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Sample records for hydraulic residence time

  1. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of two subsurface-flow constructed wetlands using radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F.; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The adoption of constructed wetland systems (CW's) with subsuperficial drainage for sewage treatment is increasingly growing in places with low technological resources and available land. The efficient removal of pollutants depends on the internal flow characteristics in the CW and on its hydraulic residence time (HRT). In the present work {sup 82}Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in two CW's: one in which plants were grown (WP) whereas the other had no plants (WNP). Experimental hydraulic residence time values were found to be very close to the theoretical one, while dispersion numbers obtained for both CW's were quite small. Besides these measured hydrodynamic parameters, the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of the tracer test and the results of modeling of experimental data also demonstrate the tendency of the units to display a plug flow-like effluent hydraulic transport within their systems, as expected from their designs, considering the large length/width ratio (L/W=8). (author)

  2. Hydrolysis evolution in a codigestion reactor at various hydraulic residence times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria González

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the influence of two different hydraulic residence times (HRT's, 5 and 10 days, on the process of hydrolysis-solubilization in a codigestion reactor. Tap water was used to simulate recirculation of a treated leachate. Organic solid waste (OSW from urban solid waste (USW and excess sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant were first characterized and then treated together by anaerobic codigestion. This was done using a 27.2-L total volume pilot scale bioreactor, which was loaded with equal amounts (w/w of OSW and sludge to a total useful volume of 13-L. The bioreactor was filled with tap water to ensure high humidity. In order to assure suitable mixing and good microbial-substrate contact in the reactor, recirculation of treated effluent was maintained by continuous water flow. The influence of HRT on the process performance was determined through physicochemical characterization of the effluent. Results indicate that HRT is a determinant factor in the efficiency of the system. Reducing HRT increases hydrodynamics and solubilization kinetic rate of organic matter in the bioreactor. Stabilization time of solids is reduced from 20 to 10 days when HRT is shortened from 10 to 5 days.

  3. River delta network hydraulic residence time distributions and their role in coastal nutrient biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, M. R.; Castaneda, E.; Twilley, R.; Hodges, B. R.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    River deltas have the potential to mitigate increased nutrient loading to coastal waters by acting as biofilters that reduce the impact of nutrient enrichment on downstream ecosystems. Hydraulic residence time (HRT) is known to be a major control on biogeochemical processes and deltaic floodplains are hypothesized to have relatively long HRTs. Hydrological connectivity and delta floodplain inundation induced by riverine forces, tides, and winds likely alter surface water flow patterns and HRTs. Since deltaic floodplains are important elements of delta networks and receive significant fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients from distributary channels, biogeochemical transformations occurring within these zones could significantly reduce nutrient loading to coastal receiving waters. However, network-scale estimates of HRT in river deltas are lacking and little is known about the effects of tides, wind, and the riverine input on the HRT distribution. Subsequently, there lacks a benchmark for evaluating the impact of engineered river diversions on coastal nutrient ecology. In this study, we estimate the HRT of a coastal river delta by using hydrodynamic modeling supported by field data and relate the HRT to spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate levels measured at discrete stations inside a delta island at Wax Lake Delta. We highlight the control of the degree of hydrological connectivity between distributary channels and interdistributary islands on the network HRT distribution and address the roles of tides and wind on altering the shape of the distribution. We compare the observed nitrate concentrations to patterns of channel-floodplain hydrological connectivity and find this connectivity to play a significant role in the nutrient removal. Our results provide insight into the potential role of deltaic wetlands in reducing the nutrient loading to near-shore waters in response to large-scale river diversions.

  4. Effects of Temperature and Hydraulic Residence Time (HRT) on Treatment of Dilute Wastewater in a Carrier Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA-JUN FENG; LI-FANG HU; DAN SHAN; CHENG-RAN FANG; DONG-SHENG SHEN

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effect of hydraulic residence time (HRT) on the performance and stability,to treat dilute wastewater at different operational temperatures in a carrier anaerobic baffled reactor (CABR),and hence to gain a deeper insight into microbial responses to hydraulic shocks on the base of the relationships among macroscopic performance,catabolic intermediate,and microcosmic alternation.Methods COD,VFAs,and microbial activity were detected with constant feed strength (300 mg/L) at different HRTs (9-18 h) and temperatures (10℃-28℃) in a CABR.Results The removal efficiencies declined with the decreases of HRTs and temperatures.However,the COD removal load was still higher at short HRT than at long HRT.Devastating reactor performance happened at temperature of 10℃ and at HRT of 9 h.HRTs had effect on the VFAs in the reactor slightly both at high and low temperatures,but the reasons differed from each other.Microbial activity was sensitive to indicate changes of environmental and operational parameters in the reactor.Conclusion The CABR offers to certain extent an application to treat dilute wastewater under a hydraulic-shock at temperatures from 10℃ to 28℃.

  5. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  6. Effects of loading rate and hydraulic residence time on anoxic sulfide biooxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Jing; ZHENG Ping; MAHMOOD Qaisar; ISLAM Ejazul; HU Bao-lan; WU Dong-lei

    2007-01-01

    The optimal operation conditions in an anoxic sulfide oxidizing (ASO) bioreactor were investigated. The maximal loading rates (LRs) observed through decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) at fixed substrate concentration are higher than those by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The sulfide oxidation in ASO reactor was partially producing both sulfate and sulfur; but the amount of sulfate produced was approximately one third that of sulfur. The process was able to tolerate high sulfide concentration, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained near 99% when influent concentration was up to 580 mg/L. It tolerated relatively lower nitrate concentration because the removal percentage dropped to 85% when influent concentration was increased above 110 mg/L. The process can tolerate shorter HRT but careful operation is needed. Nitrate conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion since the process performance deteriorated abruptly when HRT was decreased from 3.12 h to 2.88 h. In order to avoid nitrite accumulation in the reactor, the influent sulfide and nitrate concentrations should be kept at 280 mg/L and 67.5 mg/L respectively. Present biotechnology is useful for removing sulfides from sewers and crude oil.

  7. Hydraulic paths and estimation of the real residence time of the water in Lago Maggiore (N. Italy: application of massless markers transported in 3D motion fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Sala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, conducted using the TRIM_LM model, is a continuation of work on the movement of the water mass at different depths in Lago Maggiore, and thus on the estimation of the real residence time of the water in the lake. Three-dimensional CFD numerical simulations were extended to a 4-year period, focusing on the movements of 202 (two hundred and two massless markers inserted at different points in Lago Maggiore and at the mouths of 11 of its tributaries, enabling us to establish more realistic water renewal times for Lago Maggiore. By crossing the data of the horizontal trajectories of the environmental markers with those of their vertical variations, we reconstructed their movements over the four years of the simulation programme. An analysis of the results shows that the water mass in the layers of the upper 100 m has residence times between a minimum of 1 y and a maximum of 4-5 y. The water from the tributaries has residence times between 250 and 1000 days, depending on the distance of the tributaries from the closing section of the lake. The water in the layers below 100 m has residence times that still cannot be quantified with precision, but that can certainly be estimated at a number of years in two figures. These times are strongly conditioned by the depth of the late winter mixing, which in the last 40 y has not exceeded 200 m.

  8. Aired-time and chamotte hydraulic mortars

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    González Cortina, M.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research project has been to obtain aired-li me based hydraulic mortars with the addition of chamotte or burnt clay powder obtained from the ceramic industry waste. By doing this, hydraulic properties have been included into lime and hydraulic mortars with a great improvement in mechanical properties. In order to achieve this, different types of chamotte obtained from clay burnt at different temperatures have been tested, changing, at the same time, the proportions of lime, sand, chamotte and water. All the tests have been performed preparing a double set of test pieces to be kept at room temperature or to be immersed in water, determining the Shore C hardness and the mechanical compressive and tensile strengths. Further on, X-ray diffraction analysis have been developed to determine the qualitative composition of the crystalline structure, as well as micro structural analysis, using stereomicroscope and electric microscope scanning, with X-ray microanalysis have been used. As a conclusion, several types of mortars have been created with different proportions, which can be used, due to its characteristics, as keying mortars in brickwork, for restoration works as well as for new constructions.

    El objetivo de éste trabajo es el conseguir morteros hidráulicos, a partir de la cal aérea, con adición de chamota o polvo de arcilla cocida, obtenida de los residuos-desechos de la industria cerámica. De este modo se pretende infundir propiedades hidráulicas a la cal y obtener morteros hidráulicos, con una mejora sustancial de sus propiedades mecánicas. Para ello, se ha experimentado con diversos tipos de chamotas, obtenidas a partir de arcillas cocidas a diferentes temperaturas, y con diversas granulometrías, y se han realizado morteros con distintas dosificaciones, variando las proporciones de cal, arena, chamota y agua. En todos los casos se ha preparado una doble serie de probetas, para conservarlas al aire o

  9. Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  10. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  11. Residence times of branching diffusion processes

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    Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.

    2016-07-01

    The residence time of a branching Brownian process is the amount of time that the mother particle and all its descendants spend inside a domain. Using the Feynman-Kac formalism, we derive the residence-time equation as well as the equations for its moments for a branching diffusion process with an arbitrary number of descendants. This general approach is illustrated with simple examples in free space and in confined geometries where explicit formulas for the moments are obtained within the long time limit. In particular, we study in detail the influence of the branching mechanism on those moments. The present approach can also be applied to investigate other additive functionals of branching Brownian process.

  12. Residence time and physical processes in lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta SALA

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The residence time of a lake is highly dependent on internal physical processes in the water mass conditioning its hydrodynamics; early attempts to evaluate this physical parameter emphasize the complexity of the problem, which depends on very different natural phenomena with widespread synergies. The aim of this study is to analyse the agents involved in these processes and arrive at a more realistic definition of water residence time which takes account of these agents, and how they influence internal hydrodynamics. With particular reference to temperate lakes, the following characteristics are analysed: 1 the set of the lake's caloric components which, along with summer heating, determine the stabilizing effect of the surface layers, and the consequent thermal stratification, as well as the winter destabilizing effect; 2 the wind force, which transfers part of its momentum to the water mass, generating a complex of movements (turbulence, waves, currents with the production of active kinetic energy; 3 the water flowing into the lake from the tributaries, and flowing out through the outflow, from the standpoint of hydrology and of the kinetic effect generated by the introduction of these water masses into the lake. These factors were studied in the context of the general geographical properties of the lake basin and the watershed (latitude, longitude, morphology, also taking account of the local and regional climatic situation. Also analysed is the impact of ongoing climatic change on the renewal of the lake water, which is currently changing the equilibrium between lake and atmosphere, river and lake, and relationships

  13. Catchment residence and travel time distributions: The master equation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gianluca Botter; Enrico Bertuzzo; Andrea Rinaldo

    2011-01-01

      Travel/residence time pdf's are related objects with different physical meaning A Master Equation for the residence time pdf is derived and solved analytically We develop a mathematical framework...

  14. Hydraulic Travel Time Tomography Appraisal Using Synthetic Data Sets

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    Brauchler, R.; Cheng, J.; Dietrich, P.; Everett, M.; Johnson, B.

    2003-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography is an aquifer characterization method allowing the two and three dimensional spatial identification of hydraulic properties in the subsurface. Such information is essential for rigorous analysis of a variety of engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological problems within the context of water resources management. We propose a tomographic approach providing the inversion of travel times of multiwell slug tests. The inversion is based on the relation between the travel times of a recorded transient pressure curve and the diffusivity of the geological medium. Usually, just one value of a measured hydraulic signal, mostly the peak time, is used as the data for the inversion in order to reconstruct the diffusivity field of the investigated system. This situation is not satisfying because much information is lost. Therefore, we have developed a transformation factor allowing to apply our approach to several travel times characterizing each signal. Thereby, each travel time is inverted separately. The main focus is to appraise the influence of the various travel times on the inversion results. It can be assumed that early travel times are dominated by preferential flow along fast, high permeability paths, while the inversion results based on late travel times reflect an integration of the received signal over many flow paths. Synthetic data sets were created using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data base of the inversion comprises simulated slug tests, in which the position of the sources (injection ports) and the receivers (observation ports) isolated with packers, are varied between the tests. We also investigate the effects of input parameters such as the number of source-receiver positions used, borehole storage and permeability distribution. The hydraulic tomography appraisal shows a strong dependence of the inversion results on the used travel times and input parameters. Results of

  15. Time- versus Competency-Based Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu T; Losee, Joseph E

    2016-08-01

    Graduate medical education is at the brink of a paradigm shift in educating the next generation of physicians. Over 100 years ago, the Flexner report helped usher in the Halstedian residency, based on timed exposure and knowledge assessment as the cornerstones of medical education. The addition of operative case logs and respective board examinations to the current model of surgical education has served to establish practice minimums; however, they do not provide any assessment of actual operative capability or clinical competence. Although these facets have been tempered over time, one could argue that they currently exist only as surrogates for the true goal of all graduate medical education: the development of competent, graduating physicians, capable of independent and ethical practice. There now exists a growing body of evidence that competency-based medical education is this century's Flexnerian revolution. By the objective, subjective, and global assessment of competence, it is thought that we can more effectively and efficiently educate our trainees, provide much needed accountability to our individual patients and to the public as a whole, and establish a lasting model of self-motivated, lifelong learning.

  16. Untangling hyporheic residence time distributions and whole stream metabolisms using a hydrological process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenkirch, Nora; Mutz, Michael; Molkenthin, Frank; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Trauth, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of the water residence time in hyporheic sediments with the sediment metabolic rates is believed to be a key factor controlling whole stream metabolism. However, due to the methodological difficulties, there is little data that investigates this fundamental theory of aquatic ecology. Here, we report on progress made to combine numerical modeling with a series of manipulation to laboratory flumes overcoming methodological difficulties. In these flumes, hydraulic conditions were assessed using non-reactive tracer and heat pulse sensor. Metabolic activity was measured as the consumption and production of oxygen and the turnover of reactive tracers. Residence time and metabolic processes were modeled using a multicomponent reactive transport code called Min3P and calibrated with regard to the hydraulic conditions using the results obtained from the flume experiments. The metabolic activity was implemented in the model via Monod type expressions e.g. for aerobic respiration rates. A number of sediment structures differing in residence time distributions were introduced in both, the model and the flumes, specifically to model the biogeochemical performance and to validate the model results. Furthermore, the DOC supply and surface water flow velocity were altered to test the whole stream metabolic response. Using the results of the hydrological process model, a sensitivity analysis of the impact of residence time distributions on the metabolic activity could yield supporting proof of an existing link between the two.

  17. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  18. Does streambed heterogeneity matter for hyporheic residence time distribution in sand-bedded streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonina, Daniele; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Marzadri, Alessandra; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Stream water residence times within streambed sediments are key values to quantify hyporheic processes including sediment thermal regime, solute transient storage, dilution rates and biogeochemical transformations, such as those controlling degassing nitrous oxide. Heterogeneity of the streambed sediment hydraulic properties has been shown to be potentially an important factor to characterize hyporheic processes. Here, we quantify the importance of streambed heterogeneity on residence times of dune-like bedform induced hyporheic fluxes at the bedform and reach scales. We show that heterogeneity has a net effect of compression of the hyporheic zone (HZ) toward the streambed, changing HZ volume from the homogenous case and thus inducing remarkable differences in the flow field with respect to the homogeneous case. We unravel the physical conditions for which the commonly used homogenous field assumption is applicable for quantifying hyporheic processes thus explaining why predictive measures based on a characteristic residence time, like the Damköhler number, are robust in heterogeneous sand bedded streams.

  19. Effects of shifting time on pressure impact in hydraulic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhen-cai; CHEN Guo-an

    2005-01-01

    The limitations in existing measures for absorbing pressure impact in hydraulic systems were summarized in this paper. Based on the forming principle of the oil in a hydrostatic closed pressure chamber, the underlying reasons of the pressure impact were analyzed theoretically, the intrinsic laws that the extent of the pressure impact in hydraulic oil lines are affected by some factors, such as oil elastic modulus, oil line's geometrical volume, and changing rate of oil volume versus time etc, were discussed. Experimental investigations into pressure impact in all pressure chambers because of shifting were conducted under different working conditions by employing a special experimental system. The effects of shifting time on pressure impact were studied. A new concept with universal meaning, i.e. optimal shifting time, and its characterizing parameter and the methods of shifting at optimal shifting time were also proposed. The results show that shifting time lag △t is of rationality and maneuverablility. The higher the working pressure, the shorter the shifting time.

  20. The imprint of climate and geology on the residence times of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.; Kollet, Stefan J.; Maher, Kate; Haggerty, Roy; Forrester, Mary Michael

    2016-01-01

    Surface and subsurface flow dynamics govern residence time or water age until discharge, which is a key metric of storage and water availability for human use and ecosystem function. Although observations in small catchments have shown a fractal distribution of ages, residence times are difficult to directly quantify or measure in large basins. Here we use a simulation of major watersheds across North America to compute distributions of residence times. This simulation results in peak ages from 1.5 to 10.5 years, in agreement with isotopic observations from bomb-derived radioisotopes, and a wide range of residence times—from 0.1 to 10,000 years. This simulation suggests that peak residence times are controlled by the mean hydraulic conductivity, a function of the prevailing geology. The shape of the residence time distribution is dependent on aridity, which in turn determines water table depth and the frequency of shorter flow paths. These model results underscore the need for additional studies to characterize water ages in larger systems.

  1. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  2. Tracer travel and residence time distributions in highly heterogeneous aquifers: Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2016-12-01

    The driving mechanism of tracer transport in aquifers is groundwater flow which is controlled by the heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. We show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer are coupled in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity field and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity.

  3. Determination and discussion hydraulic retention time in membrane bioreactor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the microorganism kinetic model, the formulafor computing hydraulic retention time in a membrane bioreactorsystem (MBR) is derived. With considering HRT as an evaluationindex a combinational approach was used to discuss factors whichhave an effect on MBR. As a result, the influencing factors werelisted in order from strength to weakness as: maximum specificremoval rate K, saturation constant Ks, maintenance coefficient m,Moreover, the formula was simplified, whose parameters wereexperimentally determined in petrochemical wastewater treatment. The simplified formula is (=1.1((1/(-1)(Ks+S)/KX0, forpetrochemical wastewater treatment K and Ks equaled 0.185 and154.2, respectively.

  4. The residence time of water in the atmosphere revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Ruud J.; Tuinenburg, Obbe A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper revisits the knowledge on the residence time of water in the atmosphere. Based on state-of-the-art data of the hydrological cycle we derive a global average residence time of 8.9 ± 0.4 days (uncertainty given as 1 standard deviation). We use two different atmospheric moisture tracking models (WAM-2layers and 3D-T) to obtain atmospheric residence time characteristics in time and space. The tracking models estimate the global average residence time to be around 8.5 days based on ERA-Interim data. We conclude that the statement of a recent study that the global average residence time of water in the atmosphere is 4-5 days, is not correct. We derive spatial maps of residence time, attributed to evaporation and precipitation, and age of atmospheric water, showing that there are different ways of looking at temporal characteristics of atmospheric water. Longer evaporation residence times often indicate larger distances towards areas of high precipitation. From our analysis we find that the residence time over the ocean is about 2 days less than over land. It can be seen that in winter, the age of atmospheric moisture tends to be much lower than in summer. In the Northern Hemisphere, due to the contrast in ocean-to-land temperature and associated evaporation rates, the age of atmospheric moisture increases following atmospheric moisture flow inland in winter, and decreases in summer. Looking at the probability density functions of atmospheric residence time for precipitation and evaporation, we find long-tailed distributions with the median around 5 days. Overall, our research confirms the 8-10-day traditional estimate for the global mean residence time of atmospheric water, and our research contributes to a more complete view of the characteristics of the turnover of water in the atmosphere in time and space.

  5. Repeated Hospital Transfers and Associated Outcomes by Residency Time Among Nursing Home Residents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-11-01

    Nursing home residents' repeated transfers to hospital are costly and can lead to in-hospital complications and high mortality for frail residents. However, no research has examined the trajectory of residents' symptoms over their nursing home residency and its relationship to hospital transfer. The purpose of this retrospective chart-review study was to examine associations between nursing home residents' characteristics, including length of residency, and repeated hospital transfers as well as the trajectory of transfers during residency. For this retrospective study, we reviewed 583 residents' charts in 6 randomly selected nursing homes from northern Taiwan. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, and 1-way analysis of variance. About half of nursing home residents who had been transferred to hospital (n = 320) were transferred more than twice during their residency (50.97%). Residents who had been transferred 1, 2, 3, or ≥4 times differed significantly in length of residency (F = 3.85, P = .01), physical status (F = 2.65, P = .05), medical history of pneumonia (χ(2) = 13.03, P = .01), and fractures (χ(2) = 8.52, P = .04). Residents with different numbers of transfers differed significantly in their reasons for transfer, that is, falls (χ(2) = 13.01, P = .01) and tube problems (χ(2) = 8.87, P = .03). Among 705 total transfers, fever was the top reason for transfer, and transfer prevalence increased with nursing home residency. To decrease the chance of residents' hospital transfer, nursing home staff should be educated about recognizing and managing fever symptoms, infection-control programs such as influenza vaccination should be initiated, and fall-prevention/education programs should be started when residents first relocate to nursing homes. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-08-21

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Personal time off and residents' career satisfaction, attitudes and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedfeldt, Andrea S; Bower, Elizabeth A; English, Clea; Grady-Weliky, Tana A; Girard, Donald E; Choi, Dongseok

    2010-10-01

    Doctors who are satisfied with their careers have less stress and burnout and are less likely to make medical errors and more likely to provide a higher quality of patient care. In response to reports that residents experienced barriers to taking time off, Oregon Health and Science University designed a survey to evaluate residents' awareness of their programmes' policies for time off, their ability to find time for personal needs, and associations of both with career satisfaction, emotions and training experience. All 675 residents in a large, urban, tertiary care academic medical centre located in the USA were invited to participate in a confidential, web-based, cross-sectional survey in 2008; 66% completed the survey. The survey instrument consisted of a variety of items including yes/no, multiple choice, Likert scale and narrative response types. Only 41% of respondents were aware of their programmes' policies regarding time off. Residents who reported awareness of a policy were more able to find time to take care of personal needs (odds ratio=1.553, p=0.026). These respondents reported more positive experiences and emotions, fewer negative experiences and emotions, higher levels of career satisfaction and relatively less perceived stress than those who were unaware of a time-off policy. In addition, these respondents reported, on average, fewer work and more sleep hours. Our results highlight the importance of ensuring mechanisms for residents to find time to fulfil personal needs in order to enhance resident well-being and career satisfaction. Ensuring resident awareness of time-off policies is one way to do this. Our study demonstrates that ensuring residents are able to find time for personal needs has significant consequences with respect to resident perceptions of well-being and may be an effective strategy to promote career satisfaction and prevent burnout. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  8. Time perspective and place of residence: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OKSANA M. SENYK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on relationship between time perspective and place of residence. Five hundred and eleven Ukrainian participants completed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory [Ukrainian language version by Oksana Senyk (Senyk, 2012] and a questionnaire that included the question about participants’ current place of residence and their place of residence in childhood. Answers to the questionnaire made it possible to consider in the research respondents’ change of residential place and its relation to the formation of different time orientations. The results have shown that the individual’s time perspective is influenced not by the specific life situation represented by his past or current place of residence, but upon his whole life story that includes changing different residential settlements. The research has also indicated that among all types of settlements rural settlements most significantly contribute to the development of time orientation towards a positive past.

  9. Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and parental experienced time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Franciëlla; Poortman, Anne Rigt; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Although the rise in postdivorce joint physical custody has fueled scholarly interest in its impact on children, consequences for parents remain understudied. Because children's residence arrangements determine time and coordination demands associated with child care, this study investigated the rel

  10. Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and parental experienced time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Franciëlla; Poortman, Anne Rigt; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Although the rise in postdivorce joint physical custody has fueled scholarly interest in its impact on children, consequences for parents remain understudied. Because children's residence arrangements determine time and coordination demands associated with child care, this study investigated the

  11. Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and parental experienced time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Franciëlla; Poortman, Anne Rigt; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Although the rise in postdivorce joint physical custody has fueled scholarly interest in its impact on children, consequences for parents remain understudied. Because children's residence arrangements determine time and coordination demands associated with child care, this study investigated the rel

  12. Prediction of residence time distributions in food processing machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Torben; Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet.......The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet....

  13. Prediction of residence time distributions in food processing machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Torben; Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet.......The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet....

  14. Temperature, plant species and residence time effects on nitrogen removal in model treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C R; Stein, O R; Hook, P B; Burr, M D; Parker, A E; Hafla, E C

    2013-01-01

    Total nitrogen (TN) removal in treatment wetlands (TWs) is challenging due to nitrogen cycle complexity and the variation of influent nitrogen species. Plant species, season, temperature and hydraulic loading most likely influence root zone oxygenation and appurtenant nitrogen removal, especially for ammonium-rich wastewater. Nitrogen data were collected from two experiments utilizing batch-loaded (3-, 6-, 9- and 20-day residence times), sub-surface TWs monitored for at least one year during which temperature was varied between 4 and 24 °C. Synthetic wastewater containing 17 mg/l N as NH4 and 27 mg/l amino-N, 450 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 13 mg/l SO4-S was applied to four replicates of Carex utriculata, Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha latifolia and unplanted controls. Plant presence and species had a greater effect on TN removal than temperature or residence time. Planted columns achieved approximately twice the nitrogen removal of unplanted controls (40-95% versus 20-50% removal) regardless of season and temperature. TWs planted with Carex outperformed both Typha and Schoenoplectus and demonstrated less temperature dependency. TN removal with Carex was excellent at all temperatures and residence times; Schoenoplectus and Typha TN removal improved at longer residence times. Reductions in TN were not accompanied by increases in NO3, which was consistently below 1 mg/l N.

  15. Time-dependent water permeation behavior of concrete under constant hydraulic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Yonghao; Wang Zhongli; Zhou Yue

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a concrete permeability testing setup was designed to study the behavior of hydraulic concrete subjected to constant hydraulic pressure. The results show that when concrete is subjected to high enough constant hydraulic pressure, it will be permeated, and after it reaches its maximum permeation rate, the permeability coefficient will gradually decrease towards a stable value. A time-dependent model of permeability coefficient for concrete subjected to hydraulic pressure is proposed. It is indicated that the decrease of the permeability coefficient with permeation time conforms well to the negative-exponential decrease model.

  16. Antiquity versus modern times in hydraulics - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroia, L.; Georgescu, S. C.; Georgescu, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    Water supply and water management in Antiquity represent more than Modern World can imagine about how people in that period used to think about, and exploit the resources they had, aiming at developing and improving their society and own lives. This paper points out examples of how they handled different situations, and how they managed to cope with the growing number of population in the urban areas, by adapting or by improving their water supply systems. The paper tries to emphasize the engineering contribution of Rome and the Roman Empire, mainly in the capital but also in the provinces, as for instance the today territory of France, by analysing some aqueducts from the point of view of modern Hydraulic Engineering. A third order polynomial regression is proposed to compute the water flow rate, based on the flow cross-sectional area measured in quinaria. This paper also emphasizes on contradictory things between what we thought we knew about Ancient Roman civilization, and what could really be proven, either by a modern engineering approach, a documentary approach, or by commonsense, where none of the above could be used. It is certain that the world we live in is the heritage of the Greco-Roman culture and therefore, we are due to acknowledge their contribution, especially taking into account the lack of knowledge of that time, and the poor resources they had.

  17. Effect of hydraulic retention time on anaerobic hydrogenesis in CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kuo-Shuh; Kan, Ni-ru; Lay, Jiuun-jyi

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the production of hydrogen in a continuous system as a function of hydraulic retention time (HRT). The intermediates accumulated and other parameters of pH, oxidation-reduction potential were quantified. The heat treatment (103 degrees C for 24 h) of the compost from a cattle dung composting facility was able to select H2-producing spores; this product was used as a seed for continuous systems. The brewery waste was used as substrate. For the eight runs with combinations of five HRTs and four pHs, the results indicate that at pH=5.5, a maximum H2 production of 47% H2 concentration, 43 ml H2/g COD(added), and 3.1 l H2/l reactor d was achieved at HRT=18 h. Nevertheless, at HRT=18 h, pH 5.5 was also the optimum pH for the maximum H2 production among four pHs evaluated from 5 to 6.5. There was a significant accumulation of volatile acid and alcohols during the entire study.

  18. Spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Capacity of carbon sequestration in forest ecosystem largely depends on the trend of net primary production (NPP) and the length of ecosystem carbon residence time. Retrieving spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time is important and necessary for accurately predicting regional carbon cycles in the future. In this study, a data-model fusion method that combined a process-based regional carbon model (TECO-R) with various ground-based ecosystem observations (NPP, biomass, and soil organic carbon) and auxiliary data sets (NDVI, meteorological data, and maps of vegetation and soil texture) was applied to estimate spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests at steady state. In the data-model fusion, the genetic algorithm was used to estimate the optimal model parameters related with the ecosystem carbon residence time by minimizing total deviation between modeled and observed values. The results indicated that data-model fusion technology could effectively retrieve model parameters and simulate carbon cycling processes for Chinese forest ecosystems. The estimated carbon residence times were highly heterogenous over China, with most of regions having values between 24 and 70 years. The deciduous needleleaf forest and the evergreen needleleaf forest had the highest averaged carbon residence times (73.8 and 71.3 years, respectively), the mixed forest and the deciduous broadleaf forest had moderate values (38.1 and 37.3 years, respectively), and the evergreen broadleaf forest had the lowest value (31.7 years). The averaged carbon residence time of forest ecosystems in China was 57.8 years.

  19. Changes in residents' opportunities for experiential learning over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Adam D; Stelfox, Henry T

    2012-12-01

    Learning in the clinical environment is believed to be a crucial component of residency training. However, it remains unclear whether recent changes to postgraduate medical education, including the implementation of work hour limitations, have significantly impacted opportunities for experiential learning. Therefore, we sought to quantify opportunities to gain clinical experience within medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) over time. Data on the numbers of patients admitted and invasive procedures performed per day between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2010 within three academic medical-surgical ICUs in Calgary, Alberta, Canada were obtained from electronic medical records. These data were matched to resident doctor on-call schedules and residents' opportunities to admit patients and participate in procedures were calculated and compared over time using Spearman's rho. We found that over a 9-year period, the opportunities afforded to residents (n = 1156) to admit patients (n = 17 189) and perform procedures (n = 52 827) during ICU rotations decreased by 32% (p < 0.001) and 34% (p < 0.001), respectively. Our results suggest that there has been a significant decrease in residents' clinical experiences in the ICU over time. Further investigations to better understand these changes and how they may impact on performance as residents become independent practising doctors are warranted. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  20. Protected Resident Research Time Does Not Increase the Quantity or Quality of Residency Program Research Publications: A Comparison of 3 Orthopedic Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Hoffman, Jeffery D; Balazs, George C; Johnson, Anthony E; Potter, Benjamin K; Belmont, Philip J

    The effect of dedicated resident research time in terms of residency program research productivity remains largely unknown. We hypothesize that the quantity and quality of a residency program's peer-reviewed publications (PRPs) increase proportionately with the amount of dedicated research time given to residents. Three residency programs (P1, P2, and P3) were examined. P1 has a mandatory research year for all residents between postgraduate years 3 and 4. P2 has an elective research year for 1 resident between postgraduate years 2 and 3. P3 has no dedicated research time for residents. All publications produced by residents and staff at each program from January 2007 through December were recorded from PUBMED. SCImago Journal Rankings were used as a proxy to measure research quality. There was no significant difference in the number of publications produced between the institutions on a per-staff (p = 0.27) and per-resident (p = 0.80) basis. There were no residents at P3 who graduated without at least 1 PRP, whereas there were 7 residents from P1 and 8 residents from P2 who graduated without a PRP. There were no significant differences between programs in terms of the SCImago Journal Ranking for the journals containing their publications (p = 0.135). Residency programs with dedicated research time did not produce significantly (p > 0.05) more, or higher quality, PRPs than residencies without dedicated research time. It may be that the quantity and quality of PRPs is related more to faculty engagement, research interest, and mentorship at individual programs rather than the number of residents given dedicated time to complete research. Level 3. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Residence time, mineralization processes and groundwater origin within a carbonate coastal aquifer with a thick unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, S.; Huneau, F.; Garel, E.; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.; Jaunat, J.; Celle-Jeanton, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at establishing groundwater residence times, identifying mineralization processes and determining groundwater origins within a carbonate coastal aquifer with thick unsaturated zone and lying on a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach (major ions, SiO2, Br-, Ba+, Sr2+, 18O, 2H, 13C, 3H, Ne, Ar) combined with a groundwater residence time determination using CFCs and SF6 allows defining the global setting of the study site. A typical mineralization conditioned by the sea sprays and the carbonate matrix helped to validate the groundwater weighted residence times from using a binary mixing model. Terrigenic SF6 excesses have been detected and quantified, which permits to identify a groundwater flow from the surrounding fractured granites towards the lower aquifer principally. The use of CFCs and SF6 as a first hydrogeological investigation tool is possible and very relevant despite the thick unsaturated zone and the hydraulic connexion with a granitic environment.

  2. Residence Time Distributions in a Cold, Confined Swirl Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1997-01-01

    Residence time distributions (RTD) in a confined, cold swirling flow have been measured with a fast-response probe and helium as a tracer. The test-rig represented a scaled down version of a burner. The effect of variation of flow velocities and swirl angle on the flow pattern in the near-burner ...

  3. Influence of hydraulic retention time on the psychrophilic hydrolysis/acidogenesis of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, Paola; Schiappacasse, María Cristina; Carballa, Marta; Lema, Juan M

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the anaerobic hydrolysis of complex substrates has been studied under psychrophilic conditions. For this purpose, a continuous stirred tank reactor was operated at 15 °C and neutral pH and gelatin was considered as a model protein. Three HRTs have been tested: 12, 21 and 36 h. Gelatin hydrolysis was greatly dependent on HRT, increasing from 40% at 12 h-HRT to a maximum of 65% at 36 h-HRT. Molecular size distribution analyses of the effluent showed that hydrolysation of compounds larger than 10 kDa was poor at 12 h-HRT, whereas the fraction of 1-10 kDa was completely transformed into compounds smaller than 1 kDa. Higher HRT (36 h) improved the degradation of the recalcitrant fraction (>10 kDa), obtaining an effluent with around 95% of soluble molecules (<1 kDa). In that way, the use of membrane bioreactors for the treatment of this type of macromolecules could improve the degradation efficiencies by enabling to increase the residence time of the non-hydrolyzed molecules, with what would be possible to achieve higher organic loading rate operation.

  4. An inversion strategy for hydraulic tomography: Coupling travel time and amplitude inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchler, R.; Cheng, J.-T.; Dietrich, P.; Everett, M.; Johnson, B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2007-10-01

    SummaryWe present a hydraulic tomographic inversion strategy with an emphasis on the reduction of ambiguity of hydraulic travel time inversion results and the separation of the estimated diffusivity values into hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Our tomographic inversion strategy is tested by simulated multilevel interference slug tests in which the positions of the sources (injection ports) and the receivers (observation ports) isolated with packers are varied. Simulations include the delaying effect of wellbore storage on travel times which are quantified and shown to be of increasing importance for shorter travel distances. For the reduction of ambiguity of travel time inversion, we use the full travel time data set, as well as smaller data subsets of specified source-receiver angles. The inversion results of data subsets show different resolution characteristics and improve the reliability of the interpretation. The travel time of a pressure pulse is a function of the diffusivity of the medium between the source and receiver. Thus, it is difficult to directly derive values for hydraulic conductivity and specific storage by inverting travel times. In order to overcome this limitation, we exploit the great computational efficiency of hydraulic travel time tomography to define the aquifer structure, which is then input into the underlying groundwater flow model MODFLOW-96. Finally, we perform a model calibration (amplitude inversion) using the automatic parameter estimator PEST, enabling us to separate diffusivity into its two components hydraulic conductivity and specific storage.

  5. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  6. Mean Residence Time and Emergency Drinking Water Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin; Humer, Franko

    2013-04-01

    Immediately after securing an endangered population, the first priority of aid workers following a disaster is the distribution of drinking water. Such emergency situations are reported from many parts of the world following regional chemical or nuclear pollution accidents, floods, droughts, rain-induced landslides, tsunami, and other extreme events. It is often difficult to organise a replacement water supply when regular water systems with short residence times are polluted, infiltrated or even flooded by natural or man-made disasters. They are either unusable or their restoration may take months or even years. Groundwater resources, proven safe and protected by the geological environment, with long residence times and the necessary infrastructure for their exploitation, would provide populations with timeous replacement of vulnerable water supply systems and make rescue activities more rapid and effective. Such resources have to be identified and investigated, as a substitute for affected drinking water supplies thereby eliminating or reducing the impact of their failure following catastrophic events. Even in many areas such water resources with long residence times in years or decades are difficult to find it should be known which water supply facilities in the region are matching these requirements to allow in emergency situation the transport of water in tankers to the affected regions to prevent epidemics, importing large quantities of bottled water. One should know the residence time of the water supply to have sufficient time to plan and install new safe water supply facilities. Development of such policy and strategy for human security - both long term and short term - is therefore needed to decrease the vulnerability of populations threatened by extreme events and water supplies with short residence times. Generally: The longer the residence time of groundwater in the aquifer, the lower its vulnerability. The most common and economic methods to estimate

  7. Groundwater residence time : tell me who you are and I will tell which information you may provide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Kolbe, Tamara; Marçais, Jean; Leray, Sarah; Abbott, Ben; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater residence-time or ages have been widely used in hydrogeology during the last decades. Following tritium measurements, anthropogenic gases (CFC, SF6, 35Kr) have been developed. They provide information at the aquifer scale on long residence times. They complement the more localized data obtained from sparse boreholes with hydraulic and geophysical methods. Anthropogenic tracer concentrations are most generally considered as "Groundwater ages" using a piston flow model providing an order of magnitude for the residence time. More advanced information can however be derived from the combined analysis of the tracer concentrations. For example, the residence time distribution over the last 50 years can be well approached by the concentration of two sufficient different anthropogenic tracers in the group (CFC, SF6, 35Kr), i.e. tracers whose anthropogenic chronicles are sufficiently different. And, with additional constrains on geological and hydraulic properties, groundwater ages contribute to characterize the aquifer structures and the groundwater resources. Complex geological environments also include old groundwater bodies in extremely confined aquifer sections. In such cases, various tracers are related to highly different processes. CFCs can be taken as a marker of modern contamination to track exchanges between shallower and deeper aquifers, leakage processes, and modification of circulations linked to recent anthropogenic changes. 14C or 36Cl can be used to evidence much older processes but have to be related to the history of the chemical element itself. Numerous field studies in fact demonstrate the broad-range extent of the residence time distribution spanning in some cases several orders of magnitude. Flow and transport models in heterogeneous structures confirm such wide residence times and help to characterize their distribution. Residence times also serve as a privileged interface to the fate of some contaminants in aquifers or to trace

  8. Hydraulic mechanism and time-dependent characteristics of loose gully deposits failure induced by rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wu; Siming He

    2015-01-01

    Failure of loose gully deposits under the effect of rainfall contributes to the potential risk of debris flow. In the past decades, researches on hydraulic mechanism and time-dependent characteristics of loose deposits failure are frequently reported, however adequate measures for reducing debris flow are not available practically. In this context, a time-dependent model was established to determine the changes of water table of loose deposits using hydraulic and topographic theories. In addition, the variation in water table with elapsed time was analyzed. The formulas for calculating hydrodynamic and hydrostatic pressures on each strip and block unit of deposit were proposed, and the slope stability and failure risk of the loose deposits were assessed based on the time-dependent hydraulic characteristics of established model. Finally, the failure mechanism of deposits based on infinite slope theory was illustrated, with an example, to calculate sliding force, anti-sliding force and residual sliding force applied to each slice. The results indicate that failure of gully deposits under the effect of rainfall is the result of continuously increasing hydraulic pressure and water table. The time-dependent characteristics of loose deposit failure are determined by the factors of hydraulic properties, drainage area of interest, rainfall pattern, rainfall duration and intensity.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic investigations on groundwater residence time and flow in the Independence Basin, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlknecht, J.; Gárfias-Solis, J.; Aravena, R.; Tesch, R.

    2006-06-01

    The Independence Basin in the semi-arid Guanajuato state of central Mexico is facing serious groundwater resources deficiency due to an increasing demand linked to a rapid population growth and agricultural development. This problem is aggravated by an inadequate evaluation of groundwater resources in the region. Geochemistry and isotopic tracers were used in order to investigate the groundwater flow system and estimate the groundwater residence time. The groundwater is characterized by low salinity with some exceptions associated to a contribution of more saline groundwater from deep formations. The predominant reactions are CO 2 gas dissolution, carbonate dissolution, albite weathering, kaolinite and chalcedony precipitation. Six principal hydrochemical zones were recognized, which provided information on plausible recharge sources and groundwater chemical evolution. The 14C concentration varies between 19 and 94 pmc. The high 14C values indicating recent recharge are observed at the basin margins and a trend to lower 14C values is observed along the modern groundwater flow paths. The groundwater residence time according to radiocarbon estimations ranges between recent and ˜11 ka. The residence time distribution matches the regional important discharge zones west in the basin center (from Dolores Hidalgo and southwest from Doctor Mora). Hydrochemical tracers are in general agreement with the predeveloped and current hydraulic-head configuration, however, show some inconsistencies with the predeveloped head in the downgradient areas, which means that the impact by gradually increasing groundwater extraction during the last decades is reflected on radiocarbon age distribution. Geochemical evidences imply that the recharge input from the northern basin area is insignificant.

  10. Origin and residence time of water in the Lima Aquifer

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    The 8 million inhabitants of the coast Lima City are supplied with water from Rimac and Chillons rivers and water wells in the Lima aquifer. Historics of Rimac River flow and static level of water level in wells are correlated in order to calculate residence time of water since the aquifer is recharged by Rimac River until water reaches a well located 12 km farther, in Miraflores district near sea. Relative abundances of 2H and 18O are used to identify origins of waters from those wells. 3H and 14C contents, respectively, are used to estimate ages of waters.

  11. A Hydraulic Tomographic Approach: Coupling of Travel Time and Amplitude Inversion Using Multivariate Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchler, R.; Cheng, J.; Dietrich, P.; Everett, M.; Johnson, B.; Sauter, M.

    2005-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variations in hydraulic properties plays an important role controlling solute movement in saturated flow systems. Traditional hydrogeological approaches appear to have difficulties providing high resolution parameter estimates. Thus, we have decided to develop an approach coupling the two existing hydraulic tomographic approaches: a) Inversion of the drawdown as a function of time (amplitude inversion) and b) the inversion of travel times of the pressure disturbance. The advantages of hydraulic travel time tomography are its high structural resolution and computational efficiency. However, travel times are primarily controlled by the aquifer diffusivity making it difficult to determine hydraulically conductivity and storage. Amplitude inversion on the other hand is able to determine hydraulic conductivity and storage separately, but the heavy computational burden of the amplitude inversion is often a shortcoming, especially for larger data sets. Our coupled inversion approach was developed and tested using synthetic data sets. The data base of the inversion comprises simulated slug tests, in which the position of the sources (injection ports) isolated with packers, are varied between the tests. The first step was the inversion of several characteristic travel times (e.g. early, intermediate and late travel times) in order to determine the diffusivity distribution. Secondly, the resulting diffusivity distributions were classified into homogeneous groups in order to differentiate between hydrogeological units characterized by a significant diffusivity contrast. The classification was performed by using multivariate statistics. With a numerical flow model and an automatic parameter estimator the amplitude inversion was performed in a final step. The classified diffusivity distribution is an excellent starting model for the amplitude inversion and allows to reduce strongly the calculation time. The final amplitude inversion overcomes

  12. On solute residence time in the storage zones of small streams - experimental study and scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Transient storage has a major influence on solute transport in streams, on biogeochemical cycling, water quality and on the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The first part of the research reported here focuses on surface transient storage (STS) zones between groins along small streams. Such groins are used to protect banks, but also to increase habitat diversity and are, thus, not restricted to large rivers. Repeated tracer dilution experiments on the Mödlingbach, a small stream in Austria some 30 km south of Vienna, have been analyzed to determine the solute residence time between groins and to characterize the exchange processes between dead zones and main stream. Pairs of related breakthrough curves were measured in main stream and storage zones, resp., and used subsequently to estimate the solute residence time in the surface dead zones under study. Following previous work (Weitbrecht et al., 2008; Jackson et al., 2012) these residence times were, in turn, expressed as T = -W-.hD- k ?u hE (1) with W denoting groin length, u main stream flow velocity, hD mean water depth between the groins and hE depth at the interface dead zone - main stream. Coefficient k, finally, is thought to depend on a type of hydraulic radius, RD = W.L/(W+L), with L denoting the distance between the groins, measured in main flow direction. Using both the Mödlingbach STS zone data and the results of the aforementioned study (Weitbrecht et al., 2008) the following regression equation was derived (hS denotes main stream water depth): k = 0.00282? RD + 0.00802 hS (2) The second part of this research focuses on the dependency of solute residence time on flow rate, which is important for an improved understanding of longitudinal solute transport in streams and for the application of mathematical models. The scaling law proposed here is based on a physics-related theory combined with extensive data sets available form a decade of stream tracer experiments on the Mödlingbach stream

  13. The determination of residence times in a pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, F. Pablo E-mail: fcopabloramirez@tonatiu.netmeci44@prodigy.net.com; Cortes, M. Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that residence time distributions (RTD) are very important in many chemical processes such as separation, reforming, hydrocracking, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfuration, hydrogenation among others [3 Procedes de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. In addition, tracers can be used to measure the velocity, distribution and residence time of any stream through any part of an industrial [Guidebook on Radioisotope Tracers in Industry, IAEA, Vienna, 1990] or experimental system. Perhaps the best quality of radiotracers is that they do not interfere with normal unit operations or production scheduling. In this paper are presented the RTDs obtained in a pilot plant for a hydrogenation process [IMP, Technical Report, Determinacion del tiempo de residencia promedio en el reactor de la planta piloto de hidroagotamiento de crudo, 2002]. The RTDs show a random phenomenon, which is not typical of this type of chemical processes. Several RTDs were determined in order to confirm this random behavior. The data were obtained using as a tracer a radioactive form of sodium iodide containing iodine-131 [The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 10th Ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold, USA, 1981]. The process works with two phases in a countercurrent flow, inside a packed column. The liquid phase goes down by gravity. The gas phase goes up due to pressure difference [3 Procedes de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. The tracer was selected such that it would follow the liquid phase.

  14. The determination of residence times in a pilot plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, F. Pablo; Cortés, M. Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that residence time distributions (RTD) are very important in many chemical processes such as separation, reforming, hydrocracking, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfuration, hydrogenation among others [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. In addition, tracers can be used to measure the velocity, distribution and residence time of any stream through any part of an industrial [Guidebook on Radioisotope Tracers in Industry, IAEA, Vienna, 1990] or experimental system. Perhaps the best quality of radiotracers is that they do not interfere with normal unit operations or production scheduling. In this paper are presented the RTDs obtained in a pilot plant for a hydrogenation process [IMP, Technical Report, Determinación del tiempo de residencia promedio en el reactor de la planta piloto de hidroagotamiento de crudo, 2002]. The RTDs show a random phenomenon, which is not typical of this type of chemical processes. Several RTDs were determined in order to confirm this random behavior. The data were obtained using as a tracer a radioactive form of sodium iodide containing iodine-131 [The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 10th Ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold, USA, 1981]. The process works with two phases in a countercurrent flow, inside a packed column. The liquid phase goes down by gravity. The gas phase goes up due to pressure difference [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. The tracer was selected such that it would follow the liquid phase.

  15. Sunda Shelf Seas: flushing rates and residence times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mayer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The region of the Sunda Shelf has an average depth of approx. 48 m and is subject to many physical and biogeochemical processes with a strong impact from human activities. For the investigation of marine environmental water properties and quality, it is helpful to have an idea about exchange rates of water masses in the different parts of this region. Four numerical models, the global hydrodynamical model MPI-OM, the global hydrological model MPI-HM, the regional hydrodynamical model HAMSOM and a Lagrangian tracer model have been utilized to estimate the flushing rates and residence times in different seas on the Sunda Shelf. Using decadal averaged monthly transports, the commonly used flushing rate formula gives rates for the different months of approximately 40 to 70 days for the entire Sunda Shelf. For most parts of it (Malacca Strait, southern South China Sea, Java Sea, the results are similar, while for the Gulf of Thailand, the flushing rates amount to 80 to 170 days. The tracer model provides quite different but very detailed 3-D pictures with residence times of below 30 days to more than two years, depending on the location within the region, on the starting layer and on the season.

  16. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-4 - Residency time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for tax purposes on the alien's residency starting date. The residency starting date for an alien who... resident test (green card test), described in paragraph (b)(1) of § 301.7701(b)-1, is the first day during... test and the green card test will be the earlier of the first day the individual is physically...

  17. Particle Residence Time in Column Flotation Based on Cyclonic Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-hua; LIU Jiong-tian

    2007-01-01

    The cyclonic static micro-bubble column flotation (FCSMC) is an effective separation device for fine particle treatment. The high mineralization rate and short flotation time of this equipment can be attributed to its unique cyclonic force field. It also has been observed that the presence of a cyclonic force field leads to a lower bottom separation size limit and a reduction of unselective entrainment. The collection zone of the column is considered to consist of two parts, a column separation zone and a cyclonic zone. Total recovery of the collection zone was developed. For our study, we analyzed the particle movement in the cyclonic zone. Particle residence time equations for the cyclonic zone were derived by force analysis. Results obtained in this study provide a theoretical foundation for the design and scale-up of the FCSMC.

  18. Exposure times rather than residence times control redox transformation efficiencies in riparian wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, S.; Peiffer, S.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of Damköhler numbers have been extensively used in the discipline of chemical engineering and lately increasingly found its application into environmental science in order to describe the integrated behavior of hydrological systems with respect to their physical transport and biogeochemical transformation capabilities. Defining characteristic time scales of transport and reaction, as part of the Damköhler concept, however is not trivial especially for non-well mixed systems like catchments where physically controlled transport and biogeochemical moderated reactions can be highly variable among individual flow paths. Often, system specific residence times alone are not useful to describe the timescales of transport in the Damköhler concept, because it neglects that degradation of redox-sensitive compounds depend on dynamically changing and non-uniformly distributed hydro-biogeochemical boundary conditions that either facilitate or suppress biogeochemical reactions. In this study an approach is presented that highlights the importance to specifically distinguish between residence and exposure times if system specific transformation efficiencies are evaluated. We investigate the inter-relationship between residence and exposure time distributions for different biogeochemical processes in a virtual wetland environment that is exposed to different hydrological conditions. The relationship between exposure and residence times is mathematically described by a composition matrix that linearly relates the two identities to each other. Composition matrices for different hydrological conditions are analyzed by using the singular value decomposition technique. Results show that especially the type of couplings between the surface and subsurface flow domain control how exposure and residence times are related to each other in the wetland system and that timescales of residence and exposure typically differ by orders of magnitude. Finally, results also indicate

  19. The application of models to find the relevance of residence time in lake and reservoir management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven E. JØRGENSEN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The residence time is among the most important factors that determine the water quality of lakes and reservoirs. Models are useful tools to reveal the relationship between the residence time and the water quality. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the application of models to determine the importance of the residence time for the water quality. It was found that manipulation of the residence time, i.e. ecohydrology, may be a very useful environmental management tool.

  20. Soil residence time: A window into landscape morphologic steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, P. C.; Roering, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    For a landscape in true morphologic steady state the erosion rate and the average residence time of the debris mantle regolith (including the soils) are everywhere equal. Where other factors influencing soil properties such as climate, organisms and parent material are relatively invariant the degree of weathering and extent of pedological development in the debris mantle regolith should be spatially invariant. The corollary to this argument, commonly exploited in soil-geomorphic analysis, is that variation in debris mantle regolith development in a landscape reflects inheritance of older geomorphic surfaces and hence departure from steady state, at least over some time and space scale. The Oregon Coast Range (OCR) experiences a constant rate of rock uplift and has escaped the effects of Pleistocene glacial and periglacial processes. Furthermore, rock uplift and denudation rates have been shown to be approximately in balance, and consequently the OCR is promoted as being a good candidate for a (flux) steady state landscape. This is, however, not a sufficient condition for morphologic steady state, which is often assumed in numerical landscape simulations. The rock underlying the OCR is relatively homogeneous turbidites of the Tyee formation, and climatic and vegetation factors are relatively uniform over large areas. The degree of weathering and pedological development of the regolith on hillslopes should therefore dominantly reflect variation in regolith residence time, such that significant variation implies non-morphologic-steady state conditions. Indeed, spatial variation in soil/regolith age indicates the extent of departure from morphologic steady state. We have observed ubiquitous but localised deep, highly weathered regoliths and soils on ridge tops in the OCR. The extent, depth, geometry and elevational distribution of these deep regolith patches combined with relative measures of their age derived from total element and meteoric 10Be inventory will enable

  1. RTDB: A memory resident real-time object database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzy M. Nogiec; Eugene Desavouret

    2003-06-04

    RTDB is a fast, memory-resident object database with built-in support for distribution. It constitutes an attractive alternative for architecting real-time solutions with multiple, possibly distributed, processes or agents sharing data. RTDB offers both direct and navigational access to stored objects, with local and remote random access by object identifiers, and immediate direct access via object indices. The database supports transparent access to objects stored in multiple collaborating dispersed databases and includes a built-in cache mechanism that allows for keeping local copies of remote objects, with specifiable invalidation deadlines. Additional features of RTDB include a trigger mechanism on objects that allows for issuing events or activating handlers when objects are accessed or modified and a very fast, attribute based search/query mechanism. The overall architecture and application of RTDB in a control and monitoring system is presented.

