-clogging. Subsequent experiments in one meter tall laboratory columns instrumented with TDR directly assessed the proportion of the observed hydraulic changes that could be attributed to microbial-induced changes versus abiotic effects. While small abiotic effects were observed in columns receiving treatments containing a biocide, large changes in hydraulic properties consistent with those observed in the field were attributable to enhanced microbial activity.

  4. Estimating hydraulic parameters of the Açu-Brazil aquifer using the computer analysis of micrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucena, Leandson R. F.; da Silva, Luis R. D.; Vieira, Marcela M.; Carvalho, Bruno M.; Xavier Júnior, Milton M.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional way of obtaining hydraulic parameters of aquifers is through the interpretation of aquifer tests that requires a fairly complex logistics in terms of equipment and personnel. On the other way, the processing and analysis of digital images of two-dimensional rock sample micrographs presents itself as a promising (simpler and cheaper) alternative procedure for obtaining estimates for hydraulics parameters. This methodology involves the sampling of rocks, followed by the making and imaging of thin rock samples, image segmentation, three-dimensional reconstruction and flow simulation. This methodology was applied to the outcropping portion of the Açu aquifer in the northeast of Brazil, and the computational analyses of the thin rock sections of the acquired samples produced effective porosities between 11.2% and 18.5%, and permeabilities between 52.4 mD and 1140.7 mD. Considering that the aquifer is unconfined, these effective porosity values can be used effectively as storage coefficients. The hydraulic conductivities produced by adopting different water dynamic viscosities at the temperature of 28 °C in the conversion of the permeabilities result in values in the range of [ 6.03 ×10-7, 1.43 ×10-5 ] m/s, compatible with the local hydrogeology.

  5. Thermal-Hydraulic Sensitivity Study of Intermediate Loop Parameters for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Hwa; Lee, Heung Nae; Park, Jea Ho [KONES Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae [Hyundai Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The heat generated from the VHTR is transferred to the intermediate loop through Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX). It is further passed on to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) hydrogen production system (HPS) through Process Heat Exchanger (PHX). The IL provides the safety distance between the VHTR and HPS. Since the IL performance affects the overall nuclear HPS efficiency, it is required to optimize its design and operation parameters. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic sensitivity of IL parameters with various coolant options has been examined by using MARS-GCR code, which was already applied for the case of steam generator. Sensitivity study of the IL and PHX parameters has been carried out based on their thermal-hydraulic performance. Several parameters for design and operation, such as the pipe diameter, safety distance and surface area, are considered for different coolant options, He, CO{sub 2} and He-CO{sub 2} (2:8). It was found that the circulator work is the major factor affecting on the overall nuclear hydrogen production system efficiency. Circulator work increases with the safety distance, and decreases with the operation pressure and loop pipe diameter. Sensitivity results obtained from this study will contribute to the optimization of the IL design and operation parameters and the optimal coolant selection.

  6. Using genetic algorithm to define the governor parameters of a hydraulic turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J G P; Ribeiro, L C L J [School of Technology, UNICAMP Rua Paschoal Marmo, 1888, Limeira, Postal Code:13484-332 (Brazil); Junior, E L, E-mail: josegeraldo@ft.unicamp.b [School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urbanism, UNICAMP Avenida Albert Einstein, 951, Campinas, Postal Code: 13083-852 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    There are several governor architectures, but in general, all of them are designed to maintain the controlled variable fluctuations within acceptable range. The Proportional, Integral and Derivative (PID) governor is one of the types used to regulate a hydraulic turbine, in which the deviation of the variable controlled is corrected through earnings proportional, integral and derivative. For a definition of the governor parameters and its stability analysis there are several methods that in general can be classified into a time domain and frequency domain. The frequency domain method, based on the control theory, have ease application, expeditious manner of obtaining the parameters, but the physical phenomena involved are linearized. However the time domain methods are more difficult to be applied, but have the advantage of being able to take into account the non-linearities presents in physical phenomena. Despite the time-domain method offers advantages, it does not provides a structured way to optimize the parameters of the governor, since the parameters are obtained through simulations with adopted values. This paper presents a methodology to obtain the turbine governor appropriate parameters through a hybrid model (simulation and optimization model), based on method of characteristic to the hydraulic simulation (time domain) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) to obtain appropriate values. Examples are presented showing the application of the proposed methodology.

  7. Study of heat treatment parameters for large-scale hydraulic steel gate track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-zhou Cao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance external hardness and strength, a large-scale hydraulic gate track should go through heat treatment. The current design method of hydraulic gate wheels and tracks is based on Hertz contact linear elastic theory, and does not take into account the changes in mechanical properties of materials caused by heat treatment. In this study, the heat treatment parameters were designed and analyzed according to the bearing mechanisms of the wheel and track. The quenching process of the track was simulated by the ANSYS program, and the temperature variation, residual stress, and deformation were obtained and analyzed. The metallurgical structure field after heat treatment was predicted by the method based on time-temperature-transformation (TTT curves. The results show that the analysis method and designed track heat treatment process are feasible, and can provide a reference for practical projects.

  8. Thermal hydraulic simulations, error estimation and parameter sensitivity studies in Drekar::CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Thomas Michael; Shadid, John N; Pawlowski, Roger P; Cyr, Eric C; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) CFD Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P7.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Hub effort. The focus of this milestone was to demonstrate the thermal hydraulics and adjoint based error estimation and parameter sensitivity capabilities in the CFD code called Drekar::CFD. This milestone builds upon the capabilities demonstrated in three earlier milestones; THM.CFD.P4.02 [12], completed March, 31, 2012, THM.CFD.P5.01 [15] completed June 30, 2012 and THM.CFD.P5.01 [11] completed on October 31, 2012.

  9. Parameter Design for the Energy Regeneration System of Series Hydraulic Hybrid Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yunpu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper simplifies the energy recovery process in the series hydraulic hybrid bus’ energy regeneration system into a process in which the main axle’s moment of inertia drives the secondary element variable delivery pump/motor and brings hydraulic oil from the oil tank to the accumulator. This process enables braking of the vehicle and also allows recovery of energy to the accumulator. Based on the flow equation for the secondary element variable delivery pump/motor and the torque equilibrium equation for its axle, the force equilibrium equation for vehicle braking and the pressure variation and flow continuity equations for the accumulator, simulation studies are conducted to analyze the effects of various system parameters, such as accumulator capacity, displacement of the secondary element variable delivery pump/motor, initial operating pressure of the system, etc. on system performance during regenerative braking.

  10. Dynamic changes in hydraulic properties of soils irrigated with treated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2014-05-01

    With increasing water scarcity, treated wastewater (TW) appears as an attractive alternative source of water for irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where freshwater is naturally scarce. However, it seems that long-term use of TW for irrigation cause to soil degradation and crop yield reduction. This study aims to describe and quantify the dynamic changes in the soil hydraulic properties resulting from the use of TW for irrigation. Combining between analysis of data from a set of complementary laboratory experiments involving infiltration, evaporation, swelling and saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and numerical simulations provide quantitative estimates of the negative impact of TW for irrigation on the soil properties. It appears that the soil degradation is a dynamic process that depends on the duration of the exposure to the low-quality irrigation water. The intensity of the changes distributes with depth and results from the irrigation management applied and the efficiency of the leaching process induced by rainfall. The negative impact is the result between increase of soil sodicity and changes in soil wettability. Such negative impact may affect the hydrological balance components at the field and at the regional scale.

  11. Hyperspectral Technique for Detecting Soil Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfagnoli, F.; Ciampalini, A.; Moretti, S.; Chiarantini, L.

    2011-12-01

    In satellite and airborne remote sensing, hyperspectral technique has become a very powerful tool, due to the possibility of rapidly realizing chemical/mineralogical maps of the studied areas. Many studies are trying to customize the algorithms to identify several geo-physical soil properties. The specific objective of this study is to investigate those soil characteristics, such as clay mineral content, influencing degradation processes (soil erosion and shallow landslides), by means of correlation analysis, in order to examine the possibility of predicting the selected property using high-resolution reflectance spectra and images. The study area is located in the Mugello basin, about 30 km north of Firenze (Tuscany, Italy). Agriculturally suitable terrains are assigned mainly to annual crops, marginally to olive groves, vineyards and orchards. Soils mostly belong to Regosols and Cambisols orders. An ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer was used to obtain reflectance spectra from about 80 dried, crushed and sieved samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Samples were collected simultaneously with the flight of SIM.GA hyperspectral camera from Selex Galileo, over an area of about 5 km2 and their positions were recorded with a differential GPS. The quantitative determination of clay minerals content was performed by means of XRD and Rietveld refinement. Different chemometric techniques were preliminarily tested to correlate mineralogical records with reflectance data. A one component partial least squares regression model yielded a preliminary R2 value of 0.65. A slightly better result was achieved by plotting the absorption peak depth at 2210 versus total clay content (band-depth analysis). The complete SIM.GA hyperspectral geocoded row dataset, with an approximate pixel resolution of 0.6 m (VNIR) and 1.2 m (SWIR), was firstly transformed into at sensor radiance values, by applying calibration coefficients and parameters from laboratory measurements to non

  12. Calculation of hydraulic conductivities and capillary rise in peat soils from bulk density and solid matter volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated how unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of soils can be calculated from granular composition and organic matter content (BLOEMEN, 1980a). This type of calculations has to be restricted to mineral soils because the capillary properties of organic soils will not be

  13. ESTIMATION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND CONTENT OF FINES FROM EXPERIMENTAL LAWS THAT CORELATE HYDRAULIC AND ELECTRIC PARAMETERS

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor José Peinado-Guevara; Carlos René Green-Ruìz; Omar Delgado-Rodríguez; Jaime Herrera-Barrientos; Salvador Belmonte-Jiménez; María de los Ángeles Ladrón de Guevara Torres; Vladimir Shevnin

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a basic element in the advancement of knowledge of a geological environment in both the flow and transport processes of pollutants for conservation projects, managementand environmental management and also for the development of public policies for protection of ecosystems, among others. The aim of this paper is to obtain the hydraulic conductivity (K) and the finescontent (C) of saturated granular half using two empirical laws. One correlates the electrical conducti...

  14. Integrating models to simulate emergent behaviour: effects of organic matter on soil hydraulics in the ICZ-1D soil-vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valstar, Johan; Rowe, Ed; Konstantina, Moirogiorgou; Giannakis, Giorgos; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Soil develops as a result of interacting processes, many of which have been described in more or less detailed models. A key challenge in developing predictive models of soil function is to integrate processes that operate across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Many soil functions could be classified as "emergent", since they result from the interaction of subsystems. For example, soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics are commonly considered in relation to carbon storage, but can have profound effects on soil hydraulic properties that are conventionally considered to be static. Carbon fixed by plants enters the soil as litterfall, root turnover or via mycorrhizae. Plants need water and nutrients to grow, and an expanding root system provides access to a larger volume of soil for uptake of water and nutrients. Roots also provide organic exudates, such as oxalate, which increase nutrient availability. Carbon inputs are transformed at various rates into soil biota, CO2, and more persistent forms of organic matter. The SOM is partly taken up into soil aggregates of variable sizes, which slows down degradation. Water availability is an important factor as both plant growth and SOM degradation can be limited by shortage of water. Water flow is the main driver for transport of nutrients and other solutes. The flow of water in turn is influenced by the presence of SOM as this influences soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity. Towards the top of the unsaturated zone, bioturbation by the soil fauna transports both solid material and solutes. Weathering rates of minerals determine the availability of many nutrients and are in turn dependent on parameters such as pH, water content, CO2 pressure and oxalate concentration. Chemical reactions between solutes, dissolution and precipitation, and exchange on adsorption sites further influence solute concentrations. Within the FP7 SoilTrEC project, we developed a model that incorporates all of these processes, to

  15. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like ;shift; parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  16. Linking Soil Physical Parameters Along a Density Gradient in a Loess-Soil Long-Term Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    coefficient data; the model pore-connectivity factor was fairly constant, whereas the water blockage factor was markedly different. Water and air parameters both implied that change in bulk density was the major driver for diffusive and convective parameters in the experiment......., Bad Lauchstadt, Germany) on a loess soil that started more than 100 years ago with six different combinations of organic and mineral fertilizers. The parameters measured include soil texture, water retention curve, air-connected porosity, gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and saturated...... hydraulic conductivity. The management resulted in a distinct gradient in OC. A bulk density gradient developed from differences in amount of clay not complexed with OC. This gradient in bulk density mainly affected content of pores larger than 3 [mu]m. The air-connected porosity measured by a pycnometer...

  17. Laboratory analysis of soil hydraulic properties of G-5 soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Hydrologic Testing Laboratory at DBS&A has completed laboratory tests on TA-54 samples from well G5 as specified by Daniel James and summarized in Table 1. Tables 2 through 8 give the results of the specified analyses. Raw laboratory data and graphical plots of data (where appropriate) are contained in Appendices A through G. Appendix H lists the methods used in these analyses. A detailed description of each method is available upon request. Several sample-specific observations are important for data interpretation. Sample G-5 @ 21.5 was a short core and showed indications of preferential flow. Sample G-5 @ 92.5 developed a visually apparent crack during drying which correlates with the higher air permeabilities observed at lower water contents. Several samples yielded negative estimates of extrapolated intrinsic permeability while measured apparent permeabilities were reasonable. For consistency, however, only intrinsic values are presented. While our defined task is to provide data for interpretation, the following comments are offered as a context for some of the common parameter extraction issues. Further details and a more comprehensive summary of TA-54 data can be found in Unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the Bandelier tuff at TA-54 dated November 17, 1994.

  18. Implementation of Linear Pipe Channel Network to Estimate Hydraulic Parameters of Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Um, J. G.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of fluid flow is important in geological, petroleum, environmental, civil and mining engineering. Fluid flow through fractured hard rock is very much dependent on the fracture network pattern in the rock mass and on the flow behavior through these fractures. This research deals with fluid flow behavior through fractures at an abandoned copper mine in southeast Korea. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the mine site to monitor the hydraulic heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability and corresponding effective hydraulic aperture of the fractures. The three dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for the mine site. The two dimensional linear pipe network systems were constructed in directions of the observation wells using the fracture network model. A procedure of the fluid flow analysis on two dimensional discrete domain was applied to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in the 2-D linear pipe channel network. The present results indicate that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic characteristics of fractured rock masses.

  19. Ecohydrological controls on soil moisture and hydraulic conductivity within a pinyon-juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, I.; Madsen, M.D.; Chandler, D.G.; Robinson, D.A.; Wendroth, O.; Belnap, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of pinyon-juniper woodland encroachment on rangeland ecosystems is often associated with a reduction of streamflow and recharge and an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to investigate vegetational control on seasonal soil hydrologic properties along a 15-m transect in pinyon-juniper woodland with biocrust. We demonstrate that the juniper tree controls soil water content (SWC) patterns directly under the canopy via interception, and beyond the canopy via shading in a preferred orientation, opposite to the prevailing wind direction. The juniper also controls the SWC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured close to water saturation (K(h)) under the canopy by the creation of soil water repellency due to needle drop. We use this information to refine the hydrologic functional unit (HFU) concept into three interacting hydrologic units: canopy patches, intercanopy patches, and a transitional unit formed by intercanopy patches in the rain shadow of the juniper tree. Spatial autoregressive state-space models show the close relationship between K(h) close to soil water saturation and SWC at medium and low levels, integrating a number of influences on hydraulic conductivity. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Impact of water temperature and structural parameters on the hydraulic labyrinth-channel emitter performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Al-Amoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water temperature and structural parameters of a labyrinth emitter on drip irrigation hydraulic performance were investigated. The inside structural parameters of the trapezoidal labyrinth emitter include path width (W and length (L, trapezoidal unit numbers (N, height (H, and spacing (S. Laboratory experiments were conducted using five different types of labyrinth-channel emitters (three non-pressure compensating and two pressure-compensating emitters commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation systems. The water temperature effect on the hydraulic characteristics at various operating pressures was recorded and a comparison was made to identify the most effective structural parameter on emitter performance. The pressure compensating emitter flow exponent (x average was 0.014, while non-pressure compensating emitter’s values average was 0.456, indicating that the sensitivity of non-pressure compensating emitters to pressure variation is an obvious characteristic (p<0.001 of this type of emitters. The effects of water temperature on emitter flow rate were insignificant (p>0.05 at various operating pressures, where the flow rate index values for emitters were around one. The effects of water temperature on manufacturer’s coefficient of variation (CV values for all emitters were insignificant (p>0.05. The CV values of the non-pressure compensating emitters were lower than those of pressure compensating emitters. This is typical for most compensating models because they are manufactured with more elements than non-compensating emitters are. The results of regression analysis indicate that N and H are the essential factors (p<0.001 to affect the hydraulic performance.

  1. Analysis on the Initial Cracking Parameters of Cross-Measure Hydraulic Fracture in Underground Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial cracking pressure and locations are important parameters in conducting cross-measure hydraulic fracturing to enhance coal seam permeability in underground coalmines, which are significantly influenced by in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seam. In this study, stress state around cross-measure fracturing boreholes was analyzed using in-situ stress coordinate transformation, then a mathematical model was developed to evaluate initial cracking parameters of borehole assuming the maximum tensile stress criterion. Subsequently, the influences of in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seams on initial cracking pressure and locations in underground coalmines were analyzed using the proposed model. Finally, the proposed model was verified with field test data. The results suggest that the initial cracking pressure increases with the depth cover and coal seam dip angle. However, it decreases with the increase in azimuth of major principle stress. The results also indicate that the initial cracking locations concentrated in the second and fourth quadrant in polar coordinate, and shifted direction to the strike of coal seam as coal seam dip angle and azimuth of maximum principle stress increase. Field investigation revealed consistent rule with the developed model that the initial cracking pressure increases with the coal seam dip angle. Therefore, the proposed mathematical model provides theoretical insight to analyze the initial cracking parameters during cross-measure hydraulic fracturing for underground coalmines.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of hydraulic and thermal parameters inducing anomalous heat flow in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goretzki, Nora; Inbar, Nimrod; Kühn, Michael; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Schneider, Michael; Siebert, Christian; Magri, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    The Lower Yarmouk Gorge, at the border between Israel and Jordan, is characterized by an anomalous temperature gradient of 46 °C/km. Numerical simulations of thermally-driven flow show that ascending thermal waters are the result of mixed convection, i.e. the interaction between the regional flow from the surrounding heights and buoyant flow within permeable faults [1]. Those models were calibrated against available temperature logs by running several forward problems (FP), with a classic "trial and error" method. In the present study, inverse problems (IP) are applied to find alternative parameter distributions that also lead to the observed thermal anomalies. The investigated physical parameters are hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity. To solve the IP, the PEST® code [2] is applied via the graphical interface FEPEST® in FEFLOW® [3]. The results show that both hydraulic and thermal conductivity are consistent with the values determined with the trial and error calibrations, which precede this study. However, the IP indicates that the hydraulic conductivity of the Senonian Paleocene aquitard can be 8.54*10-3 m/d, which is three times lower than the originally estimated value in [1]. Moreover, the IP suggests that the hydraulic conductivity in the faults can increase locally up to 0.17 m/d. These highly permeable areas can be interpreted as local damage zones at the faults/units intersections. They can act as lateral pathways in the deep aquifers that allow deep outflow of thermal water. This presentation provides an example about the application of FP and IP to infer a wide range of parameter values that reproduce observed environmental issues. [1] Magri F, Inbar N, Siebert C, Rosenthal E, Guttman J, Möller P (2015) Transient simulations of large-scale hydrogeological processes causing temperature and salinity anomalies in the Tiberias Basin. Journal of Hydrology, 520, 342-355 [2] Doherty J (2010) PEST: Model-Independent Parameter Estimation. user

  3. Estimating the hydraulic parameters of a confined aquifer based on the response of groundwater levels to seismic Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Xiang, Yang; Shi, Zheming

    2018-01-01

    Groundwater flow models implemented to manage regional water resources require aquifer hydraulic parameters. Traditional methods for obtaining these parameters include laboratory experiments, field tests, and model inversions, and each are potentially hindered by their unique limitations. Here, we propose a methodology for estimating hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficients using the spectral characteristics of the coseismic groundwater-level oscillations and seismic Rayleigh waves. The results from Well X10 are consistent with the variations and spectral characteristics of the water-level oscillations and seismic waves and present an estimated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 × 10-3 m/s and storativity of 15 × 10-6. The proposed methodology for estimating hydraulic parameters in confined aquifers is a practical and novel approach for groundwater management and seismic precursor anomaly analyses.

  4. Simulating soil-water movement through loess-veneered landscapes using nonconsilient saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lee, Brad D.; Schoeneberger, Philip J.; McCauley, W. M.; Indorante, Samuel J.; Owens, Phillip R.

    2014-01-01

    Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) data are available for the entire United States, so are incorporated in many regional and national models of hydrology and environmental management. However, SSURGO does not provide an understanding of spatial variability and only includes saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) values estimated from particle size analysis (PSA). This study showed model sensitivity to the substitution of SSURGO data with locally described soil properties or alternate methods of measuring Ksat. Incorporation of these different soil data sets significantly changed the results of hydrologic modeling as a consequence of the amount of space available to store soil water and how this soil water is moved downslope. Locally described soil profiles indicated a difference in Ksat when measured in the field vs. being estimated from PSA. This, in turn, caused a difference in which soil layers were incorporated in the hydrologic simulations using TOPMODEL, ultimately affecting how soil water storage was simulated. Simulations of free-flowing soil water, the amount of water traveling through pores too large to retain water against gravity, were compared with field observations of water in wells at five slope positions along a catena. Comparison of the simulated data with the observed data showed that the ability to model the range of conditions observed in the field varied as a function of three soil data sets (SSURGO and local field descriptions using PSA-derived Ksat or field-measured Ksat) and that comparison of absolute values of soil water storage are not valid if different characterizations of soil properties are used.

  5. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A bayesian geostatistical parameter estimation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, M.; Hunt, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Clemo, T.

    2009-01-01

    Flow path delineation is a valuable tool for interpreting the subsurface hydrogeochemical environment. Different types of data, such as groundwater flow and transport, inform different aspects of hydrogeologie parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work combines flow and transport information to estimate a unified set of hydrogeologic parameters using the Bayesian geostatistical inverse approach. Parameter flexibility is allowed by using a highly parameterized approach with the level of complexity informed by the data. Despite the effort to adhere to the ideal of minimal a priori structure imposed on the problem, extreme contrasts in parameters can result in the need to censor correlation across hydrostratigraphic bounding surfaces. These partitions segregate parameters into faci??s associations. With an iterative approach in which partitions are based on inspection of initial estimates, flow path interpretation is progressively refined through the inclusion of more types of data. Head observations, stable oxygen isotopes (18O/16O) ratios), and tritium are all used to progressively refine flow path delineation on an isthmus between two lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, northern Wisconsin, United States. Despite allowing significant parameter freedom by estimating many distributed parameter values, a smooth field is obtained. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Determination of the saturated film conductivity to improve the EMFX model in describing the soil hydraulic properties over the entire moisture range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Guan, Huade; Zhu, Gaofeng

    2017-06-01

    Difficulty in measuring hydraulic conductivity, particularly under dry conditions, calls for methods of predicting the conductivity from easily obtained soil properties. As a complement to the recently published EMFX model, a method based on two specific suction conditions is proposed to estimate saturated film conductivity from the soil water retention curve. This method reduces one fitting parameter in the previous EMFX model, making it possible to predict the hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve over the complete moisture range. Model performance is evaluated with published data of soils in a broad texture range from sand to clay. The testing results indicate that 1) the modified EMFX model (namely the EMFX-K model), incorporating both capillary and adsorption forces, provides good agreement with the conductivity data over the entire moisture range; 2) a value of 0.5 for the tortuosity factor in the EMFX-K model as that in the Mualem's model gives comparable estimation of the relative conductivity associated with the capillary force; and 3) a value of -1.0 × 10-20 J for the Hamaker constant, rather than the commonly used value of -6.0 × 10-20 J, appears to be more appropriate to represent solely the effect of the van der Waals forces and to predict the film conductivity. In comparison with the commonly used van Genuchten-Mualem model, the EMFX-K model significantly improves the prediction of hydraulic conductivity under dry conditions. The sensitivity analysis result suggests that the uncertainty in the film thickness estimation is important in explaining the model underestimation of hydraulic conductivity for the soils with fine texture, in addition to the uncertainties from the measurements and the model structure. High quality data that cover the complete moisture range for a variety of soil textures are required to further test the method.

  7. Avaliação de parâmetros hidráulicos para modelos de distribuição de água no solo sob gotejamento Evaluation of soil hydraulic parameters for soil water distribution models under drip irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio Ferreira Coêlho

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available As soluções analíticas de distribuição de água para ponto fonte e regime de fluxo não- permanente são dependentes de parâmetros de solos considerados constantes em suas deduções. Erros na determinação desses parâmetros implicam insucesso dessas soluções. Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o comportamento dos parâmetros alfada equação de Gardner k(h = Ks ealfah e o parâmetro de linearização k = dK(teta/dteta em diferentes posições do bulbo molhado, considerando os processos de infiltração isolado e seguido de redistribuição de água, à semelhança de um ciclo de irrigação. Dados de potencial matricial foram coletados em diversas posições do bulbo molhado em duas situações:(i início da irrigação até atingir regime permanente em todo o bulbo molhado (infiltração; e (ii durante dois ciclos de irrigação envolvendo infiltração e redistribuição de água. Os resultados mostraram que os parâmetros alfa e k variaram nas posições do bulbo molhado em relação ao gotejador, de acordo com o regime de umidade a que tais posições estiveram sujeitas. A obtenção desses parâmetros pelo método inverso requer testes que considerem as fases de infiltração e redistribuição em pelo menos dois ciclos de irrigação.The transient analytical solutions for water distribution from point source are dependent on the soil parameters alpha from Gardner equation, i.e., k(h = Ks ealphah and the linearization parameter k=dK(theta/dtheta assumed constant in the derivation of these solutions. Errors in obtaining these parameters result in failure of the solutions. The objective of this work was to evaluate the parameter alpha and k at different locations in the wetted volume under an isolated and a cyclic infiltration process. Matric potential data were collected in several positions of the wetted volume in two situations: (i beginning of irrigation until steady-state, i.e., only during infiltration process, and (ii

  8. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity on clay content in soil determined from resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevnin, Vladimir; Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Mousatov, Aleksandr [Mexican Petroleum Institute, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Geophysical Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of clay content in sandy and clayey soils on hydraulic conductivity (filtration coefficient) is considered. A review of published experimental data on the relationship of hydraulic conductivity with soil lithology and grain size, as dependent on clay content is presented. Theoretical calculations include clay content. Experimental and calculated data agree, and several approximation formulas for filtration coefficient vs clay content are presented. Clay content in soil is estimated from electric resistivity data obtained from 2D VES interpretation. A two-step method is proposed, the first step including clay content calculating from soil resistivity and groundwater salinity, and the second step including filtration coefficient estimating from clay content. Two applications are presented. [Spanish] El contenido de arcilla en suelos areno-arcillosos influye sobre la permeabilidad hidraulica (coeficiente de filtracion). Se presenta una revision de datos experimentales publicados que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el tipo litologico del suelo y el tamano de las particulas. A partir de calculos teoricos, se modifican las conocidas formulas que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el contenido de arcilla. Se estima el contenido de arcilla a partir de los datos interpretados por el metodo SEV, y se propone un procedimiento para la estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion: (a) calculo del contenido de arcilla a partir de la resistividad del suelo y de la salinidad del agua subterranea, (b) estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion a partir del contenido de arcilla. Se presentan algunos ejemplos de la aplicacion de esta metodologia.

  9. The effect of measured and estimated soil hydraulic properties on simulated water regime in the analysis of grapevine adaptability to future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Antonello; Alfieri, Silvia Maria; Agrillo, Antonietta; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Mileti, Antonio; Monaco, Eugenia; De Lorenzi, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    In the last years many research works have been addressed to evaluate the impact of future climate on crop productivity and plant water use at different spatial scales (global, regional, field) by means of simulation models of agricultural crop systems. Most of these approaches use estimated soil hydraulic properties, through pedotransfer functions (PTF). This choice is related to soil data availability: soil data bases lack measured soil hydraulic properties, but generally they contain information that allow the application of PTF . Although the reliability of the predicted future climate scenarios cannot be immediately validated, we address to evaluate the effects of a simplification of the soil system by using PTF. Thus we compare simulations performed with measured soil hydraulic properties versus simulations carried out with estimated properties. The water regimes resulting from the two procedures are evaluated with respect to crop adaptability to future climate. In particular we will examine if the two procedures bring about different seasonal and spatial variations in the soil water regime patterns, and if these patterns influence adaptation options. The present case study uses the agro-hydrological model SWAP (soil-water-atmosphere and plant) and studies future adaptability of grapevine. The study area is a viticultural area of Southern Italy (Valle Telesina, BN) devoted to the production of high quality wines (DOC and DOCG), and characterized by a complex geomorphology and pedology. The future climate scenario (2021-2050) was constructed applying statistical downscaling techniques to GCMs scenarios. The moisture regime for 25 soils of the selected study area was calculated by means of SWAP model, using both measured and estimated soil hydraulic properties. In the simulation, the upper boundary conditions were derived from the regional climate scenarios. Unit gradient in soil water potential was set as lower boundary condition. Crop-specific input data and

  10. Influence of temperature and hydraulic conductivity of soil on electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The electrokinetic process holds great promise for the decontamination of contaminated soil because it has a high removal efficiency and is time-effective for low permeability. Electrokinetic decontamination can be used to treat soil contaminated with inorganic species and radionuclides. The main mechanisms of a contaminant's movement in an electrical field involved in electrokinetic technology are the electro-migration of the ionic species and electro-osmosis. Electro-migration probably contributes significantly to the removal of contaminants, especially at high concentrations of ionic contaminants and/or a high hydraulic permeability of soil. The cathode reaction should be depolarized to avoid the generation of hydroxides and their transport in soil. The selected liquid, also known as a purging reagent, should induce favorable pH conditions in soil, and/or interact with the incorporated heavy metals so that these heavy metals are removed from the soil. The removal efficiencies of uranium from contaminated soil in manufactured laboratory electrokinetic decontamination equipment were proportional to the elapsed time. The removal efficiencies of uranium for 2 days were 77-87%. In addition, the removal efficiencies according to the elapsed time after 2 days were reduced. When 75, 80, and 85℃ electrolyte temperatures in the cathode chamber were applied, the time required for the removal efficiency of uranium to reach 92% was 6, 5 and 4 days.

  11. Wildfire Effects on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Subsurface Flow Pathways in Southwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, K. D.; Cole, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Stouts Creek wildfire burned 10,700 ha of forestland in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains in southwestern Oregon in summer 2015. Burn severity was spatially variable, with 17% of the landscape burning at high severity and 33% at medium severity. Two small headwater catchments (Stouts Ck and Callahan Ck), which were more severely impacted by the wildfire, were investigated regarding the effects of wildfire on soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation. Mean soil moisture in the surface soil layer (θsurf; 0-5 cm) along unburned hillslopes was 20.4% ± 2.5%, while mean θsurf on burned hillslopes was 13.9% ± 2.2% (F = 11.8; p = .002). Similarly, mean θdepth (5-10 cm) on reference hillslopes was 22.0 ± 2.2%, and mean θdepth on burned hillslopes was 17.6 ± 2.8% (F = 4.54; p = .042). Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was approximately the same at the soil surface in the unburned (3.34 mm hr-1) and burned catchments (2.76 mm hr-1)—however, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at 10 cm depth in the soil was 3-times greater along unburned hillslopes compared to the burned hillslopes (χ2 = 6.5; p = .01). A dye tracer experiment and soil profile image analysis showed high variability in infiltration and subsurface flow paths between reference and burned plots. Dye image analysis suggested that water infiltrated and moved vertically as a more uniform wetting front with little evidence of lateral movement of water downslope in the reference plots. Alternatively, the burned plots showed greater evidence of heterogeneous finger flow, as well as evidence of overland flow, which produced gullies (>4 m long, 0.5 m wide) below the bottom edges of the burned plots. Overall, results suggest the wildfire impacted soil structure with likely impacts on surface runoff and subsurface flow pathways—these hillslope changes can influence the timing and magnitude of streamflow and increase soil erosion, negatively affecting source water quality.

  12. Impact of anthropomorphic soil genesis on hydraulic properties: the case of cranberry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean; Hallema, Dennis W.

    2014-05-01

    The construction of a cranberry field requires the installation of a drainage system which causes anthropic layering of the natural sequence of soil strata. Over the years, the soil hydraulic properties may change under the influence of irrigation and water table control. In fact, natural consolidation (drainage and recharge cycles), filtration and clogging soil pores by colloidal particle accelerated by water management will alter the hydrodynamic behavior of the soil (Gaillard et al., 2007; Wildenschild and Sheppard, 2013; Bodner et al., 2013). Today, advances in the field of tomography imagery allows the study a number of physicals processes of soils (Wildenschilds and Sheppard, 2013) especially for the transport of colloidal particles (Gaillard et al., 2007) and consolidation (Reed et al, 2006; Pires et al, 2007). Therefore, the main objective of this work is to analyze the temporal evolution of hydrodynamic properties of a sandy soil during repeated drainage and recharge cycles using a medical CT-scan. A soil columns laboratory experiment was setup in fall 2013, pressure head, input and output flow, tracer monitoring (KBr and ZrO2) and tomographic analyses have been used to quantify the temporal variation of the soil hydrodynamic properties of these soil columns. The results showed that the water management (irrigation and drainage) has strong effect on soil genesis and causes significant alteration of soil hydraulic properties, which may reduce soil drainage capacity. Knowledge about the mechanisms responsible of anthropic cranberry soil genesis will allow us to predict soil evolution according to several conditions (soil type, drainage system design, water management) to better anticipate and control their future negative effects on cranberry production. References: Bodner, G., P. Scholl and H.P. Kaul. 2013. Field quantification of wetting-drying cycles to predict temporal changes of soil pore size distribution. Soil and Tillage Research 133: 1-9. doi

  13. Field scale variability of solute transport parameters and related soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lennartz

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of transport parameters has to be taken into account for a reliable assessment of solute behaviour in natural field soils. Two field sites were studied by collecting 24 and 36 small undisturbed soil columns at an uniform grid of 15 m spacing. Displacement experiments were conducted in these columns with bromide traced water under unsaturated steady state transport conditions. Measured breakthrough curves (BTCs were evaluated with the simple convective-dispersive equation (CDE. The solute mobility index (MI calculated as the ratio of measured to fitted pore water velocity and the dispersion coefficient (D were used to classify bromide breakthrough behaviour. Experimental BTCs were classified into two groups: type I curves expressed classical solute behaviour while type II curves were characterised by the occurrence of a bromide concentration maximum before 0.35 pore volumes of effluent (MI<0.35 resulting from preferential flow conditions. Six columns from site A and 8 from site B were identified as preferential. Frequency distributions of the transport parameters (MI and D of both sites were either extremely skewed or bimodal. Log-transformation did not lead to a normal distribution in any case. Contour maps of bromide mass flux at certain time steps indicated the clustering of preferential flow regions at both sites. Differences in the extent of preferential flow between sites seemed to be governed by soil structure. Linear cross correlations among transport parameters and independently measured soil properties revealed relations between solute mobility and volumetric soil water content at time of sampling, texture and organic carbon content. The volumetric field soil water content, a simple measure characterising the soil hydraulic behaviour at the sampling location, was found to be a highly sensitive parameter with respect to solute mobility and preferential flow situations. Almost no relation was found between solute

  14. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  15. A Long-Term Strategic Plan for Hanford Sediment Physical Property and Vadose Zone Hydraulic Parameter Databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2009-09-30

    Physical property data and unsaturated hydraulic parameters are critical input for analytic and numerical models used to predict transport and fate of contaminants in variably saturated porous media and to assess and execute remediation alternatives. The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. Efforts have been initiated to transfer sediment physical property data and vadose zone hydraulic parameters to CHPRC for inclusion in HEIS-Geo, a new instance of the Hanford Environmental Information System database that is being developed for borehole geologic data. This report describes these efforts and a strategic plan for continued updating and improvement of these datasets.

  16. Investigation and Parameter Optimization of a Hydraulic Ram Pump Using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Dhrupad; Das, Monotosh; Brahma, Bipul; Pandwar, Deepak; Rongphar, Sermirlong; Rahman, Mafidur

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research work is to investigate the effect of Waste Valve height and Pressure Chamber height on the output flow rate of a Hydraulic ram pump. Also the second objective of this work is to optimize them for a hydraulic ram pump delivering water up to a height of 3.81 m (12.5 feet ) from the ground with a drive head (inlet head) of 1.86 m (6.11 feet). Two one-factor-at-a-time experiments have been conducted to decide the levels of the selected input parameters. After deciding the input parameters, an experiment has been designed using Taguchi's L9 Orthogonal Array with three repetitions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is carried out to verify the significance of effect of the factors on the output flow rate of the pump. Results show that the height of the Waste Valve and height of the Pressure Chamber have significant effect on the outlet flow of the pump. For a pump of drive pipe diameter (inlet pipe) 31.75 mm (1.25 in.) and delivery pipe diameter of 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) the optimum setting was found out to be at a height of 114.3 mm (4.5 in.) of the Waste Valve and 406.4 mm (16 in.) of the Pressure vessel providing a delivery flow rate of 93.14 l per hour. For the same pump estimated range of output flow rate is, 90.65-94.97 l/h.