  2. Mean Transit Time and Mean Residence Time for Linear Diffusion–Convection–Reaction Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic times for transport processes in biological systems may be evaluated as mean transit times (MTTs (for transit states or mean residence times (MRT (for steady states. It is shown in a general framework of a (linear reaction–diffusion–convection equation that these two times are related. Analytical formulas are also derived to calculate moments of exit time distribution using solutions for a stationary state of the system.

  3. Parametric identification of a servo-hydraulic actuator for real-time hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yili; Ou, Ge; Maghareh, Amin; Dyke, Shirley J.

    2014-10-01

    In a typical Real-time Hybrid Simulation (RTHS) setup, servo-hydraulic actuators serve as interfaces between the computational and physical substructures. Time delay introduced by actuator dynamics and complex interaction between the actuators and the specimen has detrimental effects on the stability and accuracy of RTHS. Therefore, a good understanding of servo-hydraulic actuator dynamics is a prerequisite for controller design and computational simulation of RTHS. This paper presents an easy-to-use parametric identification procedure for RTHS users to obtain re-useable actuator parameters for a range of payloads. The critical parameters in a linearized servo-hydraulic actuator model are optimally obtained from genetic algorithms (GA) based on experimental data collected from various specimen mass/stiffness combinations loaded to the target actuator. The actuator parameters demonstrate convincing convergence trend in GA. A key feature of this parametric modeling procedure is its re-usability under different testing scenarios, including different specimen mechanical properties and actuator inner-loop control gains. The models match well with experimental results. The benefit of the proposed parametric identification procedure has been demonstrated by (1) designing an H∞ controller with the identified system parameters that significantly improves RTHS performance; and (2) establishing an analysis and computational simulation of a servo-hydraulic system that help researchers interpret system instability and improve design of experiments.

  4. Residence time of the freshwater component in the Arctic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, H.G.

    1982-03-20

    The time function of bomb tritium concentrations in river runoff to the Arctic Ocean has been reconstructed from published data on tritium in precipatatio 1959--1975. Tritium measurements on oceanic samples through the haloclinie exhibit strong linear relatioships between tritium concetrations (TU values) and salinity. These wates thus look like binary mixtures of Atlantic source water and freshwater runoff. Combining these data, the vintage of the freshwater component in the Arctic Basin has been determined assuming no other major tritium source. The relation indicates the average age of the freshwater component to be 11 +- 1 years in the Namsen Basin and the outflow and somewhat higher in the Canada Basin. According to ttitium/salinity data, a surface layer of 10--60 m is affected by sea ice melting and freezing in the Nansen Basin, and the thickness of this layer increases to 150--170 m toward the Canada Basin. There is tritium also in the deep waters, the unumixed Atlantic water, which points at residence times for that water not to exceed 17 years.

  5. Using a physically-based transit time distribution function to estimate the hydraulic parameters and hydraulic transit times of an unconfined aquifer from tritium measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Maloszewski, Piotr; Schneider, Wilfried; Gallé, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater transit time is of interest in environmental studies pertaining to the transport of pollutants from its source to the aquifer outlet (spring or pumping well) or to an observation well. Different models have been proposed to describe the distribution of transit times within groundwatersheds, the most common being the dispersion model, the exponential-piston-flow model (EPM) both proposed by Maloszewski and Zuber (Maloszewski and Zuber, 1982) and the (two or three parameter) gamma model (Amin and Campana, 1996; Kirchner et al., 1999). Choosing which function applies best is a recurrent and controversial problem in hydrogeology. The object of this study is to revisit the applicability of the EPM for unconfined aquifers, and to introduce an alternative model based explicitly on groundwater hydraulics. The alternative model is based on the transit time of water from any point at the groundwater table to the aquifer outlet, and is used to calculate inversely the hydraulic parameters of a fractured unconfined sandstone aquifer from tritium measurements made in a series of contact springs. This model is compared to the EPM, which is usually adopted to describe the transit time distribution of confined and unconfined aquifers alike. Both models are tested against observations, and it is shown that the EPM fails the test for some of the springs, and generally seems to overestimate the older water component. Amin, I. E., and M. E. Campana (1996), A general lumped parameter model for the interpretation of tracer data and transit time calculation in hydrologic systems, Journal of Hydrology, 179, 1-21, doi: 10.1016/0022-1694(95)02880-3. Kirchner, J. W., X. H. Feng, and C. Neal (1999), Fractal stream chemistry and its implications for contaminant transport in catchments, Nature physics, 403, 524-527, doi: 10.1038/35000537. Maloszewski, P., and A. Zuber (1982), Determining the turnover time of groundwater systems with the aid of environmental tracers, Journal of

  6. Wave characterization for mammalian cell culture: residence time distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2012-02-15

    The high dose requirements of biopharmaceutical products led to the development of mammalian cell culture technologies that increase biomanufacturing capacity. The disposable Wave bioreactor is one of the most promising technologies, providing ease of operation and no cross-contamination, and using an innovative undulation movement that ensures good mixing and oxygen transfer without cell damage. However, its recentness demands further characterization. This study evaluated the residence time distribution (RTD) in Wave, allowing the characterization of mixing and flow and the comparison with ideal models and a Stirred tank reactor (STR) used for mammalian cell culture. RTD was determined using methylene blue with pulse input methodology, at three flow rates common in mammalian cell culture (3.3×10(-5)m(3)/h, 7.9×10(-5)m(3)/h, and 1.25×10(-4)m(3)/h) and one typical of microbial culture (5×10(-3)m(3)/h). Samples were taken periodically and the absorbance read at 660nm. It was observed that Wave behavior diverted from ideal models, but was similar to STR. Therefore, the deviations are not related to the particular Wave rocking mechanism, but could be associated with the inadequacy of these reactors to operate in continuous mode or to a possible inability of the theoretical models to properly describe the behavior of reactors designed for mammalian cell culture. Thus, the development of new theoretical models could better characterize the performance of these reactors.

  7. Pathology residency training: time for a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Ronald E; Baccon, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    The exponential growth of the field of pathology over the past several decades has created challenges for residency training programs. These challenges include the ability to train competent pathologists in 4 years, an increased demand for fellowship training, and the structuring and completion of maintenance of certification. The authors feel that pathology residency training has reached a critical point and that a new paradigm for training is required.

  8. Nonparametric estimation of groundwater residence time distributions: What can environmental tracer data tell us about groundwater residence time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, James L.; Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Cook, Peter. G.

    2014-03-01

    Residence time distributions (RTDs) have been used extensively for quantifying flow and transport in subsurface hydrology. In geochemical approaches, environmental tracer concentrations are used in conjunction with simple lumped parameter models (LPMs). Conversely, numerical simulation techniques require large amounts of parameterization and estimated RTDs are certainly limited by associated uncertainties. In this study, we apply a nonparametric deconvolution approach to estimate RTDs using environmental tracer concentrations. The model is based only on the assumption that flow is steady enough that the observed concentrations are well approximated by linear superposition of the input concentrations with the RTD; that is, the convolution integral holds. Even with large amounts of environmental tracer concentration data, the entire shape of an RTD remains highly nonunique. However, accurate estimates of mean ages and in some cases prediction of young portions of the RTD may be possible. The most useful type of data was found to be the use of a time series of tritium. This was due to the sharp variations in atmospheric concentrations and a short half-life. Conversely, the use of CFC compounds with smoothly varying atmospheric concentrations was more prone to nonuniqueness. This work highlights the benefits and limitations of using environmental tracer data to estimate whole RTDs with either LPMs or through numerical simulation. However, the ability of the nonparametric approach developed here to correct for mixing biases in mean ages appears promising.

  9. Controls on residence time and exchange in a system of shallow coastal bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, I.; Wiberg, P. L.; Richardson, D. L.; Kurum, M. O.

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of transport and residence time influence the morphology, ecology and biogeochemistry of shallow coastal bay systems in important ways. To better understand the factors controlling residence time and exchange in coastal bays, a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model was set up and validated with field observations of circulation in a system of 14 shallow coastal bays on the Atlantic coast of the USA (Virginia Coast Reserve). Residence times of neutrally buoyant particles as well as exchange among the bays in the system and between the bays and the ocean were examined with Lagrangian particle tracking. There was orders of magnitude variation in the calculated residence time within most of the bays, ranging from hours in the tidally refreshed (repletion) water near the inlets to days-weeks in the remaining (residual) water away from the inlets. Residence time in the repletion waters was most sensitive to the tidal phase (low vs. high) when particles were released whereas residence time in the residual waters was more sensitive to wind forcing. Wind forcing was found to act as a diffuser that shortens particle residence within the bays; its effect was higher away from the inlets and in relatively confined bays. Median residence time in the bays significantly decreased with an increase in the ratio between open water area and total area (open water plus marsh). Exchange among the bays and capture areas of inlets (i.e., exchange between the bays and the ocean) varied considerably but were insensitive to tidal phase of release, wind, and forcing conditions in different years, in contrast to the sensitivity of residence time to these factors. We defined a new quantity, termed shortest-path residence time, calculated as distance from the closest inlet divided by root-mean-square velocity at each point in model domain. A relationship between shortest-path residence time and particle-tracking residence time provides a means of estimating residence time

  10. Time delay control of hydraulic manipulators with continuous nonsingular terminal sliding mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王尧尧; 陈家旺; 顾临怡; 李晓东

    2015-01-01

    For the position tracking control of hydraulic manipulators, a novel method of time delay control (TDC) with continuous nonsingular terminal sliding mode (CNTSM) was proposed in this work. Complex dynamics of the hydraulic manipulator is approximately canceled by time delay estimation (TDE), which means the proposed method is model-free and no prior knowledge of the dynamics is required. Moreover, the CNTSM term with a fast-TSM-type reaching law ensures fast convergence and high-precision tracking control performance under heavy lumped uncertainties. Despite its considerable robustness against lumped uncertainties, the proposed control scheme is continuous and chattering-free and no pressure sensors are required in practical applications. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that faster and higher-precision position tracking performance is achieved compared with the traditional CNTSM-based TDC method using boundary layers.

  11. Does unsaturated flow drive soil carbon residence times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Mnich, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Schulz, M. S.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Maher, K.; Harden, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is widely recognized as a driver of many important biogeochemical processes. For example, ecosystem productivity, microbial lifecycles, soil organic matter decomposition, soil secondary mineralogy, the development and persistence of redox gradients, and the export of dissolved carbon are all sensitive to soil-water content and potential. In turn, each of these processes is recognized as an important control on the turnover of soil organic carbon. These dependencies raise a key question: Is the flux of water through unsaturated soils the dominant driver of soil organic carbon turnover across broad spatial scales? To better characterize the importance of soil moisture fluxes, we synthesize data from a number of soil studies to evaluate how total soil carbon storage, carbon residence time, and depth dependent gradients vary in relation to soil hydrologic fluxes. Specifically, we compare soil carbon storage and stability to measured and/or modeled infiltration ([precipitation + condensation] - [evapotranspiration + runoff]) and long-term soil water flux estimates from chloride mass balance, or other techniques. Additionally, we consider the interaction of soil age and hydrology, as the development of secondary mineral horizons during pedogenesis represents a critical threshold in both soil water flux and soil organic carbon turnover. We focus on data from 3 previously descried soil chronosequences, including the Santa Cruz, Mattole, and Merced terraces, which together span a wide range of age and soil moisture conditions. Across these sites, organic carbon accumulates to greater depths in the soils with highest infiltration but the relationship between turnover and soil moisture is not as straightforward. To help interpret these results, we compare field data against simulations of biogeochemical reactions involving soil carbon and the resulting isotopic gradients using the reactive transport model CrunchTope. Overall, this effort provides for an improved

  12. Training general surgery residents in pediatric surgery: educational value vs time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven L; Sydorak, Roman M; Applebaum, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the educational value of pediatric surgery rotations, the likelihood of performing pediatric operations upon completing general surgery (GS) residency, and time and cost of training GS residents in pediatric surgery. A survey was administered to GS residents that evaluated the pediatric surgery rotation and anticipated practice intentions. A retrospective analysis (2005-2006) of operative times for unilateral inguinal hernia repair, bilateral inguinal hernia repair, and umbilical hernia repair was also performed. Procedure times were compared for operations performed by a pediatric surgeon with and without GS residents. Cost analysis was based on time differences. General surgery residents (n = 19) considered the pediatric surgery rotation to have high educational value (4.7 +/- 0.6 of 5) with extensive teaching (4.6 +/- 0.7) and operative experience (4.4 +/- 0.8). Residents listed pediatric surgery exposure, operative technique, and observed work ethic as most valuable. Upon graduation, residents expect to perform pediatric operations 2 to 3 times annually. Thirty-seven percent of residents felt competent to perform appendectomy (patients >5 years), 32% appendectomy (3-5 years), 21% gastrostomy (>1 year), and 11% inguinal herniorrhaphy (>1 year). Operative times and costs were significantly higher in operative procedures performed with a GS resident. General surgery residents considered pediatric surgery as a valuable educational experience. Residents anticipate performing pediatric operations a few times annually. Training GS residents in pediatric surgery increased operative time and cost. This information may be useful in determining the appropriate setting for resident education as well as budget planning for pediatric surgical practices.

  13. The residence time of the water in Lago Maggiore (N. Italy: first results from an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo ROLLA

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a numerical study for estimating the spatial distribution of the hydraulic residence time in Lago Maggiore. A 3D eulerian time-dependent CFD code has been applied under real conditions, taking into account the effects of the monthly mean values of the mass flow rates and temperatures of all the tributaries, mass flow rate of the Ticino effluent and meteorological, hydrogeological and limnological parameters available from the rich data-base of CNR-ISE (Pallanza. The velocity distributions from these simulations were used to compute the paths of a number of massless markers with different initial positions and so evaluate their residence times within the lake. The results presented here follow a two-year simulation and show encouraging agreement with the mechanisms of mixing and of deep water oxygenation revealed by recent limnological studies carried out at CNR-ISE. Further studies are in progress to improve the results and extend the research over a time period of at least four years.

  14. Time-Varying Hydraulic Gradient Model of Paste-Like Tailings in Long-Distance Pipeline Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paste-like tailings slurry (PTLS is always simplified as a Bingham plastic fluid, leading to excessive computational errors in the calculation of the hydraulic gradient. In the case of paste-like tailings in long-distance pipeline transportation, to explore a high-precision and reliable hydraulic gradient formula, the rheological behavior of paste-like tailings slurry was analyzed, a time-varying hydraulic gradient model was constructed, and a series of laboratory shear tests were conducted. The results indicate that the PTLS shows noticeable shear-thinning characteristics in constant shear tests; the calculated hydraulic gradient declined by about 56%, from 4.44 MPa·km−1 to 1.95 MPa·km−1 within 253 s, and remained constant for the next four hours during the pipeline transportation. Comparing with the balance hydraulic gradient obtained in a semi-industrial loop test, the computational errors of those calculated by using the time-varying hydraulic gradient model, Jinchuan formula, and Shanxi formula are 15%, 78%, and 130%, respectively. Therefore, our model is a feasible and high-precision solution for the calculation of the hydraulic gradient of paste-like tailings in long-distance pipeline transportation.

  15. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Osman2_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 17244 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Osman2_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 REAL-TIME DYNAMIC HYDRAULIC MODEL... of specially developed methods which have been published and hence are not further discussed. ∆PfP is the pressure loss due to pipe friction and determined from Darcy-Weisbach equation (5):  2000 ' 2 D LufPfP  (5) 'f is the friction factor L...

  16. Role of hydraulic diffusivity in the decrease of weathering rates over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2014-05-01

    Springs emerging within massifs of crystalline rocks were monitored for discharge rate (Q), and the Q values combined with geomorphic and hydrographic parameters in a hydrologic model to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) and effective porosity (ne) of the spring watersheds. The spring waters, several borehole waters and rain water were analyzed for major dissolved compounds, strontium and isotopes (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C and 87Sr/86Sr). With a shift to less negative values, δ18O and δ2H were fitted by a line approximately parallel to the GMWL, but no significant dependence on altitude was found. The δ18O and δ2H values correlate better with those of precipitation amount. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in drilled well waters correlate positively with the depth of water circulation reported in the borehole logs. The corresponding regression equations were used to extrapolate the depth of hydraulic circuits within the spring watersheds. The previous data, together with groundwater travel times calculated by a water balance model, and with reactions of granite/metassediment plagioclase and biotite precipitating halloysite, gibbsite and vermiculite, were assembled in a mass balance model to calculate solute-flux weathering rates of plagioclase (WPl). The WPl's were described as a function of √{D}∝√{K/n}, where D is the hydraulic diffusivity. The discrepancies between the WPl values and solid-state rates, based on the differences between elemental, isotopic and mineral compositions measured in present-day regoliths and in the assumed protolith, were assigned to a decrease in D over time, from values in the protolith to values in the weathered aquifer.

  17. A time step criterion for the stable numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Lien Ramirez, Alina; Löhnert, Stefan; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    The process of propagating or widening cracks in rock formations by means of fluid flow, known as hydraulic fracturing, has been gaining attention in the last couple of decades. There is growing interest in its numerical simulation to make predictions. Due to the complexity of the processes taking place, e.g. solid deformation, fluid flow in an open channel, fluid flow in a porous medium and crack propagation, this is a challenging task. Hydraulic fracturing has been numerically simulated for some years now [1] and new methods to take more of its processes into account (increasing accuracy) while modeling in an efficient way (lower computational effort) have been developed in recent years. An example is the use of the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM), whose application originated within the framework of solid mechanics, but is now seen as an effective method for the simulation of discontinuities with no need for re-meshing [2]. While more focus has been put to the correct coupling of the processes mentioned above, less attention has been paid to the stability of the model. When using a quasi-static approach for the simulation of hydraulic fracturing, choosing an adequate time step is not trivial. This is in particular true if the equations are solved in a staggered way. The difficulty lies within the inconsistency between the static behavior of the solid and the dynamic behavior of the fluid. It has been shown that too small time steps may lead to instabilities early into the simulation time [3]. While the solid reaches a stationary state instantly, the fluid is not able to achieve equilibrium with its new surrounding immediately. This is why a time step criterion has been developed to quantify the instability of the model concerning the time step. The presented results were created with a 2D poroelastic model, using the XFEM for both the solid and the fluid phases. An embedded crack propagates following the energy release rate criteria when the fluid pressure

  18. Methane Fermentation of Cattle Manure : Effects of Hydraulic Retention Time. Temperature and Substrate Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zennaki-Bensouda, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been undertaken in order to improve yield of methane production by anaerobic fermentation of cattle manure. Optimization of hydraulic retention time and organic concentration substrate were evaluated at 37°C and 55°C. The study of cattle manure fermentation process as well as that of methane production yield showed that methanogenic fermentation of these organic wastes may be conducted at low hydraulic retention time without stressing the fermentary process : 8 days at 37°C and 5 days at 55°C for a dry matter concentration of 43 g/1. The biogas yield increased, reaching 0.46 m3/(m3. d at 37°C and 0.68m3/(m3. d at 55°C with a methane content of 56 %> and 51 %> respectively. The best biogas yields occurred for dry matter concentrations between 7 and 9 %>. Kinetic models of Chen and Hashimoto (7 and of Monod (19 described well substrate depletion and methane production.

  19. Inter-generational co-residence and women's work and leisure time in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Diamond-Smith

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Labor force participation among women in Egypt remains low, and due to falling fertility and increases life expectancy, women in Egypt in the future may spend more time co-residing with aging in-laws. Past literature has suggested that co-residence in some settings allows women to enter the labor force more, as mother-in-laws help care for their grandchildren, or inhibits labor force participation when mother-in-laws reinforce traditional values. There is little research on co-residence and labor supply, or leisure time, in Egypt. Objective: This paper examines the role of intergenerational co-residence in women's work, work time, and leisure time using data on time allocation in Egypt. Methods: Data were collected from 548 women with a living mother-in-law: 291 co-residing their mother-in-law and 257 not. Survey data included work status, a 24-hour time diary, and a health assessment of the mother-in-law. Multivariate regression models predicted work, work time, and leisure time use using standard models. Results: Co-residing with a disabled mother-in-law was associated with decreased odds of women working and fewer minutes spent working a day. Leisure time was not associated with the co-residence and disability status of a mother-in-law. Factors related to couples' relationships and the woman's views on gender norms were also associated with women working. Conclusions: Co-residence appears to be associated with women's work, depending on the disability status of the co-residing mother-in-law. If increased life expectancy is associated with more time spent in a disabled state for mothers-in-law, this could put downward pressure on women's work in this setting.

  20. Children's Perspectives on Everyday Experiences of Shared Residence: Time, Emotions and Agency Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Gry Mette D.

    2010-01-01

    Shared residence is often presented as an arrangement that is in the best interests of the child following the divorce of its parents. Based on in-depth interviews with Norwegian children who have experienced shared residence, this article seeks to explore some dilemmas concerning time, agency and the children's emotions. Three characteristics of…

  1. Robust Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) of Multiple Time Overlapping Events Using a Generalized Discrete Radon Transform

    CERN Document Server

    Ely, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In this work we propose a novel algorithm for multiple-event localization for Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) through the exploitation of the sparsity of the observed seismic signal when represented in a basis consisting of space time propagators. We provide explicit construction of these propagators using a forward model for wave propagation which depends non-linearly on the problem parameters - the unknown source location and mechanism of fracture, time and extent of event, and the locations of the receivers. Under fairly general assumptions and an appropriate discretization of these parameters we first build an over-complete dictionary of generalized Radon propagators and assume that the data is well represented as a linear superposition of these propagators. Exploiting this structure we propose sparsity penalized algorithms and workflow for super-resolution extraction of time overlapping multiple seismic events from single well data.

  2. The drug-target residence time model: a 10-year retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    The drug-target residence time model was first introduced in 2006 and has been broadly adopted across the chemical biology, biotechnology and pharmaceutical communities. While traditional in vitro methods view drug-target interactions exclusively in terms of equilibrium affinity, the residence time model takes into account the conformational dynamics of target macromolecules that affect drug binding and dissociation. The key tenet of this model is that the lifetime (or residence time) of the binary drug-target complex, and not the binding affinity per se, dictates much of the in vivo pharmacological activity. Here, this model is revisited and key applications of it over the past 10 years are highlighted.

  3. Reactive barriers: hydraulic performance and design enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, B D M

    2004-01-01

    The remediation of contaminated ground water is a multibillion-dollar global industry. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are one of the leading technologies being developed in the search for alternatives to the pump-and-treat method. Improving the hydraulic performance of these PRBs is an important part of maximizing their potential to the industry. Optimization of the hydraulic performance of a PRB can be defined in terms of finding the balance between capture, residence time, and PRB longevity that produces a minimum-cost acceptable design. Three-dimensional particle tracking was used to estimate capture zone and residence time distributions. Volumetric flow analysis was used for estimation of flow distribution across a PRB and in the identification of flow regimes that may affect the permeability or reactivity of portions of the PRB over time. Capture zone measurements extended below the base of partially penetrating PRBs and were measured upgradient from the portion of aquifer influenced by PRB emplacement. Hydraulic performance analysis of standard PRB designs confirmed previously presented research that identified the potential for significant variation in residence time and capture zone. These variations can result in the need to oversize the PRB to ensure that downgradient contaminant concentrations do not exceed imposed standards. The most useful PRB design enhancements for controlling residence time and capture variation were found to be customized downgradient gate faces, velocity equalization walls, deeper emplacement of the funnel than the gate, and careful manipulation of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between the gate and the aquifer.

  4. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  5. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Kaper, Hans J.; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces. although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients

  6. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Kaper, Hans J.; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces. although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients w

  7. Feeding assistance needs of long-stay nursing home residents and staff time to provide care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

    2006-06-01

    To describe the staff time requirements to provide feeding assistance to nursing home residents who require three different types of assistance to improve oral food and fluid intake (social stimulation, verbal cuing, or both; physical guidance; or full physical assistance) and to determine whether physically dependent residents require more staff time, as defined in the national Resource Utilization Group System (RUGS) used for reimbursement. Descriptive. Six skilled nursing homes. Ninety-one long-stay residents with low oral intake who responded to improved feeding assistance. Research staff conducted direct observations of usual nursing home care for 2 consecutive days (total of six meals) to measure oral food and fluid consumption (total percentage eaten) and staff time spent providing assistance (minutes and seconds). Research staff then implemented a standardized graduated-assistance protocol on 2 separate days (total of six meals) that enhanced residents' oral food and fluid intake. Staff time to provide feeding assistance that improved food and fluid consumption was comparable across different levels of eating dependency. Across all levels, residents required an average of 35 to 40 minutes of staff time per meal; thus, residents who needed only supervision and verbal cuing required just as much time as those who were physically dependent on staff for eating. The current RUGS system used for reimbursement likely underestimates the staff time required to provide feeding assistance care that improves oral intake.

  8. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  9. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Talebizadeh

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma (NTP has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  10. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  11. Two phase residence time distribution in a modified twin screw extruder

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Biomass fractionation is performed with a modified Clextral twin-screw extruder used as a thermo-mechano-chemical reactor. This new process is firstly analyzed. Visual observations, residence time distributions, and global mass balances are used to obtain information about the process phenomena and their coupling. Residence time distributions (RTD) classical models are adopted to represent the experimental plots. The influence of continuous and discrete process parameters upon the RTD of the ...

  12. Effect of Hydraulic Retention Time on Nitrification in an AirLift Biological Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtado A.A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of nitrogenous compounds in industrial effluents at concentration levels above legal limits, is a well-known and serious pollution problem for the receiving body. The biological process for the removal of these substances, commonly referred to as ammoniacal nitrogen, is known as nitrification. Bacteria involved are mainly of the genuses Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT on the efficiency of ammonia removal from a petroleum refinery effluent using activated carbon particles as a biofilm support in an airlift bioreactor. The experiments were carried out using HRTs, equal to six, eight and ten hours. The results show that HRT equal to 8 and 10 hours were enough to reduce ammoniacal nitrogen concentration to levels below permited legal limits (5mg/L NH3-N. The reactor nitrifying performance was maximized at 85% removal of ammoniacal nitrogen, for a HRT equal to 10 hours.

  13. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  14. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  15. Residence time distribution in twin-screw extruders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the twin-screw extruders used in the food industry at short time high temperature processes the knowledge of their reactor properties is incomplete for mass- and heat flow. Therefore each process change such as: scale-up or product development requires a great number of measurements before an ac

  16. Residence time distribution in twin-screw extruders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the twin-screw extruders used in the food industry at short time high temperature processes the knowledge of their reactor properties is incomplete for mass- and heat flow. Therefore each process change such as: scale-up or product development requires a great number of measurements

  17. A multitracer approach to estimate groundwater residence time distributions at a managed aquifer recharge site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Andrea; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has become a common water management tool and serves various purposes such as improving the quality of groundwater (GW). At the study site, the Hardwald in Muttenz (Switzerland), MAR has been implemented in the mid-1950s to overcome increasing water demands. GW is artificially recharged with water from the river Rhine through a system of channels and ponds. The area is surrounded by potential contamination sites such as chemical industry, former landfills, a highway and a freight depot. Furthermore, the area shows a complex hydrogeologic setting with several fault zones and two main aquifers, the Quaternary Rhine gravel aquifer overlying a karstified Upper Muschelkalk limestone aquifer. Water from the deeper limestone aquifer is suspected to contain contaminants originating from the landfills. The fractures might serve as a hydraulic connection between the upper and lower aquifer. Further, groundwater pumping might enhance the mixing of recently infiltrated water with older water from the lower aquifer. Hence, the proximity to potential contamination sites and the complex geologic setting both pose risks for GW pollution and challenge the drinking water production in this area. To guarantee a safe drinking water supply, it is crucial to know the mixing patterns of young and old GW abstracted from the pumping wells. With this study we aim to determine the spatial variability of GW residence time distributions to differentiate between recently infiltrated river water and older groundwater. To reach our objectives, we use a combination of the following tracers to cover a wide range of possible GW ages: (1) radiogenic 222Rn (young water := product 3He (old water := 0.5-50 years); and (3) radiogenic 4He (very old water := 100-1000 years). Additionally, we analysed other dissolved (noble) gases (O2, N2, Ar, Kr) to estimate the amount of excess air and to derive the equilibration temperature. We also sampled for physico-chemical parameters

  18. Residence time and Posidonia oceanica in Cabrera Archipelago National Park, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfila, A.; Jordi, A.; Basterretxea, G.; Vizoso, G.; Marbà, N.; Duarte, C. M.; Werner, F. E.; Tintoré, J.

    2005-07-01

    Flushing time and residence time are studied in a small inlet in Cabrera National Park, Western Mediterranean Sea. Flushing time is studied using ADCP in situ data. Observed flushing time data are compared with the simulations from a three-dimensional coastal ocean numerical model. Residence time is assessed using virtual lagrangian particles and studying the number remaining within the analyzed domain. Results show a good agreement between observations and modeling estimations of the flushing time (i.e. 6 days from the ADCP data and 5.6 days from the numerical model). Residence time estimations yield a broad range of values, from 1 h in the Bay to over 30 days depending also on the horizontal and vertical position where particles were released. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model for the Port yields a value of 8.7 days. Results obtained for the residence time appear to have a determinant impact over the meadows of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, present inside the Port. Recirculation patterns and complex flows in coastal environments create a non-uniform distribution of the areas of accumulation of non-conservative properties that indicate that residence time concept is the correct approach when studying the impact of water transport over biological communities.

  19. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  20. Exploitation of rapid acidification phenomena of food waste in reducing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of high rate anaerobic digester without conceding on biogas yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruti, Kranti; Begum, Sameena; Ahuja, Shruti; Anupoju, Gangagni Rao; Juntupally, Sudharshan; Gandu, Bharath; Ahuja, Devender Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study and infer a full scale experience on co-digestion of 1000kg of FW (400kg cooked food waste and 600kg uncooked food waste) and 2000L of rice gruel (RG) on daily basis based on a high rate biomethanation technology called "Anaerobic gas lift reactor" (AGR). The pH of raw substrate was low (5.2-5.5) that resulted in rapid acidification phenomena with in 12h in the feed preparation tank that facilitated to obtain a lower hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 10days. At full load, AGR was fed with 245kg of total solids, 205kg of volatile solids (167kg of organic matter in terms of chemical oxygen demand) which resulted in the generation of biogas and bio manure of 140m(3)/day and 110kg/day respectively. The produced biogas replaced 60-70kg of LPG per day.

  1. Hydraulic Modeling and Evolutionary Optimization for Enhanced Real-Time Decision Support of Combined Sewer Overflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Schmidt, A. R.; Ostfeld, A.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time mitigation of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) requires evaluation of multiple operational strategies during rapidly changing rainfall events. Simulation models for hydraulically complex systems can effectively provide decision support for short time intervals when coupled with efficient optimization. This work seeks to reduce CSOs for a test case roughly based on the North Branch of the Chicago Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP), which is operated by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). The North Branch tunnel flows to a junction with the main TARP system. The Chicago combined sewer system alleviates potential CSOs by directing high interceptor flows through sluice gates and dropshafts to a deep tunnel. Decision variables to control CSOs consist of sluice gate positions that control water flow to the tunnel as well as a treatment plant pumping rate that lowers interceptor water levels. A physics-based numerical model is used to simulate the hydraulic effects of changes in the decision variables. The numerical model is step-wise steady and conserves water mass and momentum at each time step by iterating through a series of look-up tables. The look-up tables are constructed offline to avoid extensive real-time calculations, and describe conduit storage and water elevations as a function of flow. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to minimize CSOs at each time interval within a moving horizon framework. Decision variables are coded at 15-minute increments and GA solutions are two hours in duration. At each 15-minute interval, the algorithm identifies a good solution for a two-hour rainfall forecast. Three GA modifications help reduce optimization time. The first adjustment reduces the search alphabet by eliminating sluice gate positions that do not influence overflow volume. The second GA retains knowledge of the best decision at the previous interval by shifting the genes in the best previous sequence to initialize search at

  2. MIXING PATTERNS AND RESIDENCE TIME DETERMINATION IN A BUBBLING FLUIDIZED BED SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ghaly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed gasification can be used to convert the solar energy stored as carboneous compounds in bio-mass into a carbon neutral fuel with reduced emissions. Canada produces 20.57 million tonnes of wheat straw annually which could be used for green energy production. Wheat straw residue gasification has the capability of replacing 7.5 % (0.62 EJ of Canada’s annual fossil fuel consumption. To achieve efficient gasification in a fluidized bed proper fuel mixing and residence time must be achieved. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sand particle size, distributor plate shape and angle, bed height and fluidizing velocity on particle mixing and residence time in the fluidized bed reactor. Greater values of the residence time were obtained with course sand whereas lower values were obtained with fine sand. An in-crease in the angle of convex or a decrease in the angle of a concave of the distributor plate resulted in an increase in the residence time. Both the concave and convex distributor plates achieved vertical upward and downward movements of the bed material resulting in continuous bed material turnover and, thus, good mixing. However, the concave plate achieved longer residence time which will result in better conversion efficiency. To improve the mixing properties of the binary mixture, which has great tendency for segregation due to density differences, an angled distributor plate (concave or convex should be used. Considerable increases in the residence time were recorded with increases in the bed height. Increasing the fluidizing velocity decreased the residence time due to the increase in the bubble velocity. However, since the conversion efficiency is affected by the degree of mixing, it will also be improved by increasing the fluidization velocity. A velocity above 1.50 Umf is recommended for better fluidization and improved mixing.

  3. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Long

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA. A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are

  4. Developing a Tool Point Control Scheme for a Hydraulic Crane Using Interactive Real-time Dynamic Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Hansen, Michael Rygaard; Ballebye, Morten

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an interactive real-time dynamic simulation model of a hydraulic crane. The user input to the model is given continuously via joystick and output is presented continuously in a 3D animation. Using this simulation model, a tool point control scheme...

  5. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  6. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ISSUES OF CONTAINMENT FILTERED VENTING SYSTEM FOR A LONG OPERATING TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNG SU NA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the thermal hydraulic issues in the Containment Filtered Venting System (CFVS for a long operating time using the MELCOR computer code. The modeling of the CFVS, including the models for pool scrubbing and the filter, was added to the input file for the OPR-1000, and a Station Blackout (SBO was chosen as an accident scenario. Although depressurization in the containment building as a primary objective of the CFVS was successful, the decontamination feature by scrubbing and filtering in the CFVS for a long operating time could fail by the continuous evaporation of the scrubbing solution. After the operation of the CFVS, the atmosphere temperature in the CFVS became slightly above the water saturation temperature owing to the release of an amount of steam with high temperature from the containment building to the scrubbing solution. Reduced pipe diameters at the inlet and outlet of the CFVS vessel mitigated the evaporation of scrubbing water by controlling the amount of high-temperature steam and the water saturation temperature.

  7. Hydraulic retention time on vinasse stabilisation with limestone in the acidogenic phase of anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Plácido Tomielis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The main problem in anaerobic digestion of low-protein residues is the instability caused acidity. The use of limestone at the same time as a neutralizing agent and support material is innovative because stones wear allows the slow release of the calcium carbonate thereby eliminating dispersers. Free calcium content in the system was measured in two plug flow reactors filled with vinasse at initial pH of 4.50. The proportion of 1.8 tonnes of limestone per m³ of vinasse was evaluated at the Hydraulic Retention Times (HRT of 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours, allowing stabilisation at 96 hours. The ratio of Volatile Acids/Total Alkalinity (VA/TA ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 and the pH reached 7.0, at the HRT of 120 hours. Increasing the HRT also increased the volatile total solids (VTS and fixed total solids (TFS in a similar profile to the measured free calcium content, but calcium remained at the appropriate level of 100 to 250mg l-1. The proportion of limestone/vinasse was adequate to ensure stabilisation, but it is not recommended to reduce the HRT below 96 hours due to the risk of compromising the stability of the anaerobic system.

  8. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse GPR data measured at Selhausen, Germany

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach that uses time-lapse off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data to estimate soil hydraulic parameters, and apply it to a dataset collected in the field. Off-ground GPR data are mainly sensitive to the near-surface water content profile and dynamics, and are thus related to soil hydraulic parameters, such as the parameters of the hydraulic conductivity and water retention functions. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS 1-D was used with a two-layer single- and dual-porosity model. To monitor the soil water content dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. The dual porosity model provided better results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is supported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agreement with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and monitoring water dynamics at the field scale.

  9. Strategic Application of Residence-Time Control in Continuous-Flow Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2015-06-01

    As a sustainable alternative for conventional batch-based synthetic techniques, the concept of continuous-flow processing has emerged in the synthesis of fine chemicals. Systematic tuning of the residence time, a key parameter of continuous-reaction technology, can govern the outcome of a chemical reaction by determining the reaction rate and the conversion and by influencing the product selectivity. This review furnishes a brief insight into flow reactions in which high chemo- and/or stereoselectivity can be attained by strategic residence-time control and illustrates the importance of the residence time as a crucial parameter in sustainable method development. Such a fine reaction control cannot be performed in conventional batch reaction set-ups.

  10. Scheduling algorithm of dual-armed cluster tools with residency time and reentrant constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周炳海; 高忠顺; 陈佳

    2014-01-01

    To solve the scheduling problem of dual-armed cluster tools for wafer fabrications with residency time and reentrant constraints, a heuristic scheduling algorithm was developed. Firstly, on the basis of formulating scheduling problems domain of dual-armed cluster tools, a non-integer programming model was set up with a minimizing objective function of the makespan. Combining characteristics of residency time and reentrant constraints, a scheduling algorithm of searching the optimal operation path of dual-armed transport module was presented under many kinds of robotic scheduling paths for dual-armed cluster tools. Finally, the experiments were designed to evaluate the proposed algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm is feasible and efficient for obtaining an optimal scheduling solution of dual-armed cluster tools with residency time and reentrant constraints.

  11. Educating pediatric residents about breastfeeding: evaluation of 3 time-efficient teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tender, Jennifer A F; Cuzzi, Sandra; Kind, Terry; Simmens, Samuel J; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie

    2014-11-01

    Previously reported breastfeeding curricula for residents have combined different teaching methods, have focused on knowledge and attitudes, and have been time-intensive. This study aimed to evaluate 3 time-efficient breastfeeding curricula for effectiveness in regard to pediatric residents' knowledge, confidence, and skills in managing a simulated breastfeeding scenario. First-year pediatric residents during their 4-week community hospital newborn nursery rotation were consecutively assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 shadowed an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) for 1 hour; group 2 watched a 25-minute case-based breastfeeding DVD; and group 3 observed a 3-hour prenatal parent breastfeeding class (CLS). Residents were assessed by (1) a pretest and posttest evaluating their breastfeeding knowledge and confidence, and (2) a clinical skills scenario managing a breastfeeding standardized patient (SP). Thirty-nine pediatric residents participated in the study (11 in IBCLC, 16 DVD, 12 CLS) over a 1-year period. All groups significantly improved their knowledge scores and confidence in managing breastfeeding problems, with the IBCLC group showing more improvement in knowledge than the other groups (P = .02) and a higher rating of their teaching method (P = .01). All groups performed well on the SP clinical skills scenario, with no significant difference between groups. All 3 teaching methods were time-efficient and produced important gains in knowledge and confidence, with residents in the IBCLC group demonstrating greatest improvement in knowledge and a higher rating of their teaching method. Our study provides support for 3 methods of teaching residents breastfeeding management and demonstrates that IBCLCs are well-received as interprofessional educators. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate...... the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate...

  13. Linear and Nonlinear Time-Frequency Analysis for Parameter Estimation of Resident Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0023 Linear and Nonlinear Time-Frequency Analysis for Parameter Estimation of Resident Space Objects Marco Martorella... UNIVERSITY DI PISA, DEPARTMENT DI INGEGNERIA Final Report 02/22/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research...Nonlinear Time-Frequency Analysis for Parameter Estimation of Resident Space Objects 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0183 5c.  PROGRAM

  14. High nitrogen removal rate using ANAMMOX process at short hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, C G; Kunz, A; De Prá, M C; Bressan, C R; Soares, H M

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is a chemolithoautotrophic process, which converts NH(4)(+) to N(2) using nitrite (NO(2)(-)) as the electron acceptor. This process has very high nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) and is an alternative to classical nitrification/denitrification wastewater treatment. In the present work, a strategy for nitrogen removal using ANAMMOX process was tested evaluating their performance when submitted to high loading rates and very short hydraulic retention times (HRTs). An up-flow ANAMMOX column reactor was inoculated with 30% biomass (v v(-1)) fed from 100 to 200 mg L(-1) of total N (NO(2)(-)-N + NH(4)(+)-N) at 35 °C. After start-up and process stability the maximum NRR in the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was 18.3 g-N L(-1) d(-1) operated at 0.2 h of HRT. FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis and process stoichiometry confirmed that ANAMMOX was the prevalent process for nitrogen removal during the experiments. The results point out that high NRRs can be obtained at very short HRTs using up-flow ANAMMOX column reactor configuration.

  15. Enhancement of anaerobic methanogenesis at a short hydraulic retention time via bioelectrochemical enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Liu, Yiwen; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zisheng; Liu, Sitong; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2016-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an important energy strategy for converting organic waste to CH4. A major factor limiting the practical applicability of AD is the relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT) which declines the treatment efficiency of digesters. A coupling process of anaerobic digestion and 'electromethanogenesis' was proposed to enhance anaerobic digestion at a short HRT in this study. Microorganisms analysis indicated that the electric-biological reactor enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens in both cathodic biofilm and suspended sludge, helping achieve the high organic removal (71.0% vs 42.3% [control reactor]) and CH4 production (248.5mL/h vs 51.3mL/h), while the additional electric input was only accounted for 25.6% of the energy income from the increased CH4 production. This study demonstrated that a bioelectrochemical enhanced anaerobic reactor could improve the CH4 production and organic removal at a short HRT, providing an economically feasible scheme to treat wastewater.

  16. Residence time control on hot moments of net nitrate production and uptake in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura K.; Hare, Danielle K.

    2014-01-01

    The retention capacity for biologically available nitrogen within streams can be influenced by dynamic hyporheic zone exchange, a process that may act as either a net source or net sink of dissolved nitrogen. Over 5 weeks, nine vertical profiles of streambed chemistry (NO3- and NH4+) were collected above two beaver dams along with continuous high-resolution vertical hyporheic flux data. The results indicate a non-linear relation of net NO3- production followed by net uptake in the hyporheic zone as a function of residence time. This Lagrangian-based relation is consistent through time and across varied morphology (bars, pools, glides) above the dams, even though biogeochemical and environmental factors varied. The empirical continuum between net NO3- production and uptake and residence time is useful for identifying two crucial residence time thresholds: the transition to anaerobic respiration, which corresponds to the time of peak net nitrate production, and the net sink threshold, which is defined by a net uptake in NO3- relative to streamwater. Short-term hyporheic residence time variability at specific locations creates hot

  17. Numerical estimation of the noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters variance and coefficient of variation of residence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, R D

    1994-02-01

    Noncompartmental investigation of the distribution of residence times from concentration-time data requires estimation of the second noncentral moment (AUM2C) as well as the area under the curve (AUC) and the area under the moment curve (AUMC). The accuracy and precision of 12 numerical integration methods for AUM2C were tested on simulated noisy data sets representing bolus, oral, and infusion concentration-time profiles. The root-mean-squared errors given by the best methods were only slightly larger than the corresponding errors in the estimation of AUC and AUMC. AUM2C extrapolated "tail" areas as estimated from a log-linear fit are biased, but the bias is minimized by application of a simple correction factor. The precision of estimates of variance of residence times (VRT) can be severely impaired by the variance of the extrapolated tails. VRT is therefore not a useful parameter unless the tail areas are small or can be shown to be estimated with little error. Estimates of the coefficient of variation of residence times (CVRT) and its square (CV2) are robust in the sense of being little affected by errors in the concentration values. The accuracy of estimates of CVRT obtained by optimum numerical methods is equal to or better than that of AUC and mean residence time estimates, even in data sets with large tail areas.

  18. Age and residence time of terrestrial source water in the northwest Atlantic shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Todd, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal river mouths and bays are the junctions where terrestrial-source water meets and mixes with water from the open ocean. Once the riverine water reaches the coastal ocean, its eventual fate is largely unknown and difficult to trace. Rivers that flow into the ocean may contain high levels of nutrients and organic matter, so understanding the fate of terrestrial source water is important for a variety of biogeochemical processes that occur in the shelf seas. The fate of this terrestrial source water may be described in terms of its mean age (the time since it reached the ocean) and its residence time (the time it remains on the continental shelf). Using a high-resolution ocean model, we apply the constituent-oriented age and residence time (CART) theory to a large region encompassing the northwest Atlantic shelf seas to calculate the mean age of terrestrial source water and its residence time. For this application, 196 river mouths are used as sources of terrestrial water from South America to Nova Scotia. We investigate the spatial and seasonal variability of the water's mean age and compute the residence time within four different shelf regions: the Carribean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, the South Atlantic Bight, and the Mid-Atlantic Bight/Gulf of Maine. From the estimates of mean age and residence time, we describe the impact of the coastal circulation on the eventual fate of terrestrial waters, and provide conjecture on how varying transport time scales may affect the general biogeochemical processes in the coastal ocean.

  19. Microbial Biogeography along an Estuarine Salinity Gradient: Combined Influences of Bacterial Growth and Residence Time

    OpenAIRE

    Crump, Byron C.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Hobbie, John E

    2004-01-01

    Shifts in bacterioplankton community composition along the salinity gradient of the Parker River estuary and Plum Island Sound, in northeastern Massachusetts, were related to residence time and bacterial community doubling time in spring, summer, and fall seasons. Bacterial community composition was characterized with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA. Average community doubling time was calculated from bacterial production ([14C]leucine incorpo...

  20. Extra-regional residence time as a correlate of plant invasiveness: European archaeophytes in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Pysek, Petr

    2009-09-01

    Human activities have degraded biogeographical barriers to dispersal resulting in the spread and naturalization of increasing numbers of nonnative invasive species. One correlate of invasiveness within a region is residence time or time since introduction. Plant species that were introduced into Europe prior to AD 1500 (European archaeophytes) that were subsequently introduced into North America provide a unique opportunity to examine the effect of extra-regional residence time (i.e., residence time that occurred in a nonnative region before a species was introduced into a new region). Here, we examine how nonnative species with extensive extra-regional residence times have affected beta diversity among states in the contiguous United States of America based on an analysis of occupancy and distance decay of similarity. State floras contained an average of 3106 +/- 922 species (mean +/- SD) with 2318 +/- 757 species classified as native, 180 +/- 43 species as European archaeophyte, and 608 -236 species as other exotic with no European archaeophyte association. For European archaeophytes, 42% were identified as noxious weeds in the United States with 8% identified as agricultural and 14% as natural-area weeds (20%, 2%, and 13% for other exotics, respectively). In strong contrast to natives and other exotics, European archaeophytes were more widespread and presented weaker distance-decay patterns. Thus, European archaeophytes were more likely to become noxious weeds, particularly within agricultural areas, and were associated with significant losses in beta diversity. We suggest that this outcome is a consequence of extra-regional residence time, which allowed for the selection of species or the evolution of traits that favored the colonization of arable habitats associated with early agricultural activities in Europe, habitats that are widespread, resource rich, and uniformly distributed in the United States. Our findings suggest that a long-term trajectory can be

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times.

  2. Residence time of pollutants discharged in the Gulf of Kachchh, northwestern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patgaonkar, R.S.; Vethamony, P.; Lokesh, K.S.; Babu, M.T.

    A 2D Hydrodynamic-Particle Analysis model was applied to the Gulf of Kachchh (GoK) to estimate the residence time of pollutants. The tidal currents in the Gulf have a strong E-W component, which prevents the material in the north being transported...

  3. Effects of Reducing River Flow on Pulse Residence Time in Little Manatee River, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wenrui; LIU Xiaohai

    2009-01-01

    Residence time is an important indicator for river environmental management. In this paper, a 3D hydrody-namic model has been successfully applied to Little Manatee River to characterize the mixing and transport process and residence time. The model employs horizontal curvilinear orthogonal grids to represent the complex river system that consists of branches and bayous. The model has been satisfactorily calibrated and verified by using two continuous data sets. The data sets consist of hourly observations of all forcing boundaries, including freshwater inputs, tides, winds, salin-ity and temperatures at bay boundary, and air temperatures for model simulations. The data sets also consist of hourly observations of water levels, salinity, and temperature at several river stations. The calibrated and verified hydrodynamic model was used to predict residence time in the Little Manatee River. Under the minimum flow of 0.312 m3/s, the pulse residence time (PRT) is 108 days. Model simulations were also conducted for 17 flow scenarios. Empirical regression equations have been satisfactorily derived to correlate PRT to freshwater inflow. Correlation coefficient R2 is 0.982 for PRT.

  4. The influence of particle residence time distribution on the reactivity in fluidized bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, A.B.M.; Klaus, J.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle residence time distribution on the average conversion rate (or reactivity) of particles undergoing a non-catalytic gas-solid reaction inside a continuously operated fluidized bed reactor is evaluated. A so called ß-factor is defined as the ratio of the actual reactivity in

  5. Acetonitrile in the troposphere - Residence time due to rainout and uptake by the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, S.; Hahn, J.; Helas, G.; Warneck, P.

    1984-12-01

    Henry's law coefficients for the binary system acetonitrile-water are reported as a function of temperature from 279-303 K. The results are used to estimate the tropospheric residence time of acetonitrile due to wet precipitation (3 + or - 1.5 years) and the dry deposition velocity over the ocean (0.5 cm/s).

  6. Water residence times and nutrient budgets across an urbanizing gradient (Croton water supply area, NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D. A.; Duncan, J. M.; Hassett, J. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    Water residence times and nutrient budgets in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY, were examined. The watersheds (less than 1km 2) have different level of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on roads and slow flow through subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wet zones, hillslopes) . Measurements of the comprehensive chemical suite incl. components of nitrogen budget in the throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were performed bi-weekly over a period up to 2 years. Mean water residence times of the stream water were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes. There are significant differences in the chemical composition and decrease of nitrification intensity and of mean streamwater residence time along the increasing watershed development. Within each watershed, longer water residence times (up to over 2 years) were estimated in the wetland zones without direct communication with streams in comparison to hillslope areas (up to over 1 year). The results can be used in watershed management and planning of the further urbanization of this water supply area.

  7. Water Residence Times and Runoff Sources Across an Urbanizing Gradient (Croton Water Supply Area, New York)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D. A.; Duncan, J. M.; Hassett, J. M.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    Water residence times and nutrient budgets were measured in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY. The watersheds (less than 1km 2) have different levels of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on impervious surfaces and slow flow through the subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wet zones, hillslopes). Throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were sampled bi-weekly during a period of up to 2 years and analyzed for major chemical constituents, oxygen-18 content, and nitrogen species. Mean residence times of the stream water of about 30 weeks were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes for all 3 watersheds. There was no significant difference in mean residence times among the three study watersheds, despite their different levels of urbanization. However, residence times from a few weeks up to ca 2 years vary within the watersheds, depending on the local runoff sources and their geographical conditions (riparian and hillslope topography, aquifer type). The runoff sources were quantified for selected streamwater and groundwater sampling sites using the end member mixing analysis technique (EMMA). The mixing analysis shows the impact of the runoff sources on runoff generation in the selected watersheds, i.e. it shows how big is the impact of urbanization on the runoff generation and how big is the natural control. These results may be useful in watershed management and planning of further urbanization in the Croton water supply area.

  8. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-04-25

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate on residence time. The study established that the kneading block in the screw configuration acts as a plug-flow zone inside the granulator. Furthermore, it was found that a balance between the throughput force and conveying rate is required to obtain a good axial mixing inside the twin-screw granulator. Although the granulation behaviour is different for other excipients, the experimental data collection and modelling methods applied in this study are generic and can be adapted to other excipients.