  17. Quantifying the transferability of hydraulic parameters using geostatistics: The Boom Clay Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannée, N.; Berckmans, A.; Wouters, L.; Deraisme, J.; Chilès, J. P.

    The Boom Clay is currently investigated as potential host formation for the deep disposal of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste in Belgium. As such, the formation is expected to play a role of natural barrier, to slow the migration of radionuclides towards the biosphere for a sufficiently long time when the man-made barriers are no longer effective. In this context, the Boom Clay aquitard requires to be precisely characterized in terms of hydrogeological parameters, to confirm its role of geological barrier between its surrounding aquifers. Therefore, hydraulic conductivity and migration parameters have been intensively measured over the years in a few boreholes in Belgium; the latter are mainly located in the Mol-Dessel area, assuming historically a good lateral continuity of the geology. Combining these measurements with more densely acquired geophysical information allows quantifying their spatial variability and consolidating the continuity assumption. From a methodological point of view, the modeling of hydrogeological parameters requires to solve several issues. First, it is required to find a consistent geo-reference coordinate system allowing to laterally correlate thin observations derived from boreholes separated by several tens of kilometers. Then, in order to provide a reliable 3D model, it is compulsory to integrate the correlation between the scarcely sampled target parameters (core measurements) and numerous geophysical logs (gamma ray, resistivity). Geostatistics provides a suitable framework to analyze and solve these issues. Finally, a 3D model of the target parameters is proposed, together with an uncertainty envelope. This uncertainty quantification is of significant added value to assess the efficiency of the geological barrier. Besides the actual modeling of target parameters, the paper also presents sampling recommendations for forthcoming boreholes.

  18. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  19. A New Parameter to Assess Hydromechanical Effect in Single-hole Hydraulic Testing and Grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2007-09-01

    Grouting or filling of the open voids in fractured rock is done by introducing a fluid, a grout, through boreholes under pressure. The grout may be either a Newtonian fluid or a Bingham fluid. The penetration of the grout and the resulting pressure profile may give rise to hydromechanical effects, which depends on factors such as the fracture aperture, pressure at the borehole and the rheological properties of the grout. In this paper, we postulate that a new parameter, {angstrom}, which is the integral of the fluid pressure change in the fracture plane, is an appropriate measure to describe the change in fracture aperture volume due to a change in effective stress. In many cases, analytic expressions are available to calculate pressure profiles for relevant input data and the {angstrom} parameter. The approach is verified against a fully coupled hydromechanical simulator for the case of a Newtonian fluid. Results of the verification exercise show that the new approach is reasonable and that the {angstrom}-parameter is a good measure for the fracture volume change: i.e., the larger the {angstrom}-parameter, the larger the fracture volume change, in an almost linear fashion. To demonstrate the application of the approach, short duration hydraulic tests and constant pressure grouting are studied. Concluded is that using analytic expressions for penetration lengths and pressure profiles to calculate the {angstrom} parameter provides a possibility to describe a complex situation and compare, discuss and weigh the impact of hydromechanical couplings for different alternatives. Further, the analyses identify an effect of high-pressure grouting, where uncontrolled grouting of larger fractures and insufficient (or less-than-expected) sealing of finer fractures is a potential result.

  20. On the quantitative relationships between environmental parameters and heavy metals pollution in Mediterranean soils using GIS regression-trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bou Kheir, Rania; Shomar, B.; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2014-01-01

    the relationships between four toxic heavy metals (Ni, Cr, Cd and As) and sixteen environmental parameters (e.g., parent material, slope gradient, proximity to roads, etc.) in the soils of northern Lebanon (as a case study of Mediterranean landscapes), and to detect the most important parameters that can be used...... between 68% and 100%), surroundings of waste areas (48 – 92%), proximity to roads (45 – 82%) and parent materials (57 – 73%) considerably influenced all investigated heavy metals, which is not the case of hydromorphological and soil properties. For instance, hydraulic conductivity (18 – 41%) and pH (23...

  1. A Modified van Genuchten-Mualem Model of Hydraulic Conductivity in Korean Residual Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seboong Oh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the Mualem capillary model, hydraulic conductivity (HC is integrated theoretically from the function related to soil water retention curves (SWRC. On the other hand, based on the smooth type of SWRC, the predicted HC function decreases abruptly near saturation, which often challenges the stability of numerical solutions. To improve the Mualem HC, van Genuchten’s function for SWRC was modified within the range of low matric suction. The van Genuchten-Mualem HC was then modified to integrate the proposed SWRC for each interval decomposed by a tangential curve. The analytical solutions of the modified HC were derived to prevent an abrupt decrease near saturation. The SWRC and HC data were acquired from laboratory tests for unsaturated soils sampled from five areas in Korea. The results of the HC tests were compared with the theoretical HC models using both the van Genuchten SWRCs and the modified curves. For fine grained soils, the modified model predicts a saturated HC at very small suctions. Furthermore, the modified model was shown to accurately predict the unsaturated behavior of the HC functions for Korean weathered soils.

  2. Gamma ray transmission for hydraulic conductivity measurement of undisturbed soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Camargo Moreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work had the objective to determine the Hydraulic Conductivity K(theta function for different depth levels z, of columns of undisturbed soil, using the gamma ray transmission technique applied to the Sisson method. The results indicated a growing behavior for K(theta and a homogeneous soil density, both in relation to the increase of the depth. The methodology of gamma ray transmission showed satisfactory results on the determination of the hydraulic conductivity in columns of undisturbed soil, besides being very reliable and a nondestructive method.O estudo da condutividade hidráulica para solos não saturados é essencial quando aplicado às situações relacionadas à irrigação, drenagem e transporte de nutrientes no solo, é uma importante propriedade para desenvolvimentos de culturas agrícolas. Este trabalho tem o objetivo de determinar a função Condutividade Hidráulica K(teta, em diferentes níveis z de profundidade, em colunas de solo indeformado, utilizando a transmissão de raios gama aplicada ao método de Sisson. Os resultados indicam um comportamento crescente para K(teta e uma densidade de solo homogênea, ambos em relação ao aumento da profundidade. A metodologia de transmissão de raios gama mostrou resultados bastante satisfatórios na determinação da condutividade hidráulica em colunas de solo indeformado, além de ser muito confiável e não destrutivo.

  3. METHODOLOGY FOR HYDRAULIC CALCULATION OF RIVER REGULATION AND DETERMINATION OF DIKE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Mikhnevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Territory protection against flood water inundation and creation of polder systems are carried out with the help of protection dikes. One of the main requirements to the composition of polder systems in flood plains is a location of border dikes beyond meander belt in order to avoid their erosion when meander development occurs. Meander belt width can be determined on the basis of the analysis of multi-year land surveying pertaining top river-bed building and in the case when such data is not available this parameter is calculated in accordance with the Snishchenko formula. While banking-up a river bed a flooded area is decreasing and, consequently, water level in inter-dike space and rate of flood water are significantly increasing. For this reason it is necessary to locate dikes at a such distance from a river bed which will not cause rather high increase in water level and flow velocity in the inter-dike space. Methodology for hydraulic calculation of river regulation has been developed in order to substantiate design parameters for levee systems, creation of favourable hydraulic regime in these systems and provision of sustainability for dikes. Its main elements are calculations of pass-through capacity of the leveed channel and rise of water level in inter-dike space, and distance between dikes and their crest level. Peculiar feature of the proposed calculated formulae is an interaction consideration of channel and inundated flows. Their mass-exchanging process results in slowing-down of the channel flow and acceleration of the inundated flow. This occurrence is taken into account and coefficients of kinematic efficiency are introduced to the elements of water flow rate in the river channel and flood plain, respectively. The adduced dependencies for determination of a dike crest level (consequently their height take into consideration a rise of water level in inter-dike space for two types of polder systems: non-inundable (winter dikes with

  4. Evaluation of physico-chemical parameters of agricultural soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of physico-chemical parameters of agricultural soils irrigated by the waters of the hydrolic basin of Sebou River and their influences on the transfer of trace elements into sugar crops (the case of sugar cane)

  5. Instrumentation of Lysimeter Experiments and Monitoring of Soil Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, T.; Tallos, A.; Millan, R.; Vera, R.; Recreo, F.

    2004-07-01

    This study forms part of the project Mercurio and Recuperation de Terrenos Afectados por Mercurio Ambiental (RETAMA), which determines the behaviour of mercury in the soil-plant system within the area of Almaden. The objective of this work is to instrument lysimeters with a set of electronic sensors to monitor physical and chemical soil parameters (moisture content, soil temperature, soil water matrix potential. Eh and pH) over a period of a complete vegetation cycle for selected crops. Physical and chemical soil analyses have been carried out on samples two soil profiles marking the extreme perimeter where the lysimeters were extracted. The monitoring data obtained every half hour show that the physicochemical conditions of the soils in the lysimeter can be correlated with the type of cultivation in the lysimeters. The results for parameters such as soil water matrix potential and the soil temperature reflect the diurnal changes; and fluctuations of the Eh can be related to the biological activities in the soils and are within oxid and suboxic conditions. Slight fluctuations have been observed for the pH and constant volumetric moisture content is maintained during the period of no hydric stress. (Author) 16 refs.

  6. A flexible system for the estimation of infiltration and hydraulic resistance parameters in surface irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical to the use of modeling tools for the hydraulic analysis of surface irrigation systems is characterizing the infiltration and hydraulic resistance process. Since those processes are still not well understood, various formulations are currently used to represent them. A software component h...

  7. Experimental examination of the relationships among chemico-osmotic, hydraulic, and diffusion parameters of Wakkanai mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Manaka, M.; Finsterle, S.; Ito, K.

    2014-05-01

    Sequential permeability and chemical osmosis experiments on Wakkanai mudstones were performed to explore the relationships between the semipermeability of clayey rocks and the hydraulic and diffusion parameters as well as the pore structure characteristics. The wide ranges in osmotic efficiency (0.0004-0.046) and intrinsic permeability (8.92 × 10-20 to 1.24 × 10-17 m2) reflect the variation in the pore size distributions of the Wakkanai mudstones. A regression analysis between osmotic efficiency and permeability shows that the osmotic efficiency is proportional to the inverse of permeability, suggesting that the permeability is indeed indicative of the degree of semipermeability. Osmotic efficiency was determined invariant with the effective diffusion coefficient for the Wakkanai mudstones (3.59-8.36 × 10-11 m2/s) due to their small osmotic efficiencies (≤0.046). The wide variation in osmotic efficiencies and pore structure characteristics of Wakkanai mudstones indicates that the nanoscale pores enable semipermeability in Wakkanai mudstones. However, the pressure evolution caused by chemical osmosis is limited by the connected wide pores that are the main conduits for water, thus dissipating the osmotic pressure buildup induced by the semipermeability of nanoscale pores.

  8. Sensitivity of soil water fluxes to changes in vegetation and root parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawitsch, Veronika; Birk, Steffen; Herndl, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Climate change will cause changes in soil water fluxes, on the one hand, because of the direct effect of changing precipitation and evaporative demand; on the other hand, climate change is expected to alter the vegetation cover and the plant roots, thus causing indirect effects on root water uptake and transpiration. In this work, the sensitivity of soil water fluxes to changes in vegetation and root parameters are examined using model scenarios implemented in Hydrus 1D. Reasonable ranges of Leaf Area Index, crop coefficient and root distribution parameters for Alpine grasslands affected by rising temperature and increasing carbon dioxide concentration of the atmosphere are derived from a literature review and from observations at the experimental Clim-Grass site (Herndl and Pötsch, 2013), where 54 plots equipped with the free-air carbon dioxide enrichment technique and infrared heaters (T-FACE technique) represent various combinations of increased carbon dioxide concentration and increased temperature. The results from this sensitivity study serve to identify the most influential vegetation and root parameters, thus supporting both the design of a monitoring strategy for the experimental site and future inverse modelling efforts aimed at identifying the effects of carbon dioxide enrichment and increasing temperature on the effective soil hydraulic and root distribution parameters.

  9. Impact of soil texture and water availability on the hydraulic control of plant and grape-berry development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara Tramontini; Cornelis van Leeuwen; Jean-Christophe Domec; Agnès Destrac-Irvine; Cyril Basteau; Marco Vitali; Olaf Mosbach-Schulz; Claudio Lovisolo

    2013-01-01

    All components of the soil-plant-atmosphere (s-p-a) continuum are known to control berry quality in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) via ecophysiological interactions between water uptake by roots and water loss by leaves. The scope of the present work was to explore how the main hydraulic components of grapevine influence fruit quality through changes...

  10. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Paulo H S; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X; Orlande, Helcio R B; Cotta, Renato M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical

  11. Rheological Parameters as Affected by Water Tension in Subtropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pértile

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rheological parameters have been used to study the interaction between particles and the structural strength of soils subjected to mechanical stresses, in which soil composition and water content most strongly affect soil resistance to deformation. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of water tension on rheological parameters of soils with different mineralogical, physical, and chemical composition. Surface and subsurface horizons of four Oxisols, two Ultisols, one Alfisol, and one Vertisol were physically and chemically characterized; their rheological parameters were obtained from amplitude sweep tests under oscillatory shear on disturbed soil samples that were saturated and subjected to water tension of 1, 3, 6, and 10 kPa. In these samples, the rheological parameters linear viscoelastic deformation limit (γL, maximum shear stress (τmax, and integral z were determined. By simple regression analysis of the rheological parameters as a function of soil water tension, we observed increased mechanical strength with increasing water tension up to at least 6 kPa, primarily due to increased capillary forces in the soil. However, increased elasticity assessed by γL was not as expressive as the increase in structural rigidity assessed by τmax and integral z. Elastic deformation of the soil (γL increases with the increase in the number of bonds among particles, which depend on the clay, total carbon, expansive clay mineral, and cation contents; however, maximum shear resistance (τmax and structural stiffness (integral z mainly increase with clay, kaolinite, and oxide content by increasing the strength of interparticle bonds. A decrease in mechanical strength occurs for water tension of 10 kPa (the lowest water content evaluated in sandy horizons or in horizons with a high proportion of resistant microaggregates (pseudosand, when associated with low bulk density, due to fewer points of contact between soil particles and therefore

  12. In-Situ Hydraulic Conductivities of Soils and Anomalies at a Future Biofuel Production Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, M. F.; Jackson, C. R.; Hale, J. C.; Sletten, H. R.

    2010-12-01

    Forested hillslopes of the Upper Coastal Plain at the Savannah River Site, SC, feature a shallow clay loam argillic layer with low median saturated hydraulic conductivity. Observations from a grid of shallow, maximum-rise piezometers indicate that perching on this clay layer is common. However, flow measurements from an interflow-interception trench indicate that lateral flow is rare and most soil water percolates through the clay layer. We hypothesize that the lack of frequent lateral flow is due to penetration of the clay layer by roots of pine trees. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the soil structure and potential anomalies, such as root holes, down to two meters depth at three 10×10-m plots. At each plot, a 1×10-m trench was later back-hoe excavated along a transect that showed the most anomalies on the GPR maps. Each trench was excavated at 0.5-m intervals until the clay layer was reached (two plots were excavated to a final depth of 0.875 m and the third plot was excavated to a final depth of 1.0 m). At each interval, compact constant-head permeameters (CCHPs) were used to measure in-situ hydraulic conductivities in the clay-loam matrix and in any visually apparent anomalies. Conductivity was also estimated using a second 1×10-m transect of CCHP measurements taken within randomly placed augur holes. Additional holes targeted GPR anomalies. The second transect was created in case the back-hoe impacted conductivity readings. High-conductivity anomalies were also visually investigated by excavating with a shovel. Photographs of soil wetness were taken at visually apparent anomalies with a multispectral camera. We discovered that all visually apparent anomalies found are represented on the GPR maps, but that not all of the predicted anomalies on the GPR maps are visually apparent. We discovered that tree root holes create anomalies, but that there were also many conductivity anomalies that could not be visually distinguished from low

  13. Effects of land use and management on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity of soils within River Njoro Watershed in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary G. Mainuri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been tremendous changes in land use and management in the River Njoro Watershed during the last three decades. Formerly large scale farms have been converted into smallholder farms and plantation forests have gradually been lost. These changes in land use and management have brought in different approaches that have triggered soil erosion and other forms of land degradation. The objective of this study was to trace the changes in land use and determine their effects on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity. A semi detailed soil survey of the watershed was undertaken following a three-tier approach comprising image interpretation, field surveys and laboratory analysis. The measured variables in the soil were analysed using ANOVA and correlation analysis. The major land uses were found to be forestland, agricultural land, grassland, and wetland. A strong soil type _ landscape relationship was observed within the watershed. Soils of slopes were moderately to severely eroded, shallow and less developed whereas those on summits, pen plains, uplands, plateaus and valleys were deep and well developed. Aggregate stability was the highest in forestland and decreased in the order of grassland, agricultural land and wetland respectively. The mean weight diameter under the various land use conditions was 0.68, 0.64, 0.58, and 0 41 respectively. Hydraulic conductivity was the highest in forest-land and decreased in the order of agricultural land, grassland and wetland respectively. There was significant negative correlation between hydraulic conductivity and the bulk density and clay content of the soils. Reduced aggregate stability and lowered hydraulic conductivity is likely to be responsible for some of the severe soil erosion and other forms of land degradation observed in the River Njoro Watershed.

  14. Soil parameter retrieval under vegetation cover using SAR polarimetery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagdhuber, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Soil conditions under vegetation cover and their spatial and temporal variations from point to catchment scale are crucial for understanding hydrological processes within the vadose zone, for managing irrigation and consequently maximizing yield by precision farming. Soil moisture and soil roughness are the key parameters that characterize the soil status. In order to monitor their spatial and temporal variability on large scales, remote sensing techniques are required. Therefore the determination of soil parameters under vegetation cover was approached in this thesis by means of (multi-angular) polarimetric SAR acquisitions at a longer wavelength (L-band, {lambda}{sub c}=23cm). In this thesis, the penetration capabilities of L-band are combined with newly developed (multi-angular) polarimetric decomposition techniques to separate the different scattering contributions, which are occurring in vegetation and on ground. Subsequently the ground components are inverted to estimate the soil characteristics. The novel (multi-angular) polarimetric decomposition techniques for soil parameter retrieval are physically-based, computationally inexpensive and can be solved analytically without any a priori knowledge. Therefore they can be applied without test site calibration directly to agricultural areas. The developed algorithms are validated with fully polarimetric SAR data acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for three different study areas in Germany. The achieved results reveal inversion rates up to 99% for the soil moisture and soil roughness retrieval in agricultural areas. However, in forested areas the inversion rate drops significantly for most of the algorithms, because the inversion in forests is invalid for the applied scattering models at L-band. The validation against simultaneously acquired field measurements indicates an estimation accuracy (root mean square error) of 5-10vol.% for the soil moisture (range of in situ

  15. Characterising and linking X-ray CT derived macroporosity parameters to infiltration in soils with contrasting structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Karin; Katuwal, Sheela; Young, Iain

    2017-01-01

    with X-ray CT. Kunsat was significantly higher in the Andosol than in the Gleysol at all water potentials, and decreased significantly with depth in both soils. The in situ measurements guided the definition of new macroporosity parameters from the X-ray CT reconstructions. For the Andosol, Kunsat......Soils deliver the regulating ecosystem services of water infiltration and distribution, which can be controlled by macropores. Parameterizing macropore hydraulic properties is challenging due to the lack of direct measurement methods. With tension-disc infiltrometry hydraulic properties near...... saturation can be measured. Differentiating between hydrologically active and non-active pores, at a given water potential, indirectly assesses macropore continuity. Water flow through macropores is controlled by macropore size distribution, tortuosity, and connectivity, which can be directly derived by X...

  16. Characterising and linking X-ray CT derived macroporosity parameters to infiltration in soils with contrasting structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Karin; Katuwal, Sheela; Young, Iain

    2018-01-01

    with X-ray CT. Kunsat was significantly higher in the Andosol than in the Gleysol at all water potentials, and decreased significantly with depth in both soils. The in situ measurements guided the definition of new macroporosity parameters from the X-ray CT reconstructions. For the Andosol, Kunsat......Soils deliver the regulating ecosystem services of water infiltration and distribution, which can be controlled by macropores. Parameterizing macropore hydraulic properties is challenging due to the lack of direct measurement methods. With tension-disc infiltrometry hydraulic properties near...... saturation can be measured. Differentiating between hydrologically active and non-active pores, at a given water potential, indirectly assesses macropore continuity. Water flow through macropores is controlled by macropore size distribution, tortuosity, and connectivity, which can be directly derived by X...

  17. Land-use effects on flood generation – considering soil hydraulic measurements in modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Münch

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigation in the catchment of the Mulde (51°0'55" N, 13°15'54" E Saxony, Germany researches the effect of afforestation measures on the soil hydraulic properties. The concept of a "false chronosequence" was used to quantify the time-dependent dynamical character of the forest impact. Four adjacent plots were identified at a test location with comparable pedological start conditions and a set of tree stands of different age: (1 arable field (initial state; (2 6-year-old afforestation; (3 50-year-old afforestation; (4 ancient natural forest ("target" stocking. Water retention curves and unsaturated conductivities were analysed in the lab. In the field, the undisturbed infiltration capacities were measured quantitatively (hood infiltrometer and qualitatively (brilliant blue tracer. Pronounced differences between all 4 plots were detected. The afforestation causes an increased infiltration and soil water retention potential. Especially the topsoil layers showed a distinct increase in conductivity and portion of coarse/middle pores. The influence of these changes on rainfall-runoff calculations at the test location was analysed in this study.

  18. Hydraulic conductivity of a sandy soil at low water content after compaction by various methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Akstin, Katherine C.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the degree to which compaction of a sandy soil influences its unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K, samples of Oakley sand (now in the Delhi series; mixed, thermic, Typic Xeropsamments) were packed to various densities and K was measured by the steady-state centrifuge method. The air-dry, machine packing was followed by centrifugal compression with the soil wet to about one-third saturation. Variations in (i) the impact frequency and (ii) the impact force during packing, and (iii) the amount of centrifugal force applied after packing, produced a range of porosity from 0.333 to 0.380. With volumetric water content θ between 0.06 and 0.12, K values were between 7 × 10−11 and 2 × 10−8 m/s. Comparisons of K at a single θ value for samples differing in porosity by about 3% showed as much as fivefold variation for samples prepared by different packing procedures, while there generally was negligible variation (within experimental error of 8%) where the porosity difference resulted from a difference in centrifugal force. Analysis involving capillary-theory models suggests that the differences in K can be related to differences in pore-space geometry inferred from water retention curves measured for the various samples.

  19. Using a physically-based transit time distribution function to estimate the hydraulic parameters and hydraulic transit times of an unconfined aquifer from tritium measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Maloszewski, Piotr; Schneider, Wilfried; Gallé, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater transit time is of interest in environmental studies pertaining to the transport of pollutants from its source to the aquifer outlet (spring or pumping well) or to an observation well. Different models have been proposed to describe the distribution of transit times within groundwatersheds, the most common being the dispersion model, the exponential-piston-flow model (EPM) both proposed by Maloszewski and Zuber (Maloszewski and Zuber, 1982) and the (two or three parameter) gamma model (Amin and Campana, 1996; Kirchner et al., 1999). Choosing which function applies best is a recurrent and controversial problem in hydrogeology. The object of this study is to revisit the applicability of the EPM for unconfined aquifers, and to introduce an alternative model based explicitly on groundwater hydraulics. The alternative model is based on the transit time of water from any point at the groundwater table to the aquifer outlet, and is used to calculate inversely the hydraulic parameters of a fractured unconfined sandstone aquifer from tritium measurements made in a series of contact springs. This model is compared to the EPM, which is usually adopted to describe the transit time distribution of confined and unconfined aquifers alike. Both models are tested against observations, and it is shown that the EPM fails the test for some of the springs, and generally seems to overestimate the older water component. Amin, I. E., and M. E. Campana (1996), A general lumped parameter model for the interpretation of tracer data and transit time calculation in hydrologic systems, Journal of Hydrology, 179, 1-21, doi: 10.1016/0022-1694(95)02880-3. Kirchner, J. W., X. H. Feng, and C. Neal (1999), Fractal stream chemistry and its implications for contaminant transport in catchments, Nature physics, 403, 524-527, doi: 10.1038/35000537. Maloszewski, P., and A. Zuber (1982), Determining the turnover time of groundwater systems with the aid of environmental tracers, Journal of

  20. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  1. Reactive transport modelling to infer changes in soil hydraulic properties induced by non-conventional water irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Candela, Lucila; Jacques, Diederik; Kohfahl, Claus; Tamoh, Karim

    2017-06-01

    The use of non-conventional water (e.g., treated wastewater, desalinated water) for different purposes is increasing in many water scarce regions of the world. Its use for irrigation may have potential drawbacks, because of mineral dissolution/precipitation processes, such as changes in soil physical and hydraulic properties (e.g., porosity, permeability), modifying infiltration and aquifer recharge processes or blocking root growth. Prediction of soil and groundwater impacts is essential for achieving sustainable agricultural practices. A numerical model to solve unsaturated water flow and non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport has been modified implementing the spatio-temporal evolution of soil physical and hydraulic properties. A long-term process simulation (30 years) of agricultural irrigation with desalinated water, based on a calibrated/validated 1D numerical model in a semi-arid region, is presented. Different scenarios conditioning reactive transport (i.e., rainwater irrigation, lack of gypsum in the soil profile, and lower partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)) have also been considered. Results show that although boundary conditions and mineral soil composition highly influence the reactive processes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonate species is triggered mainly by pCO2, closely related to plant roots. Calcite dissolution occurs in the root zone, precipitation takes place under it and at the soil surface, which will lead a root growth blockage and a direct soil evaporation decrease, respectively. For the studied soil, a gypsum dissolution up to 40 cm depth is expected at long-term, with a general increase of porosity and hydraulic conductivity.

  2. Numerical simulation of infiltration and groundwater recharge using the Hydrus for Modflow package and the BEST model of soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumuła-Kawęcka, Anna; Szymkiewicz, Adam; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Šimůnek, Jirka; Jaworska-Szulc, Beata; Pruszkowska-Caceres, Małgorzata; Gorczewska-Langner, Wioletta; Leterme, Bertrand; Jacques, Diederik

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Groundwater recharge is a complex process, which depends on several factors, including the hydraulic properties of soils in the vadose zone. On the other hand, the rate of recharge is one of the main input data in hydrogeological models for saturated groundwater flow. Thus, there is an increasing understanding of the need for more complete representation of vadose zone processes in groundwater modeling. One of the possible approaches is to use a 1D model of water flow in the unsaturated zone coupled with 3D groundwater model for the saturated zone. Such an approach was implemented in the Hydrus for Modflow package (Seo et al. 2007), which combines two well-known and thoroughly tested modeling tools: groundwater flow simulator MODFLOW (Harbaugh 2005) and one-dimensional vadose zone simulator HYDRUS 1D (Šimůnek et al. 2016), based on the Richards equation. The Hydrus for Modflow package has been recently enhanced by implementing the BEST model of soil hydraulic properties (Lassabatere et al. 2006), which is a combination of van Genuchten - type retention function with Brooks-Corey type hydraulic conductivity function. The parameters of these functions can be divided into texture-related and structure-related and can be obtained from relatively simple lab and field tests. The method appears a promising tool for obtaining input data for vadose zone flow models. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the sensitivity of the recharge rates to the values of various parameters of the BEST model. Simulations are performed for a range of soil textural classes and plant covers, using meteorological data typical for northern Poland. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work has been supported by National Science Centre, Poland in the framework of the project 2015/17/B/ST10/03233 "Groundwater recharge on outwash plain". REFERENCES [1]Harbaugh, A.W. (2005) MODFLOW-2005, the US Geological Survey modular ground-water model: the ground-water flow process. Reston, VA, USA. [2

  3. Calibration of channel depth and friction parameters in the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using medium resolution SAR data and identifiability techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Melissa; hostache, renaud; Neal, J. C.; wagener, thorsten; giustarini, laura; chini, marco; corato, giovani; matgen, patrick; Bates, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Single satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are now regularly used to estimate hydraulic model parameters such as channel roughness, depth and water slope. However, despite channel geometry being critical to the application of hydraulic models and poorly known a priori, it is not frequently

  4. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  5. Soil air CO2 concentration as an integrative parameter of soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Corinna; Gaertig, Thorsten; Fründ, Heinz-Christian

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of soil structure is an important but difficult issue and normally takes place in the laboratory. Typical parameters are soil bulk density, porosity, water or air conductivity or gas diffusivity. All methods are time-consuming. The integrative parameter soil air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) can be used to assess soil structure in situ and in a short time. Several studies highlighted that independent of soil respiration, [CO2] in the soil air increases with decreasing soil aeration. Therefore, [CO2] is a useful indicator of soil aeration. Embedded in the German research project RÜWOLA, which focus on soil protection at forest sites, we investigated soil compaction and recovery of soil structure after harvesting. Therefore, we measured soil air CO2 concentrations continuously and in single measurements and compared the results with the measurements of bulk density, porosity and gas diffusivity. Two test areas were investigated: At test area 1 with high natural regeneration potential (clay content approx. 25 % and soil-pH between 5 and 7), solid-state CO2-sensors using NDIR technology were installed in the wheel track of different aged skidding tracks in 5 and 10 cm soil depths. At area 2 (acidic silty loam, soil-pH between 3.5 and 4), CO2-sensors and water-tension sensors (WatermarkR) were installed in 6 cm soil depth. The results show a low variance of [CO2] in the undisturbed soil with a long term mean from May to June 2014 between 0.2 and 0.5 % [CO2] in both areas. In the wheel tracks [CO2] was consistently higher. The long term mean [CO2] in the 8-year-old-wheel track in test area 1 is 5 times higher than in the reference soil and shows a high variation (mean=2.0 %). The 18-year-old wheel track shows a long-term mean of 1.2 % [CO2]. Furthermore, there were strong fluctuations of [CO2] in the wheel tracks corresponding to precipitation and humidity. Similar results were yielded with single measurements during the vegetation period using a portable

  6. Mercury porosimetry for comparing piece-wise hydraulic properties with full range pore characteristics of soil aggregates and porous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turturro, Antonietta Celeste; Caputo, Maria C.; Gerke, Horst H.

    2017-04-01

    Unsaturated hydraulic properties are essential in the modeling of water and solute movement in the vadose zone. Since standard hydraulic techniques are limited to specific moisture ranges, maybe affected by air entrapment, wettability problems, limitations due to water vapor pressure, and are depending on the initial saturation, the continuous maximal drying curves of the complete hydraulic functions can mostly not reflect the basic pore size distribution. The aim of this work was to compare the water retention curves of soil aggregates and porous rocks with their porosity characteristics. Soil aggregates of Haplic Luvisols from Loess L (Hneveceves, Czech Republic) and glacial Till T (Holzendorf, Germany) and two lithotypes of porous rock C (Canosa) and M (Massafra), Italy, were analyzed using, suction table, evaporation, psychrometry methods, and the adopted Quasi-Steady Centrifuge method for determination of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. These various water-based techniques were applied to determine the piece-wise retention and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions in the range of pore water saturations. The pore-size distribution was determined with the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). MIP results allowed assessing the volumetric mercury content at applied pressures up to 420000 kPa. Greater intrusion and porosity values were found for the porous rocks than for the soil aggregates. Except for the aggregate samples from glacial till, maximum liquid contents were always smaller than porosity. Multimodal porosities and retention curves were observed for both porous rocks and aggregate soils. Two pore-size peaks with pore diameters of 0.135 and 27.5 µm, 1.847 and 19.7 µm, and 0.75 and 232 µm were found for C, M and T, respectively, while three peaks of 0.005, 0.392 and 222 µm were identified for L. The MIP data allowed describing the retention curve in the entire mercury saturation range as compared to water retention curves that required

  7. Increasing of Mechanical Parameters of Clay soil Using Calcium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshty, Seyyed Amir Hossein; Moosa Aniran, Mir; Firoozfar, Alireza; Kiamehr, Ramin

    2017-04-01

    Research on roads to increase the resistance of weak soils to build structures on it has been increased in recent years. The present article provide the effects of different mixtures containing calcium chloride solution and clay soil on mechanical parameters such as, compressibility, compressive strength, shear strength and durability characteristic. In this study also is investigated evaluation the effect of road subgrade based on proposed material. The used clay soil in this research was obtained from zanjan city where is located in northwestern of Iran. The obtained results show that the calcium chloride solution could play a major role in reducing the cost and required time for building roads and also building foundation on these types of soils.

  8. The effect of quickly fermented pig manure on the broccoli yield parameters and selected soil parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kováčik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Difert (a pig manure fermented by caddices of domestic flies produced on sawdust litter on broccoli yield parameters and selected soil parameters were investigated on gleic fluvisol in a small-plot field trial localized at area of Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra (48°18´ N, 18°05´ E.The results showed that Difert applied in doses of 250 kg N . ha−1 and 350 kg N . ha−1 acted positively on the yields of fresh primary broccoli roses. However, the results are not statistically significant. Also a positive effect on N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents in broccoli roses was recorded. Difert has a moderate alkalizing effect on soil and increases the content of Cox in the soil. Moreover Difert insignificantly decreased the content of vitamin C and significantly increased the content of nitrates in broccoli roses, but the worst qualitative effect on broccoli parameters was detected by applying mineral N fertilizers, which significantly increased the content of nitrates in broccoli roses and insignificantly decreased the vitamin C content. However, it resulted in the highest broccoli yields. The application of mineral N fertilizers had a negative effect on the total content of carbon in the soil as well.The effect of Difert on broccoli yield and soil parameters refers to the feasibility of reducing the maturing period of the manure from 6 months to 1 week, in order to decrease the manure storage capacities.

  9. Biogas Digester Hydraulic Retention Time Affects Oxygen Consumption Patterns and Greenhouse Gas Emissions after Application of Digestate to Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen, Quan; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Bol, Roland; Wu, Di; Triolo, Jin Mi; Vazifehkhoran, Ali Heidarzadeh; Bruun, Sander

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge about environmental impacts associated with the application of anaerobic digestion residue to agricultural land is of interest owing to the rapid proliferation of biogas plants worldwide. However, virtually no information exists concerning how soil-emitted NO is affected by the feedstock hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the biogas digester. Here, the O planar optode technique was used to visualize soil O dynamics following the surface application of digestates of the codigestion of pig slurry and agro-industrial waste. We also used NO isotopomer analysis of soil-emitted NO to determine the NO production pathways, i.e., nitrification or denitrification. Two-dimensional images of soil O indicated that anoxic and hypoxic conditions developed at 2.0- and 1.5-cm soil depth for soil amended with the digestate produced with 15-d (PO15) and 30-d (PO30) retention time, respectively. Total NO emissions were significantly lower for PO15 than PO30 due to the greater expansion of the anoxic zone, which enhanced NO reduction via complete denitrification. However, cumulative CO emissions were not significantly different between PO15 and PO30 for the entire incubation period. During incubation, NO emissions came from both nitrification and denitrification in amended soils. Increasing the HRT of the biogas digester appears to induce significant NO emissions, but it is unlikely to affect the NO production pathways after application to soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Soil characteristics and landcover relationships on soil hydraulic conductivity at a hillslope scale: A view towards local flood management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, N. A. L.; Bonell, M.; Coles, N.; MacDonald, A. M.; Auton, C. A.; Stevenson, R.

    2013-08-01

    There are surprisingly few studies in humid temperate forests which provide reliable evidence that soil permeability is enhanced under forests. This work addresses this research gap through a detailed investigation of permeability on a hillslope in the Eddleston Catchment, Scottish Borders UK, to evaluate the impact of land cover, superficial geology and soil types on permeability using measurements of field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) supported by detailed topsoil profile descriptions and counting of roots with diameters >2 mm. Kfs was measured at depth 0.04-0.15 m using a constant head well permeameter across four paired landcover sites of adjacent tree and intensely grazed grassland. The measured tree types were: 500-year-old mixed woodland; 180-year-old mixed woodland; 45-year-old Pinus sylvestris plantation; and 180-year-old Salix caprea woodland. The respective paired grids of trees and grassland were compared on similar soil texture and topography. This study highlights the significant impact of broadleaf woodland at a hillslope scale on Kfs in comparison to grassland areas: median Kfs values under 180-year-old S. caprea woodland (8 mm h-1), 180-year-old mixed woodland (119 mm h-1) and 500-year-old broadleaf woodland (174 mm h-1) were found to be respectively 8, 6 and 5 times higher than neighbouring grazed grassland areas on the same superficial geology. Further statistical analysis indicates that such Kfs enhancement is associated with the presence of coarse roots (>2 mm diameter) creating conduits for preferential flow and a deeper organic layer in the topsoil profile under woodlands. By contrast the P. sylvestris forest had only slightly higher (42 mm h-1), but not statistically different Kfs values, when compared to adjacent pasture (35 mm h-1). In the grassland areas, in the absence of course roots, the superficial geology was dominant in accounting for differences in Kfs, with the alluvium floodplain having a significantly lower median Kfs

  11. Numerical Evaluation and Optimization of Multiple Hydraulically Fractured Parameters Using a Flow-Stress-Damage Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-factor analysis and optimization play a critical role in the the ability to maximizethe stimulated reservoir volume (SRV and the success of economic shale gas production. In this paper, taking the typical continental naturally fractured silty laminae shale in China as anexample, response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize multiple hydraulic fracturing parameters to maximize the stimulated area in combination with numerical modeling based on the coupled flow-stress-damage (FSD approach. This paper demonstrates hydraulic fracturing effectiveness by defining two indicesnamelythe stimulated reservoir area (SRA and stimulated silty laminae area (SLA. Seven uncertain parameters, such as laminae thickness, spacing, dip angle, cohesion, internal friction angle (IFA, in situ stress difference (SD, and an operational parameter-injection rate (IR with a reasonable range based on silty Laminae Shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, are used to fit a response of SRA and SLA as the objective function, and finally identity the optimum design under the parameters based on simultaneously maximizingSRA and SLA. In addition, asensitivity analysis of the influential factors is conducted for SRA and SLA. The aim of the study is to improve the artificial ability to control the fracturing network by means of multi-parameteroptimization. This work promises to provide insights into the effective exploitation of unconventional shale gas reservoirs via optimization of the fracturing design for continental shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, China.