  9. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  10. Burnout syndrome during residency in internal medicine and pediatrics in a country without working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Durusu Tanriover, Mine; Unal, Sule; Dizdar, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Serhat; Kale, Gulsev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate burnout syndrome among internal medicine and pediatrics residents in a country that does not have the working time directive (WTD) and also to determine the risk factors and consequent impact on efficient functioning in clinical areas. A 57-item questionnaire was given to internal medicine and pediatrics residents. Responses from 22 pediatrics and 33 internal medicine residents were evaluated. Demographic findings, burnout scores, having hobbies, social activities and reading books unrelated to medicine were similar between the two groups. Six pediatrics residents (27.3 per cent) and 11 (33.3 per cent) internal medicine residents met the criteria for clinically significant burnout. Personal accomplishment scores and reading books unrelated to medicine were found to be related to burnout. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and a low sense of personal accomplishment. It is important to document burnout in countries where WTDs are not implemented. Further studies might demonstrate burnout's effect on patient safety, service quality and physician's performance.

  11. Influence of temperature on patch residence time in parasitoids: physiological and behavioural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Abram, Paul K; Louâpre, Philippe; Barrette, Maryse; Brodeur, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Patch time allocation has received much attention in the context of optimal foraging theory, including the effect of environmental variables. We investigated the direct role of temperature on patch time allocation by parasitoids through physiological and behavioural mechanisms and its indirect role via changes in sex allocation and behavioural defences of the hosts. We compared the influence of foraging temperature on patch residence time between an egg parasitoid, Trichogramma euproctidis, and an aphid parasitoid, Aphidius ervi. The latter attacks hosts that are able to actively defend themselves, and may thus indirectly influence patch time allocation of the parasitoid. Patch residence time decreased with an increase in temperature in both species. The increased activity levels with warming, as evidenced by the increase in walking speed, partially explained these variations, but other mechanisms were involved. In T. euproctidis, the ability to externally discriminate parasitised hosts decreased at low temperature, resulting in a longer patch residence time. Changes in sex allocation with temperature did not explain changes in patch time allocation in this species. For A. ervi, we observed that aphids frequently escaped at intermediate temperature and defended themselves aggressively at high temperature, but displayed few defence mechanisms at low temperature. These defensive behaviours resulted in a decreased patch residence time for the parasitoid and partly explained the fact that A. ervi remained for a shorter time at the intermediate and high temperatures than at the lowest temperature. Our results suggest that global warming may affect host-parasitoid interactions through complex mechanisms including both direct and indirect effects on parasitoid patch time allocation.

  12. Effect of Hydraulic Retention Time and Wastewater Temperature on Treatment Efficiency of Upflow Anaerobic Filter Treating Campus Domestic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju Celestino Ladu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the removal efficiency of upflow anaerobic filter reactor fed continuously with campus domestic wastewater at different hydraulic retention time and wastewater temperature. The reactor was filled with non woven filter materials and operated at hydraulic retention time ranging from 1 to 6 days and wastewater temperature ranging from 20 to 30C. At that operating condition, the result revealed no significant difference for Carbonaceous (COD and nutrients materials except there was significant production of gas. The result revealed that increase in HRT and wastewater temperature improves removal performance of the reactor. The overall reactor removal efficiency for COD, TN, NH4+-N, NO3-N and TP concentration were 51, 22, 21, 28 and 10% and 61 35, 37, 49 and 27% in the anaerobic and anoxic columns, respectively. The experimental system was capable of instantaneous removal of the carbonaceous, nitrogenous and phosphorous compounds.

  13. An approach for second order control with finite time convergence for electro-hydraulic drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    Being a second order sliding algorithm, the super twisting algorithm is highly attractive for application in control of hydraulic drives and mechanical systems in general, as it utilizes only the control error while driving the control error as well as its derivative to zero for properly chosen a...

  14. Developing a Tool Point Control Scheme for a Hydraulic Crane Using Interactive Real-time Dynamic Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel M. Pedersen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an interactive real-time dynamic simulation model of a hydraulic crane. The user input to the model is given continuously via joystick and output is presented continuously in a 3D animation. Using this simulation model, a tool point control scheme is developed for the specific crane, considering the saturation phenomena of the system and practical implementation.

  15. Dedicated Shift Wrap-up Time Does Not Improve Resident Sign-out Volume or Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanmonod, Rebecca K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sign-out (SO is a challenge to the emergency physician. Some training programs have instituted overlapping 9-hour shifts. The residents see patients for eight hours, and have one hour of wrap-up time. This hour helps them complete patient care, leaving fewer patients to sign-out. We examined whether this strategy impacts SO burden.Methods: This is a retrospective review of patients evaluated by emergency medicine (EM residents working 9-hour (eight hours of patient care, one hour wrap-up time and 12-hour shifts (12 hours patient care, no reserved time for wrap-up. Data were collected by reviewing the clinical tracker. A patient was assigned to the resident who initiated care and dictated the chart. SO was defined as any patient in the ED without disposition at change of shift. Patient turn-around-time (TAT was also recorded.Results: One-hundred sixty-one postgraduate-year-one resident (PGY1, 264 postgraduate-year-two resident (PGY2, and 193 postgraduate-year-three resident (PGY3 shifts were included. PGY1s signed out 1.9 patients per 12-hour shift. PGY2s signed out 2.3 patients on 12-hour shifts and 1.8 patients on 9-hour shifts. PGY3s signed out 2.1 patients on 12-hour shifts and 2.0 patients on 9-hour shifts. When we controlled for patients seen per hour, SO burden was constant by class regardless of shift length, with PGY2s signing out 18% of patients seen compared to 15% for PGY3s. PGY1s signed out 18% of patients seen. TAT for patients seen by PGY1s and PGY2s was similar, at 189 and 187 minutes, respectively. TAT for patients seen by PGY3s was significantly less at 175 minutes.Conclusion: The additional hour devoted to wrapping up patients in the ED had no affect on SO burden. The SO burden represented a fixed percentage of the total number of patients seen by the residents. PGY3s sign-out a smaller percentage of patients seen compared to other classes, and have faster TATs. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:35-39].

  16. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors.

  17. Influence of hydraulic retention time on indigenous microalgae and activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Schwede, Sebastian; Lindberg, Carl-Fredrik; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2016-03-15

    Integration of the microalgae and activated sludge (MAAS) process in municipal wastewater treatment and biogas production from recovered MAAS was investigated by studying the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of semi-continuous photo-bioreactors. An average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency (RE) of maximum 81.5 ± 5.1 and 64.6 ± 16.2% was achieved at 6 and 4 days HRT. RE of total phosphorous (TP) increased slightly at 6 days (80 ± 12%) HRT and stabilized at 4 days (56 ± 5%) and 2 days (55.5 ± 5.5%) HRT due to the fluctuations in COD and N/P mass ratio of the periodic wastewater. COD and organic carbon were removed efficiently and a rapidly settleable MAAS with a sludge volume index (SVI_10) of less than 117 mL g(-1) was observed at all HRTs. The anaerobic digestion of the untreated MAAS showed a higher biogas yield of 349 ± 10 mL g VS(-1) with 2 days HRT due to a low solids retention time (SRT). Thermal pretreatment of the MAAS (120 °C, 120 min) did not show any improvement with biogas production at 6 days (269 ± 3 (untreated) and 266 ± 16 (treated) mL gVS(-1)), 4 days (258 ± 11(untreated) and 263 ± 10 (treated) mL gVS(-1)) and 2 days (308 ± 19 mL (treated) gVS(-1)) HRT. Hence, the biogas potential tests showed that the untreated MAAS was a feasible substrate for biogas production. Results from this proof of concept support the application of MAAS in wastewater treatment for Swedish conditions to reduce aeration, precipitation chemicals and CO2 emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Residence time distribution (RTD) of particulate foods in a continuous flow pilot-scale ohmic heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarang, Sanjay; Heskitt, Brian; Tulsiyan, Priyank; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2009-08-01

    The residence time distribution (RTD) of a model particulate-fluid mixture (potato in starch solution) in the ohmic heater in a continuous sterilization process was measured using a radio frequency identification (RFID) methodology. The effect of solid concentration and the rotational speed of the agitators on the RTD were studied. The velocity of the fastest particle was 1.62 times the mean product velocity. In general, particle velocity was found to be greater than the product bulk average velocity. Mean particle residence time (MPRT) increased with an increase in the rotational speed of the agitators (P < 0.05), and no particular trend was observed between the MPRT and the solid concentration. The distribution curves E (theta) were skewed to the right suggesting slow moving zones in the system.

  19. Seasonal Short-Lived Radium Activity in the Venice Lagoon: The Role of Residence Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaglia, J.; Ferrarin, C.; Zaggia, L.; Umgiesser, G.; Zuppi, G.; Manfe', G.

    2008-12-01

    Radium is considered to be an excellent tracer of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and, therefore, has been used in many studies of this process in the past decade. Comprehensive surveys of excess 223,224Ra activity were completed in the surface waters of the Venice Lagoon over 6 seasons in order to quantify seasonal variation of SGD into the lagoon. The mass balance of radium found that SGD was 5-26 times greater than total river discharge (35.5 m3 s-1), and that total SGD could differ by almost an order of magnitude pending season. Several possible parameters, which may cause the seasonal variation, were tested. These included precipitation events, average tidal elevation, average tidal excursion, wind speed and direction, yet none provided a satisfactory explanation for the difference. Residence time based on a hydrodynamic model, however, was very strongly correlated with the observed variation. When the average residence time in the lagoon was low (5 days) the SGD was calculated to be 930 m3 s-1 and when the average residence time was high (9 days) the SGD was quantified as 160 m3 s-1. Radioactive decay is already accounted for in the mass balance model and therefore this correlation must be explained by another process. The Venice Lagoon is characterized by low residence time during periods of spring tides and bora or northerly winds, both of which create exceptionally strong currents in the Venice Lagoon. The currents as well as the large tidal excursion which occurs at spring tides drive a recirculation of seawater through the surface sediments, which greatly increases short-lived Ra activity in the surface waters. This evidence suggests, therefore, that short-lived Ra mass balance studies, which are based on a single survey, may under or overestimate the mean annual SGD pending the hydrodynamics of the investigated location.

  20. Does residence time affect responses of alien species richness to environmental and spatial processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Dainese

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most robust emerging generalisations in invasion biology is that the probability of invasion increases with the time since introduction (residence time. We analysed the spatial distribution of alien vascular plant species in a region of north-eastern Italy to understand the influence of residence time on patterns of alien species richness. Neophytes were grouped according to three periods of arrival in the study region (1500–1800, 1800–1900, and > 1900. We applied multiple regression (spatial and non-spatial with hierarchical partitioning to determine the influence of climate and human pressure on species richness within the groups. We also applied variation partitioning to evaluate the relative importance of environmental and spatial processes. Temperature mainly influenced groups with speciesa longer residence time, while human pressure influenced the more recently introduced species, although its influence remained significant in all groups. Partial regression analyses showed that most of the variation explained by the models is attributable to spatially structured environmental variation, while environment and space had small independent effects. However, effects independent of environment decreased, and spatially independent effects increased, from older to the more recent neophytes. Our data illustrate that the distribution of alien species richness for species that arrived recently is related to propagule pressure, availability of novel niches created by human activity, and neutral-based (dispersal limitation processes, while climate filtering plays a key role in the distribution of species that arrived earlier. This study highlights the importance of residence time, spatial structure, and environmental conditions in the patterns of alien species richness and for a better understanding of its geographical variation.

  1. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  2. An overview of oil palm biomass torrefaction: Effects of temperature and residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, N.; Rahman, N. A.; Matali, S.; Idris, S. S.; Alias, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass is characterized as high moisture content, low bulk and energy density, possesses hygroscopic behaviour and poor grindability material as compared to the superior coal. A thermal treatment called torrefaction is a heating of biomass in a temperature range between 200°C to 300°C under inert atmosphere in order to upgrade biomass properties. Torrefied biomass has many similar characteristics to coal such as low moisture content, high bulk and energy density, hydrophobic and good grindability. This paper reviews the effects of oil palm biomass torrefaction in terms of temperature and residence time. This is because comprehensive studies on torrefaction parameters need to be carried out since different parameters might affect the chemical and physical characteristic of the torrefied product. Hence, this paper aims to discuss the effects of different torrefaction temperature and residence time towards physicochemical characteristic, mass and energy yield as well as calorific value of torrefied oil palm biomass.

  3. Effect of oven residence time on mechanical properties in rotomoulding of LLDPE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P L RAMKUMAR; SACHIN D WAIGAONKAR; D M KULKARNI

    2016-05-01

    In rotational moulding of plastics, improving the mechanical properties without sacrificing the processibility is a challenging task. In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of oven residence time on the mechanical properties of the rotationally moulded products made using linear low densitypolyethylene. Simulation studies were conducted using ROTOSIM software to analyze thermal transitions and phase changes during the process. Degree of curing of the polymers was also assessed and correlated with mechanical properties. Experiments were further conducted to obtain favourable oven residence time to obtain highest mechanical properties. Experimental investigation revealed that there exist regions where the part was ‘under-cured’ and mechanical properties were found to be inferior. It was also found that when parts were ‘overcured’, the mechanical properties were severely affected. A regime of favourable processing window was identified where the highest tensile, flexural and impact properties were noticed.

  4. Method for Making Measurements of the Post-Combustion Residence Time in a Gas Turbine Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey H (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method of measuring a residence time in a gas-turbine engine is provided, whereby the method includes placing pressure sensors at a combustor entrance and at a turbine exit of the gas-turbine engine and measuring a combustor pressure at the combustor entrance and a turbine exit pressure at the turbine exit. The method further includes computing cross-spectrum functions between a combustor pressure sensor signal from the measured combustor pressure and a turbine exit pressure sensor signal from the measured turbine exit pressure, applying a linear curve fit to the cross-spectrum functions, and computing a post-combustion residence time from the linear curve fit.

  5. Analysis of Tidal DC Resistivity Time Series for Periodic Saltwater Mixing Patterns and Determination of Hydraulic Ground Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E. M.; Ingham, M.

    2016-12-01

    Saline intrusion research using geoelectrical time-lapse monitoring, is often directed towards imaging the saltwater-freshwater boundary and the amount of seawater mixing within a coastal aquifer. However, these time series can contain additional information about subsurface hydrologic properties like hydraulic conductivity and permeability which are crucial elements in coastal groundwater management. In this study, DC resistivity time series from tidal time-lapse monitoring surveys of a shallow coastal sand and gravel aquifer in New Zealand have been analysed for recurring patterns of percentage seawater mixing in different portions of the aquifer. The results show a distinctly different behaviour of percentage seawater change with time for several horizontal locations along two profile lines with varying depth. In addition, the geoelectric time series have been cross-correlated with tidal stage data approximated near the survey location in order to find portions of the aquifer that exhibit different time lags with respect to a diurnal tidal cycle. First results yield a remarkably similar picture to resistivity ratios obtained between high and low tide inversion models of the DC resistivity time series both at different locations and for different seasons. The two methods indicate a correlation between rising and falling tides and the resistivity changes observed from geoelectrical monitoring studies .This may be used to distinguish between more or less hydraulically conductive portions of a coastal aquifer.

  6. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine\\ud exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the ...

  7. Classification of Animal Movement Behavior through Residence in Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orben, Rachael A.; Tolkova, Irina; Thompson, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Identification and classification of behavior states in animal movement data can be complex, temporally biased, time-intensive, scale-dependent, and unstandardized across studies and taxa. Large movement datasets are increasingly common and there is a need for efficient methods of data exploration that adjust to the individual variability of each track. We present the Residence in Space and Time (RST) method to classify behavior patterns in movement data based on the concept that behavior states can be partitioned by the amount of space and time occupied in an area of constant scale. Using normalized values of Residence Time and Residence Distance within a constant search radius, RST is able to differentiate behavior patterns that are time-intensive (e.g., rest), time & distance-intensive (e.g., area restricted search), and transit (short time and distance). We use grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) GPS tracks to demonstrate RST’s ability to classify behavior patterns and adjust to the inherent scale and individuality of each track. Next, we evaluate RST’s ability to discriminate between behavior states relative to other classical movement metrics. We then temporally sub-sample albatross track data to illustrate RST’s response to less resolved data. Finally, we evaluate RST’s performance using datasets from four taxa with diverse ecology, functional scales, ecosystems, and data-types. We conclude that RST is a robust, rapid, and flexible method for detailed exploratory analysis and meta-analyses of behavioral states in animal movement data based on its ability to integrate distance and time measurements into one descriptive metric of behavior groupings. Given the increasing amount of animal movement data collected, it is timely and useful to implement a consistent metric of behavior classification to enable efficient and comparative analyses. Overall, the application of RST to objectively explore and compare behavior patterns in movement data

  8. Classification of Animal Movement Behavior through Residence in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leigh G; Orben, Rachael A; Tolkova, Irina; Thompson, David R

    2017-01-01

    Identification and classification of behavior states in animal movement data can be complex, temporally biased, time-intensive, scale-dependent, and unstandardized across studies and taxa. Large movement datasets are increasingly common and there is a need for efficient methods of data exploration that adjust to the individual variability of each track. We present the Residence in Space and Time (RST) method to classify behavior patterns in movement data based on the concept that behavior states can be partitioned by the amount of space and time occupied in an area of constant scale. Using normalized values of Residence Time and Residence Distance within a constant search radius, RST is able to differentiate behavior patterns that are time-intensive (e.g., rest), time & distance-intensive (e.g., area restricted search), and transit (short time and distance). We use grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) GPS tracks to demonstrate RST's ability to classify behavior patterns and adjust to the inherent scale and individuality of each track. Next, we evaluate RST's ability to discriminate between behavior states relative to other classical movement metrics. We then temporally sub-sample albatross track data to illustrate RST's response to less resolved data. Finally, we evaluate RST's performance using datasets from four taxa with diverse ecology, functional scales, ecosystems, and data-types. We conclude that RST is a robust, rapid, and flexible method for detailed exploratory analysis and meta-analyses of behavioral states in animal movement data based on its ability to integrate distance and time measurements into one descriptive metric of behavior groupings. Given the increasing amount of animal movement data collected, it is timely and useful to implement a consistent metric of behavior classification to enable efficient and comparative analyses. Overall, the application of RST to objectively explore and compare behavior patterns in movement data can

  9. Fertilizer residence time affects nitrogen uptake efficiency and growth of sweet corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotarelli, L; Scholberg, J M; Dukes, M D; Muñoz-Carpena, R

    2008-01-01

    Understanding plant N uptake dynamics is critical for increasing fertilizer N uptake efficiency (FUE) and minimize the risk of N leaching. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of residence time of N fertilizer on N uptake and FUE of sweet corn. Plants were grown in 25 L columns during the fall and spring to mimic short-term N uptake dynamics. Nitrogen was applied either 1, 3, or 7 d before a weekly leaching event, using KNO3 solution (total of 393 kg N ha(-1)). Residence times (tR) were tR-1, tR-3, and tR-7 d before weekly removal of residual soil N. Plant N uptake was calculated by comparing weekly N recovery from planted with non-planted columns. During the fall, N uptake values at 70 d after emergence were 59, 73, and 126 kg N ha(-1). During the spring, corresponding values were 54, 108, and 159 kg N ha(-1). A linear response of plant growth and yield to the tR was observed under cooler conditions, whereas a quadratic response occurred under warmer conditions. There was correlation between root length density and yield. It is concluded that increasing N fertilizer residence time, which is indicative of better irrigation practices, enhanced overall sweet corn growth, yield, N uptake, and FUE, consequently reduced the risk of N being leached below the root zone before complete N uptake.

  10. Residence time distribution for electrokinetic flow through a microchannel comprising a bundle of cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Ting, Chung-Chieh; Lee, Duu-Jong; Tseng, Shiojenn; Chen, Chur-Jen; Su, Ay

    2007-03-01

    The electrokinetic flow of an electrolyte solution through a microchannel that comprises a bundle of cylinders is investigated for the case of constant surface potential. The system under consideration is simulated by a unit cell model, and analytical expressions for the flow field and the corresponding residence time distribution under various conditions are derived. These results are readily applicable to the assessment of the performance of a microreactor such as that which comprises a bundle of optical fibers. Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the influences of the key parameters, including the thickness of the double layer, the strength of the applied electric field, the magnitude of the applied pressure gradient, and the characteristic sizes of a microchannel, on the residence time distribution. We show that the following could result in a shorter residence time: thin double layer, strong applied electric field, large applied pressure gradient, and small number of cylinders. Based on the thickness of the double layer, criteria are proposed for whether the flow field can be treated as a laminar flow or as a plug flow, two basic limiting cases in reactor design.

  11. The relative importance of water temperature and residence time in predicting cyanobacteria abundance in regulated rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, YoonKyung; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Hyuk; Kang, Taegu; Kim, Joon Ha

    2017-11-01

    Despite a growing awareness of the problems associated with cyanobacterial blooms in rivers, and particularly in regulated rivers, the drivers of bloom formation and abundance in rivers are not well understood. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to assess the relative importance of predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance, and to test whether the relative importance of each predictor varies by site, using monitoring data from 16 sites in the four major rivers of South Korea. The results suggested that temperature and residence time, but not nutrient levels, are important predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance in rivers. Although the two predictors were of similar significance across the sites, the residence time was marginally better in accounting for the variation in cyanobacteria abundance. The model with spatial hierarchy demonstrated that temperature played a consistently significant role at all sites, and showed no effect from site-specific factors. In contrast, the importance of residence time varied significantly from site to site. This variation was shown to depend on the trophic state, indicated by the chlorophyll-a and total phosphorus levels. Our results also suggested that the magnitude of weir inflow is a key factor determining the cyanobacteria abundance under baseline conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Data tables of well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient...

  13. Hydraulic analysis of cell-network treatment wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaguo; Jawitz, James W.

    2006-11-01

    SummaryWhen individual cells of a multiple-cell treatment wetland are hydraulically connected, the wetland has a cell-network structure. The hydraulic performance of treatment wetlands is often characterized using tracer residence time distributions (RTDs) measured between the wetland inlet and outlet, such that the wetland is considered as a single hydraulic unit, regardless of the extent of networking between individual internal cells. This work extends the single hydraulic unit approach to enable the specification of moments and RTD parameters for individual cells, or clusters of cells, within the cell-network based on inert tracer tests with injection only at the network inlet. Hydraulic performance is quantified in terms of hydraulic efficiency and travel time dimensionless variance using both the method of moments and RTD modeling. Cell-network analysis was applied to a case study from the Orlando Easterly Wetland (OEW), demonstrating the improvement in hydraulic performance of individual wetland cells following wetland restoration activities. Furthermore, cell-network analysis indicated that the location of water quality sampling station locations within the cell network can significantly affect the accuracy of pollutant removal effectiveness estimation when the individual sample station RTD does not represent the hydraulic unit RTD. At the OEW, it was determined that historical nutrient removal effectiveness estimation may be underestimated for one area and overestimated for another, and recommendations were provided for sample station locations to minimize future performance estimation errors.

  14. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, L. Neil; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  15. Fault Diagnosis of a Hydraulic Pump Based on the CEEMD-STFT Time-Frequency Entropy Method and Multiclass SVM Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault diagnosis of hydraulic pumps is currently important and significant to ensure the normal operation of the entire hydraulic system. Considering the nonlinear characteristics of hydraulic-pump vibration signals and the mode mixing problem of the original Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD method, first, we use the Complete Ensemble EMD (CEEMD method to decompose the signals. Second, the time-frequency analysis methods, which include the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT and time-frequency entropy calculation, are applied to realize the robust feature extraction. Third, the multiclass Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier is introduced to automatically classify the fault mode in this paper. An actual hydraulic-pump experiment demonstrates the procedure with a complete feature extraction and accurate mode classification.

  16. An influential factor for external radiation dose estimation for residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident-time spent outdoors for residents in Iitate Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Sakata, Ritsu; Ozasa, Kotaro; Hayashi, Masayuki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have been conducted on radiation doses to residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Time spent outdoors is an influential factor for external dose estimation. Since little information was available on actual time spent outdoors for residents, different values of average time spent outdoors per day have been used in dose estimation studies on the FDNPP accident. The most conservative value of 24 h was sometimes used, while 2.4 h was adopted for indoor workers in the UNSCEAR 2013 report. Fukushima Medical University has been estimating individual external doses received by residents as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey by collecting information on the records of moves and activities (the Basic Survey) after the accident from each resident. In the present study, these records were analyzed to estimate an average time spent outdoors per day. As an example, in Iitate Village, its arithmetic mean was 2.08 h (95% CI: 1.64-2.51) for a total of 170 persons selected from respondents to the Basic Survey. This is a much smaller value than commonly assumed. When 2.08 h is used for the external dose estimation, the dose is about 25% (23-26% when using the above 95% CI) less compared with the dose estimated for the commonly used value of 8 h.

  17. Root microbiota dynamics of perennial Arabis alpina are dependent on soil residence time but independent of flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Nina; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Agler, Matthew T; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kemen, Eric; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Wunder, Jörg; Coupland, George; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent field and laboratory experiments with perennial Boechera stricta and annual Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the root microbiota influences flowering time. Here we examined in long-term time-course experiments the bacterial root microbiota of the arctic-alpine perennial Arabis alpina in natural and controlled environments by 16S rRNA gene profiling. We identified soil type and residence time of plants in soil as major determinants explaining up to 15% of root microbiota variation, whereas environmental conditions and host genotype explain maximally 11% of variation. When grown in the same soil, the root microbiota composition of perennial A. alpina is largely similar to those of its annual relatives A. thaliana and Cardamine hirsuta. Non-flowering wild-type A. alpina and flowering pep1 mutant plants assemble an essentially indistinguishable root microbiota, thereby uncoupling flowering time from plant residence time-dependent microbiota changes. This reveals the robustness of the root microbiota against the onset and perpetual flowering of A. alpina. Together with previous studies, this implies a model in which parts of the root microbiota modulate flowering time, whereas, after microbiota acquisition during vegetative growth, the established root-associated bacterial assemblage is structurally robust to perturbations caused by flowering and drastic changes in plant stature.

  18. Development of the Real-time Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Kori-1 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hwang, Do Hyun; Byon, Soo Jin [KEPRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The operation of the Kori-Unit 1 (1723.5MWt) is expanded to additional 10 years with upgrades of the Main Control Room (MCR). Therefore, the revision of the procedures, performance tests and works related with the exchange of the Main Control Board (MCB) are currently carried out. And as a part of it, the fullscope simulator for the Kori-1 is being developed for the purpose of the pre-operation and emergence response capability for the operators. The purpose of this paper is to report on the performance of the developed neutronics and thermal-hydraulic (TH) models of Kori Unit 1 simulator. The neutronics model is based on the NESTLE code and TH model based on the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulics analysis code which was funded as FY-93 LDRD Project 7201 and is running on the commercial simulator environment tool (the 3KeyMaster{sup TM} of the WSC). As some examples for the verification of the developed neutronics and TH models, some figures are provided. The outputs of the developed neutronics and TH models are in accord with the Nuclear Design Report (NDR) and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the reference plant

  19. Performance of a semi-pilot tubular microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) under several hydraulic retention times and applied voltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Carrera, L; Escapa, A; Carracedo, B; Morán, A; Gómez, X

    2013-10-01

    The influence of applied voltage and hydraulic retention time on the performance of a semi-pilot modular tubular wastewater-fed microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with high scalability was investigated. A chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 80%, as well as an energy consumption of 0.3-1.1 Wh g-COD(-1) removed, were achieved. Hydrogen production was limited by the reduced amounts of organic matter fed into the reactor, the poor performance of the cathode, and COD consuming by non electrogenic microorganisms. The presence of COD consuming microorganism that do not contribute to electrogenic metabolism severely affected the MEC performance.

  20. Geometrical effects on the electron residence time in semiconductor nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koochi, Hakimeh [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand 97175-615 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Fatemeh, E-mail: f-ebrahimi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand 97175-615 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Solar Energy Research Group, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-07

    We have used random walk (RW) numerical simulations to investigate the influence of the geometry on the statistics of the electron residence time τ{sub r} in a trap-limited diffusion process through semiconductor nano-particles. This is an important parameter in coarse-grained modeling of charge carrier transport in nano-structured semiconductor films. The traps have been distributed randomly on the surface (r{sup 2} model) or through the whole particle (r{sup 3} model) with a specified density. The trap energies have been taken from an exponential distribution and the traps release time is assumed to be a stochastic variable. We have carried out (RW) simulations to study the effect of coordination number, the spatial arrangement of the neighbors and the size of nano-particles on the statistics of τ{sub r}. It has been observed that by increasing the coordination number n, the average value of electron residence time, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} rapidly decreases to an asymptotic value. For a fixed coordination number n, the electron's mean residence time does not depend on the neighbors' spatial arrangement. In other words, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} is a porosity-dependence, local parameter which generally varies remarkably from site to site, unless we are dealing with highly ordered structures. We have also examined the effect of nano-particle size d on the statistical behavior of τ{sup ¯}{sub r}. Our simulations indicate that for volume distribution of traps, τ{sup ¯}{sub r} scales as d{sup 2}. For a surface distribution of traps τ{sup ¯}{sub r} increases almost linearly with d. This leads to the prediction of a linear dependence of the diffusion coefficient D on the particle size d in ordered structures or random structures above the critical concentration which is in accordance with experimental observations.

  1. Noble gas residence times of saline waters within crystalline bedrock, Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niedermann, Samuel; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Noble gas residence times of saline groundwaters from the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, located within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Finland, are presented. The accumulation of radiogenic (4He, 40Ar) and nucleogenic (21Ne) noble gas isotopes in situ together with the effects of diffusion are considered. Fluid samples were collected from depths between 180 and 2480 m below surface, allowing us to compare the modelled values with the measured concentrations along a vertical depth profile. The results show that while the concentrations in the upper part are likely affected by diffusion, there is no indication of diffusive loss at or below 500 m depth. Furthermore, no mantle derived gases were found unequivocally. Previous studies have shown that distinct vertical variation occurs both in geochemistry and microbial community structuring along the drill hole, indicating stagnant waters with no significant exchange of fluids between different fracture systems or with surface waters. Therefore in situ accumulation is the most plausible model for the determination of noble gas residence times. The results show that the saline groundwaters in Outokumpu are remarkably old, with most of the samples indicating residence times between ∼20 and 50 Ma. Although being first order approximations, the ages of the fluids clearly indicate that their formation must predate more recent events, such as Quaternary glaciations. Isolation within the crust since the Eocene-Miocene epochs has also direct implications to the deep biosphere found at Outokumpu. These ecosystems must have been isolated for a long time and thus very likely rely on energy and carbon sources such as H2 and CO2 from groundwater and adjacent bedrock rather than from the ground surface.

  2. Spatial distribution of triazine residues in a shallow alluvial aquifer linked to groundwater residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassine, Lara; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Khaska, Mahmoud; Verdoux, Patrick; Meffre, Patrick; Benfodda, Zohra; Roig, Benoît

    2017-03-01

    At present, some triazine herbicides occurrence in European groundwater, 13 years after their use ban in the European Union, remains of great concern and raises the question of their persistence in groundwater systems due to several factors such as storage and remobilization from soil and unsaturated zone, limited or absence of degradation, sorption in saturated zones, or to continuing illegal applications. In order to address this problem and to determine triazine distribution in the saturated zone, their occurrence is investigated in the light of the aquifer hydrodynamic on the basis of a geochemical approach using groundwater dating tracers ((3)H/(3)He). In this study, atrazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deethylterbuthylazine are measured in 66 samples collected between 2011 and 2013 from 21 sampling points, on the Vistrenque shallow alluvial aquifer (southern France), covered by a major agricultural land use. The frequencies of quantification range from 100 to 56 % for simazine and atrazine, respectively (LQ = 1 ng L(-1)). Total triazine concentrations vary between 15 and 350 ng L(-1) and show three different patterns with depth below the water table: (1) low concentrations independent of depth but related to water origin, (2) an increase in concentrations with depth in the aquifer related to groundwater residence time and triazine use prior to their ban, and (3) relatively high concentrations at low depths in the saturated zone more likely related to a slow desorption of these compounds from the soil and unsaturated zone. The triazine attenuation rate varies between 0.3 for waters influenced by surface water infiltration and 4.8 for water showing longer residence times in the aquifer, suggesting an increase in these rates with water residence time in the saturated zone. Increasing triazine concentrations with depth is consistent with a significant decrease in the use of these pesticides for the last 10

  3. Residence time effect on fullerene yield in butadiene-based laser pyrolysis flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ténégal, F.; Voicu, I.; Armand, X.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Reynaud, C.

    2003-09-01

    A new route for fullerene synthesis by CO 2-laser pyrolysis of gas phase mixture is proposed. Small hydrocarbon molecules which absorb the laser radiation, such as butadiene, are mixed with nitrous oxide (N 2O) as oxidizer. Such a mixture allows avoiding the use of a photosensitizer as SF 6 which causes contamination of the reaction zone and possibly influences the growth of fullerenic structures. This Letter also confirms the strong influence of the C/O atomic ratio in the mixture on the fullerene yield, and shows that residence time of the reactants in the pyrolysis flame and pressure influence dramatically the fullerene formation.

  4. The roles of mean residence time on herd behavior in a financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Cheng; Li, Yun-Xian; Tang, Nian-Sheng; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the herd behavior of stock prices in a finance system with the Heston model. Based on parameter estimation of the Heston model obtained by minimizing the mean square deviation between the theoretical and empirical return distributions, we simulate mean residence time of positive return (MRTPR). Plots of MRTPR against the amplitude or mean reversion of volatility demonstrate a phenomenon of herd behavior for a positive cross correlation between noise sources of the Heston model. Also, for a negative cross correlation, a phenomenon of herd behavior is observed in plots of MRTPR against the long-run variance by increasing amplitude or mean reversion of volatility.

  5. Does Be10 Underestimate Residence Time of Critical Zones in Acid Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be inventories were coupled with with mass balance of 9Be (bedrock to 18.3 meters soil-saprolite profile) to estimate the soil residence time (SRT) of a biogeomorphically stable Ultisol. We estimate SRT after correcting for observed9Be losses, which indicate that more than half of the 9Be weathered from primary minerals had been leached from the soil and saprolite. Our estimates of minimum SRT range between 1.3-1.4 Ma and between 2.6-3.1 Ma under high and low (2.0 and 1.3 × 106 atoms cm-2 yr-1, respectively) estimates of atmospheric 10Be deposition. Denudation rates of the physiographic region corroborate our residence time estimates. We double to quadruple the pedogenic time constraints of interfluves on the Southern Piedmont, and demonstrate that assumptions of complete meteoric 10Be retention in acidic soil systems need questioning. The results may have far-reaching consequences for soil, sediment, river, and ocean research using meteoric 10Be.

  6. Sediment residence time and connectivity in non-equilibrium and transient geomorphic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Hillebrand, Gudrun

    2016-04-01

    Growing empirical evidence shows that sediment delivery in many geomorphic systems is in transient state or out of equilibrium with respect to the external driving forces. The transient state is often related to the (dis)connectivity of the many constituent parts of geomorphic systems as a result of sediment storage along the sediment flow path from its source to the final sink. The response time of geomorphic systems to external changes is thus dependent on the residence time of sediment in various storage compartments. Here, a mathematical concept based on reservoir theory to model residence time of sediment in various depositional environments is presented. The concept allows to reinterpret millennial scale sediment budges, but can be also applied to decal sediment storage in reservoirs and aids sediment management practices in river systems. The framework sheds light on the limitation of the sediment delivery ratio, which is often used as a measure of sediment connectivity in geomorphic systems, and provides analytical information on process type, pace of sediment flux and connectivity of storage compartments along the sediment cascade. Examples will be given using Postglacial sediment budgets from the Canadian Rocky mountains on the one hand and short-term (~15 yrs.) sediment dynamics in the Iffezheim barrage in the Upper Rhine (Germany).

  7. Residence times in shallow waters help explain regional differences in Wadden Sea eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2016-11-01

    Regional variations in eutrophication levels of tidal basins in the Wadden Sea can be caused by external factors, like organic matter import, and internal factors like the morphology and hydrodynamics of the receiving tidal basin. For instance, benthic nutrients from remineralized organic matter may be more concentrated in shallow basins or diluted in basins with high exchange rates. In addition, the location of a monitoring station may determine which basin-specific water masses are actually observed. In the present paper a hydrodynamic intertidal imprint (IMP) is estimated for ten stations in various tidal basins of the Wadden Sea. The fraction of time water masses spent in intertidal areas prior to observation is calculated by linking the Lagrangian transport module PELETS to already existing hourly reconstructions of currents between 1959 and 2003. Irrespective of water depth, additional calculations of mean residence times (MRT) in the Wadden Sea indicate whether, in the case of low IMP values, water masses originate from coastal areas or tidal channels. Results show distinct regional differences, with highest values in the eastern part of the Dutch sector of the southern Wadden Sea (IMP=77%, MRT=99%) and lowest values in the German/Danish sector of the northern Wadden Sea (IMP=1.1%, MRT=21%). The IMP correlates positively with observed nutrient levels (R2=0.83). Evidently, this residence time-based intertidal signal is pivotal in explaining regional variations in eutrophication levels revealed by long-term comparative data from different monitoring stations.

  8. Keeping up with the times: revising the dermatology residency curriculum in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, Avery; Murphy, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The clinical use of molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine is increasing and improving rapidly over time. However, medical education incorporating the practical application of these techniques is lagging behind. Although instruction in these areas should be expanded upon and improved at all levels of training, residency provides a concentrated period of time in which to hone in on skills that are practically applicable to a trainee's specialty of choice. Although residencies in some fields, such as pathology, have begun to incorporate practical molecular diagnostics training, this area remains a relative gap in dermatology residency programs. Herein, we advocate for the incorporation of training in molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine into dermatology residency programs and propose a basic curriculum template for how to begin approaching these topics. By incorporating molecular diagnostics into dermatology residency training, dermatologists have the opportunity to lead the way and actively shape the specialty's transition into the era of personalized medicine. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Tolerance of disturbance by humans in long-time resident and recent colonist urban doves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jemma Gendall; Alan Lill; Juliey Beckman

    2015-01-01

    Background:A critical trait for successful urban dwelling by birds is the ability to tolerate high levels of disturbing stimulation by humans. If such tolerance is partly acquired gradually after colonization, species with a long history of residence in cities are likely to be more tolerant of such stimulation than recent urban colonists, but this has not often been tested. Methods:We tested whether introduced Rock (Columba livia) and Spotted (Streptopelis chinensis) Doves, historically long-term residents of Melbourne, Australia, were more tolerant of disturbance by humans than the very recent colonist, the native Crested Pigeon (Ochyphaps lophotes) by comparing the Flight Initiation Distances (FID) and time allocations to vigilance during foraging of all three species in urban Melbourne. That al three species are members of the Columbiformes reduces the possibility that any species differences in tolerance are simply phylogenetic in origin. Results:Flight initiation distance was shorter in Rock Doves than in the other two species, which did not differ in approachability by a human. Rock Doves retreated from an approaching human mainly by walking a relatively short distance, Crested Pigeons mainly by running a relatively short distance and Spotted Doves primarily by flying a comparatively long distance. The time allocation to anti-predator vigilance of Rock Doves was smaller than that of the other two species, whose allocations were similar. Conclusions:The very recent colonist of eastern Melbourne, the Crested Pigeon, was not the least tolerant of disturbance by humans of the three related species. Natural selection for tolerance therefore probably cannot entirely explain the pattern of tolerance evident among these urban dove species and behavioural flexibility is probably involved. Length of residency in a city is not an infallible guide to a species’ level of tolerance of disturbance by humans.

  10. Tolerance of disturbance by humans in long-time resident and recent colonist urban doves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jemma; Gendall; Alan; Lill; Juliey; Beckman

    2015-01-01

    Background: A critical trait for successful urban dwelling by birds is the ability to tolerate high levels of disturbing stimulation by humans. If such tolerance is partly acquired gradually after colonization, species with a long history of residence in cities are likely to be more tolerant of such stimulation than recent urban colonists, but this has not often been tested.Methods: We tested whether introduced Rock(Columba livia) and Spotted(Streptopelis chinensis) Doves, historically long-term residents of Melbourne, Australia, were more tolerant of disturbance by humans than the very recent colonist, the native Crested Pigeon(Ochyphaps lophotes) by comparing the Flight Initiation Distances(FID) and time allocations to vigilance during foraging of all three species in urban Melbourne. That all three species are members of the Columbiformes reduces the possibility that any species differences in tolerance are simply phylogenetic in origin.Results: Flight initiation distance was shorter in Rock Doves than in the other two species, which did not differ in approachability by a human. Rock Doves retreated from an approaching human mainly by walking a relatively short distance, Crested Pigeons mainly by running a relatively short distance and Spotted Doves primarily by flying a comparatively long distance. The time allocation to anti-predator vigilance of Rock Doves was smaller than that of the other two species, whose allocations were similar.Conclusions: The very recent colonist of eastern Melbourne, the Crested Pigeon, was not the least tolerant of disturbance by humans of the three related species. Natural selection for tolerance therefore probably cannot entirely explain the pattern of tolerance evident among these urban dove species and behavioural flexibility is probably involved. Length of residency in a city is not an infallible guide to a species’ level of tolerance of disturbance by humans.

  11. A study of residence time distribution using radiotracer technique in the large scale plant facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetchagarun, S.; Tippayakul, C.; Petchrak, A.; Sukrod, K.; Khoonkamjorn, P.

    2017-06-01

    As the demand for troubleshooting of large industrial plants increases, radiotracer techniques, which have capability to provide fast, online and effective detections to plant problems, have been continually developed. One of the good potential applications of the radiotracer for troubleshooting in a process plant is the analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD). In this paper, the study of RTD in a large scale plant facility using radiotracer technique was presented. The objective of this work is to gain experience on the RTD analysis using radiotracer technique in a “larger than laboratory” scale plant setup which can be comparable to the real industrial application. The experiment was carried out at the sedimentation tank in the water treatment facility of Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (Public Organization). Br-82 was selected to use in this work due to its chemical property, its suitable half-life and its on-site availability. NH4Br in the form of aqueous solution was injected into the system as the radiotracer. Six NaI detectors were placed along the pipelines and at the tank in order to determine the RTD of the system. The RTD and the Mean Residence Time (MRT) of the tank was analysed and calculated from the measured data. The experience and knowledge attained from this study is important for extending this technique to be applied to industrial facilities in the future.

  12. Residence time and conversion in the extrusion of chemically reactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, W.; Jaluria, Y.

    1999-07-01

    Extrusion is one of the most versatile and energy-efficient processes for the manufacture of polymer products, including food, pharmaceuticals and plastics. Many functions including mixing, cooking and chemical reaction can be performed in an extruder. Here, twin-screw extruders offer improved control of the residence time distribution (RTD) and mixing in materials such as plastics, rubber and food. Based on the flow and the heat transfer characteristics obtained for a self-wiping, co-rotating twin-screw extruder, the residence time and chemical reaction are studied by tracking the particles. For normally starve-fed twin-screw extruders, the length of the completely filled section is calculated as function of the process variables using the coupling of the flow with the die. With a model of the solid conveying section, the RTD for the whole extruder is calculated for corn meal at different screw speeds and flow rates. The calculated variation of RTD with the screw speed and the flow rate yields good agreement with observations from many experiments. The variation of the fully filled section length, chemical conversion and mixing effectiveness are also obtained under different operation conditions. Most of the results are in qualitative agreement with experimental results and may be used as guidelines for extruder design and determination of optimal operating condition.

  13. Tritium activity concentrations and residence times of groundwater collected in Rokkasho, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hidenao; Ueda, Shinji; Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Tritium ((3)H) concentrations were measured in groundwater samples from four surface wells (4-10 m deep), four shallow wells (24-26.5 m deep) and a 150-m-deep well in the Futamata River catchment area, which is adjacent to the large-scale commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. The (3)H concentrations in most of the surface- and shallow-well samples (<0.03-0.57 Bq l(-1)) were similar to those in precipitation (annual mean: 0.31-0.79 Bq l(-1)), suggesting that the residence time of the water in those wells was 0-15 y. The (3)H concentrations in the samples from a 26-m-deep well and the 150-m-deep well were lower than those in the other wells, indicating that groundwater with a long residence time exists in deep aquifers and the estuary area of the catchment. It is not clear whether (3)H released during test operation of the plant with actual spent nuclear fuel affected the (3)H concentrations observed in this study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The reactive transport of trichloroethene is influenced by residence time and microbial numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haest, P. J.; Philips, J.; Springael, D.; Smolders, E.

    2011-01-01

    The dechlorination rate in a flow-through porous matrix can be described by the species specific dechlorination rate observed in a liquid batch unless mass transport limitations prevail. This hypothesis was examined by comparing dechlorination rates in liquid batch with that in column experiments at various flow rates (3-9-12 cm day - 1 ). Columns were loaded with an inoculated sand and eluted with a medium containing 1 mM trichloroethene (TCE) for 247 days. Dechlorination in the column treatments increased with decreasing flow rate, illustrating the effect of the longer residence time. Zeroth order TCE or cis-DCE degradation rates were 4-7 folds larger in columns than in corresponding batch systems which could be explained by the higher measured Geobacter and Dehalococcoides numbers per unit pore volume in the columns. The microbial numbers also explained the variability in dechlorination rate among flow rate treatments marked by a large elution of the dechlorinating species' yield as flow increased. Stop flow events did not reveal mass transport limitations for dechlorination. We conclude that flow rate effects on reactive transport of TCE in this coarse sand are explained by residence time and by microbial transport and that mass transport limitations in this porous matrix are limited.

  15. Investigation of liquid phase axial dispersion in Taylor bubble flow by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin J.H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow occurs in small diameter channels in which gas bubbles are separated by slugs of pure liquid. This type of flow regime is well suited for solid catalyzed gas-liquid reactors in which the reaction efficiency is a strong function of axial dispersion in the regions of pure liquid. This paper presents an experimental study of liquid phase axial dispersion in a Taylor bubble flow developed in a horizontal tube using high speed photography and radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD analysis. A parametric dependence of axial dispersion on average volume fraction of gas phase was also investigated by varying the relative volumetric flow rates of the two phases. 137mBa produced from a 137Cs/137mBa radionuclide generator was used as radiotracer and measurements were made using the NaI(Tl scintillation detectors. Validation of 137mBa in the form of barium chloride as aqueous phase radiotracer was also carried out. Axial Dispersion Model (ADM was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system and the results of the experiment are presented. It was observed that the system is characterized by very high values of Peclet Number (Pe∼102 which reveals an approaching plug type flow. The experimental and model estimated values of mean residence times were observed in agreement with each other.

  16. Fluid flow pattern and water residence time in waste stabilisation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrot-Nico, F; Guinot, V; Brissaud, F

    2009-01-01

    As treatment processes are kinetic-dependent, a consistent description of water residence times is essential to the prediction of waste stabilization ponds performance. A physically-based 3D transient CFD model simulating the water velocity, temperature and concentration fields as a function of all influent meteorological factors--wind speed and direction, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity--was used to identify the relationships between the meteorological conditions and the hydrodynamic patterns and water residence times distributions in a polishing pond. The required meteorological data were recorded on site and water temperatures recorded at 10 sampling sites for 141 days. Stratification events appear on very calm days for wind speeds lower than 3 m s(-1) and on sunny days for wind speeds lower than 5 m s(-1). De-stratification is related to two mixing processes: nightly convection cells and global mixing patterns. Numerical tracer experiments show that the results of the flow patterns can be evaluated using the dispersed flow regime approximation and, for wind speeds exceeding 6 m s(-1), the completely stirred tank reactor assumption.

  17. Residence times in subsurface hydrological systems, introduction to the Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Ginn, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Interest in the residence time distribution (RTD) as a comprehensive measure of subsurface hydrologic systems is growing. This focus is resulting from recognition that diverse vadose zone, groundwater flows, and transfer between hydrological compartments, are fundamentally related to the system RTD. Furthermore, transport of chemical or biological species and the biogeochemical activities that govern their fate, is principally reflected by the system RTD. Thus the RTD is used in geochemical interpretation of environmental tracers, in direct reactive transport approaches, and ultimately for sustainability and protection assessments in the consideration of transient boundary flows due to climate change or other causes, anthropogenic and/or natural. The RTD has been handled in the past primarily as a byproduct of models. It is now increasingly viewed as an integrative characteristic for which shape-free and generic distributions are developed, that links conceptual hydrology, characterization data, and mathematical models. Intermediary between mechanistic modeling, geochemical data and predictions, the role for residence time distribution is to represent consistently the flow, transport and reactivity processes while reaching the objective of biogeochemical interpretation and sustainability assessment. After some outline of the scientific context, we introduce the contributions of this special issue and conclude with the emerging challenges.

  18. A non-discrete method for computation of residence time in fluid mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular simulations provide a promising means to predict risk of thrombosis in grafts, devices, and surgical anatomies in adult and pediatric patients. Although the pathways for platelet activation and clot formation are not yet fully understood, recent findings suggest that thrombosis risk is increased in regions of flow recirculation and high residence time (RT). Current approaches for calculating RT are typically based on releasing a finite number of Lagrangian particles into the flow field and calculating RT by tracking their positions. However, special care must be taken to achieve temporal and spatial convergence, often requiring repeated simulations. In this work, we introduce a non-discrete method in which RT is calculated in an Eulerian framework using the advection-diffusion equation. We first present the formulation for calculating residence time in a given region of interest using two alternate definitions. The physical significance and sensitivity of the two measures of RT are discussed and their mathematical relation is established. An extension to a point-wise value is also presented. The methods presented here are then applied in a 2D cavity and two representative clinical scenarios, involving shunt placement for single ventricle heart defects and Kawasaki disease. In the second case study, we explored the relationship between RT and wall shear stress, a parameter of particular importance in cardiovascular disease.

  19. Residence Times of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead in Off-Channel Tidal Freshwater Habitats, Columbia River, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We estimated seasonal residence times of acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids in off-channel, tidal freshwater habitats of the Columbia River near the Sandy River delta (rkm 198; 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011) and Cottonwood Island (rkm 112; 2012).

  20. The significance of oxygen as oxides and hydroxides in controlling the abundance and residence times of elements in seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    A model is presented which signifies the role of oxygen (as oxides and hydroxides) in controlling the composition of seawater. respective concentration and residence times for the unknown elements can be estimated. Geometric and statistical indices...

  1. Coupling groundwater residence time and 234U/238U isotopic ratios in a granitic catchment (Vosges, Eastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viville, Daniel; Aquilina, Luc; Ackerer, Julien; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Granet, Mathieu; Perrone, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    Weathering processes are active in surface waters but groundwater also represents no neglectable chemical fluxes. As residence-time in groundwater are high, silicate weathering might take place and control Si, Ca and C fluxes. Weathering processes can be deduced from U isotopic ratios but the kinetics of these processes remain relatively poorly constrained. In order to better characterize these processes, we have coupled residence-times deduced from anthropogenic gases (CFC and SF6) analysis and 234U/238U isotopic ratios determination. Samples were collected in the Strengbach catchment (Hydro-geochemical Observatory OHGE, Vosges, eastern France). Two campaigns were carried out in May and August 2015 during two highly contrasted hydro-climatic periods. Both springs and boreholes down to 80 m depth have been sampled. A very clear geochemical distinction is observed between groundwater from surface springs and deeper groundwater from boreholes. Springs show much lower residence-time (few years) and specific chemical composition. Deeper groundwater have residence-time of several decades and different geochemical composition. A clear SF6 production is observed with increasing SF6 concentrations with residence-time. The campaign of May is characterized by highly groundwater levels and spring fluxes. All groundwater show very low residence time, except in the boreholes at depth greater than 40 m. Conversely, during low groundwater-level period in August, the residence times are much higher and CFC concentrations indicate a large mixing process between surface groundwater and deeper levels. The 234U/238U isotopic ratios confirm this vertical zonation in the boreholes, with much higher activity ratios in the deep ground-waters from borehole than in the surface and spring waters; Such high U activity ratios are indicative of long water-rock interactions, which is consistent with the long residence times deducted from the CFC and SF6 data.

  2. A simple model for Junge’s relationship between concentration fluctuations and residence times for tropospheric trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    SLINN, W. G. N.

    2011-01-01

    A simple model is advanced to explain Junge’s empirical result relating the residence times oftrace gases in the troposphere to a coefficient of deviation of their concentrations. It is shownthat Junge’s result can be derived from a peculiar definition for the concentration variations inspace, based only on the spatial variation of the mean concentration. Nevertheless, forsufficiently uniform sources and sinks of the gases, the result can be used to estimatetropospheric residence-times of gas...

  3. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Niels P; Kaper, Hans J; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-12-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces, although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients were similar for hydrophilic and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass, likely because initial desorption is controlled by attractive Lifshitz-Van der Waals interactions, which are comparable on both substratum surfaces. However, significantly slower decay times of the desorption rate coefficients are found for hydrophilic glass than for hydrophobic DDS-coated glass. This difference is suggested to be due to the acid-base interactions between staphylococci and these surfaces, which are repulsive on hydrophilic glass and attractive on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass. Final desorption rate coefficients are higher on hydrophilic glass than on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass, due to the so called hydrophobic effect, facilitating a closer contact on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass.

  4. Estimating soil hydraulic properties from soil moisture time series by inversion of a dual-permeability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Meyer, Stefanie; Potthast, Karin; Michalzik, Beate

    2017-04-01

    Dual-permeability type models are widely used to simulate water fluxes and solute transport in structured soils. These models contain two spatially overlapping flow domains with different parameterizations or even entirely different conceptual descriptions of flow processes. They are usually able to capture preferential flow phenomena, but a large set of parameters is needed, which are very laborious to obtain or cannot be measured at all. Therefore, model inversions are often used to derive the necessary parameters. Although these require sufficient input data themselves, they can use measurements of state variables instead, which are often easier to obtain and can be monitored by automated measurement systems. In this work we show a method to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from high frequency soil moisture time series data gathered at two different measurement depths by inversion of a simple one dimensional dual-permeability model. The model uses an advection equation based on the kinematic wave theory to describe the flow in the fracture domain and a Richards equation for the flow in the matrix domain. The soil moisture time series data were measured in mesocosms during sprinkling experiments. The inversion consists of three consecutive steps: First, the parameters of the water retention function were assessed using vertical soil moisture profiles in hydraulic equilibrium. This was done using two different exponential retention functions and the Campbell function. Second, the soil sorptivity and diffusivity functions were estimated from Boltzmann-transformed soil moisture data, which allowed the calculation of the hydraulic conductivity function. Third, the parameters governing flow in the fracture domain were determined using the whole soil moisture time series. The resulting retention functions were within the range of values predicted by pedotransfer functions apart from very dry conditions, where all retention functions predicted lower matrix potentials

  5. Capabilities needed for the next generation of thermo-hydraulic codes for use in real time applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, S.A.

    1997-07-01

    The real-time reactor simulation field is currently at a crossroads in terms of the capability to perform real-time analysis using the most sophisticated computer codes. Current generation safety analysis codes are being modified to replace simplified codes that were specifically designed to meet the competing requirement for real-time applications. The next generation of thermo-hydraulic codes will need to have included in their specifications the specific requirement for use in a real-time environment. Use of the codes in real-time applications imposes much stricter requirements on robustness, reliability and repeatability than do design and analysis applications. In addition, the need for code use by a variety of users is a critical issue for real-time users, trainers and emergency planners who currently use real-time simulation, and PRA practitioners who will increasingly use real-time simulation for evaluating PRA success criteria in near real-time to validate PRA results for specific configurations and plant system unavailabilities.

  6. Impacts of Hydraulic Residence Time Prediction and Diurnal Loading Pattern on the Estimation of Drug Abuse in Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Polesel, Fabio; Andresson, Guðmundur

    The measurement of illicit drugs and their human urinary metabolites in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has been recently used to estimate prohibited drug consumption in catchment communities. In this study, a preliminary estimation of the consumption of cocaine (COC...

  7. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-04-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species' native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the inclusion

  8. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  9. The mean residence time of river water in the Canada Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min; XING Na; HUANG YiPu; QIU YuSheng

    2008-01-01

    Seawater was collected from the western Arctic Ocean for measurements of 18O, 226Ra and 228Ra. The fractions of river runoff and sea ice melt-water in water samples were estimated by using δ18O-S-PO* tracer system. The mean residence time of river water in the Canada Basin was calculated based on the relationship between 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. and the fractions of river runoff in the shelf and deep ocean. Our results showed that the river runoff fractions in the Canada Basin were significantly higher than those in the shelf regions, suggesting that the Canada Basin is a major storage region for Arctic river water. 228Ra activity concentrations in the Chukchi shelf and the Beaufort shelf ranged from 0.16 to 1.22 Bq/m3,lower than those reported for shelves in the low and middle latitudes, indicating the effect of sea ice melt-water. A good positive linear relationship was observed between 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. and the fraction of river runoff for shelf waters, while the 228Ra/226Ra)A.R in the Canada Basin was located below this regressive line. The low 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. in the Canada Basin was ascribed to 228Ra decay during shelf wa-ters transporting to the deep ocean. The residence time of 5.0-11.0 a was estimated for the river water in the Canada Basin, which determined the time response of surface freshening in the North Atlantic to the river runoff into the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Analysis of catchment behavior using residence time distributions with application to the Thuringian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykhodko, Vladyslav; Heße, Falk; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    Residence time distribution (RTD), as presented e.g. by Botter et al., are a novel mathematical framework for a quantitative characterization of hydrological systems. These distributions contain information about water storage, flow pathways and water sources and therefore improve the classical hydrograph methods by allowing both nonlinear as well as time-dependent dynamics. In our study we extend this previous works by applying this theoretical framework on real-world heterogeneous catchments. To that end we use a catchment-scale hydrological model (mHM) and apply the approach of Botter et al. to each spatial grid cell of mHM. To facilitate the coupling we amended Botter's approach by introducing additional fluxes (like runoff from unsaturated zone) and specifying the structure of the groundwater zone. By virtue of this coupling we could then make use of the realistic hydrological fluxes and state variables as provided by mHM. This allowed us to use both observed (precipitation, temperature, soil type etc.) and modeled data sets and asses their impact on the behavior of the resulting RTD's. We extended the aforementioned framework to analyze large catchments by including geomorphic effect due to the actual arrangement of subcatchments around the channel network using the flood routing algorithm of mHM. Additionally we study dependencies of the stochastic characteristics of RTD's on the meteorological and hydrological processes as well as on the morphological structure of the catchment. As a result we gained mean residence times (MRT) of base flow and groundwater flow on the mesoscale (4km x 4km). We compare the spatial distribution of MRT's with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and temperature. Results showed that land cover is a major predictor for MRT's whereas its impact on the mean evapotranspiration time was much lower. Additionally we determined the temporal evolution of mean travel times by using time series of

  11. Examining the information content of time-lapse crosshole GPR data collected under different infiltration conditions to estimate unsaturated soil hydraulic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholer, M.; Irving, J.; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2013-01-01

    by natural or artificial means, have been demonstrated in a number of studies to contain valuable information concerning the hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone. Previous work in this domain has considered a variety of infiltration conditions and different amounts of time-lapse GPR data......Time-lapse geophysical data acquired during transient hydrological experiments are being increasingly employed to estimate subsurface hydraulic properties at the field scale. In particular, crosshole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data, collected while water infiltrates into the subsurface either...... subsurface hydraulic properties as a function of depth, with forced infiltration offering the greatest potential for VGM parameter refinement because of the higher stressing of the hydrological system. Considering greater amounts of time-lapse data in the inversion procedure is also found to help refine VGM...

  12. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F. Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  13. Residence Times of Particles in Diffusive Protoplanetary Disk Environments I. Vertical Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Ciesla, Fred J

    2010-01-01

    The chemical and physical evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks are determined by the types of environments they are exposed to and their residence times within each environment. Here a method for calculating representative paths of materials in diffusive protoplanetary disks is developed and applied to understanding how the vertical trajectories that particles take impact their overall evolution. The methods are general enough to be applied to disks with uniform diffusivity, the so-called "constant-$\\alpha$" cases, and disks with a spatially varying diffusivity, such as expected in "layered-disks." The average long-term dynamical evolution of small particles and gaseous molecules is independent of the specific form of the diffusivity in that they spend comparable fractions of their lifetimes at different heights in the disk. However, the paths that individual particles and molecules take depend strongly on the form of the diffusivity leading to a different range of behavior of particles in...

  14. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robers, Matthew B; Dart, Melanie L; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Zimprich, Chad A; Kirkland, Thomas A; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V

    2015-12-03

    The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment.

  15. Recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept: unsteady state conditions and hydrodynamic model developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Claudel

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Two recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept are developed. The first one concerns the use of this method under transient conditions, a concept theoretically treated but rarely confirm by relevant experiments. In the present work, two experimental set-ups have been used to verify some limits of the concept. The second extension is devoted to the development of hydrodynamic models. Up to now, the hydrodynamics of the process are either determined by simple models (mixing cells in series, plug flow reactor with axial dispersion or by the complex calculation of the velocity profile obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations. An alternative is to develop a hydrodynamic model by use of a complex network of interconnected elementary reactors. Such models should be simple enough to be derived easily and sufficiently complex to give a good representation of the behavior of the process.

  16. Influences of pH and hydraulic retention time on anaerobes converting beer processing wastes into hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, J J; Tsai, C J; Huang, C C; Chang, J J; Chou, C H; Fan, K S; Chang, J I; Hsu, P C

    2005-01-01

    To convert high-solids organic wastes (3% w./w.) to high-value hydrogen, a full factorial experimental design was employed in planning the experiments for learning the effects of pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the hydrogen production in a chemostat reactor using waste yeast obtained from beer processing wastes. For determining which experimental variable settings affect hydrogen production, predictive polynomial quadratic equation and response surface methodology were employed to determine and explain the conditions required for high-value hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 460 mL/gVSS/d was obtained at pH = 5.8 and HRT = 32 hours. Moreover, hydrogenase targeted RT-PCR results indicate that Clostridium thermocellum and Klebsiella pneumoniae predominated.

  17. Multi-scale field investigation of water flow pathways and residence times in mountainous catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, S. W.; Troch, P. A.; Desilets, S. E.

    2006-12-01

    The "sky islands" of Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States form a unique complex of about 27 mountain ranges whose ecosystems support many perennial and ephemeral streams in an arid climate. Among these sky islands are the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, AZ, with a peak elevation of 9157 ft at Mt. Lemmon. Sabino Canyon Creek is the main stream which runs on the south face of the mountain range. It usually flows from July through April with an average daily flow of approximately 0.28 m3/s (10 cfs). However, flash floods are common both during summer as a result of intense monsoon rains and during spring because of rapid snowmelt. During these events, flow increases rapidally, reaching peak flows up to 480 m3/s (16,000 cfs, July 2006). Characterizing water flow pathways and residence times in these complex catchments is important for improving flash flood warning systems, estimating mountain front recharge, managing forest and wild fires, and understanding ecosystem functions. In the summer of 2006, we set up an extensive hydrometrical and hydro-chemical monitoring network in Sabino Canyon Creek, comprising 40 tipping bucket rain gauges (two of which were equipped to automatically collect rainwater samples), 5 automatic surface water level stations (three of which were equipped with auto samplers), and 8 manual soil lysimeters. In addition, several rain and stream water grab samples were collected manually during intensive rain events. Water samples are analyzed for major ions and liquid water isotopic concentration (2H and 18O) in rain, soil, ground and surface water. The data allows for a detailed reconstruction of water flow pathways and residence times at 3 different catchment scales (2 km2, 8 km2, and 91 km2) during the recorded flow events, including the highest monsoon rainfall-runoff event ever recorded in these mountains.

  18. Sources and Residence Times of Groundwater in Shasta County, CA Determined by Isotopic Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E.; Moran, J. E.; Deinhart, A.; Roberts, S. K.; Esser, B.; Visser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Large-volume springs are a significant source of water to communities in Shasta County. Aquifers in this region are developed in young volcanic formations and the age and flow of groundwater is not well characterized, making predicting the impact of drought and climate change on spring flow difficult. To better understand the water resources and the hydrogeology of the region and to better constrain the age of water produced by springs, we have sampled water from wells, springs, and streams for a suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers. We are using isotopic tracers because of the limited number of sampling points over a large area, leaving traditional hydrogeologic methods such as water levels and pump tests inadequate for a regional study. We analyzed samples for sulfur-35 (87.4 day half-life) and found detections in two springs, confirming the presence of a fraction of recently (1-2 years) recharged groundwater. Tritium (12.3 year half-life) activities show that some wells produce water recharged more than 5 decades ago, but most produce more recently recharged water. We will also report results for sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life), krypton-85 (10.8 year half-life), carbon-14 (5,730 year half-life), dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, and helium isotopic composition. These isotopes are applied to determine the age (residence time) of groundwater over a broad age distribution, from less than one year to tens of thousands of years. These tracers should also provide information on aquifer volumes, help delineate groundwater flow, and help to identify recharge areas. A collection of groundwater ages from springs at high elevations to wells in the upper Sacramento Valley will help delineate groundwater flowpaths. Finally, groundwater residence times will help determine groundwater volume and recharge rates, and resolve questions related to drought vulnerability and effective adjustments in water resource management.

  19. Residence time distributions for hydrologic systems: Mechanistic foundations and steady-state analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Sarah; Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Massoudieh, Arash; Bresciani, Etienne; McCallum, James

    2016-12-01

    This review presents the physical mechanisms generating residence time distributions (RTDs) in hydrologic systems with a focus on steady-state analytical solutions. Steady-state approximations of the RTD in hydrologic systems have seen widespread use over the last half-century because they provide a convenient, simplified modeling framework for a wide range of problems. The concept of an RTD is useful anytime that characterization of the timescales of flow and transport in hydrologic systems is important, which includes topics like water quality, water resource management, contaminant transport, and ecosystem preservation. Analytical solutions are often adopted as a model of the RTD and a broad spectrum of models from many disciplines has been applied. Although these solutions are typically reduced in dimensionality and limited in complexity, their ease of use makes them preferred tools, specifically for the interpretation of tracer data. Our review begins with the mechanistic basis for the governing equations, highlighting the physics for generating a RTD, and a catalog of analytical solutions follows. This catalog explains the geometry, boundary conditions and physical aspects of the hydrologic systems, as well as the sampling conditions, that altogether give rise to specific RTDs. The similarities between models are noted, as are the appropriate conditions for their applicability. The presentation of simple solutions is followed by a presentation of more complicated analytical models for RTDs, including serial and parallel combinations, lagged systems, and non-Fickian models. The conditions for the appropriate use of analytical solutions are discussed, and we close with some thoughts on potential applications, alternative approaches, and future directions for modeling hydrologic residence time.

  20. Residence time of water discharging from the Hanging Gardens of Zion Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Christensen, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Hanging Gardens are a unique feature of Zion National Park. Knowledge of the source and residence time of water discharging from the Hanging Gardens is necessary to help preserve these features. Ground-water chemical and isotopic data distinguish the discharge from seeps and springs into two groups, one of low and one of high conductivity. Water with low conductivity likely originates as recharge near the steps and springs, and it only interacts with the Navajo Sandstone. High conductivity water, on the other hand, originates as recharge on the tops of plateaus to the east, where it interacts with marine rocks of the Carmel Formation. Carbon dating of these ground waters indicates that the low conductivity water is essentially modern recharge, while the high conductivity water was recharged 1,000 to 4,000 years ago.The Hanging Gardens are a unique feature of Zion National Park. Knowledge of the source and residence time of water discharging from the Hanging Gardens is necessary to help preserve these features. Ground-water chemical and isotopic data distinguish the discharge from seeps and springs into two groups, one of low and one of high conductivity. Water with low conductivity likely originates as recharge near the seeps and springs, and it only interacts with the Navajo Sandstone. High conductivity water, on the other hand, originates as recharge on the tops of plateaus to the cast, where it interacts with marine rocks of the Carmel Formation. Carbon dating of these ground waters indicates that the low conductivity water is essentially modern recharge, while the high conductivity water was recharged 1,000 to 4,000 years ago.

  1. Chloride and organic chlorine in forest soils: storage, residence times, and influence of ecological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Paul-Olivier; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Bastviken, David; Cecchini, Sébastien; Nicolas, Manuel; Thiry, Yves

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that extensive chlorination of natural organic matter significantly affects chlorine (Cl) residence time in soils. This natural biogeochemical process must be considered when developing the conceptual models used as the basis for safety assessments regarding the potential health impacts of 36-chlorine released from present and planned radioactive waste disposal facilities. In this study, we surveyed 51 French forested areas to determine the variability in chlorine speciation and storage in soils. Concentrations of total chlorine (Cl(tot)) and organic chlorine (Cl(org)) were determined in litterfall, forest floor and mineral soil samples. Cl(org) constituted 11-100% of Cl(tot), with the highest concentrations being found in the humus layer (34-689 mg Cl(org) kg(-1)). In terms of areal storage (53 - 400 kg Cl(org) ha(-1)) the mineral soil dominated due to its greater thickness (40 cm). Cl(org) concentrations and estimated retention of organochlorine in the humus layer were correlated with Cl input, total Cl concentration, organic carbon content, soil pH and the dominant tree species. Cl(org) concentration in mineral soil was not significantly influenced by the studied environmental factors, however increasing Cl:C ratios with depth could indicate selective preservation of chlorinated organic molecules. Litterfall contributions of Cl were significant but generally minor compared to other fluxes and stocks. Assuming steady-state conditions, known annual wet deposition and measured inventories in soil, the theoretical average residence time calculated for total chlorine (inorganic (Cl(in)) and organic) was 5-fold higher than that estimated for Cl(in) alone. Consideration of the Cl(org) pool is therefore clearly important in studies of overall Cl cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Modelled hydraulic redistribution by sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) matches observed data only after including night-time transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G; Teshera-Levye, Jennifer; Rockwell, Fulton E; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2014-04-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, whereas the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two ecotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modelling formulation developed by Ryel et al. matched experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive night-time transpiration, and although over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that night-time transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. formulation does not include the effect of night-time transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of night-time transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and night-time stomatal behaviour changed, both influencing HR.

  3. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  4. On-site residence time in a driven diffusive system: violation and recovery of mean-field

    CERN Document Server

    Messelink, Joris J B; Vahabi, Mahsa; MacKintosh, Fred C; Sharma, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    We investigate simple one-dimensional driven diffusive systems with open boundaries. We are interested in the average on-site residence time defined as the time a particle spends on a given site before moving on to the next site. Using mean-field theory, we obtain an analytical expression for the on-site residence times. By comparing the analytic predictions with numerics, we demonstrate that the mean-field significantly underestimates the residence time due to the neglect of time correlations in the local density of particles. The temporal correlations are particularly long-lived near the average shock position, where the density changes abruptly from low to high. By using Domain wall theory (DWT), we obtain highly accurate estimates of the residence time for different boundary conditions. We apply our analytical approach to residence times in a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP), TASEP coupled to Langmuir kinetics (TASEP + LK), and TASEP coupled to mutually interactive LK (TASEP + MILK). The high ...

  5. Hydraulic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the planning, design, construction and management of hydraulic structures, covering dams, spillways, tunnels, cut slopes, sluices, water intake and measuring works, ship locks and lifts, as well as fish ways. Particular attention is paid to considerations concerning the environment, hydrology, geology and materials etc. in the planning and design of hydraulic projects. It also considers the type selection, profile configuration, stress/stability calibration and engineering countermeasures, flood releasing arrangements and scouring protection, operation and maintenance etc. for a variety of specific hydraulic structures. The book is primarily intended for engineers, undergraduate and graduate students in the field of civil and hydraulic engineering who are faced with the challenges of extending our understanding of hydraulic structures ranging from traditional to groundbreaking, as well as designing, constructing and managing safe, durable hydraulic structures that are economical ...

  6. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  7. Use of time-subsidence data during pumping to characterize specific storage and hydraulic conductivity of semi-confining units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbey, T. J.

    2003-09-01

    A new graphical technique is developed that takes advantage of time-subsidence data collected from either traditional extensometer installations or from newer technologies such as fixed-station global positioning systems or interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery, to accurately estimate storage properties of the aquifer and vertical hydraulic conductivity of semi-confining units. Semi-log plots of time-compaction data are highly diagnostic with the straight-line portion of the plot reflecting the specific storage of the semi-confining unit. Calculation of compaction during one-log cycle of time from these plots can be used in a simple analytical expression based on the Cooper-Jacob technique to accurately calculate specific storage of the semi-confining units. In addition, these semi-log plots can be used to identify when the pressure transient has migrated through the confining layer into the unpumped aquifer, precluding the need for additional piezometers within the unpumped aquifer or within the semi-confining units as is necessary in the Neuman and Witherspoon method. Numerical simulations are used to evaluate the accuracy of the new technique. The technique was applied to time-drawdown and time-compaction data collected near Franklin Virginia, within the Potomac aquifers of the Coastal Plain, and shows that the method can be easily applied to estimate the inelastic skeletal specific storage of this aquifer system.

  8. Biofilm growth in gravel bed streams controls solute residence time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Hanrahan, Brittany; Bolster, Diogo; Tank, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Streambed substrates harbor a rich biome responsible for biogeochemical processing in riverine waters. Beyond their biological role, the presence of benthic and hyporheic biofilms can play an important role in influencing large-scale transport of solutes, even for conservative tracers. As biofilms grow and accumulate biomass, they actively interact with and influence surface and subsurface flow patterns. To explore this effect, we conducted experiments at the Notre Dame Linked Ecosystems Experimental Facility in four outdoor streams, each with different gravel beds. Over the course of 20 weeks we conducted transport experiments in each of these streams and observed different patterns in breakthrough curves as biofilms grew on the substrate. Biofilms played a major role in shaping the observed conservative transport patterns. Overall, while the presence of biofilms led to a decreased exchange rate between the fast (mobile) and slow (immobile) parts of the flow domain, water that was exchanged tended to be stored in the slow regions for longer times once biofilms had established. More specifically, we observed enhanced longitudinal dispersion in breakthrough curves as well as broader residence time distributions when biofilms were present. Biofilm colonization over time homogenized transport patterns across the four streams that were originally very distinct. These results indicate that stream biofilms exert a strong control on conservative solute transport in streams, a role that to date has not received enough attention.

  9. Ross ice shelf cavity circulation, residence time, and melting: Results from a model of oceanic chlorofluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Tasha E.; Holland, David M.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2010-04-01

    Despite their harmful effects in the upper atmosphere, anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons dissolved in seawater are extremely useful for studying ocean circulation and ventilation, particularly in remote locations. Because they behave as a passive tracer in seawater, and their atmospheric concentrations are well-mixed, well-known, and have changed over time, they are ideal for gaining insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the isolated cavities found under Antarctic ice shelves, where direct observations are difficult to obtain. Here we present results from a modeling study of air-sea chlorofluorocarbon exchange and ocean circulation in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. We compare our model estimates of oceanic CFC-12 concentrations along an ice shelf edge transect to field data collected during three cruises spanning 16 yr. Our model produces chlorofluorocarbon concentrations that are quite similar to those measured in the field, both in magnitude and distribution, showing high values near the surface, decreasing with depth, and increasing over time. After validating modeled circulation and air-sea gas exchange through comparison of modeled temperature, salinity, and chlorofluorocarbons with field data, we estimate that the residence time of water in the Ross Ice Shelf cavity is approximately 2.2 yr and that basal melt rates for the ice shelf average 10 cm yr -1. The model predicts a seasonal signature to basal melting, with highest melt rates in the spring and also the fall.

  10. Impact of climate change on mean groundwater residence time in several Mediterranean Spanish aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Velazquez, David; Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Collados-Lara, Antonio-Juan; Ruíz-Constan, Ana

    2017-04-01

    The mean residence time in an aquifer, also known as natural turnover time or renewable period, can be obtained as the relation (R / St) between its storage capacity (St) and its recharge (R). It is an excellent indicator of the aquifer response capacity to its exploitation. Aquifers in which R is close to St values are extremely vulnerable to exploitation, even when it is less than the average recharge. This is especially relevant in Mediterranean climate areas, where long and intensive drought periods appear and will be exacerbated in future scenarios of global change. The natural turnover time depends on the recharge and the Global Change can produce important changes on it in the future. In this research we propose a method for a detailed estimation of natural turnover time by combining detailed 3D geological modelling of the case studies, estimated fields of specific yield for the aquifers (based on the analysis of multiple field sample), and rainfall-recharge models in several aquifer with different ratios of natural turnover time. These detailed 3D geological models have been defined by integrating information coming from seismic profiles, boreholes, magnetotelluric, electromagnetic and electrical sounding, digital elevation models, previous geological maps and new structural dates. They also allow us to deduce the reserve curve as a function of the elevation. On the other hand, different ensemble and downscaling techniques will be used to define potential future global climate change scenarios for the test-regions based on the data coming from simulations with different Regional Circulation Models (RCMs). These precipitation and temperature scenarios will be employed to feed the previously calibrated rainfall-recharge models in order to estimated future recharge and turnover time values. The methodology applied in this work could be a tool of special interest to identify at regional level which aquifers are most vulnerable to exploitation considering

  11. Dedicated Research Time During Surgery Residency Leads to a Significant Decline In Self-Assessed Clinical Aptitude and Surgical Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, Monica M; Yang, Anthony D; Humphries, Misty D; Galante, Joseph M; Salcedo, Edgardo S

    2017-05-19

    The surgical community commonly perceives a decline in surgical and patient care skills among residents who take dedicated time away from clinical activity to engage in research. We hypothesize that residents perceive a decline in their skills because of dedicated research time. UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, an institutional tertiary care center. General surgery residents and graduates from UC Davis general surgery residency training program, who had completed at least 1 year of research during their training. A total of 35 people were asked to complete the survey, and 19 people submitted a completed survey. Participants were invited to complete an online survey. Factors associated with the decline in skills following their research years were examined. All statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS Statistics software. A total of 19 current or former general surgery residents responded to the survey (54% response rate). Overall, 42% described their research as "basic science." Thirteen residents (68%) dedicated 1 year to research, while the remainder spent 2 or more years. Basic science researchers were significantly more likely to report a decrease in clinical judgment (75% vs. 22%, p = 0.013) as well as a decrease in patient care skills (63% vs. 0%, p = 0.002). Residents who dedicated at least 2 years to research were more likely to perceive a decline in overall aptitude and surgical skills (100% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), and a decline in patient care skills (67% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Most residents who dedicate time for research perceive a decline in their overall clinical aptitude and surgical skills. This can have a dramatic effect on the confidence of these residents in caring for patients and leading a care team once they re-enter clinical training. Residents who engaged in 2 or more years of research were significantly more likely to perceive these problems. Further research should determine how to keep residents who are interested in academics

  12. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading...... elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain...... interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time...

  13. Changes in catchment-scale water fluxes due to time-variant soil hydraulic properties in a subtropical agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Gao, Lei; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul

    2017-04-01

    In agricultural landscapes, temporal fluxes in hydraulic properties due to tillage, grazing, crop root growth and cycles of wetting and drying influenced by irrigation, could have large impacts at catchment scale. These effects are particularly evident in tropical climates where long periods of drought are followed by intense rainfall that greatly exceeds the infiltration capacity of the soil. This work explores the impact of the seasonal development of crops and the shifts in time between crop types on soil physical properties and the relative changes in the probability distribution of the water storage and fluxes dynamics. We focussed on an agricultural catchment in south east China where the climatic conditions include periods of droughts and heavy rainfall. Using coupled 1-dimension and semi-distributed catchment modelling combined with basic water balance data and both on-site and literature values for soil and crop properties, we investigated the impact of soil physical changes in the root-zone of the soil over different time scales ranging from daily to annual. Our results also showed that the resulting time-variant spatial patterns in soil water storage and flow had an impact on the integrated catchment runoff response at different times of the year.

  14. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  15. Are Prior Experience and Subspecialty Training Time Predictive of Pediatric Anesthesia Exit Exam Scores for Rotating CA-2 Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathon H; Deutsch, Nina; Cohen, Ira T; Reddy, Srijaya K

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiology residency programs commonly have rotations at free-standing children's hospitals to provide and/or supplement their residents' training in pediatric anesthesia. Length and timing of these rotations differ from program to program as can their residents' existing medical knowledge and clinical skills. We predicted that residents with prior pediatric anesthesia experience, who rotate at our pediatric institution for two consecutive months, will score higher on an exit exam compared to residents without prior pediatric experience or those that only rotate for one month. A 50-question multiple choice test was created using pediatric questions released from The American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) written examinations. The test was administered and proctored at the end of each rotation. Study participants came from three different programs: Program A offers prior pediatric anesthesia experience and a one month rotation; Program B - offers prior pediatric anesthesia experience and a two month rotation; and Program C - does not offer prior pediatric anesthesia experience but includes a two month rotation. The 2014-2015 cohort consisted of 26 rotating second-year clinical anesthesia (CA-2) residents. One resident's exam scores were excluded from this study due to protocol violation. Mean exam scores for Program A, B, and C were 70.5% ± 5.7, 64.2% ± 7.0, and 67.3% ± 4.3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the exit exam scores among the three groups. Prior pediatric anesthesia experience or length of time for subspecialty rotation was not associated with any significant difference in exit exam scores for CA-2 residents.

  16. Mixing effects on nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and the relationship to mean residence time in a hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Clinton Davis,

    2015-01-01

    Flow paths and residence times in the hyporheic zone are known to influence biogeochemical processes such as nitrification and denitrification. The exchange across the sediment-water interface may involve mixing of surface water and groundwater through complex hyporheic flow paths that contribute to highly variable biogeochemically active zones. Despite the recognition of these patterns in the literature, conceptualization and analysis of flow paths and nitrogen transformations beneath riffle-pool sequences often neglect to consider bed form driven exchange along the entire reach. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) were monitored in the hyporheic zone beneath a riffle-pool sequence on a losing section of the Truckee River, NV. Spatially-varying hyporheic exchange and the occurrence of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells are shown to influence concentrations of DO and NO3- and the mean residence time (MRT) of riffle and pool areas. Distinct patterns observed in piezometers are shown to be influenced by the first large flow event following a steady 8 month period of low flow conditions. Increases in surface water discharge resulted in reversed hydraulic gradients and production of nitrate through nitrification at small vertical spatial scales (0.10 to 0.25 m) beneath the sediment-water interface. In areas with high downward flow rates and low MRT, denitrification may be limited. The use of a longitudinal two-dimensional flow model helped identify important mechanisms such as multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells and spatially varying MRT, an important driver for nitrogen transformation in the riverbed. Our observations of DO and NO3- concentrations and model simulations highlight the role of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells on MRT and nitrogen transformations in the hyporheic zone of riffle-pool sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Water residence time affecting phytoplankton blooms: study case in Ibitinga Reservoir (São Paulo, Brazil) using Landsat/TM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londe, L R; Novo, E M L M; Barbosa, C; Araujo, C A S

    2016-05-01

    Satellite images are an effective tool for the detection of phytoplankton blooms, since they cause striking changes in water color. Bloom intensity can be expressed in terms of chlorophyll-a concentration. Previous studies suggest the use of Landsat TM4/TM3 reflectance ratio to retrieve surface chlorophyll-a concentration from aquatic systems. In this study we assumed that a remote sensing trophic state index can be applied to investigate how changes in HRT along the hydrologic year affect the spatial distribution of the phytoplankton blooms at Ibitinga's reservoir surface. For that, we formulated two objectives: (1) apply a semi-empirical model which uses this reflectance ratio to map chlorophyll-a concentration at Ibitinga reservoir along the 2005 hydrologic year and (2) assess how changes in hydraulic residence time (HRT) affect the spatial distribution of phytoplankton blooms at Ibitinga Reservoir. The study site was chosen because previous studies reported seasonal changes in the reservoir limnology which might be related to the reservoir seasonality and hydrodynamics. Six Landsat/TM images were acquired over Ibitinga reservoir during 2005 and water flow measurements provided by the Brazilian Electric System National Operator - ONS were used to compute the reservoir´s residence time, which varied from 5.37 to 52.39 days during 2005. The HRT in the date of image acquisition was then compared to the distribution of chlorophyll-a in the reservoir. The results showed that the HRT increasing implies the increasing of the reservoir surface occupied by phytoplankton blooms.

  18. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.

    2017-10-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes. Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture-laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  19. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes.Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture—laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  20. Accessing doctors at times of need-measuring the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Matthew Richard; Humphreys, John Stirling; Ward, Bernadette

    2015-05-29

    Poor access to doctors at times of need remains a significant impediment to achieving good health for many rural residents. The two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method has emerged as a key tool for measuring healthcare access in rural areas. However, the choice of catchment size, a key component of the 2SFCA method, is problematic because little is known about the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel. Our study sought new evidence to test the hypothesis that residents of sparsely settled rural areas are prepared to travel further than residents of closely settled rural areas when accessing primary health care at times of need. A questionnaire survey of residents in five small rural communities of Victoria and New South Wales in Australia was used. The two outcome measures were current travel time to visit their usual doctor and maximum time prepared to travel to visit a doctor, both for non-emergency care. Kaplan-Meier charts were used to compare the association between increased distance and decreased travel propensity for closely-settled and sparsely-settled areas, and ordinal multivariate regression models tested significance after controlling for health-related travel moderating factors and town clustering. A total of 1079 questionnaires were completed with 363 from residents in closely-settled locations and 716 from residents in sparsely-settled areas. Residents of sparsely-settled communities travel, on average, 10 min further than residents of closely-settled communities (26.3 vs 16.9 min, p time prepared to travel (54.1 vs 31.9 min, p time remained significant after controlling for demographic and other constraints to access, such as transport availability or difficulties getting doctor appointments, as well as after controlling for town clustering and current travel times. Improved geographical access remains a key issue underpinning health policies designed to improve the provision of rural primary health care

  1. Seasonal variation of residence time in spring and groundwater evaluated by CFCs and numerical simulation in mountainous headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Watanabe, Yasuto; Ikeda, Koichi; Yano, Shinjiro; Abe, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    Headwater catchments in mountainous region are the most important recharge area for surface and subsurface waters, additionally time information of the water is principal to understand hydrological processes in the catchments. However, there have been few researches to evaluate variation of residence time of subsurface water in time and space at the mountainous headwaters especially with steep slope. We investigated the temporal variation of the residence time of the spring and groundwater with tracing of hydrological flow processes in mountainous catchments underlain by granite, Yamanashi Prefecture, central Japan. We conducted intensive hydrological monitoring and water sampling of spring, stream and ground waters in high-flow and low-flow seasons from 2008 through 2013 in River Jingu Watershed underlain by granite, with an area of approximately 15 km2 and elevation ranging from 950 m to 2000 m. The CFCs, stable isotopic ratios of oxygen-18 and deuterium, inorganic solute constituent concentrations were determined on all water samples. Also, a numerical simulation was conducted to reproduce of the average residence times of the spring and groundwater. The residence time of the spring water estimated by the CFCs concentration ranged from 10 years to 60 years in space within the watershed, and it was higher (older) during the low flow season and lower (younger) during the high flow season. We tried to reproduce the seasonal change of the residence time in the spring water by numerical simulation, and the calculated residence time of the spring water and discharge of the stream agreed well with the observed values. The groundwater level was higher during the high flow season and the groundwater dominantly flowed through the weathered granite with higher permeability, whereas that was lower during the low flow season and that flowed dominantly through the fresh granite with lower permeability. This caused the seasonal variation of the residence time of the spring

  2. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ISSUES OF CONTAINMENT FILTERED VENTING SYSTEM FOR A LONG OPERATING TIME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ha, Kwang Soon; Park, Rae-Joon; Park, Jong-Hwa; Cho, Song-Won

    2014-01-01

    ...) for a long operating time using the MELCOR computer code. The modeling of the CFVS, including the models for pool scrubbing and the filter, was added to the input file for the OPR-1000, and a Station Blackout (SBO...

  3. Watershed Influences on Residence Time and Oxygen Reduction Rates in an Agricultural Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tesoriero, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural use of synthetic fertilizers and animal manure has led to increased crop production, but also elevated nitrogen concentrations in groundwater, resulting in impaired water quality. Groundwater oxygen concentrations are a key indicator of potential biogeochemical processes, which control water/aquifer interactions and contaminant transport. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program has a long-history of studying nutrient transport and processing across the United States and the Glacial Aquifer system in particular. A series of groundwater well networks in Eastern Wisconsin is being used to evaluate the distribution of redox reaction rates over a range of scales with a focus on dissolved O2 reduction rates. An analysis of these multi-scale networks elucidates the influence of explanatory variables (i.e.: soil type, land use classification) on reduction rates and redox reactions throughout the Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo watersheds. Multiple tracers including dissolved gasses, tritium, helium, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and carbon-14 were used to estimate groundwater ages (0.8 to 61.2 yr) at over 300 locations. Our results indicate O2 reduction rates along a flowpath study area (1.2 km2) of 0.15 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.12 to 0.18 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) up to 0.41 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.23 to 0.89 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) for a larger scale land use study area (3,300 km2). Preliminary explanatory variables that can be used to describe the variability in reduction rates include soil type (hydrologic group, bulk density) and chemical concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate, silica). The median residence time expected to reach suboxic conditions (≤ 0.4 mg O2 L-1) for the flowpath and the land use study areas was 66 and 25 yr, respectively. These results can be used to elucidate and differentiate the impact of residence time on groundwater quality vulnerability and sustainability in agricultural regions without complex flow models.

  4. Naturalization of central European plants in North America: species traits, habitats, propagule pressure, residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyšek, Petr; Manceur, Ameur M; Alba, Christina; McGregor, Kirsty F; Pergl, Jan; Stajerová, Katerina; Chytrý, Milan; Danihelka, Jiří; Kartesz, John; Klimesova, Jitka; Lucanova, Magdalena; Moravcová, Lenka; Nishino, Misako; Sadlo, Jiri; Suda, Jan; Tichy, Lubomir; Kühn, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    The factors that promote invasive behavior in introduced plant species occur across many scales of biological and ecological organization. Factors that act at relatively small scales, for example, the evolution of biological traits associated with invasiveness, scale up to shape species distributions among different climates and habitats, as well as other characteristics linked to invasion, such as attractiveness for cultivation (and by extension propagule pressure). To identify drivers of invasion it is therefore necessary to disentangle the contribution of multiple factors that are interdependent. To this end, we formulated a conceptual model describing the process of invasion of central European species into North America based on a sequence of "drivers." We then used confirmatory path analysis to test whether the conceptual model is supported by a statistical model inferred from a comprehensive database containing 466 species. The path analysis revealed that naturalization of central European plants in North America, in terms of the number of North American regions invaded, most strongly depends on residence time in the invaded range and the number of habitats occupied by species in their native range. In addition to the confirmatory path analysis, we identified the effects of various biological traits on several important drivers of the conceptualized invasion process. The data supported a model that included indirect effects of biological traits on invasion via their effect on the number of native range habitats occupied and cultivation in the native range. For example, persistent seed banks and longer flowering periods are positively correlated with number of native habitats, while a stress-tolerant life strategy is negatively correlated with native range cultivation. However, the importance of the biological traits is nearly an order of magnitude less than that of the larger scale drivers and highly dependent on the invasion stage (traits were associated

  5. Effect of hydraulic retention time and sludge recirculation on greenhouse gas emission and related microbial communities in two-stage membrane bioreactor treating solid waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuansawan, Nararatchporn; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and responsible microorganisms during the treatment of municipal solid waste leachate in two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated. The MBR system, consisting of anaerobic and aerobic stages, were operated at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 and 2.5days in each reactor under the presence and absence of sludge recirculation. Organic and nitrogen removals were more than 80% under all operating conditions during which CH4 emission were found highest under no sludge recirculation condition at HRT of 5days. An increase in hydraulic loading resulted in a reduction in CH4 emission from anaerobic reactor but an increase from the aerobic reactor. N2O emission rates were found relatively constant from anaerobic and aerobic reactors under different operating conditions. Diversity of CH4 and N2O producing microorganisms were found decreasing when hydraulic loading rate to the reactors was increased.

  6. How Do Residents Spend Their Shift Time? A Time and Motion Study With a Particular Focus on the Use of Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamykina, Lena; Vawdrey, David K; Hripcsak, George

    2016-06-01

    To understand how much time residents spend using computers compared with other activities, and what residents use computers for. This time and motion study was conducted in June and July 2010 at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center with seven residents (first-, second-, and third-year) on the general medicine service. An experienced observer shadowed residents during a single day shift, captured all their activities using an iPad application, and took field notes. The activities were captured using a validated taxonomy of clinical activities, expanded to describe computer-based activities with a greater level of detail. Residents spent 364.5 minutes (50.6%) of their shift time using computers, compared with 67.8 minutes (9.4%) interacting with patients. In addition, they spent 292.3 minutes (40.6%) talking with others in person, 186.0 minutes (25.8%) handling paper notes, 79.7 minutes (11.1%) in rounds, 80.0 minutes (11.1%) walking or waiting, and 54.0 minutes (7.5%) talking on the phone. Residents spent 685 minutes (59.6%) multitasking. Computer-based documentation activities amounted to 189.9 minutes (52.1%) of all computer-based activities time, with 128.7 minutes (35.3%) spent writing notes and 27.3 minutes (7.5%) reading notes composed by others. The study showed that residents spent considerably more time interacting with computers (over 50% of their shift time) than in direct contact with patients (less than 10% of their shift time). Some of this may be due to an increasing reliance on computing systems for access to patient data, further exacerbated by inefficiencies in the design of the electronic health record.

  7. Remote estimation of the hydraulic properties of a sand using full-waveform integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, off-ground GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Slob, E.; Rhebergen, J.B.; Lopera, O.; Jadoon, K.Z.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-01-01

    We used integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, proximal ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties of a laboratory sand during an infiltration event. The inversion procedure involved full-waveform modeling of the radar signal and one

  8. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  9. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when work...

  10. Estimation of sediment residence times in subtropical highland catchments of central Mexico combining river gauging and fallout radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Duvert, Clément; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Esteves, Michel; Bonté, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Subtropical regions of the world are affected by intense soil erosion associated with deforestation, overgrazing and cropping intensification. This land degradation leads to important on-site (e.g. decrease in soil fertility) and off-site impacts (e.g. reservoir sedimentation, water pollution). This study determined the mean sediment residence times in soils and rivers of three catchments (3 - 12 km²) with contrasted land uses (i.e. cropland, forests, rangelands, extended gully networks) located in highlands of the transvolcanic belt of central Mexico. Calculations were based on rainfall and river gauging as well as on fallout radionuclide measurements (Be-7, Cs-137, Pb-210). Atmospheric deposition of Be-7 and Pb-210 was estimated based on the analysis of rainfall precipitated samples. Rainfall samples were collected all throughout the rainy season in order to take account of the temporal variations of the radionuclide fluxes. Furthermore, sampling of suspended sediment was conducted at the outlet of each catchment during most of the storms that occurred throughout the 2009 rainy season. Be-7, Cs-137 and Pb-210 concentrations of this sediment were determined by gamma-spectrometry. A two-box balance model was then used to estimate the sediment residence time and the inventory of radionuclides in the three selected catchments. This model subdivided each catchment into two boxes: (i) a "soil-box" characterised by low transport velocities and hence long radionuclide residence times and (ii) a "river-box" covering the river surface and its surroundings characterised by quicker exchanges and shorter radionuclide residence times. Input and output fluxes of sediment and radionuclides were taken into account in each box. Radioactive decay during the residence time of sediment was also considered. The mean residence time of sediment in soils ranged between 13,300 - 28,500 years. In contrast, sediment residence time in rivers was much shorter, fluctuating between 28 and 393

  11. Climate controls on the residence time of terrestrial biospheric carbon in river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, T.; Galy, V.; Feng, X.; Drenzek, N.; Dickens, A.; Ponton, C.; Giosan, L.; Schefuss, E.; Voss, B.; Vonk, J.; Gustafsson, O.; Montlucon, D.; Wu, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Our current understanding of the timescales over which terrestrial biospheric carbon is transferred from source to sedimentary sink, and of the factors that control these timescales, remains limited. Such information is crucial for developing a mechanistic understanding organic matter cycling on the continents and the dynamics of terrestrial carbon delivery to the oceans. Radiocarbon is increasingly being used to examine the "age" of organic constituents in the dissolved and particulate phase. Based on such measurements, there is growing evidence to suggest that land-ocean organic matter transfer via rivers may be rapid (years, decades) or may take place over centuries to millennia. How do these ages relate to drainage basin properties and biospheric carbon dynamics within continental drainage basins? This presentation seeks to explore the factors that influence radiocarbon ages of specific components of terrestrial biospheric carbon carried and exported by rivers to the ocean. Molecular-level radiocarbon measurements on vascular plant biomarkers (plant leaf waxes and lignin-derived phenols) have been made on particulate matter collected from a range of river systems globally, as well as on sediment cores collected near the mouths of rivers. Additional molecular isotopic (stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes) measurements of the plant wax markers provides complementary information on the provenance of the vegetation signals and on regional environmental conditions. The measurements reveal that two primary controls on apparent storage time of terrestrial biospheric carbon are regional temperature and aridity. The former is most apparent in contrasts between low and high latitude rivers, with colder regional climates resulting in longer residence times. Evidence for aridity as a control on storage times is evident from relationships between the stable carbon isotopic and/or hydrogen isotopic composition of vascular plant markers and their radiocarbon age, with dryer

  12. Transport in lymphatic capillaries. I. Macroscopic measurements using residence time distribution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, M A; Berk, D A; Jain, R K

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel integrative method for characterizing transport in the lymphatic capillaries in the tail of the anesthetized mouse, which is both sensitive and reproducible for quantifying uptake and flow. Interstitially injected, fluorescently labeled macromolecules were used to visualize and quantify these processes. Residence time distribution (RTD) theory was employed to measure net flow velocity in the lymphatic network as well as to provide a relative measure of lymphatic uptake of macromolecules from the interstitium. The effects of particle size and injection pressure were determined. The uptake rate was found to be independent of particle size in the range of a 6- to 18-nm radius; beyond this size, the interstitial matrix seemed to pose a greater barrier. A comparison of 10 vs. 40 cmH2O injection pressure showed a significant influence on the relative uptake rate but not on the net velocity within the network (3.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.8 +/- 1.0 micron/s). This suggested the presence of a systemic driving force for baseline lymph propulsion that is independent of the local pressure gradients driving the uptake. This model can be used to examine various aspects of transport physiology of the initial lymphatics.

  13. Predictive Model for Particle Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors. Part 1: Model Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, Thomas D.; Ziegler, Jack L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Ciesielski, Peter; Nimlos, Mark R.; Robichaud, David J.

    2017-01-16

    In this computational study, we model the mixing of biomass pyrolysis vapor with solid catalyst in circulating riser reactors with a focus on the determination of solid catalyst residence time distributions (RTDs). A comprehensive set of 2D and 3D simulations were conducted for a pilot-scale riser using the Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid modeling framework with and without sub-grid-scale models for the gas-solids interaction. A validation test case was also simulated and compared to experiments, showing agreement in the pressure gradient and RTD mean and spread. For simulation cases, it was found that for accurate RTD prediction, the Johnson and Jackson partial slip solids boundary condition was required for all models and a sub-grid model is useful so that ultra high resolutions grids that are very computationally intensive are not required. We discovered a 2/3 scaling relation for the RTD mean and spread when comparing resolved 2D simulations to validated unresolved 3D sub-grid-scale model simulations.

  14. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Small dams enhance the development of patchy microenvironments along stream corridors by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This patchiness drives intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of O2 and redox-sensitive solutes between the water column and the stream bed. We used multiple tracer techniques, naturally occurring and injected, to evaluate hyporheic flow dynamics and associated biogeochemical cycling and microbial reactivity around 2 beaver dams in Wyoming (USA). High-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing was used to collect temperature data over 9 vertical streambed profiles and to generate comprehensive vertical flux maps using 1-dimensional (1-D) heat-transport modeling. Coincident with these locations, vertical profiles of hyporheic water were collected every week and analyzed for dissolved O2, pH, dissolved organic C, and several conservative and redox-sensitive solutes. In addition, hyporheic and net stream aerobic microbial reactivity were analyzed with a constant-rate injection of the biologically sensitive resazurin (Raz) smart tracer. The combined results revealed a heterogeneous system with rates of downwelling hyporheic flow organized by morphologic unit and tightly coupled to the redox conditions of the subsurface. Principal component analysis was used to summarize the variability of all redox-sensitive species, and results indicated that hyporheic water varied from oxic-stream-like to anoxic-reduced in direct response to the hydrodynamic conditions and associated residence times. The anaerobic transition threshold predicted by the mean O2 Damko

  15. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K. (Michigan)

    2012-03-15

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37 C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37 C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Treating Stormwater with Green Infrastructure: Plants, Residence Time Distributions, and the Removal of Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.; Winfrey, B.; Mehring, A.

    2015-12-01

    In many cities, green infrastructure is increasingly used to capture and treat stormwater runoff, due to the many opportunities these systems afford for protecting receiving water quality and ecology while mitigating water scarcity. Here, we focus on how plants affect the removal of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in newly-constructed stormwater biofilters, a type of green infrastructure consisting of unconsolidated granular media containing one or more plant species. Input-response experiments were carried out using both non-reactive (salt) and reactive (sewage) tracers on six laboratory-scale (~1m long by 24 cm diameter) biofilters, half of which were planted with the sedge Carex appressa (treatment replicates) and half of which were unplanted (control replicates). C. appressa modifies the residence time distribution (RTD) in a biofilter by creating preferential flow paths along which water and mass can move quickly, but does not appear to alter the intrinsic rate at which FIB are removed. Thus, the "green" component of green infrastructure can alter pollutant removal by changing the RTD, with or without a concomitant change in pollutant reactivity.

  17. Structure-guided residence time optimization of a dabigatran reversal agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Felix; van Ryn, Joanne; Litzenburger, Tobias; Ritter, Michael; Seeliger, Daniel; Nar, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternatives to vitamin-K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy. However, anticoagulation therapy in general is associated with an elevated risk of bleeding. Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®) and is currently in Phase 3 studies. Here, we report data on the antibody fragment aDabi-Fab2, a putative backup molecule for idarucizumab. Although aDabi-Fab2 completely reversed effects of dabigatran in a rat model in vivo, we observed significantly reduced duration of action compared to idarucizumab. Rational protein engineering, based on the X-ray structure of aDabi-Fab2, led to the identification of mutant Y103W. The mutant had optimized shape complementarity to dabigatran while maintaining an energetically favored hydrogen bond. It displayed increased affinity for dabigatran, mainly driven by a slower off-rate. Interestingly, the increased residence time translated into longer duration of action in vivo. It was thus possible to further enhance the efficacy of aDabi-Fab2 based on rational design, giving it the potential to serve as a back-up candidate for idarucizumab.

  18. Effects of Nitrogen source, empty bed residence time and inlet concentration on biofilter removal of chlorobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Can; Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2009-04-15

    A new biofilter with bamboo carriers was used to remove gaseous chlorobenzene. Operating parameters such as the nitrogen source, the empty bed residence time (EBRT) and the inlet concentration of chlorobenzene were varied. The ability of the biofilter to remove chlorobenzene was evaluated under each set of conditions. The experimental results indicated that better biofilter performance was achieved using ammonium instead of nitrate nitrogen as the nitrogen source. However, an addition of excess ammonium did not further increase the removal efficiency. The optimal ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply (C/N) was 7:1-14:1. Increasing EBRT increased the biofilter efficiency from 0-20% (EBRT=24 s) to 30-50% (EBRT=41 s) and to 50-70% (EBRT=122 s). The relationship between removal efficiency and EBRT indicated that the removal of chlorobenzene is a pseudo first order kinetic process below the concentration of 400 mg/m{sup 3}. A substrate inhibition model, the Haldane equation, successfully described the removal rate of the biofilter at various inlet concentrations. With increasing inlet concentration, the removal rate initially rose and then declined. The highest removal rate of 18 g/m{sup 3} x h was achieved at an inlet concentration of 1440 mg/m{sup 3}. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. The Effect of Solids Residence Time on Chemical Phosphorus Removal in Low Concentration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Daniela; Parker, Wayne J

    2016-11-01

      The effect of solids residence time (SRT) on steady state phosphorus (P) removal when striving for ultralow concentrations through metal salt addition was studied. Lab-scale continuous flow sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated under high (6.4 mg P/L; 1.4 mol Fe/mol P) and low (3.4 mg P/L; 2.6 mol Fe/mol P) influent phosphate concentrations to characterize P removal. Residual P concentrations, particle size distribution, and microscopy analyses were determined over a range of SRTs. A majority of P removal (94% with 3.4 mg P/L; 83% with 6.4 mg P/L) occurred immediately after iron (Fe) addition with additional removal in the SBRs (3.3-4.8% with 3.4 mg P/L; 5.5-8.8% with 6.4 mg P/L). Soluble P uptake was higher for SRTs ≤ 7.4 days with 3.4 mg P/L and ≤ 14.3 days with 6.4 mg P/L. Normalized P uptake (μg P/mg total suspended solids [TSS]) decreased with SRT providing evidence that aging changed floc properties relevant to P removal. Floc size was found to have no distinguishable influence on P removal. However, changes in floc morphology were consistent with P removal trends.