  12. Desenvolvimento de um modelo fractal para a estimativa da condutividade hidráulica de solos não saturados A fractal model to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fuentes

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Baseado nos conceitos da geometria fractal e nas leis de Laplace e de Poiseuille, foi criado um modelo geral para estimar a condutividade hidráulica de solos não saturados, utilizando a curva de retenção da água no solo, conforme representada por um modelo em potência. Considerando o fato de que este novo modelo da condutividade hidráulica introduz um parâmetro de interpolação ainda desconhecido, e que, por sua vez, depende das propriedades dos solos, a validação do modelo foi realizada, utilizando dois valores-limite fisicamente representativos. Para a aplicação do modelo, os parâmetros de forma da curva de retenção da água no solo foram escolhidos de maneira a se obter o modelo de van Genuchten. Com a finalidade de obter fórmulas algébricas da condutividade hidráulica, foram impostas relações entre seus parâmetros de forma. A comparação dos resultados obtidos com o modelo da condutividade e a curva experimental da condutividade dos dois solos, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo e Argissolo Amarelo, permitiu concluir que o modelo proposto é simples em sua utilização e é capaz de predizer satisfatoriamente a condutividade hidráulica dos solos não saturados.From a conceptual model based on fractal geometry and Laplace's and Poiseuille's laws, a versatile and general fractal model for the hydraulic conductivity to be used in the soils was developed. The soil-moisture retention curve is derived from a power model. Due to the fact that the proposed model of hydraulic conductivity introduces a still unknown interpolation parameter, which in turn is a function of soil properties, its limiting values were considered for the analysis. To apply the model in the soil, the form parameters of the soil-moisture retention curve were chosen so as to reproduce van Genuchten's equation. In order to obtain a closed-form equation for the hydraulic conductivity, relationships between the form parameters were imposed. The comparison between

  13. Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2003-07-02

    This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide

  14. Large Dam Effects on Flow Regime and Hydraulic Parameters of river (Case study: Karkheh River, Downstream of Reservoir Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Azarang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The critical role of the rivers in supplying water for various needs of life has led to engineering identification of the hydraulic regime and flow condition of the rivers. Hydraulic structures such dams have inevitable effects on their downstream that should be well investigated. The reservoir dams are the most important hydraulic structures which are the cause of great changes in river flow conditions. Materials and Methods: In this research, an accurate assessment was performed to study the flow regime of Karkheh river at downstream of Karkheh Reservoir Dam as the largest dam in Middle East. Karkheh River is the third waterful river of Iran after Karun and Dez and the third longest river after the Karun and Sefidrud. The Karkheh Dam is a large reservoir dam built in Iran on the Karkheh River in 2000. The Karkheh Reservoir Dam is on the Karkheh River in the Northwestern Khouzestan Province, the closest city being Andimeshk to the east. The part of Karkheh River, which was studied in this research is located at downstream of Karkheh Reservoir Dam. This interval is approximately 94 km, which is located between PayePol and Abdolkhan hydrometric stations. In this research, 138 cross sections were used along Karkheh River. Distance of cross sections from each other was 680m in average. The efficient model of HEC-RAS has been utilized to simulate the Karkheh flow conditions before and after the reservoir dam construction using of hydrometric stations data included annually and monthly mean discharges, instantaneous maximum discharges, water surface profiles and etc. Three defined discharges had been chosen to simulate the Karkheh River flow; maximum defined discharge, mean defined discharge and minimum defined discharge. For each of these discharges values, HEC-RAS model was implemented as a steady flow of the Karkheh River at river reach of study. Water surface profiles of flow, hydraulic parameters and other results of flow regime in

  15. Soil and vegetation parameter uncertainty on future terrestrial carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothavala, Z.; Felzer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    We examine the role of the terrestrial carbon cycle in a changing climate at the centennial scale using an intermediate complexity Earth system climate model that includes the effects of dynamic vegetation and the global carbon cycle. We present a series of ensemble simulations to evaluate the sensitivity of simulated terrestrial carbon sinks to three key model parameters: (a) The temperature dependence of soil carbon decomposition, (b) the upper temperature limits on the rate of photosynthesis, and (c) the nitrogen limitation of the maximum rate of carboxylation of Rubisco. We integrated the model in fully coupled mode for a 1200-year spin-up period, followed by a 300-year transient simulation starting at year 1800. Ensemble simulations were conducted varying each parameter individually and in combination with other variables. The results of the transient simulations show that terrestrial carbon uptake is very sensitive to the choice of model parameters. Changes in net primary productivity were most sensitive to the upper temperature limit on the rate of photosynthesis, which also had a dominant effect on overall land carbon trends; this is consistent with previous research that has shown the importance of climatic suppression of photosynthesis as a driver of carbon-climate feedbacks. Soil carbon generally decreased with increasing temperature, though the magnitude of this trend depends on both the net primary productivity changes and the temperature dependence of soil carbon decomposition. Vegetation carbon increased in some simulations, but this was not consistent across all configurations of model parameters. Comparing to global carbon budget observations, we identify the subset of model parameters which are consistent with observed carbon sinks; this serves to narrow considerably the future model projections of terrestrial carbon sink changes in comparison with the full model ensemble.

  16. Constraining Parameter Uncertainty in Simulations of Water and Heat Dynamics in Seasonally Frozen Soil Using Limited Observed Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousong Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water and energy processes in frozen soils are important for better understanding hydrologic processes and water resources management in cold regions. To investigate the water and energy balance in seasonally frozen soils, CoupModel combined with the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE method was used. Simulation work on water and heat processes in frozen soil in northern China during the 2012/2013 winter was conducted. Ensemble simulations through the Monte Carlo sampling method were generated for uncertainty analysis. Behavioral simulations were selected based on combinations of multiple model performance index criteria with respect to simulated soil water and temperature at four depths (5 cm, 15 cm, 25 cm, and 35 cm. Posterior distributions for parameters related to soil hydraulic, radiation processes, and heat transport indicated that uncertainties in both input and model structures could influence model performance in modeling water and heat processes in seasonally frozen soils. Seasonal courses in water and energy partitioning were obvious during the winter. Within the day-cycle, soil evaporation/condensation and energy distributions were well captured and clarified as an important phenomenon in the dynamics of the energy balance system. The combination of the CoupModel simulations with the uncertainty-based calibration method provides a way of understanding the seasonal courses of hydrology and energy processes in cold regions with limited data. Additional measurements may be used to further reduce the uncertainty of regulating factors during the different stages of freezing–thawing.

  17. THREE-PARAMETER CREEP DAMAGE CONSTITUTIVE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN HYDRAULIC TUNNELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Gang; Chen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Rock deformation is a time-dependent process, generally referred to as rheology. Especially for soft rock strata, design and construction of tunnel shall take full account of rheological properties of adjoining rocks. Based on classic three-parameter HK model (generalized Kelvin model), this paper proposes a three-parameter H-K damage model of which parameters attenuate with increase of equivalent strain, provides attenuation equation of model parameters in the first, second and third stage o...

  18. Improving the relationship between soil characteristics and metal bioavailability by using reactive fractions of soil parameters in calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago-Martín, Ana; van Oort, Folkert; González, Concepción; Quintana, José R; Lafuente, Antonio L; Lamy, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of the nature instead of the total content of soil parameters relevant to metal bioavailability in lettuce was tested using a series of low-polluted Mediterranean agricultural calcareous soils offering natural gradients in the content and composition of carbonate, organic, and oxide fractions. Two datasets were compared by canonical ordination based on redundancy analysis: total concentrations (TC dataset) of main soil parameters (constituents, phases, or elements) involved in metal retention and bioavailability; and chemically defined reactive fractions of these parameters (RF dataset). The metal bioavailability patterns were satisfactorily explained only when the RF dataset was used, and the results showed that the proportion of crystalline Fe oxides, dissolved organic C, diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu and Zn, and a labile organic pool accounted for 76% of the variance. In addition, 2 multipollution scenarios by metal spiking were tested that showed better relationships with the RF dataset than with the TC dataset (up to 17% more) and new reactive fractions involved. For Mediterranean calcareous soils, the use of reactive pools of soil parameters rather than their total contents improved the relationships between soil constituents and metal bioavailability. Such pool determinations should be systematically included in studies dealing with bioavailability or risk assessment. © 2014 SETAC.

  19. Regional-scale variation and distribution patterns of soil saturated hydraulic conductivities in surface and subsurface layers in the loessial soils of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an; Liu, Zhipeng; Horton, Robert

    2013-04-01

    SummarySaturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is an important soil property that shows a high degree of spatial heterogeneity. There is a lack of research that investigates and determines Ks at a regional scale, due to the challenges associated with the required intensive sampling. To determine the closely correlated factors affecting Ks at a regional scale and to then generate a regional distribution map of Ks, we selected 382 sampling sites across the Loess Plateau of China (620,000 km2) and collected undisturbed and disturbed soil samples from two soil layers (0-5 and 20-25 cm). We found that both surface Ks and subsurface Ks had log(base 10)-normal distributions, and demonstrated strong spatial variability (CV = 206% and 135%, respectively). Surface LogKs was most closely correlated with LogSand, LogSilt, LogSG (slope gradient), LogSSWC (saturated soil water content), vegetation coverage and land use; while subsurface LogKs was correlated with LogClay, SSWC, LogSG, LogAltitude, LogGY (growth year) and land use. Geostatistical analysis indicated that semivariograms of surface and subsurface Log Ks could be best fitted by an isotropic exponential model, with effective ranges of 204 km and 428 km, respectively. Distribution maps of Ks produced by kriging indicated a pronounced spatial pattern and demonstrated an obvious spatial depth gradient. The spatial distribution patterns of Ks at a regional scale in the loessial soils of China comprehensively reflected soil hydraulic properties and the combined effects of soil texture, vegetation, topography and human activities.

  20. Changes in catchment-scale water fluxes due to time-variant soil hydraulic properties in a subtropical agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Gao, Lei; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul

    2017-04-01

    In agricultural landscapes, temporal fluxes in hydraulic properties due to tillage, grazing, crop root growth and cycles of wetting and drying influenced by irrigation, could have large impacts at catchment scale. These effects are particularly evident in tropical climates where long periods of drought are followed by intense rainfall that greatly exceeds the infiltration capacity of the soil. This work explores the impact of the seasonal development of crops and the shifts in time between crop types on soil physical properties and the relative changes in the probability distribution of the water storage and fluxes dynamics. We focussed on an agricultural catchment in south east China where the climatic conditions include periods of droughts and heavy rainfall. Using coupled 1-dimension and semi-distributed catchment modelling combined with basic water balance data and both on-site and literature values for soil and crop properties, we investigated the impact of soil physical changes in the root-zone of the soil over different time scales ranging from daily to annual. Our results also showed that the resulting time-variant spatial patterns in soil water storage and flow had an impact on the integrated catchment runoff response at different times of the year.

  1. Bioremediation treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils: influencing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Masoud; Barabadi, Abbas; Barabady, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The Arctic environment is very vulnerable and sensitive to hydrocarbon pollutants. Soil bioremediation is attracting interest as a promising and cost-effective clean-up and soil decontamination technology in the Arctic regions. However, remoteness, lack of appropriate infrastructure, the harsh climatic conditions in the Arctic and some physical and chemical properties of Arctic soils may reduce the performance and limit the application of this technology. Therefore, understanding the weaknesses and bottlenecks in the treatment plans, identifying their associated hazards, and providing precautionary measures are essential to improve the overall efficiency and performance of a bioremediation strategy. The aim of this paper is to review the bioremediation techniques and strategies using microorganisms for treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils. It takes account of Arctic operational conditions and discusses the factors influencing the performance of a bioremediation treatment plan. Preliminary hazard analysis is used as a technique to identify and assess the hazards that threaten the reliability and maintainability of a bioremediation treatment technology. Some key parameters with regard to the feasibility of the suggested preventive/corrective measures are described as well.

  2. Space agriculture: the effect of micro- and hypo-gravity on soil hydraulics and biogeochemistry in a bioregenerative soil-based cropping unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, F.; Pallud, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Abstract Increasing interest has developed towards growing plants in soil-based cropping modules as a long-term bioregenerative life support system in space and planetary explorations. Contrary to hydroponics, zeoponics and aeroponics, soil-based cropping would offer an effective approach to sustain food and oxygen production, decompose organic wastes, sequester carbon dioxide, and filter water for the crew. The hydraulic and biogeochemical functioning are highly complex in soil-based systems but such systems provide a self-sustainable microcosm that potentially offers compactness, low energy demand, near-ambient reactor temperatures and pressure, reliability, forgiveness of operational errors or neglect, and a rich biodiversity of microorganisms, all features which are fundamental for the sustainability and reliability of long-term manned space missions. However, the hydraulics and biogeochemical functioning of soil systems exposed to gravities lower than the Earth’s are still unknown. Since gravity is crucial in driving water flow, hypogravity will affect nutrient and oxygen transport in the liquid and gaseous phases, and could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, and emissions of toxic gases. A highly mechanistic model coupling soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry previously tested on soils on Earth (g = 9.806 m s-2) is used to highlight the effects of gravity on the functioning of cropping units on Mars (0.38g), the Moon (0.16g), and in the international space station (ISS, nearly 0g). For each scenario, we have compared the net leaching of water, the leaching of NH3, NH4+, NO2- and NO3- solutes, the emissions of NH3, CO2, N2O, NO and N2 gases, the concentrations profiles of O2, CO2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil, the pH, and the dynamics of various microbial functional groups within the root zone against the same control variables in the soil under terrestrial gravity. The tested hypo- and micro-gravity resulted in 90

  3. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure

  4. The Influence of Hydrologic Parameters on the Hydraulic Efficiency of an Extensive Green Roof in Mediterranean Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Garofalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In an urban environment, green roofs represent a sustainable solution for mitigating stormwater volumes and hydrograph peaks. So far, many literature studies have investigated the hydraulic efficiency and the subsurface runoff coefficient of green roofs, showing their strong variability according to several factors, including the characteristics of storm events. Furthermore, only few studies have focused on the hydraulic efficiency of green roofs under Mediterranean climate conditions and defined the influencing hydrological parameters on the subsurface runoff coefficient. Nevertheless, for designing purposes, it is crucial to properly assess the subsurface runoff coefficient of a given green roof under specific climate conditions and its influencing factors. This study intends to, firstly, evaluate the subsurface runoff coefficient at daily and event-time scales for a given green roof, through a conceptual model implemented in SWMM. The model was loaded with both daily and 1-min rainfall data from two Mediterranean climate sites, one in Thessaloniki, Greece and one in Cosenza, Italy, respectively. Then, the most influencing hydrological parameters were examined through a statistical regression analysis. The findings show that the daily subsurface runoff coefficient is 0.70 for both sites, while the event-based one is 0.79 with a standard deviation of 0.23 for the site in Cosenza, Italy. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the influencing parameters are the rainfall intensity and antecedent dry weather period with a confidence level of 95%. This study demonstrated that, due to the high variability of the subsurface runoff coefficient, the use of a unique value for design purposes is inappropriate and that a preliminary estimation could be obtained as a function of the total rainfall depth and the antecedent dry weather period by using the validated multi-regression relationship which is site specific.

  5. A Sequence of Laboratory Experiments for the Determination of Chemico-osmotic, Hydraulic and Diffusion Parameters of Rock Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Manaka, M.; Finsterle, S.; Ito, K.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key issues in the hydrogeologic characterization of sedimentary formations is the uncertainties of fluid pressure anomalies which could be caused by chemical osmosis. Chemical osmosis is the migration of water through a semi-permeable membrane driven by the difference of chemical potentials between waters to compensate for the difference in water potentials, leading to an increase in the pressure gradient. Accordingly, if geologic media can act as semi-permeable membranes, and if salinity is not uniform in the formation, localized fluid pressures may be generated by chemical osmosis. In order to identify the possibility of chemical osmosis in formations, it is essential to evaluate the membrane properties of representative rock types. However, for the examination of the magnitude and the duration time of osmotically induced pressures, the parameters relevant to the migration of water and dissolved substances, such as the hydraulic and diffusion parameters, are also necessary since they control the spatial variation of salinity and the dissipation of osmotically induced pressures. In order to obtain the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion parameters from a rock sample, this study developed a laboratory experimental system capable of performing chemical osmosis and permeability experiments under the confining pressure simulating in-situ effective stress conditions. The permeability and chemical-osmosis experiments are performed in sequence on a rock sample, and the progress of each experiment is monitored by measuring fluid pressures and salt concentrations in reservoirs contacting the ends of the disc-shaped rock sample. Analytical solutions for the permeability and chemical osmosis experiments were also derived for parameter determination. The semi-analytical solution for the chemical osmosis experiment involves five unknown parameters, i.e., the reflection coefficient, intrinsic permeability, specific storage and effective diffusion coefficient of

  6. Main Parameters of Soil Quality and it's Management Under Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    byproducts and atmospheric deposition; 4. storing and cycling nutrients and other elements within the earth's biosphere; and 5. providing support of socioeconomic structures and protection for archeological treasures associated with human habitation. No soil is likely to successfully provide all of these functions, some of which occur in natural ecosystems and some of which are the result of human modification. We can summarize by saying that soil quality depends on the extent to which soil functions to benefit humans. Thus, for food production or mediation of contamination, soil quality means the extent to which a soil fulfills the role we have defined for it. Within agriculture, high quality equates to maintenance of high productivity without significant soil or environmental degradation. The Glossary of Soil Science terms produced by the Soil Science Society of America (1996) states that soil quality is an inherent attribute of a soil that is inferred from soil characteristics or indirect observations. To proceed from a dictionary definition to a measure of soil quality, a minimum dataset (MDS) of soil characteristics that represents soil quality must be selected and quantified (Papendick et al., 1995). The MDS may include biological, chemical or physical soil characteristics [Organic matter (OM), Aggregation (A), Bulk density (BD), Depth to hardpan (DH), Electrical conductivity (EC), Fertility (F), Respiration (R), pH, Soil test (ST), Yield (Y), Infiltration (I), Mineralizable nitrogen potential (MNP), Water holding capacity (WHC)]. For agriculture, the measurement of properties should lead to a relatively simple and accurate way to rank soils based on potential plant production without soil degradation. Unfortunately, commonly identified soil quality parameters may not correlate well with yield (Reganold, 1988). In the next section, we consider these four points concerning the selection and quantification of soil characteristics: 1. soil characteristics may be desirable

  7. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. THREE-PARAMETER CREEP DAMAGE CONSTITUTIVE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN HYDRAULIC TUNNELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Gang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rock deformation is a time-dependent process, generally referred to as rheology. Especially for soft rock strata, design and construction of tunnel shall take full account of rheological properties of adjoining rocks. Based on classic three-parameter HK model (generalized Kelvin model, this paper proposes a three-parameter H-K damage model of which parameters attenuate with increase of equivalent strain, provides attenuation equation of model parameters in the first, second and third stage of creep deformation and introduces equivalent strain threshold value. When the equivalent strain is greater than the threshold value, the third stage of accelerating creep will be conducted. The three-parameter H-K damage model is used for numerical calculation of finite difference method FLAC3D and deformation features of soft rock with time under high ground stress are described based on diversion tunnel project of Jinping Hydropower Station, of which model parameters can be obtained by back analysis according to measured site data and BP neural network.

  9. Constraining Unsaturated Hydraulic Parameters Using the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method and Coupled Hydrogeophysical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzamian, Mohammad; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Khalil, Mohamed A.

    2017-09-01

    The coupled hydrogeophysical approach has proved to be a valuable tool for improving the use of geoelectrical data for hydrological model parameterization. In the coupled approach, hydrological parameters are directly inferred from geoelectrical measurements in a forward manner to eliminate the uncertainty connected to the independent inversion of electrical resistivity data. Several numerical studies have been conducted to demonstrate the advantages of a coupled approach; however, only a few attempts have been made to apply the coupled approach to actual field data. In this study, we developed a 1D coupled hydrogeophysical code to estimate the van Genuchten-Mualem model parameters, K s, n, θ r and α, from time-lapse vertical electrical sounding data collected during a constant inflow infiltration experiment. van Genuchten-Mualem parameters were sampled using the Latin hypercube sampling method to provide a full coverage of the range of each parameter from their distributions. By applying the coupled approach, vertical electrical sounding data were coupled to hydrological models inferred from van Genuchten-Mualem parameter samples to investigate the feasibility of constraining the hydrological model. The key approaches taken in the study are to (1) integrate electrical resistivity and hydrological data and avoiding data inversion, (2) estimate the total water mass recovery of electrical resistivity data and consider it in van Genuchten-Mualem parameters evaluation and (3) correct the influence of subsurface temperature fluctuations during the infiltration experiment on electrical resistivity data. The results of the study revealed that the coupled hydrogeophysical approach can improve the value of geophysical measurements in hydrological model parameterization. However, the approach cannot overcome the technical limitations of the geoelectrical method associated with resolution and of water mass recovery.

  10. Alternative Analytical Expressions for the General van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine Hydraulic Conductivity Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neto, D.D.; Lier, van Q.D.; Genuchten, van M.T.; Reichardt, K.; Metselaar, K.; Nielsen, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    The van Genuchten expressions for the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties, first published in 1980, are used frequently in various vadose zone flow and transport applications assuming a specific relationship between the m and n soil hydraulic parameters. By comparison, probably because of the

  11. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of xerophilous mosses: towards implementation of moss covered soils in hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, B.R.; Bartholomeus, R.P.; Bodegom, van P.M.; Gooren, H.P.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Witte, J.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation from mosses and lichens can form a major component of the water balance, especially in ecosystems where mosses and lichens often grow abundantly, such as tundra, deserts and bogs. To facilitate moss representation in hydrological models, we parameterized the unsaturated hydraulic

  12. Effects of long-term irrigation with treated wastewater on the hydraulic properties, and the water and air regime in the root zone of a clayey soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2013-04-01

    With increasing water scarcity, treated wastewater (TW) appears as an attractive alternative source of water for irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where freshwater is naturally scarce. However, it seems that long-term use of TW for irrigation of orchards planted on heavy soils cause to yield reduction and crop damages. In terms of water quality, TW are characterized by higher concentrations of sodium and dissolved organic content (DOC) that affect soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) on one hand and soil wettability, on the other hand. The working hypothesis of this study is that long-term use of TW for irrigation of clayey soils causes significant changes in the soil hydraulic properties. Such changes might affect the water and air regime in the root zone, and the hydrological balance components at the field scale. High-resolution field sampling determined the spatial distribution of chloride, ESP and DOC below the dripper, revealing higher salinity and sodicity, lower hydraulic conductivity, and possible preferential flow pattern linked to wettability in WW-irrigated soils. Laboratory experiments involving infiltration, evaporation, and swelling pressure measurements provide quantitative estimates of the impact of TW for irrigation on the soil hydraulic properties. The upper soil layer of TW-irrigated plots is more affected by the impact of DOC on soil wettability, while the lower layers are more affected by the impact of the increased ESP on soil hydraulic conductivity. Continuous monitoring of oxygen concentration at 10, 20 and 30 cm depths in the root zone near the trees and at mid-distance between trees revealed that the air regime in the root zone is significantly affected by the TW use as a consequence for the effect on the water regime.

  13. Estimating hydraulic parameters of a heterogeneous aquitard using long-term multi-extensometer and groundwater level data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chao; Zhou, Zhifang; Illman, Walter A.; Guo, Qiaona; Wang, Jinguo

    2017-09-01

    The classical aquitard-drainage model COMPAC has been modified to simulate the compaction process of a heterogeneous aquitard consisting of multiple sub-units (Multi-COMPAC). By coupling Multi-COMPAC with the parameter estimation code PEST++, the vertical hydraulic conductivity ( K v) and elastic ( S ske) and inelastic ( S skp) skeletal specific-storage values of each sub-unit can be estimated using observed long-term multi-extensometer and groundwater level data. The approach was first tested through a synthetic case with known parameters. Results of the synthetic case revealed that it was possible to accurately estimate the three parameters for each sub-unit. Next, the methodology was applied to a field site located in Changzhou city, China. Based on the detailed stratigraphic information and extensometer data, the aquitard of interest was subdivided into three sub-units. Parameters K v, S ske and S skp of each sub-unit were estimated simultaneously and then were compared with laboratory results and with bulk values and geologic data from previous studies, demonstrating the reliability of parameter estimates. Estimated S skp values ranged within the magnitude of 10-4 m-1, while K v ranged over 10-10-10-8 m/s, suggesting moderately high heterogeneity of the aquitard. However, the elastic deformation of the third sub-unit, consisting of soft plastic silty clay, is masked by delayed drainage, and the inverse procedure leads to large uncertainty in the S ske estimate for this sub-unit.

  14. Estimating geostatistical parameters and spatially-variable hydraulic conductivity within a catchment system using an ensemble smoother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Bailey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater flow models are important tools in assessing baseline conditions and investigating management alternatives in groundwater systems. The usefulness of these models, however, is often hindered by insufficient knowledge regarding the magnitude and spatial distribution of the spatially-distributed parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity (K, that govern the response of these models. Proposed parameter estimation methods frequently are demonstrated using simplified aquifer representations, when in reality the groundwater regime in a given watershed is influenced by strongly-coupled surface-subsurface processes. Furthermore, parameter estimation methodologies that rely on a geostatistical structure of K often assume the parameter values of the geostatistical model as known or estimate these values from limited data.

    In this study, we investigate the use of a data assimilation algorithm, the Ensemble Smoother, to provide enhanced estimates of K within a catchment system using the fully-coupled, surface-subsurface flow model CATHY. Both water table elevation and streamflow data are assimilated to condition the spatial distribution of K. An iterative procedure using the ES update routine, in which geostatistical parameter values defining the true spatial structure of K are identified, is also presented. In this procedure, parameter values are inferred from the updated ensemble of K fields and used in the subsequent iteration to generate the K ensemble, with the process proceeding until parameter values are converged upon. The parameter estimation scheme is demonstrated via a synthetic three-dimensional tilted v-shaped catchment system incorporating stream flow and variably-saturated subsurface flow, with spatio-temporal variability in forcing terms. Results indicate that the method is successful in providing improved estimates of the K field, and that the iterative scheme can

  15. Root induced changes of effective 1D hydraulic properties in a soil column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, P; Leitner, D; Kammerer, G; Loiskandl, W; Kaul, H-P; Bodner, G

    Roots are essential drivers of soil structure and pore formation. This study aimed at quantifying root induced changes of the pore size distribution (PSD). The focus was on the extent of clogging vs. formation of pores during active root growth. Parameters of Kosugi's lognormal PSD model were determined by inverse estimation in a column experiment with two cover crops (mustard, rye) and an unplanted control. Pore dynamics were described using a convection-dispersion like pore evolution model. Rooted treatments showed a wider range of pore radii with increasing volumes of large macropores >500 μm and micropores <2.5 μm, while fine macropores, mesopores and larger micropores decreased. The non-rooted control showed narrowing of the PSD and reduced porosity over all radius classes. The pore evolution model accurately described root induced changes, while structure degradation in the non-rooted control was not captured properly. Our study demonstrated significant short term root effects with heterogenization of the pore system as dominant process of root induced structure formation. Pore clogging is suggested as a partial cause for reduced pore volume. The important change in micro- and large macropores however indicates that multiple mechanic and biochemical processes are involved in root-pore interactions.

  16. Hydraulic Property and Soil Textural Classification Measurements for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents particle size analysis, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and qualitative descriptions of surficial materials at selected locations at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Measurements and sample collection were conducted in the Rainier Mesa area, including unconsolidated sediments on top of the mesa, an ephemeral wash channel near the mesa edge, and dry U12n tunnel pond sediments below the mesa. Particle size analysis used a combination of sieving and optical diffraction techniques. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements employed a single-ring infiltrometer with analytical formulas that correct for falling head and spreading outside the ring domain. These measurements may prove useful to current and future efforts at Rainier Mesa aimed at understanding infiltration and its effect on water fluxes and radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone.

  17. Hydraulic Property and Soil Textural Classification Measurements for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2009-12-29

    This report presents particle size analysis, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and qualitative descriptions of surficial materials at selected locations at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Measurements and sample collection were conducted in the Rainier Mesa area, including unconsolidated sediments on top of the mesa, an ephemeral wash channel near the mesa edge, and dry U12n tunnel pond sediments below the mesa. Particle size analysis used a combination of sieving and optical diffraction techniques. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements employed a single-ring infiltrometer with analytical formulas that correct for falling head and spreading outside the ring domain. These measurements may prove useful to current and future efforts at Rainier Mesa aimed at understanding infiltration and its effect on water fluxes and radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone.

  18. On the use of the fictitious wave steepness and related surf-similarity parameters in methods that describe the hydraulic and structural response to waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineke, D.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the hydraulic performance of coastal structures - viz. wave run-up, overtopping and reflection - and to evaluate the stability of the armour layers, use is made of the dimensionless surf similarity parameter, as introduced by Battjes (1974). The front side slope of the structure and the

  19. Relationship between gaseous N dynamics and the hydraulic state of hierarchically structured soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Dörsch, Peter; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The inherent spatial heterogeneity of soil generates spatially distributed micro-sites with different local N gas (NO, N2O, N2) production and release rates. Moreover, local micro-site conditions and the pathways between them depend on soil moisture which itself is highly dynamic close to the soil surface. These relationships need to be taken into account for a quantitative understanding of soil denitrification and associated N gas dynamics. Soil structure has been recognized as a key factor to understand the high spatial variability of N gas emissions. In particular gaseous N release from soils depends on: i) the total denitrification rate, which is related to the spatial extent and distribution of anaerobic sites and ii) the probability of N2O to escape from the soil without being further reduced to N2. This impact of soil structure is typically ignored in studies with soil slurries or repacked soil. In this project we run well-defined mesocosm experiments on N gas dynamics with hierarchically structured, artificial soils in which the spatial distribution of substrate and denitrifiers is known exactly. Sintered, porous glass pellets are inoculated with strains of Paracoccus denitrificans and/or Agrobacterium tumefaciens and amended with nutrient solution. These pellets are embedded in coarse-grained sand within gas-tight columns under O2/He atmosphere. The pellets are either places in layers or randomly to create different patterns of N gas production sites and diffusion pathways. Denitrification occurs in the anaerobic centers of the porous pellets, while the partially saturated sand matrix controls the diffusive transport of N gases towards the headspace, where all relevant gas concentrations are monitored with gas chromatography. Water saturations are adjusted such that the diffusive pathways are either fully continuous or partially discontinuous. Preliminary results indicate that the water content exert a major control on the magnitude of denitrification

  20. Desiccation-Induced Volumetric Shrinkage of Compacted Metakaolin-Treated Black Cotton Soil for a Hydraulic Barriers System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses George

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Black cotton soil treated with up to 24% metakaolin (MCL content was prepared by molding water contents of −2, 0, 2, 4 and 6% of optimum moisture content (OMC and compacted with British Standard Light (BSL and West African Standard (WAS or ‘Intermediate’ energies. The specimens were extruded from the compaction molds and allowed to air dry in a laboratory in order to assess the effect of desiccation-induced shrinkage on the compacted mix for use as a hydraulic barrier in a waste containment application. The results recorded show that the volumetric shrinkage strain (VSS values were large within the first 10 days of drying; the VSS values increased with a higher molding of the water content, relative to the OMC. The VSS generally increased with a higher initial degree of saturation for the two compactive efforts, irrespective of the level of MCL treatment. Generally, the VSS decreased with an increasing MCL content. Only specimens treated with a minimum 20% MCL content and compacted with the WAS energy satisfied the regulatory maximum VSS of 4% for use as a hydraulic barrier.

  1. Uniqueness and stability analysis of hydrogeophysical inversion for time-lapse ground-penetrating radar estimates of shallow soil hydraulic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jadoon, K.Z.; Slob, E.; Vanclooster, M.; Vereecken, H.; Lambot, S.

    2008-01-01

    Precise measurement of soil hydraulic properties at field scales is one of the prerequisites to simulate subsurface flow and transport processes, which is crucial in many research and engineering areas. In our study, we numerically analyze uniqueness and stability for integrated hydrogeophysical

  2. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  3. Implicit Treatment of Technical Specification and Thermal Hydraulic Parameter Uncertainties in Gaussian Process Model to Estimate Safety Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Fynan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gaussian process model (GPM is a flexible surrogate model that can be used for nonparametric regression for multivariate problems. A unique feature of the GPM is that a prediction variance is automatically provided with the regression function. In this paper, we estimate the safety margin of a nuclear power plant by performing regression on the output of best-estimate simulations of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident with sampling of safety system configuration, sequence timing, technical specifications, and thermal hydraulic parameter uncertainties. The key aspect of our approach is that the GPM regression is only performed on the dominant input variables, the safety injection flow rate and the delay time for AC powered pumps to start representing sequence timing uncertainty, providing a predictive model for the peak clad temperature during a reflood phase. Other uncertainties are interpreted as contributors to the measurement noise of the code output and are implicitly treated in the GPM in the noise variance term, providing local uncertainty bounds for the peak clad temperature. We discuss the applicability of the foregoing method to reduce the use of conservative assumptions in best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU and Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA success criteria definitions while dealing with a large number of uncertainties.

  4. The Effects of Salinity and Sodium Adsorption Ratio on the Water Retention and Hydraulic Conductivity Curves of Soils From The Pampa del Tamarugal, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, M. S.; Munoz, J.; Suarez, F. I.; Fierro, V.; Moreno, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa del Tamarugal is located in the Atacama Desert, the most arid desert of the world. It has important reserves of groundwater, which are probably fed by infiltration coming from the Andes Mountain, with groundwater levels fluctuating between 3 and 10-70 m below the land surface. In zones where shallow groundwater exists, the capillary rise allows to have a permanently moist vadose zone, which sustain native vegetation such as the Tamarugos (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) and Algarrobos (Prosopis alba Griseb.). The native vegetation relies on the soil moisture and on the evaporative fluxes, which are controlled by the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soils. The soils associated to the salt flats of the Pampa del Tamarugal are a mixture of sands and clays, which have high levels of sulfates, chloride, carbonates, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium, with high pH and electrical conductivity, and low organic matter and cationic exchange capacity. In this research, we are interested in evaluating the impact of salinity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soil, i.e., water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. Soils were collected from the Pampa del Tamarugal and brought to the laboratory for characterization. The evaporation method (HYPROP, UMS) was used to determine the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve was estimated combining the evaporation method with direct measurements using a variable head permeameter (KSAT, UMS). It was found that higher sodium concentrations increase the water retention capacity and decrease the soiĺs hydraulic conductivity. These changes occur in the moist range of the hydrodynamic characteristics. The soil's hydraulic properties have significant impact on evaporation fluxes, which is the mayor component of the water balance. Thus, it is important to quantify them and incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution effect on the hydrodynamic properties to correctly

  5. Using random forests to explore the effects of site attributes and soil properties on near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, Helena; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of the near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil is fundamental for understanding important processes like groundwater contamination risks or runoff and soil erosion. Hydraulic conductivities are however difficult and time-consuming to determine by direct measurements, especially at the field scale or larger. So far, pedotransfer functions do not offer an especially reliable alternative since published approaches exhibit poor prediction performances. In our study we aimed at building pedotransfer functions by growing random forests (a statistical learning approach) on 486 datasets from the meta-database on tension-disk infiltrometer measurements collected from peer-reviewed literature and recently presented by Jarvis et al. (2013, Influence of soil, land use and climatic factors on the hydraulic conductivity of soil. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 17(12), 5185-5195). When some data from a specific source publication were allowed to enter the training set whereas others were used for validation, the results of a 10-fold cross-validation showed reasonable coefficients of determination of 0.53 for hydraulic conductivity at 10 cm tension, K10, and 0.41 for saturated conductivity, Ks. The estimated average annual temperature and precipitation at the site were the most important predictors for K10, while bulk density and estimated average annual temperature were most important for Ks prediction. The soil organic carbon content and the diameter of the disk infiltrometer were also important for the prediction of both K10 and Ks. However, coefficients of determination were around zero when all datasets of a specific source publication were excluded from the training set and exclusively used for validation. This may indicate experimenter bias, or that better predictors have to be found or that a larger dataset has to be used to infer meaningful pedotransfer functions for saturated and near-saturated hydraulic conductivities. More research is in progress

  6. characterization of soil and sediments parameters of oguta – izombe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    The high leaching potentials and high transmissive properties of the sediments below the clayey laterite .... impacts, if any, consequent on past petroleum operations. FIG. 2: LITHOLOGIC LOG OF THE THREE BOREHOLES. Top Soil. Top Soil. Top Soil. Silty Sand. Silty Sand ... Rich in micro fauna at the base. Eocene to ...