  20. The effect of solids residence time on phosphorus adsorption to hydrous ferric oxide floc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Daniela; Parker, Wayne J

    2015-11-01

    The impact of solids residence time (SRT) on phosphate adsorption to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) floc when striving for ultra-low P concentrations was characterized and an equilibrium model that describes the adsorption of P onto HFO floc of different ages was developed. The results showed that fresh HFO had a higher adsorption capacity in comparison to aged (2.8, 7.4, 10.8 and 22.8 days) HFO and contributed substantially to P removal at steady state. P adsorption onto HFO solids was determined to be best described by the Freundlich isotherm. P desorption from HFO solids was negligible supporting the hypothesis that chemisorption is the mechanism of P adsorption on HFO solids. A model that included the contribution of different classes of HFO solids (i.e. High, Low or Old, containing high concentration, low concentration or no active surface sites, respectively) to adsorption onto HFO from a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system was found to adequately describe P adsorption onto HFO solids of different ages. From the model it was determined that the fractions of High and Low HFO decreased with SRT while the fraction of Old HFO increased with SRT. The transformation of High HFO to Low HFO did not limit the overall production of Old HFO and the fresh HFO solids contributed more to P removal at steady state than the aged solids.

  1. Investigation of residence time and groundwater flux in Venice Lagoon: comparing radium isotope and hydrodynamical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapaglia, John, E-mail: john.rapaglia@gmail.co [National Research Council of Italy, Marine Science Institute-Venice, Castello 1364/a, Venice 30122 (Italy); Ferrarin, Christian, E-mail: christian.ferrarin@ve.ismar.cnr.i [National Research Council of Italy, Marine Science Institute-Venice, Castello 1364/a, Venice 30122 (Italy); Zaggia, Luca, E-mail: luca.zaggia@ve.ismar.cnr.i [National Research Council of Italy, Marine Science Institute-Venice, Castello 1364/a, Venice 30122 (Italy); Moore, Willard S., E-mail: moore@geol.sc.ed [Department of Geological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Umgiesser, Georg, E-mail: georg.umgiesser@ve.ismar.cnr.i [National Research Council of Italy, Marine Science Institute-Venice, Castello 1364/a, Venice 30122 (Italy); Garcia-Solsona, Ester, E-mail: esther.garcia@uab.ca [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals - Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Garcia-Orellana, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.garcia@uab.ca [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals - Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Masque, Pere, E-mail: pere.masque@uab.ca [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals - Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The four naturally-occurring isotopes of radium were coupled with a previously evaluated hydrodynamic model to determine the apparent age of surface waters and to quantify submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Mean apparent age of water in the Venice Lagoon was calculated using the ratio of {sup 224}Ra to {sup 228}Ra determined from 30 monitoring stations and a mean pore water endmember. Average apparent age was calculated to be 6.0 d using Ra ratios. This calculated age was very similar to average residence time calculated for the same period using a hydrodynamic model (5.8 d). A mass balance of Ra was accomplished by quantifying each of the sources and sinks of Ra in the lagoon, with the unknown variable being attributed to SGD. Total SGD were calculated to be 4.1 {+-} 1.5, 3.8 {+-} 0.7, 3.0 {+-} 1.3, and 3.5 {+-} 1.0 x 10{sup 10} L d{sup -1} for {sup 223,224,226,228}Ra, respectively, which are an order of magnitude larger than total mean fluvial discharge into the Venice Lagoon (3.1 x 10{sup 9} L d{sup -1}). The SGD as a source of nutrients in the Venice Lagoon is also discussed and, though significant to the nutrient budget, is likely to be less important as the dominant control on SGD is recirculated seawater rather than freshwater.

  2. Relationship between fiber degradation and residence time distribution in the processing of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT were processed by in-line compounding equipment with a modified single screw extruder. A pulse stimulus response technique using PET spheres as the tracer was adopted to obtain residence time distribution (RTD of extrusion compounding. RTD curves were fitted by the model based on the supposition that extrusion compounding was the combination of plug flow and mixed flow. Characteristic parameters of RTD model including P the fraction of plug flow reactor (PFR and d the fraction of dead volume of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR were used to associate with fiber degradation presented by fiber length and dispersion. The effects of screw speed, mixing length and channel depth on RTD curves, and characteristic parameters of RTD models as well as their effects on the fiber degradation were investigated. The influence of shear force with different screw speeds and variable channel depth on fiber degradation was studied and the main impetus of fiber degradation was also presented. The optimal process for obtaining the balance of fiber length and dispersion was presented.

  3. Towards a Fully Distributed Characterization of Water Residence and Transit Time by Coupled Hydrology-Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondi, F.; Fatichi, S.; Burlando, P.

    2015-12-01

    Water residence and transit time are crucial elements in flow pathways and catchment response characterization. The temporal distribution of catchment transit times has been generally studied and modelled with lumped parameter approaches. However, understanding the dominant controls in a more holistic manner requires attention to the spatially distributed catchment properties also in relation to their control on the basin response to different type of precipitation events. A tool that looks both at the time and space distribution of water residence and transport can be useful for predicting water and solute fluxes and ultimately for better understanding the dependence of catchment transit and residence times on geomorphological and climatic factors. To this purpose we couple a fully distributed, yet essential, process-based watershed model with a component to simulate solute transport. Key features of the developed tool include: (a) reduced complexity spatially-distributed hydrological model; (b) spatially-distributed water age and conservative tracer concentration; (c) possibility to explicitly compute transit time distributions for different precipitation events and locations. The presented framework is tested on the Plynlimon watershed (UK), where long-term records of hydrological variables are available. Among them, discharge and chloride concentration are used to investigate the model behavior. We present the integrated model concept, the underlying methodologies, the results from the case study application, as well as preliminary virtual experiments that allow exploring the full statistical space of travel and residence times.

  4. Leveraging time and learning style, iPod vs. realtime attendance at a series of medicine residents conferences: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tempelhof

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions Residency training programmes can optimise time management strategies with the integration of innovative learning resources into educational curricula. This study suggests that iPod capture of conferences is a reasonable resource to help meet the educational goals of residents and residency programs.

  5. Reflections in a time of transition: orthopaedic faculty and resident understanding of accreditation schemes and opinions on surgical skills feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Gundle

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthopaedic surgery is one of the first seven specialties that began collecting Milestone data as part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System (NAS rollout. This transition from process-based advancement to outcome-based education is an opportunity to assess resident and faculty understanding of changing paradigms, and opinions about technical skill evaluation. Methods: In a large academic orthopaedic surgery residency program, residents and faculty were anonymously surveyed. A total of 31/32 (97% residents and 29/53 (55% faculty responded to Likert scale assessments and provided open-ended responses. An internal end-of-rotation audit was conducted to assess timeliness of evaluations. A mixed-method analysis was utilized, with nonparametric statistical testing and a constant-comparative qualitative method. Results: There was greater familiarity with the six core competencies than with Milestones or the NAS (p<0.05. A majority of faculty and residents felt that end-of-rotation evaluations were not adequate for surgical skills feedback. Fifty-eight per cent of residents reported that end-of-rotation evaluations were rarely or never filled out in a timely fashion. An internal audit demonstrated that more than 30% of evaluations were completed over a month after rotation end. Qualitative analysis included themes of resident desire for more face-to-face feedback on technical skills after operative cases, and several barriers to more frequent feedback. Discussion: The NAS and outcome-based education have arrived. Residents and faculty need to be educated on this changing paradigm. This transition period is also a window of opportunity to address methods of evaluation and feedback. In our orthopaedic residency, trainees were significantly less satisfied than faculty with the amount of technical and surgical skills feedback being provided to trainees. The quantitative and qualitative analyses

  6. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Abramowitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified the first-order representation of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of current state-of-the-art models of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k) and the sensitivity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10) on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C, which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitude carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers, it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be more constrained by available data sets of carbon stocks.

  7. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Exbrayat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified the first-order parameterization of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of the current state-of-the-art parameterization of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k and the sensitvity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10 on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitudes carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon, and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be constrained by available observational data sets.

  8. Phosphorus as indicator of magmatic olivine residence time, morphology and growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexander; Batanova, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is among of slowest elements by diffusion rate in silicate melts and crystals (e.g. Spandler et al, 2007). In the same time it is moderately incompatible to compatible with olivine (Brunet & Chazot, 2001; Grant & Kohn, 2013). This makes phosphorus valuable tracer of olivine crystallization in natural conditions. Indeed, it is shown that natural magmatic olivine crystals commonly posses strong and complicated zoning in phosphorus (Milman-Barris et al, 2008; Welsch et al, 2014). In this paper we intend to review phosphorus behavior in olivine in published experimental and natural olivine studies and present large set of new EPMA data on phosphorus zoning in olivine phenocrysts from MORBs, OIBs, komatiites and kimberlites. We will show that sharp olivine zones enriched in phosphorus by a factor of 10-20 over prediction by equilibrium partition may be due to formation of P-rich boundary layer on the interface of fast growing olivine. This is proved by finding of small-size (normally 10 mkm or less) exceptionally P-rich melt inclusions in olivine, which are otherwise similar in composition to typical melt. These observations could provide potential olivine growth speedometer. We will also demonstrate, that sharp zoning in phosphorus may provide valuable information on the residence time of olivine crystals in different environments: magma chambers and conduits as well as mantle sources. This study has been founded by Russian Science Foundation grant 14-17-00491. References: Spandler, et al, 2007, Nature, v. 447, p. 303-306; Brunet & Chazot, 2001, Chemical Geology, v. 176, p. 51-72; Grant & Kohn, 2013, American Mineralogist, v. 98, p. 1860-1869; Milman-Barris et al, 2008, Contr. Min. Petrol. v. 155, p.739-765; Welsch et al, 2014, Geology, v. 42, p.867-870.

  9. A geostatistical methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnez-Ferreira, H E; Herrera, G S

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer in Mexico. The selection of the space-time monitoring points is done using a static Kalman filter combined with a sequential optimization method. The Kalman filter requires as input a space-time covariance matrix, which is derived from a geostatistical analysis. A sequential optimization method that selects the space-time point that minimizes a function of the variance, in each step, is used. We demonstrate the methodology applying it to the redesign of the hydraulic head monitoring network of the Valle de Querétaro aquifer with the objective of selecting from a set of monitoring positions and times, those that minimize the spatiotemporal redundancy. The database for the geostatistical space-time analysis corresponds to information of 273 wells located within the aquifer for the period 1970-2007. A total of 1,435 hydraulic head data were used to construct the experimental space-time variogram. The results show that from the existing monitoring program that consists of 418 space-time monitoring points, only 178 are not redundant. The implied reduction of monitoring costs was possible because the proposed method is successful in propagating information in space and time.

  10. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  11. Atmospheric residence times from transpiration and evaporation to precipitation: An age-weighted regional evaporation tagging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianhui; Knoche, Hans Richard; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The atmospheric water residence time is a fundamental descriptor that provides information on the timescales of evaporation and precipitation. In this study, a regional climate model-based evaporation tagging algorithm is extended with an age tracer approach to calculate moisture residence times, defined as time between the original evaporation and the returning of water masses to the land surface as precipitation. Our case study addresses how long this time is for the transpired and for the direct evaporated moisture. Our study region is the Poyang Lake region in Southeast China, the largest freshwater lake in the country. We perform simulations covering the period from October 2004 to December 2005. In 2005, 11% of direct evaporated water (10% of transpired water) precipitates locally. Direct evaporated water accounts for 64% and transpired water for 36% of the total tagged moisture with a mean age of around 36 h for both. Considering precipitation, a large proportion (69%) originates from direct evaporated water with a mean atmospheric residence time of 6.6 h and a smaller amount from transpired water with a longer residence time of 10.7 h. Modulated by the East Asian monsoon, the variation of the meteorological conditions, the magnitude of the partitioned moisture, and the corresponding residence time patterns change seasonally and spatially and reveal the different fate of transpired and direct evaporated water in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. We conclude that our methodological approach has the potential to be used for addressing how timescales of the hydrological cycle changes regionally under global warming.

  12. Using reactor network for global identification based on residence time distribution theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocine, S.; Pibouleau, L.; Azzaro-Pantel, C.; Domenech, S. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique - UMR 5503 CNRS/ INPT ENSIACET, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the ventilation systems, the control of transfer contaminants is one of the principal problems during the design and control phases. The installation of a suitable ventilation system for the control of contaminant transfer is essential in industry, because it makes it possible to detect and to prevent chemical and radiological risks. Research on air distribution in ventilated rooms traditionally involves full-scale experiments, scale -model experiments and application of the computational fluid dynamics (C.F.D.) tools. Most of the time, particularly in our case of large and cluttered enclosures, the predictive approach based on C.F.D. codes can not be used. The solution retained here is the establishment of a model based on the well known residence time distribution. This model is widely used in chemical engineering to treat non-ideal flows. The proposed method is based on the experimental determination of the residence time distribution curve, generally obtained through the response of the system to tracer release. A superstructure involving the set of all the possible solutions corresponding to the physical reactor is then defined, and the model will be selected from this superstructure according to its simulated response. The superstructure is identified as a combination of elementary systems, representing ideal flow patterns, as perfect mixed flows, plug flows, continuous stirred tank reactors, etc. The selected model is derived from the comparison between the simulated response to a stimulus, and the experimental response. The structure and parameters of the model are simultaneously optimized in order to fit the experimental curve with a minimal number of elementary units, constituting a key point for future control purposes of the process. This problem is a dynamic M.I.N.L.P. (Mixed Integer Non Linear Programming) problem with bilinear equality constraints. Generally, these constraints lead to numerical difficulties for reaching an optimum solution (even a

  13. Metabolic and energetic aspects of biohydrogen production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum: The effects of hydraulic retention time and peptone addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Lin, Che-An; Liu, I-Chun; Wu, Chao-Wei; Cheng, Hai-Hsuan

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the microbial metabolism and energy demand in fermentative biohydrogen production using Clostridium tyrobutyricum FYa102 at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) over a period of 1-18 h. The hydrogen yield shows a positive correlation with the butyrate yield, the B/A ratio, and the Y(H2)/2(Y(HAc)+Y(HBu)) ratio, but a negative correlation with the lactate yield. A decrease in HRT, which is accompanied by an increased biomass growth, tends to decrease the B/A ratio, due presumably to a higher energy demand for microbial growth. The production of lactate at a low HRT, however, may involve an unfavorable change in e(-) equiv distribution to result in a reduced hydrogen production. Finally, the relatively high hydrogen yields observed in the bioreactor with the peptone addition may be ascribed to the utilization of peptone as an additional energy and/or amino-acid source, thus reducing the glucose demand for biomass growth during the hydrogen production process.

  14. Effects of hydraulic retention time on nitrification activities and population dynamics of a conventional activated sludge system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan LI; Yu ZHANG; Min YANG; Yoichi KAMAGATA

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the nitrification activities and population dynamics of a conventional activated sludge system fed with synthetic inorganic wastewater were investigated over a period of 260 days. When the HRT was gradually decreased from 30 to 5 h, the specific ammonium-oxidizing rates (SAOR) varied between 0.32 and 0.45kg NH4+-N (kg mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS)·d)-1, and the specific nitrate-forming rates (SNFR) increased from 0.11 to 0.50kg NO3-N (kg MLSS·d)1l, showing that the decrease in HRT led to a significant increase in the nitrite oxidation activity. According to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis results, the proportion of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOBs) among the total bacteria decreased from 33% to 15% with the decrease in HRT, whereas the fraction of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOBs), particularly the fast-growing Nitrobacter sp., increased significantly (from 4% to 15% for NOBs and from 1.5% to 10.6% for Nitrobacter sp.) with the decrease in HRT, which was in accordance with the changes in SNFR. A short HRT favored the relative growth of NOBs, particularly the fast-growing Nitrobacter sp., in the conventional activated sludge system.

  15. Effect of hydraulic retention time on the hydrogen yield and population of Clostridium in hydrogen fermentation of glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Chunfeng; EBIE Yoshitaka; INAMORI Yuhei; KONG Hainan

    2009-01-01

    The conversion of glucose to hydrogen was evaluated with continuous stirred tank reactor at 30℃, pH 5.5 at various hydraulic retention times (HRT). Furthermore, the population dynamics of hydrogen-producing bacteria was surveyed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization using probe Clost IV targeting the genus Clostridium based on 16S rRNA. It was clear that positive correlation was observed between the cells quantified with probe Clost IV and hydrogen yield of the respective sludge. The numbers of hydrogen-producing bacteria were decreased gradually with increasing HRT, were 9.2 × 108, 8.2 × 108, 2.8 × 108 , and 6.2 × 107 cells/mL, at HRT 6, 8, 12, and 14 h, respectively. The hydrogen yield was 1.4-1.5 mol H2/mol glucose at the optimum HRT 6-8 h. It is considered that the percentage of the hydrogen-producing bacteria to total bacteria is useful parameter for evaluation of hydrogen production process.

  16. Effect of Hydraulic Retention Time on Anaerobic Digestion of Wheat Straw in the Semicontinuous Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Yu, Jun-Hong; Yin, Hua; Hu, Shu-Min; Huang, Shu-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Three semicontinuous continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operating at mesophilic conditions (35°C) were used to investigate the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on anaerobic digestion of wheat straw. The results showed that the average biogas production with HRT of 20, 40, and 60 days was 46.8, 79.9, and 89.1 mL/g total solid as well as 55.2, 94.3, and 105.2 mL/g volatile solids, respectively. The methane content with HRT of 20 days, from 14.2% to 28.5%, was the lowest among the three reactors. The pH values with HRT of 40 and 60 days were in the acceptable range compared to that with HRT of 20 days. The propionate was dominant in the reactor with HRT of 20 days, inhibiting the activities of methanogens and causing the lower methane content in biogas. The degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and crystalline cellulose based on XRD was also strongly influenced by HRTs. PMID:28589134

  17. Hydrogen production from cheese whey with ethanol-type fermentation: effect of hydraulic retention time on the microbial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Paula Rúbia Ferreira; Santos, Samantha Christine; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio; Silva, Edson Luiz

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 4, 2, and 1h and varying sources of inoculum (sludge from swine and sludge from poultry) on the hydrogen production in two anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs) were evaluated. Cheese whey was used as a substrate, and 5000mgCODL(-1) was applied. The highest hydrogen yield (HY) of 1.33molmol(-1) lactose and highest ethanol yield (EtOHY) of 1.22molEtOHmol(-1) lactose were obtained at the highest HRT (4h). When the reactors were operated at an HRT of 1h, methane (0.68LCH4h(-1)L(-1)) was produced concurrently with hydrogen (0.51LH2h(-1)L(-1)). The major metabolites observed were soluble ethanol, methanol, acetic acid, and butyric acid. Cloning of the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the microbial community were affiliated with the genera Selenomonas sp. (69% of the sequences), and Methanobacterium sp. (98% of the sequences).

  18. Effects of hydraulic retention time on cultivation of indigenous microalgae as a renewable energy source using secondary effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Yugo; Hidaka, Taira; Tsumori, Jun; Minamiyama, Mizuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Secondary effluent from wastewater treatment plants is suitable media for cultivating microalgae as a renewable energy source, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) control in culture is important to conduct well-planned outdoor indigenous microalgae cultivation with secondary effluent. This study revealed cultivation characteristics under various HRT by continuous 6-month experiments. In addition, effects of HRT on cultivation were determined by a mathematical model that described indigenous microalgae growth. Cultivated biomass mainly consisted of Chlorophyceae and its detritus regardless of HRT, and 5.93-14.8g/m(2)/day of biomass yield was obtained. The cultivated biomass had a stable higher heating value of 16kJ/g. Sensitivity analysis of the model suggests that HRT control had great effects on biomass yield, and 2-3days of HRT were recommended to obtain maximum biomass yield under certain weather conditions (temperature: approximately 12-25°C and solar radiation: approximately 8-19MJ/m(2)/day).

  19. Groundwater residence time and movement in the Maltese islands - A geochemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, M.E., E-mail: mest@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Maurice, L. [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Heaton, T.H.E. [British Geological Survey, NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratory, Keyworth, Nottinghamshire NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Sapiano, M.; Micallef Sultana, M. [Malta Resources Authority, Marsa MRS 9065 (Malta); Gooddy, D.C.; Chilton, P.J. [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    The Maltese islands are composed of two limestone aquifers, the Upper and Lower Coralline Limestone separated by an aquitard, the 'Blue Clay'. The Lower Coralline Limestone is overlain in part by the poorly permeable Globigerina Limestone. The upper perched aquifers are discontinuous and have very limited saturated thickness and a short water level response time to rainfall. Frequent detections of coliforms suggest a rapid route to groundwater. However, the unsaturated zone has a considerable thickness in places and the primary porosity of the Upper Coralline Limestone is high, so there is likely to be older recharge by slow matrix flow as well as rapid recharge from fractures. Measurement of SF{sub 6} from a pumping station in a deep part of one of the perched aquifers indicated a mean saturated zone age of about 15 a. The Main Sea Level aquifers (MSL) on both Malta and Gozo have a large unsaturated thickness as water levels are close to sea level. On Malta, parts of the aquifer are capped by the perched aquifers and more extensively by the Globigerina Limestone. The limited detection of coliform bacteria suggests only some rapid recharge from the surface via fractures or karst features. Transmissivity is low and {sup 3}H and CFC/SF{sub 6} data indicate that saturated zone travel times are in the range 15-40 a. On Gozo the aquifer is similar but is more-extensively capped by impermeable Blue Clay. CFC data show the saturated zone travel time is from 25 a to possibly more than 60 a. Groundwater age is clearly related to the extent of low-permeability cover. The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of groundwater is related to the geochemical processes which occur along the flowpath and is consistent with residence time ages in the sequence; perched aquifers < Malta MSL < Gozo MSL. The {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H enriched isotopic signature of post 1983 desalinated water can be seen in more-modern groundwater, particularly the urbanized areas of the perched and Malta MSL

  20. Time in U.S. Residency and the Social, Behavioral, and Emotional Adjustment of Latino Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Charles R., Jr.; McClure, Heather H.; Eddy, J. Mark; Wilson, D. Molloy

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about contributors to positive social, behavioral, and emotional adjustment among foreign-born youth at different stages of adapting to life in the United States. Using baseline data from the Adolescent Latino Acculturation Study (N = 217), this article examines the effects of time in residency on parent adjustment, family stress,…

  1. Drug-target residence time : a case for the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ligand-receptor binding kinetics is increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in the early phase of drug design and discovery. In this thesis ligand-receptor binding kinetics, particularly residence time, at the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors was extensively investigated. Several case studies

  2. Residence time distribution and hold-up in a cocurrent upflow packed bed reactor at elevated pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Klaas B.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The residence time distribution in liquid phase was measured in a cocurrent upflow packed bed reactor for the system methanol-hydrogen at low Reynolds numbers and at elevated pressure. The plug flow with axial dispersion model was used to describe mixing in the system. The imperfect pulse method was

  3. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  4. Water Residence Times and Their Relation to Soil and Aquifer Properties and Degree of Urbanization (Croton Water Supply Area, NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitvar, T.; Burns, D.; Kendall, C.; McDonnell, J.

    2002-05-01

    Water residence times were determined in 3 small watersheds in the Croton water supply area, NY. The watersheds (less than 1 km2 drainage area) have different amounts of urbanization (natural, semi-developed and fully developed), different mechanisms of runoff generation (quick flow on roads and slow flow through subsurface) and different watershed landscape characteristics (wetlands, hillslopes) . Measurements of the Oxygen-18 content of throughfall, stream water, soil water and groundwater in the saturated zone were performed bi-weekly over a period of 2 years. Mean water residence times of the stream water, soil water and groundwater were estimated using Oxygen-18 and Helium-3/Tritium isotopes. There are small but significant differences in the isotopic content of waters in each watershed, along with soil and aquifer properties as a function of the level of urbanization. Longer groundwater residence times (up to more than 2 years) were estimated in wetland zones without direct communication with streams in comparison to hillslope areas (up to more than 1 year). In highly urbanized areas, mixing of natural runoff generation processes with urbanization effects such as the influence of septic plumes results in a complex spectrum of residence times in soil waters and groundwaters. We illustrate the possibilities of using stable isotope measurements to describe small-scale complex runoff generation processes in watersheds.

  5. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  6. Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the FIRM, channels containing the...

  7. Firing technology in practice - temperature, residence time, corrosion; Feuerungstechnik in der Praxis - Temperatur, Verweilzeit, Korrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, P.; Holl, D. [Muellheizkraftwerk Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Burgkirchen/Alz (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In a circular dated 1st Sept. 1994, i.e., after the issue of the pertinent planning decision, the Federal Environmental Ministry, BMU, laid down uniform standards on measurements and the parameterisation of the evaluation system for different operation states and loads. Subsequently, TUeV, the German Technical Control Board, prepared the parameterisation curves on the basis of these specifications. The implementation of the BMU paper of 1st Sept. 1994 did not result in any advantage, nor did it lead to a reduction of plant emissions, nor to advantages in the operation of the waste-fuelled cogeneration plant. On the contrary, elevated gas consumption and operating trouble due to frequent feed stops worsened the operating state of the plant. Elevated crude gas temperature in the boiler reduced the lifetime of the two boilers to a critical degree. An operating temperature of 850 C and a residence time of approx. 1 sec. in Burgkirchen waste-fuelled cogeneration plant have not worsened emission values while rendering the plant operable again. [Deutsch] Durch Rundschreiben d. BMU vom 01.09.1994 - also nach Erlass des Planfeststellungsbeschlusses - wurden einheitliche Vorgaben ueber Messungen und Parametrierung des Auswertesystems fuer die verschiedenen Betriebs- bzw. Lastzustaende erlassen. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser Vorgaben wurden vom TUeV die Parametrierungskurven erstellt. Die Umsetzung des BMU-Papieres vom 01.09.1994 ergab keinerlei Vorteile, weder gab es eine Verringerung der anlagenbedingten Emissionen noch Vorteile fuer den Betrieb des MHKW`s. Im Gegenteil, erhoehte Gasverbraeuche und Betriebsstoerungen durch oftmalige Beschickungsstops verschlechterten den Betriebszustand. Erhoehte Rohgastemperatur im Kessel reduzierten die Lebensdauer der beiden Kessel kritisch. Der Betrieb mit 850 C und mit einer Verweilzeit von ca. 1 sec. fuehrt im MHKW Burgkirchen zu keiner Verschlechterung der Emissionswerte, macht aber die Anlagen wieder betreibbar. (orig./SR)

  8. Global patterns of woody residence time and its influence on model simulation of aboveground biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bao-Lin; Guo, Qinghua; Hu, Tianyu; Xiao, Jingfeng; Yang, Yuanhe; Wang, Guoqiang; Tao, Shengli; Su, Yanjun; Liu, Jin; Zhao, Xiaoqian

    2017-05-01

    Woody residence time (τw) is an important parameter that expresses the balance between mature forest recruitment/growth and mortality. Using field data collected from the literature, this study explored the global forest τw and investigated its influence on model simulations of aboveground biomass (AGB) at a global scale. Specifically, τw was found to be related to forest age, annual temperature, and precipitation at a global scale, but its determinants were different among various plant function types. The estimated global forest τw based on the filed data showed large spatial heterogeneity, which plays an important role in model simulation of AGB by a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). The τw could change the resulting AGB in tenfold based on a site-level test using the Monte Carlo method. At the global level, different parameterization schemes of the Integrated Biosphere Simulator using the estimated τw resulted in a twofold change in the AGB simulation for 2100. Our results highlight the influences of various biotic and abiotic variables on forest τw. The estimation of τw in our study may help improve the model simulations and reduce the parameter's uncertainty over the projection of future AGB in the current DGVM or Earth System Models. A clearer understanding of the responses of τw to climate change and the corresponding sophisticated description of forest growth/mortality in model structure is also needed for the improvement of carbon stock prediction in future studies.

  9. Stochastic water demand modelling for a better understanding of hydraulics in water distribution networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the water distribution network water quality process take place influenced by de flow velocity and residence time of the water in the network. In order to understand how the water quality changes in the water distribution network, a good understanding of hydraulics is required. Specifically in

  10. A Short-review: Semi-enclosed Coastal Seas in the Southeast Asia : From the Viewpoint of Water Mass Residence Time

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagi, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of remnant function and residence time are reviewd. Then, the characteristics of semi-enclosed coastal seas in the Southeast Asia such as Hurun Bay in Indonesia, the Banpakong estuary in Thailand, and the Sulu Sea in the Philippines are discussed based on the concept of water mass residence time. The concept of residence time is very useful to investigate the environmental problems such as eutrophication in the semi-enclosed coastal sea.

  11. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  12. Assessment of resident operative performance using a real-time mobile Web system: preparing for the milestone age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin P; Chen, David C; Donahue, Timothy R; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy trainees' operative competency requirements while improving feedback validity and timeliness using a mobile Web-based platform. The Southern Illinois University Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS) was embedded into a website formatted for mobile devices. From March 2013 to February 2014, faculty members were instructed to complete the OPRS form while providing verbal feedback to the operating resident at the conclusion of each procedure. Submitted data were compiled automatically within a secure Web-based spreadsheet. Conventional end-of-rotation performance (CERP) evaluations filed 2006 to 2013 and OPRS performance scores were compared by year of training using serial and independent-samples t tests. The mean CERP scores and OPRS overall resident operative performance scores were directly compared using a linear regression model. OPRS mobile site analytics were reviewed using a Web-based reporting program. Large university-based general surgery residency program. General Surgery faculty used the mobile Web OPRS system to rate resident performance. Residents and the program director reviewed evaluations semiannually. Over the study period, 18 faculty members and 37 residents logged 176 operations using the mobile OPRS system. There were 334 total OPRS website visits. Median time to complete an evaluation was 45 minutes from the end of the operation, and faculty spent an average of 134 seconds on the site to enter 1 assessment. In the 38,506 CERP evaluations reviewed, mean performance scores showed a positive linear trend of 2% change per year of training (p = 0.001). OPRS overall resident operative performance scores showed a significant linear (p = 0.001), quadratic (p = 0.001), and cubic (p = 0.003) trend of change per year of clinical training, reflecting the resident operative experience in our training program. Differences between postgraduate year-1 and postgraduate year-5 overall performance scores were greater with the OPRS (mean = 0.96, CI

  13. An integrated approach for determining sources and residence times of fine sediment transported through a river network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. G.; Blake, W. H.

    2012-04-01

    Fine sediment and associated contaminants transported through river networks can have important impacts on water quality, aquatic habitat and ecosystem function long after catchment remediation measures have been implemented. In this context, the potential role of fine sediment as a secondary source of pollution requires attention. Knowledge of fine sediment transfer and storage in river basins is essential for predicting recovery times of rivers affected by historic or contemporary industrial pollution e.g. mining. It is also vital for determining the effectiveness of management actions in reducing the supply of contaminated sediment to coastal ecosystems. Against this background, we aim to determine the residence/travel times of fine sediment through a river network in south-west England. The approach utilises fallout radionuclides (Cs-137, excess Pb-210, Be-7) to (i) infer diffuse sources of sediment and associated contaminants transported in suspension over event and seasonal timescales and (ii) estimate fine sediment residence times based on differences in radioactive decay rates. Information on downstream changes in sediment sources within basins is critical for interpreting residence times using fallout radionuclide data since changes in source type (e.g. surface versus subsurface) may influence residence time signals. Consequently, analysis of sediment sources for a set of nested monitoring sites is coupled with methods for estimating residence time e.g. comparison of Be-7/excess Pb-210 ratios and a two-compartment radionuclide mass balance model comprising slow and rapid transport components. The present study focuses on the River Tamar (917 km2), an agricultural basin with an extensive history of metal mining and legacy of fine sediment contamination. Sampling of land use and channel bank source material across the basin has been undertaken for the sediment source analysis in conjunction with integrated suspended sediment sampling over monthly intervals

  14. Effects of temperature and hydraulic retention time on acetotrophic pathways and performance in high-rate sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Batstone, Damien

    2014-06-01

    High-rate anaerobic digestion of organic solids requires rapid hydrolysis and enhanced methanogenic growth rates, which can be achieved through elevated temperature (>55 °C) at short hydraulic retention times (HRT). This study assesses the effect of temperatures between 55 °C and 65 °C and HRTs between 2 and 4 days on process performance, microbial community structure, microbial capability, and acetotrophic pathways in thermophilic anaerobic reactors. Increasing the temperature did not enhance volatile solids (VS) destruction above the base value of 37% achieved at 55 °C and 4 days HRT. Stable isotopic signatures (δ13C) revealed that elevated temperature promoted syntrophic acetate oxidation, which accounted for 60% of the methane formation at 55 °C, and increasing substantially to 100% at 65 °C. The acetate consumption capacity dropped with increasing temperature (from 0.69-0.81 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 55 °C to 0.21-0.35 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 65 °C), based on specific activity testing of reactor contents. Community analysis using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of Methanosarcina at 55-60 °C. However, a further increase to 65 °C resulted in loss of Methanosarcina, with an accumulation of organic acids and reduced methane production. Similar issues were observed when reducing the HRT to 2 days, indicating that temperature3 days are critical to operate these systems stably.

  15. Bioaugmentation of anaerobic sludge digestion with iron-reducing bacteria: process and microbial responses to variations in hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-01-01

    Although anaerobic digestion (AD) is a widely used option to manage waste activated sludge (WAS), there are some drawbacks related to its slow reaction rate and low energy productivity. This study examined an anaerobic WAS digester, augmented with an iron-reducing microbial consortium, relative to changes in microbial community structure and process performance at decreasing hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 to 10 days. The enhanced methanation performance (approximately 40 % increase in methane yield) by the bioaugmentation was sustained until the HRT was decreased to 12.5 days, under Fe(3+)-rich conditions (ferric oxyhydroxide, 20 mM Fe). Enhanced iron-reducing activity was evidenced by the increased Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio maintained above 50 % during the stable operational phases. A further decrease in HRT to 10 days resulted in a significant performance deterioration, along with a drop in the Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio to <35 %, after four turnovers of operation. Prevailing existence of putative iron-reducing bacteria (IRBs) was identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), with Spirochaetaceae- and Thauera-related organisms being dominant members, and clear dominance shifts among them with respect to decrease in HRT were observed. Lowering HRT led to evident shifts in bacterial community structure likely associated with washout of IRBs, leading to decreases in iron respiration activity and AD performance at a lower HRT. The bacterial community structure shifted dynamically over phases, and the community transitions correlated well with the changes in process performance. Overall, the combined biostimulation and bioaugmentation investigated in this study proved effective for enhanced methane recovery from anaerobic WAS digestion, which suggests an interesting potential for high-rate AD.

  16. Effect of hydraulic retention time on suppression of methanogens during a continuous biohydrogen production process using molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-01-02

    This study was undertaken to investigate the reduction of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) to decrease methane generation and recover hydrogen production during the long-term operation of biohydrogen production in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) using molasses wastewater. Reduction of HRT can be a simple and economic method to immediately control unfavorable methane generated during continuous operation of a hydrogen production system. The steady-state performance of the CSTR showed a hydrogen content of 41.3 ± 3.30% and a hydrogen production rate (HPR) of 63.7 ± 10.01 mmol-H2L(-1)d(-1) under an organic loading rate (OLR) of 29.7 g CODL(-1) at an HRT of 24 h. Increase in the methane level above 40% during long-term operation caused decrease in the hydrogen content and HPR to 5.9 ± 1.6% and 2.1 ± 1.1 mmoL-H2L(-1)d(-1), respectively. When methane increased to a high level over 40%, the CSTR at the HRT of 24 h was operated at the HRT of 12 h. Reduction of the HRT from 24 to 12 h led to decrease in the methane content of 12.1 ± 4.44% and recovery of the HPR value to 48.9 ± 15.37 mmol-H2L(-1)d(-1) over a duration of 13-22 d. When methane is generated in a continuously operated reactor, reduction of the HRT can be an easy way to suppress methanogens and recover hydrogen production without any additives or extra treatments.

  17. Sediment residence times constrained by uranium-series isotopes: A critical appraisal of the comminution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Afonso, Juan C.; Dosseto, Anthony; Cohen, Tim

    2013-02-01

    Quantifying the rates of landscape evolution in response to climate change is inhibited by the difficulty of dating the formation of continental detrital sediments. We present uranium isotope data for Cooper Creek palaeochannel sediments from the Lake Eyre Basin in semi-arid South Australia in order to attempt to determine the formation ages and hence residence times of the sediments. To calculate the amount of recoil loss of 234U, a key input parameter used in the comminution approach, we use two suggested methods (weighted geometric and surface area measurement with an incorporated fractal correction) and typical assumed input parameter values found in the literature. The calculated recoil loss factors and comminution ages are highly dependent on the method of recoil loss factor determination used and the chosen assumptions. To appraise the ramifications of the assumptions inherent in the comminution age approach and determine individual and combined comminution age uncertainties associated to each variable, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted for a synthetic sediment sample. Using a reasonable associated uncertainty for each input factor and including variations in the source rock and measured (234U/238U) ratios, the total combined uncertainty on comminution age in our simulation (for both methods of recoil loss factor estimation) can amount to ±220-280 ka. The modelling shows that small changes in assumed input values translate into large effects on absolute comminution age. To improve the accuracy of the technique and provide meaningful absolute comminution ages, much tighter constraints are required on the assumptions for input factors such as the fraction of α-recoil lost 234Th and the initial (234U/238U) ratio of the source material. In order to be able to directly compare calculated comminution ages produced by different research groups, the standardisation of pre-treatment procedures, recoil loss factor estimation and assumed input parameter values

  18. Radiotracer method for residence time distribution study in multiphase flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiharto, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl Lebak Bulus No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia)], E-mail: sugi@batan.go.id; Su' ud, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)], E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Wibisono, W.; Abidin, Z. [Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl Lebak Bulus No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia)

    2009-07-15

    [{sup 131}I] isotope in different chemical compounds have been injected into 24 in hydrocarbon transmission pipeline containing approximately 95% water, 3% crude oil, 2% gas and negligible solid material, respectively. The system is operated at the temperature around 70 deg. C enabling fluids flow is easier in the pipeline. The segment of measurement was chosen far from the junction point of the pipeline, therefore, it was reasonably to assume that the fluids in such multiphase system were separated distinctively. Expandable tubing of injector was used to ensure that the isotopes were injected at the proper place in the sense that [{sup 131}I]Na isotope was injected into water layer and iodo-benzene, {sup [131]}IC{sub 6}H{sub 5,} was injected into crude oil regime. The radiotracer selection was based on the compatibility of radiotracer with each of fluids under investigation. [{sup 131}I]Na was used for measuring flow of water while iodo-benzene, {sup [131]}IC{sub 6}H{sub 5,} was used for measuring flow of crude oil. Two scintillation detectors were used and they are put at the distances 80 and 100 m, respectively, from injection point. The residence time distribution data were utilized for calculation water and crude oil flows. Several injections were conducted in the experiments. Although the crude oil density is lighter than the density of water, the result of measurement shows that the water flow is faster than the crude oil flow. As the system is water-dominated, water may act as carrier and the movement of crude oil is slowed due to friction between crude oil with water and crude oil with gas at top layer. Above of all, this result was able to give answer on the question why crude oil always arrives behind water as it is checked at gathering station. In addition, the flow patterns of the water in the pipeline calculated by Reynolds number and predicted by simple tank-in-series model is turbulence in character.

  19. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species’ native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the

  20. Patterns and processes of fluvial discontinuity and sediment residence times on the lower Macquarie River, Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Zacchary; Ralph, Timothy; Hesse, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The supply, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment are important factors determining the morphology of lowland rivers that experience channel breakdown and have wetlands on their lower reaches. Sediment supply and residence time determine whether reaches accumulate sediment (wetland areas) or erode sediment (channelised areas). This research investigated how processes of sedimentation and erosion drive channel breakdown and reformation in the Macquarie Marshes, a large anastomosing wetland system in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Channel breakdown is attributed to a dominance of in-stream sedimentation that leads to a point where single-thread river channels cannot be maintained and so avulsion and floodout processes create smaller distributary channels and wetlands. Avulsions may reconnect channels, changing the sediment supply regime in those particular channels. Channel reformation occurs on the trunk stream where the floodplain gradient steepens enough to allow convergence of small tributaries, locally increasing stream power (and erosive energy in channels). As each river reach reforms following channel breakdown, the channel is smaller, shallower and straighter than the previous reach. One reach in this system recently (in the 1970s) became connected with a parallel channel through avulsion and has morphological characteristics that indicate a significant change in flow and sediment supply. In a pilot study using uranium-series disequilibrium methods and OSL dating, a sediment residence time of 58 +/- 2 ka was determined for sediment in the base of the active channel and a sediment residence time of 153 +/- 5 ka was determined for sediment buried in an adjacent meander that was cut off from the main channel 1,000 years ago. The apparent dramatic decrease in sediment residence time to this active channel poses an interesting question about the role of relatively new channels in transporting and depositing sediment more rapidly than the

  1. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  2. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  3. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor James Morgan

    Full Text Available A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water. The amounts of char (organic fraction and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis and high

  4. Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents' duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leafloor CW

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cameron W Leafloor,1 Heather A Lochnan,2,3,6 Catherine Code,2,4 Erin J Keely,2,3,6 Deanna M Rothwell,5,6 Alan J Forster,2,4–6 Allen R Huang2,6,7 1Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, 4Division of General Internal Medicine, 5Performance Measurement and Innovation, 6Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 7Division of Geriatric Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Background: Since the mid-1980s, medical residents' long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America.Methods: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service.Results: Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal

  5. Highly efficient indoor air purification using adsorption-enhanced-photocatalysis-based microporous TiO2 at short residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinze; Zhu, Lizhong

    2013-01-01

    A short residence time is a key design parameter for the removal of organic pollutants in catalyst-based indoor air purification systems. In this study, we synthesized a series of TiO2 with different micropore volumes and studied their removal efficiency of indoor carbonyl pollutants at a short residence time. Our results indicated that the superior adsorption capability of TiO2 with micropores improved its performance in the photocatalytic degradation of cyclohexanone, while the photocatalytic removal of the pollutant successfully kept porous TiO2 from becoming saturated. When treated with 1 mg m(-3) cyclohexanone at a relatively humidity of 18%, the adsorption amount on microporous TiO2 was 5.4-7.9 times higher than that on P25. Removal efficiency via photocatalysis followed'the same order as the adsorption amount: TiO2-5 > TiO2-20 > TiO2-60 > TiO2-180 > P25. The advantage of microporous TiO2 over P25 became more pronounced when the residence time declined from 0.072 to 0.036 s. Moreover, as the concentration of cyclohexanone deceased from 1000 ppb to 500 ppb, removal efficiency by microporous TiO2 increased more rapidly than P25.

  6. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    groundwater are due to carbonate reactions: oxidising of organic carbon, and dissolution and precipitation of calcite. The carbonate reactions and slight hydrolysis of silicates stabilise the pH value at 8-9. In addition to aerobic oxidation of organic matter, oxidative dissolution of biotite seems to be an important oxygen consumer at shallow depth during recharge. The most important process controlling the redox state deeper in the bedrock was interpreted to be the microbially mediated sulphate reduction with simultaneous anaerobic respiration of organic carbon. This process buffers the redox level of about -200 - -300 mV depending on the pH. Even though the salinities of the groundwater samples and mass-transfer along flow paths remain low, the geochemical evolution was fully developed and has reached quite a stable thermodynamic state. The residence times of the groundwater samples cover the time span back to glaciation. Young ages seem to be limited to the upper part of bedrock, and any really dynamic natural flowpath with deep observed recently recharged water cannot be demonstrated. Deglacial or subglacial ages (over 9,700 years old at Kivetty) are typical below the 150-300m level in the bedrock. Subglacial waters are interpreted to derive from mixing of preglacial water and meltwater, the input of which is estimated to be about 20% at the most. Indications of elevated oxygen intrusion cannot be observed in groundwater having glacial signals. (orig.) 122 refs.

  7. Isotopic and geochemical tracers in the evaluation of groundwater residence time and salinization problems at Santiago Island, Cape Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, Paula M.; Nunes, Dina [Quimica Analitica e Ambiental, IST/ITN, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional no. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Marques, Jose M. [Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica. Instituto Superior Tecnico, UTL, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Monteiro Santos, Fernando A. [Universidade de Lisboa-IDL, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Goncalves, Rui [Inst. Politecnico de Tomar, Quinta do Contador, Estrada da Serra, 2300 Tomar (Portugal); Pina, Antonio; Mota Gomes, Antonio [Instituto Superior de Educacao, Praia, Santiago (Cape Verde)

    2013-07-01

    Stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H) and tritium ({sup 3}H), together with geochemistry and geophysical data, were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times in a watershed on Santiago Island, Cape Verde, West Africa. Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. Low tritium concentrations at seven sampling sites indicate groundwater residence times greater than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other locations suggest more recent recharge. Young ages indicate local recharge and potential groundwater vulnerability to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. Geochemical results indicate that water-rock interaction mechanisms are the major processes responsible for the groundwater quality (mainly calcium-bicarbonate type), reflecting the lithological composition of subsurface soil. (authors)

  8. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Zhang, Yong; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-12-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3- reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He), 14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3- and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3- reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3- trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  9. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant; Zhang, Yong; Starn, Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3− reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He),14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3− and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3− reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3− trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  10. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisden, W.T., E-mail: t.baisden@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Canessa, S. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2013-01-15

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of {sup 14}C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of {approx}500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of {sup 14}C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of 'bomb {sup 14}C' incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point {sup 14}C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C ('passive fraction'), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  11. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  12. Residence half-time of {sup 137}Cs in the top-soils of Japanese paddy and upland fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komamura, Misako [National Inst. of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsumura, Akito; Kodaira, Kiyoshi

    1999-03-01

    A series of top-soil samples of 14 paddy fields and 10 upland fields in Japan, were annually collected during more than 30 years, to be examined in the contents of {sup 137}Cs. The data, which were obtained by the use of a gamma spectrometric system, received some statistical treatments to distinguish the annual decline of {sup 137}Cs contents from deviations. Then the authors calculated `residence half-time of {sup 137}Cs` within top-soil, and `eluviation rate of {sup 137}Cs` from top to the sub-layer of the soil. The following nationwide results were obtained irrespective of paddy or upland field: (1) The `apparent residence half-time` was estimated as 16 - 17 years. This consists of both effects of eluviation and nuclear disintegration. (2) The true residence half-time` was reported as 41 - 42 years. This depends on the eluviation speed of {sup 137}Cs exclusively, because the influence of nuclear disintegration has been compensated. (3) The eluviation rate of {sup 137}Cs from top-soil down to the sub-soil was 1.6 - 1.7% per year. (4) The ratio of distribution of {sup 137}Cs between top-soil and the sub-soil was estimated to be 6:4 as average at the date of 1996. (author)

  13. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C. M.; de Peuter, K.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-07-01

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiNx) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiNx by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiNx by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called "redeposition effect". This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiNx ALD using SiH2(NHtBu)2 as precursor and N2 plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiNx film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  14. River Incision, Sediment Storage, and Sediment Residence Times at the Western Tibetan Plateau Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloethe, J. H.; Munack, H.; Fülling, A.; Resentini, A.; Garzanti, E.; Kubik, P.; Korup, O.

    2012-12-01

    Intermediate sediment storage protects underlying bedrock from incision, buffers sediment delivery from adjacent hillslopes and provides the source for potentially catastrophic sediment release. Along the western Tibetan plateau margin, broad alluviated valleys host large valley fills. Besides sediment storage in major valleys, deeply incised bedrock gorges also have the potential to store sediment for > 104 yrs, even though they are typically portrayed as conveyor belts for incoming sediment. Here we report on cyclic aggradation and re-incision of fluvial terraces near the Tibetan plateau margin in the Ladakh and Zanskar Ranges, NW Himalaya, India. Recently reported 10Be-derived bedrock incision rates of up to 3 mm/yr suggest locally focused fast incision that contrasts with the low (~0.02 mm/yr) denudation rates of this dry high-altitude mountain desert. We combine Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 10Be dating techniques, provenance analyses and morphometric analyses of digital elevation models (DEMs), in order to understand the Quaternary evolution of the region and to estimate sediment storage and residence times. We present the first OSL-derived dataset of fluvial fill terrace ages in the lower Zanskar gorge, a major tributary of the upper Indus River. These data are complemented by new 10Be exposure ages from fluvially polished surfaces and a 10Be depth profile of a fluvial terrace situated at the Zanskar-Indus confluence. Our data indicate at least two cycles of aggradation and re-incision. OSL ages from a terrace level 35 m above the river point to a phase of aggradation between 50 ka and 20 ka, which we attribute either to a late- or postglacial sediment pulse from the Zanskar headwaters, and/or to natural damming downstream. Preliminary results for the 10Be depth profile from the top of a terrace ~160 m above river level suggest a deposition age of > 100 ka, dating an older aggradation cycle. This higher terrace level is also present in the

  15. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    external conditions such as glaciation, palaeo Baltic stages, land uplift and ancient hydrothermal events, have had a significant effect on local palaeohydrogeological conditions. They have caused great variability, which is observable in the chemical data notably in salinity (up to 70 g/l), water type and contents of conservative parameters, such as Cl, Br and stable isotopes of water. However, their influence is also significant on the water-rock interaction that principally controls the pH and redox conditions - varying 7.5 to 8 and -200 to -300 mV, respectively - in the groundwater, although the calculated mass transfer in the reactions is minor compared with conservative mixing at the site. Calcite in fractures is interpreted to principally control pH level in groundwater. Sulphidic redox conditions dominate in the upper 500 m in brackish and slightly saline groundwater. Deeper sulphur species are absent and methanic processes are obtained. The water types can be connected to certain palaeo stages. This enables to estimate mean residence time of groundwaters. Current meteoric recharge stage (< 2500 a) mainly dominates in the upper 150 m. Groundwater from Litorina stage (7500-2500 a ago) forms the bulk at 100 - 250 m. Glacial melt water (about 10 000 a old) is an important component of groundwater between 100 - 500 m. However, any remarks of oxygen intrusion cannot be interpreted neither from mineralogy nor from groundwater. Deeper, subglacial and older saline groundwater predominates. Despite the current locations of different groundwater bodies it seems according to hydrogeochemical interpretation that dynamic flow conditions has been limited to upper 150 - 200 m. (orig.) 82 refs.

  16. Pathology resident and fellow education in a time of disruptive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, James M; Smith, Brian R

    2012-12-01

    The development of disruptive technologies is changing the practice of pathology. Their implementation challenges traditional educational paradigms. Training programs must adapt to these heuristic needs. The dual explosion of new medical knowledge and innovative methodologies adds new practice aspects to the pathologist's areas of expertise. This transformation potentially challenges the traditional core model of training. It raises questions as to how pathology should incorporate future expanding subspecialty needs into educational and practice models. This article examines the impact of these disruptive technologies on resident and fellow education and explores alternative educational and practice models that may better accommodate pathology's future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and sludge retention time (SRT) on the treatment of nitrobenzene in AMBR/CSTR reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, O S; Sponza, D T

    2007-03-01

    The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid retention time (SRT) on the biodegradation of a synthetic wastewater containing nitrobenzene was investigated in a sequential anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) and aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. Reactor performance was evaluated at six different HRTs (1,1.5,2,2.5,3.5,5.19 and 10.38 days) and at six different SRTs (32,53,76,217,415 and 932 days). The influent COD and nitrobenzene concentration were kept constant at 3000 mg l(-1) and 60 mg l(-1), respectively, during continuous operation. The maximum COD removal efficiency was found to be 92% at a HRT of 10.38 days and a SRT of 932 days in AMBR reactor. However, nitrobenzene removal efficiencies were found to be 99.9% through all HRTs and SRTs in AMBR reactor. Most of the influent COD and nitrobenzene concentrations were removed in first compartment of AMBR. The total and methane gas production rates increased from 2760 ml day(-1) to 11760 ml day(-1) and from 1300 ml day(-1) to 3331 ml day(-1), respectively, as the HRT was decreased from 10.38 to 1 day in AMBR. However, methane percentage decreased from 47% to 28% with decreased HRTs and SRTs. The methanogens inhibition was observed at lower HRTs. pH values in the compartments and the effluent of AMBR was between optimum values. TVFA concentrations in effluent of AMBR were measured as zero until a HRT of 3.5 days. In the aerobic CSTR reactor, the COD removal efficiency decreased from 79% to 68% with decreased HRT from 6.79 to 0.67 days. It was found that the nitrobenzene transformed to aniline under anaerobic phase, and then the aniline mineralized in the oxidative stage, with efficiencies varying between 79% to 99.9%, in anaerobic/aerobic reactor system.