  7. Productivity model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fracturing horizontal wells and optimization of hydraulic fracture parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-fractured horizontal wells are commonly employed to improve the productivity of low and ultra-low permeability gas reservoirs. However, conventional productivity models for open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells do not consider the interferences between hydraulic fractures and the open-hole segments, resulting in significant errors in calculation results. In this article, a novel productivity prediction model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells was proposed based on complex potential theories, potential superimposition, and numerical analysis. Herein, an open-hole segment between two adjacent fractures was regarded as an equivalent fracture, which was discretized as in cases of artificial fractures. The proposed model was then applied to investigate the effects of various parameters, such as the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft, fracture quantity, fracture length, diversion capacity of fractures, horizontal well length, and inter-fracture distance, on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs with multi-fractured horizontal wells. Simulation results revealed that the quantity, length, and distribution of fractures had significant effects on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs while the effects of the diversion capacity of fractures and the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft were negligible. Additionally, a U-shaped distribution of fracture lengths was preferential as the quantity of fractures at shaft ends was twice that in the middle area. Keywords: Low permeability gas reservoir, Multi-fractured horizontal well, Productivity prediction, Open-hole completion, Unsteady-state flow, Fracture parameters optimization

  8. Hydraulic root water uptake models: old concerns and new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Carminati, A.; Rothfuss, Y.; Meunier, F.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2014-12-01

    Root water uptake (RWU) affects underground water dynamics, with consequences on plant water availability and groundwater recharge. Even though hydrological and climate models are sensitive to RWU parameters, no consensus exists on the modelling of this process. Back in the 1940ies, Van Den Honert's catenary approach was the first to investigate the use of connected hydraulic resistances to describe water flow in whole plants. However concerns such as the necessary computing when architectures get complex made this approach premature. Now that computing power increased dramatically, hydraulic RWU models are gaining popularity, notably because they naturally produce observed processes like compensatory RWU and hydraulic redistribution. Yet major concerns remain. Some are more fundamental: according to hydraulic principles, plant water potential should equilibrate with soil water potential when the plant does not transpire, which is not a general observation when using current definitions of bulk or average soil water potential. Other concerns regard the validation process: water uptake distribution is not directly measurable, which makes it hard to demonstrate whether or not hydraulic models are more accurate than other models. Eventually parameterization concerns exist: root hydraulic properties are not easily measurable, and would even fluctuate on an hourly basis due to processes like aquaporin gating. While offering opportunities to validate hydraulic RWU models, newly developed observation techniques also make us realize the increasing complexity of processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, such as the change of rhizosphere hydraulic properties with soil drying. Surprisingly, once implemented into hydraulic models, these processes do not necessarily translate into more complex emerging behavior at plant scale, and might justify the use of simplified representations of the soil-plant hydraulic system.

  9. Conductividad hidráulica en un suelo aluvial en respuesta al porcentaje de sodio intercambiable Saturated hydraulic conductivity of an alluvial soil with different exchangeable sodium percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco L. Barreto Filho

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available El efecto del porcentaje de sodio intercambiable (PSI sobre la conductividad hidráulica de un suelo saturado, fue estudiado en condiciones de laboratorio a través de la determinación de las relaciones entre la conductividad hidráulica medida en un suelo normal y las medidas en suelos con diferentes PSI. Los resultados muestran una gran reducción de la conductividad hidráulica con el aumento de sodio en el suelo, llegando esta reducción a ser en las muestras más sodificadas de casi 100%, cuando comparadas con las muestras sin sodio, hecho probablemente acontecido debido al efecto dispersante del sodio sobre las partículas del suelo.The effect of different exchangeable sodium percentages (ESP on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of a soil was studied under laboratory conditions by determining the relationship between the hydraulic conductivity of a normal soil and that measured on soil with different ESP. The results show a great reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity with the increase of the exchangeable sodium percentage in the soil, this reduction being as great as 100% on the highly sodified samples when compared with those which did not receive sodium treatment. This fact is explained due to the dispersing effect of the exchangeable sodium on the soil particles.

  10. A finite strain elastoplastic constitutive model for unsaturated soils incorporating mechanisms of compaction and hydraulic collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Keita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the deformation of unsaturated soils has usually been described based on simple infinitesimal theory, simulation methods based on the rational framework of finite strain theory are attracting attention especially when solving geotechnical problems such as slope failure induced by heavy rain in which large a deformation is expected. The purpose of this study is to reformulate an existing constitutive model for unsaturated soils (Kikumoto et al., 2010 on the basis of finite strain theory. The proposed model is based on a critical state soil model, modified Cam-clay, implementing a hyperelastic model and a bilogarithmic lnv-lnP’ (v, specific volume; P’, effective mean Kirchhoff stress relation for a finite strain. The model is incorporated with a soil water characteristic curve based on the van Genuchten model (1990 modified to be able to consider the effect of deformation of solid matrices. The key points of this model in describing the characteristics of unsaturated soils are as follows: (1 the movement of the normal consolidation line in lnv-lnP’ resulted from the degree of saturation (Q, deviatoric Kirchhoff stress, and (2 the effect of specific volume on a water retention curve. Applicability of the model is shown through element simulations of compaction and successive soaking behavior.

  11. Does the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity adapt in order to obey the Maximum Entropy Production principle? A lab experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Martijn; Zehe, Erwin; Erpicum, Sébastien; Archambeau, Pierre; Pirotton, Michel; Dewals, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The Maximum Entropy Production (MEP) principle is a conjecture assuming that a medium is organized in such a way that maximum power is subtracted from a gradient driving a flux (with power being a flux times its driving gradient). This maximum power is also known as the Carnot limit. It has already been shown that the atmosphere operates close to this Carnot limit when it comes to heat transport from the Equator to the poles, or vertically, from the surface to the atmospheric boundary layer. To reach this state close to the Carnot limit, the effective thermal conductivity of the atmosphere is adapted by the creation of convection cells (e.g. wind). The aim of this study is to test if the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity also adapts itself in such a way that it operates close to the Carnot limit. The big difference between atmosphere and soil is the way of adaptation of its resistance. The soil's hydraulic conductivity is either changed by weathering processes, which is a very slow process, or by creation of preferential flow paths. In this study the latter process is simulated in a lab experiment, where we focus on the preferential flow paths created by piping. Piping is the process of backwards erosion of sand particles subject to a large pressure gradient. Since this is a relatively fast process, it is suitable for being tested in the lab. In the lab setup a horizontal sand bed connects two reservoirs that both drain freely at a level high enough to keep the sand bed always saturated. By adding water to only one reservoir, a horizontal pressure gradient is maintained. If the flow resistance is small, a large gradient develops, leading to the effect of piping. When pipes are being formed, the effective flow resistance decreases; the flow through the sand bed increases and the pressure gradient decreases. At a certain point, the flow velocity is small enough to stop the pipes from growing any further. In this steady state, the effective flow resistance of

  12. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Senegal and The Gambia (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2013-01-01

    This data set describes a harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Senegal and The Gambia. It was derived from the Soil and Terrain Database for Senegal and The Gambia (SENSOTER ver. 1.0) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database, using standardized taxonomy-based pedotransfer (taxotransfer)

  13. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Brazil (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    This dataset presents harmonized soil parameter estimates for Brazil. The 1:5M scale Soil and Terrain Database for Latin America and the Caribbean (FAO et al. 1998), provided the basis for the current study. The data set has been prepared for the project on &Assessment of soil organic carbon stocks

  14. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean was derived from a revised version of the 1:5M Soil and Terrain Database for the region (SOTERLAC, ver. 2.0) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. The land surface of Latin America and the Caribbean has been

  15. THE SPATIAL VARIATION OF MORPHOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF VIRGIN AND TILED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ursu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Is established that the morphological parameters of soils change on small distance. Especially appreciably vary the depth of transitive horizons (B in brown and gray soils, as under a forest, and ploughed up. All on distance of two meters the general depth of soil (A + B and the depth of penetration of carbonates varies also.

  16. Hydraulic responses to extreme drought conditions in three co-dominant tree species in shallow soil over bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukowski, Kelly R; Schwinning, Susanne; Schwartz, Benjamin F

    2013-04-01

    An important component of the hydrological niche involves the partitioning of water sources, but in landscapes characterized by shallow soils over fractured bedrock, root growth is highly constrained. We conducted a study to determine how physical constraints in the root zone affected the water use of three tree species that commonly coexist on the Edwards Plateau of central Texas; cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), live oak (Quercus fusiformis), and Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei). The year of the study was unusually dry; minimum predawn water potentials measured in August were -8 MPa in juniper, less than -8 MPa in elm, and -5 MPa in oak. All year long, species used nearly identical water sources, based on stable isotope analysis of stem water. Sap flow velocities began to decline simultaneously in May, but the rate of decline was fastest for oak and slowest for juniper. Thus, species partitioned water by time when they could not partition water by source. Juniper lost 15-30 % of its stem hydraulic conductivity, while percent loss for oak was 70-75 %, and 90 % for elm. There was no tree mortality in the year of the study, but 2 years later, after an even more severe drought in 2011, we recorded 34, 14, 6, and 1 % mortality among oak, elm, juniper, and Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana), respectively. Among the study species, mortality rates ranked in the same order as the rate of sap flow decline in 2009. Among the angiosperms, mortality rates correlated with wood density, lending further support to the hypothesis that species with more cavitation-resistant xylem are more susceptible to catastrophic hydraulic failure under acute drought.

  17. Effects of Monoculture, Crop Rotation, and Soil Moisture Content on Selected Soil Physicochemical and Microbial Parameters in Wheat Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marais

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different plants are known to have different soil microbial communities associated with them. Agricultural management practices such as fertiliser and pesticide addition, crop rotation, and grazing animals can lead to different microbial communities in the associated agricultural soils. Soil dilution plates, most-probable-number (MPN, community level physiological profiling (CLPP, and buried slide technique as well as some measured soil physicochemical parameters were used to determine changes during the growing season in the ecosystem profile in wheat fields subjected to wheat monoculture or wheat in annual rotation with medic/clover pasture. Statistical analyses showed that soil moisture had an over-riding effect on seasonal fluctuations in soil physicochemical and microbial populations. While within season soil microbial activity could be differentiated between wheat fields under rotational and monoculture management, these differences were not significant.

  18. Establishing Relationships between Parameters of the Controlled Compaction Soil by Using Various In-Situ Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroslak, Mariusz

    2017-10-01

    The aim of research was evaluating reliable correlations between chosen soil parameters describing state of surface layers of soil. The paper presents site comparative tests based on the light falling weight deflectometer (LFWD), the static plate load tester (VSS), the dynamic probing light tester (DPL) and the bearing ratio tester (CBR in-situ) with relationships between soil state parameters. All featured in-situ tests were conducted based on Polish experiences and Standards used in engineering practice.

  19. Sensitivity of hydrodynamic parameters' distributions in VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with respect to uncertainty of the local hydraulic resistance coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany); Nikonov, S. [NRC ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper presents an uncertainty and sensitivity (U and S) study of the VVER-1000 reactor hydraulic properties. It is based on the OECD/NEA coolant transient Benchmark (K-3) on measured data at Kalinin-3 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The novelty of the work consists of taking into consideration all hydraulic uncertainty parameters used in the modeling of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals. A detailed parallel channel ATHLET model of the RPV is developed. It consists of ca. 26 600 control volumes most of them connected with junctions for cross flows. The specific geometry of the gap between upper part of the baffle and upper part of fuel assembly and also a fuel assembly head is taken explicitly into account The influence of the input parameters on the sensitivity and uncertainty of the RPV outlet and inlet temperatures and mass flows as well assembly-wise mass flow and coolant temperature axial distributions is shown.

  20. Development of hydraulic properties and nitrate turnover processes in minerotrophic fen soil on differnet scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleimeier, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Generally, it is recommended to remove the uppermost highly degraded peat layer from fens prior to rewetting to eliminate a potential source of organic pollutants for downstream water bodies. We investigated this material as a potential medium for denitrifying filters to further use the organic material. We are aiming to remove nitrate from tile drainage runoff at the outlet drainage dominated catchments to fullfill the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive. In a lysimeter scale long term mesocosm experiments we were aiming to reveal the peats behavior after disturbing and rewetting under constant flow conditions. Tracer experiments revealed a restructuring of the peat ending up at 20/80 percentage of mobile immobile pore volume. Additionally we observed the nitrate turnover. The turnover rate was determined by the hydraulic load. Absolute turnover rates were equal at lower and higher concentrations as well as flow rates, whereas the turnover reached higher percentages at lower concentrations. To further reveal the nitrate turnover processes flow through rector experiments were conducted in an anaerobic environment. We found that strongly reducing conditions can be created in peat even at the presence of nitrate. Thus we can conclude that the minerotrophic peat with its high iron and sulfur concentrations also enables autotrophic denitrification oxidizing iron and sulfur. While the conditions are favorable to re-reduce iron and sulfur,thus an electron shuttling system developed transporting electrons from the organic material as initial e- donor to nitrate as terminal e- acceptor.

  1. Research progress of on-the-go soil parameter sensors based on NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiaofei; Meng, Zhijun; Wu, Guangwei; Guo, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Both the ever-increasing prices of fertilizer and growing ecological concern over chemical run-off into sources of drinking water have brought the issues of precision agriculture and site-specific management to the forefront of present technological development within agriculture and ecology. Soil is an important and basic element in agriculture production. Acquisition of soil information plays an important role in precision agriculture. The soil parameters include soil total nitrogen, phosporus, potassium, soil organic matter, soil moisture, electrical conductivity and pH value and so on. Field rapid acquisition to all the kinds of soil physical and chemical parameters is one of the most important research directions. And soil parameter real-time monitoring is also the trend of future development in precision agriculture. While developments in precision agriculture and site-specific management procedures have made significant in-roads on these issues and many researchers have developed effective means to determine soil properties, routinely obtaining robust on-the-go measurements of soil properties which are reliable enough to drive effective fertilizer application remains a challenge. NIRS technology provides a new method to obtain soil parameter with low cost and rapid advantage. In this paper, research progresses of soil on-the-go spectral sensors at domestic and abroad was combed and analyzed. There is a need for the sensing system to perform at least six key indexes for any on-the-go soil spectral sensor to be successful. The six indexes are detection limit, specificity, robustness, accuracy, cost and easy-to-use. Both the research status and problems were discussed. Finally, combining the national conditions of china, development tendency of on-the-go soil spectral sensors was proposed. In the future, on-the-go soil spectral sensors with reliable enough, sensitive enough and continuous detection would become popular in precision agriculture.

  2. Soil erosion model predictions using parent material/soil texture-based parameters compared to using site-specific parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Foltz; W. J. Elliot; N. S. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    Forested areas disturbed by access roads produce large amounts of sediment. One method to predict erosion and, hence, manage forest roads is the use of physically based soil erosion models. A perceived advantage of a physically based model is that it can be parameterized at one location and applied at another location with similar soil texture or geological parent...

  3. Soil-Gas Phase Transport and Structure Parameters for a Soil Under Different Management Regimes and at Two Moisture Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    tortuous and well-connected pathways for gas diffusion at higher bulk density. Pore organization, PO = k(a) / epsilon, showed a treatment effect with typically higher values for the organic plots, implying that an improved possibility for formation of organomineral soil aggregates resulted in better......Measurements of diffusive and convective gas transport parameters can be used to describe soil functional architecture and reveal key factors for soil structure development. Undisturbed 100-cm(3) soil samples were sampled at the Long-term Research on Agricultural Systems experiment located...... at the University of California, Davis. The 18 plots used in this study represented fairly wide ranges in organic carbon (0. 0072-0.0153 kg kg(-1)) and clay (0.30-0.44 kg kg(-1)). Soil-air permeability, k(a), and soil-gas diffusivity, D-P/D-0, were determined at field-moist conditions (fin) and, subsequently, after...

  4. Physical-hydraulic properties of a sandy loam typic paleudalf soil under organic cultivation of 'montenegrina' mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Valverde dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are the most important fruit species in the world, with emphasis to oranges, mandarins and lemons. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, most fruit production is found on small properties under organic cultivation. Soil compaction is one of the factors limiting production and due to the fixed row placement of this crop, compaction can arise in various manners in the interrows of the orchard. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil physical properties and water infiltration capacity in response to interrow management in an orchard of mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore 'Montenegrina' under organic cultivation. Interrow management was performed through harrowing, logs in em "V", mowing, and cutting/knocking down plants with a knife roller. Soil physical properties were evaluated in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, between the wheel tracks (BWT, and in the area under the line projection of the canopy (CLP, with undisturbed soil samples collected in the 0.00-0.15, 0.15-0.30, 0.30-0.45, and 0.45-0.60 m layers, with four replicates. The soil water infiltration test was performed using the concentric cylinder method, with a maximum time of 90 min for each test. In general, soil analysis showed a variation in the physical-hydraulic properties of the Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico (sandy loam Typic Paleudalf in the three sampling sites in all layers, regardless of the management procedure in the interrows. Machinery traffic leads to heterogeneity in the soil physical-hydraulic properties in the interrows of the orchard. Soil porosity and bulk density are affected especially in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, which causes a reduction in the constant rate of infiltration and in the accumulated infiltration of water in this sampling site. The use of the disk harrow and mower leads to greater harmful effects on the soil, which can interfere with mandarin production.

  5. Soil Parameters Drive the Structure, Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of the Bacterial Communities Across Temperate Beech Forest Soil Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, M; Buée, M; Bach, C; Cébron, A; Frey-Klett, P; Turpault, M P; Uroz, S

    2016-02-01

    Soil and climatic conditions as well as land cover and land management have been shown to strongly impact the structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities. Here, we addressed under a same land cover the potential effect of the edaphic parameters on the soil bacterial communities, excluding potential confounding factors as climate. To do this, we characterized two natural soil sequences occurring in the Montiers experimental site. Spatially distant soil samples were collected below Fagus sylvatica tree stands to assess the effect of soil sequences on the edaphic parameters, as well as the structure and diversity of the bacterial communities. Soil analyses revealed that the two soil sequences were characterized by higher pH and calcium and magnesium contents in the lower plots. Metabolic assays based on Biolog Ecoplates highlighted higher intensity and richness in usable carbon substrates in the lower plots than in the middle and upper plots, although no significant differences occurred in the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities along the soil sequences as assessed using quantitative PCR. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundantly represented phyla. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Chlamydiae were significantly enriched in the most acidic and nutrient-poor soils compared to the Bacteroidetes, which were significantly enriched in the soils presenting the higher pH and nutrient contents. Interestingly, aluminium, nitrogen, calcium, nutrient availability and pH appeared to be the best predictors of the bacterial community structures along the soil sequences.

  6. Classifying zones of suitability for manual drilling using textural and hydraulic parameters of shallow aquifers: a case study in northwestern Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, F. Fabio; Fumagalli, Letizia; Fava, Francesco; Di Mauro, Biagio; Kane, Cheik Hamidou; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Hamidou, Barry; Colombo, Roberto; Bonomi, Tullia

    2017-08-01

    A method is proposed that uses analysis of borehole stratigraphic logs for the characterization of shallow aquifers and for the assessment of areas suitable for manual drilling. The model is based on available borehole-log parameters: depth to hard rock, depth to water, thickness of laterite and hydraulic transmissivity of the shallow aquifer. The model is applied to a study area in northwestern Senegal. A dataset of boreholes logs has been processed using a software package (TANGAFRIC) developed during the research. After a manual procedure to assign a standard category describing the lithological characteristics, the next step is the automated extraction of different textural parameters and the estimation of hydraulic conductivity using reference values available in the literature. The hydraulic conductivity values estimated from stratigraphic data have been partially validated, by comparing them with measured values from a series of pumping tests carried out in large-diameter wells. The results show that this method is able to produce a reliable interpretation of the shallow hydrogeological context using information generally available in the region. The research contributes to improving the identification of areas where conditions are suitable for manual drilling. This is achieved by applying the described method, based on a structured and semi-quantitative approach, to classify the zones of suitability for given manual drilling techniques using data available in most African countries. Ultimately, this work will support proposed international programs aimed at promoting low-cost water supply in Africa and enhancing access to safe drinking water for the population.

  7. Classifying zones of suitability for manual drilling using textural and hydraulic parameters of shallow aquifers: a case study in northwestern Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, F. Fabio; Fumagalli, Letizia; Fava, Francesco; Di Mauro, Biagio; Kane, Cheik Hamidou; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Hamidou, Barry; Colombo, Roberto; Bonomi, Tullia

    2017-12-01

    A method is proposed that uses analysis of borehole stratigraphic logs for the characterization of shallow aquifers and for the assessment of areas suitable for manual drilling. The model is based on available borehole-log parameters: depth to hard rock, depth to water, thickness of laterite and hydraulic transmissivity of the shallow aquifer. The model is applied to a study area in northwestern Senegal. A dataset of boreholes logs has been processed using a software package (TANGAFRIC) developed during the research. After a manual procedure to assign a standard category describing the lithological characteristics, the next step is the automated extraction of different textural parameters and the estimation of hydraulic conductivity using reference values available in the literature. The hydraulic conductivity values estimated from stratigraphic data have been partially validated, by comparing them with measured values from a series of pumping tests carried out in large-diameter wells. The results show that this method is able to produce a reliable interpretation of the shallow hydrogeological context using information generally available in the region. The research contributes to improving the identification of areas where conditions are suitable for manual drilling. This is achieved by applying the described method, based on a structured and semi-quantitative approach, to classify the zones of suitability for given manual drilling techniques using data available in most African countries. Ultimately, this work will support proposed international programs aimed at promoting low-cost water supply in Africa and enhancing access to safe drinking water for the population.

  8. Preliminary Report on the Effect of Pre-Boring on the Mobilized Friction Capacity of Pile Foundation Hydraulically Jacked into Expansive Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Budi G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-drilling was performed to reduce lateral earth pressure generated by pile foundation hydraulically jacked into expansive soil. Nineteen prestressed-precast spun concrete pile with diameter of 800 mm were penetrated into expansive soil up the depth of 40 m. Pre-drilling with diameter of 700 mm was carried out up to the depth of 12.5 m. Penetration loads required to install the piles, which was displayed on the built-in pressure panel, were recorded every 1 m interval. The load that was con...

  9. Effects of hazelnut husk compost application on soil quality parameters in hazelnut orchards in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilkaya, Ridvan

    2016-04-01

    The long-term application of excessive chemical fertilizers has resulted in the degeneration of soil quality parameters such as soil microbial biomass, respiration, and nutrient content, which in turn affects crop health, productivity, and soil sustainable productivity. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid and efficient solution for rehabilitating degraded two hazelnut orchards having different textures by precisely quantifying soil quality parameters through the application of different doses (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 ton da-1) of hazelnut husk compost (HH) during hazelnut growth. After nine months of HHC application, soil quality parameters such as microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), basal respiration (BSR), total organic carbon (Corg), total N, C/N ratio, aggregate stability and some soil chemical properties (pH, EC and NO3-N content) were carried out on collected soil samples. The results showed that soil quality parameters were significantly affected by soil texture and HHC application doses. In general, Cmic, BSR, C/N ratio and the contents of Corg and N increased (P<0,001) and Cmic/Corg values decreased (P<0,001) with increasing HHC application in comparison with the control. In addition, HHC markedly increased the contents of NO3-N, the aggregate stability of soil, and the hydrolic conductivity in the soil were notably heightened. According to the results of field experiments conducted different location and condition, when the focusing on the organic substance management and sustainability of the quality parameters in soil, it was clear from the evidence obtained the research that the ideal HHC application was 5 ton per decare to increase the organic matter content by 2%. (This research was supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Project number: 111O698).

  10. Modeling and Parameter Identification of the Vibration Characteristics of Armature Assembly in a Torque Motor of Hydraulic Servo Valves under Electromagnetic Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The resonance of the armature assembly is the main problem leading to the fatigue of the spring pipe in a torque motor of hydraulic servo valves, which can cause the failure of servo valves. To predict the vibration characteristics of the armature assembly, this paper focuses on the mathematical modeling of the vibration characteristics of armature assembly in a hydraulic servo valve and the identification of parameters in the models. To build models more accurately, the effect of the magnetic spring is taken into account. Vibration modal analysis is performed to obtain the mode shapes and natural frequencies, which are necessary to implement the identification of damping ratios in the mathematical models. Based on the mathematical models for the vibration characteristics, the harmonic responses of the armature assembly are analyzed using the finite element method and measured under electromagnetic excitations. The simulation results agree well with the experimental studies.

  11. Influence of soil parameters on depth of oil waste penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rychlicki Stanislaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A measurement post for testing propagation of hydrocarbon contamination in a model of a near-surface soil layer and its remediation, are characterized in the paper. Generalized results of laboratory observations require meeting similarity criteria of the laboratory and actual processes. These requirements were used when designing the measurement post. A successful attempt to match a theoretical model describing oil products filtration necessitates certain conditions, e.g. homogeneity of the physical model of soil and characteristic of the course of the analyzed processes.

  12. Effect of different soil conditions on magnetic parameters of power-plant fly ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapic̆ka, A.; Jordanova, N.; Petrovský, E.; Ustjak, S.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of soil conditions on magnetic parameters of anthropogenic ferrimagnetics was studied. Fly ash from a coal burning power plant (Pocerady, Czech Republic) was used as original contaminant material, whereas soil-reactive medium was modelled by different soil solutions. Magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis parameters, and thermomagnetic curves were measured for samples that underwent different leaching time periods. Virtually constant magnetic susceptibility values were obtained independently on the soil medium (acid and neutral). On the other hand, the original highly nonstoichiometric maghemite phase has been rapidly transformed to stable magnetite. In some cases (model of free-draining soils), further decrease of Curie temperature ( TC) to 550-560 °C is observed. Unstable maghemite phase was not identified in contaminated soil horizons in the surroundings of the power plant.

  13. Canola traits and some soil biological parameters in response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the effects of fertilization and tillage methods on soil microbial community and canola traits. A field experiment was carried out in 2009 to 2010 growing season. Experiments were arranged in a split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Main plots consisted of no ...

  14. The contibutions of soil properties to cassava yield parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Collaborative Study of Cassava in Africa (COSCA) undertook cassava yield and soil fertility surveys in sub-Saharan Africa in 1991 with the objectives of obtaining average yields from farmers' fields and determining factors which could account for the yield differences across the various climate, altitude, population ...

  15. evaluation of physico-chemical parameters of agricultural soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benlkhoubi N, Saber S, Lebkiri A, Rifi El and Fahime El

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... analysis of source plasma emission (ICP) has identified eight trace elements contained in the materials taken from ..... The global analysis by the method of PCA (principal component analysis) is combined with .... auger. The soils (Layer: 0-15 cm) from the same area were mixed, put into a clean plastic bag.

  16. Nitrogen mineralization kinetics and parameter estimates in soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonium-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen were determined after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 19 and 34 weeks from soils covered with PVC tubes inserted into the sixteen treatment combination plots. Inorganic N concentration in the amended plots and the control were analysed using five mathematical N mineralization models. N0, Ne ...

  17. Analysis of soil chemical parameters of an uncleaned crude oil spill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of soil chemical parameters of an uncleaned crude oil spill site at Biara was carried out. Soil samples were collected at 0 -15 cm and 15 – 30 cm soil depths from both polluted and unpolluted sites for analysis. Significant increase in high total hydrocarbon content (1015±80.5 – 1150±90.1 mg/kg) in polluted site was ...

  18. Prediction of compressibility parameters of the soils using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, T Fikret; Dagdeviren, Ugur; Yildiz, Murat; Ozkan, Ozhan

    2016-01-01

    The compression index and recompression index are one of the important compressibility parameters to determine the settlement calculation for fine-grained soil layers. These parameters can be determined by carrying out laboratory oedometer test on undisturbed samples; however, the test is quite time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, many empirical formulas based on regression analysis have been presented to estimate the compressibility parameters using soil index properties. In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) model is suggested for prediction of compressibility parameters from basic soil properties. For this purpose, the input parameters are selected as the natural water content, initial void ratio, liquid limit and plasticity index. In this model, two output parameters, including compression index and recompression index, are predicted in a combined network structure. As the result of the study, proposed ANN model is successful for the prediction of the compression index, however the predicted recompression index values are not satisfying compared to the compression index.

  19. Assessment of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval Parameters Using Tau-Omega Algorithms for Soil Moisture Deficit Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika

    2014-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the latest mission which provides flow of coarse resolution soil moisture data for land applications. However, the efficient retrieval of soil moisture for hydrological applications depends on optimally choosing the soil and vegetation parameters. The first stage of this work involves the evaluation of SMOS Level 2 products and then several approaches for soil moisture retrieval from SMOS brightness temperature are performed to estimate Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). The most widely applied algorithm i.e. Single channel algorithm (SCA), based on tau-omega is used in this study for the soil moisture retrieval. In tau-omega, the soil moisture is retrieved using the Horizontal (H) polarisation following Hallikainen dielectric model, roughness parameters, Fresnel's equation and estimated Vegetation Optical Depth (tau). The roughness parameters are empirically calibrated using the numerical optimization techniques. Further to explore the improvement in retrieval models, modifications have been incorporated in the algorithms with respect to the sources of the parameters, which include effective temperatures derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-NOAH Land Surface Model and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) while the s is derived from MODIS Leaf Area Index (LAI). All the evaluations are performed against SMD, which is estimated using the Probability Distributed Model following a careful calibration and validation integrated with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The performance obtained after all those changes indicate that SCA-H using WRF-NOAH LSM downscaled ECMWF LST produces an improved performance for SMD estimation at a catchment scale.

  20. physico-chemical parameters of soil in some selected dumpsites in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Physico-chemical parameters of soil were found to have influence on the availability of heavy metals in plants. pH values recorded in the ... Correlation analysis revealed that pH, electrical conductivity and moisture content were negatively correlated. ... conductivity meter was inserted and the electrical conductivity of the soil ...

  1. Assessment of soil quality parameters using multivariate analysis in the Rawal Lake watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, Shahana; Begum, Shaheen; Yasmin, Azra

    2016-09-01

    Soil providing a wide array of ecosystem services is subjected to quality deterioration due to natural and anthropogenic factors. Most of the soils in Pakistan have poor status of available plant nutrients and cannot support optimum levels of crop productivity. The present study statistically analyzed ten soil quality parameters in five subwatersheds (Bari Imam, Chattar, Rumli, Shahdra, and Shahpur) of the Rawal Lake. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster analysis (CA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were performed to evaluate correlation in soil quality parameters on spatiotemporal and vertical scales. Soil organic matter, electrical conductivity, nitrates, and sulfates were found to be lower than that required for good quality soil. Soil pH showed significant difference (p analysis resulted in three major factors contributing 76 % of the total variance. For factor 1, temperature, sand, silt, clay, and nitrates had the highest factor loading values (>0.75) and indicated that these were the most influential parameters of first factor or component. Cluster analysis separated five sampling sites into three statistically significant clusters: I (Shahdra-Bari Imam), II (Chattar), and III (Shahpur-Rumli). Among the five sites, Shahdra was found to have good quality soil followed by Bari Imam. The present study illustrated the usefulness of multivariate statistical approaches for the analysis and interpretation of complex datasets to understand variations in soil quality for effective watershed management.

  2. Optimum control parameters and long-term productivity of geothermal reservoirs using coupled thermo-hydraulic process modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Aliyu, Musa D.; Chen, Hua-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the long-term performance of geothermal energy extraction is crucial to decision-makers and reservoir engineers for optimal management and sustainable utilisation. This article presents a three dimensional, numerical model of coupled thermo-hydraulic processes, in a deep heterogeneous geothermal reservoir overlain and underlain by impermeable layers, with discrete fracture. The finite element method is employed in modelling the reservoir, after conducting a verification study to test ...

  3. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  4. In-situ determination of strength parameters of marine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, R. L.; Green, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Principles are developed whereby both the sear strength, S, and the effective soil strength angle, phi', can be calculated from the readings of a combined shear/normal-stress gauge mounted on the face of a rough penetrator. The method calculates S and phi' even if interface friction is the mechanism of failure, unless that friction is local to the gauge face. In that case, the method yields only the interface friction angle, delta.

  5. Method of defining rational parameters for excavator buckets vibrating devices in order to reduce soil adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The article describes the method of defining rational parameters for excavator buckets vibrating devices in order to reduce soil adhesion under various operating conditions. The method includes limits formation, calculating geometric parameters of curved mold concentrator for excavator buckets with magnetostriction vibration exciters; calculating parameters of acoustic influence equipment; calculating power demand of equipment, defining adhesive forces of soil to buckets with given values of external factors; defining equipment operation mode (turn-on frequency, exposure time). Suggested method enables one to define required parameters of vibrating equipment to excavator buckets during the design phase.

  6. Predicting Soil Physical Parameters and Copper Transport in a Polluted Field From X Ray CT-Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    in soils is strongly controlled by the soil structure, the capabilities of these visualization techniques could be used to predict the risk of pollutants leaching. This work was carried out using soils from a field site (Hygum) in Jutland, Denmark, a historical copper (Cu) polluted field cultivated for 80...... to the volume of each soil column. Leaching experiments were performed to analyze tritium transport, colloid leaching and dissolved organic carbon and Cu losses associated with particles or dissolved organic matter (DOM). Air permeability and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured before and after...

  7. Controlling parameters of fluorescent tracer sorption on soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Marcus; Graf-Rosenfellner, Markus; Lange, Jens; Lang, Friederike

    2017-04-01

    Fluorescent dyes like uranine (UR) and sulforhodamine B (SRB) have been widely used, especially for tracing hydrological processes. In the recent past, efforts have intensified to use fluorescent tracers also in soils, for example as proxies for organic pollutants. However, the sorption properties of both organic pollutants and fluorescent tracers have to be exactly known to succeed. Yet existing knowledge for soils is still incomplete and poorly standardized. For this reason, we carried out laboratory batch experiments to determine sorption isotherms of UR and SRB with varying pH, soil texture and organic carbon content (OC). As sorbents we used a sandy sediment with low OC, a silty loamy topsoil with 2.8 %-OC and a similar textured subsoil containing 0.6 %-OC. For both tracers six concentration steps each were prepared and shaken with the suspended sorbent for 42 h using a sorbent:solution ratio of 1:5. During the equilibration, the pH was repeatedly adjusted to 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5 by adding hydrochloric acid (HCl) or sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Subsequently, the tracer-sorbent-suspension was centrifuged and the fluorescence of the tracer in the supernatant was measured. In order to examine the influence of OC and the clay fraction on the tracer sorption, batch-experiments at pH 7.5 were also conducted with manipulated sorbents: top- and subsoil samples were treated with H2O2 to remove organic matter and the clay mineral montmorillonite was added to the sandy sediment to achieve final clay contents of 0.1 %, 0.5 %, 1 %, 2 %, 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % clay. We observed a negative relationship between the linear sorption coefficient Kd and pH, which was stronger for UR than for SRB. Increasing numbers of negative sorption sites and functional groups of both tracers and sorbents with increasing pH might be the reason for this observation. Besides the pH-value, quantity and quality of clay and OC had a crucial influence on the sorption of UR and SRB in soils and sediment. As

  8. Soybean fungal soil-borne diseases: a parameter for measuring the effect of agricultural intensification on soil health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Brandán, C; Huidobro, J; Grümberg, B; Scandiani, M M; Luque, A G; Meriles, J M; Vargas-Gil, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of agricultural intensification on soil microbial diversity, chemical and physical parameters, and the decrease of the incidence of sudden death syndrome (Fusarium crassistipitatum) and charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) in soybean. Soils under different management systems were evaluated during 2 crop cycles: soybean monoculture for 24 and 11 years, soybean-maize rotation for 15 and 4 years, 1 year of soybean, and native vegetation. The incidence of both soil-borne diseases was higher under monoculture than under rotation. Increased populations of potential biocontrol agents (Trichoderma spp., Gliocladium spp., fluorescent pseudomonads) were associated with rotation treatments, especially in 2010-2011. The comparison of agricultural vs. native vegetation soil and the average of agricultural cycles showed that microbial biomass carbon and glomalin-related soil protein were higher in the rotation system than in monoculture (50% and 77%, respectively). Furthermore, from the community-level functional diversity (Biolog Eco plates), McIntosh index showed lower functional diversity in monoculture than in rotation and native vegetation plots. Agricultural intensification reduced microbial biomass carbon, glomalin-related soil protein, organic matter, total nitrogen, aggregate stability, and yield, and increased bulk density. Soil quality degradation was associated with the establishment of soil-borne pathogens and increased soybean plant susceptibility to disease.

  9. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    the water retention curve), both exhibiting similar and exponential relationships with D50. Under variably saturated conditions, higher Dp and ka in coarser sand (larger D50) were observed due to rapid gas diffusion and advection through the less tortuous large-pore networks. In addition, soil compaction......The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...... saturated conditions. Data showed that particle size markedly affects the effective diameter of the drained pores active in leading gas through the sample at –100 cm H2O of soil water matric potential (calculated from Dp and ka) as well as the average pore diameter at half saturation (calculated from...

  10. Effect of saline soil parameters on endo mycorrhizal colonisation of dominant halophytes in four Hungarian sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuzy, A.; Biro, B.; Toth, T.

    2010-07-01

    Soil and root samples were collected from the rhizosphere of dominant halophytes (Artemisia santonicum, Aster tripolium, Festuca pseudovina, Lepidium crassifolium, Plantago maritima and Puccinellia limosa) at four locations with saline soils in Hungary. The correlations- between arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungal colonisation parameters (% colonisation, % arbuscules) and soil physical, chemical and biological parameters were determined Endomycorrhiza colonisation was found to be negatively correlated with the electric conductivity of the soil paste, the salt-specific ion concentrations and the cation exchange capacity, showing the sensitivity of AM fungi at increasing salt concentrations, independently of the types of salt-specific anions. A positive correlation was detected between the mycorrhiza colonisation and the abundance of oligotroph bacteria known to be the less variable and more stable (k-strategist) group. This fact and the negative correlation found with the humus content underlines the importance of nutrient availability and the limitations of the symbiotic interactions in stressed saline or sodic soils. (Author) 29 refs.

  11. Metop ASCAT soil moisture product: Calibration of the vegetation correction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sebastian; Melzer, Thomas; Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigated the calibration of the vegetation correction parameters in the TU Wien soil moisture retrieval algorithm. Unlike conventional soil moisture retrieval techniques used for space-borne microwave instruments, the TU Wien soil moisture retrieval algorithm represents a change detection method. The algorithm accounts for heterogeneous land cover and for the effects of vegetation based on empirically derived model parameters. The optimal choice of these parameters can be supported by calibrating the model using external reference data sets. In the past, external data sets have not been used unless they are indispensable to correct or improve the model output (e.g. wet correction in desert environment). Three different study areas (South-East U.S., Central Europe and South-East Australia) were tested to see whether the vegetation correction parameters can be calibrated using in-situ soil moisture information or soil moisture from land surface models. The experiments show that an enhanced vegetation correction leads to a better quality of the Metop ASCAT soil moisture time series signal. Our study demonstrates the need to calibrate the vegetation parametrization in order to remove remaining vegetation effects in the Metop ASCAT soil moisture product.

  12. Retrieving Vegetation Parameters and Soil Reflection Coefficients with P-band SAR Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemohammad, S. H.; Konings, A. G.; Jagdhuber, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is highly dependent on the water available to the plant through its roots. Therefore, measuring the root-zone-soil-moisture across large spatial scales is of great importance for crop monitoring and yield estimation as well as hydrological and ecological modeling. Unlike L-band instruments, which are sensitive to only a few centimeters of the top soil layer, P-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments have a penetration depth that can be used to retrieve soil moisture profiles in depths of several tens of centimeters (depending on soil texture and moisture content). NASA's Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission is designed to study the application of P-band SAR measurements for monitoring root-zone-soil-moisture. In this study, we introduce a new framework to retrieve vegetation parameters and smooth-surface soil reflection coefficients using SAR polarimetry and the fully polarimetric covariance matrix of the backscattering signal from AirMOSS observations. The retrieved soil reflectivities (both horizontally and vertically -polarized) can then be used to estimate the soil moisture profile. The retrieval model takes into account contributions from surface, dihedral and volume scattering coming from the vegetation and soil components, and does not require prior vegetation parameters. This approach reduces the dependency of the retrieval on allometry-based vegetation models with large numbers of uncertain parameters. The performance of this method will be validated using observations from AirMOSS field campaigns in July 2013 over Harvard Forest in Massachusetts, USA. This will enable a quality assessment of the polarimetry-based retrieval of the soil reflectivities and the estimated root-zone-soil-moisture profiles.

  13. Time-lapse effect of ancient plant coal biochar on some soil agrochemical parameters and soil characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Tamás; Biró, Borbála; Ulmer, Ákos; Szántó, Mónika; Kotroczó, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    Biochar is a solid material obtained from reductive, oxygen-free processes, i.e. the thermo-chemical conversion of biomass in oxygen-limited environment. The obtained products have high carbon sequestration potential and strong nutrient-water absorption capacities because of the enlarged carbon surfaces. It is not yet clear how carbon stimulates agrochemical parameters in soil and how those characteristics are developing as time goes on a long-term basis. Samples of ancient (25, 35, 80 years old) plant coal-affected soils were collected in a temperate deciduous forest site located in the south part of the Bükk Mountains (in North Eastern Hungary). Physical-chemical soil characteristics, such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), the organic and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+, NH3-) and the available nutrients (P2O5 and K2O), were estimated beside organic matter (SOM) content, measured by two different methods. Levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in soil and in various biochar samples were assessed in relation with permissible limit values and potential toxicity. Positive correlation was found between the amount of available nutrients, total organic nitrogen content, cation exchange capacity and the age of plant coal-affected soils. The sample soils were exposed to continuous plant coal biochar effect for 25 years, during which macronutrients absorbed and accumulated in the plant coal surfaces. After this period, the degradation of carbon developed simultaneously with the reduction of the amount of available nutrients, till the end of the studied 80-year-affecting period. Measured CEC level indicated positive correlation with nutrient availability and the age of biochar-affected soils. Our results support the hypothesis that biochar in soil can improve its general agrochemical characteristics in relation with its persistence in a specific soil-plant system. Potential PAH content and toxicity of biochar products are key issues of developing

  14. Moisture can be the dominant environmental parameter governing cadaver decomposition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, David O; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2010-07-15

    Forensic taphonomy involves the use of decomposition to estimate postmortem interval (PMI) or locate clandestine graves. Yet, cadaver decomposition remains poorly understood, particularly following burial in soil. Presently, we do not know how most edaphic and environmental parameters, including soil moisture, influence the breakdown of cadavers following burial and alter the processes that are used to estimate PMI and locate clandestine graves. To address this, we buried juvenile rat (Rattus rattus) cadavers (approximately 18 g wet weight) in three contrasting soils from tropical savanna ecosystems located in Pallarenda (sand), Wambiana (medium clay), or Yabulu (loamy sand), Queensland, Australia. These soils were sieved (2mm), weighed (500 g dry weight), calibrated to a matric potential of -0.01 megapascals (MPa), -0.05 MPa, or -0.3 MPa (wettest to driest) and incubated at 22 degrees C. Measurements of cadaver decomposition included cadaver mass loss, carbon dioxide-carbon (CO(2)-C) evolution, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), protease activity, phosphodiesterase activity, ninhydrin-reactive nitrogen (NRN) and soil pH. Cadaver burial resulted in a significant increase in CO(2)-C evolution, MBC, enzyme activities, NRN and soil pH. Cadaver decomposition in loamy sand and sandy soil was greater at lower matric potentials (wetter soil). However, optimal matric potential for cadaver decomposition in medium clay was exceeded, which resulted in a slower rate of cadaver decomposition in the wettest soil. Slower cadaver decomposition was also observed at high matric potential (-0.3 MPa). Furthermore, wet sandy soil was associated with greater cadaver decomposition than wet fine-textured soil. We conclude that gravesoil moisture content can modify the relationship between temperature and cadaver decomposition and that soil microorganisms can play a significant role in cadaver breakdown. We also conclude that soil NRN is a more reliable indicator of gravesoil than soil pH. (c

  15. Characterization of Soil and Sediment Parameters of Jisike-Izombe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high leaching potentials and high transmissive properties of the sediments below the clayey laterite suggests a vulnerability of the aquifer to pollution through vertical infiltration. However, borehole water quality parameters for the area show that groundwater quality is not in anyway compromised when compared to the ...

  16. Nonlinear genetic-based simulation of soil shear strength parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a significantly better prediction performance than the regression models. 1. Introduction. One of the most important engineering ..... 3.1 Parameters for performance evaluation. The correlation coefficient (R), root mean ...... in modelling and control of diesel engines; PhD Thesis,. University of Newcastle, UK. Mollahasani A ...

  17. Progress on the calibration of channel geometry and friction parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using time series of SAR flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Bates, P. D.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to calibrate channel depth and roughness parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP Sub-Grid 2D hydraulic model using SAR image-derived flood extent maps. The aim is to reduce uncertainty in flood model predictions for those rivers where channel geometry is unknown and/or cannot be easily measured. In particular we consider the effectiveness of using real SAR data for calibration and whether the number and timings of SAR acquisitions is of benefit to the final result. Terrain data are processed from 2m LiDAR images and inflows to the model are taken from gauged data. As a test case we applied the method to the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury. We firstly applied the automatic flood mapping algorithm of Giustarini[1] et al. (2013) to ENVISAT ASAR (wide swath mode) flood images; generating a series of flood maps. We then created an ensemble of flood extent maps with the hydraulic model (each model representing a unique parameter set). Where there is a favourable comparison between the modelled flood map and the SAR obtained flood map we may suggest an optimal parameter set. Applying the method to a sequence of SAR acquisitions provides insight into the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of using series of acquired images. To complete the investigation we simultaneously explore parameter 'identifiabilty' within a sequence of available satellite observations by adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[2] et al. (2003). We show where we might most easily detect the depth and roughness parameters within the SAR acquisition sequence. [1] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 51, no. 4. [2] Wagener. 2003. 'Towards reduced uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff modelling: Dynamic identifiability analysis'. Hydrol. Process. 17, 455-476.

  18. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and biofilms: A theoretical approach linking pore and pedon scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M.; Moenickes, S.; Richter, O.; Schröder, T.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of active substances in the soil environment is shaped by soil physical properties as well as microbial life. Microorganisms degrading those substances occur in soil pores either in suspension or as biofilms on grain surfaces. At the same scale, i.e. pore scale, the soil physical properties texture, density, porosity, and water content have an impact on transport behaviour of active substances. Macroscopic parameters describe these processes at pedon scale; e.g. hydraulic conductivity summarizes the effect of named pore scale parameters. Narsilio et al. [2009] derived a relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity and pore scale water velocity fields based on Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids. However, they did not analyse the influence of heterogeneity and microbial activity, whereas microorganisms, especially biofilms, do have an impact on hydraulic conductivity [Vandevivere and Baveye, 1992]. Biofilms alter the pore geometry while growing. This alteration directly influences the soil water flow field and hence the convective transport of active substances. Here, we present a way to couple the saturated hydraulic conductivity at macro scale to biomass population dynamics and pore space. The hydraulic conductivity will be analysed with regard to heterogeneous soils. The model combining fluid flow, reactive transport, and biofilm dynamics is applied to investigate the degradation and transport behaviour of pesticides in heterogeneous soils.

  19. Determination of the hydraulic characteristics by means of integral parameters in a model of wetland with subsuperficial flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejos, G.; Ponce Caballero, C.; Quintal Franco, C.; Mendez Novelo, R.

    2009-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the portions of plug flow and death zones using tracer tests by empiric models as Wolf-Resnick and Dispersion in evaluate bed-packed reactors with horizontal subsurface flow, as a model of a constructed wetland. In order to assess the hydraulic behavior of systems such as packed-bed reactors and constructed wetlands both of subsurface flow, it is necessary to study and evaluate them modifying some variables while others remain constant. As well it is important to use mathematical models to describe, as precise as possible, the different phenomenon inside the systems, in such a way that these models bring information in an integral way to predict the behavior of the systems. (Author)

  20. The hydraulic conductivity of sediments: A pore size perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, X.W.

    2017-12-06

    This article presents an analysis of previously published hydraulic conductivity data for a wide range of sediments. All soils exhibit a prevalent power trend between the hydraulic conductivity and void ratio. Data trends span 12 orders of magnitude in hydraulic conductivity and collapse onto a single narrow trend when the hydraulic conductivity data are plotted versus the mean pore size, estimated using void ratio and specific surface area measurements. The sensitivity of hydraulic conductivity to changes in the void ratio is higher than the theoretical value due to two concurrent phenomena: 1) percolating large pores are responsible for most of the flow, and 2) the larger pores close first during compaction. The prediction of hydraulic conductivity based on macroscale index parameters in this and similar previous studies has reached an asymptote in the range of kmeas/5≤kpredict≤5kmeas. The remaining uncertainty underscores the important role of underlying sediment characteristics such as pore size distribution, shape, and connectivity that are not measured with index properties. Furthermore, the anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity cannot be recovered from scalar parameters such as index properties. Overall, results highlight the robustness of the physics inspired data scrutiny based Hagen–Poiseuille and Kozeny-Carman analyses.

  1. Evaluation of different soil parameters and wild boar (Sus scrofa [L.] grassland damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Laznik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Presented in this paper are the correlations between different soil parameters [presence of grubs, earthworms, pH, content of P2O5, K2O and organic matter (OM in soil] and wild boar (Sus scrofa [L.] damage to grasslands. The soil samples and damage assessments were performed at six locations in the Kočevje region, which is a densely wooded part of South East Slovenia. A significant positive correlation was discovered between the extent of damage due to wild boar rooting in grasslands and the number of grubs (r=0.73, the weight of grubs (r=0.69 and the content of P2O5 (r=0.87 in the soil. The quantity and weight of grubs in soil were significantly influenced by soil pH, the content of CaCl2 (r=0.71/0.72, P2O5 (r=0.90/0.91, and OM (r=0.74/0.77; while the quantity and weight of earthworms in soil were influenced by the content of K2O (r=0.81/-0.84. A moderate yet insignificant correlation (r=0.48/0.56 was discovered between the number and weight of earthworms in soil and the extent of grassland damage. Grubs represent a more important source of protein for wild boars than earthworms; consequently, reducing the quantity of grubs in soil could minimise the extent of damage caused by boars.

  2. Evaluation of Grounding Resistance and Inversion Method to Estimate Soil Electrical Grounding Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Slaoui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil resistivity plays a key role in designing grounding systems for high-voltage transmission lines and substations. The objectives of this paper are to determine the best estimated value of the apparent resistivity or electrode grounding resistance of N-layer soil and to use a new inversion method to precisely determine earth parameters. The inversion of electrical sounding data does not yield a unique solution, and a single model to interpret the observations is sought. This paper presents a new inversion method to statistically estimate soil parameters from Schlumberger and Wenner measurements. To validate the method and test the inversion scheme, four soundings were selected: two theoretical and two in the field. The procedure was applied using test data and a satisfactory soil model was obtained.

  3. Single- and multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization for identifying soil parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Papon, Aurélie; Riou, Yvon; Dano, Christophe; Hicher, Pierre Yves

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper discusses the quality of the procedure employed in identifying soil parameters by inverse analysis. This procedure includes a FEM-simulation for which two constitutive modelsa linear elastic perfectly plastic MohrCoulomb model and a strain-hardening elasto-plastic modelare successively considered. Two kinds of optimization algorithms have been used: a deterministic simplex method and a stochastic genetic method. The soil data come from the results of two pre...

  4. Quantification of parameters controlling the carbon stocks in German agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Cora; Don, Axel; Freibauer, Annette; Heidkamp, Arne; Prietz, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of UNFCCC, Germany is obligated to report on its greenhouse gas emissions from soils. This also includes the emissions in the agricultural sector. Changes in soil carbon stocks are a major source of CO2 that need to be reported. Until now there are only regional inventories of the soil carbon stocks in the agricultural sector while for the forestry sector a repeated national inventory exists. In order to report on changes in soil carbon stocks in agricultural soils, a consistent, representative and quantitative dataset of agricultural soil properties, especially on carbon stocks and management data is necessary. In the course of the German Agricultural Soil Inventory 3109 agricultural sites are examined. Up to January 2016, 2450 sites were sampled. The sites are sampled in five depth increments and all samples are analyzed in the same laboratory. Of the sampled sites the laboratory analyses are completed for 1312 sites. The samples of all depth increments were analyzed for their texture, bulk density, pH, electric conductivity, stone and root content, organic and inorganic carbon content and nitrogen content. The data are coupled with management data covering the past ten years and with climate data. They are analyzed with multivariate statistical techniques (e.g. mixed effects models, additive models, random forest) to quantify the parameters that control the carbon stocks in German agricultural soils. First descriptive results show that the mean soil carbon stocks down to a depth of 100 cm are 126.1 t ha-1 (range 8.9-1158.9 t ha-1). The mean stocks only for croplands are 102.6 t ha-1 (range 8.9-1158.9 t ha-1), while for grasslands the mean stock is 184.1 t ha-1 (range 19.4-937.8 t ha-1). In total the soil scientists found a surprisingly high proportion of disturbed and unusual soil profiles, indicating intensive human modifications of agricultural soils through e.g. deep ploughing. The data set of the German Agricultural Soil Inventory is the

  5. Visible and near infrared spectroscopy coupled to random forest to quantify some soil quality parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Felipe Bachion; de Souza, André Marcelo; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the use of visible and near infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) combined with multivariate regression based on random forest to quantify some quality soil parameters. The parameters analyzed were soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), sum of exchange bases (SB), organic matter (OM), clay and sand present in the soils of several regions of Brazil. Current methods for evaluating these parameters are laborious, timely and require various wet analytical methods that are not adequate for use in precision agriculture, where faster and automatic responses are required. The random forest regression models were statistically better than PLS regression models for CEC, OM, clay and sand, demonstrating resistance to overfitting, attenuating the effect of outlier samples and indicating the most important variables for the model. The methodology demonstrates the potential of the Vis-NIR as an alternative for determination of CEC, SB, OM, sand and clay, making possible to develop a fast and automatic analytical procedure.

  6. Potential of Sentinel-1 Radar Data for the Assessment of Soil and Cereal Cover Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousbih, Safa; Zribi, Mehrez; Lili-Chabaane, Zohra; Baghdadi, Nicolas; El Hajj, Mohammad; Gao, Qi; Mougenot, Bernard

    2017-11-14

    The main objective of this study is to analyze the potential use of Sentinel-1 (S1) radar data for the estimation of soil characteristics (roughness and water content) and cereal vegetation parameters (leaf area index (LAI), and vegetation height (H)) in agricultural areas. Simultaneously to several radar acquisitions made between 2015 and 2017, using S1 sensors over the Kairouan Plain (Tunisia, North Africa), ground measurements of soil roughness, soil water content, LAI and H were recorded. The NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) index computed from Landsat optical images revealed a strong correlation with in situ measurements of LAI. The sensitivity of the S1 measurements to variations in soil moisture, which has been reported in several scientific publications, is confirmed in this study. This sensitivity decreases with increasing vegetation cover growth (NDVI), and is stronger in the VV (vertical) polarization than in the VH cross-polarization. The results also reveal a similar increase in the dynamic range of radar signals observed in the VV and VH polarizations as a function of soil roughness. The sensitivity of S1 measurements to vegetation parameters (LAI and H) in the VV polarization is also determined, showing that the radar signal strength decreases when the vegetation parameters increase. No vegetation parameter sensitivity is observed in the VH polarization, probably as a consequence of volume scattering effects.

  7. Potential of Sentinel-1 Radar Data for the Assessment of Soil and Cereal Cover Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Bousbih

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to analyze the potential use of Sentinel-1 (S1 radar data for the estimation of soil characteristics (roughness and water content and cereal vegetation parameters (leaf area index (LAI, and vegetation height (H in agricultural areas. Simultaneously to several radar acquisitions made between 2015 and 2017, using S1 sensors over the Kairouan Plain (Tunisia, North Africa, ground measurements of soil roughness, soil water content, LAI and H were recorded. The NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index index computed from Landsat optical images revealed a strong correlation with in situ measurements of LAI. The sensitivity of the S1 measurements to variations in soil moisture, which has been reported in several scientific publications, is confirmed in this study. This sensitivity decreases with increasing vegetation cover growth (NDVI, and is stronger in the VV (vertical polarization than in the VH cross-polarization. The results also reveal a similar increase in the dynamic range of radar signals observed in the VV and VH polarizations as a function of soil roughness. The sensitivity of S1 measurements to vegetation parameters (LAI and H in the VV polarization is also determined, showing that the radar signal strength decreases when the vegetation parameters increase. No vegetation parameter sensitivity is observed in the VH polarization, probably as a consequence of volume scattering effects.

  8. Discrimination of soils and assessment of some soil fertility parameters using an electronic tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimendia, Aitor; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Alcañiz, Josep Maria; del Valle, Manel

    2011-09-01

    In this communication, a new strategy to perform soil classification and/or characterization is reported, which is the coupling of chemical sensors with a pattern recognition method, what is known as an electronic tongue. Following this approach, the system proposed in this paper uses a sensor array formed by potentiometric sensors with generic cross response against several cations and anions, plus a pattern recognition method based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs); the sensor-based system allows performing a simple laboratory procedure where the advanced data processing methodology permits to extract the meaningful information. In this way this work represents the first application and testing of an electronic tongue in soil analysis. Apart from the qualitative classification application, a quantitative analysis of certain chemical features related to soil fertility has also been attempted.

  9. Automated Soil Physical Parameter Assessment Using Smartphone and Digital Camera Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Aitkenhead

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we present work on using different types of soil profile imagery (topsoil profiles captured with a smartphone camera and full-profile images captured with a conventional digital camera to estimate the structure, texture and drainage of the soil. The method is adapted from earlier work on developing smartphone apps for estimating topsoil organic matter content in Scotland and uses an existing visual soil structure assessment approach. Colour and image texture information was extracted from the imagery. This information was linked, using geolocation information derived from the smartphone GPS system or from field notes, with existing collections of topography, land cover, soil and climate data for Scotland. A neural network model was developed that was capable of estimating soil structure (on a five-point scale, soil texture (sand, silt, clay, bulk density, pH and drainage category using this information. The model is sufficiently accurate to provide estimates of these parameters from soils in the field. We discuss potential improvements to the approach and plans to integrate the model into a set of smartphone apps for estimating health and fertility indicators for Scottish soils.

  10. Examining the information content of time-lapse crosshole GPR data collected under different infiltration conditions to estimate unsaturated soil hydraulic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholer, M.; Irving, J.; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical data acquired during transient hydrological experiments are being increasingly employed to estimate subsurface hydraulic properties at the field scale. In particular, crosshole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data, collected while water infiltrates into the subsurface either...... by natural or artificial means, have been demonstrated in a number of studies to contain valuable information concerning the hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone. Previous work in this domain has considered a variety of infiltration conditions and different amounts of time-lapse GPR data...... of time-lapse zero-offset-profile (ZOP) GPR traveltime data, collected under three different infiltration conditions, for the estimation of van Genuchten–Mualem (VGM) parameters in a layered subsurface medium. Specifically, we systematically analyze synthetic and field GPR data acquired under natural...

  11. Nonlinear soil parameter effects on dynamic embedment of offshore pipeline on soft clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Young Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of nonlinear soft clay on dynamic embedment of offshore pipeline were investigated. Seabed embedment by pipe-soil interactions has impacts on the structural boundary conditions for various subsea structures such as pipeline, riser, pile, and many other systems. A number of studies have been performed to estimate real soil behavior, but their estimation of seabed embedment has not been fully identified and there are still many uncertainties. In this regards, comparison of embedment between field survey and existing empirical models has been performed to identify uncertainties and investigate the effect of nonlinear soil parameter on dynamic embedment. From the comparison, it is found that the dynamic embedment with installation effects based on nonlinear soil model have an influence on seabed embedment. Therefore, the pipe embedment under dynamic condition by nonlinear para- meters of soil models was investigated by Dynamic Embedment Factor (DEF concept, which is defined as the ratio of the dynamic and static embedment of pipeline, in order to overcome the gap between field embedment and currently used empirical and numerical formula. Although DEF through various researches is suggested, its range is too wide and it does not consider dynamic laying effect. It is difficult to find critical parameters that are affecting to the embedment result. Therefore, the study on dynamic embedment factor by soft clay parameters of nonlinear soil model was conducted and the sensitivity analyses about parameters of nonlinear soil model were performed as well. The tendency on dynamic embedment factor was found by conducting numerical analyses using OrcaFlex software. It is found that DEF was influenced by shear strength gradient than other factors. The obtained results will be useful to understand the pipe embedment on soft clay seabed for applying offshore pipeline designs such as on-bottom stability and free span analyses.

  12. Obtaining of Analytical Relations for Hydraulic Parameters of Channels With Two Phase Flow Using Open CFD Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varseev, E.

    2017-11-01

    The present work is dedicated to verification of numerical model in standard solver of open-source CFD code OpenFOAM for two-phase flow simulation and to determination of so-called “baseline” model parameters. Investigation of heterogeneous coolant flow parameters, which leads to abnormal friction increase of channel in two-phase adiabatic “water-gas” flows with low void fractions, presented.

  13. Small-scale spatial variability of atrazine and dinoseb adsorption parameters in an alluvial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermoud, A; Martins, J M F; Zhang, D; Favre, A C

    2008-01-01

    Soil sorption processes largely control the environmental fate of herbicides. Therefore, accuracy of sorption parameters is crucial for accurate prediction of herbicide mobility in agricultural soils. A combined experimental and statistical study was performed to investigate the small-scale spatial variability of sorption parameters for atrazine and dinoseb in soils and to establish the number of samples needed to provide a value of the distribution coefficient (K(d)) next to the mean, with a given precision. The study explored sorption properties of the two herbicides in subsurface samples collected from four pits distributed along a transect of an alluvial soil; two to four samples were taken at about 30 cm apart at each sampling location. When considering all the data, the distribution coefficients were found to be normally and log-normally distributed for atrazine and dinoseb, respectively; the CVs were relatively high (close to 50% for dinoseb and 40% for atrazine). When analyzed horizon by horizon, the data revealed distribution coefficients normally distributed for both herbicides, whatever the soil layer, with lower CVs. The K(d) values were shown to vary considerably between samples collected at very short distance (a few centimeters), suggesting that taking a single soil sample to determine sorption properties through batch experiments can lead to highly unrepresentative results and to poor sorption/mobility predictions.

  14. Traffic effects on soil compaction and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot quality parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinello, F.; Pezzuolo, A.; Cillis, D.; Chiumenti, A.; Sartori, L.

    2017-09-01

    Soil compaction is a critical issue in agriculture having a significant influence on crop growth. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is accounted as a crop susceptible to compaction. Reduction of leaf area, final yield, and root quality parameters are reported in compacted soils. The most obvious visual indicator of topsoil compaction is root depth affected by agricultural tractor and machinery traffic up on the soil. Such indicators are mainly correlated to initial soil condition, tyre features, and number of passages. Monitoring and controlling frequency and position of machine traffic across the field, in such a way that passages are completed on specific, well-defined tracks, can assist with minimization of compaction effects on soil. The objective of the present work was to analyze the subsoil compaction during the growing period of sugar beet with different farming approaches including controlled traffic passages and random traffic. To this end, tests were carried out following each agro technical operation using penetrometer readings in order to monitor the state of cone-index after each step. In addition, at the harvesting time, root quality parameters were analyzed with particular attention to length and regularity of the taproot, total length, circumference, mass, and above-ground biomass. Such parameters were usefully implemented in order to evaluate the effects of controlled traffic passages compared to the random traffic in a cultivation of sugar beet. Results highlight how an increase in crop yield, derived from samples monitored, higher than 10% can be expected with implementation of a careful traffic management.

  15. Identifying mechanical property parameters of planetary soil using in-situ data obtained from exploration rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Gao, Haibo; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Guangjun

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the mechanical property parameters of planetary soil based on terramechanics models using in-situ data obtained from autonomous planetary exploration rovers is both an important scientific goal and essential for control strategy optimization and high-fidelity simulations of rovers. However, identifying all the terrain parameters is a challenging task because of the nonlinear and coupling nature of the involved functions. Three parameter identification methods are presented in this paper to serve different purposes based on an improved terramechanics model that takes into account the effects of slip, wheel lugs, etc. Parameter sensitivity and coupling of the equations are analyzed, and the parameters are grouped according to their sensitivity to the normal force, resistance moment and drawbar pull. An iterative identification method using the original integral model is developed first. In order to realize real-time identification, the model is then simplified by linearizing the normal and shearing stresses to derive decoupled closed-form analytical equations. Each equation contains one or two groups of soil parameters, making step-by-step identification of all the unknowns feasible. Experiments were performed using six different types of single-wheels as well as a four-wheeled rover moving on planetary soil simulant. All the unknown model parameters were identified using the measured data and compared with the values obtained by conventional experiments. It is verified that the proposed iterative identification method provides improved accuracy, making it suitable for scientific studies of soil properties, whereas the step-by-step identification methods based on simplified models require less calculation time, making them more suitable for real-time applications. The models have less than 10% margin of error comparing with the measured results when predicting the interaction forces and moments using the corresponding identified parameters.

  16. Can Simple Soil Parameters Explain Field-Scale Variations in Glyphosate-, Bromoxyniloctanoate-, Diflufenican-, and Bentazone Mineralization?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Trine; De Jonge, L. W.; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    The large spatial heterogeneity in soil physico-chemical and microbial parameters challenges our ability to predict and model pesticide leaching from agricultural land. Microbial mineralization of pesticides is an important process with respect to pesticide leaching since mineralization...... is the major process for the complete degradation of pesticides without generation of metabolites. The aim of our study was to determine field-scale variation in the potential for mineralization of the herbicides glyphosate, bromoxyniloctanoate, diflufenican, and bentazone and to investigate whether...... this variation can be predicted by variations in basic soil parameters. Sixty-five soil samples were sampled from an agricultural, loamy field in Silstrup, Denmark, from a 60 × 165 m rectangular grid. The mineralization potential of the four pesticides was determined using a 96-well microplate 14C...

  17. The Importance of Deep Roots and Hydraulic Redistribution on Vegetation and Soil Responses to Hydro-Climatic Variability: A Simulation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, Darren; Kumar, Praveen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is fundamentally coupled to the soil through the uptake of moisture and nutrients that regulate carbon, water and energy exchange with the atmosphere. Along with the biological and physical characteristics of the above-ground vegetation, rooting depth and the vertical distribution of root biomass play a critical role in vegetation functioning by controlling access to resources. Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the passive redistribution of moisture across soil potential gradients by the root system, has been widely observed and provides plants the ability to modify resource distributions through the depth of the root zone. Amongst the potential consequences of HR are greater resiliency to drought during dry seasons and more efficient transport of moisture to deep soil layers for storage during wet seasons. At longer timescales the redistribution of moisture through the top several meters of the soil column has the potential to modify soil moisture persistence with implications for long-term weather and climate prediction. Here we examine the roles of deep roots and HR in modulating mass and energy exchange at a site in Eastern Amazonia over decadal timescales. Recent studies using remotely-sensed indices of canopy functioning (ie. canopy greeness, canopy water storage and photosynthetic capacity) have raised questions regarding the response of deep-rooted Amazonian vegetation functioning to short-term hydro-climatic forcing anomalies. Climate model predictions show an increase in ENSO-driven drought for eastern Amazonia in the coming decades, leaving open the question of how the climatologically important rain forest vegetation in this region will respond to more frequent and deeper droughts. Our analysis is conducted utilizing a multi-layer process-based model that represents the complex set of interactions and feedbacks between the canopy, soil and root subsystems. The model canopy is partitioned into several layers, allowing for resolution of the

  18. Thermal analysis to derive energetic quality parameters of soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Benjamin; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have dealt with thermal analysis for characterisation of soil and soil organic matter. It is a versatile tool assessing various physicochemical properties of the sample during heating and/or cooling. Especially the combination of different detection methods is highly promising. In this contribution, we will discuss the combination of thermogravimetry (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one single thermal analysis device. TGA alone helps distinguishment of soil and soil organic matter fractions with respect to their resistance towards combustion and allows a quantitative assignment of thermolabile and recalcitrant OM fractions. Combination with DSC in the same device, allows determination of energy transformation during the combustion process. Therefore, it becomes possible to determine not only the calorific value of the organic matter, but also of its fractions. We will show the potential of using the calorific values of OM fractions as quality parameter - exemplified for the analysis of soils polluted with organic matter from the olive oil production. The pollution history of these samples is largely unknown. As expected, TGA indicated a relative enrichment of the labile carbon fraction in contaminated samples with respect to the controls. The calorific values of the thermolabile and the recalcitrant fractions differ from each other, and those of the recalcitrant fractions of the polluted samples were higher than of those of the unpolluted controls. Further analyses showed correlation of the calorific value of this fraction with soil water repellency and the carbon isotopic ratio. The synthesis of our current data suggests that the content of thermolabile fraction, the isotopic ratio and calorific value of the recalcitrant fraction are useful indicators for characterizing the degree of decomposition of OMW organic matter. In this contribution, we will further discuss the potential of using the energetic parameters a quality

  19. Modeling soil parameters using hyperspectral image reflectance in subtropical coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Naveen J. P.; Abd-Elrahman, Amr H.; Lewis, David B.; Hewitt, Nicole A.

    2014-12-01

    Developing spectral models of soil properties is an important frontier in remote sensing and soil science. Several studies have focused on modeling soil properties such as total pools of soil organic matter and carbon in bare soils. We extended this effort to model soil parameters in areas densely covered with coastal vegetation. Moreover, we investigated soil properties indicative of soil functions such as nutrient and organic matter turnover and storage. These properties include the partitioning of mineral and organic soil between particulate (>53 μm) and fine size classes, and the partitioning of soil carbon and nitrogen pools between stable and labile fractions. Soil samples were obtained from Avicennia germinans mangrove forest and Juncus roemerianus salt marsh plots on the west coast of central Florida. Spectra corresponding to field plot locations from Hyperion hyperspectral image were extracted and analyzed. The spectral information was regressed against the soil variables to determine the best single bands and optimal band combinations for the simple ratio (SR) and normalized difference index (NDI) indices. The regression analysis yielded levels of correlation for soil variables with R2 values ranging from 0.21 to 0.47 for best individual bands, 0.28 to 0.81 for two-band indices, and 0.53 to 0.96 for partial least-squares (PLS) regressions for the Hyperion image data. Spectral models using Hyperion data adequately (RPD > 1.4) predicted particulate organic matter (POM), silt + clay, labile carbon (C), and labile nitrogen (N) (where RPD = ratio of standard deviation to root mean square error of cross-validation [RMSECV]). The SR (0.53 μm, 2.11 μm) model of labile N with R2 = 0.81, RMSECV= 0.28, and RPD = 1.94 produced the best results in this study. Our results provide optimism that remote-sensing spectral models can successfully predict soil properties indicative of ecosystem nutrient and organic matter turnover and storage, and do so in areas with dense

  20. Evolution of Soil Biochemical Parameters in Rainfed Crops: Effect of Organic and Mineral Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M. Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In organic farming, crop fertilization is largely based on the decomposition of organic matter and biological fixation of nutrients. It is therefore necessary to develop studies conducted to know and understand the soil biological processes for the natural nutrient supplies. The effect of three fertilizer managements (chemical with synthetic fertilizers, organic with 2500 kg compost ha−1, and no fertilizer in a rainfed crop rotation (durum wheat-fallow-barley-vetch as green manure on different soil biochemical parameters in semi-arid conditions was investigated. Soil organic matter, microbial biomass carbon, organic matter mineralization, CO2 production-to-ATP ratio, and NO3-N content were analysed. Fertilization was only applied to cereals. The results showed the scarce effect of the organic fertilization on soil quality, which resulted more dependent on weather conditions. Only soil organic matter and NO3-N were affected by fertilization (significantly higher in the inorganic treatment, 1.28 g 100 g−1 and 17.3 ppm, resp.. Soil organic matter was maintained throughout the study period by the inclusion of a legume in the cropping system and the burying of crop residues. In fallow, soil microbial biomass carbon increased considerably (816 ng g−1, and NO3-N at the end of this period was around 35 ppm, equivalent to 100 kg N ha−1.

  1. Evaluation of Regression and Neuro_Fuzzy Models in Estimating Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Behmanesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of soil hydraulic properties such as saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is required in the environmental investigations. Despite numerous research, measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity using by direct methods are still costly, time consuming and professional. Therefore estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity using rapid and low cost methods such as pedo-transfer functions with acceptable accuracy was developed. The purpose of this research was to compare and evaluate 11 pedo-transfer functions and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil. In this direct, saturated hydraulic conductivity and physical properties in 40 points of Urmia were calculated. The soil excavated was used in the lab to determine its easily accessible parameters. The results showed that among existing models, Aimrun et al model had the best estimation for soil saturated hydraulic conductivity. For mentioned model, the Root Mean Square Error and Mean Absolute Error parameters were 0.174 and 0.028 m/day respectively. The results of the present research, emphasises the importance of effective porosity application as an important accessible parameter in accuracy of pedo-transfer functions. sand and silt percent, bulk density and soil particle density were selected to apply in 561 ANFIS models. In training phase of best ANFIS model, the R2 and RMSE were calculated 1 and 1.2×10-7 respectively. These amounts in the test phase were 0.98 and 0.0006 respectively. Comparison of regression and ANFIS models showed that the ANFIS model had better results than regression functions. Also Nuro-Fuzzy Inference System had capability to estimatae with high accuracy in various soil textures.