  18. Maintaining social cohesion is a more important determinant of patch residence time than maximizing food intake rate in a group-living primate, Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazahari, Nobuko

    2014-04-01

    Animals have been assumed to employ an optimal foraging strategy (e.g., rate-maximizing strategy). In patchy food environments, intake rate within patches is positively correlated with patch quality, and declines as patches are depleted through consumption. This causes patch-leaving and determines patch residence time. In group-foraging situations, patch residence times are also affected by patch sharing. Optimal patch models for groups predict that patch residence times decrease as the number of co-feeding animals increases because of accelerated patch depletion. However, group members often depart patches without patch depletion, and their patch residence time deviates from patch models. It has been pointed out that patch residence time is also influenced by maintaining social proximity with others among group-living animals. In this study, the effects of maintaining social cohesion and that of rate-maximizing strategy on patch residence time were examined in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). I hypothesized that foragers give up patches to remain in the proximity of their troop members. On the other hand, foragers may stay for a relatively long period when they do not have to abandon patches to follow the troop. In this study, intake rate and foraging effort (i.e., movement) did not change during patch residency. Macaques maintained their intake rate with only a little foraging effort. Therefore, the patches were assumed to be undepleted during patch residency. Further, patch residence time was affected by patch-leaving to maintain social proximity, but not by the intake rate. Macaques tended to stay in patches for short periods when they needed to give up patches for social proximity, and remained for long periods when they did not need to leave to keep social proximity. Patch-leaving and patch residence time that prioritize the maintenance of social cohesion may be a behavioral pattern in group-living primates.

  19. Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion using time-lapse magnetic resonance sounding and time-lapse gravity data for hydraulic aquifer testing: Will it work in practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    for the specific yield and hydraulic conductivity when considering a fully penetrating well and minimal data error. Using more conservative TL-RG and TL-MRS data error estimates according our own field experience strongly limited the informative value of the TL-RG data; TL-MRS data was less affected by this...... of representative measurement error correlation in the TL-RG data did not affect its informative value. A local sensitivity analysis showed that observations were most sensitive to the pumping rate and the thickness, specific yield, and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. The inclusion of TL-MRS data proved...

  20. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  1. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters in the field by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-01-01

    An integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach was used to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data collected at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field. The GPR model combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propaga- tion in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. The hydrological simu- lator HYDRUS-1D was used with a two layer single- and dual-porosity model. The radar model was coupled to the hydrodynamic model, such that the soil electrical properties (permitivity and conductivity) that serve as input to the GPR model become a function of the hydrodynamic model output (water content), thereby permiting estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters from the GPR data in an inversion loop. To monitor the soil water con- tent dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. Significant effects of water dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR data and in particular precipitation and evaporation events were clearly visible. The dual porosity model provided betier results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is sup- ported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agree- ment with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and moni- toring water dynamics at the field scale. © Soil Science Society of America.

  2. The Effects of Particle Size, Different Corn Stover Components, and Gas Residence Time on Torrefaction of Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rahn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Large scale biofuel production will be possible only if significant quantities of biomass feedstock can be stored, transported, and processed in an economic and sustainable manner. Torrefaction has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of transportation, storage, and downstream processing through the improvement of physical and chemical characteristics of biomass. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of particle size, plant components, and gas residence time on the production of torrefied corn (Zea mays stover. Different particle sizes included 0.85 mm and 20 mm. Different stover components included ground corn stover, whole corn stalk, stalk shell and pith, and corn cob shell. Three different purge gas residence times were employed to assess the effects of interaction of volatiles and torrefied biomass. Elemental analyses were performed on all of the samples, and the data obtained was used to estimate the energy contents and energy yields of different torrefied biomass samples. Particle density, elemental composition, and fiber composition of raw biomass fractions were also determined. Stalk pith torrefied at 280 °C and stalk shell torrefied at 250 °C had highest and lowest dry matter loss, of about 44% and 13%, respectively. Stalk pith torrefied at 250 °C had lowest energy density of about 18–18.5 MJ/kg, while cob shell torrefied at 280 °C had the highest energy density of about 21.5 MJ/kg. The lowest energy yield, at 59%, was recorded for stalk pith torrefied at 280 °C, whereas cob and stalk shell torrefied at 250 °C had highest energy yield at 85%. These differences were a consequence of the differences in particle densities, hemicellulose quantities, and chemical properties of the original biomass samples. Gas residence time did not have a significant effect on the aforementioned parameters.

  3. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  4. Application of computational fluid dynamic to model the hydraulic performance of subsurface flow wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Liwei; Hai Reti; WANG Wenxing; LU Zexiang; YANG Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    A subsurface flow wetland (SSFW) was simulated using a commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The constructed media was simulated using porous media and the liquid resident time distribution (RTD) in the SSFW was obtained using the particle trajectory model. The effect of wetland configuration and operating conditions on the hydraulic performance of the SSFW were investigated. The results indicated that the hydraulic performance of the SSFW was predominantly affected by the wetland configuration. The hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW with an inlet at the middle edge of the upper media was 0.584 and the best among the SSFWs with an inlet at the top, the middle, and the bottom edge of the upper media. The constructed media affected the hydraulic performance by the ratio (K) of the upper and lower media resistance. The selection of appropriate media resistance in the protection layer can improve the hydraulic efficiency. When the viscous resistance coefficient of the media in the protection layer changed from 2.315×105 to 1.200×108, the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW increased from 0.301 to 0.751. However, the effect of operating conditions on the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW was slight.

  5. Effects of inlet momentum and orientation on the hydraulic performance of water storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Manoel Lucas Machado; Janzen, Johannes Gérson

    2017-09-01

    The influence of inlet momentum and inlet orientation on hydraulic performance of cylindrical water process tanks were investigated using a factorial design strategy. The hydraulic performance of the tanks was assessed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, which calculated the flow fields and the residence time distribution (RTD). RTDs were used to quantify the tanks hydraulic performance using hydraulic indexes that represent short-circuiting, mixing, and moment. These indexes were later associated with the effluent fraction of disinfectant (inlet and outlet disinfectant ratio). For small depth-to-diameter ratios, the inlet orientation and the inlet momentum were the most important factors regarding the hydraulic indexes and the effluent fraction of disinfectant, respectively. A poor correlation was obtained between the hydraulic indexes and the effluent fraction of disinfectant, indicating that they are not good predictors for water quality. For large depth-to-diameter ratios, the inlet orientation had the most significant effect on both the hydraulic indexes and effluent fraction of disinfectant. The short-circuiting and mixing indexes presented a good correlation with water quality for this case.

  6. Multi-tracer investigation of groundwater residence time in a karstic aquifer: Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Lewis; Huff, G. F.

    2010-03-01

    Several natural and anthropogenic tracers have been used to evaluate groundwater residence time within a karstic limestone aquifer in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Natural groundwater discharge occurs in the lower Pecos Valley from a region of karst springs, wetlands and sinkhole lakes at Bitter Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, on the northeast margin of the Roswell Artesian Basin. The springs and sinkholes are formed in gypsum bedrock that serves as a leaky confining unit for an artesian aquifer in the underlying San Andres limestone. Because wetlands on the Refuge provide habitat for threatened and endangered species, there is concern about the potential for contamination by anthropogenic activity in the aquifer recharge area. Estimates of the time required for groundwater to travel through the artesian aquifer vary widely because of uncertainties regarding karst conduit flow. A better understanding of groundwater residence time is required to make informed decisions about management of water resources and wildlife habitat at Bitter Lakes. Results indicate that the artesian aquifer contains a significant component of water recharged within the last 10-50 years, combined with pre-modern groundwater originating from deeper underlying aquifers, some of which may be indirectly sourced from the high Sacramento Mountains to the west.

  7. Effects of hydraulic retention time and nitrobenzene concentration on the performance of sequential upflow anaerobic filter and air lift reactors in treating nitrobenzene-containing wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jinhua; Chen, Guocai; Gu, Jingjing;

    2014-01-01

    Sequential upflow anaerobic filter (UAF)/air lift (ALR) reactors were employed to investigate the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrobenzene (NB) concentration on treatment of NB-containing wastewater. The results showed that NB was effectively reduced to aniline (AN) with glucose...... and the influent NB concentration increased from 400 to 800 mg l super(-1), respectively. The results showed that sequential UAF/ALR system can be operated at low HRTs and high NB concentrations without significantly affecting the removal efficiency of NB in the reactor system. The UAF/ALR system can provide...... an effective yet low cost method for treatment of NB-containing industrial wastewater....

  8. Comparison of two mathematical models for correlating the organic matter removal efficiency with hydraulic retention time in a hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor treating molasses

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaniyari-Benis, Saeid; Martín, Antonio; Borja Padilla, Rafael; M. A. Martín; Hedayat, N.

    2012-01-01

    A modelling of the anaerobic digestion process of molasses was conducted in a 70-L multistage anaerobic biofilm reactor or hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor with six compartments at an operating temperature of 26 °C. Five hydraulic retention times (6, 16, 24, 72 and 120 h) were studied at a constant influent COD concentration of 10,000 mg/L. Two different kinetic models (one was based on a dispersion model with first-order kinetics for substrate consumption and the other based on a modificati...

  9. Increasing functional modularity with residence time in the co-distribution of native and introduced vascular plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cang; Richardson, David M.; Pyšek, Petr; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Kučera, Tomáš; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    Species gain membership of regional assemblages by passing through multiple ecological and environmental filters. To capture the potential trajectory of structural changes in regional meta-communities driven by biological invasions, one can categorize species pools into assemblages of different residence times. Older assemblages, having passed through more environmental filters, should become more functionally ordered and structured. Here we calculate the level of compartmentalization (modularity) for three different-aged assemblages (neophytes, introduced after 1500 AD; archaeophytes, introduced before 1500 AD, and natives), including 2,054 species of vascular plants in 302 reserves in central Europe. Older assemblages are more compartmentalized than younger ones, with species composition, phylogenetic structure and habitat characteristics of the modules becoming increasingly distinctive. This sheds light on two mechanisms of how alien species are functionally incorporated into regional species pools: the settling-down hypothesis of diminishing stochasticity with residence time, and the niche-mosaic hypothesis of inlaid neutral modules in regional meta-communities. PMID:24045305

  10. Measurements of liquid phase residence time distributions in a pilot-scale continuous leaching reactor using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K; Shenoy, K T; Sreenivas, T

    2015-03-01

    An alkaline based continuous leaching process is commonly used for extraction of uranium from uranium ore. The reactor in which the leaching process is carried out is called a continuous leaching reactor (CLR) and is expected to behave as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the liquid phase. A pilot-scale CLR used in a Technology Demonstration Pilot Plant (TDPP) was designed, installed and operated; and thus needed to be tested for its hydrodynamic behavior. A radiotracer investigation was carried out in the CLR for measurement of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase with specific objectives to characterize the flow behavior of the reactor and validate its design. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer and about 40-60MBq activity was used in each run. The measured RTD curves were treated and mean residence times were determined and simulated using a tanks-in-series model. The result of simulation indicated no flow abnormality and the reactor behaved as an ideal CSTR for the range of the operating conditions used in the investigation.

  11. A new methodology for measurement of sludge residence time distribution in a paddle dryer using X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlou, Christophe; Milhé, Mathieu; Sauceau, Martial; Arlabosse, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Drying is a necessary step before sewage sludge energetic valorization. Paddle dryers allow working with such a complex material. However, little is known about sludge flow in this kind of processes. This study intends to set up an original methodology for sludge residence time distribution (RTD) measurement in a continuous paddle dryer, based on the detection of mineral tracers by X-ray fluorescence. This accurate analytical technique offers a linear response to tracer concentration in dry sludge; the protocol leads to a good repeatability of RTD measurements. Its equivalence to RTD measurement by NaCl conductivity in sludge leachates is assessed. Moreover, it is shown that tracer solubility has no influence on RTD: liquid and solid phases have the same flow pattern. The application of this technique on sludge with different storage duration at 4 °C emphasizes the influence of this parameter on sludge RTD, and thus on paddle dryer performances: the mean residence time in a paddle dryer is almost doubled between 24 and 48 h of storage for identical operating conditions.

  12. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-11-06

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ'E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ'E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models.

  13. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  14. Water availability limits tree productivity, carbon stocks, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Logan T.; Law, Beverly E.; Hudiburg, Tara W.

    2017-01-01

    Water availability constrains the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems and is projected to change in many parts of the world over the coming century. We quantified the response of tree net primary productivity (NPP), live biomass (BIO), and mean carbon residence time (CRT = BIO / NPP) to spatial variation in water availability in the western US. We used forest inventory measurements from 1953 mature stands (> 100 years) in Washington, Oregon, and California (WAORCA) along with satellite and climate data sets covering the western US. We summarized forest structure and function in both domains along a 400 cm yr-1 hydrologic gradient, quantified with a climate moisture index (CMI) based on the difference between precipitation and reference evapotranspiration summed over the water year (October-September) and then averaged annually from 1985 to 2014 (CMIwy). Median NPP, BIO, and CRT computed at 10 cm yr-1 intervals along the CMIwy gradient increased monotonically with increasing CMIwy across both WAORCA (rs = 0.93-0.96, p changes over the western US, though these data sets tended to plateau in the wettest areas, suggesting that additional efforts are needed to better quantify NPP and BIO from satellites in high-productivity, high-biomass forests. Our results illustrate that long-term average water availability is a key environmental constraint on tree productivity, carbon storage, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US, underscoring the need to assess potential ecosystem response to projected warming and drying over the coming century.

  15. Robust Control of Industrial Hydraulic Cylinder Drives - with Special Reference to Sliding Mode- & Finite-Time Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse

    performance, simple parameter design and robustness in the presence of uncertain parameters- and disturbances, the field of sliding mode control has been investigated. Especially high order sliding mode control methods have been studied, due the intriguing possibility of maintaining the main properties...... of sliding mode control but with continuous control inputs. The applicability of second order modes has been investigated, and modifications of such controls have been developed based on homogeneity principles in order to provide more suitable controllers for hydraulic systems, than conventional second order...... sliding mode types. Also, an extension of the second order sliding algorithm known as the twisting algorithm has been developed, with compensation of local equilibria, and even an arbitrary order sliding mode design has been considered in a future perspective. Experimental results reveal that the model...

  16. A decade of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: Time-based metrics and qualitative grading for fellows and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altok, Muammer; Achim, Mary F; Matin, Surena F; Pettaway, Curtis A; Chapin, Brian F; Davis, John W

    2017-09-27

    As modern urology residency and fellowship training in robot-assisted surgery evolves toward standardized curricula (didactics, dry/wet-laboratory exercises, and surgical assistance), additional tools are needed to evaluate on-console performance. At the start of our robotics program in 2006, we set-up a time- and quality-based evaluation program and aim to consolidate this data into a simple set of metrics for self-evaluation. Using our index procedure of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), we prospectively collected data on 2,215 cases over 10 years from 6 faculty surgeons and 94 trainees (43 urologic oncology fellows and 51 urology residents). The steps of the operation were divided into 11 consistent steps, and the metrics included time to completion and quality using a 6-level grading system. Time metrics were consolidated into quartiles for benchmarking. The median times for trainees to complete each step were 15% to 120% higher than those of the staff (Pstaff results. Steps performed by trainees were carefully chosen for a high success rate, and on our Likert-like scale were graded 4 to 5 in more than 95% of cases. There were no grade 0 (very poor) cases, and grades 1 (multiple technical errors) and 2 (could not be completed but without safety issues) were rare (staff. As a trainee progress through a rotation, these benchmarks can assist in prioritizing the need for more attention to a basic step vs. progression to more advanced steps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Groundwater residence times in Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia, USA: A multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Nelms, D.L.; Michel, R.L.; Schlosser, P.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic properties of water discharging from springs and wells in Shenandoah National Park (SNP), near the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA, USA were monitored to obtain information on groundwater residence times. Investigated time scales included seasonal (wet season, April, 1996; dry season, August-September, 1997), monthly (March through September, 1999) and hourly (30-min interval recording of specific conductance and temperature, March, 1999 through February, 2000). Multiple environmental tracers, including tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), sulfur-35 (35S), and stable isotopes (??18O and ??2H) of water, were used to estimate the residence times of shallow groundwater discharging from 34 springs and 15 wells. The most reliable ages of water from springs appear to be based on SF6 and 3H/3He, with most ages in the range of 0-3 years. This range is consistent with apparent ages estimated from concentrations of CFCs; however, CFC-based ages have large uncertainties owing to the post-1995 leveling-off of the CFC atmospheric growth curves. Somewhat higher apparent ages are indicated by 35S (> 1.5 years) and seasonal variation of ??18O (mean residence time of 5 years) for spring discharge. The higher ages indicated by the 35S and ??18O data reflect travel times through the unsaturated zone and, in the case of 35S, possible sorption and exchange of S with soils or biomass. In springs sampled in April, 1996, apparent ages derived from the 3H/3He data (median age of 0.2 years) are lower than those obtained from SF6 (median age of 4.3 years), and in contrast to median ages from 3H/3He (0.3 years) and SF6 (0.7 years) obtained during the late summer dry season of 1997. Monthly samples from 1999 at four springs in SNP had SF6 apparent ages of only 1.2 to 2.5 ?? 0.8 years, and were consistent with the 1997 SF6 data. Water from springs has low excess air (0-1 cm3 kg-1) and N2-Ar temperatures that vary

  18. Mean residence time of kaolinite and smectite-bound organic matter in mozambiquan soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.; Buurman, P.

    2004-01-01

    To gain understanding about the process of global warming, it is essential to study the global C cycle. In the global C cycle, soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source and sink of atmospheric C. Turnover times of C in these soil organic compounds vary from hours to thousands of years. Clay minera

  19. Distribution of residence times as a marker to distinguish different pathways for quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-10-01

    Electron transport through a nanoscale system is an inherently stochastic quantum mechanical process. Electric current is a time series of electron tunneling events separated by random intervals. Thermal and quantum noise are two sources of this randomness. In this paper we use the quantum master equation to consider the following questions. (i) Given that an electron has tunneled into the electronically unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (the tunneling path)? (ii) Given that an electron tunneled into the unoccupied system from the source electrode at some particular time, how long is it until an electron tunnels out to the drain electrode to leave the system electronically unoccupied, where there are no intermediate tunneling events (a tunneling path)? (iii) What are the distributions of these times? We show that electron correlations suppress the difference between the electron tunneling path and an electron tunneling path.

  20. Mean residence time of kaolinite and smectite-bound organic matter in mozambiquan soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.; Buurman, P.

    2004-01-01

    To gain understanding about the process of global warming, it is essential to study the global C cycle. In the global C cycle, soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source and sink of atmospheric C. Turnover times of C in these soil organic compounds vary from hours to thousands of years. Clay minera

  1. What can environmental tracer concentrations tell us about groundwater residence time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, J. L.; Engdahl, N. B.; Cook, P. G.; Simmons, C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of groundwater age distributions through the use on lumped parameter models and environmental tracer concentrations is an ongoing practice. These models are based on simple geometries and sampling conditions and may not be applicable outside of ideal conditions, limiting the results that can be obtained. We have developed a method that requires no underlying assumptions about the structure of the groundwater age distribution. This method assumes that the convolution relationship describes the relationship between temporal atmospheric concentrations and measured groundwater sample concentrations. We looked at synthetically generated groundwater age distributions and a number of levels of tracer data including a long time series of tritium, the use of CFCs and SF6 sampled at various times and the use of CFCs, SF6, 3H and 14C sampled at a single time. In general, we found that environmental tracers are not very informative of groundwater age distributions resulting in estimates being highly non-unique. The exception was the use of a time series of tritium data. Tritium is more informative due to the temporal variations of atmospheric concentrations and a short half-life reducing the correlation of sequential measurements. The ability of CFC compounds to estimate entire distributions was limited due to the lack of variation in temporal atmospheric concentrations and correlation between sampled concentrations. Despite varying ability of the method to predict whole distributions, some indicators such as the mean age and some arrival time statistics were estimated well by the method. The implications of this show that care should be taken in the choice of lumped parameter model used in conjunction with environmental tracer techniques to constrain entire groundwater age distributions. Interestingly, the ability to correct for mixing bias of mean ages despite poor estimates of entire groundwater age distributions shows some promise.

  2. Structure, provenance and residence time of terrestrial organic carbon: insights from Programmed temperature Pyrolysis-Combustion of river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Galy, V.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Roe, K. M.; Williams, E. K.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial organic carbon (OC) represents one of the largest reservoirs of C on earth and thus plays a crucial role in the global C cycle, participating to the regulation of atmospheric chemistry. While degradation of sedimentary OC (petrogenic C) is a source of CO2 for the atmosphere, burial of biospheric C (e.g. plant debris and soil OC) is a long-term sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Over short timescales, the atmospheric CO2 level is also sensitive to variations of the residence time of carbon in continental reservoirs. Fluvial transport plays a crucial role in the organic carbon cycle, constituting the connection between the different reservoirs and promoting the transfer of C from one reservoir to the other. Moreover, thanks to the integrating effect of erosion, studying river sediments allows the spatial and temporal integration of organic carbon exchanges occurring in a given basin. OC transported by rivers (riverine OC) is known to be extremely heterogeneous in nature and reactivity, however; ranging from extremely refractory petrogenic C (e.g. graphite) to soil complex OC to labile vegetation debris. Here we use a recently developed method, a programmed-temperature pyrolysis-combustion system (PTP-CS) coupled to multiisotopic analysis, to determine the reactivity, age and nature of OC in river sediments. The method takes advantage of the wide range of reactivity and radiocarbon content of different components of riverine OC. We submitted to PTP-CS a set of river sediments from 1) the Ganges-Brahmputra river system and, 2) the lower Mississippi river. Preliminary results highlight the heterogeneous nature of riverine OC. Different components of the riverine OC pool decompose at different temperature and are characterized by extremely variable isotopic compositions. The decomposition of radiocarbon dead petrogenic C at very high temperature allows estimating the respective contribution of biospheric and petrogenic C. Moreover, biospheric OC appears to

  3. Recovery of Sleep or Recovery of Self? A Grounded Theory Study of Residents' Decision Making Regarding How to Spend Their Nonclinical Postcall Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Taryn S; Nisker, Jeff; Teunissen, Pim W; Dornan, Tim; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-03-01

    As resident work hours policies evolve, residents' off-duty time remains poorly understood. Despite assumptions about how residents should be using their postcall, off-duty time, there is little research on how residents actually use this time and the reasoning underpinning their activities. This study sought to understand residents' nonclinical postcall activities when they leave the hospital, their decision-making processes, and their perspectives on the relationship between these activities and their well-being or recovery. The study took place at a Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited Canadian medical school from 2012 to 2014. The authors recruited a purposive and convenience sample of postgraduate year 1-5 residents from six surgical and nonsurgical specialties at three hospitals affiliated with the medical school. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed, anonymized, and combined with field notes. The authors analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative analysis and performed post hoc member checking. Twenty-four residents participated. Residents characterized their predominant approach to postcall decision making as one of making trade-offs between multiple, competing, seemingly incompatible, but equally valuable, activities. Participants exhibited two different trade-off orientations: being oriented toward maintaining a normal life or toward mitigating fatigue. The authors' findings on residents' trade-off orientations suggest a dual recovery model with postcall trade-offs motivated by the recovery of sleep or of self. This model challenges the dominant viewpoint in the current duty hours literature and suggests that the duty hours discussion must be broadened to include other recovery processes.

  4. Foraging strategy of a neotropical primate: how intrinsic and extrinsic factors influence destination and residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Sabrina; Colchero, Fernando; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Most animals need to actively search for food to meet energetic requirements and live in heterogeneous environments where food resources have complex spatio-temporal patterns of availability. Consequently, foraging animals need to find a balance between effort and resource allocation while accounting for intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which are often overlooked when modelling foraging behaviour. We identified the decision rules for foraging in black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), according to food preferences, locations of high-quality patches and previously eaten trees, phenology of food resources and hunger state. We depicted foraging in two stages: (i) the choice of the immediate next tree and (ii) the time spent on this tree. We used a recently developed model for inference of movement processes, incorporating resource selection functions into a Markov chain framework. We found that monkeys tend to move to preferred tree species at each step. However, we did not find conclusively that, at each step, monkeys direct their movements to reach high-quality patches. In fact, they were using these patches intensively, thus limiting the possibility to move towards other high-quality patches. Time spent on a tree was positively and strongly affected by the presence of preferred food items, but not by its species. We also showed that time spent on trees increased as a function of satiation state. We suggest that the strategy adopted by black howlers tends to be efficient because choosing preferred trees at each step and spending spend more time where preferred resources are available should favour energy intake and restrain movement costs. This study showcases a modelling framework that can be widely used in ecology to describe movements as a combination of multiple attraction and repulsion sources, such as mates and competitors. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  5. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977–1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990–1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953–1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  6. Effects of hydraulic retention time on aerobic granulation and granule growth kinetics at steady state with a fast start-up strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4, 6, and 8 h was employed, respectively, in three reactors to study the effects of HRT on granulation with a newly developed fast granulation strategy, i.e., a strategy by combining strong hydraulic selection pressure with high organic loading rate (OLR). Granules with clear boundary appeared within 24 h after reactor start-up and all reactors reached a pseudo steady state after 6-day operation. A 4-h HRT resulted in a relatively higher increasing rate in terms of granule size during granule development period, i.e., 208 μm day(-1), and the bigger granule size and the higher sludge volume index at the pseudo steady state. For HRT of 6 or 8 h, no obvious difference was observed. However, it was found that HRT influenced sludge retention time (SRT) and kinetics significantly. A HRT changing from 4 to 8 h led to an increased SRT from 3 to 21 days, a decreased observed specific biomass growth rate (μ obs) and an decreased observed biomass yield (Y obs) of stable granules from 0.37 to 0.062 days(-1), and 0.177 to 0.055 g MLVSS g(-1) COD, respectively. Both μ obs and Y obs had a linear relationship with the reciprocal of HRT. In addition, the great difference of microbial community between seed sludge, sludge retained in the reactors, and sludge washed out indicated a strong microbial selection for fast granulation within 24 h. However, during the granule development period from day 1 to 6, no more microbial selection was observed except an adjustment of microbial community. Little influence of HRT on microbial population in granular sludge indicated a minor role of HRT played for granulation with the fast start-up strategy adopted in this study. The results demonstrated that hydraulic selection pressure for granulation was mainly from short settling time, which led to strong microbial selection during the granulation period. Meanwhile, although HRT did not affect granulation with the fast start-up strategy, it played an

  7. LUMPED: a Visual Basic code of lumped-parameter models for mean residence time analyses of groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, N. N.; Bayari, C. S.

    2003-02-01

    A Microsoft ® Visual Basic 6.0 (Microsoft Corporation, 1987-1998) code of 15 lumped-parameter models is presented for the analysis of mean residence time in aquifers. Groundwater flow systems obeying plug and exponential flow models and their combinations of parallel or serial connection can be simulated by these steady-state models which may include complications such as bypass flow and dead volume. Each model accepts tritium, krypton-85, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6) as environmental tracer. Retardation of gas tracers in the unsaturated zone and their degradation in the flow system may also be accounted for. The executable code has been tested to run under Windows 95 or higher operating systems. The results of comparisons between other comparable codes are discussed and the limitations are indicated.

  8. Fly Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass. Effects of Residence Time and Fuel-Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to generate comprehensive data on the formation of residual fly ash during the initial stages of suspension-firing of biomass. Combustion experiments were carried out with pulverized biomass fuels (two straw fuels and two wood fuels), in an entrained flow reactor...... at 1200-1400 °C, simulating full-scale suspension-firing of biomass. By the use of a movable, cooled and quenched gas/particle sampling probe, samples were collected at different positions along the vertical axis in the reactor, corresponding to gas residence times ranging from 0.25 – 2.0s. The collected...... particles were subjected to various analyses, including char burnout level, particle size distribution, elemental composition, and particle morphology and composition. Furthermore, the transient release, i.e. the vaporization of the flame-volatile inorganic elements K, Cl and S, from the burning fuel...

  9. Polymer binding to carbon nanotubes in aqueous dispersions: residence time on the nanotube surface as obtained by NMR diffusometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frise, Anton E; Pagès, Guilhem; Shtein, Michael; Pri Bar, Ilan; Regev, Oren; Furó, István

    2012-03-08

    The binding of block copolymer Pluronic F-127 in aqueous dispersions of single- (SWCNT) and multiwalled (MWCNT) carbon nanotubes has been studied by pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. We show that a major fraction of polymers exist as a free species while a minor fraction is bound to the carbon nanotubes (CNT). The polymers exchange between these two states with residence times on the nanotube surface of 24 ± 5 ms for SWCNT and of 54 ± 11 ms for MWCNT. The CNT concentration in the solution was determined by improved thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicating that the concentration of SWCNT dispersed by F-127 was significantly higher than that for MWCNT. For SWCNT, the area per adsorbed Pluronic F-127 molecule is estimated to be about 40 nm(2).

  10. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  11. Multi-scale field investigation of water flow pathways and residence times in mountainous catchments during monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troch, P. A.; Lyon, S. W.; Desilets, S.

    2007-05-01

    The "sky islands" of Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States form a unique complex of about 27 mountain ranges whose ecosystems support many perennial and ephemeral streams in an arid climate. Among these sky islands are the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, AZ, with a peak elevation of 9157 ft at Mt. Lemmon. Sabino Canyon Creek is the main stream which runs on the south face of the mountain range. It usually flows from July through April with an average daily flow of approximately 0.28 m3/s (10 cfs). However, flash floods are common both during summer as a result of intense monsoon rains and during spring because of rapid snowmelt. During these events, flow increases drastically, reaching peak flows up to 480 m3/s (15,984 cfs, July 2006). Characterizing water flow pathways and residence times in these complex catchments is important for improving flash flood warning systems, estimating mountain front recharge, managing forest and wild fires, and understanding ecosystem functions. In the summer of 2006, we set up an extensive hydrometrical and hydro- chemical monitoring network in Sabino Canyon Creek, comprising 40 tipping bucket rain gauges (two of which were equipped to automatically collect rainwater samples), 5 automatic surface water level stations (three of which were equipped with auto samplers), and 8 manual soil lysimeters. In addition, several rain and stream water grab samples were collected manually during intensive rain events. Water samples are analyzed for major ions and liquid water isotopic concentration (2H and 18O) in rain, soil, ground and surface water. The data allows for a detailed reconstruction of water flow pathways and residence times at 3 different catchment scales (2 km2, 8 km2, and 91 km2) during the recorded flow events, including the highest monsoon rainfall-runoff event ever recorded in these mountains.

  12. An experimental study of the role of particle diffusive convection on the residence time of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, E.; Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, M.

    2013-12-01

    The longevity of volcanic ash clouds generated by explosive volcanic plumes is difficult to predict. Diffusive convective instabilities leading to the production of internal layering are known to affect the stability and longevity of these clouds, but the detailed mechanisms controlling particle dynamics and sedimentation are poorly understood. We present results from a series of analog experiments reproducing diffusive convection in a 2D (Hele-Shaw) geometry, which allow us to constrain conditions for layer formation, sedimentation regime and cloud residence time as a function of only the source conditions. We inject a turbulent particle-laden jet sideways into a tank containing a basal layer of salt water and an upper layer of fresh water, which ultimately spreads as a gravity current. After the injection is stopped, particles in suspension settle through the cloud to form particle boundary layers (PBL) at the cloud base. We vary the initial particle concentration of the plume and the injection velocity over a wide range of conditions to identify and characterize distinct regimes of sedimentation. Our experiments show that convective instabilities driven as a result of differing diffusivities of salt and particles lead to periodic layering over a wide range of conditions expected in nature. The flux of particles from layered clouds and the thicknesses of the layers are understood using classical theory for double diffusive convection adjusted for the hydrodynamic diffusion of particles. Although diffusive convection increases sedimentation rates for the smallest particles (<30 μm) its overall effect is to extend the cloud residence time to several hours by maintaining larger particles in suspension within the layers, which is several orders of magnitude longer than expected when considering individual settling rates.

  13. NMR-based estimates of the molecular dimensions in wildfire charcoal: Implications for predictions of biochar residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, William; Kane, Evan; Huang, Rixiang; Von Bargen, Justin; Davis, Rebecca; Ohlson, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to energy and fuels generates charcoal as a co-product. Charcoals derived from sustainable biomass sources—biochars—are an inherently stable form of carbon, relatively long residence times in the environment. Biochars can have potentially beneficial properties as soil fertility amendments, which has further stimulated research on the use of biochars for soil carbon sequestration as a climate change mitigation strategy. However, it is challenging to assess the long-term stability of biochar carbon using laboratory or field incubations because these are comprised of short-term observations. In this study, we make use of ancient charcoals from the boreal forests of Alaska and Scandanavia. We have deliberately selected charcoals from organic soil horizons, as to investigate the inherent biological and chemical stability of charcoal C without the protective influence of soil minerals. We use 14C radiocarbon dating to determine the age of the charcoals, differential scanning calorimetry to assess thermal stability, and solid-state 13C NMR to assess the chemical structure. Specifically, we employ C-H dipolar-dephasing NMR experiments to estimate the relative abundance and molecular dimensions of condensed aromatic domains and aliphatic structures. We test the hypothesis that the environmental stability, as determined by apparent 14C age and thermal stability, is related to the extent of ring condensation in the charcoal structure. Preliminary results suggest that the dimension of the condensed aromatic ring clusters may be an important molecular parameter to include in algorithms used to model/predict the residence time of charcoal and biochar C in soil.

  14. In vivo Target Residence Time and Kinetic Selectivity: The Association Rate Constant as Determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that, in conjunction with pharmacokinetics, the first-order rate constant of target dissociation is a major determinant of the time course and duration of in vivo target occupancy. Here we show that the second-order rate constant of target association can be equally important. On the basis of the commonly used mathematical models for drug-target binding, it is shown that a high target association rate constant can increase the (local) concentration of the drug, which decreases the rate of decline of target occupancy. The increased drug concentration can also lead to increased off-target binding and decreased selectivity. Therefore, the kinetics of both target association and dissociation need to be taken into account in the selection of drug candidates with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of residence times of coastal basins in the Laxemar- Simpevarp area between 3000 BC and 9000 AD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engqvist, Anders (AandI Engqvist Konsult HB, Vaxholm (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The assignment has consisted of computation of the morpho- and bathymetry of the coastal area of Laxemar-Simpevarp for the time period 3000 BC through 9000 AD, in order to estimate the residence times as yearly means of volume-averaged specific age (Average Age, AvA) for water in coastal basins. These basins have been selected as belonging to earlier defined biosphere objects, containing anticipated exit points from possible radionuclides leaking from a hypothetical underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. This endeavor starts with partitioning of the coast into appropriate sub-basins interconnected by straits in an as objective manner as possible. This has been performed in cooperation with Umeaa Univ. followed by the transformation of these hypsographical data to a form that can serve as input data to the employed numerical CouBa-model. This model has been developed to simulate the water exchange of straits between densimetrically stably stratified basins with a free sea level including advection and mixing of water-borne conservative scalar properties, e.g. salinity, heat and specific age. The forcing of the model consists of run-off, wind-induced stress, thermal surface dynamics (heating/cooling) and density fluctuations at the open boundary toward the coastal zone, relative by which the specific water age is calculated For these ambient forcing factors there do not exist sufficiently precise climate data other than for contemporary times. For all other time periods the measured and/or model-computed forcing data regarding 2004 have been used. Estimated AvA-values for the different time periods are thus an expression of sub-basin configuration and hypsographical differences. An overriding directive has been to rather overestimate than underestimate the residence times, as to avoid underestimation of the subsequent dose calculations. The results of these AvA computations, presented as volume averages of yearly means of the sixteen biosphere object

  16. Uncertainties in carbon residence time and NPP-driven carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous USA: a Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhui Zhou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C residence time is one of the key factors that determine the capacity of ecosystem C storage. However, its uncertainties have not been well quantified, especially at regional scales. Assessing uncertainties of C residence time is thus crucial for an improved understanding of terrestrial C sequestration. In this study, the Bayesian inversion and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC technique were applied to a regional terrestrial ecosystem (TECO-R model to quantify C residence times and net primary productivity (NPP-driven ecosystem C uptake and assess their uncertainties in the conterminous USA. The uncertainty was represented by coefficient of variation (CV. The 13 spatially distributed data sets of C pools and fluxes have been used to constrain TECO-R model for each biome (totally eight biomes. Our results showed that estimated ecosystem C residence times ranged from 16.6±1.8 (cropland to 85.9±15.3 yr (evergreen needleleaf forest with an average of 56.8±8.8 yr in the conterminous USA. The ecosystem C residence times and their CV were spatially heterogeneous and varied with vegetation types and climate conditions. Large uncertainties appeared in the southern and eastern USA. Driven by NPP changes from 1982 to 1998, terrestrial ecosystems in the conterminous USA would absorb 0.20±0.06 Pg C yr−1. Their spatial pattern was closely related to the greenness map in the summer with larger uptake in central and southeast regions. The lack of data or timescale mismatching between the available data and the estimated parameters lead to uncertainties in the estimated C residence times, which together with initial NPP resulted in the uncertainties in the estimated NPP-driven C uptake. The Bayesian approach with MCMC inversion provides an effective tool to estimate spatially distributed C residence time and assess their uncertainties in the conterminous USA.

  17. Improving Timely Resident Follow-Up and Communication of Results in Ambulatory Clinics Utilizing a Web-Based Audit and Feedback Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Joel C; Swaminathan, Aparna; Thomas, Samantha; Simel, David L; Zaas, Aimee K; Bae, Jonathan G

    2017-04-01

    Failure to follow up and communicate test results to patients in outpatient settings may lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Residents are less likely than attending physicians to report results to patients, and may face additional barriers to reporting, given competing clinical responsibilities. This study aimed to improve the rates of communicating test results to patients in resident ambulatory clinics. We performed an internal medicine, residency-wide, pre- and postintervention, quality improvement project using audit and feedback. Residents performed audits of ambulatory patients requiring laboratory or radiologic testing by means of a shared online interface. The intervention consisted of an educational module viewed with initial audits, development of a personalized improvement plan after Phase 1, and repeated real-time feedback of individual relative performance compared at clinic and program levels. Outcomes included results communicated within 14 days and prespecified "significant" results communicated within 72 hours. A total of 76 of 86 eligible residents (88%) reviewed 1713 individual ambulatory patients' charts in Phase 1, and 73 residents (85%) reviewed 1509 charts in Phase 2. Follow-up rates were higher in Phase 2 than Phase 1 for communicating results within 14 days and significant results within 72 hours (85% versus 78%, P audit and feedback quality improvement project can improve rates of resident follow-up and communication of results, although communication gaps remained.

  18. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of the System 81 cold traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1977-06-15

    Thermal and hydraulic analyses of the System 81 Type I and II cold traps were completed except for thermal transients analysis. Results are evaluated, discussed, and reported. Analytical models were developed to determine the physical dimensions of the cold traps and to predict the performance. The FFTF cold trap crystallizer performances were simulated using the thermal model. This simulation shows that the analytical model developed predicts reasonably conservative temperatures. Pressure drop and sodium residence time calculations indicate that the present design will meet the requirements specified in the E-Specification. Steady state temperature data for the critical regions were generated to assess the magnitude of the thermal stress.

  19. Characterization of surface and ground water δ18O seasonal variation and its use for estimating groundwater residence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Schuster, Paul; Kendall, Carol; Reddy, Micaela B.

    2006-01-01

    18O is an ideal tracer for characterizing hydrological processes because it can be reliably measured in several watershed hydrological compartments. Here, we present multiyear isotopic data, i.e. 18O variations (δ18O), for precipitation inputs, surface water and groundwater in the Shingobee River Headwaters Area (SRHA), a well-instrumented research catchment in north-central Minnesota. SRHA surface waters exhibit δ18O seasonal variations similar to those of groundwaters, and seasonal δ18O variations plotted versus time fit seasonal sine functions. These seasonal δ18O variations were interpreted to estimate surface water and groundwater mean residence times (MRTs) at sampling locations near topographically closed-basin lakes. MRT variations of about 1 to 16 years have been estimated over an area covering about 9 km2 from the basin boundary to the most downgradient well. Estimated MRT error (±0·3 to ±0·7 years) is small for short MRTs and is much larger (±10 years) for a well with an MRT (16 years) near the limit of the method. Groundwater transit time estimates based on Darcy's law, tritium content, and the seasonal δ18O amplitude approach appear to be consistent within the limits of each method. The results from this study suggest that use of the δ18O seasonal variation method to determine MRTs can help assess groundwater recharge areas in small headwaters catchments.

  20. Gasification of biomass wastes in an entrained flow gasifier: Effect of the particle size and the residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Juan J.; Aranda-Almansa, Guadalupe [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Departamento de Mecanica Aplicada e Ingenieria de Proyectos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (Edificio Politecnico), Avenida Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Bula, Antonio [Universidad del Norte, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Km.5 Antigua Via Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2010-06-15

    Experimental tests in an entrained flow gasifier have been carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the biomass particle size and the space residence time on the gasifier performance and the producer gas quality. Three types of biomass fuels (grapevine pruning and sawdust wastes, and marc of grape) and a fossil fuel (a coal-coke blend) have been tested. The results obtained show that a reduction in the fuel particle size leads to a significant improvement in the gasification parameters. The thermochemical characterisation of the resulting char-ash residue shows a sharp increase in the fuel conversion for particles below 1 mm diameter, which could be adequate to be used in conventional entrained flow gasifiers. Significant differences in the thermochemical behaviour of the biomass fuels and the coal-coke blend have been found, especially in the evolution of the H{sub 2}/CO ratio with the space time, mainly due to the catalytic effect of the coal-coke ash. The reaction temperature and the space time have a significant effect on the H{sub 2}/CO ratio (the relative importance of each of these parameters depending on the temperature), this value being independent of the fuel particle size. (author)

  1. Effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on denitrification using waste activated sludge thermal hydrolysis liquid and acidogenic liquid as carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiding; Guo, Liang; Sun, Mei; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian

    2017-01-01

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) internal carbon source can efficiently and economically enhance denitrification, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) is one of the most important operational parameters for denitrification. The effects of HRT on denitrification were investigated with WAS thermal hydrolysis liquid and acidogenic liquid as carbon sources in this study. The optimal HRT was 12h for thermal hydrolysis liquid and 8h for acidogenic liquid, with NO3(-)-N removal efficiency of 91.0% and 97.6%, respectively. In order to investigate the utilization of sludge carbon source by denitrifier, the changes of SCOD (Soluble chemical oxygen demand), proteins, carbohydrates, and VFAs (Volatile fatty acids) during denitrification process were analyzed and three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) analysis was introduced. The kinetics parameters of denitrification rate (VDN), denitrification potential (PDN) and heterotroph anoxic yield (YH) were also investigated using sludge carbon source at different HRT.

  2. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data.

  3. Microbial population dynamics in urban organic waste anaerobic co-digestion with mixed sludge during a change in feedstock composition and different hydraulic retention times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Treu, Laura; Boldrin, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    organic polymers was found to be the most active process, performed by members of S1 (Thermotogales), Thermonema and Lactobacillus in a reactor fed with a high share of food waste. Conversely, Thermacetogenium, Anaerobaculum, Ruminococcaceae, Porphyromonadaceae and the lignocellulosic-degrading......Microbial communities play an essential role in the biochemical pathways of anaerobic digestion processes. The correlations between microorganisms' relative abundance and anaerobic digestion process parameters were investigated, by considering the effect of different feedstock compositions...... and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Shifts in microbial diversity and changes in microbial community richness were observed by changing feedstock composition from mono-digestion of mixed sludge to co-digestion of food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with mixed sludge at HRT of 30, 20, 15 and 10 days...

  4. Biohydrogen production from Tequila vinasses in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor: effect of initial substrate concentration, temperature and hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrón, Germán; Carvajal, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    The effect of the temperature (25 and 35 degrees C), the hydraulic retention time, HRT, (12 and 24 h) and initial substrate concentration on hydrogen production from Tequila vinasse was studied using a sequencing batch reactor. When 25 degrees C and 12-h HRT were applied, only insignificant biogas quantities were produced; however, using 24 h of HRT and temperatures of 25 and 35 degrees C, biogas containing hydrogen was produced. A maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate of 50.5 mL H(2) L(-1) h(-1) (48 mmol H(2) L(reactor)(-1) d(-1)) and an average hydrogen content in the biogas of 29.2+/-8.8% were obtained when the reactor was fed with 3 g COD L(-1), at 35 degrees C and 12-h HRT. Methane formation was observed when the longer HRT was applied. Results demonstrated the feasibility to produce hydrogen from this waste without a previous pre-treatment.

  5. An estimation of the average residence times and onshore-offshore diffusivities of beached microplastics based on the population decay of tagged meso- and macrolitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Hirofumi; Mori, Keita; Ohno, Kazuki; Miyao, Yasuyuki; Kataoka, Tomoya

    2017-09-15

    Residence times of microplastics were estimated based on the dependence of meso- and macrolitter residence times on their upward terminal velocities (UTVs) in the ocean obtained by one- and two-year mark-recapture experiments conducted on Wadahama Beach, Nii-jima Island, Japan. A significant linear relationship between the residence time and UTV was found in the velocity range of about 0.3-0.9ms(-1), while there was no significant difference between the residence times obtained in the velocity range of about 0.9-1.4ms(-1). This dependence on the UTV would reflect the uprush-backwash response of the target items to swash waves on the beach. By extrapolating the linear relationship down to the velocity range of microplastics, the residence times of microplastics and the 1D onshore-offshore diffusion coefficients were inferred, and are one to two orders of magnitude greater than the coefficients of the macroplastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  7. Program Directors' Responses to a Survey on Variables Used To Select Residents in a Time of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Suriano, J. Robert

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 794 program directors in 14 specialties assessed actual and projected changes in the selection process for medical residents and determined the relative weights the directors assigned to personal and academic criteria. Results indicate significant changes in the selection process, including a continuing decrease in residency positions…

  8. Residence Times of Particles in Diffusive Protoplanetary Disk Environments II. Radial Motions and Applications to Dust Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Ciesla, Fred J

    2011-01-01

    The origin of crystalline grains in comets and the outer regions of protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. It has been suggested that such grains form via annealing of amorphous precursors in the hot, inner region of a protoplanetary disk, where the temperatures needed for such transformations were found, and were then transported outward by some dynamical means. Here we develop a means of tracking the paths that dust grains would have taken through a diffusive protoplanetary disk and examine the types and ranges of environments that particles would have seen over a 10$^{6}$ year time period in the dynamic disk. We then combine this model with three annealing laws to examine how the dynamic evolution of amorphous grains would have led to their physical restructuring and their delivery to various regions of the disk. It is found that "sibling particles"-- those particles that reside at the same location at a given period of time--take a wide range of unique and independent paths through the disk to arrive the...

  9. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENCE-TIME DISTRIBUTION ON A SURFACE-RENEWAL MODEL OF CONSTANT-PRESSURE CROSS-FLOW MICROFILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work examines the influence of the residence-time distribution (RTD of surface elements on a model of cross-flow microfiltration that has been proposed recently (Hasan et al., 2013. Along with the RTD from the previous work (Case 1, two other RTD functions (Cases 2 and 3 are used to develop theoretical expressions for the permeate-flux decline and cake buildup in the filter as a function of process time. The three different RTDs correspond to three different startup conditions of the filtration process. The analytical expressions for the permeate flux, each of which contains three basic parameters (membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal, are fitted to experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units. All three expressions for the permeate flux fit the experimental data fairly well with average root-mean-square errors of 4.6% for Cases 1 and 2, and 4.2% for Case 3, respectively, which points towards the constructive nature of the model - a common feature of theoretical models used in science and engineering.

  10. Seasonal recharge and mean residence times of soil and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke; Chen, Hongsong; Nie, Yunpeng; Wang, Kelin

    2015-05-11

    Soil and epikarst play an important role in the hydrological cycle in karst regions. This paper focuses on investigating the seasonal recharge and mean residence time (MRT) of soil water and epikarst water in a small karst catchment of southwest China. The deuterium contents in precipitation, creek, soil baseflow (direct recharge of the saturated soil water to the stream), epikarst spring, and soil waters were monitored weekly for two years, and MRT was calculated by an exponential model (EM) and a dispersion model (DM). The obvious seasonal variation of deuterium in rainfall was buffered in epikarst water, indicating sufficient water mixing. Soil baseflow contained less rainy-season rainwater than epikarst spring discharge, reflecting the retarded effect of soil thickness on rainwater recharge. MRTs of all water bodies were 41-71 weeks, and soils in the depression extended those of shallow groundwater. This demonstrated that the deep soil layer played an important role in karst hydrological processes in the study catchment. The creek was recharged mostly by rainfall through epikarst, indicating its crucial role in water circulation. These results showed epikarst had a strong water-holding capacity and also delayed water contact time with dolomite.

  11. Characterization of hydraulic connections between mine shaft and caprock based on time series analysis of water level changes for the flooded Asse I salt mine in northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauchler, Ralf; Mettier, Ralph; Schulte, Peter [AF-Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland); Fuehrboeter, Jens Fred [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In the context of safe enclosure of nuclear waste in salt formations, one of the main challenges is potential water inflow into the excavations. In this context, the hydraulic relationship between the abandoned Asse I salt mine and the salt dissolution network at the base of the caprock of the Asse salt structure in northern Germany is characterized by utilizing time series analysis of water level changes. The data base comprises a time series of water level measurements over eight years with a temporal resolution of 15 minutes (in general) and up to 2 minutes for specific intervals. The water level measurements were collected in the shaft of the flooded mine, which is filled with ground rock salt until a depth of 140 m, and a deep well, which is screened in 240 m depth at the salt dissolution zone at the base of the caprock. The distance between the well and the shaft is several hundred meters. Since the beginning of the continuous observations in the 1970s, the shaft has shown periodically abrupt declines of the water level of several meters occurring in intervals of approx. 8 to 10 years. The time series analysis consists of trend, Fourier-, autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis. The analysis showed that during times with small water level changes the measured water level in the well and the shaft are positively correlated whereas during the abrupt water level drops in the shaft, the measured water levels between the shaft and the well are negatively correlated. A potential explanation for this behavior is that during times with small changes, the measured water levels in the well and in the shaft are influenced by the same external events with similar response times. In contrast, during the abrupt water level decline events in the shaft, a negatively correlated pressure signal is induced in the well, which supports the assumption of a direct hydraulic connection between the shaft and the well via flooded excavations and the salt dissolution network

  12. Progress on the calibration of channel geometry and friction parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using time series of SAR flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Bates, P. D.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to calibrate channel depth and roughness parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP Sub-Grid 2D hydraulic model using SAR image-derived flood extent maps. The aim is to reduce uncertainty in flood model predictions for those rivers where channel geometry is unknown and/or cannot be easily measured. In particular we consider the effectiveness of using real SAR data for calibration and whether the number and timings of SAR acquisitions is of benefit to the final result. Terrain data are processed from 2m LiDAR images and inflows to the model are taken from gauged data. As a test case we applied the method to the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury. We firstly applied the automatic flood mapping algorithm of Giustarini[1] et al. (2013) to ENVISAT ASAR (wide swath mode) flood images; generating a series of flood maps. We then created an ensemble of flood extent maps with the hydraulic model (each model representing a unique parameter set). Where there is a favourable comparison between the modelled flood map and the SAR obtained flood map we may suggest an optimal parameter set. Applying the method to a sequence of SAR acquisitions provides insight into the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of using series of acquired images. To complete the investigation we simultaneously explore parameter 'identifiabilty' within a sequence of available satellite observations by adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[2] et al. (2003). We show where we might most easily detect the depth and roughness parameters within the SAR acquisition sequence. [1] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 51, no. 4. [2] Wagener. 2003. 'Towards reduced uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff modelling: Dynamic identifiability analysis'. Hydrol. Process. 17, 455-476.

  13. Rational optimization of drug-target residence time: Insights from inhibitor binding to the S. aureus FabI enzyme-product complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew; Schiebel, Johannes; Yu, Weixuan; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Pan, Pan; Baxter, Michael V.; Khanna, Avinash; Sotriffer, Christoph A.; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-target kinetics has recently emerged as an especially important facet of the drug discovery process. In particular, prolonged drug-target residence times may confer enhanced efficacy and selectivity in the open in vivo system. However, the lack of accurate kinetic and structural data for series of congeneric compounds hinders the rational design of inhibitors with decreased off-rates. Therefore, we chose the Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) - an important target for the development of new anti-staphylococcal drugs - as a model system to rationalize and optimize the drug-target residence time on a structural basis. Using our new, efficient and widely applicable mechanistically informed kinetic approach, we obtained a full characterization of saFabI inhibition by a series of 20 diphenyl ethers complemented by a collection of 9 saFabI-inhibitor crystal structures. We identified a strong correlation between the affinities of the investigated saFabI diphenyl ether inhibitors and their corresponding residence times, which can be rationalized on a structural basis. Due to its favorable interactions with the enzyme, the residence time of our most potent compound exceeds 10 hours. In addition, we found that affinity and residence time in this system can be significantly enhanced by modifications predictable by a careful consideration of catalysis. Our study provides a blueprint for investigating and prolonging drug-target kinetics and may aid in the rational design of long-residence-time inhibitors targeting the essential saFabI enzyme. PMID:23697754

  14. Prolonged naproxen joint residence time after intra-articular injection of lipophilic solutions comprising a naproxen glycolamide ester prodrug in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Mette; Lu, Yi; Agårdh, Li

    2013-01-01

    Intra-articular injection of oil solutions of lipophilic prodrugs that rapidly degrade to their parent compound in synovial fluid may constitute a feasible approach to increase the joint residence time of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this in vivo study, oil solutions of the N...... around 0.11 to 3.3h and a 30% reduction in the maximum serum concentration were observed compared to that of the parent naproxen. The similar serum profiles obtained using the two oils indicate that the release was not affected by the oil viscosity. A prolonged naproxen joint residence time in rats...