  2. Potential impact of flowback water from hydraulic fracturing on agricultural soil quality: Metal/metalloid bioaccessibility, Microtox bioassay, and enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Season S; Sun, Yuqing; Tsang, Daniel C W; Graham, Nigel J D; Ok, Yong Sik; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has advanced the development of shale gas extraction, while inadvertent spills of flowback water may pose a risk to the surrounding environment due to its high salt content, metals/metalloids (As, Se, Fe and Sr), and organic additives. This study investigated the potential impact of flowback water on four representative soils from shale gas regions in Northeast China using synthetic flowback solutions. The compositions of the solutions were representative of flowback water arising at different stages after fracturing well establishment. The effects of solution composition of flowback water on soil ecosystem were assessed in terms of metal mobility and bioaccessibility, as well as biological endpoints using Microtox bioassay (Vibrio fischeri) and enzyme activity tests. After one-month artificial aging of the soils with various flowback solutions, the mobility and bioaccessibility of As(V) and Se(VI) decreased as the ionic strength of the flowback solutions increased. The results inferred a stronger binding affinity of As(V) and Se(VI) with the soils. Nevertheless, the soil toxicity to Vibrio fischeri only presented a moderate increase after aging, while dehydrogenase and phosphomonoesterase activities were significantly suppressed with increasing ionic strength of flowback solutions. On the contrary, polyacrylamide in the flowback solutions led to higher dehydrogenase activity. These results indicated that soil enzyme activities were sensitive to the composition of flowback solutions. A preliminary human health risk assessment related to As(V) suggested a low level of cancer risk through exposure via ingestion, while holistic assessment of environmental implications is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation of Hydraulic Fracturing Induced Seismicity with Operation Parameters of Shale Gas Extraction: Two Case Studies in Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbod, A. M.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Snyder, D. B.; Cairns, S.; Walker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Northeast British Columbia, specifically the Horn River Basin (HRB) and Montney Trend, are among the largest shale gas production regions in western Canada. In contrast, there has been no large-scale hydraulic fracturing (HF) operation in the Northwest Territories in the Norman Wells region of the central Mackenzie valley. In this study, we investigate the effect of injection pressure, operation duration and injected volume on the observed seismicity in the HRB and Norman Wells regions and compare our observations with the pre-HF records. In the HRB, we apply the single-station location and waveform correlation methods to establish a homogenous earthquake catalog (2006/12-2011/12). In the Northwest Territories, we combine data from a local seismograph network of 4 stations plus a dense array of 7 stations located from 1 km to 50 km from the operation wells to locate earthquakes (2013/09-2014/07). In the HRB, the initial effect of an increased injected volume is an increase in earthquake frequency but not magnitude. Local earthquakes gradually become larger in magnitude as the scale of HF in the region expands. While the injection pressure during HF operations has been regulated at a relatively constant level, the massive increase of injection volume in 2010 and 2011 coincides with a series of ML>3 events. Relatively large seismic moment release (>1014 N m) occurred only when the monthly injected volume exceeded ~150,000 m3. In addition, we observe variable time lags, from days to up to 4 months between intense HF and the occurrence of a significant local earthquake. On the other hand, in the Norman Wells region, two small-scale HF were performed in 2014 with a total injected volume of ~ 14000 m3. We observed an increase in the number of micro-earthquakes (M < 2.0) during the HF period without a clear change in the overall seismic pattern. From these two observations, we conclude that HF operations do not necessarily result in an increase in the occurrence rate of

  4. Identification of sensitive parameters in the modeling of SVOCs reemission processes from soil to atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizeau, Vincent; Ciffroy, Philippe; Musson Genon, Luc; Roustan, Yelva

    2013-04-01

    Many studies have shown that semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are subject to Long-Range Atmospheric Transport (LRAT) and that such a transport may occur through a series of deposition-reemission events at the soil surface-air interface. This periodic movement of pollutants between soil and atmosphere is called the 'grasshopper effect'. Thus, it appears necessary to take into account the exchange between soil and atmosphere to properly simulate the fate of these pollutants at regional or global scale. The prediction of reemission from soils is however associated with large uncertainties, which can be schematically classified into three main sources : (i) natural variability, including nature of soil (organic matter content, porosity, water content) and meteorological conditions ; (ii) uncertainty about intrinsic properties of chemicals, like degradation rate or partitioning between environmental components, which govern the dynamics of chemicals in air and soils ; (iii) model structure, and particularly the discretization of soil compartment. Considering this background, a major challenge is to identify the most sensitive sources of uncertainty in modelling the reemission of chemicals from soils, in order to know where the priority has to be set for upgrading SVOC dispersion estimation. To answer this question, we studied a multi-layer soil model, including exchanges between soil and atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was conducted by affecting probability density functions for each of model parameters. Four chemicals were selected (Benzo(a)Pyrene, PCB-28, Lindane and Hexachlorobenzene) because of their contrasted behaviors in soils, as expected by their partition and degradation properties. For this first exercise, simple emission scenarii were considered, i.e. a period of constant concentration in air (where realistic concentrations were estimated for each chemical from monitoring data provided by EMEP) followed by a zero-concentration in air. Although

  5. Transfer of the nationwide Czech soil survey data to a foreign soil classification - generating input parameters for a process-based soil erosion modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitlerová, Hana; Hieke, Falk; Žížala, Daniel; Kapička, Jiří; Keiser, Andreas; Schmidt, Jürgen; Schindewolf, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    Process-based erosion modelling is a developing and adequate tool to assess, simulate and understand the complex mechanisms of soil loss due to surface runoff. While the current state of available models includes powerful approaches, a major drawback is given by complex parametrization. A major input parameter for the physically based soil loss and deposition model EROSION 3D is represented by soil texture. However, as the model has been developed in Germany it is dependent on the German soil classification. To exploit data generated during a massive nationwide soil survey campaign taking place in the 1960s across the entire Czech Republic, a transfer from the Czech to the German or at least international (e.g. WRB) system is mandatory. During the survey the internal differentiation of grain sizes was realized in a two fractions approach, separating texture into solely above and below 0.01 mm rather than into clayey, silty and sandy textures. Consequently, the Czech system applies a classification of seven different textures based on the respective percentage of large and small particles, while in Germany 31 groups are essential. The followed approach of matching Czech soil survey data to the German system focusses on semi-logarithmic interpolation of the cumulative soil texture curve additionally on a regression equation based on a recent database of 128 soil pits. Furthermore, for each of the seven Czech texture classes a group of typically suitable classes of the German system was derived. A GIS-based spatial analysis to test approaches of interpolation the soil texture was carried out. First results show promising matches and pave the way to a Czech model application of EROSION 3D.

  6. Hydraulic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the planning, design, construction and management of hydraulic structures, covering dams, spillways, tunnels, cut slopes, sluices, water intake and measuring works, ship locks and lifts, as well as fish ways. Particular attention is paid to considerations concerning the environment, hydrology, geology and materials etc. in the planning and design of hydraulic projects. It also considers the type selection, profile configuration, stress/stability calibration and engineering countermeasures, flood releasing arrangements and scouring protection, operation and maintenance etc. for a variety of specific hydraulic structures. The book is primarily intended for engineers, undergraduate and graduate students in the field of civil and hydraulic engineering who are faced with the challenges of extending our understanding of hydraulic structures ranging from traditional to groundbreaking, as well as designing, constructing and managing safe, durable hydraulic structures that are economical ...

  7. Error estimates for near-Real-Time Satellite Soil Moisture as Derived from the Land Parameter Retrieval Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parinussa, R.M.; Meesters, A.G.C.A.; Liu, Y.Y.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.; de Jeu, R.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A time-efficient solution to estimate the error of satellite surface soil moisture from the land parameter retrieval model is presented. The errors are estimated using an analytical solution for soil moisture retrievals from this radiative-transfer-based model that derives soil moisture from

  8. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for the Indo-Gangetic Plains of India (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.; Bhattacharyya, T.; Mandal, C.; Dijkshoorn, J.A.; Milne, E.; Gajbhiye, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Metis_ID: 166424 This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) of India, at scale 1:1 000 000, has been derived from soil and terrain data collated in SOTER format by staff of the National Bureau of Soil Survey and Land Use Planning (NBSS & LUP) at Nagpur, India.

  9. The modern instrumentation used for monitoring and controlling the main parameters of the regenerative electro-mechano-hydraulic drive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Krevey, Petrica

    2009-01-01

    In this work is presented the modern instrumentation used for monitoring and controlling the main parameters for one regenerative drive system, used to recovering the kinetic energy of motor vehicles, lost in the braking phase, storing and using this energy in the starting or accelerating phases. Is presented a Romanian technical solution for a regenerative driving system, based on a hybrid solution containing a hydro-mechanic module and an existing thermal motor drive, all conceived as a mechatronics system. In order to monitoring and controlling the evolution of the main parameters, the system contains a series of sensors and transducers that provide the moment, rotation, temperature, flow and pressure values. The main sensors and transducers of the regenerative drive system, their principal features and tehnical conecting solutions are presented in this paper, both with the menaging electronic and informational subsystems.

  10. Inverse modeling using PS-InSAR for improved calibration of hydraulic parameters and prediction of future subsidence for Las Vegas Valley, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Burbey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Las Vegas Valley has had a long history of surface deformation due to groundwater pumping that began in the early 20th century. After nearly 80 years of pumping, PS-InSAR interferograms have revealed detailed and complex spatial patterns of subsidence in the Las Vegas Valley area that do not coincide with major pumping regions. High spatial and temporal resolution subsidence observations from InSAR and hydraulic head data were used to inversely calibrate transmissivities (T, elastic and inelastic skeletal storage coefficients (Ske and Skv of the developed-zone aquifer and conductance (CR of the basin-fill faults for the entire Las Vegas basin. The results indicate that the subsidence observations from PS-InSAR are extremely beneficial for accurately quantifying hydraulic parameters, and the model calibration results are far more accurate than when using only water-levels as observations, and just a few random subsidence observations. Future predictions of land subsidence to year 2030 were made on the basis of existing pumping patterns and rates. Simulation results suggests that subsidence will continue in northwest subsidence bowl area, which is expected to undergo an additional 11.3 cm of subsidence. Even mitigation measures that include artificial recharge and reduced pumping do not significantly reduce the compaction in the northwest subsidence bowl. This is due to the slow draining of thick confining units in the region. However, a small amount of uplift of 0.4 cm is expected in the North and Central bowl areas over the next 20 years.

  11. Hydropedological parameters limiting soil moisture regime floodplain ecosystems of south Moravia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kubík

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture regime of floodplain ecosystems in southern Moravia is considerably influenced and greatly changed by human activities. It can be changed negatively by water management engineering or positively by landscape revitalizations. The paper deals with problems of hydropedological characteristics (hydrolimits limiting soil moisture regime and solves effect of hydrological factors on soil moisture regime in the floodplain ecosystems. Attention is paid especially to water retention curves and to hydrolimits – wilting point and field capacity. They can be acquired either directly by slow laboratory assessment, derivation from the water retention curves or indirectly by calculation using pedotransfer functions (PTF. This indirect assessment uses hydrolimit dependency on better available soil physical parameters namely soil granularity, bulk density and humus content. The aim is to calculate PTF for wilting point and field capacity and to compare them with measured values. The paper documents suitableness utilization of PTF for the region of interest. The results of correlation and regression analysis for soil moisture and groundwater table are furthermore presented.

  12. Comparison of Pattern Recognition, Artificial Neural Network and Pedotransfer Functions for Estimation of Soil Water Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir LAKZIAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparison of three different approaches to estimate soil water content at defined values of soil water potential based on selected parameters of soil solid phase. Forty different sampling locations in northeast of Iran were selected and undisturbed samples were taken to measure the water content at field capacity (FC, -33 kPa, and permanent wilting point (PWP, -1500 kPa. At each location solid particle of each sample including the percentage of sand, silt and clay were measured. Organic carbon percentage and soil texture were also determined for each soil sample at each location. Three different techniques including pattern recognition approach (k nearest neighbour, k-NN, Artificial Neural Network (ANN and pedotransfer functions (PTF were used to predict the soil water at each sampling location. Mean square deviation (MSD and its components, index of agreement (d, root mean square difference (RMSD and normalized RMSD (RMSDr were used to evaluate the performance of all the three approaches. Our results showed that k-NN and PTF performed better than ANN in prediction of water content at both FC and PWP matric potential. Various statistics criteria for simulation performance also indicated that between kNN and PTF, the former, predicted water content at PWP more accurate than PTF, however both approach showed a similar accuracy to predict water content at FC.

  13. Preliminary Report on the Effect of Pre-Boring on the Mobilized Friction Capacity of Pile Foundation Hydraulically Jacked into Expansive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-drilling was performed to reduce lateral earth pressure generated by pile foundation hydraulically jacked into expansive soil. Nineteen prestressed-precast spun concrete pile with diameter of 800 mm were penetrated into expansive soil up the depth of 40 m. Pre-drilling with diameter of 700 mm was carried out up to the depth of 12.5 m. Penetration loads required to install the piles, which was displayed on the built-in pressure panel, were recorded every 1 m interval. The load that was consisted of merely shaft friction was then used to find out the mobilized skin friction between pile shaft and its surrounding soils. The calculated mobilized skin friction was correlated to the value of Standard Penetration Test (NSPT and compared to Decourt formula. The result shows that skin friction calculated using Decourt formula relatively conservative compared to those determined from the records of field penetration. The upper bound of mobilized skin friction can be defined by modifying Decourt formula.

  14. A large scale GIS geodatabase of soil parameters supporting the modeling of conservation practice alternatives in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality modeling requires across-scale support of combined digital soil elements and simulation parameters. This paper presents the unprecedented development of a large spatial scale (1:250,000) ArcGIS geodatabase coverage designed as a functional repository of soil-parameters for modeling an...

  15. GEYSER/TONUS: a coupled multi-D lumped parameter code for reactor thermal hydraulics analysis in case of severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, M.; Durin, M.; Gauvain, J.

    1995-12-31

    The safety requirements for future light water reactors include accounting for severe accidents in the design process. The design must now include mitigation features to limit pressure and temperature inside the building. Hydrogen concentration is also a major issue for severe accidents. Modelling the thermal hydraulics inside the containment requires the description of complex phenomena such as condensation, stratification, transport of gases and aerosols, heat transfers. The effect of mitigation systems will increase the heterogeneities in the building, and most of those phenomena can be coupled. The GEYSER/TONUS multi-dimensional computer code is under development at CEA Saclay to model this complex situation. It allow the coupling of parts of the containment described in a lumped parameter manner, together with meshed parts. Emphasis is put on the numerical methods used to solve the transient problem, and physical models of classical lumped parameters codes will be adapted for the spatially described zones. The code is developed in the environment of the CASTEM 2000/TRIO EF system which allows to construct sophisticated applications based upon it. (J.S.). 22 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Estimation of soil parameters over bare agriculture areas from C-band polarimetric SAR data using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Baghdadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop an approach to estimate soil surface parameters from C-band polarimetric SAR data in the case of bare agricultural soils. An inversion technique based on multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural networks was introduced. The neural networks were trained and validated on a noisy simulated dataset generated from the Integral Equation Model (IEM on a wide range of surface roughness and soil moisture, as it is encountered in agricultural contexts for bare soils. The performances of neural networks in retrieving soil moisture and surface roughness were tested for several inversion cases using or not using a-priori knowledge on soil parameters. The inversion approach was then validated using RADARSAT-2 images in polarimetric mode. The introduction of expert knowledge on the soil moisture (dry to wet soils or very wet soils improves the soil moisture estimates, whereas the precision on the surface roughness estimation remains unchanged. Moreover, the use of polarimetric parameters α1 and anisotropy were used to improve the soil parameters estimates. These parameters provide to neural networks the probable ranges of soil moisture (lower or higher than 0.30 cm3 cm−3 and surface roughness (root mean square surface height lower or higher than 1.0 cm. Soil moisture can be retrieved correctly from C-band SAR data by using the neural networks technique. Soil moisture errors were estimated at about 0.098 cm3 cm−3 without a-priori information on soil parameters and 0.065 cm3 cm−3 (RMSE applying a-priori information on the soil moisture. The retrieval of surface roughness is possible only for low and medium values (lower than 2 cm. Results show that the precision on the soil roughness estimates was about 0.7 cm. For surface roughness lower than 2 cm, the precision on the soil roughness is better with an RMSE about 0.5 cm. The use of polarimetric

  17. Effects of Spatial Sampling Interval on Roughness Parameters and Microwave Backscatter over Agricultural Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Ernesto Barber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial sampling interval, as related to the ability to digitize a soil profile with a certain number of features per unit length, depends on the profiling technique itself. From a variety of profiling techniques, roughness parameters are estimated at different sampling intervals. Since soil profiles have continuous spectral components, it is clear that roughness parameters are influenced by the sampling interval of the measurement device employed. In this work, we contributed to answer which sampling interval the profiles needed to be measured at to accurately account for the microwave response of agricultural surfaces. For this purpose, a 2-D laser profiler was built and used to measure surface soil roughness at field scale over agricultural sites in Argentina. Sampling intervals ranged from large (50 mm to small ones (1 mm, with several intermediate values. Large- and intermediate-sampling-interval profiles were synthetically derived from nominal, 1 mm ones. With these data, the effect of sampling-interval-dependent roughness parameters on backscatter response was assessed using the theoretical backscatter model IEM2M. Simulations demonstrated that variations of roughness parameters depended on the working wavelength and was less important at L-band than at C- or X-band. In any case, an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient of about 1-4 dB was observed at larger sampling intervals. As a general rule a sampling interval of 15 mm can be recommended for L-band and 5 mm for C-band.

  18. Analysis of soluble chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff and incomplete mixing parameter identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-xiu Tong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer mathematical model proposed by Tong et al. (2010 was used to predict soluble chemical transfer from soil into surface runoff with ponded water on the soil surface. Infiltration-related incomplete mixing parameter γ and runoff-related incomplete mixing parameter α in the analytical solution of the Tong et al. (2010 model were assumed to be constant. In this study, different laboratory experimental data of soluble chemical concentration in surface runoff from initially unsaturated and saturated soils were used to identify the variables γ and α based on the analytical solution of the model. The values of γ and α without occurrence of surface runoff were constant and equal to their values at the moment when the surface runoff started. It was determined from the results that γ decreases with the increase of the ponded water depth, and when the initial volumetric water content is closer to the saturated water content, there is less variation of parameter γ after the occurrence of surface runoff. As infiltration increases, the soluble chemical concentration in surface runoff decreases. The values of parameter α range from 0 to 1 for the fine loam and sand under the controlled infiltration conditions, while it can increase to a very large value, greater than 1, for the sand under the restrained infiltration conditions, and the analytical solution of the model is not valid for experimental soil without any infiltration if α is expected to be less than or equal to 1. The soluble chemical concentrations predicted from the model with variable incomplete mixing parameters γ and α are more accurate than those from the model with constant γ and α values.

  19. A Method for Controlled Oxidation of Lube and Hydraulic Oils and Investigation of the Effects on Oil Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Morten; Eriksen, René Lynge; Müller, Frank

    A controlled laboratory set-up for oxidation of oil has been applied in order to gain reference measurements for oil degradation by FTIR spectroscopy. The method is presented for accelerated oxidation of three different base oils. The technique controls the factors triggering oil oxidation...... quality estimation. The effect of the oxidation and nitration is studied from the knowledge of the absorption bands as well as indirectly from additive (oxidation inhibiter) absorption bands. We show how to estimate oxidation as well as TAN and viscosity with PLS from an oil sample using FTIR as reference...... by adding heat, a catalyst in the form of an overwound carbon and copper steel wire, oxygen and water to the oil under the degradation process. The reference measurements are correlated with absolute parameters (TAN and viscosity) used in oil quality assessment in order to obtain a reference frame for oil...

  20. Determination of saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The estimation of hydraulic conductivity indicates how fluids flow through a substance and thus determine the water balance in the soil profile. In determining the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil, five plots of 5.0 x 4.0 m were prepared with a PVC access tube installed in each plot. The plots were ...

  1. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of parameters affecting biological and physicochemical phosphate removal from wastewaters in a Multi-Soil-Layering system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula LAMZOURI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater disposal is a serious problem in Moroccan rural area. Discharged with high levels of phosphorus and nitrogen can result in eutrophication of receiving waters. Biological processes are the most adapted alternative to the needs of these areas, such as the Multi-Soil-Layering (MSL system. The process of rural wastewater treatment by MSL, which is an innovative system used for the first time in Morocco, was studied by modelling the relationships between a set of environmental factors and total phosphorus removed, based upon 153 sampling. Three MSL pilot plants, constructed in three 36 cm × 30 cm × 65 cm plastic boxes, were continuously fed with domestic wastewater, with different hydraulic loading rate (HLR of 250, 500 and 1000 l/m2/day. This study was to investigate and quantify the effect of parameters affecting biological and physico-chemical phosphate removal from wastewaters in this system, using neural networks (NNs and multiple regression analysis (MRA. The results show the influence of the hydraulic loading rate (HLR, Hydrogen potential (pH, phosphorus load (PL, nitrite (NO2--N, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5, and the Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3–-N in the phosphorus removal with a contribution of 36, 16, 15, 12, 9, 7 and 6% respectively.

  2. Analyzing soil electrical and strength parameters using geophysical and geotechnical methods in Sungai Batu, Kedah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nabila; Nordiana, M. M.; Azwin, I. N.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2017-07-01

    Engineering structures require strong foundations to prevent hazards occur due to lack of understanding the subsurface soil. Geophysical and geotechnical surveys were conducted in Sungai Batu, Kedah to determine the effectiveness of correlating electrical parameters for vertical resolution and to evaluate soil strength by integrating Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Standard Penetration Test (SPT). Results from ERT and GPR showed heterogeneity in the subsurface stratigraphy from surface to 8.6 m depth. The inversion model showed two zones of saturated (150 Ωm). The integration of ERT, GPR and SPT is applied at the borehole position which is at distance of 9.5 m of the survey line. The resistivity values at distance of 9.5 m range from 7 - 30 Ωm due to soil formed by sedimentation originated from fluvial system (sandy clay and clay). Calculated electrical conductivity values from GPR radargram coincide and in range with values from ERT. At distance of 9.5 m, the electrical conductivity range from 32 - 148 mS/m. The N-value from SPT showed low value with range of 12 - 20. The correlation of electrical parameters from ERT and GPR showed good agreement which is effective for vertical resolution. Low resistivity (high conductivity), low N-value and heterogeneity of the soil denote unstable subsurface. Sandy clay/clay in Sungai Batu are detrimental for shallow foundation as the soil material is susceptible to subsidence and has irregular characteristics influenced by the weather. Hence, the soils up to 8 m depth were u nstable, weak and may cause harm to building structure.

  3. Pedotransfer functions to estimate water retention parameters of soils in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hugo Cezar Barros

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pedotransfer functions (PTF were developed to estimate the parameters (α, n, θr and θs of the van Genuchten model (1980 to describe soil water retention curves. The data came from various sources, mainly from studies conducted by universities in Northeast Brazil, by the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa and by a corporation for the development of the São Francisco and Parnaíba river basins (Codevasf, totaling 786 retention curves, which were divided into two data sets: 85 % for the development of PTFs, and 15 % for testing and validation, considered independent data. Aside from the development of general PTFs for all soils together, specific PTFs were developed for the soil classes Ultisols, Oxisols, Entisols, and Alfisols by multiple regression techniques, using a stepwise procedure (forward and backward to select the best predictors. Two types of PTFs were developed: the first included all predictors (soil density, proportions of sand, silt, clay, and organic matter, and the second only the proportions of sand, silt and clay. The evaluation of adequacy of the PTFs was based on the correlation coefficient (R and Willmott index (d. To evaluate the PTF for the moisture content at specific pressure heads, we used the root mean square error (RMSE. The PTF-predicted retention curve is relatively poor, except for the residual water content. The inclusion of organic matter as a PTF predictor improved the prediction of parameter a of van Genuchten. The performance of soil-class-specific PTFs was not better than of the general PTF. Except for the water content of saturated soil estimated by particle size distribution, the tested models for water content prediction at specific pressure heads proved satisfactory. Predictions of water content at pressure heads more negative than -0.6 m, using a PTF considering particle size distribution, are only slightly lower than those obtained by PTFs including bulk density and organic matter

  4. Traffic effects on soil compaction and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. taproot quality parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marinello

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil compaction is a critical issue in agriculture having a significant influence on crop growth. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. is accounted as a crop susceptible to compaction. Reduction of leaf area, final yield, and root quality parameters are reported in compacted soils. The most obvious visual indicator of topsoil compaction is root depth affected by agricultural tractor and machinery traffic up on the soil. Such indicators are mainly correlated to initial soil condition, tyre features, and number of passages. Monitoring and controlling frequency and position of machine traffic across the field, in such a way that passages are completed on specific, well-defined tracks, can assist with minimization of compaction effects on soil. The objective of the present work was to analyze the subsoil compaction during the growing period of sugar beet with different farming approaches including controlled traffic passages and random traffic. To this end, tests were carried out following each agro technical operation using penetrometer readings in order to monitor the state of cone-index after each step. In addition, at the harvesting time, root quality parameters were analyzed with particular attention to length and regularity of the taproot, total length, circumference, mass, and above-ground biomass. Such parameters were usefully implemented in order to evaluate the effects of controlled traffic passages compared to the random traffic in a cultivation of sugar beet. Results highlight how an increase in crop yield, derived from samples monitored, higher than 10% can be expected with implementation of a careful traffic management.

  5. Parameter Sensitivity Analysis on Deformation of Composite Soil-Nailed Wall Using Artificial Neural Networks and Orthogonal Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbin Hao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the back-propagation algorithm of artificial neural networks (ANNs, this paper establishes an intelligent model, which is used to predict the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil-nailed wall. Some parameters, such as soil cohesive strength, soil friction angle, prestress of anchor cable, soil-nail spacing, soil-nail diameter, soil-nail length, and other factors, are considered in the model. Combined with the in situ test data of composite soil-nail wall reinforcement engineering, the network is trained and the errors are analyzed. Thus it is demonstrated that the method is applicable and feasible in predicting lateral displacement of excavation retained by composite soil-nailed wall. Extended calculations are conducted by using the well-trained intelligent forecast model. Through application of orthogonal table test theory, 25 sets of tests are designed to analyze the sensitivity of factors affecting the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil-nailing wall. The results show that the sensitivity of factors affecting the maximum lateral displacement of composite soil nailing wall, in a descending order, are prestress of anchor cable, soil friction angle, soil cohesion strength, soil-nail spacing, soil-nail length, and soil-nail diameter. The results can provide important reference for the same reinforcement engineering.

  6. Estimation of uncertainty arising from different soil sampling devices: the use of variogram parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zorzi, Paolo; Barbizzi, Sabrina; Belli, Maria; Barbina, Maria; Fajgelj, Ales; Jacimovic, Radojko; Jeran, Zvonka; Menegon, Sandro; Pati, Alessandra; Petruzzelli, Giannantonio; Sansone, Umberto; Van der Perk, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of the international SOILSAMP project, funded and coordinated by the National Environmental Protection Agency of Italy (APAT), uncertainties due to field soil sampling were assessed. Three different sampling devices were applied in an agricultural area using the same sampling protocol. Cr, Sc and Zn mass fractions in the collected soil samples were measured by k(0)-instrumental neutron activation analysis (k(0)-INAA). For each element-device combination the experimental variograms were calculated using geostatistical tools. The variogram parameters were used to estimate the standard uncertainty arising from sampling. The sampling component represents the dominant contribution of the measurement uncertainty with a sampling uncertainty to measurement uncertainty ratio ranging between 0.6 and 0.9. The approach based on the use of variogram parameters leads to uncertainty values of the sampling component in agreement with those estimated by replicate sampling approach.

  7. Environmental parameters altered by climate change affect the activity of soil microorganisms involved in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Itziar; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2017-10-16

    Bioremediation, based on the use of microorganisms to break down pollutants, can be very effective at reducing soil pollution. But the climate change we are now experiencing is bound to have an impact on bioremediation performance, since the activity and degrading abilities of soil microorganisms are dependent on a series of environmental parameters that are themselves being altered by climate change, such as soil temperature, moisture, amount of root exudates, etc. Many climate-induced effects on soil microorganisms occur indirectly through changes in plant growth and physiology derived from increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures, the alteration of precipitation patterns, etc., with a concomitant effect on rhizoremediation performance (i.e. the plant-assisted microbial degradation of pollutants in the rhizosphere). But these effects are extremely complex and mediated by processes such as acclimation and adaptation. Besides, soil microorganisms form complex networks of interactions with a myriad of organisms from many taxonomic groups that will also be affected by climate change, further complicating data interpretation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Litter thickness, but not root biomass, explains the average and spatial structure of soil hydraulic conductivity in secondary forests and coffee agroecosystems in Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Castro, B E; Negrete-Yankelevich, S; Geissert, D

    2017-12-31

    Secondary forests and coffee agroecosystems are considered good alternatives for conservation of a high capacity for water filtration in the soil where tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) once grew; however, it is not clear which characteristics of the vegetation modulate the field saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil (Kfs) and whether these characteristics persist in such derived systems. Here, we explore how changes in vegetation between secondary forests and coffee agroecosystems have consequences for the average value and spatial variation of litter thickness and root biomass, and whether these differences can explain the Kfs and its spatial distribution. We found that the thickest litter, greatest total biomass and thickest roots are in the secondary forest of the north of the study area. The litter is spatially structured in patches of ca. 12m at plot scale in the secondary forest and coffee agroecosystem of the southern area. Like the Kfs, the thickness of the litter and biomass of the thick (>2mm), medium (1-2mm) and fine (<1mm) roots are spatially distributed on a north to south gradient at landscape scale. Our linear model indicates that geographic area (north or south), land use and litter thickness explain the Kfs and its spatial distribution along this gradient. Even on inclusion of the antecedent soil moisture and percentage of clays (found to explain Kfs in a previous study), it was not possible to eliminate from the model geographic area and land use, due to their high explanatory power. However, antecedent soil moisture became redundant on inclusion of the litter layer, which had a greater explanatory power. Our modeling suggests that undiscovered differences prevail between the geographic areas and secondary forest and coffee agroecosystems (possibly related to the edaphogenesis and management practices) that determine the Kfs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of soil electromagnetic parameters and their variation with soil water, salts: a comparison among EMI and TDR measuring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaali, Nesrine; Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have analyzed the possibility of the extension of Electromagnetic Induction EMI calibration coefficients determined at field scale, to predict the depth distribution of bulk electrical conductivity ECb within unmonitored sites and/or times, in order to appraise the effect of salts dynamics on soils and plants. However, in the literature, it has been determined that the extension of those EMI calibration coefficients can be awkward since the calibration parameters are highly site-specific because of changes in water content, temperature, root development, soil physical properties, etc... So they can only be used in sites having similar characteristics in terms of EMI. Furthermore there is a difference in the observation windows of EMI sensors and of sensors (Time Domain Reflectometry TDR, Electrical Resistance Tomography ERT, ect...) used for measuring the ECb to be then used for the calibration and validation of the EMI. By consequence the actual variability of the soil salinity will be hidden due to the fact that data coming from EMI and other sensors have different variability patterns and structure, and are then influenced by different noises. The main objectives of this work were: 1) develop a practical and cost-effective technique that uses TDR data as ground-truth data for calibrating and validating of the EMI larger scale sensor, 2) using a Fourier transform FT analysis by applying a specific noise filter to the original data, to find the correlations between the TDR and the EMI data. An experiment was designed by irrigating three transects of green beans, 30 m long each, with three irrigation salinity inputs (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). The irrigation volumes were estimated by measuring soil water content at different depths by using a Diviner 2000. During the experiment, the EM in both the vertical (EMV) and horizontal (EMH) configurations were regularly measured by a Geonics EM38 device. TDR probes were inserted vertically at the soil

  10. Fate and transport of monoterpenes through soils. Part I. Prediction of temperature dependent soil fate model input-parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roon, André; Parsons, John R; te Kloeze, Anne-Marie; Govers, Harrie A J

    2005-11-01

    Monoterpenes are C10H(n)O(n') compounds of natural origin and are potentially environmentally safe substitutes for traditional pesticides. Still, an assessment of their environmental behaviour is required. As a first step in a theoretical study focussing on monoterpenes applied as pesticides to terrestrial environments, soil fate model input-parameters were determined for 20 monoterpenes with widely different structural characteristics. Input-parameters are the water solubility (S(W)), vapour pressure (P), n-octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW)), atmospheric air and bulk water diffusion coefficients (D(A)air and D(W)water), first order biodegradation rate constants (k), and their temperature dependence. Values for these parameters were estimated or taken from previous experimental work. The quality of the estimations was discussed by focussing on their statistics and by comparison with available experimental data. From these properties, the air-water partition coefficient (K(AW), Henry's Law constant), the interface-water partition coefficient (K(IW)) and the organic matter-water partition coefficient (K(OM)) could be estimated with varying levels of accuracy. In general, little experimental data turned out to be available on biodegradation rate constants and on the temperature dependence of physico-chemical parameters.

  11. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  12. Effect of biochars produced from solid organic municipal waste on soil quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, P; Bansode, R R; Hassan, O A; Rehrah, Dj; Ravella, R; Reddy, M R; Watts, D W; Novak, J M; Ahmedna, M

    2017-05-01

    New value-added uses for solid municipal waste are needed for environmental and economic sustainability. Fortunately, value-added biochars can be produced from mixed solid waste, thereby addressing solid waste management issues, and enabling long-term carbon sequestration. We hypothesize that soil deficiencies can be remedied by the application of municipal waste-based biochars. Select municipal organic wastes (newspaper, cardboard, woodchips and landscaping residues) individually or in a 25% blend of all four waste streams were used as feedstocks of biochars. Three sets of pyrolysis temperatures (350, 500, and 750 °C) and 3 sets of pyrolysis residence time (2, 4 and 6 h) were used for biochar preparation. The biochar yield was in the range of 21-62% across all feedstocks and pyrolysis conditions. We observed variations in key biochar properties such as pH, electrical conductivity, bulk density and surface area depending on the feedstocks and production conditions. Biochar increased soil pH and improved its electrical conductivity, aggregate stability, water retention and micronutrient contents. Similarly, leachate from the soil amended with biochar showed increased pH and electrical conductivity. Some elements such as Ca and Mg decreased while NO 3 -N increased in the leachates of soils incubated with biochars. Overall, solid waste-based biochar produced significant improvements to soil fertility parameters indicating that solid municipal wastes hold promising potential as feedstocks for manufacturing value-added biochars with varied physicochemical characteristics, allowing them to not only serve the needs for solid waste management and greenhouse gas mitigation, but also as a resource for improving the quality of depleted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic Parameter Changes in Soil and Sediments in the Presence of Hydrocarbon Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Rijal, M. L.; Ameen, N. N.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic proxies were successfully used for fast and non-destructive detection of fly ash related heavy metal pollution. Correlations of magnetic signals with organic contaminants in soils and sediments were also reported; however, their significance is unclear because of co-existing heavy metal pollution. At a hydrocarbon (HC) contaminated former military airbase (Hradcany, Czech Rep.), where heavy metal contents are insignificant, we detected clearly higher magnetic concentrations at the top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. Frequent GWF by up to ca. one meter was caused through remediation by air sparging. In this study and all previous ones magnetite was identified as the dominant phase for higher magnetic concentrations. To determine the importance of microbial activity and soil parameters on changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) laboratory batch experiments with different microbially active and sterile soils without carbon addition and with gasoline amendment were setup. MS of these microcosms was followed weekly. Depending on the soil MS either increased or decreased by up to ~7% and remained constant afterwards. The main findings were that MS changes were mainly microbially driven and influenced by the bioavailable Fe content, the initial MS and the organic carbon content of the soils. Moreover, we tested magnetic changes in laboratory columns, filled with sand from the field site Hradcany, by simulating water level changes. The observed changes were small and hardly statistically significant. Our laboratory studies revealed that different factors influence changes in magnetic properties of soil/sediments after HC contamination, with much smaller effects than expected from anomalies observed at field sites. With the present results, the ambitious goal of using magnetic monitoring for detecting HC contaminations by oil spills seem far from practical application.

  14. Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the FIRM, channels containing the...

  15. Long-term effects of peatland cultivation on soil physical and hydraulic properties: Case study in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis W. Hallema; Jonathan A. Lafond; Yann Périard; Silvio J. Gumiere; Ge Sun; Jean Caron

    2015-01-01

    Organic soils are an excellent substrate for commercial lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) farming; however, drainage accelerates oxidation of the surface layer and reduces the water holding capacity, which is often lethal for crops that are sensitive to water stress. In this case study, we analyzed 942 peat samples from a large cultivated peatland complex...

  16. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossadeghi-Björklund, M; Arvidsson, J.; Keller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well-structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites, in the following referred to as trafficked and control. The trafficked treatment was created by 4 passes track...

  17. Root growth and hydraulic conductivity of southern pine seedlings in response to soil temperature and water availability after planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; John C. Brissette; James P. Barnett

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of the root system growth and water transport of southern pine species after planting in different root-zone environments is needed to guide decisions regarding when, and what species to plant. Evaluation of how seed source affects root system responses to soil conditions will allow seed sources to be matched to planting conditions. The root growth and...

  18. Insights into the subsurface transport of As(V) and Se(VI) in produced water from hydraulic fracturing using soil samples from Qingshankou Formation, Songliao Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Season S; Sun, Yuqing; Tsang, Daniel C W; Graham, Nigel J D; Ok, Yong Sik; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Produced water is a type of wastewater generated from hydraulic fracturing, which may pose a risk to the environment and humans due to its high ionic strength and the presence of elevated concentrations of metals/metalloids that exceed maximum contamination levels. The mobilization of As(V) and Se(VI) in produced water and selected soils from Qingshankou Formation in the Songliao Basin in China were investigated using column experiments and synthetic produced water whose quality was representative of waters arising at different times after well creation. Temporal effects of produced water on metal/metalloid transport and sorption/desorption were investigated by using HYDRUS-1D transport modelling. Rapid breakthrough and long tailings of As(V) and Se(VI) transport were observed in Day 1 and Day 14 solutions, but were reduced in Day 90 solution probably due to the elevated ionic strength. The influence of produced water on the hydrogeological conditions (i.e., change between equilibrium and non-equilibrium transport) was evidenced by the change of tracer breakthrough curves before and after the leaching of produced water. This possibly resulted from the sorption of polyacrylamide (PAM (-CH2CHCONH2-)n) onto soil surfaces, through its use as a friction reducer in fracturing solutions. The sorption was found to be reversible in this study. Minimal amounts of sorbed As(V) were desorbed whereas the majority of sorbed Se(VI) was readily leached out, to an extent which varied with the composition of the produced water. These results showed that the mobilization of As(V) and Se(VI) in soil largely depended on the solution pH and ionic strength. Understanding the differences in metal/metalloid transport in produced water is important for proper risk management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. VHF SoOp (Signal of Opportunity) Technology Demonstration for Soil Moisture Measurement Using Microwave Hydraulic Boom Truck Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; Deshpande, M.; O'Neill, P. E.; Miles, L.

    2017-01-01

    A goal of this research is to test deployable VHF antennas for 6U Cubesat platforms to enable validation of root zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimation algorithms for signal of opportunity (SoOp) remote sensing over the 240-270 MHz frequency band. The proposed work provides a strong foundation for establishing a technology development path for maturing a global direct surface soil moisture (SM) and RZSM measurement system over a variety of land covers. Knowledge of RZSM up to a depth of 1 meter and surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter on a global scale, at a spatial resolution of 1-10 km through moderate-to-heavy vegetation, is critical to understanding global water resources and the vertical moisture gradient in the Earths surface layer which controls moisture interactions between the soil, vegetation, and atmosphere. Current observations of surface SM from space by L-band radiometers (1.4 GHz) and radars (1.26 GHz) are limited to measurements of surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter through moderate amounts of vegetation. This limitation is mainly due to the inability of L-band signals to penetrate through dense vegetation and deep into the soil column. Satellite observations of the surface moisture conditions are coupled to sophisticated models which extrapolate the surface SM into the root zone, thus providing an indirect estimate rather than a direct measurement of RZSM. To overcome this limitation, low-frequency airborne radars operating at 435 MHz and 118 MHz have been investigated, since these lower frequencies should penetrate denser vegetation and respond to conditions deeper in the soil.

  20. Hydraulic conductivity obtained by instantaneous profile method using retention curve and neutron probes and Genuchten model; Condutividade hidraulica obtida pelo metodo do perfil instantaneo utilizando curva de retencao e sonda de neutrons e pelo modelo de Genuchten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, Ana Lucia Olmedo

    1999-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity is one of the most important parameters to understand the movement of water in the unsaturated zone. Reliable estimations are difficult to obtain, once the hydraulic conductivity is highly variable. This study was carried out at 'Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz', Universidade de Sao Paulo, in a Kandiudalfic Eutrudox soil. The hydraulic conductivity was determined by a direct and an indirect method. The instantaneous profile method was described and the hydraulic conductivity as a function of soil water content was determined by solving the Richards equation. Tensiometers were used to estimate the total soil water potential, and the neutron probe and the soil retention curve were used to estimate soil water content in the direct method. The neutron probe showed to be not adequately sensible to the changes of soil water content in this soil. Despite of the soil retention curve provides best correlation values to soil water content as a function of water redistribution time, the soil water content in this soil did not vary too much till the depth of 50 cm, reflecting the influence of the presence of a Bt horizon. The soil retention curve was well fitted by the van Genuchten model used as an indirect method. The values of the van Genuchten and the experimental relative hydraulic conductivity obtained by the instantaneous profile method provided a good correlation. However, the values estimated by the model were always lower than that ones obtained experimentally. (author)

  1. Development of CFD thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics coupling methodologies for the prediction of local safety parameters for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Manes, Jorge

    2013-02-26

    This dissertation contributes to the development of high-fidelity coupled neutron kinetic and thermal hydraulic simulation tools with high resolution of the spatial discretization of the involved domains for the analysis of Light Water Reactors transient scenarios.

  2. THERMAL-HYDRAULICS PARAMETER ANALYSIS OF THE BANDUNG TRIGA 2000 REACTOR BASED ON CFD AND RELAP5/MOD3.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldy Nazar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactor TRIGA 2000 Bandung is result of upgrading TRIGA Mark II reactor from nominal power of 1 MW becomes 2 MW and has been opened its the operation in the year 2000. In this period change of operation parameters had been occurred, especially the parameter related to thermo-hydraulic aspect, like the height of reactor core temperature and the formation of vapor bubble in the core, which is on the contrary with the safety aspect. Safety is the priority in the reactor operation, hence reactor core temperature and vapor bubble in core need to be reduced. One of methods to reduce the core temperature and vapor bubble formation is the operation at limited power of 1000 kW. To examine the safety margin of Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor operation at 1000 kW power, the analysis of thermo-hydraulic characteristic have been carried out by theoretical study using computer code of CFD (Computational of Fluid Dynamics and RELAP5/Mod3.2 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program. The result of the study indicates that reactor reaches steady state condition at 1000 kW power in 1500 seconds after critical condition, and maximum temperature of reactor core is in C4 position, whereas the maximum temperature of fuel center, cladding, and cooling water at related fuel are 529.35 °C, 103.12 °C, and 90.67 °C, respectively. Maximum temperature of cladding and primary cooling water at related fuel are below saturation temperature (112.4 °C, so the sub-cooled boiling or bubbling of saturation and vapor bubble formation can be predicted not to be happened. Besides when the reactor was operated at 1200 kW and 1250 kW power was obtained the maximum temperature of fuel cladding are 111.04 °C and 115.53 °C, respectively. This thing informs that, when the reactor was operated up to 1200 kW power sub-cooled boiling has not happened, but when the reactor was operated at 1250 kW power has started the happening of the sub-cooled boiling and the formation of vapour bubble

  3. Estimación de la conductividad hidráulica saturada in situ en un suelo tratado con vinaza Field satured hydraulic conductivity estimation on vinasse trated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig M Rojas D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estimaron los cambios en la conductividad hidráulica saturada mediante las técnicas de caída de carga" y "fuente localizada de agua en un suelo Ustipsamment típico arenoso isohipertérmico con dosis diluidas de vinazas. La investigación se realizó en el centro experimental de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Palmira (3° 25'39.81" N y 76° 25'45.70" o, 953 m.s.n.m, 24 °C y 60% HR, 1.020 mm. Los dos métodos no difirieron de forma significativa (pChanges of the satured hydraulic conductivity in a soil was estimated using the “falling head” and “point source” methods. The soil treated with vinasse was an Ustipsamment Typic Sandy Isohipertermic located at the experimental center of the National University of Colombia at Palmira (3° 25' 39.81" N, 76° 25' 45.70" W; 953 m.a.s.l., 24 °C, 60% RH. and 1020 mm.. The field methods used did not show statistical differences for the estimation of the satured hydraulic conductivity (p<0.05. However, a decreasing exponential relationship between hydraulic conductivity and vinasse concentration was found. The hydraulic conductivity was reduced about of 50% from the initial value to 2° Brix in a sandy soil, 5.3° brix to a sandy loam soil and 6.1° Brix to a clay loam soil.

  4. SMOS soil moisture retrievals using the land parameter retrieval model: Evaluation over the Murrumbidgee Catchment, southeast Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schalie, R.; Parinussa, R.M.; Renzullo, L.J.; van Dijk, A.I.J.M.; Su, C.-.; de Jeu, R.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is a methodology that retrieves soil moisture from low frequency dual polarized microwave measurements and has been extensively tested on C-, X- and Ku-band frequencies. Its performance on L-band is tested here by using observations from the Soil Moisture

  5. Fine and coarse root parameters from mature black spruce displaying genetic x soil moisture interaction in growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Major; Kurt H. Johnsen; Debby C. Barsi; Moira Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Fine and coarse root biomass, C, and N mass parameters were assessed by root size and soil depths from soil cores in plots of 32-year-old black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb.) from four full-sib families studied previously for drought tolerance and differential productivity on a dry and wet...

  6. Ubiquitous net volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soils and parameters influencing their soil-air partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Ana; Dachs, Jordi; Moeckel, Claudia; Ojeda, María-José; Caballero, Gemma; Barceló, Damià; Jones, Kevin C

    2011-06-01

    Soils are a major reservoir of organic pollutants, and soil-air partitioning and exchange are key processes controlling the regional fate of pollutants. Here, we report and discuss the soil concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), their soil fugacities, the soil-air partition coefficients (K(SA)) and soil-air gradients for rural and semirural soils, in background areas of N-NE Spain and N-NW England. Different sampling campaigns were carried out to assess seasonal variability and differences between sampling sites. K(SA) values were dependent on soil temperature and soil organic quantity and type. Soil fugacities of phenanthrene and its alkyl homologues were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than their ambient air fugacities for all sampling sites and periods. The soil to air fugacity ratio was correlated with soil temperature and soil redox potential. Similar trends for other PAHs were found but with lower fugacity ratios. The ubiquitous source of PAHs from background soils to the atmosphere found in all temperate regions in different seasons provides an indirect evidence of potential in situ generation of two to four ring PAHs and their alkyl homologues in the surface soil. We discuss this hypothetical biogenic source and other potential processes that could drive the high soil to air fugacity ratios of some PAHs.

  7. Hydraulic System Design of Hydraulic Actuators for Large Butterfly Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye HUANG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic control systems of butterfly valves are presently valve-controlled and pump-controlled. Valve-controlled hydraulic systems have serious power loss and generate much heat during throttling. Pump-controlled hydraulic systems have no overflow or throttling losses but are limited in the speed adjustment of the variable-displacement pump, generate much noise, pollute the environment, and have motor power that does not match load requirements, resulting in low efficiency under light loads and wearing of the variable-displacement pump. To overcome these shortcomings, this article designs a closed hydraulic control system in which an AC servo motor drives a quantitative pump that controls a spiral swinging hydraulic cylinder, and analyzes and calculates the structure and parameters of a spiral swinging hydraulic cylinder. The hydraulic system adjusts the servo motor’s speed according to the requirements of the control system, and the motor power matches the power provided to components, thus eliminating the throttling loss of hydraulic circuits. The system is compact, produces a large output force, provides stable transmission, has a quick response, and is suitable as a hydraulic control system of a large butterfly valve.

  8. Soil use and hydraulic systems in the Terramara S. Rosa (Poviglio, northern Italy). The role of micromorphology in decrypting site formation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Mauro; Chiara, Pizzi

    2010-05-01

    The S. Rosa moated site (Terramara), which dates back to the Middle-Recent Bronze age, is under excavation since 1984, by the Soprintendenza ai Beni Archeologici dell Emilia Romagna, in cooperation with the Università degli Studi di Milano, CNR-IDPA of Milano, and the sponsorship of the Comune di Poviglio and Coopsette. The field seasons of the last ten years were concentrated in the south-western part of the fringe of the site and the adjoining ditch, and unearthed a complex hydraulic system composed of several wells, the moat, a canal converging to it, and minor ditches connecting these structure to the countryside surrounding the Terramara. During the early phase of occupation (late Middle Bronze age), a large number of wells, located at the fringe of the village, in coincidence with the fence were dug to reach the water table. They were kept in use for a long time and the water extracted from them was not directed to the interior of the village but it was carried inside the moat throughout a system of ditches. Outside the moat, a large canal has been recently discovered. Its large size and the sophisticated knowledge in hydraulic engineering that its construction required, make it the first archaeological proof of a large scale water management during the Bronze Age. During the last phase of the village (late Recent Bronze age) the wells of the fence and the canal were deactivated and the flow inside the moat interrupted. Consequently, more wells were excavated in a very short time at the bottom of the moat, as indicated by refitting of the potsherds included in the fill. These wells are surrounded by reservoirs connected by small ditches to make the extracted water available to be used at the outer fringe of the moat. An intensive program of micromorphological studies has been undertaken to reconstruct the formation processes of the excavated deposits. Thin section study led to the differentiation of long lasting phases of use, maintenance and abandonment on

  9. Predicting Cereal Root Disease in Western Australia Using Soil DNA and Environmental Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Grant J; Harries, Martin; Hüberli, D; Miyan, S; MacLeod, W J; Lawes, Roger; McKay, A

    2015-08-01

    Root diseases have long been prevalent in Australian grain-growing regions, and most management decisions to reduce the risk of yield loss need to be implemented before the crop is sown. The levels of pathogens that cause the major root diseases can be measured using DNA-based services such as PreDicta B. Although these pathogens are often studied individually, in the field they often occur as mixed populations and their combined effect on crop production is likely to vary across diverse cropping environments. A 3-year survey was conducted covering most cropping regions in Western Australia, utilizing PreDicta B to determine soilborne pathogen levels and visual assessments to score root health and incidence of individual crop root diseases caused by the major root pathogens, including Rhizoctonia solani (anastomosis group [AG]-8), Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (take-all), Fusarium pseudograminearum, and Pratylenchus spp. (root-lesion nematodes) on wheat roots for 115, 50, and 94 fields during 2010, 2011, and 2012, respectively. A predictive model was developed for root health utilizing autumn and summer rainfall and soil temperature parameters. The model showed that pathogen DNA explained 16, 5, and 2% of the variation in root health whereas environmental parameters explained 22, 11, and 1% of the variation in 2010, 2011, and 2012, respectively. Results showed that R. solani AG-8 soil pathogen DNA, environmental soil temperature, and rainfall parameters explained most of the variation in the root health. This research shows that interactions between environment and pathogen levels before seeding can be utilized in predictive models to improve assessment of risk from root diseases to assist growers to plan more profitable cropping programs.

  10. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmukat, A., E-mail: schmukat@harzwasserwerke.de [Harzwasserwerke GmbH, Zur Granetalsperre 8, 38685 Langelsheim (Germany); Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Duester, L. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Goryunova, E. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); KAPP-Chemie GmbH & Co. KG, Industriestr. 2-4, 56357 Miehlen (Germany); Ecker, D.; Heininger, P.; Ternes, T.A. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • DoE supported multi-factorial study on the metal(loid) release from copper slag. • Interactions of four parameters were studied and weighted. • An effective separation method between slag and sediment was established. • The metal(loid) partitioning between sediment, slag and eluent is described. • The knowledge on the potential environmental impact of copper slag is increased. - Abstract: Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material.

  11. VHF SoOp (Signal of Opportunity) Technology Demonstration for Soil Moisture Measurement Using Microwave Hydraulic Boom Truck Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Alicia; Deshpande, Manohar; O'Neill, Peggy; Miles, Lynn

    2017-04-01

    A goal of this research is to test deployable VHF antennas for 6U Cubesat platforms to enable validation of root zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimation algorithms for signal of opportunity (SoOp) remote sensing over the 240-270 MHz frequency band. The proposed work provides a strong foundation for establishing a technology development path for maturing a global direct surface soil moisture (SM) and RZSM measurement system over a variety of land covers. Knowledge of RZSM up to a depth of 1 meter and surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter on a global scale, at a spatial resolution of 1-10 km through moderate-to-heavy vegetation, is critical to understanding global water resources and the vertical moisture gradient in the Earth's surface layer which controls moisture interactions between the soil, vegetation, and atmosphere. Current observations of surface SM from space by L-band radiometers (1.4 GHz) and radars (1.26 GHz) are limited to measurements of surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter through moderate amounts of vegetation. This limitation is mainly due to the inability of L-band signals to penetrate through dense vegetation and deep into the soil column. Satellite observations of the surface moisture conditions are coupled to sophisticated models which extrapolate the surface SM into the root zone, thus providing an indirect estimate rather than a direct measurement of RZSM. To overcome this limitation, low-frequency airborne radars operating at 435 MHz and 118 MHz have been investigated, since these lower frequencies should penetrate denser vegetation and respond to conditions deeper in the soil. This presentation describes a new and less expensive technique for SM as well as RZSM direct measurement using Signal of Opportunity transmitters. Being less expensive and needing only passive simple RF receiver, the SoOp concept has the potential for being used for space borne applications, thus providing global SM and RZSM measurements. This study will describe

  12. Effects of long-term use of different farming systems on some physical, chemical and microbiological parameters of soil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Anna M.; Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different farming systems (organic, integrated, conventional and monoculture) on some soil properties as: bulk density, contents of readily-dispersible clay, organic matter and particulate organic matter, and enzymatic activity measured in terms of the intensity of fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis. Soil under permanent grass was used as a control. The study was conducted on the 20 years lasting field experiment. Samples of Haplic Luvisol soil were collected twice a year on fields under winter wheat from the layers of 0-5, 5-10, 15-20, and 30-35 cm. Within arable soils the soil under organic farming contained the greatest amount of organic matter, which influenced strongly the readily-dispersible clay content, especially in the layer of 5-20 cm. The readily-dispersible clay content in soil under organic farming was 3 times lower, as compared to the conventional and monoculture farming. The highest contents of particulate organic matter 6.2 and 3.5 mg g-1 air dry soil, on average were measured in the 0-5 cm layer of control soil and soil under organic farming, respectively. Also, soil under organic farming and control soil from the depth of 0-5 cm showed 2-2.5 times greater activity of microorganisms in fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis than soil under conventional and monoculture farming. Increase of concentration of organic matter in soil under organic farming decreased soil bulk density. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between studied parameters of soil quality and confirmed their effectiveness as indicators of disturbances in soil environment.

  13. Linking Particle and Pore-Size Distribution Parameters to Soil Gas Transport Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    , respectively) and the Campbell water retention parameter b were used to characterize particle and pore size distributions, respectively. Campbell b yielded a wide interval (4.6–26.2) and was highly correlated with α, β, and volumetric clay content. Both Dp/Do and ka followed simple power-law functions (PLFs......) of air-filled porosity (εa). The PLF tortuosity–connectivity factors (X*) for Dp/Do and ka were both highly correlated with all basic soil characteristics, in the order of volumetric clay content = Campbell b > gravimetric clay content > α > β. The PLF water blockage factors (H) for Dp/Do and ka were...

  14. a Landscape Perspective of Ephemeral Erosion: Topographic Parameters Associated with Soil Property, Soil Productivity, and Precipitation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Rodrick David

    The pattern of ephemeral gully erosion and crop productivity was investigated in three different southeastern Minnesota soilscapes during 1988 and 1989. In addition, the role that local or regional landscape configuration has in controlling distribution of precipitation in agricultural landscapes was investigated. A full-scale model of a small hill was instrumented to measure rainfall intensity across its surface. The model was employed to test for wind-terrain interactions and to determine if these effects conform to the drift theory. Another study sought to identify local and topographic parameters associated with deposition and redistribution of snow in agricultural landscapes having complex relief. In 1989 soil lost from ephemeral gullies ranged from 0.8 to 1.6 Mg/ha at the study sites. Soil loss at the Mower county site ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 Mg/ha during '86, '87, and '89 seasons. Crop yield of gullied areas was not significantly different (a = 0.05) than that of adjacent non-gullied areas during the two relatively dry years, 1988 and 1989. Mid-channel reaches were most sensitive to effects of erosion. Topographically sensitive controls of ephemeral erosion, such as surface saturation and stream transport capacity, played different roles in channel formation at each site. Hydrologic rainfall varied by as much as 36% across hill model surfaces. A wind-terrain interaction occurred at all summit elevations tested (0.9, 2.1, and 2.7 m), and over a range of incident wind speeds (1 to 11 m s ^{-1}) and meteorological rainfall rates (1 to 100 mm hr^{-1}). Rainfall vector analysis indicated that a drifting process was partially responsible for the observed rainfall pattern. The drift theory did not explain decreasing rainfall incidence observed from lower to upper windward slopes. Snowfall deposition was nonuniform at mean event wind speeds above 1.2 m s^{-1} . Greatest variation in snow depth, typically about 400%, was observed when mean event wind speeds exceeded 3

  15. Residual effects of fallows on selected soil hydraulic properties in a kaolinitic soil subjected to conventional tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamadzawo, G.; Nyamugafata, P.; Chikowo, R.; Giller, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Improved fallows have been used to reduce time required for soil fertility regeneration after cropping in low input agricultural systems. In semi-arid areas of Southern Africa, Acacia angustissima and Sesbania sesban are among some of the more widely used improved fallow species. However the

  16. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [effects of measurable plant parameters on multispectral signal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance of crop residues, that are important in reducing wind and water erosion, was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, or 7. The plant parameters leaf area index, plant population, plant cover, and plant height explained 95.9 percent of the variation in band 7 (reflective infrared) digital counts for cotton and 78.2 percent of the variation in digital counts for the combined crops sorghum and corn; hence, measurable plant parameters explain most of the signal variation recorded for corpland. Leaf area index and plant population are both highly correlated with crop yields; since plant population can be readily measured (or possibly inferred from seeding rates), it is useful measurement for calibrating ERTS-type MSS digital data in terms of yield.

  17. Methane oxidation in a landfill cover soil reactor: Changing of kinetic parameters and microorganism community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi L; Zhao, Tian T; Gao, Yan H; Yang, Xu; Liu, Shuai; Peng, Xu Y

    2017-02-23

    Changing of CH4 oxidation potential and biological characteristics with CH4 concentration was studied in a landfill cover soil reactor (LCSR). The maximum rate of CH4 oxidation reached 32.40 mol d-1 m-2 by providing sufficient O2 in the LCSR. The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil were obtained by fitting substrate diffusion and consumption model based on the concentration profile of CH4 and O2. The values of [Formula: see text] (0.93-2.29%) and [Formula: see text] (140-524 nmol kgsoil-DW-1·s-1) increased with CH4 concentration (9.25-20.30%), while the values of [Formula: see text] (312.9-2.6%) and [Formula: see text] (1.3 × 10-5 to 9.0 × 10-3 nmol mL-1 h-1) were just the opposite. MiSeq pyrosequencing data revealed that Methylobacter (the relative abundance was decreased with height of LCSR) and Methylococcales_unclassified (the relative abundance was increased expect in H 80) became the key players after incubation with increasing CH4 concentration. These findings provide information for assessing CH4 oxidation potential and changing of biological characteristics in landfill cover soil.

  18. Interaction between Soil Physicochemical Parameters and Earthworm Communities in Irrigated Areas with Natural Water and Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourtel Ghanem Nadra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective is to study interaction between physical and chemical properties of soils and their earthworm community characteristics in different areas irrigated by wastewaters and well waters. The fields have different topography and agricultural practices conditions and are located in two regions of Batna department (Eastern Algeria. Both regions are characterized by a semiarid climate with cold winters and Calcisol soils. Nine fields were subject of this study. Three of these fields are located in Ouled Si Slimane region whose irrigation is effectuated by natural waters of Kochbi effluent. The other six fields are located at edges of Wed El Gourzi, effluent from Batna city, and partially treated through water treatment station. The best rates of water saturation and infiltration as well as abundance of earthworms were recorded at sites characterized by irrigation with wastewaters downstream of El Gourzi effluent. PCA characterizes two major groups: a group of hydrodynamic infiltration parameters and structural index stability of soil, explained by fields irrigated with wastewaters downstream of El Gourzi effluent. This group includes chemical characteristics: pH and electric conductivity. The second group is the characteristics of earthworms and includes organic matter content, active limestone levels, and Shannon Biodiversity Index.

  19. Effects of Soil Bulk Density on Gas Transport Parameters and Pore-Network Properties across a Sandy Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Chamindu, T K K Deepagoda

    2015-01-01

    The gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and their interrelations with air-filled porosity are crucial for characterization of diffusive and convective transport of gases in soils. Variations in soil bulk density can affect water retention, air-filled pore space, pore tortuosity...... and connectivity, and hence control gas diffusion and air permeability. Considering 86 undisturbed core samples with variable bulk density that were extracted on a grid from the top layer of a sandy field, the effects of soil bulk density on gas transport parameters and the soil water characteristic were...... to quantify gas transport and water retention processes across the field. Results revealed significant negative correlations between all six parameters and soil bulk density. Areas with higher bulk density exhibited reduced air-filled porosity and lower diffusivity- and air permeability-based connectivity...

  20. Predicted and measured soil retention curve parameters in Lombardy region north of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Wassar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water retention characteristics are fundamental input parameters in any modeling study on water flow and solute transport. These properties are difficult to measure and for that reason, we usually need to use direct and indirect methods to determine them. An extensive comparison between measured and estimated results is needed to determine their applicability for a range of different soils. However this study attempts to make a contribution specifically in this connection. These properties were determined in two representative sites located in Landriano field, in Lombardy region, northern Italy. In the laboratory we used the pressure plate apparatus and the tensiometric box. Field soil water retention was determined including measurements of soil water content with SENTEK probes and matric potential with tensiometers. The soil waer retention curves (SWRC were also settled on with some recently developed pedo-transfert functions (PTFs. Field retention curves were compared against those obtained from PTFs estimations and laboratory measurements. The comparison showed that laboratory measurements were the most accurate. They had the highest ranking for the validation indices (RMSE ranging between 2.4% and 7.7% and bias between 0.1% and 6.4%. The second best technique was the PTF Rosetta (Schaap et al. 2001. They perform only slightly poorer than the laboratory measurements (RMSE ranging between 2.7% and 10% and bias between 0.3% and 7.7%. The lowest prediction accuracy is observed for the Rawls and Brakensiek (1985 PTF (RMSE ranging between 6.3% and 17% and bias between 5% and 10% which is in contradiction with previous finding (Calzolari et al., 2001, showing that this function is well representing the retention characteristics of the area. Due to time and cost investments of laboratory and field measurements, we conclude that the Rosetta PTF developed by Schaap et al. (2001 appears to be the best to predict the soil moisture retention curve from

  1. Compost and humic substance effects on soil parameters of Vitis vinifera L cv Thompson seedless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Fincheira-Robles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic amendments is common under the concept of integrated nutrient management (INM in Vi tis vinifera (Table grape to improve plant and soil quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate compost (C and humic substances (HS mixed with mineral fertilizer (MF in an INM program of V. vinifera cv Thompson seedless. The chemical, biochemi cal and microbiological parameters were evaluated in soil on 1 - year - old V. vinifera plants growing on Alfisol soil. Five treatments and control were evaluated: (T 1 C+MF, (T 2 HS+MF, (T 3 C, (T 4 HS, (T 5 MF and (T 6 absolute control. The results indicate d that the application of C and HS, increased β glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities, reaching values of 90.2 μg p - nitrophenol g - 1 h - 1 and 9.1 μg de TFP g - 1 24h - 1 , respectively . In addition, pH was similar in all treatments while electrical conductivity increased with application of mineral and orga nic amendments, reaching 0.41dS m - 1 in T 2 (HS+MF . Furthermore, yeast concentration increased with organic amendments or mineral. Correlation analysis indicated significant and positive relationships between PO 4 - P concentration with MF (0.579 and C (0.431 and nitrogen with MF (0.868. These results support that INM, which combines mineral fertilization and organic amendments, improve positive changes in chemical soil properties and C cycling measured in terms of enzymatic activity in V. vinifera .

  2. White poplar (Populus alba L. - Litter impact on chemical and biochemical parameters related to nitrogen cycle in contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Madejon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of litter from Populus alba on chemical and biochemical properties related to the N cycle in soils with different pH values and trace element contents. We hypothesized that this litter would influence several parameters related to the N cycle and consequently to soil health.Area of study: we collected two reforested contaminated soils of different pH values (AZ pH 7.23 and DO pH = 2.66 and a non-contaminated soil (RHU pH 7.19.Materials and methods: Soil samples were placed in 2,000 cm3 microcosms and were incubated for 40 weeks in controlled conditions. Each soil was mixed with its corresponding litter, and soils without litter were also tested for comparison. Ammonium (NH4+-N and nitrate (NO3–-N content, potential nitrification rate (PNR, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN, protease activity, and several chemical properties such as pH, available trace element concentrations (extracted with 0.01 M CaCl2 were determined at different times of incubation.Main results: Values of available trace elements did not vary during the incubation and were always higher in acid soil. In neutral soils litter presence increased values of Kjeldahl-N, NO3–-N content, potential nitrification rate (PNR, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN and protease activity. Presence of trace elements in neutral soils did not alter the parameters studied. However, acidic pH and high content of available trace elements strongly affected NH4+-N andNO3–-N, microbial biomass N and protease activity.Research highlights: Our results showed the negative effect of the acidity and trace element availability in parameters related with the N-cycle.Key words: microbial biomass N; protease activity; soil pH; N mineralization; nitrification; phytoremediation.

  3. Application of microwave-pretreated cephalosporin mycelial dreg (CMD) as soil amendment: Temporal changes in chemical and fluorescent parameters of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chen; Liu, Huiling

    2018-04-15

    Land application of treated cephalosporin mycelial dreg (CMD) as a soil amendment is an alternative to its disposal in landfills and incineration because it has environmental and agronomic benefits. This study validated the efficacy of using the dewatered, microwave-pretreated CMD as a soil amendment. Pot experiments were conducted to assess the temporal changes in soil organic matter (SOM) profiles via chemical and fluorescent parameters. During the ageing period, the CMD-treated soil experienced a sudden rise in soil pH and soil electrical conductivity, along with a rapid decline in soil organic carbon and soil organic nitrogen content. The specific Ex/Em peak related to protein-like substances gradually disappeared, while those related to humic acid-like substances continued to increase thereafter. Fluorescence regional integration (FRI) results showed an ascended P V,n /P III,n index (1.94) and significant correlations with chemical data (M 2 =0.2875, r=0.8441, PCMD might be applied as a soil amendment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Influence of soil parameters on the linearity of the soil-to-plant transfer process of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Vera Tome, F. [Natural Radioactivity Group. Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Lozano, J.C. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental. Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Transfer from soil to plant is an important input of radionuclides into the food chain. Also, the mobility of radionuclides in soils is enhanced through their passage into the plant compartment. Thus, the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides raises the potential human dose. In radiological risk assessment models, this process is usually considered to be an equilibrium process such that the activity concentration in plants is linearly related to the soil concentration through a constant transfer factor (TF). However, the large variability present by measured TF values leads to major uncertainties in the assessment of risks. One possible way to reduce this variability in TF values is to parametrize their determination. This paper presents correlations of TF with the major element concentrations in soils. The findings confirm the major influence of the chemical environment of a soil on the assimilation process. The variability of TF might be greatly reduced if only the labile fraction were considered. Experiments performed with plants (Helianthus annuus L.) growing in a hydroponic medium appear to confirm this suggestion, showing a linear correlation between the plant and the soil solution activity concentrations. Extracting the labile fraction of a real soil is no trivial task, however. A possible operationally definable method is to consider the water-soluble together with the exchangeable fractions of the soil. Studies performed in granitic soils showed that the labile concentration of uranium and radium strongly depended on the soil's textural characteristics. In this sense, a parametrization is proposed of the labile uranium and radium concentration as a function of the soil's granulometric parameters. (authors)

  5. Mapping of Bare Soil Surface Parameters (Moisture, Roughness, Texture) from one TerraSAR-X Radar Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Gorrab, Azza; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Chabaane, Zohra Lili

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, surface bare soil parameters (moisture, roughness and texture) mapping was carried out in central Tunisia (North Africa) using one TerraSAR-X radar configuration (one incidence angle, one polarization). Firstly, we analyzed statistically the relationships between TerraSAR-X backscattering signals function of soil moisture and different roughness parameters (the root mean square height Hrms, the Zs and the Zg parameters) at 36° and HH polarization. Results have shown a high sensitivity of real radar data to all soil parameters. Then, we proposed an algorithm combing the TerraSAR-X images with different continuous thetaprobe measurements for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. Empirical relationship was established between the mean moisture values retrieved from the SAR images and the percentage of clay over 36 test fields. Validation of the proposed approach was carried out over a second set of 34 fields, showing that highly accurate clay estimations can be achieved. Finally, for spatial and temporal surface roughness estimation, we proposed empirical relationships between radar and soil roughness parameters (Hrms and Zg parameters). The proposed model was calibrated over 39 test fields, and then validated over 40 other plots.

  6. Soil amendments improve microbial ecology parameters of "topsoil inoculum" used in post-mining restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Munoz-Rojas, Miriam; Moreira-Grez, Benjamin; Kariman, Khalil; Whiteley, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Mine operations generate substantial volumes of waste substrates, which are crushed and/or chemically treated waste rock from which ores are extracted. Establishment of rehabilitated landforms using post-mining substrates (i.e. waste rocks, tailings) that typically exhibit extreme conditions (such as high pH, nutrient deficiency, excessive salinity and metal toxicity) can be a major environmental problem and a critical issue during mine closure operations. More importantly, mine sites are located predominantly in arid or semi-arid lands where our understanding of basic ecosystem processes and microbial interactions with native plants (e.g. Eucalyptus spp., Acacia spp., Grevillea spp. in Western Australia) are limited. Despite the wide acknowledgement on the impact of microbial functional diversity on overall soil and plant health, no detailed attention has been paid to understand the role of belowground microbial functional diversity in the context of mine rehabilitation strategies. In this research, we investigated the role of nitrogen-based and microbial consortia amendments on improving the microbial ecology parameters of "topsoil inoculum" and subsequently its cascading effect on seedling establishment and plant morphology of Acacia ancistrocarpa, a legume native to the Pilbara and other regions of Western Australia and commonly used in arid zone restoration. The study was conducted under controlled environmental conditions in potted plants using topsoil retrieved from previously stockpiled material as growth media. A morphological assessment was undertaken to measure shoot length, shoot weight, root length, root area and root weight. Soil chemical properties, e.g. carbon, nitrogen and trace metals concentrations were determined Microbial activity was measured with the 1-day CO2 test, which determines soil microbial respiration rate based on the measurement of the CO2 burst produced after moistening dry soil (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016). Bacterial and archaeal

  7. White popular (Populus alba L.) - Litter impact on chemical and biochemical parameters related to nitrogen cycle in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciadamidaro, L.; Madejon, P.; Cabrera, F.; Madejon, E.

    2014-06-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of litter from Populus alba on chemical and biochemical properties related to the N cycle in soils with different pH values and trace element contents. We hypothesized that this litter would influence several parameters related to the N cycle and consequently to soil health. Area of study: we collected two reforested contaminated soils of different pH values (AZ pH 7.23 and DO pH 2.66) and a non-contaminated soil (RHU pH 7.19). Materials and methods: Soil samples were placed in 2,000 cm{sup 3} microcosms and were incubated for 40 weeks in controlled conditions. Each soil was mixed with its corresponding litter, and soils without litter were also tested for comparison. Ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup 4}+-N) and nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -} -N) content, potential nitrification rate (PNR), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), protease activity, and several chemical properties such as pH, available trace element concentrations (extracted with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2}) were determined at different times of incubation. Main results: Values of available trace elements did not vary during the incubation and were always higher in acid soil. In neutral soils litter presence increased values of Kjeldahl-N, NO{sub 3} –-N content, potential nitrification rate (PNR), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and protease activity. Presence of trace elements in neutral soils did not alter the parameters studied. However, acidic pH and high content of available trace elements strongly affected NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and NO{sub 3}{sup -} -N, microbial biomass N and protease activity. Research highlights: Our results showed the negative effect of the acidity and trace element availability in parameters related with the N-cycle. (Author)

  8. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  9. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ndiaye, B.; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, J.P.; Lapetite, Jean-Michel; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h(-1), on 10 runoff microplots of 2 m(2), five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hy...

  10. Investigating the effect of tractive parameters on imposed vertical stresses under driving wheel using a soil bin test rig facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Taghavifar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tire tractive parameters of the driving wheel are of the most substantial factors for the evaluation of the performance of agricultural tractors. Great tractive efficiency has called the attention of vehicle designers to attain economic efficiency owing to the minimization of fuel consumption. At terrain-tire interface, some soil physical-mechanical changes occur that lead to unwanted soil compaction. Of the influential parameters for the creation of soil compaction is the soil stresses formed owing to the wheeled vehicle trafficking. While the increase of tractive efficiency is desired, minimization of soil stresses should also be considered with the same importance to make a trade-off between the aforementioned parameters. There are numerous studies documented in the literature that deal with the measurement of soil stress/strain data due to the wheeled vehicle trafficking and also those works that address the correlation between the soil stress and soil compaction. It is recognized that in order to reduce soil compaction both at topsoil and subsoil levels, the soil stress at the soil-tire interface should be reduced. There are various parameters that affect the tractive efficiency and the soil stress creation such as wheel load, slip, tire inflation pressure, velocity, etc. On the other hand, the wheel is subjected to the torques and forces exerted to the vehicle and the vehicle dynamics are significantly affected by the soil-wheel interactions. Survey of the literature shows that numerous studies have focused on the evaluation of tractive efficiency both in field test and controlled conditions in laboratories with the intention of increasing tractive efficiency. The studies dedicated to the soil mechanical strength are more engaged with the approaches to minimize the soil stress propagation. The present study considers both factors and considers the most influential tire parameters such as wheel, velocity and slip to assess the

  11. The role of uncertainty in bedrock depth and hydraulic properties on the stability of a variably-saturated slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, Guilherme J.C.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Vargas, Eurípedes A.; Camargo, Julia T.; Velloso, Raquel Q.; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    We investigate the uncertainty in bedrock depth and soil hydraulic parameters on the stability of a variably-saturated slope in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We couple Monte Carlo simulation of a three-dimensional flow model with numerical limit analysis to calculate confidence intervals of the safety

  12. A sensitivity analysis of hazardous waste disposal site climatic and soil design parameters using HELP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, D.D. [Water Resources Engineer, Lincoln, NE (United States); Stansbury, J. [Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, And Liability Act (CERCLA), and subsequent amendments have formed a comprehensive framework to deal with hazardous wastes on the national level. Key to this waste management is guidance on design (e.g., cover and bottom leachate control systems) of hazardous waste landfills. The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of leachate volume at hazardous waste disposal sites to climatic, soil cover, and vegetative cover (Leaf Area Index) conditions. The computer model HELP3 which has the capability to simulate double bottom liner systems as called for in hazardous waste disposal sites was used in the analysis. HELP3 was used to model 54 combinations of climatic conditions, disposal site soil surface curve numbers, and leaf area index values to investigate how sensitive disposal site leachate volume was to these three variables. Results showed that leachate volume from the bottom double liner system was not sensitive to these parameters. However, the cover liner system leachate volume was quite sensitive to climatic conditions and less sensitive to Leaf Area Index and curve number values. Since humid locations had considerably more cover liner system leachate volume than and locations, different design standards may be appropriate for humid conditions than for and conditions.