  15. In vitro and ex vivo methods predict the enhanced lung residence time of liposomal ciprofloxacin formulations for nebulisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Xin; Benaouda, Faiza; Traini, Daniela; Cipolla, David; Gonda, Igor; Bebawy, Mary; Forbes, Ben; Young, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Liposomal ciprofloxacin formulations have been developed with the aim of enhancing lung residence time, thereby reducing the burden of inhaled antimicrobial therapy which requires multiple daily administration due to rapid absorptive clearance of antibiotics from the lungs. However, there is a lack of a predictive methodology available to assess controlled release inhalation delivery systems and their effect on drug disposition. In this study, three ciprofloxacin formulations were evaluated: a liposomal formulation, a solution formulation and a 1:1 combination of the two (mixture formulation). Different methodologies were utilised to study the release profiles of ciprofloxacin from these formulations: (i) membrane diffusion, (ii) air interface Calu-3 cells and (iii) isolated perfused rat lungs. The data from these models were compared to the performance of the formulations in vivo. The solution formulation provided the highest rate of absorptive transport followed by the mixture formulation, with the liposomal formulation providing substantially slower drug release. The rank order of drug release/transport from the different formulations was consistent across the in vitro and ex vivo methods, and this was predictive of the profiles in vivo. The use of complimentary in vitro and ex vivo methodologies provided a robust analysis of formulation behaviour, including mechanistic insights, and predicted in vivo pharmacokinetics.

  16. Microbial community changes during different empty bed residence times and operational fluctuations in an air diffusion reactor for odor abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Elisa; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl; Lebrero, Raquel

    2017-03-08

    The succession of bacterial and fungal populations was assessed in an activated sludge (AS) diffusion bioreactor treating a synthetic malodorous emission containing H2S, toluene, butanone and alpha-pinene. Microbial community characteristics (bacterial and fungal diversity, richness, evenness and composition) and bioreactor function relationships were evaluated at different empty bed residence times (EBRTs) and after process fluctuations and operational failures (robustness test). For H2S, butanone and toluene, the bioreactor showed a stable and efficient abatement performance regardless of the EBRT and fluctuations applied, while low alpha-pinene removals were observed. While no clear positive or negative relationship between community characteristics and bioreactor functions was observed, ecological parameters such as evenness and community dynamics seemed to be of importance for maintaining reactor stability. The optimal degree of evenness of the inoculum likely contributed to the high robustness of the system towards the fluctuations imposed. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Fungi (Hypocreales, Chaeatothyriales) were the most abundant groups retrieved from the AS system with a putative key role in the degradation of butanone and toluene. Typical H2S and alpha-pinene degraders were not retrieved from the system. The inoculation of P. fluorescens, a known alpha-pinene degrader, to the system did not result in the enhancement of the degradation of this compound. This strain was likely outcompeted by the microorganisms already adapted to the AS environment.

  17. Refined assessment of associations between drinking water residence time and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Karen; Klein, Mitchel; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Panwhar, Samina; Huttinger, Alexandra; Tolbert, Paige; Moe, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Recent outbreak investigations suggest that a substantial proportion of waterborne disease outbreaks are attributable to water distribution system issues. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between modeled water residence time (WRT), a proxy for probability of microorganism intrusion into the distribution system, and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness for two water utilities in Metro Atlanta, USA during 1993-2004. We also examine the association between proximity to the nearest distribution system node, based on patients' residential address, and GI illness using logistic regression models. Comparing long (≥90th percentile) with intermediate WRTs (11th to 89th percentile), we observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for Utility 1 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.02-1.13), which had substantially higher average WRT than Utility 2, for which we found no increased risk (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.94-1.02). Examining finer, 12-hour increments of WRT, we found that exposures >48 h were associated with increased risk of GI illness, and exposures of >96 h had the strongest associations, although none of these associations was statistically significant. Our results suggest that utilities might consider reducing WRTs to water consumption.

  18. Laboratory Experiments of Roughness Effects on the Lateral Surface Transient Storage Mean Residence Time in Small Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. R.; Haggerty, R.; Apte, S. V.; Budwig, R.; Tonina, D.

    2012-12-01

    Lateral surface transient storage (LSTS) zones are common in riverine systems. The higher mean residence times (MRTs) associated with LSTS recirculation impact water quality and solute transport. We are working to develop a predictive model of LSTS MRT based on parameters easily measured in the field. We investigated the effect of streambed roughness and LSTS shape (a lateral roughness) on MRT. We performed 9 laboratory experiments spanning roughness conditions and LSTS shapes that are based on shapes observed in natural streams. The three streambed roughness conditions were: (1) a smooth flume with a 15-cm depth; (2) a uniformly rough flume with 5-cm gravels 1-particle thick in the main channel and finer sand in the LSTS at 15-cm depth; and (3) a uniformly rough flume at 30-cm depth. We collected data on: (1) entrainment velocities at the LSTS entrance using stereo particle image velocimetry; (2) velocity and turbulence quantities along a horizontal plane in the LSTS with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter; and (3) MRT with salt injection experiments and electrical conductivity probes. Preliminary results from the experiments will be presented, and resulting insights into the predictive relationship.

  19. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  20. In-situ measurement of residence time distributions in a turbulent oxy-fuel gas-flame combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürkle, Sebastian; Becker, Lukas G.; Agizza, Maria Angela; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven

    2017-07-01

    For improving the design of combustors, the knowledge of residence-time distributions (RTD) is important as they influence exhaust gas compositions. Measuring RTDs in combustors is challenging, due to high temperatures, chemical reactions, the presence of particles or corrosive species as well as high turbulence levels. This paper presents a technique for the in situ measurement of RTDs in combustors. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), the temporal evolution of the concentration of tracers is tracked simultaneously at the combustion chamber inlet and outlet. Using either air or mixtures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (oxy-fuel atmosphere) as oxidants, the method is applied to reacting and non-reacting operating conditions in a 20-kWth methane combustor. For reacting conditions, hydrogen chloride is used as a tracer, whereas for non-reacting conditions methane was chosen. Depending on the tracer, for a repetition rate of approximately 2 kHz detection limits of 16-40 ppmV are achieved. For deriving RTDs, low-pass filtering is compared to reactor network modeling. Different RTDs observed for varying operating conditions are discussed.

  1. Vascular Remodelling Relates to an Elevated Oscillatory Shear Index and Relative Residence Time in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyan; Yu, Haiyi; Shi, Yue; Zhu, Minjia; Wang, Yueshen; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Youyi; Chang, Yu; Xu, Ming; Gao, Wei

    2017-05-17

    Haemodynamic disorders are common clinical findings in hypertension and lead to adverse cardiovascular events. However, the haemodynamic conditions in hypertension models are poorly understood. This study aimed to observe the characteristics of haemodynamics in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and antihypertensive-treated SHRs. Twenty-four adult male SHRs and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) were randomly divided into four groups and treated for 7 days as follows: WKY-CON (WKYs + saline), WKY-NIF (WKYs + nifedipine, 50 mg/kg/day), SHR-CON (SHRs + saline), and SHR-NIF (SHRs + nifedipine). Aortic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were simulated to obtain the haemodynamic parameters. We found that in the hypertensive (SHR-CON) and blood pressure-controlled (SHR-NIF) groups, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT), which are key haemodynamics indices, were markedly elevated. Furthermore, there was a correlation between both the elevated OSI and RRT with the vascular wall thickening in regions near the inner wall of the aortic arch. Our research demonstrates that haemodynamics remains disturbed even if the blood pressure is normalized. In addition, vascular remodelling may play an important role in maintaining elevated OSI and RRT values.

  2. Effects of plant roots on the hydraulic performance during the clogging process in mesocosm vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, G F; Zhao, Z W; Kong, J; Guo, R; Zeng, Y T; Zhao, L F; Zhu, Q D

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of plant roots (Typha angustifolia roots) on the hydraulic performance during the clogging process from the perspective of time and space distributions in mesocosm vertical flow-constructed wetlands with coarse sand matrix. For this purpose, a pair of lab-scale experiments was conducted to compare planted and unplanted systems by measuring the effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the substrate within different operation periods. Furthermore, the flow pattern of the clogging process in the planted and unplanted wetland systems were evaluated by their hydraulic performance (e.g., mean residence time, short circuiting, volumetric efficiency, number of continuously stirred tank reactors, and hydraulic efficiency factor) in salt tracer experiments. The results showed that the flow conditions would change in different clogging stages, which indicated that plants played different roles related to time and space. In the early clogging stages, plant roots restricted the flow of water, while in the middle and later clogging stages, especially the later stage, growing roots opened new pore spaces in the substrate. The roots played an important role in affecting the hydraulic performance in the upper layer (0-30 cm) where the sand matrix had a larger root volume fraction. Finally, the causes of the controversy over plant roots' effects on clogging were discussed. The results helped further understand the effects of plant roots on hydraulic performance during the clogging process.

  3. Contrasting residence times and fluxes of water and sulfate in two small forested watersheds in Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, John Karl; Michel, Robert L

    2009-07-01

    Watershed mass balances for solutes of atmospheric origin may be complicated by the residence times of water and solutes at various time scales. In two small forested headwater catchments in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, USA, mean annual export rates of SO(4)(=) differ by a factor of 2, and seasonal variations in SO(4)(=) concentrations in atmospheric deposition and stream water are out of phase. These features were investigated by comparing (3)H, (35)S, delta(34)S, delta(2)H, delta(18)O, delta(3)He, CFC-12, SF(6), and chemical analyses of open deposition, throughfall, stream water, and spring water. The concentrations of SO(4)(=) and radioactive (35)S were about twice as high in throughfall as in open deposition, but the weighted composite values of (35)S/S (11.1 and 12.1x10(-15)) and delta(34)S (+3.8 and +4.1 per thousand) were similar. In both streams (Shelter Run, Mill Run), (3)H concentrations and delta(34)S values during high flow were similar to those of modern deposition, delta(2)H and delta(18)O values exhibited damped seasonal variations, and (35)S/S ratios (0-3x10(-15)) were low throughout the year, indicating inter-seasonal to inter-annual storage and release of atmospheric SO(4)(=) in both watersheds. In the Mill Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (10-13 TU) were consistent with relatively young groundwater discharge, most delta(34)S values were approximately the same as the modern atmospheric deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was equal to or slightly greater than the modern deposition rate. In the Shelter Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (1-3 TU) indicate that much of the discharging ground water had been deposited prior to the onset of atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, base flow delta(34)S values (+1.6 per thousand) were significantly lower than the modern deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was less than the modern deposition rate

  4. More learning in less time: optimizing the resident educational experience with limited clinical and educational work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Cara L; Spirou, Eleni; Voelker, Joseph L; Rosen, Charles L

    2017-08-23

    Resident education in the United States and elsewhere has required significant changes in recent years due to work hour restrictions, requiring didactics to fit within a limited schedule while being increasingly effective at accomplishing educational goals. Compounding these changes are an altered clinical milieu and generational changes among learners. Residents can be exposed to both clinical material and specialty-specific mores utilizing focused mentorship, curricula for intangibles, asynchronous education, and independent curricula. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Distilling allometric and environmental information from time series of conduit size: the standardization issue and its relationship to tree hydraulic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Marco; von Arx, Georg; Castagneri, Daniele; Petit, Giai

    2015-01-01

    Trees are among the best natural archives of past environmental information. Xylem anatomy preserves information related to tree allometry and ecophysiological performance, which is not available from the more customary ring-width or wood-density proxy parameters. Recent technological advances make tree-ring anatomy very attractive because time frames of many centuries can now be covered. This calls for the proper treatment of time series of xylem anatomical attributes. In this article, we synthesize current knowledge on the biophysical and physiological mechanisms influencing the short- to long-term variation in the most widely used wood-anatomical feature, namely conduit size. We also clarify the strong mechanistic link between conduit-lumen size, tree hydraulic architecture and height growth. Among the key consequences of these biophysical constraints is the pervasive, increasing trend of conduit size during ontogeny. Such knowledge is required to process time series of anatomical parameters correctly in order to obtain the information of interest. An appropriate standardization procedure is fundamental when analysing long tree-ring-related chronologies. When dealing with wood-anatomical parameters, this is even more critical. Only an interdisciplinary approach involving ecophysiology, wood anatomy and dendrochronology will help to distill the valuable information about tree height growth and past environmental variability correctly.

  6. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  7. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): Hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozyurt, Nur N. [Department of Geological Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Lutz, Hans O. [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana, E-mail: roller@medri.uniri.hr [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia)

    2014-07-01

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 m a.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0 °C-328 μS/cm, 9.6 °C-350 μS/cm and 8.9 °C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ{sup 18}O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around − 10.1‰, − 9.2‰ and − 8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the{sup 18}O signal of precipitation, the {sup 18}O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm{sup 3}), 12 years (1190 Mm{sup 3}), and 12.2 years (1210 Mm{sup 3}), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total

  8. Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) seasonal presence, residence time and habitat use at darwin island, galapagos marine reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Marrero, David; Jiménez, Jesús; Smith, Franz; Doherty, Paul F; Hearn, Alex; Green, Jonathan R; Paredes-Jarrín, Jules; Salinas-de-León, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The life history of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), including its reproductive ecology, still remains largely unknown. Here, we present results from the first whale shark population study around Darwin Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve. Following a diversified approach we characterized seasonal occurrence, population structure and size, and described habitat use of whale sharks based on fine scale movements around the island. Whale shark presence at Darwin Island was negatively correlated with Sea Surface Temperature (SST), with highest abundance corresponding to a cool season between July and December over six years of monitoring. From 2011 to 2013 we photo-identified 82 whale sharks ranging from 4 to 13.1 m Total Length (TL). Size distribution was bimodal, with a great majority (91.5%) of adult female individuals averaging 11.35 m±0.12 m (TL±SE), all but one showing signs of a potential pregnancy. Population dynamics models for apparently pregnant sharks estimated the presence of 3.76±0.90 (mean ± SE) sharks in the study area per day with an individual residence time of 2.09±0.51 (mean ± SE) days. Movement patterns analysis of four apparently pregnant individuals tracked with acoustic tags at Darwin Island revealed an intense use of Darwin's Arch, where no feeding or specific behavior has been recorded, together with periodic excursions around the island's vicinity. Sharks showed a preference for intermediate depths (20-30 m) with occasional dives mostly to mid-water, remaining the majority of their time at water temperatures between 24-25°C. All of our results point to Darwin Island as an important stopover in a migration, possibly with reproductive purposes, rather than an aggregation site. Current studies carried out in this area to investigate regional scale movement patterns may provide essential information about possible pupping grounds for this enigmatic species.

  9. Estimation of groundwater residence time using environmental radioisotopes (14C,T) in carbonate aquifers, southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborska, Katarzyna; Różkowski, Andrzej; Małoszewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Triassic carbonate aquifers in the Upper Silesia region, affected by intense withdrawal, have been investigated by means of isotopic analyses of (14)C, δ(13)C, δ(2)H, δ(18)O and (3)H. The isotopic examinations were carried out in the 1970s and in the early 1980s, and it was the first application of tracers to estimate age and vulnerability for the contamination of groundwater in this region. Similar isotopic analyses were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with the same Triassic carbonate formation. The isotopic examinations were performed within the confined part of the carbonate formation, wherein aquifers are covered by semi-permeable deposits. The direct recharge of the aquifer occurs in the outcrop areas, but it mainly takes place due to percolation of the water through aquitards and erosional windows. The Triassic aquifer has been intensively drained by wells and by lead-zinc mines. Nowadays, the declining water demand and closure of some mines have induced a significant increase in the water table level. The detailed analysis of the results, including the radiocarbon age corrections and the comparison of radioisotope activities, has made it possible to estimate the range of residence time within the carbonate Triassic aquifer. This range from several tens to several tens of thousands indicates that the recharge of aquifers might have occurred between modern times and the Pleistocene. The apparent age of the water estimated on the basis of (14)C activity was corrected considering the carbon isotope exchange and the diffusion between mobile water in fractures and stagnant water in micropores. The obtained corrected period of recharge corresponds to the result of investigations of noble gases, which were carried out in the 1990s. In almost half of the cases, groundwater is a mixture of young and old water. The mixing processes occur mainly in areas of heavy exploitation of the aquifer.

  10. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...... of the laws of physics on the system. The unknown (or uncertain) parameters are estimated with Maximum Likelihood (ML) parameter estimation. The identified model has been evaluated by comparing the measurements with simulation of the model. The identified model was much more capable of describing the dynamics...... of the system than the deterministic model....

  11. Treatment of a chocolate industry wastewater in a pilot-scale low-temperature UASB reactor operated at short hydraulic and sludge retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Soto, M; Arzate-Archundia, O; Solís-Morelos, C; Fall, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a 244-L pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor during the treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater under low-temperature conditions (18 ± 0.6 °C) for approximately 250 d. The applied organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 4 and 7 kg/m(3)/d by varying the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODsol), while keeping the hydraulic retention time constant (6.4 ± 0.3 h). The CODsol removal efficiency was low (59-78%). The measured biogas production increased from 240 ± 54 to 431 ± 61 L/d during the experiments. A significant linear correlation between the measured biogas production and removed OLR indicated that 81.69 L of biogas were produced per kg/m(3) of CODsol removed. Low average reactor volatile suspended solids (VSS) (2,700-4,800 mg/L) and high effluent VSS (177-313 mg/L) were derived in a short sludge retention time (SRT) (4.9 d). The calculated SRT was shorter than those reported in the literature, but did not affect the reactor's performance. Average sludge yield was 0.20 kg-VSS/kg-CODsol. The low-temperature anaerobic treatment was a good option for the pre-treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater.

  12. Effect of residence time on two-step liquefaction of rice straw in a CO2 atmosphere: Differences between subcritical water and supercritical ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianhua; Wang, Jian; Li, Bingshuo; Kai, Xingping; Li, Rundong

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of temperature and residence time on liquefaction of rice straw in subcritical CO2-subcritical water (subCO2-subH2O) and in subcritical CO2-supercritical ethanol (subCO2-scEtOH), considering the final reaction temperatures (270-345°C) and residence times (15 and 30min). Residence time was identified as a crucial parameter in the subCO2-subH2O liquefaction, whereas residence time had a marginal influence on subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction. When reaction conditions were 320°C and 15min, solvents have weak impact on the quality of bio-oil, HHV 28.57MJ/kg and 28.62MJ/kg, respectively. There was an obvious difference between the subCO2-subH2O and subCO2-scEtOH liquefaction mechanisms. In subCO2-subH2O, CO2 promoted the carbonyl reaction. In subCO2-scEtOH, supercritical ethanol have the function of donating hydrogen and promoting the reaction of hydroxyl-alkylation.

  13. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators; experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, B.; Kraai, G.N.; Winkelman, J.G.N.; Heeres, H.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  14. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators : Experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, Boelo; Kraai, Gerard N.; Winkelman, Jozef G. M.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  15. HYDRAULICS, LOUISA COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic analysis for estimating flood stages for a flood insurance study. It...

  16. Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the United Parcel Service (UPS) have developed a hydraulic hybrid delivery vehicle to explore and demonstrate the environmental benefits of the hydraulic hybrid for urban pick-up and delivery fleets.

  17. Relating stable isotope and geochemical data to conclude on water residence times in four small alpine headwater catchments with differing vegetation cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mueller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The mean water residence time (MRT in a catchment gives information about storage, flow pathways, sources of water and thus also about retention and release of solutes in a catchment. To our knowledge there are no catchment studies on the influence of vegetation cover change on base flow mean water residence times. The main changes in vegetation cover in the Swiss Alps are massive shrub encroachment and forest expansion into formerly open habitats. Four small and relatively steep catchments in the Swiss Alps (Ursern valley were investigated to relate different vegetation cover to water residence times and geochemical behaviour of runoff.

    Time series of water stable isotopes were used to calculate mean water residence times. The high temporal variation of the stable isotope signals in precipitation was strongly dampened in stream base flow samples. Mean water residence times of the four catchments were 64–98 weeks. The strong dampening of our input signal might point to deeper flow paths and mixing of waters of different ages at the catchments outlets. Parent geological materials are mainly gneisses and schists but they can contain dolomite, carbonate or gypsum rich zones. The major part of the quickly infiltrating precipitation likely percolates through these deeper zones. Relatively high stream water pH, Ca and SO42− concentrations in micro catchment outlets support this conclusion.

    We conclude that in mountainous headwater catchments with relatively thin soil layers the geological and topographical situation and snow dynamics influence storage, mixing and release of meteoric waters and its geochemistry in a stronger way than vegetation cover or catchment size do.

  18. New dating method: Groundwater residence time estimated from the 4He accumulation rate calibrated by using cosmogenic and subsurface-produced 36Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermehl M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater contains dissolved He, and its concentration increases with the residence time of the groundwater. Thus, if the 4He accumulation rate is constant, the dissolved 4He concentration in ground-water is equivalent to the residence time. Since accumulation mechanisms are not easily separated in the field, we estimate the total He accumulation rate during the half-life of 36Cl (3.01 × 105 years. We estimated the 4He accumulation rate, calibrated using both cosmogenic and subsurface-produced 36Cl, in the Great Artesian Basin (GAB, Australia, and the subsurface-produced 36Cl increase at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden. 4He accumulation rates range from (1.9±0.3 × 10−11 to (15±6 × 10−11 ccSTP·cm−3·y−1 in GAB and (1.8 ±0.7 × 10−8 ccSTP·cm−3·y−1 at Äspö. We confirmed a ground-water flow with a residence time of 0.7-1.06 Ma in GAB and stagnant groundwater with the long residence time of 4.5 Ma at Äspö. Therefore, the groundwater residence time can be deduced from the dissolved 4He concentration and the 4He accumulation rate calibrated by 36Cl, provided that 4He accumulation, groundwater flow, and other geo-environmental conditions have remained unchanged for the required amount of geological time.

  19. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  20. Nitrogen transport and transformations in a coastal plain watershed: Influence of geomorphology on flow paths and residence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Spruill, T.B.; Mew, H.E.; Farrell, K.M.; Harden, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen transport and groundwater-surface water interactions were examined in a coastal plain watershed in the southeastern United States. Groundwater age dates, calculated using chlorofluorocarbon and tritium concentrations, along with concentrations of nitrogen species and other redox-active constituents, were used to evaluate the fate and transport of nitrate. Nitrate is stable only in recently recharged (water found in the upper few meters of saturated thickness in the upland portion of a surficial aquifer. Groundwater with a residence time between 10 and 30 years typically has low nitrate and elevated excess N2 concentrations, indications that denitrification has reduced nitrate concentrations. Groundwater older than 30 years also has low nitrate concentrations but contains little or no excess N2, suggesting that this water did not contain elevated concentrations of nitrate along its flow path. Nitrate transport to streams varies between first- and third-order streams. Hydrologic, lithologic, and chemical data suggest that the surficial aquifer is the dominant source of flow and nitrate to a first-order stream. Iron-reducing conditions occur in groundwater samples from the bed and banks of the first-order stream, suggesting that direct groundwater discharge is denitrified prior to entering the stream. However, nitrogen from the surficial aquifer is transported directly to the stream via a tile drain that bypasses these reduced zones. In the alluvial valley of a third-order stream the erosion of a confining layer creates a much thicker unconfined alluvial aquifer with larger zones of nitrate stability. Age dating and chemical information (SiO 2, Na/K ratios) suggest that water in the alluvial aquifer is derived from short flow paths through the riparian zone and/or from adjacent streams during high-discharge periods. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. How does exposure to pesticides vary in space and time for residents living near to treated orchards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hie Ling; Garthwaite, David G; Ramwell, Carmel T; Brown, Colin D

    2017-09-25

    This study investigated changes over 25 years (1987-2012) in pesticide usage in orchards in England and Wales and associated changes to exposure and risk for resident pregnant women living 100 and 1000 m downwind of treated areas. A model was developed to estimate aggregated daily exposure to pesticides via inhaled vapour and indirect dermal contact with contaminated ground, whilst risk was expressed as a hazard quotient (HQ) based on estimated exposure and the no observed (adverse) effect level for reproductive and developmental effects. Results show the largest changes occurred between 1987 and 1996 with total pesticide usage reduced by ca. 25%, exposure per unit of pesticide applied slightly increased, and a reduction in risk per unit exposure by factors of 1.3 to 3. Thereafter, there were no consistent changes in use between 1996 and 2012, with an increase in number of applications to each crop balanced by a decrease in average application rate. Exposure per unit of pesticide applied decreased consistently over this period such that values in 2012 for this metric were 48-65% of those in 1987, and there were further smaller decreases in risk per unit exposure. All aggregated hazard quotients were two to three orders of magnitude smaller than one, despite the inherent simplifications of assuming co-occurrence of exposure to all pesticides and additivity of effects. Hazard quotients at 1000 m were 5 to 16 times smaller than those at 100 m. There were clear signals of the impact of regulatory intervention in improving the fate and hazard profiles of pesticides used in orchards in England and Wales over the period investigated.

  2. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Nur N; Lutz, Hans O; Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana; Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana

    2014-07-15

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 ma.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0°C-328 μS/cm, 9.6°C-350 μS/cm and 8.9°C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ(18)O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around -10.1‰, -9.2‰ and -8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the(18)O signal of precipitation, the (18)O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm(3)), 12 years (1,190 Mm(3)), and 12.2 years (1,210 Mm(3)), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total aquifer volumes.

  3. Coupling the k-nearest neighbor procedure with the Kalman filter for real-time updating of the hydraulic model in flood forecasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kailei Liu; Zhijia Li; Cheng Yao; Ji Chen; Ke Zhang; Muhammad Saifullah

    2016-01-01

    The Kalman filter (KF) updating method has been widely used as an efficient measure to assimilate real-time hydrological variables for reducing forecast uncertainty and providing improved forecasts. However, the accuracy of the KF relies much on the estimates of the state transition matrix and is limited due to the errors inherit from parameters and variables of the flood forecasting models. A new real-time updating approach (named KN2K) is produced by coupling the k-nearest neighbor (KNN) procedure with the KF for flood forecasting models. The nonparametric KNN algorithm, which can be utilized to predict the response of a system on the basis of the k most representative predictors, is still efficient when the descriptions for input-output mapping are insufficient. In this study, the KNN procedure is used to provide more accurate estimates of the state transition matrix to extend the applicability of the KF. The updating performance of KN2K is investigated in the middle reach of the Huai River based on a one-dimensional hydraulic model with the lead times ranging from 2 to 12 h. The forecasts from the KN2K are compared with the observations, the original forecasts and the KF-updated forecasts. The results indicate that the KN2K method, with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency larger than 0.85 in the 12-h-ahead forecasts, has a significant advantage in accuracy and robustness compared to the KF method. It is demonstrated that improved updating results can be obtained through the use of KNN procedure. The tests show that the KN2K method can be used as an effective tool for real-time flood forecasting.

  4. Behaviour of the main nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater at high hydraulic- and sludge-retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, D M; Pérez, J I; Gómez, M A

    2017-08-15

    The behaviour and removal efficiency of ibuprofen (IBU), diclofenac (DCF), ketoprofen (KPF), and naproxen (NPX) during the real urban wastewater treatment by an experimental full-scale MBR working at high sludge and hydraulic retention time (SRT, HRT) were determined. The MBR worked in denitrification/nitrification conformation at 35.4h of HRT (Q=0.45m(3)/h), 37 d of SRT and a recirculation flow rate of 4Q. The experiments were made under steady-state conditions, reaching a biodegradable organic matter removal higher than 99.5%. The MBR system showed similar removal capacity for IBU, NPX, and KTP (>95%), whose main transformation occurred in the aerobic reactor with a low contribution from the anoxic reactor. The system worked with complete nitrification, also achieving an effective retention of the unbiodegradable organic matter due to recirculation. DCF removal was low with negative removal yields for several samplings. Both removal and increase transformation of DCF also occurred in the aerobic reactor, this not being observed in the anoxic one. DCF tends to accumulate in the system and to be recirculated. Thus, during the sampling in which DCF influent concentration decreases, removal yields turn negative. The increase of DCF concentration in the aerobic bioreactor also contributes to the negative removal yields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous hydrogen and butyric acid fermentation by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755: effects of the glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert J; Kim, Ji-Seong; Jeon, Byung-Seung; Sang, Byoung-In

    2009-11-01

    The effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT=8, 10, 12 or 16.7 h) and glucose concentration (30, 40 or 50 g/L) on the production of hydrogen and butyrate by an immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum culture, grown under continuous culturing conditions, were evaluated. With 30 g/L glucose, the higher HRTs tested led to greater butyrate concentrations in the culture, i.e., 9.3 g/L versus 12.9 g/L with HRTs of 8 h and 16.7 h, respectively. In contrast, higher biogas and hydrogen production rates were generally seen when the HRT was lower. Experiments with different glucose concentrations saw a significant amount of glucose washed out when 50 g/L was used, the highest being 22.7 g/L when the HRT was 16.7 h. This study found the best conditions for the continuous production of hydrogen and butyric acid by C. tyrobutyricum to be with an HRT of 12 h and a glucose concentration of 50 g/L, respectively.

  6. Hydraulic retention time affects stable acetate production from tofu processing wastewater in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Yu, Zhong-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Acetate is an important industrial chemical and its production from wastes via mixed culture fermentation (MCF) is economic. In this work, the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on acetate production from tofu processing wastewater (TPW) in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) MCF was first investigated. It was found that long HRT (>3days) could lead to less acetate production while stable acetate production was achieved at short HRT (3days) with the yield of 0.57g-COD/g-CODTPW. The microbial community analysis showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter) occupied up to 90% of archaea at both HRTs of 3 and 5days. However, Coprothermobacter, the main acetate-degraders, decreased from 35.74% to 10.58% of bacteria when HRT decreased from 5 to 3days, supporting the aggravation of syntrophic acetate oxidation in long HRT. This work demonstrated that HRT was a crucial factor to maintain stable acetate production from TPW in extreme-thermophilic MCF.

  7. Effects of porous media, macrophyte type and hydraulic retention time on the removal of organic load and micropollutants in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Cárdenas, Jorge; Navarro, Amado E; Torres, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the removal of micropollutants from a wastewater treatment plant effluent was evaluated at mesocosm level. Fifteen mesocosms were studied following a modified Latin Square experimental design with six additional points. Three variables at three levels were studied: porous media -PM- (river gravel, fine volcanic gravel and coarse volcanic gravel), macrophyte type -M- (Thypa latiffolia, Phragmites australis, and Cyperus papyrus) and hydraulic retention time -HRT- (1, 3 and 5 days). As response variables the removal percentages of the total organic load of the effluent (BOD5) and the loads of several micropollutants (caffeine, galaxolide, tonalide, alkylphenols and their monoethoxylates and diethoxylates, methyl dihydrojasmonate, sunscreen UV-15 and parsol) were used. The results showed that the systems remove between 70% and 75% of the organic load and that all the micropollutants were degraded at different extents, from 55% to 99%. The HRT was the variable that showed major effects on the treatment process, while M and PM showed no statistically significant differences in the used experimental conditions.

  8. Effects of hydraulic retention time on anaerobic hydrogenation performance and microbial ecology of bioreactors fed with glucose-peptone and starch-peptone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiue-Lin; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Hsiao, Chia-Jung; Bai, Ming-Der [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Whang, Liang-Ming; Wang, Yung-Fu; Cheng, Sheng-Shung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center (SERC), National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Tseng, I.-Cheng [Sustainable Environment Research Center (SERC), National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Department of Life Science, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China)

    2010-01-15

    This study evaluated anaerobic hydrogenation performance and microbial ecology in bioreactors operated at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) conditions and fed with glucose-peptone (GP) and starch-peptone (SP). The maximum hydrogen production rates for GP- and SP-fed bioreactors were found to be 1247 and 412 mmol-H{sub 2}/L/d at HRT of 2 and 3 h, respectively. At HRT > 8 h, hydrogen consumption due to peptone fermentation could occur and thus reduced hydrogen yield from carbohydrate fermentation. Results of cloning/sequencing and denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium celerecrescens were dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the GP-fed bioreactor, presumably due to their capability on protein hydrolysis. In the SP-fed bioreactor, Lactobacillus plantarum, Propionispira arboris, and Clostridium butyricum were found to be dominant populations, but the presence of P. arboris at HRT > 3 h might be responsible for a lower hydrogen yield from starch fermentation. As a result, optimizing HRT operation for bioreactors was considered an important asset in order to minimize hydrogen-consuming activities and thus maximize net hydrogen production. The limitation of simple parameters such as butyrate to acetate ratio (B/A ratio) in predicting hydrogen production was recognized in this study for bioreactors fed with multiple substrates. It is suggested that microbial ecology analysis, in addition to chemical analysis, should be performed when complex substrates and mixed cultures are used in hydrogen-producing bioreactors. (author)

  9. Effect of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS and hydraulic retention time (HRT on the performance of activated sludge process during the biotreatment of real textile wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adequate information is available on colour and organics removal in batch mode using pure microbial cultures from dye contaminated wastewater. There was a need to develop environment friendly and cost effective treatment technique for actual field conditions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with an aim to evaluate the potential of acclimatized mixed microbial consortia for the removal of colour and organics from real textile wastewater. Experiments were performed in laboratory scale activated sludge process (ASP unit under steady state condition, varying mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS (2500, 3500 and 5000 mg/l and hydraulic retention time (HRT (18, 24 and 36 h. The results showed that decolourization and chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increased with increase in MLVSS and HRT. At 18 h HRT, decolourization was found to be 46, 54 and 67%, which increased to 67, 75 and 90% (36 h HRT at 2500, 3500 and 5000 mg/l MLVSS, respectively. COD removal was found to be 62, 73 and 77% (at 18 h HRT which increased to 77, 85 and 91% (36 h HRT at 2000, 3500 and 5000 mg/l MLVSS, respectively. On the basis of the results obtained in this study suitable treatment techniques can be developed for the treatment of wastewater contaminated with variety of dyes in continuous mode of operation. This shall have the advantage of treatment of larger quantity of wastewater in shorter duration.

  10. Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the anaerobic co-digestion of agro-industrial wastes in a two-stage CSTR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dareioti, Margarita Andreas; Kornaros, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A two-stage anaerobic digestion system consisting of two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) operating at mesophilic conditions (37°C) were used to investigate the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on hydrogen and methane production. The acidogenic reactor was fed with a mixture consisting of olive mill wastewater, cheese whey and liquid cow manure (in a ratio 55:40:5, v/v/v) and operated at five different HRTs (5, 3, 2, 1 and 0.75 d) aiming to evaluate hydrogen productivity and operational stability. The highest system efficiency was achieved at HRT 0.75 d with a maximum hydrogen production rate of 1.72 L/LRd and hydrogen yield of 0.54 mol H2/mol carbohydrates consumed. The methanogenic reactor was operated at HRTs 20 and 25 d with better stability observed at HRT 25 d, whereas accumulation of volatile fatty acids took place at HRT 20 d. The methane production rate at the steady state of HRT 25 d reached 0.33 L CH4/LRd.

  11. Optimization of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) degradation in UASB reactors by varying bioavailability of LAS, hydraulic retention time and specific organic load rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Dagoberto Y; Delforno, Tiago P; Esteves, Andressa S; Sakamoto, Isabel K; Duarte, Iolanda C S; Varesche, Maria B A

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in UASB reactors was optimized by varying the bioavailability of LAS based on the concentration of biomass in the system (1.3-16 g TS/L), the hydraulic retention time (HRT), which was operated at 6, 35 or 80 h, and the concentration of co-substrates as specific organic loading rates (SOLR) ranging from 0.03-0.18 g COD/g TVS.d. The highest degradation rate of LAS (76%) was related to the lowest SOLR (0.03 g COD/g TVS.d). Variation of the HRT between 6 and 80 h resulted in degradation rates of LAS ranging from 18% to 55%. Variation in the bioavailability of LAS resulted in discrete changes in the degradation rates (ranging from 37-53%). According to the DGGE profiles, the archaeal communities exhibited greater changes than the bacterial communities, especially in biomass samples that were obtained from the phase separator. The parameters that exhibited more influence on LAS degradation were the SOLR followed by the HRT.

  12. Anaerobic mesophilic co-digestion of ensiled sorghum, cheese whey and liquid cow manure in a two-stage CSTR system: Effect of hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dareioti, Margarita Andreas; Kornaros, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on hydrogen and methane production using a two-stage anaerobic process. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) were used under mesophilic conditions (37°C) in order to enhance acidogenesis and methanogenesis. A mixture of pretreated ensiled sorghum, cheese whey and liquid cow manure (55:40:5, v/v/v) was used. The acidogenic reactor was operated at six different HRTs of 5, 3, 2, 1, 0.75 and 0.5d, under controlled pH5.5, whereas the methanogenic reactor was operated at three HRTs of 24, 16 and 12d. The maximum H2 productivity (2.14L/LRd) and maximum H2 yield (0.70mol H2/mol carbohydrates consumed) were observed at 0.5d HRT. On the other hand, the maximum CH4 production rate of 0.90L/LRd was achieved at HRT of 16d, whereas at lower HRT the process appeared to be inhibited and/or overloaded.

  13. Effects of pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading rate on biohydrogen production from the anaerobic fermentation of agri-food wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, S.; Lau, A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on an experimental study in which biohydrogen was produced via anaerobic fermentation of dairy wastewater using a 6 L sequencing batch reactor. Tests were performed at ambient temperature and varying pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The seed sludge was not pretreated. The tests showed that methanogenic activity could be suppressed via short HRT and large OLR changes. However, the maximum hydrogen production rate was only 0.08 L/L per day without pH control. The rate of hydrogen production increased considerably when sucrose-rich synthetic wastewater was used as the substrate, and when pH was controlled. When HRT was reduced from 2.5 days to 1.25 days, observed hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate reached 73 per cent and 4.38 L/L per day, respectively, for an optimal pH of 4.0. Volatile fatty acid was analyzed in order to determine the microbial metabolic pathway that favours increased hydrogen production. It was concluded that the co-fermentation of agri-food wastewater could improve the utilization of animal wastewater for the production of biohydrogen.

  14. The Mean Residence Time (MRT) of exfiltrating groundwater in the Southern Vienna Basin (Fischa-Dagnitz spring area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyhlidal, Stefan; Rank, Dieter; Schuster, Katharina; Jung, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The "Mitterndorfer Senke" in the youngest zone of subsidence in the Southern Vienna Basin contains an important groundwater body used by regional water-supply facilities. The depression is filled with Pleistocene gravels and sands and is about 40 km long, up to 8 km wide and 50 to 150 m deep. Up to 13 m3/s of river water infiltrate in the alluvial cones in the most southern part of the "Mitterndorfer Senke" by the crossing rivers. The contribution of local precipitation to groundwater recharge is very low due to high evaporation in this area (up to 500 mm/a) compared with to an mean annual precipitation amount about of 500 mm/a in the southern Vienna basin. This sedimentary filling in the "Senke" acts very much like a pipeline, transmitting water readily from the main recharge area south-west of Wiener Neustadt to locations of surface discharge in the northern part of the basin. For many years a plume of chlorinated hydrocarbons has been moving from the industrial plants in the most southern part of the depression towards the Danube. In this context the determination of the groundwater flow velocity in the depression became important. The Fischa-Dagnitz spring is situated in a distance of some 20 km from the infiltration section and discharges about 350 l/s. A long-term environmental isotope monitoring record from 1964 - 2012 exists for this spring. The result of the evaluation of ³H time series using the dispersion model leads to a mean residence time between 13.5-16.5 years for the base flow of the Fischa-Dagnitz spring. This corresponds to previous studies, however, the present results are based on a more complete data set and therefore they are more significant. There is also evidence of occasional short-term influences of storm waters in the Fischa-Dagnitz spring. Normally these effects may be neglected. The difference between the δ18O values of precipitation of Gloggnitz (altitude 512 m) and the Fischa-Dagnitz spring leads to the conclusion, that the

  15. SU-E-T-45: Antibody Mean Residence Time in Blood and Its Correlation with Protein Molecular Weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, C; Williams, L [Retired from City of Hope Medical Center, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Animal biodistribution data are required prior to introducing a new radiopharmaceutical into clinical trials. Protein engineering, using recombinant DNA techniques can produce a large number of related (cognate) antibodies to a given molecular target. Thus, it is important that these constructs be numerically related to one another via a single criterion. In the following, we use the mean residence time (MRT) in murine blood as this criterion. Methods: Five cognate anti-CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) antibodies were compared with regard to their MRT in whole blood of CEA-positive tumor-bearing (LS174T) mice. MRT was defined by blood AUC (area under the curve) divided by the initial blood uptake value; all in units of percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g). Cognates included single chain scFv (25 kDa), diabody (50 kDa), minibody (80 kDa), F(ab')2 (120 kDa), and intact (155 kDa) forms of the murine cT84.66 antibody against CEA. All were labeled with radioactive iodine. Results: The agents, in the sequence listed, exhibited MRT values of 1.16 +/- 0.01 h, 0.99 h, 5.06 +/- 0.70 h, 6.61 +/- 0.36 h, and 59.3 +/- 2.4 h respectively. Because of the monotonic nature of the sequence, a linear correlation analysis was performed between molecular weight (MW) and MRT or ln(MRT) of the 5 proteins. Probability of random correlation was 0.10 for MRT and 0.01 for ln(MRT). Conclusion: MRT values of cognate anti-CEA antibodies were found to be a monotonically increasing sequence with respect to MW. Cognate MW values correlated best to ln(MRT) of the protein species. Thus MRT was proportional to an exponential function of molecular weight. The extended intact antibody circulation time presumably reflected its relatively maximal MW. Presence of an intact FC segment on this native antibody may also have influenced these results.

  16. WATER ENERGY IN HYDROAMELIORATIVE SYSTEMS USING THE HYDRAULIC TRANSFORMER TYPE A. BARGLAZAN AND THE HYDRAULIC HAMMER (HYDRAULIC PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Eugen Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two examples of exploitation of water energy that can be used in the irrigation field. First of theseexamples is the hydraulic transformer type A. Barglazan used for irrigation, pumped water is taken directly from theriver’s well, using a hydraulic pump which simultaneously carried out a double transformation in this way: hydraulicenergy into mechanic energy and mechanical energy into hydraulic energy. Technology preparation and devices designwas done in record time, seeing that this constructive solution is more robust, reliable and with improved energyperformance versus the laboratory prototype. The experimental research which was made at 1:1 scale proved theirgood function over time. Another example is the hydraulic hammer (hydraulic pump that uses low-head energy topump water, with a global efficiency of about 10 - 50%. Currently, the new situation of private ownership of landprovides conditions for new pumping microstations to be made where irrigation is necessary and optimal hydrauliclocations exist.

  17. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in raw sewage and their behavior in UASB reactors operated at different hydraulic retention times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, F B; Brandt, E M F; Aquino, S F; Chernicharo, C A L; Afonso, R J C F

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in raw sewage (from Belo Horizonte city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil) and assessed their behavior in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB reactors) operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT). The dissolved concentration of the studied micropollutants in the raw and treated sewage was obtained using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by analysis in a liquid chromatography system coupled to a hybrid high resolution mass spectrometer consisting of an ion-trap and time of flight (LC-MS-IT-TOF). The natural (estradiol) and synthetic (ethinylestradiol) estrogens were hardly detected; when present, however, their concentrations were lower than the method quantification limits. The concentrations of bisphenol A and miconazole in raw sewage were similar to that reported in the literature (around 200 ng L⁻¹ and hardly detected, respectively). The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (median 13.0 ng L⁻¹) and trimethoprim (median 61.5 ng L⁻¹), and the other pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac and bezafibrate, with median 99.9 and 94.4 ng L⁻¹, respectively) were found in lower concentrations when compared with reports in the literature, which might indicate a lower consumption of such drugs in Brazil. The UASB reactors were inefficient in the removal of bisphenol A, and led to an increased concentration of nonylphenol in the effluent. The anaerobic reactors were also inefficient in the removal of diclofenac, and led to a partial removal of bezafibrate; whereas, for sulfamethoxazole there seemed to be a direct relationship between the HRT and removal efficiencies. For trimethoprim the sludge retention time (SRT) seemed to play an important role, although it was only partially removed in the UASB reactors.

  18. Removal of antibiotics in wastewater: Effect of hydraulic and solid retention times on the fate of tetracycline in the activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungpyo; Eichhorn, Peter; Jensen, James N; Weber, A Scott; Aga, Diana S

    2005-08-01

    A study was conducted to examine the influence of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid retention time (SRT) on the removal of tetracycline in the activated sludge processes. Two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated to simulate the activated sludge process. One SBR was spiked with 250 microg/L tetracycline, while the other SBR was evaluated at tetracycline concentrations found in the influent of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) where the activated sludge was obtained. The concentrations of tetracyclines in the influent of the WWTP ranged from 0.1 to 0.6 microg/L. Three different operating conditions were applied during the study (phase 1-HRT: 24 h and SRT: 10 days; phase 2-HRT: 7.4 h and SRT: 10 days; and phase 3-HRT: 7.4 h and SRT: 3 days). The removal efficiency of tetracycline in phase 3 (78.4 +/- 7.1%) was significantly lower than that observed in phase 1 (86.4 +/- 8.7%) and phase 2 (85.1 +/- 5.4%) at the 95% confidence level. The reduction of SRT in phase 3 while maintaining a constant HRT decreased tetracycline removal efficiency. Sorption kinetics reached equilibrium within 24 h. Batch equilibrium experiments yielded an adsorption coefficient (Kads) of 8400 +/- 500 mL/g and a desorption coefficient (Kdes) of 22 600 +/- 2200 mL/g. No evidence of biodegradation for tetracycline was observed during the biodegradability test, and sorption was found to be the principal removal mechanism of tetracycline in activated sludge.

  19. Performance of a haloalkaliphilic bioreactor and bacterial community shifts under different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie-Min [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Zi-Yu [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan, Dao-Jiang; Liu, Yi-Lan [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Mao-Hua [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Hong-Bin [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Xing, Jian-Min, E-mail: jmxing@home.ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms were used to reduce sulfate. • Sulfide concentration reached up to 1603 mg/L. • There was no sulfide inhibition to haloalkaliphilic microorganisms. • Bacterial community of haloalkaliphilic bioreactor was studied. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide from flue gas was converted into sulfate after the absorption of alkaline solutions. Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms have been used in reducing sulfate to decrease expenses and avoid sulfide inhibition. The effects of different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) on the sulfate removal efficiency and bacterial community were investigated in model experiments. Ethanol showed better performance as an electron donor than lactate. The optimum COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio and HRT were 4.0 and 18 h, respectively, with respective sulfate removal efficiency and rate of 97.8 ± 1.11% and 6.26 ± 0.0710 g/L d. Sulfide concentrations reached 1603 ± 3.38 mg/L. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S rDNA, the major sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) was Desulfonatronovibrio sp., which was only detected at a COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio of 4.0 using ethanol as an electron donor. Different HRTs had no significant effect on the band corresponding to this species. PCR results show that methane-producing archaea (MPA) were from the acetoclastic methanogenic family Methanosarcinaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR did not demonstrate any significant competition between SRB and MPA. The findings of this study indicate that sulfate reduction, nitrate reduction, and sulfide oxidization may occur in the same bioreactor.

  20. Nutrient Mitigation And Changes In Hydraulic Parameters Caused By Two Helophyte Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argerich, A.; Nikolakopoulou, M.; Drummond, J. D.; Bernal, S.; Gacia, E.; Ribot, M.; Vaessen, T. N.; Martí Roca, E.; Sorolla, A.; Sabater, F.

    2016-12-01

    Plantation of helophytes has been employed in river restoration for river bank stabilization. Based on the concept of aquatic plants as biological engineers, we investigated the influence of helophytes Scirpus lacustris L. and Phragmites australis L. on modifying hydraulic properties and nutrient uptake along subsurface flow paths. We used combined pulse additions of phosphate, ammonium and chloride in 9 artificial flumes fed with treated waste water, and submitted to three different treatments: absence of helophytes (control), presence of Scirpus, and presence of Phragmites. We calculated nutrient uptake metrics and we further linked them with plant induced changes on the flumes' hydraulic parameters, estimated from the chloride breakthrough curves using a mobile-immobile stochastic model for solute transport (SMIM). Mean nutrient retention was higher in flumes with Phragmites (81% for ammonium and 50% for phosphate), followed by Scirpus (77% for ammonium and 35% for phosphate) and the control (60% for ammonium and 13% for phosphate). Mean water residence time was 2.5 times longer in Phragmites and 2 times longer in Scirpus than residence time in the control. Positive linear relationships were found between nutrient retention and water residence time for both ammonium and phosphate. Our results suggest that the bioengineering role of helophytes can enhance nutrient uptake along subsurface flow paths and this could be added value for the implementation of river restoration actions to improve water quality.

  1. Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, Thomas D.; Ziegler, Jack L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Ciesielski, Peter; Nimlos, Mark R.; Robichaud, David J.

    2017-02-21

    Using the validated simulation model developed in part one of this study for biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP), we assess the functional utility of using this validated model to assist in the development of CFP processes in fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactors to a commercially viable state. Specifically, we examine the effects of mass flow rates, boundary conditions (BCs), pyrolysis vapor molecular weight variation, and the impact of the chemical cracking kinetics on the catalyst residence times. The factors that had the largest impact on the catalyst residence time included the feed stock molecular weight and the degree of chemical cracking as controlled by the catalyst activity. Because FCC reactors have primarily been developed and utilized for petroleum cracking, we perform a comparison analysis of CFP with petroleum and show the operating regimes are fundamentally different.

  2. Determining the residence time distribution of various screw elements in a co-rotating twin-screw extruder by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepschi, Alexander; Gerstorfer, Gregor; Miethlinger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The Residence Time Distribution (RTD) is key to optimizing the mixing ability of an extruder. For both sensitive and reactive materials, it is important to know how long particles remain in the barrel and how long the polymer remains, for instance, in a kneading element. To assess the influence of different screw configurations on the RTD, a low-concentration tracer particle was injected into the feeding section and measured inline by fluorescence spectroscopy1 both inside the barrel and at the extruder exit. The measurements were conducted using polypropylene with different amounts of organic peroxide. Measuring the residence time at various positions along the screw allows the RTD to be determined for just one screw element. Furthermore, we show the influence of different screw configurations on the polydispersity of polypropylene.

  3. Maximizing Productivity and Reducing Environmental Impacts of Full-Scale Algal Production through Optimization of Open Pond Depth and Hydraulic Retention Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-04-05

    The ability to dynamically control algal raceway ponds to maximize biomass productivity and reduce environmental impacts (e.g., land and water use) with consideration of local constraints (e.g., water availability and climatic conditions) is an important consideration in algal biotechnology. This paper presents a novel optimization strategy that seeks to maximize growth (i.e., optimize land use), minimize respiration losses, and minimize water demand through regular adjustment of pond depth and hydraulic retention time (HRT) in response to seasonal changes. To evaluate the efficiency of this strategy, algal productivity and water demand were simulated in five different climatic regions. In comparison to the standard approach (constant and location-independent depth and HRT), dynamic control of depth and HRT was shown to increase productivity by 0.6-9.9% while decreasing water demand by 10-61% depending upon the location considered (corresponding to a decrease in the water footprint of 19-62%). Interestingly, when the fact that the water demand was limited to twice the local annual rainfall was added as a constraint, higher net productivities were predicted in temperate and tropical climates (15.7 and 16.7 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively) than in Mediterranean and subtropical climates (13.0 and 9.7 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively), while algal cultivation was not economically feasible in arid climates. Using dynamic control for a full-scale operation by adjusting for local climatic conditions and water constraints can notably affect algal productivity. It is clear that future assessments of algal cultivation feasibility should implement locally optimized dynamic process control.