  13. Towards a hydrologically motivated soil texture classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Helge

    2010-05-01

    Soil texture classification is not designed for hydrological purposes, e.g. for hydrological modelling. Hydrological model applications based on classified soil textures have revealed that different soil texture classes within the same classification system induce different uncertainties with respect to simulated water balances. As a consequence, there is a need to think about required similarity in texture classifications. In different regions of the world, different soil texture classification systems have been developed. These different classification systems divide the soil texture triangle in different numbers of differently shaped soil texture classes. These texture classifications are based on pedological background and practical reasons with respect to soil mapping and analyses. In comparison, a possible soil texture classification motivated by soil hydrology should be based on similarity in hydrological fluxes or in the soil water regime. Therefore, this presentation proposes a procedure how to evaluate the appropriateness of currently used texture classifications and how to derive a new soil texture classification based on a similar behaviour of soils with respect to hydrological processes. Long-term hydrological modelling of water balance terms using the 1-D SVAT scheme SIMULAT serve as the basis of a similarity analysis of 5050 possible realisations of the soil texture triangle (1% grid). Cluster analysis is used for analysing similar hydrological behaviour of theoretical soil columns. Spatial patterns of similar realisations (=clusters) in the soil texture triangle based on annual water balance terms are compared to those based on soil hydraulic parameters and current soil texture classes. The results show that clusters based on soil hydraulic parameterisation are relatively similar to current soil texture classification schemes while hydrological model simulations suggest differing spatial patterns of similar behaviour over the soil texture triangle

  14. Uptake and Hydraulic Redistribution of Soil Water in a Natural Forested Wetland and in two Contrasting Drained Loblolly Pine Plantations: Quantifying Patterns over Soil-to-Root and Canopy-to-Atmosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domec, J.; King, J. S.; Noormets, A.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; Gavazzi, M. G.; Treasure, E.; Boggs, J. L.

    2009-05-01

    The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on water and carbon balances are not well studied. Quantification of evapotranspiration (ET), tree transpiration and their biophysical regulation are needed for assessing forest water management options. We characterized vertical variation in the diurnal and seasonal soil volumetric water content at 10 cm intervals to evaluate changes in water availability for root uptake and monitored eddy covariance ET and tree transpiration (sap flux) in three contrasting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands. Those stands included a 50- yr-old wetland natural regeneration (NG), a 17-yr-old drained mid-rotation plantation (MP) and a 5-yr-old drained plantation (YP) in eastern North Carolina. We also quantified the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution (HR), the passive movement of soil water from deep to shallow roots, to identify factors affecting the seasonal dynamics of root water uptake, root and plant water potentials and stomatal conductance. In NG, soil water content was always at full saturation and total tree water use peaked between 6-7 mm/day, and this stand was used as reference. In MP, soil water content varied with soil depth and total water use from the upper 1m peaked between 4 and 6.5 mm/day during the growing season and was strongly correlated and similar to ET (ET represented 90-95% of total water depletion). In YP, soil water used was limited to the upper 30 cm and was strongly affected by summer drought by declining progressively from 0.9 mm/day in spring to 0.4 m/day in September. After periods of more than 10 days without rain, water extraction in MP shifted to the deeper layers, and recharge from HR approached 20% of ET. During days of high evaporative demand, water use in MP was comparable to NG thanks to HR and to the contribution of deeper roots to water uptake. In YP, HR never contributed for more than 8% of ET. There was no HR

  15. Spatial effects of aboveground biomass on soil ecological parameters and trace gas fluxes in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation in this area consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. Canopy structure is known to affect microclimate, throughfall and evapotranspiration and thereby controls soil moisture conditions. Consequently, the canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their spatial variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. Distances were calculated in relation to the crown radius. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass carbon C and N, soil respiration as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Each tree was characterized by crown spread, leaf area index and basal area. Preliminary results show that C and N stocks decreased about 50% with depth independently of distance to the tree. Soil water content under the tree crown increased with depth while it decreased under grass cover. Microbial

  16. Specific microbial gene abundances and soil parameters contribute to C, N, and greenhouse gas process rates after land use change in Southern Amazonian Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Renato Lammel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecological processes regulating soil carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycles are still poorly understood, especially in the world’s largest agricultural frontier in Southern Amazonia. We analyzed soil parameters in samples from pristine rainforest and after land use change to pasture and crop fields, and correlated them with abundance of functional and phylogenetic marker genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, norB, nosZ, nifH, mcrA, pmoA, and 16S/18S rRNA. Additionally, we integrated these parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions. Following forest removal, concentrations of soil C and N declined, and pH and nutrient levels increased, which influenced microbial abundances and biogeochemical processes. A seasonal trend was observed, suggesting that abundances of microbial groups were restored to near native levels after the dry winter fallow. Integration of the marker gene abundances with soil parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions provided good predictions of biogeochemical processes, such as the fluxes of NO3, N2O, CO2, and CH4. In the wet season, agricultural soil showed the highest abundance of nitrifiers (amoA and Archaea, however forest soils showed the highest abundances of denitrifiers (nirK, nosZ and high N, which correlated with increased N2O emissions. Methanogens (mcrA and methanotrophs (pmoA were more abundant in forest soil, but methane flux was highest in pasture sites, which was related to soil compaction. Rather than analyzing direct correlations, the data integration using multivariate tools provided a better overview of biogeochemical processes. Overall, in the wet season, land use change from forest to agriculture reduced the abundance of different functional microbial groups related to the soil C and N cycles; integrating the gene abundance data and soil parameters provided a comprehensive overview of these interactions. Path analysis and multiple regressions addressed the need for more comprehensive approaches

  17. Computer forecasting of the soil water infiltration parameters in seasonal freezing and thawing periods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fan, Guisheng; Han, Yonghong; Ma, Danni

    2013-01-01

    ..., most research on soil moisture infiltration during freezing and thawing periods have been focused on the water loss and soil erosion caused by snow melting  [1–3] , the soil swelling from soil frozen-in and the change of moisture and salinity  [4] , the influence factors and mechanism of moisture infiltration into freezing and thawing soils  [5–9] and...

  18. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  19. Pengaruh Hydraulic Retention TIME (Hrt) Dan Konsentrasi Influen Terhadap Penyisihan Parameter Bod Dan Cod Pada Pengolahan Limbah Domestik Greywater Artificial Menggunakan Reaktor Uasb

    OpenAIRE

    Rekoyoso, Bonis; Syafrudin, Syafrudin; Sudarno, Sudarno

    2014-01-01

    In urban areas domestic wastewater pollution reaches 60 % and about 75 % of the total volume of domestic wastewater is greywater . As an alternative wastewater treatment, UASB ( Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket ) is an effective waste processing because it has many advantages . Several factors affect the performance of UASB reactors is Hydraulic Retention Time ( HRT ) and influent concentration. In the COD removal and BOD , reactors with HRT 4 hours having the smallest removal efficiency , i.e...

  20. Influence of Different soil Management Effects on Chemical Parameters and Soil Enzyme Activities in a Long-Time Viticultural Trial. Part I: The Lanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Schaller

    2016-11-01

    Biological activity was determined with enzyme assays. Glucosidases are significantly higher in grassed plots and extensive tilling; same is true for phosphatases. Urease is also highest in grassed plots and extensive tilling. A strong and significant stratification with soil depth could be demonstrated for all analyzed parameters.

  1. Influence of soil parameters on the skewness coefficient of the annual maximum flood peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, A.; Iacobellis, V.; Manfreda, S.; Fiorentino, M.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of key parameters of flood probability distributions represents a strategy to provide insights on hydrologic similarity and building probabilistic models able to reduce the uncertainty in flood prediction in ungauged basins. In this work, we exploited the theoretically derived distribution of floods TCIF (Gioia et al., 2008), based on two different threshold mechanisms associated respectively to ordinary and extraordinary events. The model is based on the hypotheses that ordinary floods are generally due to rainfall events exceeding a threshold infiltration rate in a small source area, while the so-called outlier events, responsible of the high skewness of flood distributions, are triggered when severe rainfalls exceed a storage threshold over a large portion of the basin. Within this scheme, a sensitivity analysis was performed in order to analyze the effects of climatic and geomorphologic parameters on the skewness coefficient. In particular, the analysis was conducted investigating the influence on flood distribution of physical factors such as rainfall intensity, soil infiltration capacity, and basin area, in order to provide insights in catchment classification and process conceptualization.

  2. Assessment of the impact of pesticide residues on microbiological and biochemical parameters of tea garden soils in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnu, A; Saha, T; Mazumdar, D; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A

    2008-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess the impact of pesticidal residues on soil microbial and biochemical parameters of the tea garden soils. The microbial biomass carbon (MBC), basal (BSR) and substrate induced respirations (SIR), beta-glucosidase activity and fluorescein diacetate hydrolyzing activity (FDHA) of six tea garden soils, along with two adjacent forest soils (control) in West Bengal, India were measured. The biomass and its activities and biochemical parameters were generally lower in the tea garden soils than the control soils. The MBC of the soils ranged from 295.5 to 767.5 micro g g(- 1). The BSR and SIR ranged from 1.65 to 3.08 mu g CO2-C g(- 1) soil h(- 1) and 3.08 to 10.76 micro g CO2-C g(- 1)h(- 1) respectively. The beta-glucosidase and FDHA of the soils varied from 33.3 and 76.3 micro g para-nitrophenol g(- 1) soil h(- 1) and 60.5 to 173.5 micro g fluorescein g(- 1)h(- 1)respectively. The tea garden soils contained variable residues of organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides, which negatively affected the MBC, BSR, SIR, FDHA and beta -glucosidase activity. Ethion and chlorpyriphos pesticide residues in all the tea garden soils varied from 5.00 to 527.8 ppb and 17.6 to 478.1 ppb respectively. The alpha endosulfan, beta endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate pesticide residues in the tea garden soils ranged from 7.40 to 81.40 ppb, 8.50 to 256.1 ppb and 55 to 95.9 ppb respectively. Canonical correlation analysis shows that 93% of the total variation was associated with the negative impact of chlorpyriphos, beta and alpha endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate on MBC, BSR and FDHA. At the same time ethion had negative impact on SIR and beta-glucosidase. Data demonstrated that the pesticide residues had a strong impact on the microbial and biochemical components of soil quality.

  3. Quantifying the ability of environmental parameters to predict soil texture fractions using regression-tree model with GIS and LIDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2012-01-01

    Soil texture is an important soil characteristic that drives crop production and field management, and is the basis for environmental monitoring (including soil quality and sustainability, hydrological and ecological processes, and climate change simulations). The combination of coarse sand, fine...... sand, silt, and clay in soil determines its textural classification. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and regression-tree modeling to precisely quantify the relationships between the soil texture fractions and different environmental parameters on a national scale, and to detect...

  4. The influence of bioavailable heavy metals and microbial parameters of soil on the metal accumulation in rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling; Guan, Dongsheng; Peart, M R; Chen, Yujuan; Li, Qiqi; Dai, Jun

    2017-10-01

    A field-based study was undertaken to analyze the effects of soil bioavailable heavy metals determined by a sequential extraction procedure, and soil microbial parameters on the heavy metal accumulation in rice grain. The results showed that Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations in rice grain decreases by 65.9%, 78.9%, 32.6%, 80.5%, 61.0% and 15.7%, respectively in the sites 3 (far-away), compared with those in sites 1 (close-to). Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that soil catalase activity, the MBC/MBN ratio, along with bioavailable Cd, Cr and Ni could explain 68.9% of the total eigenvalue, indicating that these parameters have a great impact on the heavy metal accumulation in rice grain. The soil bioavailable heavy metals have a dominant impact on their accumulation in rice grain, with a variance contribution of 60.1%, while the MBC/MBN has a regulatory effect, with a variance contribution of 4.1%. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the MBC/MBN, urease and catalase activities are the key microbial parameters that affect the heavy metal accumulation in rice by influencing the soil bioavailable heavy metals or the translocation of heavy metals in rice. RDA showed an interactive effect between Cu, Pb and Zn in rice grain and the soil bioavailable Cd, Cr and Ni. The heavy metals in rice grain, with the exception of Pb, could be predicted by their respective soil bioavailable heavy metals. The results suggested that Pb accumulation in rice grain was mainly influenced by the multi-metal interactive effects, and less affected by soil bioavailable Pb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  6. Kinetic parameters and nitrate, nitrite changes in bioremediation of Toxic Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadani, Mohsen; Karami, Mohammad Amin; Teimouri, Fahimeh; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi, Seyed Mahdi; Dehdashti, Bahare

    2017-10-01

    Cleanup of areas contaminated by explosives is a public health concern. Some explosives can be carcinogenic in humans. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), a powerful explosive with very low water solubility, can be easily transported to ground waters. This study was conducted to determine the removal efficiencies of PETN from soil by bioremediation, and obtain kinetic parameters of biological process. This experimental study was conducted at the Environmental Health Engineering Lab (Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran) in 2015-2016. In the present work, bioremediation of the explosive-polluted soils by PETN in anaerobic-aerobic landfarming method was performed. The influence of seeding and biosurfactant addition on bioremediation was also evaluated. The data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel software. The results show that, as the initial concentration of PETN increased, the lag phase was increased and the specific growth rate was increased up to 0.1/day in concentration of 50 mg/kg, and then it was decreased to 0.04/day. Subsequent decreases in specific growth rate can cause substrate inhibition. Seeding causes decrease in lag phase significantly. Biosurfactant addition had little to no impact on the length of lag phase, but biosurfactant plus seeding can increase the growth rate to 0.2/day, however, inhibitory effect of the initial concentration was started in very high concentration of PETN (150 mg/kg). Biosurfactant addition and seeding together have an impressive effect on biodegradation of PETN, furthermore seeding can enhance active microbial consortium and biosurfactant can improve the poor aqueous solubility of PETN, therefore making the substrate more accessible.

  7. Simultaneous estimation of land surface scheme states and parameters using the ensemble Kalman filter: identical twin experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF in soil moisture assimilation applications is investigated in the context of simultaneous state-parameter estimation in the presence of uncertainties from model parameters, soil moisture initial condition and atmospheric forcing. A physically based land surface model is used for this purpose. Using a series of identical twin experiments in two kinds of initial parameter distribution (IPD scenarios, the narrow IPD (NIPD scenario and the wide IPD (WIPD scenario, model-generated near surface soil moisture observations are assimilated to estimate soil moisture state and three hydraulic parameters (the saturated hydraulic conductivity, the saturated soil moisture suction and a soil texture empirical parameter in the model. The estimation of single imperfect parameter is successful with the ensemble mean value of all three estimated parameters converging to their true values respectively in both NIPD and WIPD scenarios. Increasing the number of imperfect parameters leads to a decline in the estimation performance. A wide initial distribution of estimated parameters can produce improved simultaneous multi-parameter estimation performances compared to that of the NIPD scenario. However, when the number of estimated parameters increased to three, not all parameters were estimated successfully for both NIPD and WIPD scenarios. By introducing constraints between estimated hydraulic parameters, the performance of the constrained three-parameter estimation was successful, even if temporally sparse observations were available for assimilation. The constrained estimation method can reduce RMSE much more in soil moisture forecasting compared to the non-constrained estimation method and traditional non-parameter-estimation assimilation method. The benefit of this method in estimating all imperfect parameters simultaneously can be fully demonstrated when the corresponding non-constrained estimation method

  8. Effects of charcoal-enriched goat manure on soil fertility parameters and growth of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. in a sandy soil from northern Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Willich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of charcoal feeding on manure quality and its subsequent application to enhance soil productivity has received little attention. The objectives of the present study therefore were to investigate the effects of (i charcoal feeding on manure composition, and (ii charcoal-enriched manure application on soil fertility parameters and growth of millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.. To this end, two experiments were conducted: First, a goat feeding trial where goats were fed increasing levels of activated charcoal (AC; 0, 3, 5, 7, and 9% of total ration; second, a greenhouse pot experiment using the manure from the feeding trial as an amendment for a sandy soil from northern Oman. We measured manure C, N, P, and K concentrations, soil fertility parameters and microbial biomass indices, as well as plant yield and nutrient concentrations. Manure C concentration increased significantly (P<0.001 from 45.2% (0% AC to 60.2% (9% AC with increasing dietary AC, whereas manure N, P, and K concentrations decreased (P<0.001 from 0% AC (N: 2.5%, P: 1.5%, K: 0.8% to 9% AC (N: 1.7%, P: 0.8%, K: 0.4%. Soil organic carbon, pH, and microbial biomass N showed a response to AC-enriched manure. Yield of millet decreased slightly with AC enrichment, whereas K uptake was improved with increasing AC. We conclude that AC effects on manure quality and soil productivity depend on dosage of manure and AC, properties of AC, trial duration, and soil type.

  9. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L. and Various Soil Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kjellenberg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition.

  10. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Various Soil Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Granstedt, Artur; Olsson, Marie E

    2016-08-31

    This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate) in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH) in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition.

  11. Effects of cover crops on soil quality: Selected chemical and biological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops may improve soil physical, chemical, and biological properties and thus help improve land productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate short-term changes (6, 9, and 12 weeks) in soil chemical and biological properties as influenced by cover crops for two different soils and...

  12. Effects of organic versus conventional management on chemical and biological parameters in agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Vos, de O.J.; Korthals, G.W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study of organic and conventional arable farming systems was conducted in The Netherlands to determine the effect of management practices on chemical and biological soil properties and soil health. Soils from thirteen accredited organic farms and conventionally managed neighboring

  13. Comparative Mapping of Soil Physical-Chemical and Structural Parameters at Field Scale to Identify Zones of Enhanced Leaching Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow and particle-facilitated transport through macropores contributes significantly to the transport of strongly sorbing substances such as pesticides and phosphorus. The aim of this study was to perform a field-scale characterization of basic soil physical properties like clay...... and organic carbon content and investigate whether it was possible to relate these to derived structural parameters such as bulk density and conservative tracer parameters and to actual particle and phosphorus leaching patterns obtained from laboratory leaching experiments. Sixty-five cylindrical soil columns...... of 20 cm height and 20 cm diameter and bulk soil were sampled from the topsoil in a 15 m  15 m grid in an agricultural loamy field. Highest clay contents and highest bulk densities were found in the northern part of the field. Leaching experiments with a conservative tracer showed fast 5% tracer...

  14. The parameter dependence of the coefficient in a model for constant-pressure steam injection in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilding, B.H.; Li, S.

    1997-01-01

    In a recently proposed model for the injection of steam into an air-filled soil, an equation which defines an unknown coefficient in terms of the parameters in the model arises. The paper examines this equation. It is shown that the coefficient is well-defined. Furthermore, quantitative and

  15. Impact of watering with UV-LED-treated wastewater on microbial and physico-chemical parameters of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevremont, A-C; Boudenne, J-L; Coulomb, B; Farnet, A-M

    2013-04-15

    Advanced oxidation processes based on UV radiations have been shown to be a promising wastewater disinfection technology. The UV-LED system involves innovative materials and could be an advantageous alternative to mercury-vapor lamps. The use of the UV-LED system results in good water quality meeting the legislative requirements relating to wastewater reuse for irrigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of watering with UV-LED treated wastewaters (UV-LED WW) on soil parameters. Solid-state ¹³C NMR shows that watering with UV-LED WW do not change the chemical composition of soil organic matter compared to soil watered with potable water. Regarding microbiological parameters, laccase, cellulase, protease and urease activities increase in soils watered with UV-LED WW which means that organic matter brought by the effluent is actively degraded by soil microorganisms. The functional diversity of soil microorganisms is not affected by watering with UV-LED WW when it is altered by 4 and 8 months of watering with wastewater (WW). After 12 months, functional diversity is similar regardless of the water used for watering. The persistence of faecal indicator bacteria (coliform and enterococci) was also determined and watering with UV-LED WW does not increase their number nor their diversity unlike soils irrigated with activated sludge wastewater. The study of watering-soil microcosms with UV-LED WW indicates that this system seems to be a promising alternative to the UV-lamp-treated wastewaters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Sorghum Residues and Farmyard Manure Applications on Soil Erodibility Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Turgut

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil structural properties and resistance to erosion might be increased by adding organic residues into soils. Farmyard manure and legume crops are among the most important organic residues. The main purpose of this experimental work was to investigate the effects of some organic residues, such as, manure and sorghum residues on the structural stability and erodibility of some surface soils. In this laboratory research, three soil samples with different textures were treated with two various kinds of organic residues at different rates. At the end of 13 week of incubation period, structural stability and erodibility of controls and mixtures were determined by means of structural stability index, dispersion ratio, erosion ratio, permeability ratio, aggregate stability and soil erodibility factor (K. As a result, the organic residues applied into the soils improved the structural stability and to some extent decreased the erodibility of soils studied. Keywords: Organic matter, erosion, erodibility factor, aggregate stability, dispersion ratio.

  17. Comparison of empirical models and laboratory saturated hydraulic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerous methods for estimating soil saturated hydraulic conductivity exist, which range from direct measurement in the laboratory to models that use only basic soil properties. A study was conducted to compare laboratory saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) measurement and that estimated from empirical models.

  18. Hydraulic fracturing of rock-fill dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie WANG

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The condition in which hydraulic fracturing in core of earth-rock fill dam maybe induced, the mechanism by which the reason of hydraulic fracturing canbe explained, and the failure criterion by which the occurrence of hydraulicfracturing can be determined, were investigated. The condition dependson material properties such as, cracks in the core and low permeability ofcore soil, and “water wedging” action in cracks. An unsaturated core soiland fast impounding are the prerequisites for the formation of “waterwedging” action. The mechanism of hydraulic fracturing can be explainedby fracture mechanics. The crack propagation induced by water pressuremay follow any of mode I, mode II and mixed mode I-II. Based on testingresults of a core soil, a new criterion for hydraulic fracturing was suggested,from which mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in the core of rock-fill damwere discussed. The results indicated that factors such as angle betweencrack surface and direction of principal stress, local stress state at thecrack, and fracture toughness KIC of core soil may largely affect theinduction of hydraulic fracturing and the mode of the propagation of thecrack.The condition in which hydraulic fracturing in core of earth-rock fill dam maybe induced, the mechanism by which the reason of hydraulic fracturing canbe explained, and the failure criterion by which the occurrence of hydraulicfracturing can be determined, were investigated. The condition dependson material properties such as, cracks in the core and low permeability ofcore soil, and “water wedging” action in cracks. An unsaturated core soiland fast impounding are the prerequisites for the formation of “waterwedging” action. The mechanism of hydraulic fracturing can be explainedby fracture mechanics. The crack propagation induced by water pressuremay follow any of mode I, mode II and mixed mode I-II. Based on testingresults of a core soil, a new criterion for hydraulic fracturing

  19. The influence of soil organic carbon on interactions between microbial parameters and metal concentrations at a long-term contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhlbachova, G. [Crop Research Institute, Drnovska 507, 161 06 Prague 6, Ruzyne (Czech Republic); Sagova-Mareckova, M., E-mail: sagova@vurv.cz [Crop Research Institute, Drnovska 507, 161 06 Prague 6, Ruzyne (Czech Republic); Omelka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Dept. of Probability and Mathematical Statistics, Prague 8, Karlin (Czech Republic); Szakova, J.; Tlustos, P. [Czech University of Life Sciences, Department of Agroenvironmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Prague 6, Suchdol (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and copper deposits on soil microbial parameters were investigated at a site exposed to contamination for over 200 years. Soil samples were collected in triplicates at 121 sites differing in contamination and soil organic carbon (SOC). Microbial biomass, respiration, dehydrogenase activity and metabolic quotient were determined and correlated with total and extractable metal concentrations in soil. The goal was to analyze complex interactions between toxic metals and microbial parameters by assessing the effect of soil organic carbon in the relationships. The effect of SOC was significant in all interactions and changed the correlations between microbial parameters and metal fractions from negative to positive. In some cases, the effect of SOC was combined with that of clay and soil pH. In the final analysis, dehydrogenase activity was negatively correlated to total metal concentrations and acetic acid extractable metals, respiration and metabolic quotient were to ammonium nitrate extractable metals. Dehydrogenase activity was the most sensitive microbial parameter correlating most frequently with contamination. Total and extractable zinc was most often correlated with microbial parameters. The large data set enabled robust explanation of discrepancies in organic matter functioning occurring frequently in analyzing of contaminated soil processes. - Highlights: • Soil organic carbon affected all interactions between metals and microorganisms. • Soil organic carbon adjustment changed correlations from positive to negative. • Ammonium nitrate extractable metals were the most influencing fraction. • Dehydrogenase activity was the most affected soil parameter. • Zinc was the most toxic metal among studied metals.

  20. Microbial volatile fongerprints : potential use for soil / water diagnostics and correlation with traditional microbial parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    This project used an electronic nose (E-nose) system composed of an array of 14 non- specific conducting polymer sensors for soil and water diagnostics, based on qualitative microbial volatile production patterns. It tested the feasibility of using soil microbial volatile fingerprints for detecting and monitoring changes in microbial activity in three soils, as a response to key environmental factors such as temperature (16, 25, 37°C), water potential (-0.7, -2.8 MPa), and nutr...

  1. Space agriculture in micro- and hypo-gravity: A comparative study of soil hydraulics and biogeochemistry in a cropping unit on Earth, Mars, the Moon and the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Pallud, Céline

    2010-12-01

    Increasing interest is developing towards soil-based agriculture as a long-term bioregenerative life support during space and planetary explorations. Contrary to hydroponics and aeroponics, soil-based cropping would offer an effective approach to sustain food and oxygen production, decompose organic wastes, sequester carbon dioxide, and filter water. However, the hydraulics and biogeochemical functioning of soil systems exposed to gravities lower than the Earth's are still unknown. Since gravity is crucial in driving water flow, hypogravity will affect nutrient and oxygen transport in the liquid and gaseous phases, and could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, and emissions of toxic gases. A highly mechanistic model coupling soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry previously tested on soils on Earth ( g=9.806 m s -2) is used to highlight the effects of gravity on the functioning of cropping units on Mars (0.38 g), the Moon (0.16 g), and in the international space station (ISS, nearly 0 g). For each scenario, we have compared the net leaching of water, the leaching of NH 3, NH 4+, NO 2- and NO 3- solutes, the emissions of NH 3, CO 2, N 2O, NO and N 2 gases, the concentrations profiles of O 2, CO 2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil, the pH, and the dynamics of various microbial functional groups within the root zone against the same control variables in the soil under terrestrial gravity. The response of the soil ecodynamics was relatively linear; gravitational accelerations lower than the Earth's resulted in 90-100% lower water leaching rates, 95-100% lower nutrient leaching rates, and lower emissions of NH 3 and NO gases (80-95% and 30-40%, respectively). Lower N loss through leaching resulted in 60-100% higher concentration of the microbial biomass, but did not alter the vertical stratification of the microbial functional groups with respect to the stratification on Earth. However, the higher biomass concentration produced higher

  2. Relating Bioavailability Parameters to the Sorbent Characteristics of PAH Polluted Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartolome, N.; Hilber, I.; Schulin, R.

    2015-01-01

    to several sorbent characteristics including organic and black carbon content. The results will provide a better understanding of bioavailability of PAHs in soils. Moreover, the outcomes will be discussed regarding to the potential application of chemical proxies in soil pollution risk assessment......Regulation of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants (HOC) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil is still based on total concentrations. However, many studies have demonstrated that not all of a pollutant’s content in soil is equally available to organisms (Reichenberg & Mayer 2006...

  3. Modeling of Hydrophysical Properties of the Soil as Capillary-Porous Media and Improvement of Mualem-Van Genuchten Method as a Part of Foundation Arrangement Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Terleev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the concepts about the capillarity and the lognormal distribution of effective pore radii, a theoretical justification for function of differential water capacity and its antiderivative (function of water-retention capacity in form of a dependence of the soil volumetric water content on capillary pressure of the soil moisture is presented. Using these functions, the ratio of soil hydraulic conductivity function to the filter coefficient is calculated. Approximations to functions describing the water-retention capacity and relative hydraulic conductivity of the soil have been suggested. Parameters of these functions have been interpreted and estimated with applying the physical and statistical indices of the soil.

  4. Dynamics of the agrochemical fertility parameters of arable soils in the southwestern region of Central Chernozemic zone of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Data of the agrochemical survey of arable soils in Belgorod oblast during the period from 1964 to 2014 have been analyzed. The soil cover mainly consists of typical chernozems (Haplic Chernozems) and leached chernozems (Luvic Chernozems) in the forest-steppe zone and ordinary chernozems (Calcic Chernozems) in the steppe zone. Under long-term agricultural use (from 1964 to 2014), the content of mobile phosphorus in arable soils of the region under study has increased from 55 to 137 mg/kg, and the content of mobile potassium has increased from 105 to 147 mg/kg. During the period of 1976-2014, the share of acid soils has increased from 22.8 to 45.8%, including medium-acid soils from 1.5 to 12.6%. No significant changes in the weighted average content of soil organic matter are revealed for the period from 1985 to 2014. The value of this parameter is within the range of 4.8-5.0%. In the 2010-2014, 95.0% of arable soils belonged to the category of low supplied with mobile sulfur; 99.2, 96.9, 94.1, and 54.4% of soils were poorly supplied with zinc, copper, cobalt, and manganese, respectively. During the same period, the maximum average productivity of the crop area (3710 f. u./ha) was noted at the application of 4.8 t/ha organic fertilizers and 97.9 kg/ha organic fertilizers on the average. The maximum long-term yields of sugar beet (36.8 t/ha) and corn grain (4.97 t/ha) were obtained at the application of relatively low fertilizer rates.

  5. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Ahrens, B.; Schoning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.; Reichstein, M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute an important factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing

  6. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Schöning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2012-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute a significant factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing

  7. Hydraulic characteristics of sedimentary deposits at the J-PARC proton-accelerator, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marui Atsunao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic characteristics of sediments were investigated at J-PARC for the purpose of site characterization in relation with the construction of Japan's largest proton-accelerator. A total of 340 samples extracted from 9 exploratory wells were examined by standard laboratory tests and complemented with statistical analyses to quantitatively determine the main terrain attributes. Two main hydro-geological units were recognized, although a number of embedded layers defined a
    multilevel aquifer. Grain-size distribution derived from sieve analysis and the coefficient of uniformity showed that soils are poorly sorted. On the other hand, hydraulic conductivity was measured by a
    number of parameters such as a log-normal distribution. Conductivity was also predicted by empirical formulas, yielding values up to three orders of magnitude higher. Discrepancies were explained in
    terms of soil anisotropy and intrinsic differences in the calculation methods. Based on the Shepherd's approach, a power relationship between permeability and grain size was found at 2 wells. Hydraulic
    conductivity was also correlated to porosity. However, this  nterdependence was not systematic and therefore, properties at many parts of the profile were considered to be randomly distributed. Finally,
    logs of electrical conductivity suggested that variations of soil hydraulic properties can be associated to changes in water quality. In spite of the remaining uncertainties, results yielded from the study are useful to better understand the numerical modelling of the subsurface system in the site.

  8. Rapid estimation of topsoil hydraulic properties from coupled inversion of TDR data during falling head infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboh, C.; Huisman, J. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and accurate estimation of topsoil hydraulic properties is very important in many environmental and engineering fields of study. On a small scale, one way of estimating these properties is to monitor infiltration of water into the soil with time domain reflectometry (TDR). Traditionally, TDR data collected during infiltration events are initially converted into average water content along the length of the TDR probe using travel time techniques. These water content averages are then used to inversely estimate soil hydraulic properties by calibrating a hydraulic model or an analytical solution of Richard’s equation describing the infiltration event. However, travel time analysis is subjective and difficult to use for interpretation of TDR measurements made during infiltration events. Moreover, all the errors made in converting the TDR data into water content averages directly propagate to the estimated hydraulic properties. In this study, we examine a new approach to estimating topsoil hydraulic properties from TDR data collected during falling head infiltration. Unlike the classical travel-time based approach to interpreting TDR, we interpret TDR measurements based on inverse modeling of TDR waveforms which has the potential to retrieve spatially resolved soil dielectric permittivity profiles. Instead of using TDR-inferred water content averages as in the traditional approach, we directly use the TDR waveforms to estimate soil properties. This was achieved by coupling a forward model of TDR waveform propagation to a hydrological model describing falling head infiltration. By perturbing the hydraulic parameters in the hydrological model, water content profiles are simulated and converted to TDR waveforms using the TDR forward model. This is repeated until a close fit between measured and modeled TDR waveforms is found. Apart from its potential to provide accurate and hydrologically relevant estimates of topsoil hydraulic properties, the coupled approach also

  9. Plant species diversity affects infiltration capacity in an experimental grassland through changes in soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.; Tischer, J.; Roscher, C.; Eisenhauer, N.; Ravenek, J.; Gleixner, G.; Attinger, S.; Jensen, B.; Kroon, de H.; Mommer, L.; Scheu, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Soil hydraulic properties drive water distribution and availability in soil. There exists limited knowledge of how plant species diversity might influence soil hydraulic properties. Methods We quantified the change in infiltration capacity affected by soil structural variables

  10. Synergic hydraulic and nutritional feedback mechanisms control surface patchiness of biological soil crusts on tertiary sands at a post-mining site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a recultivation area located in Brandenburg, Germany, five types of biocrusts (initial BSC1, developed BSC2 and BSC3, mosses, lichens and non-crusted mineral substrate were sampled on tertiary sand deposited in 1985- 1986 to investigate hydrologic interactions between crust patches. Crust biomass was lowest in the non-crusted substrate, increased to the initial BSC1 and peaked in the developed BSC2, BSC3, the lichens and the mosses. Water infiltration was highest on the substrate, and decreased to BSC2, BSC1 and BSC3. Non-metric multidimensional scaling revealed that the lichens and BSC3 were associated with water soluble nutrients and with pyrite weathering products, thus representing a high nutrient low hydraulic feedback mode. The mosses and BSC2 represented a low nutrient high hydraulic feedback mode. These feedback mechanisms were considered as synergic, consisting of run-off generating (low hydraulic and run-on receiving (high hydraulic BSC patches. Three scenarios for BSC succession were proposed. (1 Initial BSCs sealed the surface until they reached a successional stage (represented by BSC1 from which the development into either of the feedback modes was triggered, (2 initial heterogeneities of the mineral substrate controlled the development of the feedback mode, and (3 complex interactions between lichens and mosses occurred at later stages of system development.

  11. EFFECTS OF MINERAL AND ORGANIC-MINERAL PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS ON SOIL FERTILITY PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Henriques

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic sources can replace all or part of the mineral phosphorus used in fertilizer, providing significant changes in soil chemical properties. This research evaluated the effects of mineral and organic-mineral phosphorus on the soil fertility in maize tillage. The experiment was installed in a seedling nursery at Universidade do Oeste Paulista in Presidente Prudente-SP, in a complete randomized blocks design, with 9 treatments (different Biofós doses associated with different superphosphate doses and 4 replicates. As phosphorus fertilizer source was used the organic-mineral Biofós (3.8% P2O5 and simple superphosphate (18% P2O5. At 50 days after emergence of corn plants it was held soil sampling vessels for evaluation of phosphorus, organic matter, calcium, magnesium, base saturation and soil pH. The fertilizer organic-mineral showed the same efficiency of simple superphosphate in soil fertility. The organo-mineral fertilizer showed the same efficiency of superphosphate on soil fertility, both of which promoted the same changes in pH. Higher Biofós doses should have high levels of soil organic matter, which was not observed. Phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and base saturation level did not differ in all fertilizer sources and levels used.

  12. Soil and geomorphological parameters to characterize natural environmental and human induced changes within the Guadarrama Range (Central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas; Inclán-Cuartas, Rosa M.; Santolaria-Canales, Edmundo; Saa, Antonio; Rodríguez-Rastrero, Manuel; Tanarro-Garcia, Luis M.; Luque, Esperanza; Pelayo, Marta; Ubeda, Jose; Tarquis, Ana; Diaz-Puente, Javier; De Marcos, Javier; Rodriguez-Alonso, Javier; Hernandez, Carlos; Palacios, David; Gallardo-Díaz, Juan; Fidel González-Rouco, J.

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean mountain ecosystems are often complex and remarkably diverse and are seen as important sources of biological diversity. They play a key role in the water and sediment cycle for lowland regions as well as preventing and mitigating natural hazards especially those related to drought such as fire risk. However, these ecosystems are fragile and vulnerable to changes due to their particular and extreme climatic and biogeographic conditions. Some of the main pressures on mountain biodiversity are caused by changes in land use practices, infrastructure and urban development, unsustainable tourism, overexploitation of natural resources, fragmentation of habitats, particularly when located close to large population centers, as well as by pressures related toclimate change. The objective of this work is to select soil and geomorphological parameters in order to characterize natural environmental and human induced changes within the newly created National Park of the Sierra de Guadarrama in Central Spain, where the presence of the Madrid metropolitan area is the main factor of impact. This is carried out within the framework of the Guadarrama Monitoring Network (GuMNet) of the Campus de ExcelenciaInternacionalMoncloa, where long-term monitoring of the atmosphere, soil and bedrock are priority. This network has a total of ten stations located to the NW of Madrid and in this case, three stations have been selected to represent different ecosystems that include: 1) an alluvial plain in a lowland pasture area (La Herreria at 920 m a.s.l.), 2) mid mountain pine-