  4. Effects of hydraulic retention time and [Formula: see text] ratio on thiosulfate-driven autotrophic denitrification for nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Fei, Xiang; He, Sheng-Bing; Huang, Jung-Chen; Zhou, Wei-Li

    2017-01-18

    This study was carried out to investigate the possibility of a thiosulfate-driven autotrophic denitrification for nitrate-N removal from micro-polluted surface water. The aim was to study the effects of [Formula: see text] ratio (S/N molar ratio) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the autotrophic denitrification performance. Besides, utilization efficiencies of [Formula: see text] along the biofilter and the restart-up of the bioreactor were also investigated. Autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor for treating micro-polluted surface water without the addition of external alkalinity proved to be feasible and the biofilter could be readied in two weeks. Average nitrate-N removal efficiencies at HRTs of 0.5, 1 and 2 h were 78.7%, 87.8% and 97.4%, respectively, and corresponding removal rates were 186.24, 103.92 and 58.56 g [Formula: see text], respectively. When water temperature was in the range of 8-12°C and HRT was 1 h, average nitrate-N removal efficiencies of 41.9%, 97.1% and 97.0%, nitrite accumulation concentrations of 1.45, 0.46 and 0.22 mg/L and thiosulfate utilization efficiencies of 100%, 98.8% and 92.1% were obtained at S/N ratios of 1.0, 1.2 and 1.5, respectively. Besides, the autotrophic denitrification rate in the filtration media layer was the highest along the biofilter at an S/N ratio of 1.5. Finally, after a one-month period of starvation, the biofilter could be restarted successfully in three weeks without inoculation of seed sludge.

  5. Effects of nitrobenzene concentration and hydraulic retention time on the treatment of nitrobenzene in sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-04-01

    The effects of increasing nitrobenzene (NB) concentrations and hydraulic retention times (HRT) on the treatment of NB were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. In the first step of the study, the maximum COD removal efficiencies were found as 88% and 92% at NB concentrations varying between 30 mg L(-1) and 210 mg L(-1) in ABR. The minimum COD removal efficiency was 79% at a NB concentration of 700 mg L(-1). The removal efficiency of NB was nearly 100% for all NB concentrations in the ABR reactor. The methane gas production and the methane gas percentage remained stable (1500 mL day(-1) and 48-50%, respectively) as the NB concentration was increased from 30 to 210 mg L(-1). In the second step of the study it was found that as the HRT decreased from 10.38 days to 2.5 days the COD removal efficiencies decreased slightly from 94% to 92% in the ABR. For maximum COD and NB removal efficiencies the optimum HRT was found as 2.5 days in the ABR. The total COD removal efficiency was 95% in sequential anaerobic (ABR)/aerobic (CSTR) reactor system at a minimum HRT of 1 day. When the HRT was decreased from 10.38 days to 1 day, the methane percentage decreased from 42% to 29% in an ABR reactor treating 100 mg L(-1) NB. Nitrobenzene was reduced to aniline under anaerobic conditions while aniline was mineralized to catechol with meta cleavage under aerobic conditions.

  6. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  7. Hillslope lowering rates and mobile-regolith residence times from in situ and meteoric 10Be analysis: Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Wyshnytzky, C.; Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mobile regolith is produced as weathered saprolite is entrained into the mobile layer. The rate of mobile-regolith production and its residence time on hillslopes shapes the topography and evolution of hillslopes. We calculate the production rate of mobile regolith and the mobile-regolith residence times on active hillslopes in Gordon Gulch, within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), Colorado. We find mobile-regolith production rates (average 3.1 cm/ka) and residence times (average 10-20 ka) derived from both in situand meteoric methods agree. Lowering-rates derived from our study are also comparable to basin-averaged denudation rates for small basins in the Colorado Front Range (Dethier and Lazarus, 2006). In this study, we have measured both in situ and meteoric 10Be in saprolite and mobile regolith separately. We find that, on average, two-thirds of in situ 10Be is produced within saprolite, and that at least one-tenth of the meteoric 10Be inventories are stored in saprolite. In the case of in situ 10Be, this simply reflects the exponential fall-off in production rates through a thin mobile-regolith cover. In the case of meteoric 10Be, our calculations suggest that >40% of the meteoric 10Be deposition occurs within the saprolite. Most studies that utilize 10Be report residence times and soil-production rates based on concentrations in either the mobile regolith or saprolite; therefore, our 10Be data highlight the importance of clearly identifying mobile and immobile portions of the regolith, constraining its 10Be inventory, and use of consistent terminology for the mobile-layer.

  8. Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion using time-lapse magnetic resonance sounding and time-lapse gravity data for hydraulic aquifer testing: Will it work in practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics in an aq......Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics...

  9. Flume Experiments for Optimizing the Hydraulic Performance of a Deep-Water Wetland Utilizing Emergent Vegetation and Obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Shu Shih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Constructed ponds and wetlands are widely used in urban areas for stormwater management, ecological conservation, and pollution treatment. The treatment efficiency of these systems is strongly related to the hydrodynamics and hydraulic residence time. In this study, we developed a physical model and used rhodamine-WT as a tracer to conduct flume experiments. An equivalent Reynolds number was assumed, and the flume was a 1/25-scale model. Emergent obstructions (EOs, submerged obstructions (SOs, and high- and low-density emergent vegetation were placed along the sides of the flume, and 49 tracer tests were performed. We altered the density, spatial extent, aspect ratio, and configurations of the obstructions and emergent vegetation to observe changes in the hydraulic efficiency of a deep-water wetland. In the cases of low-aspect-ratio obstructions, the effects of the EOs on the hydraulic efficiency were significantly stronger than those of the SOs. In contrast, in the cases of high-aspect-ratio obstructions, the improvement effects of the EOs were weaker than those of the SOs. The high-aspect-ratio EOs altered the flow direction and constrained the water conveyance area, which apparently caused a short-circuited flow phenomenon, resulting in a decrease in hydraulic efficiency. Most cases revealed that the emergent vegetation improved the hydraulic efficiency more than the EOs. The high-density emergent vegetation (HEV improved the hydraulic efficiency more than the low-density emergent vegetation (LEV. Three cases involving HEV, two cases involving LEV, and one case involving EOs attained a good hydraulic efficiency (λ > 0.75. To achieve greater water purification, aquatic planting in constructed wetlands should not be overly dense. The HEV configuration in case 3-1 achieved optimum hydraulic performance for compliance with applicable water treatment standards.

  10. Hydraulic, Vegetation and Water Quality Characteristics of Heavily Vegetated Groundwater-Fed Ditches in a Riparian Peatland in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, M.; Olson, M. S.; Trepel, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Environmental Ministry of Schleswig-Holstein (Northern Germany) has implemented a novel peatland management strategy in order to use the high nutrient retention potential of degenerated wetlands and peatlands, and to improve the habitat conditions at the same time. The effect of raised water levels and passive land use management on hydraulic properties and water quality of heavily vegetated and groundwater-fed ditches at one nationally important wetland case study at the Eider River valley was investigated. Most ditches in the Eider River valley were small and overgrown. The flow properties of selected ditches were regularly assessed at different discharge levels during different vegetation cover periods. The hydraulic residence is predominantly a function of the ditch geometry and overall obstruction cover including the presence of macrophytes. Vegetation cover and other hydraulic obstructions such as accumulated silt and organic debris slow down the hydraulic residence time and lead to a change in the water quality along the ditch. Experimental results were evaluated to get more realistic values for total bed-roughness and pollution loading under different hydraulic flow regimes. The total-roughness Km values of both vegetated and excavated ditch stretches were about 1 and 10, respectively. However, Km is actually a crude "fudge factor" depending predominantly on the hydraulic radius rather than on the total-roughness. This is in contrast to the theory presented in the literature. The biochemical oxygen demand and nutrient concentrations of 24 ditches were analyzed. Mean biochemical oxygen demand, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and ortho-phosphate concentrations were 6.0 (+/-2.74), 0.2 (+/-0.44), 0.0 (+/-0.02), 1.6 (+/-2.04) and 0.0 (+/-0.02) mg/L, respectively. Elevated biochemical oxygen demand and nitrate concentrations for upstream ditch cross-sections were apparent.

  11. Hydraulic Yaw System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Mørkholt, M.

    As wind turbines increase in size, combined with increased lifetime demands, new methods for load reduction needs to be examined. One method is to make the yaw system of the turbine soft/flexible and hereby dampen the loads to the system, which is the focus of the current paper. By utilizing...... the HAWC2 aeroelastic code and an extended model of the NREL 5MW turbine combined with a simplified linear model of the turbine, the parameters of the soft yaw system are optimized to reduce loading in critical components. Results shows that a significant reduction in fatigue and extreme loads to the yaw...... system and rotor shaft when utilizing the soft yaw drive concept compared to the original stiff yaw system. The physical demands of the hydraulic yaw system are furthermore examined for a life time of 20 years. Based on the extrapolated loads, the duty cycles show that it is possible to construct...

  12. Relationship Between the Number of Residency Applications and the Yearly Match Rate: Time to Start Thinking About an Application Limit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, Steven J; Kim, Soo Jeong; Feinn, Richard S; Stock, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-01

    There has been an increase in the number of applications medical students have submitted for the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP). These additional applications are associated with significant costs and may contribute to match inefficiency. We explored if match rates improved in years when an increased number of applications were submitted. We analyzed yearly published data from the NRMP and the Electronic Residency Application Service for 13 specialties. A generalized linear model was used to assess the relationship between the annual match rate and the mean number of applications submitted per applicant, while controlling for the number of positions available and the number of applicants in the given year. Over the last 13 years there has been an increase in the mean number of applications submitted per applicant (P  .05). There was no improvement in the match rate in years when medical students submitted an increased number of applications. Therefore, it would appear that the applicants do not benefit from the larger number of applications submitted. Further study is required to assess the cost and benefit of these additional applications.

  13. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, Bruce F; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution - a community hospital - in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available.

  14. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  15. Evaluating the impact of land use changes on the behaviour of shallow aquifers, by quantifying the groundwater mean residence times distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Aude; Gillon, Marina; Marc, Vincent; Cognard-Plancq, Anne-Laure; Baillieux, Antoine; Babic, Milanka; Simler, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Residence time is one of the key factors of the groundwater resource management. The Crau aquifer (Mediterranean area, south of France) is a major resource for drinking water supply, threatened by climate change, changes in irrigation patterns, and urban expansion. Water residence time in the aquifer is expected to be highly dependent on these changes. We propose to determinate it using an isotopic approach, associated to numerical modelling. The Crau aquifer is a palaeo-alluvial fan of the Durance river, made of alluviums lying on a Miocene substratum, and recharged by rainwater and gravity irrigation water, diverted from the Durance river. The irrigation water being more depleted in 18O than the rain water, the contribution of irrigation to the aquifer recharge can be quantified (up to 80 to 85% of the total recharge), but is variable in space and time. The modelling approach uses two models, a lumped one and a discretised one. They are based on daily recharge data (rainfall, drainage rates under irrigated crops calculated from the STICS crop model, Olioso et al., 2013), and on monthly water sampling conducted from February 2012 to November 2016 for δ18O content in rainwater, surface water and groundwater. The lumped approach was carried out at a monthly time step, using a binary mixing model, including two exponentially draining reservoirs in parallel. It leads to a satisfying simulation of the δ18O variations in the monitored wells, and gives mean residence times between 3 and 20 months depending on the wells locations. The discretised model is a combination of MODFLOW and MODPATH, through the free user interface MODELMUSE, on a daily time-step. The permeability map used is the one calibrated by Baillieux et al. (2015). Recharge is applied with an increasing spatial complexity, in three successive steps: - a homogeneous recharge, provided by the intermediate output of the lumped model, in order to compare the two models results; - a recharge discretised in

  16. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  17. Comparison of four methods to assess hydraulic conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gunter, J.A. [Gunter (John A.), Round Rock, TX (United States); Boutwell, G.P. [STE, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Trautwein, S.J. [Trautwein Soil Testing Equipment Co., Houston, TX (United States); Berzanskis, P.H. [Hoechst-Celanese, Inc., Pampa, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A hydraulic conductivity assessment that was conducted on four test pads constructed to the same specifications with soil from the same source by four different contractors is described. The test pads had distinctly different field hydraulic conductivities, even though they were constructed with similar soil, to similar compaction conditions, and with similar machinery. Adequate hydration time was key in achieving low field hydraulic conductivity. More extensive processing was another factor responsible for low field hydraulic conductivity. Four different test methods were used to assess the hydraulic conductivity of each test pad: (1) sealed double-ring infiltrometers (SDRIs); (2) two-stage borehole permeameters; (3) laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests on large block specimens; and (4) laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests on small specimens collected in thin-wall sampling tubes. The tests were conducted independently by each of the writers. After the tests were completed, the results were submitted and compared. Analysis of the test results show that the three large-scale test methods generally yield similar hydraulic conductivities. For two of the test pads, however, the hydraulic conductivities of the specimens collected in sampling tubes were significantly lower than the field hydraulic conductivities. Both of these test pads had high field hydraulic conductivity. Thus, there is little value in using small specimens to assess field hydraulic conductivity.

  18. Intravascular Residence Time Determination for the Cyanide Antidote Dimethyl Trisulfide in Rat by Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Deepthika; Lee, Steven; Duke, Anna; Angalakurthi, Siva; Chou, Ching-En; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Thompson, David E.

    2016-01-01

    These studies represent the first report on the intravascular residence time determinations for the cyanide antidote dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS) in a rat model by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (HPLC-UV). The newly developed sample preparation included liquid-liquid extraction by cyclohexanone. The calibration curves showed a linear response for DMTS concentrations between 0.010 and 0.30 mg/mL with R2 = 0.9994. The limit of detection for DMTS via this extraction method was 0.010 mg/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.034 mg/mL. Thus this calibration curve provided a tool for determining DMTS in the range between 0.04 and 0.30 mg/mL. Rats were given 20 mg/kg DMTS dose (in 15% Polysorbate 80) intravenously, and blood samples were taken 15, 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after DMTS injections. The data points were plotted as DMTS concentration in RBCs versus time, and the intravascular residence time was determined graphically. The results indicated a half-life of 36 min in a rat model, suggesting that the circulation time is long enough to provide a reasonable time interval for cyanide antagonism. PMID:28053802

  19. Intravascular Residence Time Determination for the Cyanide Antidote Dimethyl Trisulfide in Rat by Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthika De Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available These studies represent the first report on the intravascular residence time determinations for the cyanide antidote dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS in a rat model by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (HPLC-UV. The newly developed sample preparation included liquid-liquid extraction by cyclohexanone. The calibration curves showed a linear response for DMTS concentrations between 0.010 and 0.30 mg/mL with R2 = 0.9994. The limit of detection for DMTS via this extraction method was 0.010 mg/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.034 mg/mL. Thus this calibration curve provided a tool for determining DMTS in the range between 0.04 and 0.30 mg/mL. Rats were given 20 mg/kg DMTS dose (in 15% Polysorbate 80 intravenously, and blood samples were taken 15, 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after DMTS injections. The data points were plotted as DMTS concentration in RBCs versus time, and the intravascular residence time was determined graphically. The results indicated a half-life of 36 min in a rat model, suggesting that the circulation time is long enough to provide a reasonable time interval for cyanide antagonism.

  20. Feasibility of hydraulic separation in a novel anaerobic-anoxic upflow reactor for biological nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Montero, Rubén; De Florio, Loredana; González-Viar, Marta; Volcke, Eveline I P; Tejero, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    This contribution deals with a novel anaerobic-anoxic reactor for biological nutrient removal (BNR) from wastewater, termed AnoxAn. In the AnoxAn reactor, the anaerobic and anoxic zones for phosphate removal and denitrification are integrated in a single continuous upflow sludge blanket reactor, aiming at high compactness and efficiency. Its application is envisaged in those cases where retrofitting of existing wastewater treatment plants for BNR, or the construction of new ones, is limited by the available surface area. The environmental conditions are vertically divided up inside the reactor with the anaerobic zone at the bottom and the anoxic zone above. The capability of the AnoxAn configuration to establish two hydraulically separated zones inside the single reactor was assessed by means of hydraulic characterization experiments and model simulations. Residence time distribution (RTD) experiments in clean water were performed in a bench-scale (48.4 L) AnoxAn prototype. The required hydraulic separation between the anaerobic and anoxic zones, as well as adequate mixing in the individual zones, were obtained through selected mixing devices. The observed behaviour was described by a hydraulic model consisting of continuous stirred tank reactors and plug-flow reactors. The impact of the denitrification process in the anoxic zone on the hydraulic separation was subsequently evaluated through model simulations. The desired hydraulic behaviour proved feasible, involving little mixing between the anaerobic and anoxic zones (mixing flowrate 40.2 % of influent flowrate) and negligible nitrate concentration in the anaerobic zone (less than 0.1 mgN L(-1)) when denitrification was considered.

  1. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  2. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  3. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  4. Identifying residence times and streamflow generation processes using δ18O and δ2H in meso-scale catchments in the Abay/Upper Blue Nile, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tekleab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 (18O and deuterium (2H were carried out in two meso-scale catchments, Chemoga (358 km2 and Jedeb (296 km2 south of Lake Tana, Abay/Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia. The region is of paramount importance for the water resources in the Nile basin. Stable isotope composition in precipitation, spring water and streamflow were analyzed (i to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of water fluxes; (ii to estimate the mean residence time of water using a sine wave regression approach; and (iii to identify runoff components using classical two component hydrograph separations at a seasonal time scale. The results show that the isotopic composition of precipitation exhibit marked seasonal variations, which suggests different sources of moisture generation for the rainfall in the study area. The Atlantic–Indian ocean, Congo basin, and the Sud swamps are the likely the potential moisture source areas during the main rainy (summer season. While, the Indian–Arabian, and Mediterranean Sea moisture source areas during little rain (spring, and dry (winter seasons. The spatial variation of the isotopic composition is affected by the amount effect and to less extent by altitude and temperature effects. A mean altitude effect of −0.12‰ (100 m−1 for 18O and −0.58‰ (100 m−1 for 2H were discernable in precipitation isotope composition. The seasonal variations of the isotopic signature of the spring water exhibit a damped response as compared to the river waters, which shows that the spring water has longer residence times than the river water. Results from the hydrograph separation at a seasonal time scale indicate the dominance of event water with an average of 71% and 64% of the total runoff during the wet season in the Chemoga and Jedeb catchment, respectively. The stable isotope compositions of streamflow samples were damped compared to the input function of precipitation for both catchments

  5. Plant root-driven hydraulic redistribution, root nutrient uptake and carbon exudation interact with soil properties to generate rhizosphere resource hotspots that vary in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeleta, J. F.; Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Rastetter, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by plants occurs in seasonally dry ecosystems worldwide. During drought, water flows from deep moist soil, through plant roots, into dry (often litter-rich) upper soil layers. Using modeling, we explored how physical transport processes driven by transpiration and hydraulic redistribution interact with root physiology (nutrient uptake and carbon exudation) and soil properties (soil texture and cation exchange) to influence nitrogen and carbon concentrations in the rhizosphere. At the single root scale, we modeled a 10-cm radial soil domain, and simulated solute transport, soil cation exchange, and root exudation and nutrient uptake under two water flow patterns: daytime transpiration without nighttime HR, and daytime transpiration with nighttime HR. During HR, water efflux flushed solutes away from the root, diluting the concentrations of key nutrients like nitrate. The transport of cations by transpiration in the day and their accumulation near the root led to competitive desorption of ammonium from soil further from the root and generation of hotspots of ammonium availability at night. HR influenced the spatial and temporal patterns of these hotspots and their intensity. They were also influenced by soil properties of texture and cation exchange capacity. This dynamic resource landscape caused by diel cycling between transpiration and hydraulic redistribution presents a stage for greater complexity of microbial interactions. We are currently embedding a microbial community and small food web into this rhizosphere model in order to explore how organisms responsible for nutrient and soil carbon cycling respond to these fluctuating resource regimes.

  6. Residence times and age distributions of spring waters at the Semmering catchment area, Eastern Austria, as inferred from tritium, CFCs and stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liangfeng; Hacker, Peter; Gröning, Manfred

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater system in the mountainous area of Semmering, Austria, was studied by environmental tracers in several karst springs. The tracers used included stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), tritium ((3)H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The tracers provided valuable information in regard to (1) the mean altitude of the spring catchment areas; (2) the residence time and age distribution of the spring waters; and (3) the interconnection of the springs to a sinkhole. The combination of the stable isotopic data and the topography/geology provided the estimates of the mean altitudes of the catchment areas. Based on the stable isotopic data the recharge temperature of the spring waters was estimated. The smoothing of precipitation's isotopic signal in spring discharge provided information on the minimum transit time of the spring waters. Due to short observation time, (3)H data alone cannot be used for describing the mean residence time of the karst waters. CFCs, though useful in recognizing the co-existence of young (post-1993) water with old (CFC-free) water, could not be used to resolve age distribution models. It is shown in this article, however, that the combined use of tritium and CFCs can provide a better assessment of models to account for different groundwater age distributions. In Appendix A, a simplified method for collecting groundwater samples for the analysis of CFCs is described. The method provides a real facilitation for fieldwork. Test data are given for this sampling method in regard to potential contamination by atmospheric CFCs.

  7. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  8. Assessing groundwater residence time in a highly anthropized unconfined aquifer using bomb peak 14C and reconstructed irrigation water 3H of irrigation water

    OpenAIRE

    Baudron, Paul; Barbecot, Florent; Gillon, Marina; Garcia Arostegui, Jose Luis; Travi, Yves; Leduc, Christian; Gomariz Castillo, Francisco; Martinez-Vicente, David

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon decay is rarely used to assess the residence time of modern groundwater due to the low resolution of its long half-life in comparison to the expected range of ages. Nonetheless, the modern 14C peak induced by the nuclear bomb tests traces efficiently the impacts of recent human activities on groundwater recharge, as well as for tritium. A simple lumped parameter model (LPM) was implemented in order to assess the interest of 14C and 3H nuclear peaks in a highly anthropized aquifer ...

  9. LUMPED Unsteady: a Visual Basic ® code of unsteady-state lumped-parameter models for mean residence time analyses of groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, N. Nur; Bayari, C. Serdar

    2005-04-01

    A Microsoft ® Visual Basic 6.0 (Microsoft Corporation, 1987-1998) code of 9 lumped-parameter models of unsteady flow is presented for the analysis of mean residence time in aquifers. Groundwater flow systems obeying plug and well-mixed flow models and their combinations in parallel or serial connection can be simulated by the code. Models can use tritium, tritiugenic He-3, oxygen-18, deuterium, krypton-85, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6) as the environmental tracers. The executable code runs under all 32-bit Windows operating systems. Details of the code are explained and its limitations are indicated.

  10. Identifying residence times and streamflow generation processes using δ18O and δ2H in meso-scale catchments in the Abay/Upper Blue Nile, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Teklaeb, S.; J. W. Wenninger; S. Uhlenbrook

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (2H) were carried out in two meso-scale catchments, Chemoga (358 km2) and Jedeb (296 km2) south of Lake Tana, Abay/Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia. The region is of paramount importance for the water resources in the Nile basin. Stable isotope composition in precipitation, spring water and streamflow were analyzed (i) to characterize the spatial and temporal variations of water fluxes; (ii) to estimate the mean residence time o...

  11. Distribution of 36Cl in the Yoro River Basin, Central Japan, and Its Relation to the Residence Time of the Regional Groundwater Flow System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Kondoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of 36Cl in tracing young groundwater with residence times of up to ~50 years. Groundwater samples were obtained from 16 irrigation wells in paddy fields located within an upland–lowland system in the Yoro River basin, Central Japan. The 36Cl/Cl ratios were in the range of 17 to 362 × 10−15. Among the samples with higher Cl− concentrations (>10 mg/L, two samples showed high nitrate concentrations as well (>30 mg/L. Except for these samples, the distribution of 36Cl in groundwater was essentially consistent with previous tritium concentration data measured in 1982 and 1994, considering the time that has elapsed since these earlier measurements were performed. 36Cl/Cl values were less than 30 × 10−15 in lowland areas, with higher values in and around upland areas. The results indicate longer residence times in the regional groundwater flow system (>50 years than those estimated in previous studies, especially in the area west of the Yoro River. The results demonstrate the ability of 36Cl to trace young groundwater flow, particularly because high values of bomb-derived 36Cl/Cl are easily discriminated from pre-bomb water with low 36Cl/Cl values. Because of its very long half-life (3.01 × 105 years, 36Cl remains even after tritium is no longer available.

  12. Carbon transfer, partitioning and residence time in the plant-soil system: a comparison of two 13CO2 labelling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, M. S.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Abiven, S.

    2014-03-01

    Various 13CO2 labelling approaches exist to trace carbon (C) dynamics in plant-soil systems. However, it is not clear if the different approaches yield the same results. Moreover, there is no consistent way of data analysis to date. In this study we compare with the same experimental setup the two main techniques: pulse and continuous labelling. We evaluate how these techniques perform to estimate the C transfer time, the C partitioning along time and the C residence time in different plant-soil compartments. We used identical plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides × nigra, Cambisol soil) to compare the pulse labelling approach (exposure to 99 atom % 13CO2 for three hours, traced for eight days) with a continuous labelling (exposure to 10 atom % 13CO2, traced for 14 days). The experiments were conducted in climate chambers under controlled environmental conditions. Before label addition and at four successive sampling dates, the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested, separated into leaves, petioles, stems, cuttings, roots and soil and soil microbial biomass was extracted. The soil CO2 efflux was sampled throughout the experiment. To model the C dynamics we used an exponential function to describe the 13C signal decline after pulse labelling. For the evaluation of the 13C distribution during the continuous labelling we applied a logistic function. Pulse labelling is best suited to assess the minimum C transfer time from the leaves to other compartments, while continuous labelling can be used to estimate the mean transfer time through a compartment, including short-term storage pools. The C partitioning between the plant-soil compartments obtained was similar for both techniques, but the time of sampling had a large effect: shortly after labelling the allocation into leaves was overestimated and the soil 13CO2 efflux underestimated. The results of belowground C partitioning were consistent for the two techniques only after eight days of labelling, when the

  13. Prolonged naproxen joint residence time after intra-articular injection of lipophilic solutions comprising a naproxen glycolamide ester prodrug in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Mette; Lu, Yi; Agårdh, Li;

    2013-01-01

    Intra-articular injection of oil solutions of lipophilic prodrugs that rapidly degrade to their parent compound in synovial fluid may constitute a feasible approach to increase the joint residence time of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this in vivo study, oil solutions of the N......,N-diethyl glycolamide ester prodrug of naproxen (16mg/ml) were injected into the rat knee joint by dosing 6μl formulation per 100g body weight. The sustained release properties were compared to those of intra-articularly injected aqueous and oil solutions of naproxen by monitoring the naproxen serum concentrations over...... time. Two oils, medium-chain triglycerides and castor oil, differing with respect to viscosity were tested. After intra-articular administration of oil prodrug solutions, a significant increase in the time to maximum naproxen serum concentration from around 40 to 245min, an increase in the MRTj from...

  14. FEMA DFIRM Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer and accompanying attribute table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the...

  15. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on......-going research projects on fluid power and mechatronics based on tap water hydraulic servovalves and linear servo actuators and rotary vane actuators for motion control and power transmission. Development and design a novel water hydraulic rotary vane actuator for robot manipulators. Proposed mathematical...... modelling, control and simulation of a water hydraulic rotary vane actuator applied to power and control a two-links manipulator and evaluate performance. The results include engineering design and test of the proposed simulation models compared with IHA Tampere University’s presentation of research...

  16. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  17. Application of a novel type impinging streams reactor in solid-liquid enzyme reactions and modeling of residence time distribution using GDB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatourehchi, Niloufar; Sohrabi, Morteza; Dabir, Bahram; Royaee, Sayed Javid; Haji Malayeri, Adel

    2014-02-01

    Solid-liquid enzyme reactions constitute important processes in biochemical industries. The isomerization of d-glucose to d-fructose, using the immobilized glucose isomerase (Sweetzyme T), as a typical example of solid-liquid catalyzed reactions has been carried out in one stage and multi-stage novel type of impinging streams reactors. Response surface methodology was applied to determine the effects of certain pertinent parameters of the process namely axial velocity (A), feed concentration (B), nozzles' flow rates (C) and enzyme loading (D) on the performance of the apparatus. The results obtained from the conversion of glucose in this reactor were much higher than those expected in conventional reactors, while residence time was decreased dramatically. Residence time distribution (RTD) in a one-stage impinging streams reactor was investigated using colored solution as the tracer. The results showed that the flow pattern in the reactor was close to that in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Based on the analysis of flow region in the reactor, gamma distribution model with bypass (GDB) was applied to study the RTD of the reactor. The results indicated that RTD in the impinging streams reactor could be described by the latter model.

  18. Singlet delta oxygen production in a 2D micro-discharge array in air: effect of gas residence time and discharge power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Gaurav; Santos Sousa, João; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    The production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) is of growing interest for many applications. We report on the measurement of O2(a 1Δg) and ozone (O3) in a room temperature atmospheric pressure discharge in dry air. The plasma source is a 2D array of micro-discharges generated by an alternating current voltage at 20 kHz. The study focuses on the effect of gas flow through the discharge. The maximum investigated flow rate allows reducing the gas residence time in the discharge zone to half the discharge period. Results indicate that the residence time and discharge power have a major effect on the O2(a 1Δg) production. Different O2(a 1Δg) density dependencies on power are observed for different flow rates. Effects of collisional quenching on the as-produced and measured O2(a 1Δg) densities are discussed. The flow rate also allows for control of the O2(a 1Δg) to O3 density ratio in the effluent from 0.7 to conditions of pure O3.

  19. 散相液滴在搅拌萃取塔内的停留时间分布%The Resident Time Distribution of Injected Dispersed Drops in Stirred Extraction Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤学一; 李丹; 李胜华

    2005-01-01

    A resident time model is proposed to evaluate the performance of agitated extraction columns. In this model, the resident time of dispersed drops is simulated with the discrete phase modeling, where the continuous phase and the dispersed phase (drops) are described by the single-phase Navier-Stokes (turbulence) model and Lagrangian model, respectively. The interaction of dispersed phase and continuous phase is neglected for the low concentration of drop in the cases studied. The statistical parameters of drops (the average resident time and standard deviation) under different operation conditions are computed for four columns. The relation of the above statistical parameters with the performance of columns is discussed and the criterions for an optimal compartment are outlined. Our results indicate that the resident time model is useful to evaluate the performance and optimize the design of extraction columns.

  20. Real-time imaging of resident T cells in human lung and ovarian carcinomas reveals how different tumor microenvironments control T lymphocyte migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houcine eBougherara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available T cells play a key role in the battle against cancer. To perform their antitumor activities, T cells need to adequately respond to tumor antigens by establishing contact with either malignant cells or antigen-presenting cells. These latter functions rely on a series of migratory steps that go from entry of T cells into the tumor followed by their locomotion in the tumor stroma. Our knowledge of how T cells migrate within tumors mainly comes from experiments performed in mouse models. Whereas such systems have greatly advanced our understanding, they do not always faithfully recapitulate the disease observed in cancer patients. We previously described a technique based on tissue slices that enables to track with real-time imaging microscopy the motile behavior of fluorescent T cells plated onto fresh sections of human lung tumors. We have now refined this approach to monitor the locomotion of resident tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells labeled with fluorescently-coupled antibodies. Using this approach, our findings reveal that CD8 T cells accumulate in the stroma of ovarian and lung carcinomas but move slowly in this compartment. Conversely, even though less populated, tumors islets were found to be zones of faster migration for resident CD8 T cells. We also confirm the key role played by collagen fibers which, by their orientation, spacing and density, control the distribution and migration of resident CD8 T cells within the tumor stroma. We have subsequently demonstrated that under some physical tissue constraints CD8 T cells exhibited a mode of migration characterized by alternate forward and backward movements. In sum, using an ex vivo assay to track CD8 T cells in fresh human tumor tissues, we have identified the extracellular matrix as a major stromal component in influencing T cell migration, thereby impacting control of tumor growth. This approach will aid in the development and testing of novel immunotherapy strategies to promote T cell

  1. Reduced variability and execution time to reach a target with a needle GPS system: Comparison between physicians, residents and nurse anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Marie-Cécile; Vincent, Caroline; Picard, Julien; Vighetti, Arnaud; Chapuis, Claire; Detavernier, Maxime; Allenet, Benoît; Payen, Jean-François; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2016-09-19

    Ultrasound (US) guided needle positioning is safer than anatomical landmark techniques for central venous access. Hand-eye coordination and execution time depend on the professional's ability, previous training and personal skills. Needle guidance positioning systems (GPS) may theoretically reduce execution time and facilitate needle positioning in specific targets, thus improving patient comfort and safety. Three groups of healthcare professionals (41 anaesthesiologists and intensivists, 41 residents in anaesthesiology and intensive care, 39 nurse anaesthetists) were included and required to perform 3 tasks (positioning the tip of a needle in three different targets in a silicon phantom) by using successively a conventional US-guided needle positioning and a needle GPS. We measured execution times to perform the tasks, hand-eye coordination and the number of repositioning occurrences or errors in handling the needle or the probe. Without the GPS system, we observed a significant inter-individual difference for execution time (PGPS attenuated the inter-individual and group variability. We observed a reduced execution time and improved hand-eye coordination in all groups as compared to US without GPS. Neither US training, video gaming nor demographic personal or professional factors were found to be significantly associated with reduced execution time when GPS was used. US associated with GPS systems may improve safety and decrease execution time by reducing inter-individual variability between professionals for needle-handling procedures.

  2. Variation in reach-scale hydraulic conductivity of streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, M. J.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Pella, H.; Thommeret, N.; Valette, L.; Grant, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is an important control on flow within the hyporheic zone, affecting hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes essential to river ecosystem function. Despite many published field measurements, few empirical studies examine the drivers of spatial and temporal variations in streambed hydraulic conductivity. Reach-averaged hydraulic conductivity estimated for 119 surveys in 83 stream reaches across continental France, even of coarse bed streams, are shown to be characteristic of sand and finer sediments. This supports a model where processes leading to the accumulation of finer sediments within streambeds largely control hydraulic conductivity rather than the size of the coarse bed sediment fraction. After describing a conceptual model of relevant processes, we fit an empirical model relating hydraulic conductivity to candidate geomorphic and hydraulic drivers. The fitted model explains 72% of the deviance in hydraulic conductivity (and 30% using an external cross-validation). Reach hydraulic conductivity increases with the amplitude of bedforms within the reach, the bankfull channel width-depth ratio, stream power and upstream catchment erodibility but reduces with time since the last streambed disturbance. The correlation between hydraulic conductivity and time since a streambed mobilisation event is likely a consequence of clogging processes. Streams with a predominantly suspended load and less frequent streambed disturbances are expected to have a lower streambed hydraulic conductivity and reduced hyporheic fluxes. This study suggests a close link between streambed sediment transport dynamics and connectivity between surface water and the hyporheic zone.

  3. The Artist-in-Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James W.

    1977-01-01

    Institutions are bringing the professional artist into their instructional and cultural environments through five approaches: concert performances, extended performances, master classes, part-time residencies, and full-time residencies. The effect of each program on the artist and the college or university is examined. (Author/LBH)

  4. Seasonal variations of residence time and upper atmospheric contribution of aerosols studied with Pb-210, Bi-210, Po-210 and Be-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, Takayuki; Yamanaka, Kenji; Harada, Koh; Tsunogai, Shizuo

    1996-11-01

    All daily precipitation samples amounting to 196 in total were collected during the period from January 1990 to June 1991 at a station in Hakodate, Japan, and precisely analyzed for radon daughters, Pb-210, Bi-210 and Po-210. The samples collected after July 1990 were also determined for Be-7. The mean concentration and deposition rate of Pb-210 in 1990 were 0.20 Bq/1 as a mean and 288 Bq/m2/ yr, respectively, and they were a few times greater in winter due to the northwest winter monsoon. The total mean activity ratios with 95% confidence limits were 0.467±0.024 and 0.0624±0.0133 for Bi-210/Pb-210 and Po-210/Pb-210, respectively. The residence time of aerosols calculated from the Po-210/Pb-210 ratio was always longer than that calculated from the Bi-210/Pb-210 ratio. The difference is chiefly due to old aerosols derived from the upper atmosphere (probably the stratosphere), of which contribution for Pb-210 has been estimated to be 6% as a mean, or 12% in spring and 2% in early winter. Subtracting the upper atmospheric component, we have obtained the residence time of tropospheric aerosols carrying Pb-210 to be 4.8±0.3days for a whole year or 5.9±0.7days and 3.6±0.5days for the periods from February to April and from May to June, respectively. The deposition rate of Be-7 was correlated well with the upper atmospheric component of Pb-210. The larger deposition rate of Be-7 suggests that the study area is extremely effective for the removal of aerosols of stratospheric origin.

  5. Seasonal variations of residence time and upper atmospheric contribution of aerosols studied with Pb-210, Bi-210, Po-210 and Be-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokieda, Takayuki; Yamanaka, Kenji; Harada, Koh; Tsunogai, Shizuo [Hokkaido Univ., Hakodate (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-11-01

    All daily precipitation samples amounting to 196 in total were collected during the period from January 1990 to June 1991 at a station in Hakodate, Japan, and precisely analyzed for radon daughters, Pb-210, Bi-210 and Po-210. The samples collected after July 1990 were also determined for Be-7. The mean concentration and deposition rate of Pb-210 in 1990 were 0.20 Bq/l as a mean and 288 Bq/m{sup 2}/yr, respectively, and they were a few times greater in winter due to the northwest winter monsoon. The total mean activity ratios with 95% confidence limits were 0.467{+-}0.024 and 0.0624{+-}0.0133 for Bi-210/Pb-210 and Po-210/Pb-210, respectively. The residence time of aerosols calculated from the Po-210/Pb-210 ratio was always longer than that calculated from the Bi-210/Pb-210 ratio. The difference is chiefly due to old aerosols derived from the upper atmosphere (probably the stratosphere), of which contribution for Pb-210 has been estimated to be 6% as a mean, or 12% in spring and 2% in early winter. Subtracting the upper atmospheric component, we have obtained the residence time of tropospheric aerosols carrying Pb-210 to be 4.8{+-}0.3 days for a whole year or 5.9{+-}0.7 days and 3.6{+-}0.5 days for the periods from February to April and from May to June, respectively. The deposition rate of Be-7 was correlated well with the upper atmospheric component of Pb-210. The larger deposition rate of Be-7 suggests that the study area is extremely effective for the removal of aerosols of stratospheric origin. 36 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Trend of hydraulic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshimaru, Jun' ichi

    1988-11-01

    The gear, vane and piston pumps occupy a more then 90% share in the hydraulic pumps. Comparatively large pumps are mainly variable delivery piston pumps. The piston pumps are comparatively high in output density (output per unit weight), indicating the hydraulic pump in performance, and tend to become higher and higher in it. Though they are mainly 210 to 350kgf/cm/sup 2/ in rated pressure, some of them come to surpass 400kgf/cm/sup 3/ in it. While the progress in computation also requires the high speed operation, high accuracy and other severe conditions for the hydraulic units, which accordingly and increasingly intensify the requirement for hydraulic oil in abrasion resistibility, oxidation stability and response characteristics. While cavitation comes to easily occur, which considerably and disadvantageously influences hydraulic oil in life through degradation, noise level and respondingness. From now on, the development of high performance oil and study of mechanical structure are important. 19 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  7. The impact of home, work, and church environments on fat intake over time among rural residents: a longitudinal observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Haardörfer, Regine; Alcantara, Iris; Addison, Ann; Glanz, Karen; Kegler, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary behaviors are influenced by many individual and environmental factors. This study explores how dietary fat intake in high-risk midlife adults living in the rural south is influenced by three behavior settings, i.e. in the home, at work, and at church. Methods Self-report data were collected from rural African American or Caucasian adults age 40–70 at three time points at baseline, 6, and 12 months post baseline. Multilevel analyses investigated the impact of determinants of...

  8. Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Ghiyas Ud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: fac192@pieas.edu.pk; Chughtai, Imran Rafiq; Inayat, Mansoor Hameed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Iqbal Hussain [Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-12-15

    Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase have been investigated for a range of dispersed and continuous phase superficial velocities in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. Axial dispersion model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system. It has been observed that increase in dispersed phase superficial velocity results in a decrease in its axial dispersion and increase in its slip velocity while its holdup increases till a maximum asymptotic value is achieved. An increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase increases the axial dispersion and holdup of dispersed phase until a maximum value is obtained, while slip velocity of dispersed phase is found to decrease in the beginning and then it increases with increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase.

  9. Cavitation in Hydraulic Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The main purpose of this doctoral thesis on cavitation in hydraulic machinery is to change focus towards the coupling of non-stationary flow phenomena and cavitation. It is argued that, in addition to turbulence, superimposed sound pressure fluctuations can have a major impact on cavitation and lead to particularly severe erosion. For the design of hydraulic devices this finding may indicate how to further limit the cavitation problems. Chapter 1 reviews cavitation in general in the context of hydraulic machinery, emphasizing the initial cavitation event and the role of the water quality. Chapter 2 discusses the existence of pressure fluctuations for situations common in such machinery. Chapter 3 on cavitation dynamics presents an algorithm for calculating the nucleation of a cavity cluster. Chapter 4 describes the equipment used in this work. 53 refs., 55 figs.,10 tabs.

  10. Summer lodge residency

    OpenAIRE

    Morrad, Annie

    2015-01-01

    The summer lodge residency was based in Nottingham from June 29th to July 10th Each of the artists was given a studio space and technical facilities. There were discussion points and meals, a seminar day, open presentations and reflection time.

  11. Recharge sources and residence times of groundwater as determined by geochemical tracers in the Mayfield Area, southwestern Idaho, 2011–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Candice B.

    2013-01-01

    Parties proposing residential development in the area of Mayfield, Idaho are seeking a sustainable groundwater supply. During 2011–12, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used geochemical tracers in the Mayfield area to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge and differences in groundwater residence time. Fourteen groundwater wells and one surface-water site were sampled for major ion chemistry, metals, stable isotopes, and age tracers; data collected from this study were used to evaluate the sources of groundwater recharge and groundwater residence times in the area. Major ion chemistry varied along a flow path between deeper wells, suggesting an upgradient source of dilute water, and a downgradient source of more concentrated water with the geochemical signature of the Idaho Batholith. Samples from shallow wells had elevated nutrient concentrations, a more positive oxygen-18 signature, and younger carbon-14 dates than deep wells, suggesting that recharge comes from young precipitation and surface-water infiltration. Samples from deep wells generally had higher concentrations of metals typical of geothermal waters, a more negative oxygen-18 signature, and older carbon-14 values than samples from shallow wells, suggesting that recharge comes from both infiltration of meteoric water and another source. The chemistry of groundwater sampled from deep wells is somewhat similar to the chemistry in geothermal waters, suggesting that geothermal water may be a source of recharge to this aquifer. Results of NETPATH mixing models suggest that geothermal water composes 1–23 percent of water in deep wells. Chlorofluorocarbons were detected in every sample, which indicates that all groundwater samples contain at least a component of young recharge, and that groundwater is derived from multiple recharge sources. Conclusions from this study can be used to further refine conceptual hydrological models of the area.

  12. Residence time, chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater and surface water of a small agricultural watershed in the Coastal Plain, Bucks Branch, Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, John W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate is a common contaminant in groundwater and surface water throughout the Nation, and water-resource managers need more detailed small-scale watershed research to guide conservation efforts aimed at improving water quality. Concentrations of nitrate in Bucks Branch are among the highest in the state of Delaware and a scientific investigation was performed to provide water-quality information to assist with the management of agriculture and water resources. A combination of major-ion chemistry, nitrogen isotopic composition and age-dating techniques was used to estimate the residence time and provide a chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater in the surficial aquifer of the Bucks Branch watershed in Sussex County, Delaware. The land use was more than 90 percent agricultural and most nitrogen inputs were from manure and fertilizer. The apparent median age of sampled groundwater is 18 years and the estimated residence time of groundwater contributing to the streamflow for the entire Bucks Branch watershed at the outlet is approximately 19 years. Concentrations of nitrate exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter (as nitrogen) in 60 percent of groundwater samples and 42 percent of surface-water samples. The overall geochemistry in the Bucks Branch watershed indicates that agriculture is the predominant source of nitrate contamination and the observed patterns in major-ion chemistry are similar to those observed in other studies on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. The pattern of enrichment in nitrogen and oxygen isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate in groundwater and surface water indicates there is some loss of nitrate through denitrification, but this process is not sufficient to remove all of the nitrate from groundwater discharging to streams, and concentrations of nitrate in streams remain elevated.

  13. Hydraulics and pneumatics

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all industrial processes require objects to be moved, manipulated or subjected to some sort of force. This is frequently accomplished by means of electrical equipment (such as motors or solenoids), or via devices driven by air (pneumatics) or liquids (hydraulics).This book has been written by a process control engineer as a guide to the operation of hydraulic and pneumatic systems for all engineers and technicians who wish to have an insight into the components and operation of such a system.This second edition has been fully updated to include all recent developments su

  14. Popeye Project: Hydraulic umbilical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.G.; Williams, V.T.

    1996-12-31

    For the Popeye Project, the longest super-duplex hydraulic umbilical in the world was installed in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper reports on its selection and project implementation. Material selection addresses corrosion in seawater, water-based hydraulic fluid, and methanol. Five alternatives were considered: (1) carbon-steel with traditional coating and anodes, (2) carbon-steel coated with thermally sprayed aluminum, (3) carbon-steel sheathed in aluminum, (4) super-duplex, and (5) titanium. The merits and risks associated with each alternative are discussed. The manufacture and installation of the selected umbilical are also reported.

  15. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  16. Hydraulic Arm Modeling via Matlab SimHydraulics

    OpenAIRE

    Věchet, Stanislav; Krejsa, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    System modeling is a vital tool for cost reduction and design process speed up in most engineering fields. The paper is focused on modeling of hydraulic arm as a part of intelligent prosthesis project, in the form of 2DOF open kinematic chain. The arm model combines mechanical, hydraulic and electric subsystems and uses Matlab as modeling tool. SimMechanics Matlab extension is used for mechanical part modeling, SimHydraulics toolbox is used for modeling of hydraulic circuit used for actuating...

  17. HYDRAULICS, TUSCARAWAS COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  18. Hydraulic hoist-press

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babayev, Z.B.; Abashev, Z.V.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency expert of the Angrenskiy production-technological administration of the production association Sredazugol A. V. Bubnov has suggested a hydraulic hoist-press for repairing road equipment which is a device consisting of lifting mechanism, press and test stand for verifying the high pressure hoses and pumps.

  19. Water Treatment Technology - Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on hydraulics provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: head loss in pipes in series, function loss in…

  20. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on-going...

  1. Partitioning a Steady State Sediment Budget to Represent Long tailed Distributions of Contaminant Residence Times: A Modeling Approach for Routing Tracers Through Alluvial Storage Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, J. E.; Ackerman, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) was released into the South River, VA, from an industrial source from 1929-1950. Because of mercury's affinity for fine grained particles, a budget for fine sediment can be used to model the trajectories of Hg through the alluvial valley. We adopt Malmon's (2002) model, which requires each storage compartment to be "well-mixed". Our sediment budget quantifies residence times, exchange rates, and sediment storage volumes in the floodplain (FP), hyporheic zone, and in fine-grained channel margin (FGCM) deposits that form in the lee of obstructions (chiefly downed trees) along the sides of the wetted perimeter of the channel. This simple model with only 3 storage compartments fails to fit Hg concentration histories in the FGCM and under predicts contemporary mercury loading to the channel from bank erosion. We speculate that the FP and FGCM deposits are not well-mixed. Mercury is preferentially stored and remobilized from frequently-inundated, low elevation floodplain areas near the stream channel. Radiometric dates from FGCM deposits suggest that most sediments are reworked within a few years, but a small fraction of the deposits remains in storage for decades. We therefore partition the FP and FGCM deposits into multiple reservoirs, each with a different residence time. We divide the FGCM deposits into two sub-reservoirs with characteristic exchange rates and masses that represent the observed age distribution. Sediment accumulation rates on the FP follow an exponential distribution of FP relief, and we divide the floodplain into 5 reservoirs with inundation frequencies of 0.3, 2, 5, 62, and 100 years. Since erosion is assumed to be evenly distributed across each reservoir, FP area as a function of age decreases exponentially. With time, the elevation of floodplains increases through sedimentation, so a portion of each reservoir evolves into a less frequently inundated category every year, creating a unidirectional mass flux from each FP reservoir into

  2. Integrating hydraulic conductivity with biogeochemical gradients and microbial activity along river-groundwater exchange zones in a subtropical stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Cécile; Boulton, Andrew J.

    2009-02-01

    The pervious lateral bars (parafluvial zone) and beds (hyporheic zone), where stream water and groundwater exchange, are dynamic sites of hydrological and biological retention. The significance of these biogeochemical ‘hotspots’ to stream and groundwater metabolism is largely controlled by filtration capacity, defined as the extent to which subsurface flowpaths and matrix hydraulic conductivity modify water characteristics. Where hydraulic conductivity is high, gradients in biogeochemistry and microbial activity along subsurface flowpaths were hypothesized to be less marked than where hydraulic conductivity is low. This hypothesis was tested in two riffles and gravel bars in an Australian subtropical stream. At one site, gradients in chemical and microbial variables along flowpaths were associated with reduced hydraulic conductivity, longer water residence time and reduced filtration capacity compared with the second site where filtration capacity was greater and longitudinal biogeochemical trends were dampened. These results imply that factors affecting the sediment matrix in this subtropical stream can alter filtration capacity, interstitial microbial activity and biogeochemical gradients along subsurface flowpaths. This hydroecological approach also indicates potential for a simple field technique to estimate filtration capacity and predict the prevailing hyporheic gradients in microbial activity and biogeochemical processing efficiency, with significant implications for stream ecosystem function.

  3. Use of Natural Tracers for Understanding Porewater Residence Time and Solute Transport: Challenges Encountered in Paleozoic Rocks of the Michigan Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al, T. A.; Celejewski, M.; Clark, I. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscience programs that focus on long-term waste management in the geosphere commonly aim to develop a conceptual model that explains porewater residence time and the mechanisms and time scales for solute transport. Diffusion is the dominant transport process in low-permeability rocks so measurement of rock diffusion properties is important, but measurements at the laboratory scale can be highly variable due to changes in lithology, porosity, confining pressure and pore-fluid composition at scales of cm to 10's of m. The natural analogue approach, using tracers such as Cl, Br, 18O and 2H that commonly display conservative behaviour, provides a means to scale up the results of laboratory measurements to understand the larger-scale controls on porewater residence time and solute transport. The principal challenge in applying this approach is the difficulty of obtaining high-quality tracer concentration data from porewater in low-permeability rocks. Additional insight into solute transport and reaction processes could be gained by collecting data for the concentrations of major cations but these data are even more difficult to obtain. Using data from the geoscience site characterization for the Ontario Power Generation proposed Deep Geologic Repository at the Bruce site in southwest Ontario, this presentation will illustrate some of the problems with standard methods for obtaining porewater compositional data . Methods such as core squeezing and advective displacement simply do not work because the permeability and the water content are too low. The crush-leach method has been used but is susceptible to artifacts from dissolution of soluble minerals (halite, anhydrite, gypsum and celestite), ion exchange and difficulty in assigning a porosity value to specific solutes. In order to overcome these limitations and improve the outcome from the natural analogue approach, a new method has been developed that extracts porewater directly into hydrophyllic cellulosic paper by

  4. First data on magma ascent and residence times retrieved from Fe-Mg and trace element zonation in olivine phenocrysts from Kamchatka basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeychik, Boris; Churikova, Tatiana; Kronz, Andreas; Simakin, Alexander; Wörner, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Compositional zonation in olivine phenocrysts and diffusion modelling have been used in the last ten years to estimate magma residence times and the duration of magma ascent. The fundamental assumption is that mixing with newly injected magma into a reservoir triggers diffusional exchange between mafic olivine crystals and more evolved magma and that this magma mixing eventually triggers eruption. If depth of mixing is known, this translates to ascent rates of magmas to the surface. We applied this approach to a series of different arc basalt lavas from Kamchatka to constrain the rates of magma ascent and magma resident in what is one of the most active subduction zones in the world that is also dominated by an abundance of unusually mafic magmas. Our sample collection cover the principal modes of arc magmatism in Kamchatka: from different volcanic complexes (stratovolcano, dikes, summit eruptions, monogenetic cones), of different age (from Late-Pleistocene to Holocene and recent eruptions), from different magmatic regimes (long-lived volcanoes vs. monogenetic eruptions) and different major element composition (from basalt to basaltic andesite of different geochemical character including LILE enrichments). We analyzed and modelled zonation profiles for a range of elements with different diffusivities (e.g. Mg-Fe, Ca, Ni, Mn, Cr) to assess the role of variable diffusivities as a function of major and trace elements in the olivines from different P-T conditions. First data were obtained on samples from the Klyuchevskoy, Shiveluch and Tolbachik, including recent most eruption in 2012/2013. These data show that for some samples the zonation patterns are much more complex than is usually observed: high-Mg olivines at different volcanoes have very different zonation patterns, including normally, reversely zoned grains or even show highly complex repetitive zonation that indicate large compositional changes in the surrounding magma at very short time scales (years). Thus

  5. 大辽河口存留时间和暴露时间数值模拟%Numerical study of residence time and exposure time in Daliaohe Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)